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Sample records for obscure-overt gastrointestinal bleeding

  1. Obscure Overt Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Ventral Hernioplasty Mesh Small Bowel Perforation Visualized With Video Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mendez-Ishizaki, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 79-year-old female presenting with hematemesis and melena 9 years after ventral hernioplasty with mesh. After initial normal endoscopy and colonoscopy, video capsule endoscopy revealed a metallic wire mesh perforating the jejunum. Abdominal computed tomography did not identify a perforation although metallic mesh was visualized close to the small bowel. We present the first ventral hernia mesh perforation diagnosed via video capsule endoscopy. Such a finding emphasizes the importance of a complete diagnostic workup when approaching a patient with obscure overt gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:28008400

  2. Multiple Polypoid Angiodysplasia with Obscure Overt Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jooyoung; Hwang, Sung Wook; Kim, Jihye; Kang, Jinwoo; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Park, Kyu Joo; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Angiodysplasia (AD) is increasingly being recognized as a major cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Morphologically flat lesions are common types of AD, whereas the polypoid types are rare. We report a case of multiple polypoid AD in the small bowel causing severe anemia and requiring surgical treatment. A 60-year-old male patient visited our hospital with dyspnea and hematochezia. He had a history of myocardial infarction and was taking both aspirin and clopidogrel. Capsule endoscopy, enteroscopy, computed tomography, and angiography revealed multifocal vascular lesions with a polypoid shape in the jejunum. Surgical resection was performed because endoscopic treatment was considered impossible with the number and the location of lesions. The risk of recurrent bleeding related to the use of antiplatelet agents also contributed to the decision to perform surgery. AD was histologically diagnosed from the surgical specimen. He resumed taking both aspirin and clopidogrel after surgery. He fully recovered and has been doing well during the several months of follow-up.

  3. Multiple Polypoid Angiodysplasia with Obscure Overt Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jooyoung; Hwang, Sung Wook; Kim, Jihye; Kang, Jinwoo; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Park, Kyu Joo; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Angiodysplasia (AD) is increasingly being recognized as a major cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Morphologically flat lesions are common types of AD, whereas the polypoid types are rare. We report a case of multiple polypoid AD in the small bowel causing severe anemia and requiring surgical treatment. A 60-year-old male patient visited our hospital with dyspnea and hematochezia. He had a history of myocardial infarction and was taking both aspirin and clopidogrel. Capsule endoscopy, enteroscopy, computed tomography, and angiography revealed multifocal vascular lesions with a polypoid shape in the jejunum. Surgical resection was performed because endoscopic treatment was considered impossible with the number and the location of lesions. The risk of recurrent bleeding related to the use of antiplatelet agents also contributed to the decision to perform surgery. AD was histologically diagnosed from the surgical specimen. He resumed taking both aspirin and clopidogrel after surgery. He fully recovered and has been doing well during the several months of follow-up. PMID:26855931

  4. Gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Marek, T A

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains one of the most important emergencies in gastroenterology. Despite this, only about 100 abstracts concerning gastrointestinal bleeding (excluding bleeding complicating endoscopic procedures) were presented at this year's Digestive Disease Week (DDW; 7-10 May 2011; Chicago, Illinois, USA), accounting for less than 2% of all presented lectures and posters. It seems that the number of such abstracts has been decreasing over recent years. This may be due in part to the high level of medical care already achieved, especially in the areas of pharmacotherapy and endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review of gastrointestinal bleeding, priority has been given to large epidemiological studies reflecting "real life," and abstracts dealing more or less directly with endoscopic management. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Advances in gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2016-09-01

    The main innovations of the latest meeting of the Gastroenterological Association (2016) concerning upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the clinician's perspective can be summarised as follows: a) The Glasgow-Blatchford scale has the best accuracy in predicting the need for surgical intervention and hospital mortality; b) Prognostic scales for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also useful for lower gastrointestinal bleeding; c) Preliminary data suggest that treatment with hemospray does not seem to be superior to current standard treatment in controlling active peptic ulcer bleeding; d) Either famotidine or a proton pump inhibitor may be effective in preventing haemorrhagic recurrence in patients taking aspirin, but this finding needs to be confirmed in further studies; e) There was confirmation of the need to re-introduce antiplatelet therapy as early as possible in patients with antiplatelet-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in order to prevent cardiovascular mortality; f) Routine clinical practice suggests that gastrointestinal or cardiovascular complications with celecoxib or traditional NSAIDs are very low; g) Dabigatran is associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with apixaban or warfarin. At least half of the episodes are located in the lower gastrointestinal tract; h) Implant devices for external ventricular circulatory support are associated with early gastrointestinal bleeding in up to one third of patients; the bleeding is often secondary to arteriovenous malformations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  8. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  9. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding & Intussusception.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Benjamin E; Moses, Willieford

    2017-02-01

    Relatively uncommon compared with the adult population, lower gastrointestinal bleeding in children requires expeditious evaluation and management because of the variety of causes ranging from benign to life-threatening conditions. The causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) vary with patient age. This review focuses on the differential diagnosis and management of LGIB in children. Because intussusception is one of the most common sources of LGIB, particular attention will be given to its diagnosis and management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gastrointestinal bleeding and possible hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Leisa L

    2012-03-01

    An 88-year-old female, living independently in the community, developed duodenal and gastric ulcers from using overthe-counter naproxen sodium for pain related to a shoulder fracture and arthritis of the knees. She was hospitalized and received packed red blood cells and intravenous proton pump inhibitor therapy. During her hospitalization, she developed atrial fibrillation (AF). Warfarin was not prescribed for stroke prevention because of the gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The patient was initially placed on atenolol, and then amiodarone was added. After a two-week hospital stay she was discharged to a nursing facility to gain strength, further correct her anemia, and receive physical therapy for the shoulder and ambulation problems from arthritis of the knees. The amiodarone was continued in the nursing facility. After 15 days of amiodarone therapy (hospital and nursing facility), a laboratory report indicated an elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone level. Levothyroxine was prescribed. The patient was eventually discharged to an assisted living facility once her strength returned and her ambulation improved. GI bleeding with anemia and weakness from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and changes in thyroid function with amiodarone therapy for AF will be discussed.

  11. Assessing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in adults.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Gabrielle; Kruger, Danielle

    2014-09-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring accurate, prompt, and appropriate patient evaluation and management. Clinicians of all specialties must know the best practices for preventing and managing upper GI bleeding. This article focuses on assessing and managing adults with acute nonvariceal upper GI bleeding.

  12. [Gastrointestinal bleeding, NSAIDs, aspirin and anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2014-09-01

    The studies presented at the recent American Congress of Gastroenterology in the field of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (associated or not to NSAIDs or ASA use) have not been numerous but interesting. The key findings are: a) rabeprazole, the only PPI that had few studies in this field, is effective in the prevention of gastric ulcers; b) famotidine could also be effective in the prevention of complications by AAS; c) the new competitive inhibitors of the acid potassium pump are effective (as much as PPIs) on the recurrence of peptic ulcers by ASA; d) early endoscop (<8 h) in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding seems to offer no better results than those made in the first 24 h; e) endoscopic therapy in Forrest 1a ulcers does not obliterate the bleeding artery in 30% of cases and is the cause of bleeding recurrence; f) alternative therapies with glue or clotting products are being increasingly used in endoscopic therapy of gastrointestinal bleeding; g) liberal administration of blood in the GI bleeding is associated with poor prognosis; h) lesions of the small intestine are frequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding when upper endoscopy shows no positive stigmata; and i) capsule endoscopy studies have high performance in gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin, if performed early in the first two days after the beginning of the bleeding episode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding by radionuclide scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Luna, E.; Kingsley, S.; Prince, M.; Herrera, N.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning with Technetium /sup 99m/ labeled autologous red blood cells was performed in 59 patients with clinical suspicion of acute and/or intermittent, chronic gastrointestinal bleeding. In 36 patients (61%), a definite site of bleeding could be demonstrated. A strong correlation with other modalities such as upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy, contrast angiography, and surgical exploration was found. Overall sensitivity of the procedure was 91%; specificity 100% and accuracy 93.3%. It is suggested that radionuclide scintigraphy provides a completely noninvasive, simple, and sensitive procedure which may be routinely used for the detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  14. Gastrointestinal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Spanish Small Bowel Bleeding (American College of Gastroenterology) Also in Spanish Upper GI Endoscopy (National Institute ... in Spanish Find an Expert American College of Gastroenterology ASGE: Find a Doctor (American Society for Gastrointestinal ...

  15. [Update on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the main studies in the field of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding reported in the last American Congress of Gastroenterology (Digestive Disease Week) in 2013. Some of these studies have provided new knowledge and expertise in areas of uncertainty. In this context and among other findings, it has been reported that the administration of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prior to endoscopy or the early performance of endoscopy-within 6 hours of admission in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) (or colonoscopy within 24 hours in patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding)-does not improve the prognosis of the event. It has also been reported that oral administration of a PPI after endoscopic hemostasis may produce a similar outcome to that of intravenously administered PPI in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). In the field of endoscopic therapy, the use of radiofrequency ablation for antral vascular ectasia is of interest. Regarding UGIB and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), new data confirm the risk of cardiovascular events by stopping treatment with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) after an episode of UGIB, the increased risk of UGIB when associating gastrotoxic drugs, and the need to identify both the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks of each NSAID and coxib when prescribing these agents. Finally, there is evidence that both environmental and genetic factors are involved in individual susceptibility to gastrointestinal bleeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Bayesian network modelling of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisha, Nazziwa; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2013-09-01

    Bayesian networks are graphical probabilistic models that represent causal and other relationships between domain variables. In the context of medical decision making, these models have been explored to help in medical diagnosis and prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the Bayesian network formalism in building medical support systems and we learn a tree augmented naive Bayes Network (TAN) from gastrointestinal bleeding data. The accuracy of the TAN in classifying the source of gastrointestinal bleeding into upper or lower source is obtained. The TAN achieves a high classification accuracy of 86% and an area under curve of 92%. A sensitivity analysis of the model shows relatively high levels of entropy reduction for color of the stool, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, consistency and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to creatinine. The TAN facilitates the identification of the source of GIB and requires further validation.

  17. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  18. Angiography in gastrointestinal bleeding in children

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerovitz, M.F.; Fellows, K.E.

    1984-10-01

    Twenty-seven children aged 1 day to 16 years studied arteriographically for acute or chronic gastrointestinal bleeding were reviewed. Children with known esophageal varices and portal hypertension were excluded. Final diagnoses were made in 25 patients by means of surgery, endoscopy, biopsy, laboratory data, and clinical follow-up. Of these 25 cases, arteriography gave a correct diagnosis in 64% and was falsely negative in 36%. The common causes of bleeding in this study were gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastritis, vascular malformations, and typhlitis. Transcatheter therapy was attempted in six acute bleeders, with success in three (50%).

  19. [Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

    PubMed

    Romero-Espinosa, Larry; Souza-Gallardo, Luis Manuel; Martínez-Ordaz, José Luis; Romero-Hernández, Teodoro; de la Fuente-Lira, Mauricio; Arellano-Sotelo, Jorge

    The gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common soft tissue sarcomas of the digestive tract. They are usually found in the stomach (60-70%) and small intestine (25-30%) and, less commonly, in the oesophagus, mesentery, colon, or rectum. The symptoms present at diagnosis are, gastrointestinal bleeding, abdominal pain, abdominal mass, or intestinal obstruction. The type of symptomatology will depend on the location and size of the tumour. The definitive diagnosis is histopathological, with 95% of the tumours being positive for CD117. This is an observational and descriptive study of 5cases of small intestinal GIST that presented with gastrointestinal bleeding as the main symptom. The period from the initial symptom to the diagnosis varied from 1 to 84 months. The endoscopy was inconclusive in all of the patients, and the diagnosis was made using computed tomography and angiography. Treatment included resection in all patients. The histopathological results are also described. GIST can have multiple clinical pictures and unusual symptoms, such as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The use of computed tomography and angiography has shown to be an important tool in the diagnosis with patients with small intestine GISTs. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  20. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  1. Gastrointestinal Amyloidosis Presenting with Multiple Episodes of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Hyeon Kang, Eun Ju; Park, Jee Won; Jo, Jung Hyun; Kim, Soo Jin; Cho, Jin Han; Kang, Myong Jin; Park, Byeong Ho

    2009-05-15

    Amyloidosis is characterized by the extracellular deposition of amyloid protein in various organs. Gastrointestinal involvement in amyloidosis is common, but a diagnosis of amyloidosis is often delayed. Severe gastrointestinal hemorrhage in amyloidosis is rare but can be fatal in some cases. We experienced a case of a 49-year-old man who presented with recurrent massive hematochezia. Although embolization was performed eight times for bleeding from different sites of the small intestine, hematochezia did not cease. We report the case, with a review of the literature.

  2. Arteriovenous malformation in chronic gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Cavett, C M; Selby, J H; Hamilton, J L; Williamson, J W

    1977-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations of the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon and treatment is problematic because routine barium contrast studies and endoscopy fail to demonstrate the lesion. Diagnosis is by selective mesenteric arteriography, demonstrating a characteristic vascular tuft and very early venous phase. Two cases of arteriovenous malformation are presented and 47 other reported cases are reviewed. Forty-five per cent were found in the cecum; 37, or 80%, involved the distal ileum, cecum ascending colon, or hepatic flexure. Seventy-five per cent of all patients fall into the 50--80 year age range. The literature reveals a recurring pattern of chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, anemia, and delay (even negative abdominal explorations) before the diagnosis is finally made. A more aggressive approach to chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is suggested through the use of selective mesenteric arteriography. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:299801

  3. Microcoil Embolization for Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    D'Othee, Bertrand Janne Surapaneni, Padmaja; Rabkin, Dmitry; Nasser, Imad; Clouse, Melvin

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To assess outcomes after microcoil embolization for active lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods. We retrospectively studied all consecutive patients in whom microcoil embolization was attempted to treat acute lower GI bleeding over 88 months. Baseline, procedural, and outcome parameters were recorded following current Society of Interventional Radiology guidelines. Outcomes included technical success, clinical success (rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (>30 days), and major and minor complication rates. Follow-up consisted of clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic data. Results. Nineteen patients (13 men, 6 women; mean age {+-} 95% confidence interval = 70 {+-} 6 years) requiring blood transfusion (10 {+-} 3 units) had angiography-proven bleeding distal to the marginal artery. Main comorbidities were malignancy (42%), coagulopathy (28%), and renal failure (26%). Bleeding was located in the small bowel (n = 5), colon (n 13) or rectum (n = 1). Technical success was obtained in 17 patients (89%); 2 patients could not be embolized due to vessel tortuosity and stenoses. Clinical follow-up length was 145 {+-} 75 days. Clinical success was complete in 13 (68%), partial in 3 (16%), and failed in 2 patients (11%). Delayed rebleeding (3 patients, 27%) was always due to a different lesion in another bowel segment (0 late rebleeding in embolized area). Two patients experienced colonic ischemia (11%) and underwent uneventful colectomy. Two minor complications were noted. Conclusion. Microcoil embolization for active lower GI bleeding is safe and effective in most patients, with high technical and clinical success rates, no procedure-related mortality, and a low risk of bowel ischemia and late rebleeding.

  4. Gastrointestinal angiodysplasia and bleeding in von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Franchini, M; Mannucci, P M

    2014-09-02

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD), the most common genetic bleeding disorder, is characterised by a quantitative or qualitative defect of von Willebrand factor (VWF). Patients with VWD suffer from mucocutaneous bleeding, of severity usually proportional to the degree of VWF defect. In particular, gastrointestinal bleeding associated with angiodysplasia is often a severe symptom of difficult management. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of VWD-associated gastrointestinal angiodysplasia and related bleeding.

  5. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Kazimi, Mircelal; Ulas, Murat; Ibis, Cem; Unver, Mutlu; Ozsan, Nazan; Yilmaz, Funda; Ersoz, Galip; Zeytunlu, Murat; Kilic, Murat; Coker, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:19178725

  6. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Gastrointestinal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lin; Shin, Ji Hoon; Han, Kichang; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Shin, Jong-Soo; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by GI lymphoma. The medical records of 11 patients who underwent TAE for GI bleeding caused by GI lymphoma between 2001 and 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 20 TAE procedures were performed. On angiography, contrast extravasation, and both contrast extravasation and tumor staining were seen in 95 % (19/20) and 5 % (1/20) of the procedures, respectively. The most frequently embolized arteries were jejunal (n = 13) and ileal (n = 5) branches. Technical and clinical success rates were 100 % (20/20) and 27 % (3/11), respectively. The causes of clinical failure in eight patients were rebleeding at new sites. In four patients who underwent repeat angiography, the bleeding focus was new each time. Three patients underwent small bowel resection due to rebleeding after one (n = 2) or four (n = 1) times of TAEs. Another two patients underwent small bowel resection due to small bowel ischemia/perforation after three or four times of TAEs. The 30-day mortality rate was 18 % due to hypovolemic shock (n = 1) and multiorgan failure (n = 1). Angiogram with TAE shows limited therapeutic efficacy to manage GI lymphoma-related bleeding due to high rebleeding at new sites. Although TAE can be an initial hemostatic measure, surgery should be considered for rebleeding due to possible bowel ischemic complication after repeated TAE procedures.

  7. Laparoscopic-Assisted Resection of a Bleeding Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Frias, J. A.; Castañeda-Leeder, P.; Baquera-Heredia, J.; Weber-Sánchez, A.

    1999-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 29-year-old male patient with a severe lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in whom a successful laparoscopic diagnosis and resection (assisted) of an ileal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was performed. Laparoscopy can be very useful in the diagnosis and treatment of selected cases of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:10527336

  8. Hemostatic Powders in Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-07-01

    Topical hemostatic agents and powders are an emerging modality in the endoscopic management of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This systematic review demonstrates the effectiveness and safety of these agents with special emphasis on TC-325 and Ankaferd Blood Stopper. The unique noncontact/nontraumatic application, ability to cover large areas of bleed, and ease of use make these hemostatic agents an attractive option in certain clinical situations, such as massive bleeding with poor visualization, salvage therapy, and diffuse bleeding from luminal malignancies.

  9. Wireless capsule endoscopy: Perspectives beyond gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo; Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; De Teresa, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) is a technology developed for the endoscopic exploration of the small bowel. The first capsule model was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2001, and its first and essential indication was occult gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Over subsequent years, this technology has been refined to provide superior resolution, increased battery life, and capabilities to view different parts of the GI tract. Indeed, cases for which CE proved useful have increased significantly over the last few years, with new indications for the small bowel and technical improvements that have expanded its use to other parts of the GI tract, including the esophagus and colon. The main challenges in the development of CE are new devices with the ability to provide therapy, air inflation for a better vision of the small bowel, biopsy sampling systems attached to the capsule and the possibility to guide and move the capsule with an external motion control. In this article we review the current and new indications of CE, and the evolving technological changes shaping this technology, which has a promising potential in the coming future of gastroenterology. PMID:25400450

  10. New insights to occult gastrointestinal bleeding: From pathophysiology to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is still a clinical challenge for gastroenterologists. The recent development of novel technologies for the diagnosis and treatment of different bleeding causes has allowed a better management of patients, but it also determines the need of a deeper comprehension of pathophysiology and the analysis of local expertise in order to develop a rational management algorithm. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding can be divided in occult, when a positive occult blood fecal test is the main manifestation, and overt, when external sings of bleeding are visible. In this paper we are going to focus on overt gastrointestinal bleeding, describing the physiopathology of the most usual causes, analyzing the diagnostic procedures available, from the most classical to the novel ones, and establishing a standard algorithm which can be adapted depending on the local expertise or availability. Finally, we will review the main therapeutic options for this complex and not so uncommon clinical problem. PMID:25133028

  11. Multidetector CT angiography for acute gastrointestinal bleeding: technique and findings.

    PubMed

    Artigas, José M; Martí, Milagros; Soto, Jorge A; Esteban, Helena; Pinilla, Inmaculada; Guillén, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common reason for emergency department admissions and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Factors that complicate its clinical management include patient debility due to comorbidities; intermittence of hemorrhage; and multiple sites of simultaneous bleeding. Its management, therefore, must be multidisciplinary and include emergency physicians, gastroenterologists, and surgeons, as well as radiologists for diagnostic imaging and interventional therapy. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding is usually managed endoscopically, with radiologic intervention reserved as an alternative to be used if endoscopic therapy fails. Endoscopy is often less successful in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, where colonoscopy may be more effective. The merits of performing bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in such cases might be offset by the resultant increase in response time and should be weighed carefully against the deficits in visualization and diagnostic accuracy that would result from performing colonoscopy without bowel preparation. In recent years, multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography has gained acceptance as a first-line option for the diagnosis and management of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding. In selected cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding, CT angiography also provides accurate information about the presence or absence of active bleeding, its source, and its cause. This information helps shorten the total diagnostic time and minimizes or eliminates the need for more expensive and more invasive procedures. © RSNA, 2013.

  12. Do statins protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed Central

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Aalykke, Claus; Dall, Michael; Andries, Alin; Andersen, Birthe Søgaard; Hansen, Jane Møller; Andersen, Morten; Hallas, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Recently, an apparent protective effect of statins against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) was postulated in a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. We aimed to evaluate the effect of statin use on acute nonvariceal UGB alone or in combinations with low-dose aspirin and other antithrombotic drugs. METHODS A population-based case–control study was conducted in the County of Funen, Denmark. Cases (n = 3652) were all subjects with a first discharge diagnosis of serious UGB from a hospital during the period 1995 to 2006. Age- and gender-matched controls (10 for each case) (n = 36 502) were selected by a risk set sampling. Data on all subjects' drug exposure and past medical history were retrieved from a prescription database and from the County's patient register. Confounders were controlled by conditional logistic regression. RESULTS The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) associating use of statins with UGB were 0.94 (0.78–1.12) for current use, 1.40 (0.89–2.20) for recent use and 1.42 (0.96–2.10) for past use. The lack of effect was consistent across most patient subgroups, different cumulative or current statin doses and different statin substances. In explorative analyses, a borderline significant protective effect was observed for concurrent users of low-dose aspirin [OR 0.43 (0.18–1.05)]. CONCLUSION Statins do not prevent UGB, except possibly in users of low-dose aspirin. PMID:19371320

  13. Thrombocytosis in a patient with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xingshun; De Stefano, Valerio; Shao, Xiaodong; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2017-01-01

    Summary Reported here is a case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to a peptic ulcer involving an extremely high platelet count of 989 × 109/L. Myeloproliferative neoplasms were ruled out on the basis of gene mutation testing and a bone marrow biopsy. After the cessation of index bleeding, the platelet count decreased markedly. Thus, reactive thrombocytosis was considered as a possibility. PMID:28357187

  14. Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma to the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Koop, Andree; Brauhmbhatt, Bhaumik; Lewis, Jason

    2017-01-01

    We present a rare case of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma to the stomach. Prostate cancer, which is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men, rarely spreads to the stomach, with only 7 cases reported in the English literature. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and GI bleeding. Our patient was treated with epinephrine injection and bipolar cautery, but GI bleeding recurred 7 months later when he had worsening of his thrombocytopenia while using ibuprofen. PMID:28377935

  15. Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma to the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Koop, Andree; Brauhmbhatt, Bhaumik; Lewis, Jason; Lewis, Michele D

    2017-01-01

    We present a rare case of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma to the stomach. Prostate cancer, which is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men, rarely spreads to the stomach, with only 7 cases reported in the English literature. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and GI bleeding. Our patient was treated with epinephrine injection and bipolar cautery, but GI bleeding recurred 7 months later when he had worsening of his thrombocytopenia while using ibuprofen.

  16. Is tranexamic acid effective for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Avilés, Carolina; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-12-07

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding constitutes a medical-surgical emergency given its important associated morbidity and mortality. The antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid might help stopping bleeding, but controversy remains about its role in this setting. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded tranexamic acid probably decreases rebleeding and mortality, without increasing thromboembolic adverse effects in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  17. Serendipity in scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Goergen, T.G.

    1983-09-01

    A retrospective review of 80 scintigraphic bleeding studies performed with Tc-99m sulfur colloid or Tc-99m labeled red blood cells showed five cases where there were abnormal findings not related to bleeding. In some cases, the abnormalities were initially confused with bleeding or could obscure an area of bleeding, while in other cases, the abnormalities represented additional clinical information. These included bone marrow replacement related to tumor and radiation therapy, hyperemia related to a uterine leiomyoma and a diverticular abscess, and a dilated abdominal aorta (aneurysm). Recognition of such abnormalities should prevent an erroneous diagnosis and the additional information may be of clinical value.

  18. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A.; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5–10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine

  19. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhosis: clinical and endoscopic correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Terés, J; Bordas, J M; Bru, C; Diaz, F; Bruguera, M; Rodes, J

    1976-01-01

    The clinical data of 180 episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 168 patients with cirrhosis of the liver are examined. The source of bleeding had been determined by early endoscopy in all cases. In men under the age of 50 years, and without symptoms of liver failure, bleeding was due to ruptured gastro-oesophageal varices in 84% of cases. Severe liver failure was associated with acute lesions of gastric mucosa in many cases. No presumptive diagnosis of the source of haemorrhage could be based on the examination of other clinical data (presence of ascites, mode of presentation and pattern of bleeding, history of ulcer disease, alcoholism, and previous medication. PMID:1083824

  20. Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding after acid-corrosive injury.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yau-Lin; Wu, Ming-Ho; Lin, Mu-Yen; Lai, Wu-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Our purpose was to delineate the characteristics and outcome of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGI) caused by acid-corrosive injury and to determine its management protocol. From June 1988 to June 2000, all patients with the history of acid-corrosive injury at our institution were reviewed. Patients with massive UGI bleeding (hematocrit level <25% or transfusion of three or more units of whole blood required to restore normal vital sign) were enrolled into this study. Altogether, 12 (3.2%) of 378 patients with acid-corrosive injury developed massive bleeding: 8 gastric bleeding, 2 duodenal bleeding, and 2 first gastric and then duodenal bleeding. Gastric bleedings started an average of 12.1 days after the initial injury (range 9-21 days). Duodenal bleeding usually occurred later, at 10.1 days (range 6-18 days) after a gastric or esophagogastric operation. Nine of the ten patients with gastric bleeding underwent surgery during the subacute stage: three esophagogastrectomy, three gastric mucosectomy with gastrostomy and jejunostomy, and three total or subtotal gastrectomy. Operative findings were hemorrhagic gastritis with diffuse mucosal bleeding. Two of four patients with duodenal bleeding underwent duodenotomy with suture-ligation of bleeding vessels, and the other two had conservative treatment. Nine patients (75%) had postoperative complications. One patient (8%) died from complications of surgery performed to stop duodenal bleeding. Massive UGI bleeding rarely occurs after acid-corrosive injury; but when it does, it occurs during the subacute stage. Aggressive surgical treatment is mandatory for gastric bleeding. How duodenal bleeding can be better managed requires further study.

  1. The Clinical Outcomes of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Are Not Better than Those of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is increasing; however, predictors of outcomes for patients with LGIB are not as well defined as those for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). The aim of this study was to identify the clinical outcomes and the predictors of poor outcomes for patients with LGIB, compared to outcomes for patients with UGIB. We identified patients with LGIB or UGIB who underwent endoscopic procedures between July 2006 and February 2013. Propensity score matching was used to improve comparability between LGIB and UGIB groups. The clinical outcomes and predictors of 30-day rebleeding and mortality rate were analyzed between the two groups. In total, 601 patients with UGIB (n = 500) or LGIB (n = 101) were included in the study, and 202 patients with UGIB and 101 patients with LGIB were analyzed after 2:1 propensity score matching. The 30-day rebleeding and mortality rates were 9.9% and 4.5% for the UGIB group, and 16.8% and 5.0% for LGIB group, respectively. After logistic regression analysis, the Rockall score (P = 0.013) and C-reactive protein (CRP; P = 0.047) levels were significant predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with LGIB; however, we could not identify any predictors of rebleeding in patients with LGIB. The clinical outcomes for patients with LGIB are not better than clinical outcomes for patients with UGIB. The clinical Rockall score and serum CRP levels may be used to predict 30-day mortality in patients with LGIB. PMID:27550490

  2. Management of Patients with Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Gralnek, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based upon clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper GI bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 hours of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, CT angiography, angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation, and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. NSAID use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. In patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis), aspirin should not be discontinued. The exact timing depends on the severity of bleeding, perceived adequacy of hemostasis and the risk of a thromboembolic event. Surgery

  3. Risk of serious gastrointestinal bleeding in living kidney donors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sonia M; Lam, Ngan N; Huang, Anjie; Nash, Danielle M; Prasad, G V; Knoll, Gregory A; Koval, John J; Lentine, Krista L; Kim, S Joseph; Alam, Ahsan; Lok, Charmaine E; Treleaven, Darin J; Garg, Amit X

    2014-05-01

    Individuals with moderate-to-severe reduced renal function have greater risk of gastrointestinal bleeding than those with normal renal function. We conducted a retrospective matched cohort study to assess whether living kidney donors share a similar risk. We reviewed pre-donation charts for living kidney donations from 1992 to 2009 in Ontario, Canada, and linked this information to healthcare databases. We selected healthy non-donors from the general population and matched ten non-donors to every donor. Of the 2009 donors and 20,090 matched non-donors, none had evidence of gastrointestinal bleeding prior to cohort entry. The cohort was followed for a median of 8.4 yr (maximum 19.7 yr; loss to follow-up <7%). There was no significant difference in the rate of hospitalization with gastrointestinal bleeding in donors compared to non-donors (18.5 vs. 14.9 events per 10,000 person-years; rate ratio 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85-1.81). Similar results were obtained when we assessed the time to first hospitalization with gastrointestinal bleeding (hazard ratio 1.25, 95% CI 0.87-1.79). In conclusion, we found living kidney donation was not associated with a higher risk of hospitalization with gastrointestinal bleeding. These results are reassuring for the safety of the practice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Small Intestinal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mami; Yamamoto, Kentaroh; Taketomi, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Fumio; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The source of most cases of gastrointestinal bleeding is the upper gastrointestinal tract. Since bleeding from the small intestine is very rare and difficult to diagnose, time is required to identify the source. Among small intestine bleeds, vascular abnormalities account for 70–80%, followed by small intestine tumors that account for 5–10%. The reported peak age of the onset of small intestinal tumors is about 50 years. Furthermore, rare small bowel tumors account for only 1–2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. We describe a 29-year-old man who presented with obscure anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent laparotomy. Surgical findings revealed a well-circumscribed lesion measuring 45 × 40 mm in the jejunum that initially appeared similar to diverticulosis with an abscess. However, the postoperative pathological diagnosis was a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with extramural growth. PMID:27920659

  5. Fasting for haemostasis in children with gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shuang-Hong; Guo, Qin; Liu, Guan J; Wan, Chaomin

    2016-05-19

    Gastrointestinal bleeding refers to loss of blood from any site of the digestive tract. In paediatric clinical practice, it is usually a complaint of children attending the emergency department as a symptom of diseases such as ulcers, gastric or oesophageal varices, gastritis, Mallory-Weiss tears, anorectal fissures, allergic colitis, infectious colitis, intussusception, Henoch-Schonlein purpura, and Meckel's diverticulum; it also occurs with high incidence in critically ill children hospitalised in intensive care units and is caused by stress-induced gastropathy. No matter what the cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, fasting is believed to be necessary due to the fear that eating may affect haemostasis or aggravate bleeding. To assess the effects and safety of fasting for haemostasis in gastrointestinal bleeding in children. We searched EBM Reviews - the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (May 2016), Ovid MEDLINE(R) (1946 to 3 May 2016), EMBASE (1980 to 2016 Week 18), Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) (1978 to 3 May 2016), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1979 to 3 May 2016), VIP Database (1989 to 4 May 2016) and Wanfang Data (1990 to 4 May 2016). We used no restrictions on language or study setting and limited searches in CNKI and Wanfang Data to the medical field. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs in children with gastrointestinal bleeding that compared fasting with feeding. Two review authors independently screened the literature search results, and there were no disagreements. We identified no RCTs or quasi-RCTs that compared the effects and safety of fasting with feeding for haemostasis in children with gastrointestinal bleeding. No study fulfilled the criteria for considering studies for our review. There is currently no information available from RCTs or quasi-RCTs to support or refute the use of fasting for haemostasis in children with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  6. Enteral alimentation and gastrointestinal bleeding in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Pingleton, S K; Hadzima, S K

    1983-01-01

    The incidence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in mechanically ventilated ICU patients receiving enteral alimentation was reviewed and compared to bleeding occurring in ventilated patients receiving prophylactic antacids or cimetidine. Of 250 patients admitted to our ICU during a 1-yr time period, 43 ventilated patients were studied. Patients in each group were comparable with respect to age, respiratory diagnosis, number of GI hemorrhage risk factors, and number of ventilator, ICU, and hospital days. Twenty-one patients had evidence of GI bleeding. Fourteen of 20 patients receiving antacids and 7 of 9 patients receiving cimetidine had evidence of GI bleeding. No bleeding occurred in 14 patients receiving enteral alimentation. Complications of enteral alimentation were few and none required discontinuation of enteral alimentation. Our preliminary data suggest the role of enteral alimentation in critically ill patients may include not only protection against malnutrition but also protection against GI bleeding.

  7. [Clinical analysis of gastrointestinal bleeding after cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui-ming; Wu, Ruo-bin; Yang, Hong-wei; Zheng, Shao-yi; Fan, Rui-xin; Lu, Cong; Zhang, Jing-fang

    2005-05-15

    To explore early diagnosis, treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after cardiac surgery. In the last 13 years, cases complicated with GI bleeding after cardiac surgeries were analyzed retrospectively. Fourty-four GI bleeding occurred post-operatively in (6 +/- 3) d. The mortality was 23% (10/44). Thirty-eight were located in upper GI tract, of them 26 underwent conservative therapy while 4 died of other than GI bleeding cause; six underwent laparotomy while 1 and 3 died of septicemia and multi-organ failure respectively; six underwent gastric endoscopic hemostasis by electrocautery or clipping the bleeding vessel while all survived. Six were located in lower GI tract, and 2 of them underwent laparotomy without finding bleeding section and died of multi-organ failure. By multivariable logistic regression analysis, deaths were highly related to the post-operative ventilator-dependence, acute renal insufficiency, intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) assisting and laparotomy. The mortality of GI bleeding after cardiac surgeries is very high, early gastrointestinal endoscopic examination and minimally invasive intervention can treat this complication more effectively. GI bleeding must be prevented whenever complicating post-operative ventilator-dependence, acute renal insufficiency, and IABP assisting after cardiac surgery.

  8. An unreported complication of intravenously administered ibuprofen: gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sarici, S U; Dabak, O; Erdinc, K; Okutan, V; Lenk, M K

    2012-03-01

    Ibuprofen is used for the closure of ductus arteriosus either intravenously or enterally. Although intraventricular hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, transient renal failure, oliguria, hyponatremia and thrombocytopenia are reported complications during or after ibuprofen treatment, gastrointestinal bleeding, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. We herein report a premature newborn, in whom ibuprofen was used intravenously for the closure of ductus arteriosus and gastrointestinal bleeding developed as a complication, and aim to discuss this rare adverse effect. In conclusion, we emphasize the importance of close follow-up of premature newborns during intravenous ibuprofen treatment considering also the other rare systemic side effects reported in the literature.

  9. Novel capsules for potential theranostics of obscure gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Çolak, Bayram; Şakalak, Hüseyin; Çavuşoğlu, Halit; Yavuz, Mustafa Selman

    2016-09-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is identified as persistent or repeated bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract which could not be defined by conventional gastrointestinal endoscopy and radiological examinations. These GI bleedings are assessed through invasive diagnostic and treatment methods including enteroscopy, angiography and endoscopy. In addition, video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a non-invasive method used to determine the location of the bleeding, however, this does not provide any treatment. Despite of these successful but invasive methods, an effective non-invasive treatment is desperately needed. Herein, we prepare non-invasive theranostic capsules to cure obscure GI bleeding. An effective theranostic capsule containing endothelin as the targeting agent, thrombin-fibrinogen or fibrin as the treating agent, and fluorescein dye as the diagnostic tool is suggested. These theranostic capsules can be administered orally in a simple and non-invasive manner without a risk of complication. By using these novel capsules, one can diagnose obscure GI bleeding with having a possibility of curing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnostics and therapy by interventional radiology].

    PubMed

    Wingen, M; Günther, R W

    2006-02-01

    Modern imaging modalities such as (multislice) helical CT allow new diagnostic strategies for gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Today, interventional radiology with superselective transcatheter embolization or TIPS procedures allow minimally invasive therapeutic management which can support or replace surgery. This review is a synopsis of the possibilities and relative merits of diagnostic and therapeutic radiological procedures for gastrointestinal bleeding. Which of them to use should be decided collaboratively by gastroenterologist, surgeon, and radiologist depending on local availability, personal experience, and individual patient factors.

  11. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  12. Bevacizumab and gastrointestinal bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Ou, George; Galorport, Cherry; Enns, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of severe, refractory gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in a patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) whose massive transfusion dependence was lifted shortly after treatment with bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor. The patient’s bleeding had been refractory to repeated endoscopic interventions, tranexamic acid, and tamoxifen. However, following treatment with bevacizumab at 5 mg/kg every other week, nearly 300 units of packed red blood cell transfusions were avoided in one year’s time. Despite its relatively high cost, bevacizumab may have a more active role in the management of severe GI bleeding in HHT if such remarkable response can be consistently demonstrated. PMID:28070235

  13. [Severe lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding due to diverticulosis].

    PubMed

    Ríos Zambudio, Antonio; Montoya Tabares, Mariano J; Rodríguez González, José Manuel; Febrero Sánchez, Beatriz; Albaladejo Meroño, Aquilino; Molina, Joaquin; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2010-05-01

    Diverticulosis is the most frequent cause of lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in adults in western countries. The aims of the present study were to analyze: 1) the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients with severe lower GI bleeding due to diverticulosis; 2) associated morbidity and mortality; 3) the need for surgery, and 4) bleeding recurrence rates after hospital discharge. Were retrospectively reviewed 42 patients with severe lower GI bleeding due to diverticulosis. Patients with rectorrhagia requiring transfusion of at least three packed red blood cell units and those with a decrease in hematocrit of 10 points or more were included. As a control group, we used 133 patients with severe lower GI hemorrhage due to causes other than colonic diverticular disease. All patients were stabilized with conservative measures except one who required emergency surgery. Colonoscopy was performed in 39 patients and the most frequent finding consisted of recent signs of bleeding independently of whether colonoscopy was performed early or was delayed. Endoscopic treatment with Argon laser electrocoagulation was performed in one patient. Bleeding recurrence after hospital discharge occurred in 13 patients (31%); of these, seven (16%) required hospital readmission. Severe lower GI bleeding due to diverticulosis can usually be resolved with conservative treatment although the percentage of bleeding recurrence is high. Early endoscopy is not as important as in the remaining causes of severe lower GI bleeding.

  14. Duodenal Lipoma as a Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Helga M; Raber; Freling, G; Klaase, J M

    2010-12-01

    A 52-year-old female was referred because of melaena. After initital work-up, including gastroduodenoscopy, endosonography and CT scan, a duodenotomy was performed. Definite diagnosis was a duodenal lipoma based on histological findings. Lipomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. Only 4% occur in the duodenum. The peak incidence is around the 5th and 7th decade of life, with a slight female preponderance. Gastrointestinal lipomas are usually asymptomatic, but can present with mild to severe gastrointestinal bleeding, intussusceptions, abdominal pain, constipation and diarrhea. Clinical, endoscopical, surgical, and radiological features are described in this case of duodenal lipoma.

  15. Duodenal Lipoma as a Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ouwerkerk, Helga M.; Raber; Freling, G.; Klaase, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A 52-year-old female was referred because of melaena. After initital work-up, including gastroduodenoscopy, endosonography and CT scan, a duodenotomy was performed. Definite diagnosis was a duodenal lipoma based on histological findings. Lipomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. Only 4% occur in the duodenum. The peak incidence is around the 5th and 7th decade of life, with a slight female preponderance. Gastrointestinal lipomas are usually asymptomatic, but can present with mild to severe gastrointestinal bleeding, intussusceptions, abdominal pain, constipation and diarrhea. Clinical, endoscopical, surgical, and radiological features are described in this case of duodenal lipoma. PMID:27942311

  16. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding*

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26811556

  17. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  18. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  19. Swallowable fluorometric capsule for wireless triage of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, A; Ryou, M; Thompson, C C; Westervelt, R M

    2015-12-07

    Real-time detection of gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major challenge because there does not yet exist a minimally invasive technology that can both i) monitor for blood from an active hemorrhage and ii) uniquely distinguish it from blood left over from an inactive hemorrhage. Such a device would be an important tool for clinical triage. One promising solution, which we have proposed previously, is to inject a fluorescent dye into the blood stream and to use it as a distinctive marker of active bleeding by monitoring leakage into the gastrointestinal tract with a wireless fluorometer. This paper reports, for the first time to our knowledge, the development of a swallowable, wireless capsule with a built-in fluorometer capable of detecting fluorescein in blood, and intended for monitoring gastrointestinal bleeding in the stomach. The embedded, compact fluorometer uses pinholes to define a microliter sensing volume and to eliminate bulky optical components. The proof-of-concept capsule integrates optics, low-noise analog sensing electronics, a microcontroller, battery, and low power Zigbee radio, all into a cylindrical package measuring 11 mm × 27 mm and weighing 10 g. Bench-top experiments demonstrate wireless fluorometry with a limit-of-detection of 20 nM aqueous fluorescein. This device represents a major step towards a technology that would enable simple, rapid detection of active gastrointestinal bleeding, a capability that would save precious time and resources and, ultimately, reduce complications in patients.

  20. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding due to multifocal intestinal angiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Chagoya, Dolores; Figueroa-Ruiz, Marco; López-Gómez, Javier; Nava-Leyva, Héctor; Álvarez-Ponce, Carlos Eduardo; Guzmán-Sombrero, Gustavo; Velazquez-Garcia, José

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal angiosarcomas are an extremely rare and aggressive vascular tumors, with a few cases reported in the literature. Presentation of case A 45 years-old male arrived to our hospital with intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding presenting melena and weight loss, he has antecedent of pelvic radiotherapy ten years before admission for an unknown pelvic tumor. Emergency surgery was required because of uncontrolled bleeding and hemodynamic instability. Histopathological findings revealed a multifocal high-grade epithelioid angiosarcoma, with cells reactive for CD31, keratins CKAE 1/AE3 and factor VIII. Discussion Angiosarcomas are aggressive tumors with a high rate of lymph node metastasis and peripheral organs. The diagnosis is difficult because it present nonspecific clinical presentation, radiological and histopathological findings. There are few reports of angiosarcoma involving the small intestine and the most common presentation are abdominal pain and gastrointestinal bleeding. There is not enough information for intestinal angiosarcoma secondary to radiation therapy, but there have been proposed criteria for diagnosis: no microscopic or clinical evidence of antecedent malignant lesion, angiosarcoma presented in the field of irradiation, long latency period between radiation and angiosarcoma and histological confirmation. We suspect our patient course with a secondary form of angiosarcoma. Therapy for bleeding angiosarcoma consists in control of bleeding and medical management to stabilize the patient. Once accomplished surgical resection is required. Conclusion We should keep in mind this tumors as a cause of obscure intestinal bleeding in patients with medical history of radiation therapy. PMID:25853844

  1. Approach to a child with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Sunit; Jain, Puneet; Jayashree, M; Lal, Sadhna

    2013-04-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a potentially life threatening medical emergency requiring an appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Therefore, the primary focus in a child with UGIB is resuscitation and stabilization followed by a diagnostic evaluation. The differential diagnosis of UGIB in children is determined by age and severity of bleed. In infants and toddlers mucosal bleed (gastritis and stress ulcers) is a common cause. In children above 2 y variceal bleeding due to Extra-Hepatic Portal Venous Obstruction (EHPVO) is the commonest cause of significant UGIB in developing countries as against peptic ulcer in the developed countries. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most accurate and useful diagnostic tool to evaluate UGIB in children. Parenteral vitamin K (infants, 1-2 mg/dose; children, 5-10 mg) and parenteral Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI's), should be administered empirically in case of a major UGIB. Octreotide infusion is useful in control of significant UGIB due to variceal hemorrhage. A temporarily placed, Sengstaken-Blakemore tube can be life saving if pharmacologic/ endoscopic methods fail to control variceal bleeding. Therapy in patients having mucosal bleed is directed at neutralization and/or prevention of gastric acid release; High dose Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs, Pantoprazole) are more efficacious than H2 receptor antagonists for this purpose.

  2. Upper gastrointestinal ectopic variceal bleeding treated with various endoscopic modalities

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Eunae; Jun, Chung Hwan; Choi, Sung Kyu; Kim, Hyun Soo; Park, Chang Hwan; Rew, Jong Sun; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Hee Joon; Han, Mingui; Cho, Kyu Man

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Ectopic variceal bleeding is a rare (2–5%) but fatal gastrointestinal bleed in patients with portal hypertension. Patients with ectopic variceal bleeding manifest melena, hematochezia, or hematemesis, which require urgent managements. Definitive therapeutic modalities of ectopic varices are not yet standardized because of low incidence. Various therapeutic modalities have been applied on the basis of the experiences of experts or availability of facilities, with varying results. Patient concerns: We have encountered eight cases of gastrointestinal ectopic variceal bleeding in five patients in the last five years. Diagnoses: All patients were diagnosed with liver cirrhosis presenting melena or hematemesis. Interventions: All patients were treated with various endoscopic modalities (endoscopic variceal obturation [EVO] with cyanoacrylate in five cases, endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL) in two cases, hemoclipping in one case). Outcomes: Satisfactory hemostasis was achieved without radiologic interventions in all cases. EVO and EVL each caused one case of portal biliopathy, and EVL induced ulcer bleeding in one case. Lessons: EVO generally accomplished better results of variceal obturations than EVL or hemoclipping, without serious adverse events. EVO may be an effective modality for control of ectopic variceal bleeding without radiologic intervention or surgery. PMID:28072750

  3. Haemorrhagic cholecystitis: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Natalie

    2014-01-17

    Haemorrhagic cholecystitis is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is a difficult diagnosis to make. This case report describes an orthopaedic patient, who developed deranged liver function tests and anaemia after a hemiarthroplasty of the hip. The patient had upper abdominal pain and black stools which clinically appeared to be melaena. An ultrasound scan of the abdomen was inconclusive, and therefore a CT was performed and the potential diagnosis of haemorrhagic cholecystitis was raised. An endoscopic evaluation of the upper gastrointestinal tract showed no evidence of other causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Following an emergency laparotomy and cholecystectomy, she recovered well. This report aims to increase awareness about the uncommon condition of haemorrhagic cholecystitis, and to educate regarding clinical and radiological signs which lead to this diagnosis.

  4. Duodenal variceal bleed: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed and a difficult diagnosis to make

    PubMed Central

    Bhagani, Shradha; Winters, Conchubhair; Moreea, Sulleman

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in a man aged 57 years with primary biliary cholangitis who was ultimately diagnosed with an isolated duodenal variceal bleed, which was successfully treated with histoacryl glue injection. Duodenal varices are an uncommon presentation of portal hypertension and can result in significant GI bleeding with a high mortality. Diagnosis can be difficult and therapeutic options limited. Endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy with histoacryl glue provides an effective treatment, though endoscopists need to remain aware of and vigilant for the serious complications of this treatment option. PMID:28242804

  5. [Fiberendoscopic injection therapy of bleeding gastrointestinal lesions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Liehr, H; Brunswig, D; Gallenkamp, H; Seez, P; Zilly, W

    1979-06-01

    In 28 patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding emergency fiberendoscopy was combined with aethoxysclerole (1%) injection of the bleeding lesion with purpose to controll haemorrhage. In 61% of 31 proceudres done in patients with oesophageal varices (n = 19) haemorrhage was controlled, and in further 16% deminuation of bleeding intensity was noted. In the remaining cases (n = 7) the procedure was ineffective. Only patients with Child C liver cirrhosis having oesophageal varices stages III and IV finally died because of uncontrolled haemorrhage. In 9 patients with bleeding from other lesions (gastric erosions and ulcers, Mallory-Weiss-Syndrome, erosio simplex Dieulafoy) haemorrhage was controlled in 8 patients. The method is practicable and efficient, but does not determine better the final outcome of patients with livercirrhosis Child C having oesophageal varices stages III and IV. In other cases tube treatment was avoided. The operation lethality within the series was 1,5%.

  6. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Following LVAD Placement from Top to Bottom

    PubMed Central

    Cushing, Kelly; Kushnir, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are an increasingly prevalent form of mechanical support for patients with end-stage heart failure. These devices can be implanted both as a bridge to transplant or definitive/destination therapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is one of the most common and recalcitrant long-term complications following LVAD implantation, with an incidence approaching 30%. The pathophysiology of bleeding is multifactorial, with hemodynamic alterations, acquired von Willebrand factor deficiency, and coagulopathy being most often implicated. The majority of bleeding events in this population result from angioectasias and gastro-duodenal erosive disease. While these bleeding events are significant and often require transfusion therapy, they are rarely life threatening. Endoscopy remains the standard of care with upper endoscopy offering the highest diagnostic yield in these patients. However, the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis in this population is not well established. A small number of studies have evaluated medical therapy and alterations in LVAD settings as a means of preventing or treating bleeding with variable results. In summary, GI bleeding with LVADs is a common occurrence and will continue to be as more LVADs are being performed for destination therapy. This review will discuss what is known about the pathophysiology of GI bleeding in LVADs and the currently available options for medical and/or endoscopic management. PMID:27017225

  7. Emergency endoscopy for gastrointestinal bleeding after bariatric surgery. Therapeutic algorithm.

    PubMed

    García-García, María Luisa; Martín-Lorenzo, Juan Gervasio; Torralba-Martínez, José Antonio; Lirón-Ruiz, Ramón; Miguel Perelló, Joana; Flores Pastor, Benito; Pérez Cuadrado, Enrique; Aguayo Albasini, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GB) is a potential complication after bariatric surgery and its frequency is around 2-4% according to the literature. The aim of this study is to present our experience with GB after bariatric surgery, its presentation and possible treatment options by means of an algorithm. From January 2004 to December 2012, we performed 300 consecutive laparoscopic bariatric surgeries. A total of 280 patients underwent a laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass with creation of a gastrojejunal anastomosis using a circular stapler type CEAA No 21 in 265 patients and with a linear stapler in 15 patients. Demographics, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation and treatment were reviewed. A total of 20 patients underwent a sleeve gastrectomy. Twenty-seven cases (9%) developed GB. Diagnosis and therapeutic endoscopy was required in 13 patients. The onset of bleeding occurred between the 1(st)-6(th) postop days in 10 patients, and the origin was at the gastrojejunostomy staple-lines, and 3 patients had bleeding from an anastomotic ulcer 15-20 days after surgery. All other patients were managed non-operatively. Conservative management of gastrointestinal bleeding is effective in most cases, but endoscopy with therapeutic intent should be considered in patients with severe or recurrent bleeding. Multidisciplinary postoperative follow- up is very important for early detention and treatment of this complication. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  9. Homocystinuria with lower gastrointestinal bleeding: first case report.

    PubMed

    Al Humaidan, Mohammad; Al Sharkawy, Ibrahim; Al Sanae, Abdullah; Al Refaee, Fawaz

    2013-01-01

    To report a rare complication of homocystinuria in a child and highlight the association of homocystinuria with lower gastrointestinal bleeding and intestinal thrombosis. A 7-year-old boy with homocystinuria and poor compliance with treatment presented with abdominal pain and bloody stools. Doppler ultrasound showed superior mesenteric and middle colic vein thrombosis. Laparotomy demonstrated ischemic small bowel necessitating resection. The patient improved clinically following resection and the initiation of the anticoagulation with homocystinuria treatment and was discharged home. This case showed the need to sustain a high index of suspicion of thromboembolism in a patient with homocystinuria and lower gastrointestinal bleeding and the importance of compliance with treatment to avoid vascular complications. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. [Management of new oral anticoagulants in gastrointestinal bleeding and endoscopy].

    PubMed

    del Molino, Fátima; Gonzalez, Isabel; Saperas, Esteve

    2015-10-01

    New oral direct anticoagulants agents are alternatives to warfarin for long-term anticoagulation in a growing number of patients that require long-term anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. These new agents with predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles offer a favorable global safety profile, but increased gastrointestinal bleeding compared to the vitamin K antagonists. Many gastroenterologists are unfamiliar and may be wary of these newer drugs, since Clinical experience is limited and no specific antidote is available to reverse their anticoagulant effect. In this article the risk of these new agents and, how to manage these agents in both the presence of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and in patients undergoing endoscopic procedures is reviewed.

  11. Trends on gastrointestinal bleeding and mortality: where are we standing?

    PubMed

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2012-03-21

    Bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract and its management are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The predisposing factors that led to the occurrence of these hemorrhagic instances are largely linked to the life style of the affected persons. Designing a new strategy aimed at educating the publics and improving their awareness of the problem could effectively help in eradicating this problem with no associated risks and in bringing the mortality rates down to almost zero.

  12. Trends on gastrointestinal bleeding and mortality: Where are we standing?

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract and its management are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The predisposing factors that led to the occurrence of these hemorrhagic instances are largely linked to the life style of the affected persons. Designing a new strategy aimed at educating the publics and improving their awareness of the problem could effectively help in eradicating this problem with no associated risks and in bringing the mortality rates down to almost zero. PMID:22468077

  13. Gastric Metastases from Lung Adenocarcinoma Causing Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Abu Ghanimeh, Mouhanna; Albadarin, Sakher; Yousef, Osama

    2017-01-01

    Metastases to the stomach are rare. They are commonly asymptomatic, and the diagnosis is usually established during autopsy. We present a patient known to have stage IV lung adenocarcinoma who presented with melena and shock. Endoscopy revealed multiple gastric nodules, which were proved to be metastatic deposits from her lung cancer. The possibility of gastric metastases should be kept in mind in patients presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopy and biopsy remain the gold standard for diagnostic testing in such patients. PMID:28286791

  14. Management of anticoagulation in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Franco; Dentali, Francesco; Repici, Alessandro; Amato, Arnaldo; Paggi, Silvia; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Dumonceau, Jean Marc

    2015-08-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding represents the most common adverse event associated with the use of oral anticoagulant therapy. Due to increasing prescription of anticoagulants worldwide, gastroenterologists are more and more called to deal with bleeding patients taking these medications. Their management is challenging because several issues have to be taken into account, such as the severity of bleeding, the intensity of anticoagulation, the patient's thrombotic risk and endoscopy findings. The recent introduction into the marketplace of new direct oral anticoagulants, for whom specific reversal agents are still lacking, further contributes to make the decision-making process even more demanding. Available evidence on this topic is limited and practice guidelines by gastroenterology societies only marginally address key issues for clinicians, including when and how to reverse coagulopathy, the optimal timing of endoscopy and when and how to resume anticoagulation thereafter. The present paper reviews the evidence in the literature and provides practical algorithms to support clinicians in the management of patients on anticoagulants who present with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  15. Re-bleeding events in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding after negative capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães-Costa, Pedro; Bispo, Miguel; Santos, Sofia; Couto, Gilberto; Matos, Leopoldo; Chagas, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate long-term re-bleeding events after a negative capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and the risk factors associated with the procedure. METHODS: Patients referred to Hospital Egas Moniz (Lisboa, Portugal) between January 2006 and October 2012 with OGIB and a negative capsule endoscopy were retrospectively analyzed. The following study variables were included: demographic data, comorbidities, bleeding-related drug use, hemoglobin level, indication for capsule endoscopy, post procedure details, work-up and follow-up. Re-bleeding rates and associated factors were assessed using a Cox proportional hazard analysis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the cumulative incidence of re-bleeding at 1, 3 and 5 years, and the differences between factors were evaluated. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 640 patients referred for OGIB investigation. Wireless capsule endoscopy was deemed negative in 113 patients (17.7%). A total of 64.6% of the population was female, and the median age was 69 years. The median follow-up was forty-eight months (interquartile range 24-60). Re-bleeding occurred in 27.4% of the cases. The median time to re-bleeding was fifteen months (interquartile range 2-33). In 22.6% (n = 7) of the population, small-bowel angiodysplasia was identified as the culprit lesion. A univariate analysis showed that age > 65 years old, chronic kidney disease, aortic stenosis, anticoagulant use and overt OGIB were risk factors for re-bleeding; however, on a multivariate analysis, there were no risk factors for re-bleeding. The cumulative risk of re-bleeding at 1, 3 and 5 years of follow-up was 12.9%, 25.6% and 31.5%, respectively. Patients who presented with overt OGIB tended to re-bleed sooner (median time for re-bleeding: 8.5 mo vs 22 mo). CONCLUSION: Patients with OGIB despite a negative capsule endoscopy have a significant re-bleeding risk; therefore, these patients require an extended follow

  16. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kalipershad, Sujala; Chung, Kin Tong; Jehangir, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    A 67-year-old gentleman with no significant medical history of note presented with sudden onset of epigastric pain, coffee ground vomiting and passing black tarry stool. A series of investigations including blood tests, ultrasound scan, CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast and endoscopy failed to reveal any site of active bleeding. The mystery remained and the patient continued to have upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A second CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast was carried out and showed evidence of contrast extravasation into the duodenum (figure 3). An exploratory laparotomy showed no obvious site of haemorrhage and a loop jejunostomy was performed. The diagnosis of gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy was only made, using gastroscope via jejunostomy, when a big gallstone was found in the third part of the duodenum and the papilla was ruptured (figure 5). PMID:22914239

  17. New clinical paradigms for treating and preventing antiplatelet gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Neena S

    2017-11-01

    To quantify antiplatelet-related gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), characterize patients at greatest risk and summarize risk-management strategies emphasizing evolving knowledge in acute management of antiplatelet-related bleeding. New paradigms for acute management of antiplatelet-related GIB exist in the domains of resuscitation and the transfusion of blood products, strategic use of proton pump therapy and identification and eradication of Helicobacter pylori. This review will also highlight the importance of prompt resumption of cardiac aspirin and dual antiplatelet therapy following endoscopic hemostasis to minimize the risk of future cardiac events. This review will provide pragmatic strategies for the management of acute antiplatelet-related GIB. Emerging areas of clinical knowledge will be addressed and knowledge gaps requiring further research to inform clinical practice will be highlighted.

  18. Gastrointestinal bleeding and obstructive jaundice: Think of hepatic artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Vultaggio, Fabrice; Morère, Pierre-Henri; Constantin, Christophe; Christodoulou, Michel; Roulin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Hemobilia is an uncommon and potential life-threatening condition mainly due to hepato-biliary tree traumatic or iatrogenic injuries. Spontaneously ruptured aneurysm of the hepatic artery is seldom described. We report the case of an 89-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding, whose ultrasound and computed tomography revealed a non-traumatic, spontaneous aneurysm of the right hepatic artery. The oeso-gastro-duodenoscopy and colonoscopy did not reveal any bleeding at the ampulla of Vater, nor anywhere else. Selective angiography confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic artery aneurysm and revealed a full hepatic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was successfully treated by selective embolization of microcoils. We discuss the etiologies of hemobilia and its treatment with selective embolization, which remains favored over surgical treatment. Although aneurysm of the hepatic artery is rare, especially without trauma, a high index of suspicion is needed in order to ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:27358680

  19. Bleeding recurrence in patients with gastrointestinal vascular malformation after thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiying; Fu, Sengwang; Feng, Nan; Chen, Huimin; Gao, Yunjie; Zhao, Yunjia; Xue, Hanbing; Zhang, Yao; Li, Xiaobo; Dai, Jun; Fang, Jingyuan; Ge, Zhizheng

    2016-08-01

    Thalidomide may be used for the treatment of gastrointestinal vascular malformation (GIVM), but the long-term response and adverse effects are unknown. Aim to study the recurrence rate of GIVM bleeding after thalidomide treatment, the response to treatment, and the adverse effects.This was a retrospective study of 80 patients with GIVM treated with thalidomide between November 2003 and November 2013. Patients received a course of 100 mg/day of thalidomide for 4 months and were followed up for at least 1 year. The response rate during follow-up, the recurrence rate after the 1st course of treatment, and the rate of retreatment were assessed. Comorbidities, the need for blood transfusion, yearly bleeding episodes, hemoglobin levels, hospitalization after thalidomide treatment, and the rate of adverse effects were also examined.The overall response rate during follow-up was 79.5% (62/78). The recurrence rate was 21.0% after the 1st course of thalidomide. The response rate of retreatment was 100%. After thalidomide treatment, yearly blood transfusion amounts, yearly bleeding episodes, and yearly hospitalization numbers were significantly decreased, while hemoglobin levels were significantly increased (P < 0.001). Adverse effects were observed in 60.0% (48/80) of the patients. Serious adverse effects were reported in 31.3% (25/80). The overall response rate was 76.7% (23/30) in 30 patients with comorbidities, while the rate was 78.0% (39/50) in patients without comorbidities (P = 0.55). The rate of serious adverse effects was similar between the comorbidities (33.3%) and no-comorbidities groups (30.0%) (P = 0.76).Thalidomide showed a good response rate and low adverse effect rate in patients with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding due to GIVM.

  20. Gangliocytic paraganglioma: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Torrijos, Yolanda; León Montañés, Rafael; Mejías Manzano, María Ángeles

    2017-08-01

    Gangliocytic paraganglioma is an uncommon tumor, which is usually located in the ampulla of Vater, and may get confused in the differential diagnosis with ampuloma or GIST. Here we present a case of a patient with upper gastrointestinal bleeding as a predominant symptom, objectified by endoscopy an ulcerative polypoid mass at the juxtapilar level, with histological result of gangliocítica paraganglioma after multiple biopsies, and finally surgical resection. The interest of this case is the difficulty for diagnosing, the different treatments and prognosis that this implies, especially for the tumor location, as surgery can lead to great complications.

  1. Three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Miura, Hiroki; Mori, Yuji; Sugata, Ken; Nakajima, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide in children. We report three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by various severity of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two patients (cases 1 and 2) recovered completely without any specific treatments. One patient (case 3) died despite extensive treatments including a red blood cell transfusion and endoscopic hemostatic therapy. Rotavirus genotypes G1P[8] and G9P[8] were detected in cases 2 and 3, respectively. Rotavirus antigenemia levels were not high at the onset of melena, suggesting that systemic rotaviral infection does not play an important role in causing melena.

  2. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with renal failure under hemodialysis treatment: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Can, Özgür; Koç, Gözde; Ocak, Sema Berk; Akbay, Nursel; Ahishali, Emel; Canbakan, Mustafa; Şahin, Gülizar Manga; Apaydin, Süheyla

    2017-05-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality for patients who need hemodialysis treatment. Our aim was to evaluate patients who needed hemodialysis and presented with bleeding during their hospital stay (uremic bleeding patients). Factors that increased the risk of bleeding and death were evaluated. Additionally, uremic bleeding patients were compared to non-uremic bleeding patients regarding gastrointestinal findings. Fifty-one uremic bleeding patients were compared to two control groups which included uremic (hemodialysis dependent and non-bleeding) and non-uremic (no renal insufficiency and bleeding) patients. NSAIDs and anti-ulcer drug usage were more common in uremic bleeding and in uremic non-bleeding groups, respectively. Dialysis vintage was longer in uremic bleeding group. Comparison of uremic bleeding and non-bleeding uremic patients regarding the usage of ACEI or ARB drugs yielded non-significant results. Acute kidney injury, lower plasma albumin level and high CRP level were significantly increased the risk of mortality in uremic bleeding patients. Hospital stay more than 1 week was the only strong factor for mortality when multivariate analysis was performed. Gastroduodenal and duodenal ulcers were significantly detected in uremic bleeding and non-uremic bleeding patients; respectively. Hemodialysis patients presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding should be evaluated regarding use of prescriptions and efforts should be done in order to shorten their hospital stay and decrease their mortality. Effect of ACEI or ARB drugs should also be evaluated in future studies.

  3. Assessment of multi-modality evaluations of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ryan; Varayil, Jithinraj E; WongKeeSong, Louis M; Fidler, Jeff; Fletcher, Joel G; Barlow, John; Alexander, Jeffrey; Rajan, Elizabeth; Hansel, Stephanie; Becker, Brenda; Larson, Joseph J; Enders, Felicity T; Bruining, David H; Coelho-Prabhu, Nayantara

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the frequency of bleeding source detection in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) after pre-procedure imaging [multiphase computed tomography enterography (MPCTE), video capsule endoscopy (VCE), or both] and assess the impact of imaging on DBE diagnostic yield. METHODS Retrospective cohort study using a prospectively maintained database of all adult patients presenting with OGIB who underwent DBE from September 1st, 2002 to June 30th, 2013 at a single tertiary center. RESULTS Four hundred and ninety five patients (52% females; median age 68 years) underwent DBE for OGIB. AVCE and/or MPCTE performed within 1 year prior to DBE (in 441 patients) increased the diagnostic yield of DBE (67.1% with preceding imaging vs 59.5% without). Using DBE as the gold standard, VCE and MPCTE had a diagnostic yield of 72.7% and 32.5% respectively. There were no increased odds of finding a bleeding site at DBE compared to VCE (OR = 1.3, P = 0.150). There were increased odds of finding a bleeding site at DBE compared to MPCTE (OR = 5.9, P < 0.001). In inpatients with overt OGIB, diagnostic yield of DBE was not affected by preceding imaging. CONCLUSION DBE is a safe and well-tolerated procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of OGIB, with a diagnostic yield that may be increased after obtaining a preceding VCE or MPCTE. However, inpatients with active ongoing bleeding may benefit from proceeding directly to antegrade DBE. PMID:28216967

  4. Gastrointestinal angiodysplasia is associated with significant gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with continuous left ventricular assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Justin; Jackson, Christian; Schlepp, Greg; Strong, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Patients with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) have a 65 % incidence of bleeding events within the first year. The majority of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is from gastrointestinal angiodyplasia (GIAD). The primary aim of the study was to determine whether GIAD was associated with a higher rate of significant bleeding, an increased number of bleeding events per year, and a higher rate of transfusion compared to non-GIAD sources. Patients and methods: This retrospective cohort study included 118 individuals who received a LVAD at a tertiary medical center from 2006 through 2014. Patients were subdivided into GIB and non-GIB for comparison of patient demographics, comorbid conditions, and laboratory data. GIB was further divided into sources of GIB, GIAD, obscure, or non-GIAD to establish severity of bleeding, rate of re-bleeding, and transfusion rate. Results: GIAD is associated with an increased number of bleeding events compared to non-GIAD sources of GIB (2.07 vs 1.23, P = 0.01) and a higher number of bleeding events per year (0.806 vs. 0.455 P = 0.001). GIAD compared to non-GIAD sources of GIB was associated with an increased incidence of major bleeding (100 % vs 60 %, P = 0.006) and increased rates of transfusion (8.8 vs 2.95 units, P = 0.0004). Cox Regression analysis between non-GIB and GIAD demonstrated increased risk with age (P = 0.001), history of chronic kidney disease (P = 0.005), and length of stay after LVAD implantation of more than 45 days (P = 0.04). History of hypertension (P = 0.045), diabetes mellitus (P = 0.016), and male gender was associated with decreased risk (P = 0.04). Conclusion: Patients with a continuous-flow LVAD who develop a GIB secondary to GIAD have a higher rate of major bleeding, multiple bleeding events, and require more transfusions to achieve stabilization compared to patients who do not have GIAD. PMID

  5. Heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce positive scintiscan in occult gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, T.K.; Brantly, M.

    1984-04-01

    The value of using heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce a positive scintiscan was studied in a patient with chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding. When all standard diagnostic tests (upper and lower gastrointestinal series, upper and lower endoscopy, and conventional noninterventional Tc-99m RBC imaging) fail to detect and localize gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient who has definite clinical evidence (guaiac positive stool and dropping hemoglobin, hematocrit) of chronic occult gastrointestinal oozing, heparin may be used (with proper precaution) as a last resort to aid in the scintigraphic detection and localization of chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding.

  6. Management by the intensivist of gastrointestinal bleeding in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Intensivists are regularly confronted with the question of gastrointestinal bleeding. To date, the latest international recommendations regarding prevention and treatment for gastrointestinal bleeding lack a specific approach to the critically ill patients. We present recommendations for management by the intensivist of gastrointestinal bleeding in adults and children, developed with the GRADE system by an experts group of the French-Language Society of Intensive Care (Société de Réanimation de Langue Française (SRLF), with the participation of the French Language Group of Paediatric Intensive Care and Emergencies (GFRUP), the French Society of Emergency Medicine (SFMU), the French Society of Gastroenterology (SNFGE), and the French Society of Digestive Endoscopy (SFED). The recommendations cover five fields of application: management of gastrointestinal bleeding before endoscopic diagnosis, treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding unrelated to portal hypertension, treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding related to portal hypertension, management of presumed lower gastrointestinal bleeding, and prevention of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in intensive care. PMID:23140348

  7. Management of non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: position statement of the Catalan Society of Gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    García-Iglesias, Pilar; Botargues, Josep-Maria; Feu Caballé, Faust; Villanueva Sánchez, Càndid; Calvet Calvo, Xavier; Brullet Benedi, Enric; Cánovas Moreno, Gabriel; Fort Martorell, Esther; Gallach Montero, Marta; Gené Tous, Emili; Hidalgo Rosas, José-Manuel; Lago Macía, Amelia; Nieto Rodríguez, Ana; Papo Berger, Michel; Planella de Rubinat, Montserrat; Saló Rich, Joan; Campo Fernández de Los Ríos, Rafel

    2017-01-18

    In recent years there have been advances in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding that have helped reduce rebleeding and mortality. This document positioning of the Catalan Society of Digestologia is an update of evidence-based recommendations on management of gastrointestinal bleeding peptic ulcer.

  8. Incidental detection of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor on Tc-99m red blood cell scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Gupta, Vikas; Singh, Rajinder; Radotra, Bishan Dass; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2012-10-01

    The role of 99m-technetium labeled red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy in acute gastro-intestinal bleed is well-established. The authors report a case of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) incidentally discovered on Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy.

  9. Angiodysplasia of the right colon: a cause of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Baum, S; Athanasoulis, C A; Waltman, A C; Galdabini, J; Schapiro, R H; Warshaw, A L; Ottinger, L W

    1977-11-01

    Thirty-four patients with intermittent lower gastrointestinal bleeding were diagnosed angiographically as having angiodysplasia of the cecum and right colon. Repeated barium and endoscopic examinations were negative. Right colectomy was performed on 17 patients, who were followed postoperatively for up to 7 years. Of these, four patients rebled, two of whom had angiographic evidence of related lesions involving other parts of the colon and terminal ileum. Silicone rubber injection and tissue-clearing techniques on the specimens have facilitated the pathologic identification of these lesions. Histologically, they are dilated submucosal veins and arteries associated with areas of overlying mucosal thinning and occasional ulcerations. Although the pathogenesis of the lesion is unknown, we think they are acquired rather than congenital and result from chronic submucosal arteriovenous shunting secondary to mucosal ischemia. Of the 34 patients, 17 had a history of cardiac disease.

  10. Treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasumasa; Sato, Yoshinori; Ozawa, Sun-ichiro; Ishigooka, Shinya; Yamashita, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is the standard of care for the secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic stroke, especially after coronary intervention. However, this therapy is associated with bleeding complications such as gastrointestinal bleeding, which is one of the most common life-threatening complications. Early endoscopy is recommended for most patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. After successful endoscopic hemostasis, immediate resumption of antiplatelet therapy with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) is recommended to prevent further ischemic events. PPI prophylaxis during antiplatelet therapy reduces the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The potential negative metabolic interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel is still unclear. PMID:25685721

  11. Gastrointestinal Bleeding as a Complication of Serial Transverse Enteroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jeremy G.; Stamm, Danielle A.; Modi, Biren P.; Duggan, Christopher; Jaksic, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) lengthens and tapers bowel in patients with intestinal failure and has a generally low complication profile. Evaluation and treatment of serious gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in three STEP patients is described. Methods Records of patients participating in an interdisciplinary intestinal rehabilitation program were reviewed to identify those who underwent STEP and had GIB necessitating red blood cell transfusion. Results Of 296 patients, 23 underwent STEP and 3 (13%) had subsequent GIB requiring transfusion. Underlying diagnoses were multiple atresias/intrauterine volvulus, gastroschisis, and gastroschisis with volvulus. STEP was performed at ages ranging from 3–5 months, using 3–8 stapler firings with an increase in mean bowel length from 23 to 45 cm. GIB was noted at 10–33 months post-op and resulted in 2–7 transfusions per patient over a period of 3–16 months. Gastrointestinal endoscopic evaluation demonstrated ulcers adjacent to the staple lines in two patients. Both had improvement of GIB with enteral antibiotics, sulfasalazine, topical enteral steroids and, ultimately, a period of bowel rest. The third patient had histological evidence of eosinophilic enteritis and was treated sequentially with antibiotics, sulfasalazine, enteral steroids, and an elemental diet. In all three, hemoglobin levels improved despite persistent occult bleeding. Conclusions Significant GIB is a potential late complication of STEP. Endoscopy identified the underlying source of GIB in all three patients. A combination of enteral antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medications, and bowel rest was effective in the treatment of post-STEP GIB, without the need for additional bowel resection. PMID:24851761

  12. Uncommon gastrointestinal bleeding during targeted therapy for advanced renal cell carcinoma: A report of four cases

    PubMed Central

    FUJIHARA, SHINTARO; MORI, HIROHITO; KOBARA, HIDEKI; NISHIYAMA, NORIKO; AYAKI, MAKI; OHATA, RYO; UEDA, NOBUFUMI; SUGIMOTO, MIKIO; KAKEHI, YOSHIYUKI; MASAKI, TSUTOMU

    2015-01-01

    Clinically available targeted agents to treat advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) include sunitinib, sorafenib and temsirolimus. Sorafenib and sunitinib have been associated with bleeding in selected trials, but clinical and endoscopic characteristics of gastrointestinal bleeding are not well described. Herein, we report four cases of advanced RCC in which endoscopic hemostasis effectively resolved high-grade, life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding that occurred during targeted therapy. Although stomatitis and mucositis have occurred during targeted therapies, life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding is less common. In these four patients, the origins of gastrointestinal bleeding were identified, and complete endoscopic hemostasis was achieved. Endoscopies revealed variable characteristics including angiodysplasia, multiple gastric ulcers and oozing bleeding of the normal mucosa. Although the most effective diagnostic and treatment strategies are disputed, endoscopic examinations are best performed before starting targeted therapies. Additionally, these patients should be monitored even for rare life-threatening events. PMID:26722259

  13. [Severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to GIST tumor. Radiological embolization and surgery].

    PubMed

    Navas, Diana; Ríos, Antonio; Febrero, Beatriz; Rodríguez, José Manuel; Lloret, Francisco; Parrilla, Pascual

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) were identified only recently. These tumors usually have no symptoms, although they are localized, operable and curable. Although rare, if they are not diagnosed and treated early, they become very aggressive. The most common manifestation is gastrointestinal bleeding from mucosal erosion. Their presentation as severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding is exceptional. We report a patient with severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding stabilized by interventional radiology that subsequently required surgery for definitive care. Therapeutic use of radiological embolization is increasingly widespread in bleeding at various levels, achieving hemodynamic stabilization of patients. However, it must be kept in mind that, in cases of unknown etiology of lower gastrointestinal bleeding, possible causes must be investigated.

  14. Modern management of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hegade, Vinod S; Sood, Ruchit; Mohammed, Noor; Moreea, Sulleman

    2013-10-01

    An acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (AUGIB) often represents a life-threatening event and is recognised universally as a common cause of emergency hospitalisation. Large observational studies have improved our understanding of the disease characteristics and its impact on mortality but despite significant advancement in endoscopic management, mortality remains high, particularly in elderly patients and those with multiple comorbidities. Skilled assessment, risk stratification and prompt resuscitation are essential parts of patient care, with endoscopy playing a key role in the definitive management. A successful outcome partly relies on the clinician's familiarity with current guidelines and recommendations, including the National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines published in 2012. Validated risk stratification scores, such as the Blatchford and Rockall score, facilitate early discharge of low-risk patients as well as help in identifying those needing early endoscopic intervention. Major advances in therapeutic endoscopy, including more recently, the development of non-toxic proprietary powders (Hemospray and EndoClot), have resulted in the development of effective treatments of bleeding lesions, reduction in rebleeding rates and the need for emergency surgery. The role of proton-pump inhibitor therapy prior to endoscopy and the level of optimum red cell transfusion in the setting of AUGIB remain fields that require further research.

  15. The Application of Hemospray in Gastrointestinal Bleeding during Emergency Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Heinz; Nägel, Andreas; Vitali, Francesco; Vetter, Marcel; Dauth, Christine; Neurath, Markus F.; Raithel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Gastrointestinal bleeding represents the main indication for emergency endoscopy (EE). Lately, several hemostatic powders have been released to facilitate EE. Methods. We evaluated all EE in which Hemospray was used as primary or salvage therapy, with regard to short- and long-term hemostasis and complications. Results. We conducted 677 EE in 474 patients (488 examinations in 344 patients were upper GI endoscopies). Hemospray was applied during 35 examinations in 27 patients (19 males), 33 during upper and 2 during lower endoscopy. It was used after previous treatment in 21 examinations (60%) and in 14 (40%) as salvage therapy. Short-term success was reached in 34 of 35 applications (97.1%), while long-term success occurred in 23 applications (65.7%). Similar long-term results were found after primary application (64,3%) or salvage therapy (66,7%). Rebleeding was found in malignant and extended ulcers. One major adverse event (2.8%) occurred with gastric perforation after Hemospray application. Discussion. Hemospray achieved short-term hemostasis in virtually all cases. The long-term effect is mainly determined by the type of bleeding source, but not whether it was applied as first line or salvage therapy. But, even in the failures, patients had benefit from hemodynamic stabilization and consecutive interventions in optimized conditions. PMID:28232848

  16. Scintigraphic demonstration of acute gastrointestinal bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding the colon

    SciTech Connect

    Czerniak, A.; Zwas, S.T.; Rabau, M.Y.; Avigad, I.; Borag, B.; Wolfstein, I.

    1985-08-01

    Massive lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding into the colonic wall was demonstrated accurately by Tc-99m RBCs. In addition, retrograde bleeding into the gallbladder was also identified while arteriography did not show contrast extravasation. This case supports the use of Tc-99m RBCs over Tc-99m sulfur colloid for more accurate localization of lower GI bleeding.

  17. Gastrointestinal bleeding in cardiac patients: epidemiology and evolving clinical paradigms.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Neena S

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac patients are a fast emerging population vulnerable to gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) due to their use of antithrombotic medications. This review will quantify the GIB risk of cardiac patients prescribed antithrombotic medications, summarize risk-management strategies and highlight knowledge gaps. As the American population ages, it is anticipated that there will be an increased incidence of upper and lower GIB related to age-specific disease, higher burden of comorbidity and increased use of anticoagulants, antiplatelets and aspirin to treat cardiac disease. New evidence has highlighted the significant and clinically relevant GIB risk. The increased use of aggressive antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies will alter our current understanding of the epidemiology of GIB. The magnitude of gastrointestinal risk in this vulnerable patient population is still relatively unexplored due to a paucity of literature. This review will highlight changing GIB trends and explore current knowledge regarding GIB risk in cardiac patients. An emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach to the care of these patients will be supported, which involves active patient participation and collaboration between cardiologists and gastroenterologists. Finally, risk-minimization strategies will be suggested and knowledge gaps will be identified.

  18. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  19. Wireless capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: a comparative study with push enteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mata, A; Bordas, J M; Feu, F; Ginés, A; Pellisé, M; Fernández-Esparrach, G; Balaguer, F; Piqué, J M; Llach, J

    2004-07-15

    The identification and treatment of lesions located in the small intestine in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is always a clinical challenge. To examine prospectively the diagnostic precision and the clinical efficacy of capsule endoscopy compared with push enteroscopy in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Forty-two patients (22 men and 20 women) with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (overt bleeding in 26 cases and occult blood loss with chronic anaemia in 16) and normal oesophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy were analysed. All patients were instructed to receive the capsule endoscopy and push enteroscopy was performed within the next 7 days. Both techniques were blindly performed by separate examiners. The diagnostic yield for each technique was defined as the frequency of detection of clinically relevant intestinal lesions carrying potential for bleeding. A bleeding site potentially related to gastrointestinal bleeding or evidence of active bleeding was identified in a greater proportion of patients using capsule endoscopy (74%; 31 of 42) than enteroscopy (19%; eight of 42) (P = 0.05). The most frequent capsule endoscopy findings were: angiodysplasia (45%), fresh blood (23%), jejunal ulcers (10%), ileal inflammatory mucosa (6%) and ileal tumour (6%). No additional intestinal diagnoses were made by enteroscopy. In seven patients (22%), the results obtained with capsule endoscopy led to a successful change in the therapeutic approach. Compared with push enteroscopy, capsule endoscopy increases the diagnosis yield in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, and allows modification on therapy strategy in a remarkable proportion of patients.

  20. Outcome in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding after capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cañas-Ventura, Alex; Márquez, Lucia; Bessa, Xavier; Dedeu, Josep Maria; Puigvehí, Marc; Delgado-Aros, Sílvia; Ibáñez, Ines Ana; Seoane, Agustin; Barranco, Luis; Bory, Felipe; Andreu, Montserrat; González-Suárez, Begoña

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical impact of capsule endoscopy (CE) after an obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) episode, focusing on diagnostic work-up, follow-up and predictive factors of rebleeding. METHODS: Patients who were referred to Hospital del Mar (Barcelona, Spain) between 2007 and 2009 for OGIB who underwent a CE were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic data, current treatment with non-steroid anti-inflammtory drugs or anticoagulant drugs, hemoglobin levels, transfusion requirements, previous diagnostic tests for the bleeding episode, as well as CE findings (significant or non-significant), work-up and patient outcomes were analyzed from electronic charts. Variables were compared by χ2 analysis and Student t test. Risk factors of rebleeding were assessed by Log-rank test, Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression model. RESULTS: There were 105 patients [45.7% women, median age of 72 years old (interquartile range 56-79)] and a median follow-up of 326 d (interquartile range 123-641) included in this study. The overall diagnostic yield of CE was 58.1% (55.2% and 63.2%, for patients with occult OGIB and overt OGIB, respectively). In 73 patients (69.5%), OGIB was resolved. Multivariate analysis showed that hemoglobin levels lower than 8 g/dL at diagnosis [hazard ratios (HR) = 2.7, 95%CI: 1.9-6.3], patients aged 70 years and above (HR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2-6.1) and significant findings in CE (HR = 2.4, 95%CI: 1.1-5.8) were independent predictors of rebleeding. CONCLUSION: One third of the patients presented with rebleeding after CE; risk factors were hemoglobin levels < 8 g/dL, age ≥ 70 years or the presence of significant lesions. PMID:24255747

  1. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding following aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde's sindrome. Case report.

    PubMed

    De Palma, G D; Salvatori, F; Masone, S; Simeoli, I; Rega, M; Celiento, M; Persico, G

    2007-09-01

    A 58-year old man was admitted to the hospital because of melena. He had a 1-year history of mechanical aortic valve replacement and coronary stent placement because of myocardial infarction and he was taking warfarin and clopidogrel. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy were negative for bleeding. Capsule endoscopy showed bleeding diffuse angiodysplasia of the small bowel. The patient was treated with octreotide 20 mg, at monthly interval. After 25 months there had been no recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding. The case suggests that mechanical valve replacement may not prevent gastrointestinal bleeding in Heyde syndrome and that octreotide treatment should be considered in these cases.

  2. Multiple stomas for recurrent life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Jérémie H; Parc, Yann; Bennis, Malika; Carbonnel, Nicolas; Mourra, Najat; Tiret, Emmanuel; Parc, Rolland

    2008-11-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage is an uncommon and severe symptom. The overall mortality rate ranges from 5 to 12 percent and can approach 40 percent for persistent or recurring bleedings. We report a case of a patient with severe recurrent lower bleeding in whom, despite several repeated explorations and a blind subtotal colectomy, no lesion could be found. Multiple (n = 4) leveled stomas of the small bowel with succus entericus reinfusion were required to localize and treat the cause of the bleeding. This case report is followed by a review of the literature of the management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  3. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.; McKusick, K.A.; Froelich, J.W.; Callahan, R.J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1982-04-01

    Using a modified in vivo /sup 99m/Tc red cell labeling technique, gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy was performed in 100 patients with GI bleeding. Sixty-two patients with melena or bright red blood per rectum had positive scintiscans. In comparison to results of angiography, endoscopy, surgery and contrast radiography, radionuclide scintigraphy correctly located the site of bleeding in 83% of patients. The procedures could be performed over a 24 hr period which increased the sensitivity of the test since 85% of the scintiscans were positive at one hr or greater after the onset of imaging. The procedure was more sensitive than angiography in detecting sources of GI bleeding. We conclude that GI bleeding scintigraphy /sup 99m/Tc-red cells in an accurate and effective method to detect upper and lower GI bleeding in patients with acute intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding.

  4. [Management of gastrointestinal bleeding in Veneto Region, Italy].

    PubMed

    Saia, M; Callegaro, G; Pilerci, C; Pietrobon, F

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GB) is still a common medical emergency and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. There is clear evidence that early endoscopic intervention is effective in reducing mortality, length of stay and surgery procedures utilization in high-risk patients. In the last decades advances in medical practice and in endoscopic technology have influenced the management of GB, but their impact on the incidence and mortality is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively time trends (2000-2007) in GB hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality, and describe the organization of endoscopic services of Veneto region, Italy. Data were collected from regional database of hospital discharge from 2000 to 2007 and all patients with an ICD 9-CM discharge diagnosis of GB were included. Overall hospitalization and in-hospital mortality rates were respectively 99.3 and 4.5 per 100.000 inh./year, the last being related to older age. Surgery procedures utilization was 5%. Hospitalization and mortality rates decreased significantly over years, probably owing to advances in the acute management of GB, principally represented by endoscopic procedures.

  5. Efficacy of lactulose in the prophylaxis of hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients presenting gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Aires, Felipe Toyama; Ramos, Paola Teruya; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a bad prognostic factor in patients with liver cirrhosis and its incidence is associated with several triggering factors being the most prevalent gastrointestinal bleeding. Lactulose, despite its questionable efficacy in the literature, is considered a first line treatment in patients with HE. To evaluate the effectiveness of lactulose in preventing HE in cirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. A systematic review of the literature using the Medline scientific database. Only randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of lactulose for HE prophylaxis in cirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal bleeding were included. The incidence of HE in the intervention group was 7%, while the control group was 26% (p=0.01). There was no significant difference in the incidence of mortality in the group treated with lactulose compared to the group that was not treated (p=0.48). Administering lactulose to cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding reduces the incidence of hepatic encephalopathy.

  6. Splenic Pseudoaneursym as the Cause of Recurrent Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Woman With Diffuse Scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Joshua; Protano, Marion-Anna; Jaffin, Barry

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman with a 15-year history of intestinal scleroderma presented with recurrent melena. Upper endoscopies revealed a healing, non-bleeding, large gastric ulcer. After the third bleed, angiography demonstrated bleeding from a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm adjacent to the gastric ulcer. Scleroderma patients are at risk of bleeding from esophagitis or gastric arteriovenous malformations, while splenic artery pseudoaneurysms are primarily attributed to pancreatitis and trauma. This is the first reported case of gastrointestinal bleeding from a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm in a patient with intestinal scleroderma and a large gastric ulcer.

  7. Hyaluronic acid solution injection for upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed conventional endoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyung Hun

    2014-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be an additional endoscopic modality for controlling bleeding in difficult cases when other techniques have failed. We evaluated 12 cases in which we used hyaluronic acid solution injection for stopping bleeding. Immediately following hyaluronic acid solution injection, bleeding was controlled in 11 out of 12 cases. There was no clinical evidence of renewed bleeding in 11 cases during follow up.Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be a simple and efficient additional method for controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed endoscopic therapy.

  8. Angioleiomyoma of the small intestine – a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Sadat, Umar; Theivacumar, NS; Vat, Joe; Jah, Asif

    2007-01-01

    Background Benign tumors are a rare cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage of which angioleiomyomas constitute a very small minority. They have been reported in literature to present with volvulus, bleeding or intussusceptions. Case presentation An interesting case of a patient presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding from an underlying angioleiomyoma is discussed along with its management options. Conclusion Angioleiomyoma though rare can be managed successfully by surgical and/or minimally invasive endovascular procedures. PMID:17996042

  9. [Historical schedule of management of bleeding from the upper part of gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Jacek; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy

    2009-05-01

    Treatment of bleeding from the upper part of gastrointestinal tract were changed many times. First there were waiting (Hipocrates, Sydenham, Stahl), next transfusion of the blood were initiated (Denis, Blundell, Dieffenbach, Bierkowski, Dungren, Hirszfeld). Big (Rydygier) and small (Dragstedt) operations procedures were attempted. Discovery of endoscopy of gastrointestinal tract (Mikulicz) and initiation of elastic scopes (Hirschowitz) and exploration inhibitor of histamine receptors (H2) and proton pump inhibitors with recognition of role Helicobacter pylori in bleeding were permitted elaborate actual schemas of proceedings.

  10. Rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding owing to hepatic cancer invasion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Ding; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hong-Guo; Chen, Yuan; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Zhao, Da-Jian; Hu, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-21

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding refers to bleeding that arises from the gastrointestinal tract proximal to the ligament of Treitz. The primary reason for gastrointestinal bleeding associated with hepatocellular carcinoma is rupture of a varicose vein owing to pericardial hypotension. We report a rare case of gastrointestinal bleeding with hepatocellular carcinoma in a patient who presented with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding. The initial diagnosis was gastric cancer with metastasis to the multiple lymph nodes of the lesser curvature. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, which identified two lesions in the gastric wall. Total gastrectomy and hepatic local excision was then performed. Pathological results indicated that the hepatocellular carcinoma had invaded the stomach directly, which was confirmed immunohistochemically. The patient is alive with a disease-free survival of 1 year since the surgery. Hepatocellular carcinoma with gastric invasion should be considered as a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in hepatocellular carcinoma patients, especially with lesions located in the left lateral hepatic lobe. Surgery is the best solution.

  11. Efficacy of ankaferd blood stopper application on non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Gokhan; Goktepe, M Hakan; Biyik, Murat; Polat, Ilker; Tuna, Tuncer; Ataseven, Huseyin; Demir, Ali

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively assess the hemostatic efficacy of the endoscopic topical use of ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) in active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal system (GIS) bleeding. METHODS: Endoscopy was performed on 220 patients under suspiciency of GIS bleeding. Patients with active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) with a spurting or oozing type were included. Firstly, 8-10 cc of isotonic saline was sprayed to bleeding lesions. Then, 8 cc of ABS was applied on lesions in which bleeding continued after isotonic saline application. The other endoscopic therapeutic methods were applied on the lesions in which the bleeding did not stop after ABS. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients had an active NVUGIB with a spurting or oozing type and 193 patients were excluded from the study since they did not have non-variceal active bleeding. 8 cc of ABS was sprayed on to the lesions of 26 patients whose bleeding continued after isotonic saline and in 19 of them, bleeding stopped after ABS. Other endoscopic treatment methods were applied to the remaining patients and the bleeding was stopped with these interventions in 6 of 7 patients. CONCLUSION: ABS is an effective method on NVUGIB, particularly on young patients with no coagulopathy. ABS may be considered as part of a combination treatment with other endoscopic methods. PMID:23293725

  12. Scintigraphic diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99/. mu. Tc-labeled blood-pool agents

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiak, J.; Nielsen, S.; Munck, O.

    1981-11-01

    Abdominal scintigraphy with /sup 99/..mu..Tc-labeled albumin or red blood cells was used in 68 patients to localize gastrointestinal bleeding or confirm that it had stopped. Acute, active bleeding was identified in 33 patients; characteristic patterns of bleeding from the stomach, biliary passages, small intestine, and colon are shown. Sensitivity was 0.86 (95% confidence limits, 0.57-0.98) and specificity was 1.0 (95% confidence limits, 0.82-1.0) in 33 patients who had scintigraphy and endoscopy performed in succession. Abdominal scintigraphy appears to be a valuable supplement to conventional diagnostic methods. In upper gastrointestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be considered when endoscopy fails. In lower intestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be the method of choice.

  13. Scintigraphic diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99/mTc-labeled blood-pool agents

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiak, J.; Nielsen, S.L.; Munck, O.

    1981-01-01

    Abdominal scintigraphy with /sup 99/mTc-labeled albumin or red blood cells was used in 68 patients to localize gastrointestinal bleeding or confirm that it had stopped. Acute, active bleeding was identified in 33 patients; characteristic patterns of bleeding from the stomach, biliary passages, small intestine, and colon are shown. Sensitivity was 0.86 (95% confidence limits, 0.57-0.98) and specificity was 1.0 (95% confidence limits, 0.82-1.0) in 33 patients who had scintigraphy and endoscopy performed in succession. Abdominal scintigraphy appears to be a valuable supplement to conventional diagnostic methods. In upper gastrointestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be considered when endoscopy fails. In lower intestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be the method of choice.

  14. Protons pump inhibitor treatment and lower gastrointestinal bleeding: Balancing risks and benefits

    PubMed Central

    Lué, Alberto; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a milestone in the treatment of acid-related diseases, and are the mainstay in preventing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in high-risk patients treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or low-dose aspirin. However, this beneficial effect does not extend to the lower gastrointestinal tract. PPIs do not prevent NSAID or aspirin-associated lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGB). PPIs may increase both small bowel injury related to NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin treatment and the risk of LGB. Recent studies suggested that altering intestinal microbiota by PPIs may be involved in the pathogenesis of NSAID-enteropathy. An increase in LGB hospitalization rates may occur more frequently in older patients with more comorbidities and are associated with high hospital resource utilization, longer hospitalization, and increased mortality. Preventive strategies for NSAID and aspirin-associated gastrointestinal bleeding should be directed toward preventing both upper and lower gastrointestinal damage. Future research should be directed toward identifying patients at low-risk for gastrointestinal events associated with the use of NSAIDs or aspirin to avoid inappropriate PPI prescribing. Alternatively, the efficacy of new pharmacologic strategies should be evaluated in high-risk groups, with the aim of reducing the risk of both upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding in these patients. PMID:28082800

  15. Protons pump inhibitor treatment and lower gastrointestinal bleeding: Balancing risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Lué, Alberto; Lanas, Angel

    2016-12-28

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a milestone in the treatment of acid-related diseases, and are the mainstay in preventing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in high-risk patients treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or low-dose aspirin. However, this beneficial effect does not extend to the lower gastrointestinal tract. PPIs do not prevent NSAID or aspirin-associated lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGB). PPIs may increase both small bowel injury related to NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin treatment and the risk of LGB. Recent studies suggested that altering intestinal microbiota by PPIs may be involved in the pathogenesis of NSAID-enteropathy. An increase in LGB hospitalization rates may occur more frequently in older patients with more comorbidities and are associated with high hospital resource utilization, longer hospitalization, and increased mortality. Preventive strategies for NSAID and aspirin-associated gastrointestinal bleeding should be directed toward preventing both upper and lower gastrointestinal damage. Future research should be directed toward identifying patients at low-risk for gastrointestinal events associated with the use of NSAIDs or aspirin to avoid inappropriate PPI prescribing. Alternatively, the efficacy of new pharmacologic strategies should be evaluated in high-risk groups, with the aim of reducing the risk of both upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding in these patients.

  16. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Probable Case of Cerebroretinal Microangiopathy with Calcifications and Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, T.A.; Hubbard, M.; Hawkins, C.; Cole, T.; Livingston, J.H.; Crow, Y.J.; Pigott, A.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts (CRMCC) is a highly pleiotropic disorder, particularly affecting the eye, brain, bone, and gut. The potential catastrophic sequelae of the associated gastrointestinal phenotype, variably characterised by both chronic bleeding and liver failure, is becoming increasingly apparent. Here we report a probable case of CRMCC with pre- and postnatal growth restriction, bilateral exudative retinopathy, a pathognomonic pattern of intracranial calcification, white matter disease, osteopenia with a tendency to fractures, and chronic gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to abnormal dilated vasculature. The gastrointestinal endoscopic findings were characteristic of gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE). Treatment with a combination of oral oestrogen and progesterone ameliorated the gastrointestinal blood loss such that monthly blood transfusions could be stopped. The benefit of this relatively benign therapy in managing the potentially life-limiting consequences of an abnormal gastrointestinal vasculature in CRMCC is of great interest. PMID:21373254

  17. A typical presentation of a rare cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Stefan; Bettenworth, Dominik; Mees, Sören Torge; Neumann, Jörg; Beyna, Torsten; Domschke, Wolfram; Wessling, Johannes; Ullerich, Hansjörg

    2011-01-01

    A 52-year-old white woman had suffered from intermittent gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding for one year. Upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy and peroral double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) did not detect any bleeding source, suggesting obscure GI bleeding. However, in videocapsule endoscopy a jejunal ulceration without bleeding signs was suspected and this was endoscopically confirmed by another peroral DBE. After transfusion of packed red blood cells, the patient was discharged from our hospital in good general condition. Two weeks later she was readmitted because of another episode of acute bleeding. Multi-detector row computed tomography with 3D reconstruction was performed revealing a jejunal tumor causing lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy with partial jejunal resection and end-to-end jejunostomy for reconstruction. Histological examination of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis of a low risk gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Nine days after surgery the patient was discharged in good health. No signs of gastrointestinal rebleeding occurred in a follow-up of eight months. We herein describe the complex presentation and course of this patient with GIST and also review the current approach to treatment. PMID:21403816

  18. Long Term Use of Aspirin and the Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Edward S.; Strate, Lisa L.; Ho, Wendy W.; Lee, Salina S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    Background In short-term trials, aspirin is associated with gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the effect of dose and duration of aspirin use on risk remains unclear. Methods We conducted a prospective study of 87,680 women enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study in 1990 who provided biennial data on aspirin use. We examined the relative risk (RR) of major gastrointestinal bleeding requiring hospitalization or blood transfusion. Results Over a 24-year follow-up, 1537 women reported a major gastrointestinal bleeding. Among women who used aspirin regularly (≥2 standard [325-mg] tablets/week), the multivariate RR of gastrointestinal bleeding was 1.43 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.29-1.59) compared with non-regular users. Compared with women who denied any aspirin use, the multivariate RRs of gastrointestinal bleeding were 1.03 (95% CI, 0.85-1.24) for women who used 0.5 to 1.5 standard aspirin tablets/week, 1.30 (95% CI, 1.07-1.58) for 2 to 5 tablets/week, 1.77 (95% CI, 1.44-2.18) for 6-14 tablets/week, and 2.24 (95% CI, 1.66-3.03) for >14 tablets/week (Ptrend<.001). Similar dose-response relationships were observed among short-terms users (≤ 5 years; Ptrend<.001) and long-term users (>5 years; Ptrend<.001). In contrast, after adjustments were made for dose, increasing duration of use did not confer greater risk of bleeding (Ptrend=0.28). Conclusions Regular aspirin use is associated with gastrointestinal bleeding. Risk appears more strongly related to dose than duration of aspirin use. Efforts to minimize adverse effects of aspirin therapy should emphasize using the lowest effective dose among both short-term and long-term users. PMID:21531232

  19. Elevated C-reactive protein level predicts lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding

    PubMed Central

    TOMIZAWA, MINORU; SHINOZAKI, FUMINOBU; HASEGAWA, RUMIKO; SHIRAI, YOSHINORI; MOTOYOSHI, YASUFUMI; SUGIYAMA, TAKAO; YAMAMOTO, SHIGENORI; ISHIGE, NAOKI

    2016-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding can be caused by colorectal polyps or cancer. The aim of the present study was to identify blood test variables and medications that can predict lower GI bleeding, which would allow for appropriate colonoscopy. The medical records of patients who underwent colonoscopy from September 2014 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The selected patients included 278 men (mean age, 67.0±11.5 years) and 249 women (mean age, 69.6±12.0 years). The diagnosis, medications, and blood test variables were compared between patients with and without bleeding. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the factors associated with lower GI bleeding. The presence of colorectal polyp and cancer was associated with lower GI bleeding (P=0.0044) with an odds ratio of 6.71 (P=0.0148). No lower GI bleeding was observed in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, or anticoagulants. The C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were significantly higher in patients with lower GI bleeding (P=0.0227). The Hb levels were lower in patients with lower GI bleeding, however this finding was not statistically significant (P>0.05). No blood test variable was associated with lower GI bleeding. Elevated CRP was associated with lower GI bleeding, while there was no association between the medications and lower GI bleeding. PMID:27284411

  20. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  1. Rescue endoscopic bleeding control for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage using clipping and detachable snaring.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Kim, B K; Seol, D C; Byun, S J; Park, K H; Sung, I K; Park, H S; Shim, C S

    2013-06-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding recurs after appropriate endoscopic therapy in 10 % - 15 % of cases. The mortality rate can be as high as 25 % when bleeding recurs, but there is no consensus about the best modality for endoscopic re-treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate clipping and detachable snaring (CDS) for rescue endoscopic control of nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage. We report a case series of seven patients from a Korean tertiary center who underwent endoscopic hemostasis using the combined method of detachable snares with hemoclips. The success rate of endoscopic hemostasis with CDS was 86 %: six of the seven patients who had experienced primary endoscopic treatment failure or recurrent bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis were treated successfully. In conclusion, rescue endoscopic bleeding control by means of CDS is an option for controlling nonvariceal UGI bleeding when no other method of endoscopic treatment for recurrent bleeding and primary hemostatic failure is possible. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis with refractory ulcer disease and gastrointestinal bleeding as a rare manifestation of seronegative gastrointestinal food allergy.

    PubMed

    Raithel, Martin; Hahn, Markus; Donhuijsen, Konrad; Hagel, Alexander F; Nägel, Andreas; Rieker, Ralf J; Neurath, Markus F; Reinshagen, Max

    2014-09-17

    Gastrointestinal bleeding and iron deficiency anaemia may cause severe symptoms and may require extensive diagnostics and substantial amounts of health resources.This case report focuses on the clinical presentation of a 22 year old patient with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding from multilocular non-healing ulcers of the stomach, duodenum and jejunum over a period of four years. Extensive gastroenterological and allergological standard diagnostic procedures showed benign ulcerative lesions with tissue eosinophilia, but no conclusive diagnosis. Multiple diagnostic procedures were performed, until finally, endoscopically guided segmental gut lavage identified locally produced, intestinal IgE antibodies by fluoro-enzyme-immunoassay.IgE antibody concentrations at the intestinal level were found to be more-fold increased for total IgE and food-specific IgE against nuts, rye flour, wheat flour, pork, beef and egg yolk compared with healthy controls.Thus, a diet eliminating these allergens was introduced along with antihistamines and administration of a hypoallergenic formula, which resulted in complete healing of the multilocular ulcers with resolution of gastrointestinal bleeding. All gastrointestinal lesions disappeared and total serum IgE levels dropped to normal within 9 months. The patient has been in remission now for more than two years.Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is well known to induce refractory ulcer disease. In this case, the mechanisms for intestinal damage and gastrointestinal bleeding were identified as local gastrointestinal type I allergy. Therefore, future diagnostics in EG should also be focused on the intestinal level as identification of causative food-specific IgE antibodies proved to be effective to induce remission in this patient.

  3. Evaluation of technetium-99m DTPA for localization of site of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mahajan, K.K.; Ericsson, S.; Nawaz, K.; Owunwanne, A.; Kouris, K.; Higazy, E.; Awdeh, M.

    1986-11-01

    Intravenous Tc-99m DTPA was evaluated in 34 patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Active bleeding was detected in 25 patients: nine in the stomach, 12 in the duodenum, and four from esophageal varices. No active bleeding was seen in nine patients (two gastric ulcers and seven duodenal ulcers). Results were correlated with endoscopic and/or surgical findings. All completely correlated except: 1) one case of esophageal varices in which there was disagreement on the site, 2) three cases of duodenal ulcers that were not bleeding on endoscopy but showed mild oozing on delayed images and 3) one case of gastric ulcer, in which no bleeding was detected in the Tc-99m DTPA study, but was found to be bleeding at surgery 24 hours later. The Tc-99m DTPA study is a reliable method for localization of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with an agreement ratio of 85%. This method also can be used safely for follow-up of patients with intermittent bleeding. It is less invasive than endoscopy, is easily repeatable, and has the same accuracy.

  4. [Thalidomide for recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding caused by angiodysplasia: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Vega, Jorge; Goecke, Helmuth; Rodríguez, M De Los Ángeles; Vergara, M Teresa

    2011-07-01

    Chronic hemodialysis patients may have recurrent bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasia, that often is diffusely located in the digestive tract or in places difficult to reach with traditional endoscopes. Therefore, they cannot be locally treated or removed. We report a 70 years old man on chronic hemodialysis, with severe and persistent anemia due to bleeding from angiodysplasia of the small bowel. Despite administration of high doses of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, intravenous iron, folate, B6 and B12 vitamins, his hemoglobin levels were < 6.5 g/dL, becoming totally dependent on transfusions of red blood cells (up to 46 units per year). Recurrent bleeding was refractory to conventional management and we decided to use thalidomide at doses of 50-100 mg/day achieving rapid control of gastrointestinal bleeding and significant increase of hemoglobin levels, not requiring further transfusions.

  5. Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding with Rivaroxaban: A Comparative Study with Warfarin

    PubMed Central

    Tupper, Ruth; Spurr, Charles; Sifuentes, Humberto; Sridhar, Subbaramiah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with rivaroxaban has not been studied extensively. The aim of our study was to assess this risk in comparison to warfarin. Methods. We examined the medical records for patients who were started on rivaroxaban or warfarin from April 2011 to April 2013. Results. We identified 300 patients (147 on rivaroxaban versus 153 on warfarin). GI bleeding occurred in 4.8% patients with rivaroxaban when compared to 9.8% patients in warfarin group (p = 0.094). GI bleeding occurred in 8% with therapeutic doses of rivaroxaban (>10 mg/d) compared to 9.8% with warfarin (p = 0.65). Multivariate analysis showed that patients who were on rivaroxaban for ≤40 days had a higher incidence of GI bleeding than those who were on it for >40 days (OR = 2.8, p = 0.023). Concomitant use of dual antiplatelet agents was associated with increased risk of GI bleeding in the rivaroxaban group (OR = 7.4, p = 0.0378). Prior GI bleeding was also a risk factor for GI bleeding in rivaroxaban group (OR = 15.5). Conclusion. The incidence of GI bleeding was similar between rivaroxaban and warfarin. The risk factors for GI bleeding with rivaroxaban were the first 40 days of taking the drug, concomitant dual antiplatelet agents, and prior GI bleeding. PMID:26880901

  6. Gastrointestinal bleed induced by a fixed dose combination of rabeprazole and diclofenac sodium.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Vishal R; Chandail, Vijant; Khajuria, Vijay; Gillani, Zahid

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleed. Co-administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been widely suggested as one of the strategies to prevent these GI complications among NSAIDs users. Herein, we present a case of severe GI bleeding in a patient taking fixed dose combination (FDC) of rabeprazole (20 mg) and diclofenac sodium (100 SR).

  7. Gastrointestinal bleed induced by a fixed dose combination of rabeprazole and diclofenac sodium

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Vishal R.; Chandail, Vijant; Khajuria, Vijay; Gillani, Zahid

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleed. Co-administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been widely suggested as one of the strategies to prevent these GI complications among NSAIDs users. Herein, we present a case of severe GI bleeding in a patient taking fixed dose combination (FDC) of rabeprazole (20 mg) and diclofenac sodium (100 SR). PMID:25298591

  8. Management of Antiplatelet Agents and Anticoagulants in Patients with Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Neena S

    2015-07-01

    Antithrombotic drugs (anticoagulants, aspirin, and other antiplatelet agents) are used to treat cardiovascular disease and to prevent secondary thromboembolic events. These drugs are independently associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), and, when prescribed in combination, further increase the risk of adverse bleeding events. Clinical evidence to inform the choice of endoscopic hemostatic procedure, safe temporary drug cessation, and use of reversal agents is reviewed to optimize management following clinically significant GIB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to Kaposi sarcoma as initial presentation of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Sara A; Stawicki, Stanislaw P A; Forbes, Rachel C; Papadimos, Thomas J; Lindsey, David E

    2013-12-01

    Despite our decades of experience with Kaposi Sarcoma its true nature remains elusive. This angioproliferative disease of the vascular endothelium has a propensity to involve visceral organs in the immunocompromised population. There are four variants of the disease and each has its own pathogenesis and evolution. While the common sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding are familiar to surgeons and critical care physicians, here we present the exceedingly rare report of upper gastrointestinal bleeding attributable to this malady, explore its successful management, and review the various forms of Kaposi Sarcoma including the strategies in regard to their management.

  10. ACUTE UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING SECONDARY TO KAPOSI SARCOMA AS INITIAL PRESENTATION OF HIV INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Sara A.; Stawicki, Stanislaw P.A.; Forbes, Rachel C.; Papadimos, Thomas J.; Lindsey, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Despite our decades of experience with Kaposi Sarcoma its true nature remains elusive. This angioproliferative disease of the vascular endothelium has a propensity to involve visceral organs in the immunocompromised population. There are four variants of the disease and each has its own pathogenesis and evolution. While the common sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding are familiar to surgeons and critical care physicians, here we present the exceedingly rare report of upper gastrointestinal bleeding attributable to this malady, explore its successful management, and review the various forms of Kaposi Sarcoma including the strategies in regard to their management. PMID:24369327

  11. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with direct oral anticoagulants: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Burr, Nick; Lummis, Katie; Sood, Ruchit; Kane, John Samuel; Corp, Aaron; Subramanian, Venkataraman

    2017-02-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants are increasingly used for a wide range of indications. However, data are conflicting about the risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding with these drugs. We compared the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with direct oral anticoagulants, warfarin, and low-molecular-weight heparin. For this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched MEDLINE and Embase from database inception to April 1, 2016, for prospective and retrospective studies that reported the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with use of a direct oral anticoagulant compared with warfarin or low-molecular-weight heparin for all indications. We also searched the Cochrane Library for systematic reviews and assessment evaluations, the National Health Service (UK) Economic Evaluation Database, and ISI Web of Science for conference abstracts and proceedings (up to April 1, 2016). The primary outcome was the incidence of major gastrointestinal bleeding, with all gastrointestinal bleeding as a secondary outcome. We did a Bayesian network meta-analysis to produce incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% credible intervals (CrIs). We identified 38 eligible articles, of which 31 were included in the primary analysis, including 287 692 patients exposed to 230 090 years of anticoagulant drugs. The risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding with direct oral anticoagulants did not differ from that with warfarin or low-molecular-weight heparin (factor Xa vs warfarin IRR 0·78 [95% CrI 0·47-1·08]; warfarin vs dabigatran 0·88 [0·59-1·36]; factor Xa vs low-molecular-weight heparin 1·02 [0·42-2·70]; and low-molecular-weight heparin vs dabigatran 0·67 [0·20-1·82]). In the secondary analysis, factor Xa inhibitors were associated with a reduced risk of all severities of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with warfarin (0·25 [0.07-0.76]) or dabigatran (0.24 [0.07-0.77]). Our findings show no increase in risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding with direct oral anticoagulants compared with

  12. Early endoscopy in upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage: associations with recurrent bleeding, surgery, and length of hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G S; Chak, A; Way, L E; Hammar, P J; Harper, D L; Rosenthal, G E

    1999-02-01

    The impact of upper endoscopy in patients with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage treated in community practice is unknown. Thus we examined the effectiveness of endoscopy performed within 24 hours of admission (early endoscopy). Medical records of 909 consecutive hospitalized patients with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage who underwent endoscopy at 13 hospitals in a large metropolitan area were reviewed. We evaluated unadjusted and severity-adjusted associations of early endoscopy with recurrent bleeding or surgery to control hemorrhage, length of hospital stay, and associations of endoscopic therapy in patients with bleeding ulcers or varices. Early endoscopy was performed in 64% of patients and compared with delayed endoscopy and was associated with clinically significant reductions in adjusted risk of recurrent bleeding or surgery (odds ratio [OR] 0.70: 95% CI [0.44, 1.13]) and a 31% decrease in adjusted length of stay (95% CI: [24%, 37%]). In patients at high risk for recurrent bleeding, the use of early endoscopic therapy to control hemorrhage was associated with reductions in recurrent bleeding or surgery (OR 0.21: 95% CI [0.10, 0.47]) and length of stay (-31%: 95% CI [-44%, -14%). In this study of community-based practice, the routine use of endoscopy, and in selected cases endoscopic therapy, performed early in the clinical course of patients with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage was associated with reductions in length of stay and, possibly, the risk of recurrent bleeding and surgery.

  13. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome with gastrointestinal bleeding, splenic hemangiomas and left inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Kai; Wang, Fang-Yu; Zhu, Ren-Min; Liu, Jiong

    2010-03-28

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a congenital vascular anomaly characterized by a triad of varicose veins, cutaneous capillary malformation, and hypertrophy of bone and (or) soft tissue. Gastrointestinal vascular malformations in Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome may present with gastrointestinal bleeding. The majority of patients with splenic hemangiomatosis and/or left inferior vena cava are asymptomatic. We herein report a case admitted to the gastroenterology clinic with life-threatening hematochezia and symptomatic iron deficiency anemia. Due to the asymptomatic mild intermittent hematochezia, splenic hemangiomas and left inferior vena cava, the patient did not seek any help for gastrointestinal bleeding until his admittance to our department for evaluation of massive gastrointestinal bleeding. He was referred to angiography because of his serious pathogenetic condition and inefficiency of medical therapy. The method showed that hemostasis was successfully achieved in the hemorrhage site by embolism of corresponding vessels. Further endoscopy revealed vascular malformations starting from the stomach to the descending colon. On the other hand, computed tomography revealed splenic hemangiomas and left inferior vena cava. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome case presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding, splenic hemangiomas and left inferior vena cava. The literature on the evaluation and management of this case is reviewed.

  14. Prognostic factors for recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding due to Dieulafoy's lesion.

    PubMed

    Jamanca-Poma, Yuliana; Velasco-Guardado, Antonio; Piñero-Pérez, Concepción; Calderón-Begazo, Renzo; Umaña-Mejía, Josue; Geijo-Martínez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Pérez, Antonio

    2012-10-28

    To analyze the effectiveness of the endoscopic therapy and to identify prognostic factors for recurrent bleeding. Retrospective study of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to Dieulafoy's lesion (DL) from 2005 to 2011. We analyzed the demographic characteristics of the patients, risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding, endoscopic findings, characteristics of the endoscopic treatment, and the recurrence of bleeding. We included cases in which endoscopy described a lesion compatible with Dieulafoy. We excluded patients who had potentially bleeding lesions such as angiodysplasia in other areas or had undergone other gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. Twenty-nine patients with DL were identified. Most of them were men with an average age of 71.5 years. Fifty-five percent of the patients received antiaggregatory or anticoagulant therapy. The most common location for DL was the stomach (51.7%). The main type of bleeding was oozing in 65.5% of cases. In 27.6% of cases, there was arterial (spurting) bleeding, and 6.9% of the patients presented with an adherent clot. A single endoscopic treatment was applied to nine patients (31%); eight of them with adrenaline and one with argon, while 69% of the patients received combined treatment. Six patients (20.7%) presented with recurrent bleeding at a median of 4 d after endoscopy (interquartile range = 97.75). Within these six patients, the new endoscopic treatment obtained a therapeutic success of 100%. The presence of arterial bleeding at endoscopy was associated with a higher recurrence rate for bleeding (50% vs 33.3% for other type of bleeding) [P = 0.024, odds ratio (OR) = 8.5, 95% CI = 1.13-63.87]. The use of combined endoscopic treatment prevented the recurrence of bleeding (10% vs 44.4% of single treatment) (P = 0.034, OR = 0.14, 95% CI = 0.19-0.99). Endoscopic treatment of DL is safe and effective. Adrenaline monotherapy and arterial (spurting) bleeding are associated with a high rate of bleeding

  15. Prognostic factors for recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding due to Dieulafoy's lesion

    PubMed Central

    Jamanca-Poma, Yuliana; Velasco-Guardado, Antonio; Piñero-Pérez, Concepción; Calderón-Begazo, Renzo; Umaña-Mejía, Josue; Geijo-Martínez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Pérez, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the effectiveness of the endoscopic therapy and to identify prognostic factors for recurrent bleeding. METHODS: Retrospective study of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to Dieulafoy’s lesion (DL) from 2005 to 2011. We analyzed the demographic characteristics of the patients, risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding, endoscopic findings, characteristics of the endoscopic treatment, and the recurrence of bleeding. We included cases in which endoscopy described a lesion compatible with Dieulafoy. We excluded patients who had potentially bleeding lesions such as angiodysplasia in other areas or had undergone other gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. RESULTS: Twenty-nine patients with DL were identified. Most of them were men with an average age of 71.5 years. Fifty-five percent of the patients received antiaggregatory or anticoagulant therapy. The most common location for DL was the stomach (51.7%). The main type of bleeding was oozing in 65.5% of cases. In 27.6% of cases, there was arterial (spurting) bleeding, and 6.9% of the patients presented with an adherent clot. A single endoscopic treatment was applied to nine patients (31%); eight of them with adrenaline and one with argon, while 69% of the patients received combined treatment. Six patients (20.7%) presented with recurrent bleeding at a median of 4 d after endoscopy (interquartile range = 97.75). Within these six patients, the new endoscopic treatment obtained a therapeutic success of 100%. The presence of arterial bleeding at endoscopy was associated with a higher recurrence rate for bleeding (50% vs 33.3% for other type of bleeding) [P = 0.024, odds ratio (OR) = 8.5, 95% CI = 1.13-63.87]. The use of combined endoscopic treatment prevented the recurrence of bleeding (10% vs 44.4% of single treatment) (P = 0.034, OR = 0.14, 95% CI = 0.19-0.99). CONCLUSION: Endoscopic treatment of DL is safe and effective. Adrenaline monotherapy and arterial (spurting) bleeding are

  16. Technetium sulfur colloid scintigraphy in the detection of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, A.J.; Previti, F.W.

    1982-07-01

    /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid scintigraphy is a technique which can be used to localize sites of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Two reports of patients illustrate its use clinically. This procedure is non-invasive, relatively inexpensive, easily performed and has a high degree of sensitivity. The technique may, in some instances, replace angiography or endoscopy as the initial procedure used to diagnose the site of lower gastrointestinal bleeding or, more likely, serve as a complementary diagnostic modality.

  17. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Intestinal Histoplasmosis in a Renal Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Salem, George; Kastens, Donald J.

    2017-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is the most common endemic mycosis in the United States. Symptomatic gastrointestinal histoplasmosis is a rare entity. We report a case of isolated intestinal histoplasmosis that manifested as severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding in a renal transplant patient. The patient developed hematochezia, and colonoscopy showed diffuse, extensive areas of cratered, ulcerated mucosa in the entire colon. Biopsy showed prominent mucosal and submucosal infiltrate of plump histiocytes containing intracytoplasmic yeast forms morphologically compatible with florid histoplasmosis. PMID:28798941

  18. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Intestinal Histoplasmosis in a Renal Transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Syed, Taseen A; Salem, George; Kastens, Donald J

    2017-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is the most common endemic mycosis in the United States. Symptomatic gastrointestinal histoplasmosis is a rare entity. We report a case of isolated intestinal histoplasmosis that manifested as severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding in a renal transplant patient. The patient developed hematochezia, and colonoscopy showed diffuse, extensive areas of cratered, ulcerated mucosa in the entire colon. Biopsy showed prominent mucosal and submucosal infiltrate of plump histiocytes containing intracytoplasmic yeast forms morphologically compatible with florid histoplasmosis.

  19. Discharge hemoglobin and outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Eun Sun; Chun, Hoon Jai; Hwang, Young-Jae; Lee, Jae Hyung; Kang, Seung Hun; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Many patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding present with anemia and frequently require red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. A restrictive transfusion strategy and a low hemoglobin (Hb) threshold for transfusion had been shown to produce acceptable outcomes in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, most patients are discharged with mild anemia owing to the restricted volume of packed RBCs (pRBCs). We investigated whether discharge Hb influences the outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding who had received pRBCs during hospitalization between January 2012 and January 2014. Patients with variceal bleeding, malignant lesion, stroke, or cardiovascular disease were excluded. We divided the patients into 2 groups, low (8 g/dL ≤ Hb < 10 g/dL) and high (Hb ≥ 10 [g/dL]) discharge Hb, and compared the clinical course and Hb changes between these groups. Results: A total of 102 patients met the inclusion criteria. Fifty patients were discharged with Hb levels < 10 g/dL, whereas 52 were discharged with Hb levels > 10 g/dL. Patients in the low Hb group had a lower consumption of pRBCs and shorter hospital stay than did those in the high Hb group. The Hb levels were not fully recovered at outpatient follow-up until 7 days after discharge; however, most patients showed Hb recovery at 45 days after discharge. The rate of rebleeding after discharge was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Conclusions: In patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, a discharge Hb between 8 and 10 g/dL was linked to favorable outcomes on outpatient follow-up. Most patients recovered from anemia without any critical complication within 45 days after discharge. PMID:27540574

  20. Jejunal intussusception: a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Akter, Farhana; Harilingam, Mohanraj

    2012-11-21

    Intussusception is an important cause of abdominal pain in the paediatric population and is the most common abdominal emergency in early childhood. Intussusception in adults is, however, rare and can lead to diagnostic challenges for admitting physicians/surgeons. We present a case of a 76-year-old lady with history of a recent myocardial infarction and vasculitis presenting with melaena and bleeding per rectum, with suspicion of haematochezia. She complained of abdominal pain but was not clinically obstructed. Gastroscopy performed was negative. Colonoscopy was attempted; however, it was inconclusive because of active bleeding. A CT angiogram of the abdomen was performed, which showed a jejunal intussusception. There was no evidence of vasculitis or small bowel obstruction. She was not considered fit for surgery and was managed conservatively.

  1. Jejunal intussusception: a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Farhana; Harilingam, Mohanraj

    2012-01-01

    Intussusception is an important cause of abdominal pain in the paediatric population and is the most common abdominal emergency in early childhood. Intussusception in adults is, however, rare and can lead to diagnostic challenges for admitting physicians/surgeons. We present a case of a 76-year-old lady with history of a recent myocardial infarction and vasculitis presenting with melaena and bleeding per rectum, with suspicion of haematochezia. She complained of abdominal pain but was not clinically obstructed. Gastroscopy performed was negative. Colonoscopy was attempted; however, it was inconclusive because of active bleeding. A CT angiogram of the abdomen was performed, which showed a jejunal intussusception. There was no evidence of vasculitis or small bowel obstruction. She was not considered fit for surgery and was managed conservatively. PMID:23175009

  2. Poor outcomes in hospitalized patients with gastrointestinal bleeding: impact of baseline risk, bleeding severity, and process of care.

    PubMed

    Jairath, Vipul; Thompson, J; Kahan, B C; Daniel, R; Hearnshaw, S A; Travis, S P L; Murphy, M F; Palmer, K R; Logan, R F A

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have found higher mortality rates among inpatients (IPs) compared with new admissions (outpatients, OPs) with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB), but no studies have investigated the cause for this. The objective of this study was to determine whether the difference in outcomes between IPs and OPs with AUGIB can be explained by differences in baseline characteristics, bleeding severity, or processes of care. Data were collected from 6,657 presentations with all-cause AUGIB from 212 UK hospitals as part of a nationwide audit. IPs were older (77 vs. 65 years, P<0.001), had greater comorbidity, and presented with more severe bleeding. There was no difference in median time to endoscopy (24 vs. 24 h, P=0.67) or receipt of endotherapy (19% vs. 17%, P=0.29). IPs had an odds of mortality 4.8 times that of OPs (26% vs. 7%; odds ratio (OR) 4.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.9-5.8); after adjusting for baseline characteristics, this fell by 24% to 3.3 (95% CI 3.2-4.9) and after adjusting for bleeding severity alone to 4.0 (95% CI 3.2-4.9); adjusting for care processes had minimal effect. IPs had more than a twofold increased odds of rebleeding (20% vs. 12%; OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.7-2.5); adjusting for both baseline characteristics and severity of bleeding reduced this by 50% (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.3-2.4), but process of care had no additional impact. IPs present with both higher baseline risks and more severe bleeding. These differences in baseline characteristics explain some but not all of the greater mortality of IPs with AUGIB.

  3. Capsule endoscopy or push enteroscopy for first-line exploration of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    de Leusse, Antoine; Vahedi, Kouroche; Edery, Joël; Tiah, Djamel; Fery-Lemonnier, Elisabeth; Cellier, Christophe; Bouhnik, Yoram; Jian, Raymond

    2007-03-01

    The position of capsule endoscopy (CE) relative to push enteroscopy (PE) in the diagnostic algorithm of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is unclear, as previous studies involved the use of both techniques in all patients. We therefore conducted a trial in which patients were randomized to undergo one or other exploration. All consecutive patients referred for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding were randomized between CE and PE as the first-line exploration. The alternative method was only used if the first-line method revealed no definite bleeding source, or if required for clinical reasons during follow-up. CE and PE, used as the first-line exploration, identified a bleeding source in 20 of 40 patients and 9 of 38 patients, respectively (50% vs 24%; P = .02). CE missed lesions in 8% of patients, and all these lesions were located in sites accessible to standard endoscopy. PE missed lesions in 26% of patients. At the end of the 12-month follow-up period, the strategy based on CE as first-line exploration followed by PE if necessary only was similar to PE followed by CE in terms of diagnostic yield, clinical outcome, and therapeutic impact, but reduced the percentage of patients needing the alternative exploration (25% vs 79%; P < .001). CE has a higher diagnostic yield than PE in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, and a strategy based on CE as first-line exploration avoids unnecessary explorations.

  4. Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding Among Dabigatran Users – A Self Controlled Case Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wenze; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Zhou, Meijia; Singh, Sonal

    2017-01-01

    This article aims to evaluate the real world risk of gastrointestinal bleeding among users naïve to dabigatran. We adopted a self-controlled case series design. We sampled 1215 eligible adult participants who were continuous insured users between July 1, 2010 and March 31, 2012 with use of dabigatran and at least one gastrointestinal bleeding episode. We used a conditional Poisson regression to estimate incidence rate ratios. The population consisted of 64.69% of male and 60.25% patients equal to or greater than age 65 at start of observation. After adjustment for time-variant confounders, the incidence rate of gastrointestinal bleeding was similar during dabigatran risk period and non-exposed period (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90, 1.15). There was no significant difference in GI incidence rate between periods of dabigatran and warfarin (IRR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.75–1.31). Among this database of young and healthy participants, dabigatran was not associated with increased incidence rate of GI bleeding compared with non-exposed period among naïve dabigatran users. We did not detect an increased risk of GI bleeding over dabigatran vs warfarin risk period. Along with other studies on safety and effectiveness, this study should help clinicians choose the appropriate anticoagulant for their patients. PMID:28106053

  5. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide--Chances and limitations.

    PubMed

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-03-21

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely.

  6. The influence of the full moon on the number of admissions related to gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Román, Eva María; Soriano, Germán; Fuentes, Mercedes; Gálvez, María Luz; Fernández, Clotilde

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse whether the number of admissions for gastrointestinal bleeding to our bleeding unit increases during the full moon. In a prospective study, we included 447 consecutive patients with gastrointestinal haemorrhage admitted to our bleeding unit during a period of two years. The number of admissions was allocated to the corresponding day of the lunar cycle, and full moon and non-full moon days were compared. A wide variation in the number of admissions throughout the lunar cycle was observed. There were 26 admissions on the 25 days of full moon and 421 admissions in the remaining 713 days of non-full moon. This difference was mainly related to a higher incidence of haemorrhage in men and variceal haemorrhage at full moon. The results of this study suggest an increase in the number of admissions related to gastrointestinal haemorrhage in our bleeding unit during the full moon, especially in men and in patients experiencing variceal haemorrhage. However, the wide variation in the number of admissions throughout the lunar cycle could limit interpretation of the results. Therefore, further studies are needed to clarify the possible influence of the moon on gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

  7. Gallbladder visualization during technetium-99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy for gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, D.R.

    1985-12-01

    Localization of radionuclide activity in the gallbladder was seen on delayed views following injection of 99mTc-labeled red blood cells for gastrointestinal bleeding in five patients. The mechanism for this unusual finding probably relates to labeling of heme, the biochemical precursor of bilirubin. All patients had had prior transfusions. All but one had severe renal impairment, probably an important predisposing factor.

  8. Post-transfusion hyperhemolysis syndrome following gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to prehepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mejías Manzano, María de Los Ángeles; Giráldez Gallego, Álvaro; Sánchez Torrijos, Yolanda María

    2017-09-01

    Supportive transfusion represents a basic tool in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. However, the use of hemoderivatives is not exempt from risks such as development of hemolysis. We report a case of post-transfusion hyperhemolysis syndrome in a female patient with prehepatic portal hypertension.

  9. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to a rectal leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Giovanni D De; Rega, Maria; Masone, Stefania; Siciliano, Saverio; Persico, Marcello; Salvatori, Francesca; Maione, Francesco; Esposito, Dario; Bellino, Antonio; Persico, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of leiomyoma of the rectum is uncommon. Most of these lesions are clinically silent and are found incidentally during laparotomy or endoscopic procedures for unrelated conditions. Symptomatic leiomyomas of the rectum are encountered less frequently, with only sporadic reports in the literature. We describe a case of a leiomyoma of the rectum presenting as recurrent lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage and secondary anemia. PMID:19360922

  10. The natural history of occult or angiodysplastic gastrointestinal bleeding in von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Makris, M; Federici, A B; Mannucci, P M; Bolton-Maggs, P H B; Yee, T T; Abshire, T; Berntorp, E

    2015-05-01

    Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most challenging complications encountered in the management of patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD). The commonest cause is angiodysplasia, but often no cause is identified due to the difficulty in making the diagnosis. The optimal treatment to prevent recurrences remains unknown. We performed a retrospective study of VWD patients with occult or angiodysplastic bleeding within the setting of the von Willebrand Disease Prophylaxis Network (VWD PN) to describe diagnostic and treatment strategies. Centres participating in the VWD PN recruited subjects under their care with a history of congenital VWD and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding due to angiodysplasia, or cases in which the cause was not identified despite investigation. Patients with acquired von Willebrand syndrome or those for whom the GI bleeding was due to another cause were excluded. Forty-eight patients from 18 centres in 10 countries were recruited. Seven individuals had a family history of GI bleeding and all VWD types except 2N were represented. Angiodysplasia was confirmed in 38%, with video capsule endoscopy and GI tract endoscopies being the most common methods of making the diagnosis. Recurrent GI bleeding in VWD is associated with significant morbidity and required hospital admission on up to 30 occasions. Patients were treated with multiple pharmacological agents with prophylactic von Willebrand factor concentrate being the most efficient in preventing recurrence of the GI bleeding. The diagnosis and treatment of recurrent GI bleeding in congenital VWD remains challenging and is associated with significant morbidity. Prophylactic treatment with von Willebrand factor concentrate was the most effective method of preventing recurrent bleeding but its efficacy remains to be confirmed in a prospective study.

  11. Gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a continuous-flow biventricular assist device

    PubMed Central

    Mirasol, Raymond V; Tholany, Jason J; Reddy, Hasini; Fyfe-Kirschner, Billie S; Cheng, Christina L; Moubarak, Issam F; Nosher, John L

    2016-01-01

    The association between continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from angiodysplasia is well recognized. However, the association between continuous-flow biventricular assist devices (CF-BIVADs) and bleeding angiodysplasia is less understood. We report a case of GI bleeding from a patient with a CF-BIVAD. The location of GI bleeding was identified by nuclear red blood cell bleeding scan. The vascular malformation leading to the bleed was identified and localized on angiography and then by pathology. The intensity of bleeding, reflected by number of units of packed red blood cells needed for normalization of hemoglobin, as well as the time to onset of bleeding after transplantation, are similar to that seen in the literature for CF-LVADs and pulsatile BIVADs. While angiography only detected a dilated late draining vein, pathology demonstrated the presence of both arterial and venous dilation in the submucosa, vascular abnormalities characteristic of a late arteriovenous malformation. PMID:27158430

  12. Intractable Hematuria After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation: Can Lessons Learned from Gastrointestinal Bleeding Be Applied?

    PubMed

    Son, Andre Y; Zhao, Lee; Reyentovich, Alex; Deanda, Abe; Balsam, Leora B

    2016-01-01

    Patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) are at increased risk of bleeding. We reviewed our institutional experience with bleeding in the urinary tract after CF-LVAD implantation and quantified the impact on hospital resource utilization in comparison with bleeding in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the most commonly reported mucosal site of bleeding after LVAD implantation. Records were retrospectively reviewed for patients undergoing CF-LVAD implantation at our institution between October 2011 and April 2015. Major adverse events of gross hematuria and GI bleeding were identified, and patient demographics and hospital course were reviewed. Gross hematuria occurred in 3 of the 35 patients (8.6%) and in 5.1% of all hospitalizations for CF-LVAD patients. Severe hematuria occurred after traumatic urethral catheterization, urinary retention, or urologic surgery. Hospitalization for hematuria was six times less likely than hospitalization for GI bleeding; however, hematuria hospitalizations lasted 3.2 times longer than GI bleeding hospitalizations (17.0 vs. 5.3 days). Late recurrent gross hematuria occurred in all cases, with rehospitalization occurring after 109 ± 53 days. In conclusion, gross hematuria is an infrequent but morbid bleeding complication in CF-LVAD patients. Strategies to avoid this complication include strict avoidance of traumatic urethral catheterization and urinary retention in high-risk patients.

  13. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Balén, Marco; Plumé, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325 (Hemospray®), EndoClot™ polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper®. Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a second-line treatment, and they seem to be especially indicated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area. PMID:25133029

  14. Brunner's Gland Adenoma – A Rare Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Case Report and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sorleto, Michele; Timmer-Stranghöner, Annette; Wuttig, Helge; Engelhard, Oliver; Gartung, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Brunner's gland adenoma is an extremely rare benign small bowel neoplasm, often discovered incidentally during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy or radiological diagnostics. In few cases, it tends to cause gastrointestinal hemorrhage or intestinal obstruction. We report here our experience with a 47-year-old woman with a Brunner's gland adenoma of more than 6 cm in size, located in the first part of the duodenum and causing gastrointestinal bleeding. Initially, we performed a partial endoscopic resection using endoloop and snare alternatively to prevent severe bleeding. A rest endoscopic polypectomy with the submucosal dissection technique was planned. However, on request of the patient, an elective surgical duodenotomy with submucosal resection of the remaining small duodenal tumor was performed. To better define the patient's characteristics and treatment options of such lesions, we performed a systematic review of the available literature in PubMed. Recently, an endoscopic removal is being increasingly practiced and is considered as a safe treatment modality of such lesions. PMID:28203131

  15. Telemetric real-time sensor for the detection of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Schostek, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Melanie; Keller, Jan; Fode, Mario; Melbert, Michael; Schurr, Marc O; Gottwald, Thomas; Prosst, Ruediger L

    2016-04-15

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings from ulcers or esophago-gastric varices are life threatening medical conditions which require immediate endoscopic therapy. Despite successful endoscopic hemostasis, there is a significant risk of rebleeding often requiring close surveillance of these patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Any time delay to recognize bleeding may lead to a high blood loss and increases the risk of death. A novel telemetric real-time bleeding sensor can help indicate blood in the stomach: the sensor is swallowed to detect active bleeding or is anchored endoscopically on the gastrointestinal wall close to the potential bleeding source. By telemetric communication with an extra-corporeal receiver, information about the bleeding status is displayed. In this study the novel sensor, which measures characteristic optical properties of blood, has been evaluated in an ex-vivo setting to assess its clinical applicability and usability. Human venous blood of different concentrations, various fluids, and liquid food were tested. The LED-based sensor was able to reliably distinguish between concentrated blood and other liquids, especially red-colored fluids. In addition, the spectrometric quality of the small sensor (size: 6.5mm in diameter, 25.5mm in length) was comparable to a much larger and technically more complex laboratory spectrophotometer. The experimental data confirm the capability of a miniaturized sensor to identify concentrated blood, which could help in the very near future the detection of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and to survey high-risk patients for rebleeding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevention of acrylonitrile-induced gastrointestinal bleeding by sulfhydryl compounds, atropine and cimetidine

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanayem, B.I.; Ahmed, A.E.

    1986-07-01

    We have recently demonstrated that acrylonitrile (VCN) causes acute gastric hemorrhage and mucosal erosions. The current studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of the sulfhydryl-containing compounds, cysteine and cysteamine, the cholinergic blocking agent atropine and the histamine H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine on the VCN-induced gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in rats. Our data shows that pretreatment with L-cysteine, cysteamine, atropine or cimetidine has significantly protected rats against the VCN-induced GI bleeding. A possible mechanism of the VCN-induced GI bleeding may involve the interaction of VCN with critical sulfhydryl groups that, in turn, causes alteration of acetylcholine muscarinic receptors to lead to gastric hemorrhagic lesions and bleeding.

  17. Solitary tubercular caecal ulcer causing massive lower gastrointestinal bleed: a formidable diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Ram, Duvuru; Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ali, Sheik Manwar

    2014-03-06

    Gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage is a common surgical emergency accounting for approximately 1% of acute hospital admissions. Lower GI bleed is less common and less severe than upper GI bleed and is usually caused by diverticulosis, neoplasms, angiodysplasia and inflammatory bowel disease. A 51-year-old man presented with massive lower GI bleed. He had no history of tuberculosis. He underwent colonoscopy and an isolated caecal ulcer was noted. Segmental ileocaecal resection was performed and no specific cause was identifiable on histopathology. PCR was performed on this specimen and it was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This case reports the unusual presentation of tuberculosis as solitary caecal ulcer with massive lower GI bleed and highlights the role of PCR as an adjuvant diagnostic tool for its diagnosis when characteristic histopathological findings are absent.

  18. Solitary tubercular caecal ulcer causing massive lower gastrointestinal bleed: a formidable diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Duvuru; Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ali, Sheik Manwar

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage is a common surgical emergency accounting for approximately 1% of acute hospital admissions. Lower GI bleed is less common and less severe than upper GI bleed and is usually caused by diverticulosis, neoplasms, angiodysplasia and inflammatory bowel disease. A 51-year-old man presented with massive lower GI bleed. He had no history of tuberculosis. He underwent colonoscopy and an isolated caecal ulcer was noted. Segmental ileocaecal resection was performed and no specific cause was identifiable on histopathology. PCR was performed on this specimen and it was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This case reports the unusual presentation of tuberculosis as solitary caecal ulcer with massive lower GI bleed and highlights the role of PCR as an adjuvant diagnostic tool for its diagnosis when characteristic histopathological findings are absent. PMID:24604794

  19. Clostridium septicum: An Unusual Link to a Lower Gastrointestinal Bleed

    PubMed Central

    Jessamy, Kegan; Ojevwe, Fidelis O.; Ubagharaji, Ezinnaya; Sharma, Anuj; Anozie, Obiajulu; Gilman, Christy Ann; Rawlins, Sekou

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium septicum is a highly virulent pathogen which is associated with colorectal malignancy, hematological malignancy, immunosuppression, diabetes mellitus and cyclical neutropenia. Presentation may include disseminated clostridial infection in the form of septicemia, gas gangrene, and mycotic aortic aneurysms. We report the case of a 62-year-old female presenting with necrotizing fasciitis of her left thigh and subsequently developing rectal bleeding. While she was being treated with empiric antibiotics, her blood culture was found to be positive for C. septicum. We would like to highlight the importance of early colorectal cancer screening in minimizing the occurrence of undetected tumors which provide an optimal growth environment for C. septicum, leading to localized and/or remote infection. PMID:27721737

  20. A therapeutic dose of ketoprofen causes acute gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Shientag, Lisa J; Wheeler, Suzanne M; Garlick, David S; Maranda, Louise S

    2012-11-01

    Perioperative treatment of several rats in our facility with ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) resulted in blood loss, peritonitis, and death within a day to a little more than a week after surgery that was not related to the gastrointestinal tract. Published reports have established the 5-mg/kg dose as safe and effective for rats. Because ketoprofen is a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug that can damage the gastrointestinal tract, the putative diagnosis for these morbidities and mortalities was gastrointestinal toxicity caused by ketoprofen (5 mg/kg). We conducted a prospective study evaluating the effect of this therapeutic dose of ketoprofen on the rat gastrointestinal tract within 24 h. Ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) was administered to one group of rats that then received gas anesthesia for 30 min and to another group without subsequent anesthesia. A third group was injected with saline followed by 30 min of gas anesthesia. Our primary hypothesis was that noteworthy gastrointestinal bleeding and lesions would occur in both groups treated with ketoprofen but not in rats that received saline and anesthesia. Our results showed marked gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and small intestinal ulcers in the ketoprofen-treated rats and minimal damages in the saline-treated group. The combination of ketoprofen and anesthesia resulted in worse clinical signs than did ketoprofen alone. We conclude that a single 5-mg/kg dose of ketoprofen causes acute mucosal damage to the rat small intestine.

  1. A Therapeutic Dose of Ketoprofen Causes Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Erosions, and Ulcers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shientag, Lisa J; Wheeler, Suzanne M; Garlick, David S; Maranda, Louise S

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative treatment of several rats in our facility with ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) resulted in blood loss, peritonitis, and death within a day to a little more than a week after surgery that was not related to the gastrointestinal tract. Published reports have established the 5-mg/kg dose as safe and effective for rats. Because ketoprofen is a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug that can damage the gastrointestinal tract, the putative diagnosis for these morbidities and mortalities was gastrointestinal toxicity caused by ketoprofen (5 mg/kg). We conducted a prospective study evaluating the effect of this therapeutic dose of ketoprofen on the rat gastrointestinal tract within 24 h. Ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) was administered to one group of rats that then received gas anesthesia for 30 min and to another group without subsequent anesthesia. A third group was injected with saline followed by 30 min of gas anesthesia. Our primary hypothesis was that noteworthy gastrointestinal bleeding and lesions would occur in both groups treated with ketoprofen but not in rats that received saline and anesthesia. Our results showed marked gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and small intestinal ulcers in the ketoprofen-treated rats and minimal damages in the saline-treated group. The combination of ketoprofen and anesthesia resulted in worse clinical signs than did ketoprofen alone. We conclude that a single 5-mg/kg dose of ketoprofen causes acute mucosal damage to the rat small intestine. PMID:23294892

  2. [Upper gastrointestinal bleeding after cardiac surgery and invasive cardiology procedures--prophylaxis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Davidkov, L; Evstatiev, I; Chirkov, A

    2005-01-01

    The abdominal complications after cardiac surgery prolong the hospitalization and increase the cost. The operative treatment of these complications is having high mortality rate--up to 85%. In this study we investigated the upper gastrointestinal bleeding: the causes, the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and the difficulties of the treatment. From January to December 2003, 724 cardiac operations were performed in University Hospital "Saint Ekaterina", Sofia 2771 angiographies, 594 angioplasties, and 874 stent implantations were done as well. 380 upper GI endoscopies were performed for this period. Upper GI bleeding was found in 27 cases. We used Somatostatin and Omeprasol treatment protocol in the cases of acute upper GI bleeding and for bleeding prophylaxis in patients with previously diagnosed stomach or duodenal erosions and ulcers. Endoscopic sclerotherapy was performed in 9 cases to achieve control of the bleeding. We had no relapses of the bleeding. No open surgical procedures were necessary, and we had no mortalities due to upper GI bleeding during the study period.

  3. Juvenile polyposis syndrome: An unusual case report of anemia and gastrointestinal bleeding in young infant.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Han; Wei, Chin-Hung; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chang, Lung; Fu, Yu-Wei; Lee, Hung-Chang; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Yeung, Chun-Yan

    2016-09-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome, a rare disorder in children, is characterized with multiple hamartomatous polyps in alimentary tract. A variety of manifestations include bleeding, intussusception, or polyp prolapse. In this study, we present an 8-month-old male infant of juvenile polyposis syndrome initially presenting with chronic anemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest case reported in the literature. We report a rare case of an 8-month-old male infant who presented with chronic anemia and gastrointestinal bleeding initially. Panendoscopy and abdominal computed tomography showed multiple polyposis throughout the entire alimentary tract leading to intussusception. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell (RBC) bleeding scan revealed the possibility of gastrointestinal tract bleeding in the jejunum. Histopathological examination on biopsy samples showed Peutz-Jeghers syndrome was excluded, whereas the diagnosis of juvenile polyposis syndrome was established. Enteroscopic polypectomy is the mainstay of the treatment. However, polyps recurred and occupied the majority of the gastrointestinal tract in 6 months. Supportive management was given. The patient expired for severe sepsis at the age of 18 months. Juvenile polyposis syndrome is an inherited disease, so it is not possible to prevent it. Concerning of its poor outcome and high mortality rate, it is important that we should increase awareness and education of the parents at its earliest stages.

  4. Duodenal plexiform fibromyxoma as a cause of obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Moris, Demetrios; Spanou, Evangelia; Sougioultzis, Stavros; Dimitrokallis, Nikolaos; Kalisperati, Polyxeni; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Felekouras, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: We are reporting the first-to our knowledge-case of duodenal Plexiform Fibromyxoma causing obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patient concerns: Plexiform fibromyxoma triggered recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding episodes in a 63-year-old man who remained undiagnosed, despite multiple hospitalizations, extensive diagnostic workups and surgical interventions (including gastrectomies), for almost 17 years. Diagnoses-Interventions: During hospitalization for the last bleeding episode, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed an intestinal hemorrhagic nodule. The lesion was deemed unresectable by endoscopic means. An abdominal computerized tomography disclosed no further lesions and surgery was decided. The lesion at operation was found near the edge of the duodenal stump and treated with pancreas-preserving duodenectomy (1st and 2nd portion). Outcomes: Postoperative recovery was mainly uneventful and a 20-month follow-up finds the patient in good health with no need for blood transfusions. Plexiform fibromyxomas stand for a rare and widely unknown mesenchymal entity. Despite the fact that they closely resemble other gastrointestinal tumors, they distinctly vary in clinical management as well as the histopathology. Clinical awareness and further research are compulsory to elucidate its clinical course and prognosis. PMID:28072751

  5. Use of Provocative Angiography to Localize Site in Recurrent Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Ciaran Tuite, David; Pritchard, Ruth; Reynolds, John; McEniff, Niall; Ryan, J. Mark

    2007-09-15

    Background. While the source of most cases of lower gastrointestinal bleeding may be diagnosed with modern radiological and endoscopic techniques, approximately 5% of patients remain who have negative endoscopic and radiological investigations.Clinical Problem. These patients require repeated hospital admissions and blood transfusions, and may proceed to exploratory laparotomy and intraoperative endoscopy. The personal and financial costs are significant. Method of Diagnosis and Decision Making. The technique of adding pharmacologic agents (anticoagulants, vasodilators, fibrinolytics) during standard angiographic protocols to induce a prohemorrhagic state is termed provocative angiography. It is best employed when significant bleeding would otherwise necessitate emergency surgery. Treatment. This practice frequently identifies a bleeding source (reported success rates range from 29 to 80%), which may then be treated at the same session. We report the case of a patient with chronic lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage with consistently negative endoscopic and radiological workup, who had an occult source of bleeding identified only after a provocative angiographic protocol was instituted, and who underwent succeeding therapeutic coil embolization of the bleeding vessel.

  6. Time trends and outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding in the Veneto region: a retrospective population based study from 2001 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Lucas G; Monica, Fabio; Germanà, Bastianello; Marin, Renato; Sturniolo, Giacomo C; Saia, Mario

    2014-04-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is the most frequent emergency for gastroenterologists. Despite advances in management, an improvement in mortality is still not evident. Determining time trends of gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalization and outcomes from 2001 to 2010 in the Veneto Region (Italy). Data of patients admitted with gastrointestinal bleeding from Veneto regional discharge records were retrospectively evaluated. Chi-squared and multivariate logistic regression model were used. Overall, 44,343 patients (mean age 64.2 ± 8.6 years) with gastrointestinal bleeding were analysed: 23,450 (52.9%) had upper, 13,800 (31.1%) lower, and 7093 (16%) undefined gastrointestinal bleeding. Admission rate decreased from 108.0 per 100,000 in 2001 to 80.7 in 2010, mainly owing to a decrease in upper gastrointestinal bleeding (64.4 to 35.9 per 100,000, p<0.05). Reductions in hospital fatality rate (from 5.3% to 3%, p<0.05), length of hospital stay (from 9.3 to 8.7 days, p<0.05), and need for surgery (from 5.6% to 5%, p<0.05) were observed. Surgery (OR: 2.97, 95% CI: 2.59-3.41) and undefined gastrointestinal bleeding (OR: 2.89, 95% CI: 2.62-3.19) were found to be risk factors for mortality. Patient admissions for gastrointestinal bleeding decreased significantly over the years, owing to a decrease in upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Improved outcomes could be related to regional dedicated clinical gastroenterological management. Copyright © 2013 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and upper gastrointestinal bleeding: population based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    de Abajo, Francisco José; Rodríguez, Luis Alberto García; Montero, Dolores

    1999-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Design Population based case-control study. Setting General practices included in the UK general practice research database. Subjects 1651 incident cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and 248 cases of ulcer perforation among patients aged 40 to 79 years between April 1993 and September 1997, and 10 000 controls matched for age, sex, and year that the case was identified. Interventions Review of computer profiles for all potential cases, and an internal validation study to confirm the accuracy of the diagnosis on the basis of the computerised information. Main outcome measures Current use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or other antidepressants within 30 days before the index date. Results Current exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors was identified in 3.1% (52 of 1651) of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding but only 1.0% (95 of 10 000) of controls, giving an adjusted rate ratio of 3.0 (95% confidence interval 2.1 to 4.4). This effect measure was not modified by sex, age, dose, or treatment duration. A crude incidence of 1 case per 8000 prescriptions was estimated. A small association was found with non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (relative risk 1.4, 1.1 to 1.9) but not with antidepressants lacking this inhibitory effect. None of the groups of antidepressants was associated with ulcer perforation. The concurrent use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increased the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding beyond the sum of their independent effects (15.6, 6.6 to 36.6). A smaller interaction was also found between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and low dose aspirin (7.2, 3.1 to 17.1). Conclusions Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors increase the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The absolute effect is, however

  8. Tips and Tricks on How to Optimally Manage Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Michael W; Ginsberg, Gregory G

    2015-07-01

    Effective endoscopic therapy for upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding has been shown to reduce rebleeding, need for surgery, and mortality. Effective endoscopic management of acute upper GI bleeding can be challenging and worrying. This article provides advice that is complementary to the in-depth reviews that accompany it in this issue. Topics include initial management, resuscitation, when and where to scope, benefits and limitations of devices, device selection based on lesion characteristics, improving visualization to localize the lesion, and tips on how to reduce the endoscopist's trepidation about managing these cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Isolated Splenic Vein Thrombosis: 8-Year-Old Boy with Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Hypersplenism.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Mohammad Ali; Forouzan, Arash; Masoumi, Kambiz; Mazdaee, Behnaz; Bahadoram, Mohammad; Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Ravari, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    We present an 8-year-old boy who was referred to our center with the complaint of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and was diagnosed with hypersplenism and progressive esophageal varices. Performing a computerized tomography (CT) scan, we discovered a suspicious finding in the venography phase in favor of thrombosis in the splenic vein. Once complementary examinations were done and due to recurrent bleeding and band ligation failure, the patient underwent splenectomy. And during the one-year follow-up obvious improvement of the esophageal varices was observed in endoscopy.

  10. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Ortega, Sara; Del Olmo, Lourdes; Vidal, Xavier; Aguirre, Carmelo; Ruiz, Borja; Conforti, Anita; Leone, Roberto; López-Vázquez, Paula; Figueiras, Adolfo; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. Methods We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months) and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day). Results 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57–1.96) or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. Conclusions The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2. PMID:21625637

  11. Emergency single-balloon enteroscopy in overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: Efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Rolando; Rodrigues, Adélia; Fernandes, Carlos; Ribeiro, Iolanda; Fraga, José; Carvalho, João

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of emergency single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) on the diagnosis and treatment for active overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Methods SBE procedures for OGIB were retrospectively reviewed and sub-divided according to the bleeding types: active-overt and inactive-overt bleeding. The patient’s history, laboratory results, endoscopic findings and therapeutic interventions were registered. Emergency SBE was defined as an endoscopy that was performed for active-overt OGIB, within 24 hours of clinical presentation. Results Between January 2010 and February 2013, 53 SBEs were performed in 43 patients with overt OGIB. Seventeen emergency SBEs were performed in 15 patients with active overt-OGIB procedures (group A), which diagnosed the bleeding source in 14: angiodysplasia (n = 5), ulcers/erosions (n = 3), bleeding tumors (gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), n = 3; neuroendocrine tumor, n = 1), and erosioned polyps (n = 2). Endoscopic treatment was performed in nine patients, with one or multiple hemostatic therapies: argon plasma coagulation (n = 5), epinephrine submucosal injection (n = 5), hemostatic clips (n = 3), and polypectomy (n = 2). Twenty-eight patients with inactive bleeding (group B) were submitted to 36 elective SBEs, which successfully diagnosed 18 cases. The diagnostic yield in group A (93.3%) was significantly higher than in group B (64.3%)—Fisher’s exact test, p = 0.038. Conclusion This study revealed an important role of emergency SBE in the diagnosis of bleeding etiology in active overt OGIB. PMID:25452844

  12. Is there still a role for intraoperative enteroscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Monsanto, Pedro; Almeida, Nuno; Lérias, Clotilde; Figueiredo, Pedro; Gouveia, Hermano; Sofia, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    in 21st century, endoscopic study of the small intestine has undergone a revolution with capsule endoscopy and balloon-assisted enteroscopy. The difficulties and morbidity associated with intraoperative enteroscopy, the gold-standard in the 20th century, made this technique to be relegated to a second level. evaluate the actual role and assess the diagnostic and therapeutic value of intraoperative enteroscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. we conducted a retrospective study of 19 patients (11 males; mean age: 66.5 ± 15.3 years) submitted to 21 IOE procedures for obscure GI bleeding. Capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy had been performed in 10 and 5 patients, respectively. with intraoperative enteroscopy a small bowel bleeding lesion was identified in 79% of patients and a gastrointestinal bleeding lesion in 94%. Small bowel findings included: angiodysplasia (n = 6), ulcers (n = 4), small bowel Dieulafoy´s lesion (n = 2), bleeding from anastomotic vessels (n = 1), multiple cavernous hemangiomas (n = 1) and bleeding ectopic jejunal varices (n = 1). Agreement between capsule endoscopy and intraoperative enteroscopy was 70%. Endoscopic and/or surgical treatment was used in 77.8% of the patients with a positive finding on intraoperative enteroscopy, with a rebleeding rate of 21.4% in a mean 21-month follow-up period. Procedure-related mortality and postoperative complications have been 5 and 21%, respectively. intraoperative enteroscopy remains a valuable tool in selected patients with obscure GI bleeding, achieving a high diagnostic yield and allowing an endoscopic and/or surgical treatment in most of them. However, as an invasive procedure with relevant mortality and morbidity, a precise indication for its use is indispensable.

  13. Pancreatic extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumour masquerading as a bleeding duodenal mass

    PubMed Central

    Wegge, Jacqueline; Bartholomew, David M; Burke, Leandra H; Miller, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 55-year-old man presenting to our institution with a gastrointestinal bleed. He was found to have a 5 cm pancreatic extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumours (EGISTs) eroding into the duodenum and ampulla of Vater. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed and the tumour was noted to be positive for CD117 and CD34 with six mitotic figures per 50/high-powered field. At 5 months postoperatively he is receiving treatment with imatinib and doing well. To the best of our knowledge, our patient is only the 18th case reported in the literature to date. PMID:23087281

  14. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding persisting for a decade: a rare manifestation of a common disease

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder S.; Sharma, Vishal; Rao, Chalapathi; Singh, Kartar; Bhasin, Deepak K.

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease commonly presents with diarrhea but variable presentation with anemia, osteoporosis, incidental recognition, and liver function abnormalities is also known. Overt blood loss is uncommon in celiac disease. We present the case of a 60-year-old female who presented with obscure gastrointestinal blood loss for more than a decade necessitating multiple transfusions and was eventually diagnosed to have celiac disease. After introduction of gluten-free diet, her symptoms improved and there has been no recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:24714068

  15. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Treated With Rivaroxaban or Warfarin: ROCKET AF Trial.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Matthew W; Nessel, Christopher C; Hellkamp, Anne S; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Piccini, Jonathan P; Suh, Eun-Young; Becker, Richard C; Singer, Daniel E; Halperin, Jonathan L; Hankey, Graeme J; Berkowitz, Scott D; Fox, Keith A A; Patel, Manesh R

    2015-12-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common complication of oral anticoagulation. This study evaluated GI bleeding in patients who received at least 1 dose of the study drug in the on-treatment arm of the ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation) trial. The primary outcome was adjudicated GI bleeding reported from first to last drug dose + 2 days. Multivariable modeling was performed with pre-specified candidate predictors. Of 14,236 patients, 684 experienced GI bleeding during follow-up. These patients were older (median age 75 years vs. 73 years) and less often female. GI bleeding events occurred in the upper GI tract (48%), lower GI tract (23%), and rectum (29%) without differences between treatment arms. There was a significantly higher rate of major or nonmajor clinical GI bleeding in rivaroxaban- versus warfarin-treated patients (3.61 events/100 patient-years vs. 2.60 events/100 patient-years; hazard ratio: 1.42; 95% confidence interval: 1.22 to 1.66). Severe GI bleeding rates were similar between treatment arms (0.47 events/100 patient-years vs. 0.41 events/100 patient-years; p = 0.39; 0.01 events/100 patient-years vs. 0.04 events/100 patient-years; p = 0.15, respectively), and fatal GI bleeding events were rare (0.01 events/100 patient-years vs. 0.04 events/100 patient-years; 1 fatal events vs. 5 fatal events total). Independent clinical factors most strongly associated with GI bleeding were baseline anemia, history of GI bleeding, and long-term aspirin use. In the ROCKET AF trial, rivaroxaban increased GI bleeding compared with warfarin. The absolute fatality rate from GI bleeding was low and similar in both treatment arms. Our results further illustrate the need for minimizing modifiable risk factors for GI bleeding in patients on oral anticoagulation. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  16. Haemosuccus pancreaticus due to true splenic artery aneurysm: a rare cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, S; Sarkar, S; Verma, R; Dubey, Sk; Roy, Mk

    2010-07-01

    "Haemosuccus pancreaticus" is an unusual cause of severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding and results from rupture of splenic artery aneurysm into the pancreatic duct. More commonly, it is a pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery which develops as sequelae of pancreatitis. However, true aneurysm of the splenic artery without pancreatitis has rarely been incriminated as the etiologic factor of this condition. Owing to the paucity of cases and limited knowledge about the disease, diagnosis as well as treatment become challenging. Here we describe a 60-year-old male presenting with severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding and abdominal pain, which, after considerable delay, was diagnosed to be due to splenic artery aneurysm. Following an unsuccessful endovascular embolisation, the patient was cured by distal pancreatectomy and ligation of aneurysm.

  17. Pros and cons of colonoscopy in management of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lhewa, Dekey Y; Strate, Lisa L

    2012-01-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a frequent gastrointestinal cause of hospitalization, particularly in the elderly, and its incidence appears to be on the rise. Endoscopic and radiographic measures are available for the evaluation and treatment of LGIB including flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, angiography, radionuclide scintigraphy and multi-detector row computed tomography. Although no modality has emerged as the gold standard in the management of LGIB, colonoscopy is the current preferred initial test for the majority of the patients presenting with hematochezia felt to be from a colon source. Colonoscopy has the ability to diagnose all sources of bleeding from the colon and, unlike the radiologic modalities, does not require active bleeding at the time of the examination. In addition, therapeutic interventions such as cautery and endoclips can be applied to achieve hemostasis and prevent recurrent bleeding. Studies suggest that colonoscopy, particularly when performed early in the hospitalization, can decrease hospital length of stay, rebleeding and the need for surgery. However, results from available small trials are conflicting and larger, multicenter studies are needed. Compared to other management options, colonoscopy is a safe procedure with complications reported in less than 2% of patients, including those undergoing urgent examinations. The requirement of bowel preparation (typically 4 or more liters of polyethylene glycol), the logistical complexity of coordinating after-hours colonoscopy, and the low prevalence of stigmata of hemorrhage complicate the use of colonoscopy for LGIB, particularly in urgent situations. This review discusses the above advantages and disadvantages of colonoscopy in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in further detail. PMID:22468081

  18. Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with Eisenmenger syndrome using bosentan.

    PubMed

    Sari, Ibrahim; Cam, Hakan; Dag, M Sait; Durmus, Erdal; Kivrak, Tarik; Tigen, Kursat; Davutoglu, Vedat

    2013-09-01

    Eisenmenger syndrome is associated with irreversible increase in pulmonary vascular resistance causing reduced survival. Bosentan, a non-selective endothelin receptor antagonist is the commonly used specific pulmonary arterial hypertension drug in Eisenmenger syndrome. In this paper, we present a case of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding in a 23-year-old female with Eisenmenger syndrome who was only under bosentan treatment, which has not been reported previously. Most common adverse effect of bosentan is elevation in the liver enzymes however, bleeding complication is very rare. On the contrary, it was proposed that bosentan might be a potential protector against hyperacidity and mucosal erosion that occur as a consequence of stress. Although the mechanistic relationship of bleeding tendency and role of Eisenmenger syndrome concomitant with bosentan treatment is far from conclusive statement for now, this association warrants and should draw attention of clinicians and researches in this field.

  19. Duodenal Lipomatosis as a Curious Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleed: A Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Majid; Tiwari, Priyanka; Ramaswamy, Palaniswamy Kalipatti; Kumar, Reddy Prasanna

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. Duodenal lipomas are incidental and mostly asymptomatic. Tumours may produce symptoms of abdominal pain and discomfort or cause bleeding due to ulceration or intestinal obstruction due to intussusception. We describe a 45-year-old man presenting in emergency with 3 days history of melena with normal gastroduodenoscopy and contrast enhanced computed tomography revealing multiple polypoid lesion in duodenum and proximal jejunum suggestive of lipoma. Due to ongoing bleed, he underwent laparotomy with duodenectomy and uneventful postoperative recovery. Our review of cases published in last 67 years indicate that duodenal lipomas are rare to occur but commonly found in second part, they may be seen in third and fourth part of duodenum which may be missed on endoscopy. They can be multiple and may present as severe UGI bleeding which could be managed surgically. Though CT is diagnostic, histopathology confirms the diagnosis which shows lipomatous lesion composed of mature adipose arranged in lobules. PMID:27437304

  20. MiroCam capsule for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: a prospective, single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Mussetto, Alessandro; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Dari, Silvia; Gasperoni, Stefano; Cantoni, Franco; Brancaccio, Mario L; Triossi, Omero; Casetti, Tino

    2013-02-01

    Capsule endoscopy is an established tool for the evaluation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding but published literature is mostly limited to PillCam SB (Given Imaging, Israel). The aims of this study were to determine the findings, the diagnostic yield and the rebleeding rate in a series of patients with overt or occult obscure gastrointestinal bleeding studied with MiroCam(Intromedic, Seoul, Korea) capsule endoscopy. Data of 118 patients who underwent capsule endoscopy for overt or occult obscure gastrointestinal bleeding were prospectively collected between March 2009 and March 2011. Evaluation of the entire small bowel (completion rate) was achieved in 96% of cases. Relevant lesions occurred in 58% of patients. Angiodysplasias was the most common finding. Six patients (9% of the positive findings) had a non-small-bowel lesion detected by capsule. The yield of capsule endoscopy in the overt group was greater than in the occult group but without achieving a significant difference (61% vs. 54%, p>0.05). Rebleeding rate was lower in patients with a negative examination (6%) than in patients with a positive one (17%) (p=0.03). Capsule retention was registered in 3 of 118 patients (2.5%). MiroCam capsule endoscopy is a safe and effective tool for exploring small bowel with a high completion rate. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Diffuse Skin Thickening as Kaposi Sarcoma Clinical Presentation.

    PubMed

    Querido, Sara; Sousa, Henrique Silva; Pereira, Tiago Assis; Birne, Rita; Matias, Patrícia; Jorge, Cristina; Weigert, André; Adragão, Teresa; Bruges, Margarida; Machado, Domingos

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old African patient received a kidney from a deceased donor with 4 HLA mismatches in April 2013. He received immunosuppression with basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Immediate diuresis and a good allograft function were soon observed. Six months later, the serum creatinine level increased to 2.6 mg/dL. A renal allograft biopsy revealed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy grade II. Toxicity of calcineurin inhibitor was assumed and, after a switch for everolimus, renal function improved. However, since March 2014, renal function progressively deteriorated. A second allograft biopsy showed no new lesions. Two months later, the patient was admitted due to anuria, haematochezia with anaemia, requiring 5 units of packed red blood cells, and diffuse skin thickening. Colonoscopy showed haemorrhagic patches in the colon and the rectum; histology diagnosis was Kaposi sarcoma (KS). A skin biopsy revealed cutaneous involvement of KS. Rapid clinical deterioration culminated in death in June 2014. This case is unusual as less than 20 cases of KS with gross gastrointestinal bleeding have been reported and only 6 cases had the referred bleeding originating in the lower gastrointestinal tract. So, KS should be considered in differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding in some kidney transplant patients.

  2. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: preliminary comparison of 64-section CT enteroclysis with video capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Khalife, Samer; Soyer, Philippe; Alatawi, Abdullah; Vahedi, Kouroche; Hamzi, Lounis; Dray, Xavier; Placé, Vinciane; Marteau, Philippe; Boudiaf, Mourad

    2011-01-01

    To retrospectively compare the diagnostic capabilities of 64-section CT enteroclysis with those of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) to elucidate the cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Thirty-two patients who had 64-section CT enteroclysis and VCE because of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding were included. Imaging findings were compared with those obtained at double balloon endoscopy, surgery and histopathological analysis, which were used as a standard of reference. Concordant findings were found in 22 patients (22/32; 69%), including normal findings (n=13), tumours (n=7), lymphangiectasia (n=1) and inflammation (n=1), and discrepancies in 10 patients (10/32; 31%), including ulcers (n=3), angioectasias (n=2), tumours (n=2) and normal findings (n=3). No statistical difference in the proportions of abnormal findings between 64-section CT enteroclysis (11/32; 34%) and VCE (17/32, 53%) (P=0.207) was found. However, 64-section CT enteroclysis helped identify tumours not detected at VCE (n=2) and definitely excluded suspected tumours (n=3) because of bulges at VCE. Conversely, VCE showed ulcers (n=3) and angioectasias (n=2) which were not visible at 64-section CT enteroclysis. Our results suggest that 64-section CT enteroclysis and VCE have similar overall diagnostic yields in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the two techniques are complementary in this specific population.

  3. Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Diffuse Skin Thickening as Kaposi Sarcoma Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Querido, Sara; Sousa, Henrique Silva; Pereira, Tiago Assis; Birne, Rita; Matias, Patrícia; Jorge, Cristina; Weigert, André; Adragão, Teresa; Bruges, Margarida; Machado, Domingos

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old African patient received a kidney from a deceased donor with 4 HLA mismatches in April 2013. He received immunosuppression with basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Immediate diuresis and a good allograft function were soon observed. Six months later, the serum creatinine level increased to 2.6 mg/dL. A renal allograft biopsy revealed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy grade II. Toxicity of calcineurin inhibitor was assumed and, after a switch for everolimus, renal function improved. However, since March 2014, renal function progressively deteriorated. A second allograft biopsy showed no new lesions. Two months later, the patient was admitted due to anuria, haematochezia with anaemia, requiring 5 units of packed red blood cells, and diffuse skin thickening. Colonoscopy showed haemorrhagic patches in the colon and the rectum; histology diagnosis was Kaposi sarcoma (KS). A skin biopsy revealed cutaneous involvement of KS. Rapid clinical deterioration culminated in death in June 2014. This case is unusual as less than 20 cases of KS with gross gastrointestinal bleeding have been reported and only 6 cases had the referred bleeding originating in the lower gastrointestinal tract. So, KS should be considered in differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding in some kidney transplant patients. PMID:26783491

  4. ACR Appropriateness Criteria(®) Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Singh-Bhinder, Nimarta; Kim, David H; Holly, Brian P; Johnson, Pamela T; Hanley, Michael; Carucci, Laura R; Cash, Brooks D; Chandra, Ankur; Gage, Kenneth L; Lambert, Drew L; Levy, Angela D; Oliva, Isabel B; Peterson, Christine M; Strax, Richard; Rybicki, Frank J; Dill, Karin E

    2017-05-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality with mortality rates as high as 14%. This document addresses the indications for imaging UGIB that is nonvariceal and unrelated to portal hypertension. The four variants are derived with respect to upper endoscopy. For the first three, it is presumed that upper endoscopy has been performed, with three potential initial outcomes: endoscopy reveals arterial bleeding source, endoscopy confirms UGIB without a clear source, and negative endoscopy. The fourth variant, "postsurgical and traumatic causes of UGIB; endoscopy contraindicated" is considered separately because upper endoscopy is not performed. When endoscopy identifies the presence and location of bleeding but bleeding cannot be controlled endoscopically, catheter-based arteriography with treatment is an appropriate next study. CT angiography (CTA) is comparable with angiography as a diagnostic next step. If endoscopy demonstrates a bleed but the endoscopist cannot identify the bleeding source, angiography or CTA can be typically performed and both are considered appropriate. In the event of an obscure UGIB, angiography and CTA have been shown to be equivalent in identifying the bleeding source; CT enterography may be an alternative to CTA to find an intermittent bleeding source. In the postoperative or traumatic setting when endoscopy is contraindicated, primary angiography, CTA, and CT with intravenous contrast are considered appropriate. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to

  5. Comparison of infusion or low-dose proton pump inhibitor treatments in upper gastrointestinal system bleeding.

    PubMed

    Songür, Yildiran; Balkarli, Ayşe; Acartürk, Gürsel; Senol, Altug

    2011-04-01

    The most effective schedule of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) administration following endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding ulcers remains uncertain. To compare the treatment effects of continuous infusion and low-dose esomeprazole therapies in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. This prospective clinical study compared continuous infusion of esomeprazole (80 mg bolus followed by 8 mg∕h continuous infusion for 72 h) and low-dose esomeprazole (40 mg twice daily IV) treatments in GI bleeding patients with peptic ulcer presenting a high risk of re-bleeding, who were administered a successful endoscopic homeostasis. The primary end point was the occurrence of re-bleeding during hospitalization and within one month of discharge. Secondary outcomes were defined as duration of hospitalization, need of transfusion, surgical treatment, and mortality rate. After 72 h, both groups were switched to oral esomeprazole therapy for one-month. A hundred thirty-two subjects were enrolled. Re-bleeding occurred in 11 (16.7%) patients in the infusion therapy group and in 12 (18.2%) patients in the low-dose group (P=0.819) within the first 72 h. No patient experienced re-bleeding in the first month following discharge. There was no statistical significant difference between the two groups in terms of transfusion need, durations of hospitalization, need for surgery and mortality rate. PPI infusion therapy following endoscopic hemostasis treatment was not found superior to low-dose PPI therapy in the terms of re-bleeding, need of surgery and mortality. Copyright © 2010 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Predictors of a variceal source among patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Ahmad; Almadi, Majid; Barkun, Alan; Martel, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require an early, tailored approach best guided by knowledge of the bleeding lesion, especially a variceal versus a nonvariceal source. OBJECTIVE: To identify, by investigating a large national registry, variables that would be predictive of a variceal origin of UGIB using clinical parameters before endoscopic evaluation. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted in 21 Canadian hospitals during the period from January 2004 until the end of May 2005. Consecutive charts for hospitalized patients with a primary or secondary discharge diagnosis of UGIB were reviewed. Data regarding demographics, including historical, physical examination, initial laboratory investigations, endoscopic and pharmacological therapies administered, as well as clinical outcomes, were collected. Multivariable logistic regression modelling was performed to identify clinical predictors of a variceal source of bleeding. RESULTS: The patient population included 2020 patients (mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.4 years; 38.4% female). Overall, 215 (10.6%) were found to be bleeding from upper gastrointestinal varices. Among 26 patient characteristics, variables predicting a variceal source of bleeding included history of liver disease (OR 6.36 [95% CI 3.59 to 11.3]), excessive alcohol use (OR 2.28 [95% CI 1.37 to 3.77]), hematemesis (OR 2.65 [95% CI 1.61 to 4.36]), hematochezia (OR 3.02 [95% CI 1.46 to 6.22]) and stigmata of chronic liver disease (OR 2.49 [95% CI 1.46 to 4.25]). Patients treated with antithrombotic therapy were more likely to experience other causes of hemorrhage (OR 0.44 [95% CI 0.35 to 0.78]). CONCLUSION: Presenting historical and physical examination data, and initial laboratory tests carry significant predictive ability in discriminating variceal versus nonvariceal sources of bleeding. PMID:22506257

  7. Video capsule endoscopy in left ventricular assist device recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Amornsawadwattana, Surachai; Nassif, Michael; Raymer, David; LaRue, Shane; Chen, Chien-Huan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether video capsule endoscopy (VCE) affects the outcomes of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) recipients with gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of LVAD recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent VCE at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2013. All patients were admitted and monitored with telemetry and all VCE and subsequent endoscopic procedures were performed as inpatients. A VCE study was considered positive only when P2 lesions were found and was regarded as negative if P1 or P0 were identified. All patients were followed until heart transplant, death, or the end of the study. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2013, 30 patients with LVAD underwent VCE. Completion rate of VCE was 93.3% and there was no capsule retention. No interference of VCE recording or the function of LVAD was found. VCE was positive in 40% of patients (n = 12). The most common finding was active small intestinal bleeding (50%) and small intestinal angiodysplasia (33.3%). There was no difference in the rate of recurrent bleeding between patients with positive and negative VCE study (50.0% vs 55.6%, P = 1.00) during an average of 11.6 ± 9.6 mo follow up. Among patients with positive VCE, the recurrent bleeding rate did not differ whether subsequent endoscopy was performed (50% vs 50%, P = 1.00). CONCLUSION: VCE can be safely performed in LVAD recipients with a diagnostic yield of 40%. VCE does not affect recurrent bleeding in LVAD patients regardless of findings. PMID:27182165

  8. Can the colour of per-rectal bleeding estimate the risk of lower gastrointestinal bleeding caused by malignant lesion?

    PubMed

    Lai, Pui-Yan; Chan, Kin-Wai; Wong, Carlos King-Ho; Meng, William; Luk, Wan

    2016-02-01

    To estimate the risk of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) caused by malignant lesion in patients presenting with per-rectal bleeding (PRB), by using visual aid as an objective measurement of PRB colour. This was a prospective observational study on patients presented with PRB to Family Medicine Specialty Clinic, who undergo flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) or colonoscopy (CLN) from December 2012 to September 2013. Patients aged 40 years old or above, haemodynamically stable, with normal haemoglobin level were included. Patients with a history of previous colonic surgery, refused to have FS or CLN, with ophthalmologic diseases such as colour blindness were excluded. Parameters including subjective description of PRB colour, number of chosen red colour by patients, source and distance of bleeding from anal verge were recorded for analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to identify the optimal cutoff level of colour for diagnosing colonic lesion. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by area under the ROC curve (AUC). Accountability of this model was assessed by logistic regression. The dark PRB colour was associated with diagnosis of tumour (p < 0.001) and advanced neoplastic polyp (p < 0.001). The light PRB colour was associated with the diagnosis of piles (p < 0.001). The performance of our model to predict tumour or advanced neoplastic polyps by colour (AUC, 0.798) had a better discriminative power than that to predict colonic lesion alone (AUC, 0.610) by ROC curve analysis. Objective measurement of PRB colour accurately estimated the risk of LGIB caused by malignant lesion in patients presenting with PRB.

  9. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Recent Trends from the Fukuoka Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Matsuo, Ryu; Hata, Jun; Kuroda, Junya; Ago, Tetsuro; Sugimori, Hiroshi; Inoue, Tooru; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a potentially serious complication of acute stroke, but its incidence appears to be decreasing. The aim of this study was to elucidate the etiology of GI bleeding and its impact on clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke in recent years. Methods Using the database of the Fukuoka Stroke Registry, 6,529 patients with acute ischemic stroke registered between June 2007 and December 2012 were included in this study. We recorded clinical data including any previous history of peptic ulcer, prestroke drug history including the use of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, steroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and poststroke treatment with suppressing gastric acidity. GI bleeding was defined as any episode of hematemesis or melena on admission or during hospitalization. The cause and origin of bleeding were diagnosed endoscopically. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for GI bleeding and its influence on deteriorating neurologic function, death, and poor outcome. Results GI bleeding occurred in 89 patients (1.4%) under the condition that 66% of the total patients received acid-suppressing agents after admission. Multivariate analysis revealed that GI bleeding was associated with the absence of dyslipidemia (p = 0.03), a previous history of peptic ulcer (p < 0.001), and the severity of baseline neurologic deficit (p = 0.002) but not with antiplatelet drugs, anticoagulants, and NSAIDs. The source was the upper GI tract in 51% of the cases; causes included peptic ulceration (28%) and malignancies (12%), and other or unidentified causes accounted for 60%. GI bleeding mostly occurred within 1 week after stroke onset. Hemoglobin concentration fell by a median value of 2.5 g/dl in patients with GI bleeding. Among them, 28 patients underwent blood transfusion (31.5%). After adjustment for confounding factors, GI bleeding was independently associated with neurologic

  10. Predictors of gastrointestinal bleeding among patients with atrial fibrillation after initiating dabigatran therapy.

    PubMed

    Lauffenburger, Julie C; Rhoney, Denise H; Farley, Joel F; Gehi, Anil K; Fang, Gang

    2015-06-01

    To identify demographic and clinical risk factors associated with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding among a large cohort of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who initiated dabigatran therapy for stroke prevention, and to describe patterns of subsequent anticoagulant use after occurrence of the GI bleeding event. Retrospective cohort study. Large, nationwide United States commercial insurance database. A total of 21,033 patients with nonvalvular AF who initiated dabigatran between October 19, 2010, and December 31, 2012. We used multivariate Cox regression analysis to estimate the effect of baseline demographic and clinical characteristics on the probability of a GI bleeding event. Patterns of anticoagulation use after GI bleeding were also examined descriptively. Of the 21,033 patients receiving dabigatran, 446 (2.1%) experienced a GI bleed during follow-up. GI bleeding rates differed across many baseline characteristics. Male sex was associated with a lower risk (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-0.95) of GI bleeding. Compared with patients younger than 55 years, those aged 55-64, 65-74, and 75 years or older yielded aHRs of 1.54 (95% CI 0.89-2.68), 2.72 (95% CI 1.59-4.65), and 4.52 (95% CI 2.68-7.64), respectively. Renal impairment (aHR 1.67, 95% CI 1.24-2.25), heart failure (aHR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.56), alcohol abuse (aHR 2.57, 95%CI 1.52-4.35), previous Helicobacter pylori infection (aHR 4.75, 95% CI 1.93-11.68), antiplatelet therapy (aHR 1.49, 95% CI 1.19-1.88), and digoxin use (aHR 1.49, 95% CI 1.19-1.88) were also associated with an increased GI bleeding risk. Of the 446 patients who experienced a GI bleed, 193 (43.3%) restarted an anticoagulant, with most (65.8%) filling prescriptions for dabigatran; the mean time was 50.4 days until restarting any subsequent anticoagulant. The risk of GI bleeding in patients receiving dabigatran is highly associated with increased age and cardiovascular, renal, and other comorbidities

  11. Role of red blood cell scintigraphy for determining the localization of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sanlı, Yasemin; Ozkan, Zeynep Gözde; Kuyumcu, Serkan; Yanar, Hakan; Balık, Emre; Tokmak, Handan; Türkmen, Cüneyt; Adalet, Işık

    2012-05-01

    We aimed to evaluate the role of Tc-99m labeled red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy for determination of localization of gastrointestinal system (GIS) bleeding. Fifty-seven cases (27 females, 30 males; mean age 43.9±24; range 1 to 91 years) who referred to our clinic between 1995-2010 were evaluated for determination of localization of GIS bleeding with RBC scintigraphy. Prior to scintigraphy, gastroscopy in 51, colonoscopy in 45, and angiography in 9 patients were performed. RBC scintigraphies were positive and negative in 31 and 26 patients, respectively. Positive scintigraphic findings were obtained within the 1st hour of dynamic imaging in 19 patients, within the 1st-4th hour static images in 7, and within the 4th-24th hour images in 5 patients. Fourteen patients underwent surgical exploration. In 13 patients, the surgery confirmed the diagnosis by RBC scintigraphy (accuracy: 92.8%). Of 43 patients without surgical exploration, 12 had anemia due to iron deficiency and their scintigraphic evaluation were negative. Four patients died and in 27 patients, GIS bleeding ceased spontaneously or with conservative measures. Scintigraphy should be the primary tool for accurate diagnosis of patients with active GIS bleeding. Positive dynamic images obtained within the first hour of imaging may be more accurate for demonstrating bleeding localization and a good predictor of requirement of surgical exploration.

  12. Usefulness of CT angiography in diagnosing acute gastrointestinal bleeding: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Rong; Yin, Yan; Qu, Xin-Hua

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) angiography in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. METHODS: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cancerlit, Cochrane Library database, Sciencedirect, Springerlink and Scopus, from January 1995 to December 2009, were searched for studies evaluating the accuracy of CT angiography in diagnosing acute GI bleeding. Studies were included if they compared CT angiography to a reference standard of upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy, angiography or surgery in the diagnosis of acute GI bleeding. Meta-analysis methods were used to pool sensitivity and specificity and to construct summary receiver-operating characteristic. RESULTS: A total of 9 studies with 198 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Data were used to form 2 × 2 tables. CT angiography showed pooled sensitivity of 89% (95% CI: 82%-94%) and specificity of 85% (95% CI: 74%-92%), without showing significant heterogeneity (χ2 = 12.5, P = 0.13) and (χ2 = 22.95, P = 0.003), respectively. Summary receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.9297. CONCLUSION: CT angiography is an accurate, cost-effective tool in the diagnosis of acute GI bleeding and can show the precise location of bleeding, thereby directing further management. PMID:20712058

  13. Gastrointestinal bleeding from arteriovenous malformations in patients supported by the Jarvik 2000 axial-flow left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Letsou, George V; Shah, Nyma; Gregoric, Igor D; Myers, Timothy J; Delgado, Reynolds; Frazier, O H

    2005-01-01

    The long-term effects of axial-flow mechanical circulatory support in humans are unclear. We report 3 cases of chronic gastrointestinal bleeding after implantation of a Jarvik 2000 axial-flow left ventricular assist device. The bleeding was refractory to aggressive management and in 2 cases resolved only after orthotopic cardiac transplantation.

  14. Gastrointestinal bleeding: an accessory spleen causing a false-positive Tc-99m-sulfur colloid study

    SciTech Connect

    Heyman, S.; Sunaryo, F.P.; Ziegler, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    A Tc-99m-sulfur colloid abdominal scan was performed on a 12-year-old girl to localize the site of gastrointestinal bleeding. The study was normal. When bleeding recurred two weeks later, a repeat study revealed a focal abnormality in the upper abdomen. This was thought to be compatible with a small bleed. However, at surgery an accessory spleen was found, accounting for the abnormal scan.

  15. Gastrointestinal bleeding diagnosed by red blood cell scintigraphy in a patient with aortic stenosis: a case of Heyde syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Patrícia L; Felix, Renata C M; Azevedo, Jader C; Silva, Paulo R D; Oliveira, Amarino C; Cortes, Denise; Dohmann, Hans F R; Mesquita, Cláudio T

    2005-04-01

    The authors report a case of small bowel bleeding diagnosed by Tc-99m-labeled red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy during the postoperative period after aortic valve replacement. There is a relationship between aortic valve stenosis and gastrointestinal bleeding in elderly patients, called Heyde syndrome. The described patient had chronic anemia that worsened after surgery. RBC scintigraphy localized the source of bleeding from jejunal angiodysplasia confirmed by mesenteric angiography. This case illustrates the diagnostic information provided by RBC scintigraphy in this syndrome.

  16. Continued Antiplatelet Therapy and Risk of Bleeding in Gastrointestinal Procedures: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao; Baillargeon, Jacques G; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-05-01

    Management of perioperative antiplatelet medications in gastrointestinal (GI) surgery is challenging. The risk of intraoperative and postoperative bleeding is associated with perioperative use of antiplatelet medication. However, cessation of these drugs may be unsafe for patients who are required to maintain antiplatelet use due to cardiovascular conditions. The objective of this systematic review was to compare the risk of intraoperative or postoperative bleeding among patients who had GI surgery while on continuous antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, clopidogrel, or dual therapy) with the risk among those not taking continuous antiplatelet medication. We reviewed articles published between January 2000 and July 2015 from the Medline Ovid and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases. Studies involving any GI procedures were included if the articles met our inclusion criteria (listed in Methods). The following key words were used for the search: clopidogrel, Plavix, aspirin, antiplatelet, bleeding, hemorrhage, and digestive system surgical procedures. Quality of the studies was assessed, depending on their study design, using the Newcastle-Ottawa score or the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. Twenty-two studies were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review. Five showed that the risk of intraoperative bleeding or postoperative bleeding among patients who had GI surgery while on continuous antiplatelet therapy was higher compared that for those not on continuous therapy. The remaining 17 studies reported that there was no statistically significant difference in the risks of bleeding between the continuous antiplatelet therapy group and the group without continuous antiplatelet therapy. The risk of bleeding associated with GI procedures in patients receiving antiplatelet therapy was not significantly higher than in patients with no antiplatelet or interrupted antiplatelet therapy. Copyright © 2016 American

  17. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... ulcerative colitis Esophageal varices Esophagitis Gastric (stomach) ulcer Intussusception (bowel telescoped on itself) Mallory-Weiss tear Meckel ... used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed ...

  18. "Downhill" Esophageal Varices due to Dialysis Catheter-Induced Superior Vena Caval Occlusion: A Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nayudu, Suresh Kumar; Dev, Anil; Kanneganti, Kalyan

    2013-01-01

    "Downhill" varices are a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Rarely these varices are reported in patients receiving hemodialysis as a complication of chronic dialysis vascular access. We present a case of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an individual with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed "downhill" varices in the upper third of the esophagus without any active bleeding at the time of the procedure. An angiogram was performed disclosing superior vena caval occlusion, which was treated with balloon angioplasty. Gastroenterologists should have a high index of suspicion for these rare "downhill" varices when dealing with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving hemodialysis and manage it appropriately using endoscopic, radiological, and surgical interventions.

  19. Colonoscopic findings and management of patients with outbreak typhoid fever presenting with lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Shaikhani, Mohammad A R; Husein, Hiwa A B; Karbuli, Taha A; Mohamed, Mohamed Abdulrahman

    2013-09-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) along with intestinal perforation is a well-known complication of typhoid fever. Reports of colonoscopic appearance and intervention of typhoid perforation involve only few cases. This series reports the colonoscopic findings and the role of colonoscopic hemostatic interventions in controlling the bleeding ileocolonic lesions. During the typhoid fever outbreak in Sulaymaniyah City in Iraqi Kurdistan Region, we received 52 patients with LGIB manifesting as fresh bleeding per rectum or melena. We performed total colonoscopy with ileal intubation for all cases. The findings were recorded and endoscopic hemostatic intervention with adrenaline-saline injection and argon plasma coagulation was applied to actively bleeding lesion. These patients were young, 11-30 years of age, with female preponderance. Blood culture was positive in 50 %. Colonoscopic findings were mostly located in the ileocecal region, although other areas of the colon were involved in many cases. Twenty-four percent of the cases required endoscopic hemostatic intervention by adrenaline injection with argon plasma coagulation which was effective in all patients except one who died in spite of surgical intervention in addition of endoscopic hemostasis. Dual endoscopic hemostatic intervention can be a safe and effective management option for patients with LGIB due to typhoid fever.

  20. Is urgent CT angiography necessary in cases of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Díaz, A Martín; Rodríguez, L Fernández; de Gracia, M Martí

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding usually presents as hematochezia, rectal bleeding or melena and represents 1-2% of the medical appointments in the Emergency Services. Mortality reaches the 30-40% and it is highly related with the severity and associated comorbidity. Most clinical practice guidelines include colonoscopy at some point in the diagnostic and therapeutic process (urgent for severe cases and ambulatory for mild ones) and look for predictors of severity. In the last years, there have been numerous studies where is clear the relevance and complementarity of advanced diagnostic imaging techniques, gradually incorporated as an alternative or second step in severe cases. Therefore, we have made a review of current scientific evidence to establish a clinical prediction rule for optimal indication of CT angiography in these patients. However, future studies providing greater robustness and level of evidence are necessary. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. The significance and work-up of minor gastrointestinal bleeding in hospitalized nursing home patients.

    PubMed Central

    Suatengco, R.; Posner, G. L.; Marsh, F.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-seven consecutive admissions from nursing homes who underwent a gastrointestinal (GI) consult for coffee ground vomitus or occult GI bleeding to evaluate the outcome were reviewed retrospectively to determine whether a GI work-up was or would have been useful. There were 15 deaths, all associated with severe infection or respiratory failure. Endoscopy, barium studies, and a history of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use or peptic ulcer disease did not affect the management or outcome. No patient developed major GI bleeding. When nursing home patients present with coffee ground vomitus or newly found occult blood in the stool, efforts should be made to identify and vigorously treat any acute underlying infection or respiratory failure. Endoscopy is not helpful in this clinical situation. Both the primary care physician and the GI consultant should be aware of these associations and should focus on the underlying etiology. PMID:7473849

  2. Pancreatic arteriovenous malformation involving adjacent duodenum with gastrointestinal bleeding: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Eiji; Aimoto, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Katsuno, Akira; Chou, Kazumitsu; Kawamoto, Masao; Ono, Shinpei; Ishii, Nobuaki; Miyake, Kazumasa; Fujimori, Shunji; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Tajiri, Takashi

    2006-12-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with the symptoms of palpitation, dyspnea, and tarry stool. Upper gastroduodenal endoscopy revealed submucosal lesions with vascular ectasia in the second part of the duodenum. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) detected a hypervascular lesion in the pancreatic head and the duodenum. Selective angiography showed proliferation of a vascular network and early filling of the portal vein at the early arterial phase. With a diagnosis of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (AVM), we performed pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. At laparotomy, localized and meandering vessels were seen on the surface of the head of the pancreas. Histological examination showed dilated tortuous vessels accompanied by severed elastic fibers in the vessel media and blood clot formation. The incidence of pancreatic AVM remains extremely low, and recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding is a frequent complication. To prevent recurrent bleeding and progressive portal hypertension, surgery may be the definitive management of symptomatic AVM.

  3. Comparison of Three Risk Scores to Predict Outcomes of Severe Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Camus, Marine; Jensen, Dennis M; Ohning, Gordon V; Kovacs, Thomas O; Jutabha, Rome; Ghassemi, Kevin A; Machicado, Gustavo A; Dulai, Gareth S; Jensen, Mary E; Gornbein, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Improved medical decisions by using a score at the initial patient triage level may lead to improvements in patient management, outcomes, and resource utilization. There is no validated score for management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) unlike for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The aim of our study was to compare the accuracies of 3 different prognostic scores [Center for Ulcer Research and Education Hemostasis prognosis score, Charlson index, and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score] for the prediction of 30-day rebleeding, surgery, and death in severe LGIB. Data on consecutive patients hospitalized with severe gastrointestinal bleeding from January 2006 to October 2011 in our 2 tertiary academic referral centers were prospectively collected. Sensitivities, specificities, accuracies, and area under the receiver operator characteristic curve were computed for 3 scores for predictions of rebleeding, surgery, and mortality at 30 days. Two hundred thirty-five consecutive patients with LGIB were included between 2006 and 2011. Twenty-three percent of patients rebled, 6% had surgery, and 7.7% of patients died. The accuracies of each score never reached 70% for predicting rebleeding or surgery in either. The ASA score had a highest accuracy for predicting mortality within 30 days (83.5%), whereas the Center for Ulcer Research and Education Hemostasis prognosis score and the Charlson index both had accuracies <75% for the prediction of death within 30 days. ASA score could be useful to predict death within 30 days. However, a new score is still warranted to predict all 30 days outcomes (rebleeding, surgery, and death) in LGIB.

  4. A long-Segmental Vascular Malformation in the Small Bowel Presenting With Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Preschool-Aged Child

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeoun Joo; Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Cho, Yong Hoon; Kim, Yong-Woo; Kim, Tae Un; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in pediatric patients has several causes. Vascular malformation of the small bowel is a rare disease leading to pediatric GI bleeding. To our knowledge, few reports describe ultrasound and computed tomography findings of venous malformations involving the small bowel. We present a case of long-segmental and circumferential vascular malformation that led to GI bleeding in a pre-school aged child, focusing on the radiologic findings. Although vascular malformation including of the GI tract is rare in children, it should be considered when GI bleeding occurs in pediatric patients. PMID:27110342

  5. Percutaneous Transcatheter Embolization of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Child with Polyarteritis Nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Bas, Ahmet; Samanci, Cesur; Numan, Furuzan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Polyarteritis nodosa is a form of necrotizing vasculitis of small and medium-sized arteries. Major gastrointestinal complications are ulceration, perforation, hemorrhage, and obstruction. Case Report We report on a clinical case of a 16-year-old female patient with massive hematemesis, who was successfully treated with embolization with a 1:2 dilution of N-butyl cyanoacrylate glue. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest child reported on with massive GI bleeding secondary to PAN, treated with successful percutaneous transcatheter embolization under emergency conditions. PMID:25512765

  6. Role of Interventional Radiology in the Emergent Management of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Navuluri, Rakesh; Patel, Jay; Kang, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require inpatient admission annually in the United States. When medical management and endoscopic therapy are inadequate, endovascular intervention can be lifesaving. These emergent situations highlight the importance of immediate competence of the interventional radiologist in the preangiographic evaluation as well as the endovascular treatment of UGIB. We describe a case of UGIB managed with endovascular embolization and detail the angiographic techniques used. The case description is followed by a detailed discussion of the treatment approach to UGIB, with attention to both nonvariceal and variceal algorithms. PMID:23997408

  7. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding, hematuria and splenic hemangiomas in Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kocaman, Orhan; Alponat, Ahmet; Aygün, Cem; Gürbüz, Yeşim; Sarisoy, H Tahsin; Celebi, Altay; Sentürk, Omer; Hülagü, Sadettin

    2009-03-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a congenital vascular anomaly characterized by a triad of varicose veins, cutaneous capillary malformation, and hypertrophy of bone and soft tissue. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary vascular malformations in Klippel- Trenaunay syndrome may present with lower gastrointestinal bleeding and hematuria. The majority of patients with splenic hemangiomatosis are asymptomatic. We herein report a case admitted to the Gastroenterology Clinic with life-threatening hematochezia and symptomatic iron deficiency anemia. The patient's history was remarkable for subtotal cystectomy and enterocystoplasty in December 2002 for vascular malformation, located in the bladder, which presented with hematuria. Although the patient was also diagnosed with colonic varices and splenic hemangiomas at that time, due to the asymptomatic mild intermittent hematochezia and splenic hemangiomas, the patient did not seek any help for rectal bleeding until her admittance to our department for evaluation of massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopy revealed vascular malformations starting from the transitional zone in the rectum extending up to the descending colon. Due to this extensive involvement of the rectum and sigmoid colon, no interventional endoscopic procedure was attempted and she was referred to surgery. A very low anterior resection with double stapling technique was done. Postoperative follow-up has been uneventful for six months since the operation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome case presenting with lower gastrointestinal bleeding, hematuria and splenic hemangiomas. The literature on the evaluation and management of lower gastrointestinal and genitourinary bleeding in Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is reviewed.

  8. Technological value of SPECT/CT fusion imaging for the diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z G; Zhang, G X; Hao, S H; Zhang, W W; Zhang, T; Zhang, Z P; Wu, R X

    2015-11-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of diagnosing and locating lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging with 99mTc labeled red blood cells ((99m)Tc-RBC). Fifty-six patients with suspected lower GI bleeding received a preoperative intravenous injection of (99m)Tc-RBC and each underwent planar, SPECT/CT imaging of the lower abdominal region. The location and path of lower GI bleeding were diagnosed by contrastive analysis of planar and SPECT/CT fusion imaging. Among the 56 patients selected, there were abnormalities in concentrated radionuclide activity with planar imaging in 50 patients and in SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 52 patients. Moreover, bleeding points that were coincident with the surgical results were evident with planar imaging in 31 patients and with SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 48 patients. The diagnostic sensitivity of planar imaging and SPECT/CT fusion imaging were 89.3% (50/56) and 92.9% (52/56), respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (χ(2) = 0.11, P > 0.05). The corresponding positional accuracy values were 73.8% (31/42) and 92.3% (48/52), and the difference was statistically significant (χ(2) = 4.63, P < 0.05). (99m)Tc- RBC SPECT/CT fusion imaging is an effective, simple, and accurate method that can be used for diagnosing and locating lower GI bleeding.

  9. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao

    2013-05-02

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications.

  10. Successful Endoscopic Hemostasis Is a Protective Factor for Rebleeding and Mortality in Patients with Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong Jae; Cha, Jae Myung; Park, Jae Hyun; Jeon, Jung Won; Shin, Hyun Phil; Joo, Kwang Ro; Lee, Joung Il

    2016-07-01

    Rebleeding and mortality rates remain high in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. To identify clinical and endoscopic risk factors for rebleeding and mortality in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This study was performed in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding who underwent upper endoscopic procedures between July 2006 and February 2013. Clinical and endoscopic characteristics were compared among patients with and without rebleeding and mortality. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for rebleeding and mortality. After excluding 64 patients, data for 689 patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding were analyzed. Peptic ulcer (62.6 %) was by far the most common source of bleeding. Endoscopic intervention was performed within 24 h in 99.0 % of patients, and successful endoscopic hemostasis was possible in 80.7 % of patients. The 30-day rebleeding rate was 13.1 % (n = 93). Unsuccessful endoscopic hemostasis was found to be the only independent risk factor for rebleeding (odds ratio 79.6; 95 % confidence interval 37.8-167.6; p = 0.000). The overall 30-day mortality rate was 3.2 % (n = 23). Unsuccessful endoscopic hemostasis (odds ratio 4.9; 95 % confidence interval 1.7-13.9; p = 0.003) was also associated with increased 30-day mortality in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Successful endoscopic hemostasis is an independent protective factor for both rebleeding and mortality in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  11. Multifocal Carcinoid Tumor of Small Intestine: A Rare Cause of Chronic Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Suspected on Capsule Endoscopy and Diagnosed on Double Balloon Enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Jose C.; Rojas, Juan; Gurudu, Suryakanth R.

    2011-01-01

    We reported a case of multifocal carcinoid tumor of small intestine causing chronic obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, suspected on capsule endoscopy and diagnosed on double balloon enteroscopy. PMID:27942327

  12. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; Essamri, W.; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; Benazzouz, M.; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presenting symptoms, results of rectal and clinical examinations, and endoscopy findings. Results. 1389 cases were registered. As 66% of the patients were male, 34% were female. Mean age was 49. 12% of patients had a history of previous hemorrhage, and 26% had a history of NSAID and aspirin use. Endoscopy was performed in 96%. The gastroduodenal ulcer was the main etiology in 38%, followed by gastritis and duodenitis in 32.5%. Conclusion. AUGIB is still a frequent pathology, threatening patients' life. NSAID and aspirin are still the major risk factors. Their impact due to peptic ulcer remains stable in our country. PMID:21991509

  13. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to 'Dieulafoy's vascular malformation' of the jejunum: case report.

    PubMed Central

    Goins, W. A.; Chatman, D. M.; Kaviani, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Dieulafoy reported three cases of massive gastric hemorrhage due to a dilated submucosal artery in 1898, and since then, more than 100 cases of this gastric vascular malformation have been reported in the literature. These same pathologic lesions are even a rarer occurrence in the small bowel. This article reports a 38-year-old hypotensive male who presented to the hospital after an acute onset of massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage; superior mesenteric angiography demonstrated an actively bleeding lesion in a proximal jejunal branch. Intraoperative small bowel endoscopy via an enterotomy demonstrated a 4 mm bleeding submucosal lesion 30 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. A literature review revealed six other cases of Dieulafoy's vascular malformation that occurred in the small bowel, with the lesions located in the proximal jejunum between 15 cm and 45 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. The cause of these lesions is unknown. This case demonstrates the importance of preoperative angiography and intraoperative endoscopy when massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage is suspected to be from a small bowel source. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7473854

  14. Pharmacologic options in the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: focus on the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Moe Htet; Chan, Francis Ka Leung

    2014-05-01

    Despite the major advances in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease, its complication in the elderly has increased. This is because of the increasing use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and the high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. The presentation of peptic ulcers in the elderly patients can be subtle, and late presentation with upper gastrointestinal bleeding of peptic ulcers is not uncommon in the elderly population. The aim of this article is to review the current treatment options for upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and to discuss the place of drug therapy in both the acute and ongoing management of individual patients. Its focus will be on the benefits and risks of each option in the elderly. There is significant evidence to suggest that anti-secretory medications are useful in the treatment of peptic ulcers and associated complications in the elderly. Although a large number of studies have reported potential adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors, this evidence comes from retrospective observational studies, and such reports should be regarded with caution, and randomized controlled studies are required to confirm or refute these results. Nonetheless, it will be important to practice the appropriate use of acid suppression therapy, and identify which patients will gain maximum benefit from proton pump inhibitor therapy.

  15. Gallbladder bleeding-related severe gastrointestinal bleeding and shock in a case with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jun-Li; Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gallbladder (GB) bleeding is very rare and it is caused by cystic artery aneurysm and rupture, or GB wall rupture. For GB rupture, the typical findings are positive Murphy's sign and jaundice. GB bleeding mostly presented as hemobilia. This is the first case presented with severe GI bleeding because of GB rupture-related GB bleeding. After comparing computed tomography, one gallstone spillage was noticed. In addition to gallstones, uremic coagulopathy also worsens the bleeding condition. This is also the first case that patients with GB spillage-related rupture and bleeding were successfully treated by nonsurgical management. Clinicians should bear in mind the rare causes of GI bleeding. Embolization of the bleeding artery should be attempted as soon as possible. PMID:27281100

  16. Association of Proton Pump Inhibitors With Reduced Risk of Warfarin-Related Serious Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ray, Wayne A; Chung, Cecilia P; Murray, Katherine T; Smalley, Walter E; Daugherty, James R; Dupont, William D; Stein, C Michael

    2016-12-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) might reduce the risk of serious warfarin-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding, but the evidence of their efficacy for this indication is limited. A gastroprotective effect of PPIs would be particularly important for patients who take warfarin with antiplatelet drugs or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which further increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. This retrospective cohort study of patients beginning warfarin treatment in Tennessee Medicaid and the 5% National Medicare Sample identified 97,430 new episodes of warfarin treatment with 75,720 person-years of follow-up. The study end points were hospitalizations for upper gastrointestinal bleeding potentially preventable by PPIs and for bleeding at other sites. Patients who took warfarin without PPI co-therapy had 119 hospitalizations for upper gastrointestinal bleeding per 10,000 person-years of treatment. The risk decreased by 24% among patients who received PPI co-therapy (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63-0.91). There was no significant reduction in the risk of other gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.94-1.22) or non-gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.84-1.15) in this group. Among patients concurrently using antiplatelet drugs or NSAIDs, those without PPI co-therapy had 284 upper gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations per 10,000 person-years of warfarin treatment. The risk decreased by 45% (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.39-0.77) with PPI co-therapy. PPI co-therapy had no significant protective effect for warfarin patients not using antiplatelet drugs or NSAIDs (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.70-1.06). Findings were similar in both study populations. In an analysis of patients beginning warfarin treatment in Tennessee Medicaid and the 5% National Medicare Sample, PPI co-therapy was associated with reduced risk of warfarin-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding; the

  17. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Gastric Amyloidosis in a Patient with Smoldering Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gjeorgjievski, Mihajlo; Purohit, Treta; Amin, Mitual B.; Kurtin, Paul J.; Cappell, Mitchell S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a common complication of patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), and multiple myeloma (MM). This proteinaceous material can be deposited intercellularly in any organ system, including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the GI tract, amyloidosis affects the duodenum most commonly, followed by the stomach and colorectum. Gastric amyloidosis causes symptoms of nausea, vomiting, early satiety, abdominal pain, and GI bleeding. A case of upper GI bleeding from gastric amyloidosis is presented in a patient with SMM. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed a gastric mass. Endoscopic biopsies revealed amyloid deposition in the lamina propria, consistent with gastric amyloidosis. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry performed on peptides extracted from Congo red-positive microdissected areas of paraffin-embedded stomach specimens revealed a peptide profile consistent with AL- (lambda-) type amyloidosis. Based on this and multiple other case reports, we recommend that patients with GI bleeding and MGUS, SMM, or MM undergo EGD and pathologic examination of endoscopic biopsies of identified lesions using Congo red stains for amyloidosis for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26366309

  18. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients on novel oral anticoagulants: Risk, prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ka-Shing; Leung, Wai K

    2017-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which include direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) and direct factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban), are gaining popularity in the prevention of embolic stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation as well as in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, similar to traditional anticoagulants, NOACs have the side effects of bleeding, including gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Results from both randomized clinical trials and observations studies suggest that high-dose dabigatran (150 mg b.i.d), rivaroxaban and high-dose edoxaban (60 mg daily) are associated with a higher risk of GIB compared with warfarin. Other risk factors of NOAC-related GIB include concomitant use of ulcerogenic agents, older age, renal impairment, Helicobacter pylori infection and a past history of GIB. Prevention of NOAC-related GIB includes proper patient selection, using a lower dose of certain NOACs and in patients with renal impairment, correction of modifiable risk factors, and prescription of gastroprotective agents. Overt GIB can be managed by withholding NOACs followed by delayed endoscopic treatment. In severe bleeding, additional measures include administration of activated charcoal, use of specific reversal agents such as idarucizumab for dabigatran and andexanent alfa for factor Xa inhibitors, and urgent endoscopic management. PMID:28373761

  19. Duodenal Histoplasmosis Presenting with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in an AIDS Patient

    PubMed Central

    Spinner, Michael A.; Paulin, Heather N.; Wester, C. William

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal histoplasmosis (GIH) is common in patients with disseminated disease but only rarely comes to clinical attention due to the lack of specific signs and symptoms. We report the unusual case of a 33-year-old Caucasian male with advanced AIDS who presented with upper GI bleeding from diffuse erosions throughout the duodenum. Biopsy of the lesions revealed small bowel mucosa with granulomatous inflammation and macrophages with small intracellular yeasts consistent with disseminated histoplasmosis. The patient demonstrated significant clinical improvement following a two-week course of liposomal amphotericin B. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of duodenal histoplasmosis leading to clinically significant bleeding, manifesting with worsening anemia and melanotic stools. Given our findings, we maintain that GIH should be considered on the differential diagnosis for GI bleeding in AIDS patients at risk, specifically those with advanced immunosuppression (i.e., CD4+ cell counts <100 cells/mm3) who reside in endemic areas (Ohio or Mississippi river valleys) and/or have a prior history of histoplasmosis. For diagnostic evaluation, we recommend checking a urine Histoplasma quantitative antigen EIA as well as upper and/or lower endoscopy with biopsy. We recommend treatment with a two-week course of liposomal amphotericin B followed by indefinite itraconazole. PMID:23091745

  20. Gastrointestinal bleed after left ventricular assist device implantation: incidence, management, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Laura; Holley, Christopher T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) have become the standard of care for patients with end-stage heart failure (HF). While these devices have improved durability compared to earlier generation left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), increased frequency in some complications has been seen, including gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), pump thrombosis and hemolysis. We discuss the incidence, management and prevention of GIB after CF-LVAD implantation. Methods We reviewed the current literature available on the incidence, management and prevention of GIB after CF-LVAD implantation with a focus on our experience at the University of Minnesota, with data on nearly 300 patients who received a CF-LVAD from 2005 to 2013. Results The incidence of GIB after CF-LVAD varies between 18-40% in numerous studies. At the University of Minnesota, out of 233 patients who underwent HeartMate II (HMII) implantation between 2005-2013, 60 GIB episodes occurred in 51 patients (22%), with an event rate of 0.17 gastrointestinal bleeds/patient-year of support. The etiology of GIB appears to be multifactorial. The main factors which have been identified include the need for chronic anticoagulation, acquired von Willebrand syndrome, platelet dysfunction and increased incidence of arteriovenous malformations due to chronic low pulse pressure. When managing an LVAD patient with GIB, a multi-disciplinary approach is needed. The main goals of treatment are evaluating the location and severity of the bleed, holding anti-coagulants and resuscitation to maintain stable hemodynamics. Conclusions GIB is a complication with considerable morbidity. Future efforts to further understand the etiology of GIB and optimize anti-coagulation are needed to improve outcomes following CF-LVAD implantation. PMID:25452907

  1. In the workup of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleed, does 64-slice MDCT have a role?

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Chinmay; Moorthy, Srikanth; Sreekumar, Kp; Rajeshkannan, R; Nazar, Pk; Sandya, Cj; Sivasubramanian, S; Ramchandran, Pv

    2012-01-01

    The purpose was to prospectively determine the sensitivity of 64-slice MDCT in detecting and diagnosing the cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleed (OGIB). Our study included 50 patients (male 30, female 20) in the age range of 3-82 years (average age: 58.52 years) who were referred to our radiology department as part of their workup for clinically evident gastrointestinal (GI) bleed or as part of workup for anemia (with and without positive fecal occult blood test). All patients underwent conventional upper endoscopy and colonoscopy before undergoing CT scan. Following a noncontrast scan, all patients underwent triple-phase contrast CT scan using a 64-slice CT scan system. The diagnostic performance of 64-slice MDCT was compared to the results of capsule endoscopy, 99m-technetium-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy (99mTc-RBC scintigraphy), digital subtraction angiography, and surgery whenever available. CT scan showed positive findings in 32 of 50 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values of MDCT for detection of bleed were 72.2%, 42.8%, 81.2%, and 44.4%, respectively. Capsule endoscopy was done in 15 patients and was positive in 10 patients; it had a sensitivity of 71.4%. Eleven patients had undergone 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy prior to CT scan, and the result was positive in seven patients (sensitivity 70%). Digital subtraction angiography was performed in only eight patients and among them all except one patient showed findings consistent with the lesions detected on MDCT. MDCT is a sensitive and noninvasive tool that allows rapid detection and localization of OGIB. It can be used as the first-line investigation in patients with negative endoscopy and colonoscopy studies. MDCT and capsule endoscopy have complementary roles in the evaluation of OGIB.

  2. Breakthrough disseminated zygomycosis induced massive gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia receiving micafungin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kei; Sugawara, Yumiko; Sekine, Takao; Nakase, Kazunori; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2014-11-01

    A 69-year-old man, who had been receiving prednisolone for 11 months for treatment of interstitial pneumonia, was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. During induction therapy, he developed severe pneumonia. Although meropenem and micafungin were started, he died of circulatory failure owing to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Autopsy specimens obtained from the stomach revealed fungal hyphae, which had invaded diffusely into submucosal vessels and caused the massive gastric bleeding. The same hyphae were also observed in both lungs. A diagnosis of disseminated zygomycosis was confirmed by its characteristic histopathological findings. Because zygomycetes are spontaneously resistant to the newer antifungal agents, such as voriconazole or micafungin, it seems likely that the prevalence of zygomycosis as a breakthrough infection may increase in the future. Zygomycosis is a rare, but life-threatening, deep fungal infection that appears in immunologically or metabolically compromised hosts. Its manifestations are clinically similar to those of invasive aspergillosis. In addition to the well-established epidemiology of zygomycosis, this case suggests the following new characteristics. (1) Although the gastrointestinal manifestation of zygomycosis is relatively rare, it is observed more frequently than invasive aspergillosis. (2) Gastrointestinal zygomycosis occasionally leads to the development of necrotic ulcers and may induce hemorrhagic shock.(3) We should be cautious of an occurrence of breakthrough zygomycosis when we use echinocandins for patients with known risk factors, especially steroid use and neutropenia. (4) For patients who are receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics and echinocandins, who are negative for culture studies and aspergillus antigen, and who present with unresolved fever, it is important to make a prompt clinical diagnosis of zygomycosis.

  3. Pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding: Perspectives from the Italian Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Claudio; Oliva, Salvatore; Martellossi, Stefano; Miele, Erasmo; Arrigo, Serena; Graziani, Maria Giovanna; Cardile, Sabrina; Gaiani, Federica; de’Angelis, Gian Luigi; Torroni, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    There are many causes of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in children, and this condition is not rare, having a reported incidence of 6.4%. Causes vary with age, but show considerable overlap; moreover, while many of the causes in the pediatric population are similar to those in adults, some lesions are unique to children. The diagnostic approach for pediatric GIB includes definition of the etiology, localization of the bleeding site and determination of the severity of bleeding; timely and accurate diagnosis is necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality. To assist medical care providers in the evaluation and management of children with GIB, the “Gastro-Ped Bleed Team” of the Italian Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (SIGENP) carried out a systematic search on MEDLINE via PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) to identify all articles published in English from January 1990 to 2016; the following key words were used to conduct the electronic search: “upper GIB” and “pediatric” [all fields]; “lower GIB” and “pediatric” [all fields]; “obscure GIB” and “pediatric” [all fields]; “GIB” and “endoscopy” [all fields]; “GIB” and “therapy” [all fields]. The identified publications included articles describing randomized controlled trials, reviews, case reports, cohort studies, case-control studies and observational studies. References from the pertinent articles were also reviewed. This paper expresses a position statement of SIGENP that can have an immediate impact on clinical practice and for which sufficient evidence is not available in literature. The experts participating in this effort were selected according to their expertise and professional qualifications. PMID:28293079

  4. Role of computed tomography angiography on the management of overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chao-Ming; Lin, I-Chang; Chang, Chi-Yang; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Mo, Lein-Ray; Lin, Jaw-Town; Tai, Chi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim The role of computed tomography angiography (CTA) on the management of acute overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) remains unclear. We designed a study to evaluate the impact of CTA before enteroscopy for acute overt OGIB. Methods All patients undergoing CTA followed by enteroscopy for acute overt OGIB were enrolled in this retrospective study. Clinical characteristics and diagnosis were compared between patients with positive and negative CTA findings. We evaluated the impact of CTA on subsequent enteroscopy. Results From February 2008 to March 2015, 71 patients including 25 patients with positive CTA findings and 46 patients with negative CTA findings, were enrolled. All 25 patients with positive CTA findings were confirmed to have mid GI lesions, a significantly higher proportion than among patients with negative CTA findings (100% vs. 52.2%, respectively; P <0.001). CTA had a higher diagnostic yield for bleeding from tumor origin than from non-tumor origin (80.0% vs. 23.7%, respectively; P <0.001). The diagnostic yield of CTA and enteroscopy was 35.2% and 73.2%, respectively. The lesions could be identified by the initial route of enteroscopy in more patients with positive CTA findings than in those with negative CTA findings (92.0% vs. 47.8%, respectively; P <0.001). Lesions could be identified in seven of the 25 patients (28.0%) with positive CTA findings by using only push enteroscopy instead of single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE), but all 46 patients with negative CTA findings needed SBE for deep small-bowel examination. Conclusions CTA is useful in the diagnosis of acute overt OGIB, especially in patients with bleeding from tumors. In addition, it also can show the precise location of bleeding, and guide subsequent enteroscopic management. PMID:28248993

  5. Defining upper gastrointestinal bleeding from linked primary and secondary care data and the effect on occurrence and 28 day mortality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary care records from the UK have frequently been used to identify episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in studies of drug toxicity because of their comprehensive population coverage and longitudinal recording of prescriptions and diagnoses. Recent linkage within England of primary and secondary care data has augmented this data but the timing and coding of concurrent events, and how the definition of events in linked data effects occurrence and 28 day mortality is not known. Methods We used the recently linked English Hospital Episodes Statistics and General Practice Research Database, 1997–2010, to define events by; a specific upper gastrointestinal bleed code in either dataset, a specific bleed code in both datasets, or a less specific but plausible code from the linked dataset. Results This approach resulted in 81% of secondary care defined bleeds having a corresponding plausible code within 2 months in primary care. However only 62% of primary care defined bleeds had a corresponding plausible HES admission within 2 months. The more restrictive and specific case definitions excluded severe events and almost halved the 28 day case fatality when compared to broader and more sensitive definitions. Conclusions Restrictive definitions of gastrointestinal bleeding in linked datasets fail to capture the full heterogeneity in coding possible following complex clinical events. Conversely too broad a definition in primary care introduces events not severe enough to warrant hospital admission. Ignoring these issues may unwittingly introduce selection bias into a study’s results. PMID:23148590

  6. Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... back into place. Cover the injury with a moist cloth or bandage. Apply only very gentle pressure ... the vomit (looks bright red, or brown like coffee-grounds) Vaginal bleeding (heavier than usual or after ...

  7. A novel approach to assess the spontaneous gastrointestinal bleeding risk of antithrombotic agents using Apc(min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huijun; Shang, Jin; Keohane, CarolAnn; Wang, Min; Li, Qiu; Ni, Weihua; O'Neill, Kim; Chintala, Madhu

    2014-06-01

    Assessment of the bleeding risk of antithrombotic agents is usually performed in healthy animals with some form of vascular injury to peripheral organs to induce bleeding. However, bleeding observed in patients with currently marketed antithrombotic drugs is typically spontaneous in nature such as intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, which happens most frequently on top of preexisting pathologies such as GI ulcerations and polyps. Apc(min/+) mice are reported to develop multiple adenomas through the entire intestinal tract and display progressive anaemia.In this study, we evaluated the potential utility of Apc(min/+) mice as a model for assessing spontaneous GI bleeding with antithrombotic agents. Apc(min/+) mice exhibited progressive blood loss starting at the age of nine weeks. Despite the increase in bleeding, Apc(min/+) mice were in a hypercoagulable state and displayed an age-dependent increase in thrombin generation and circulating fibrinogen as well as a significant decrease in clotting times. We evaluated the effect of warfarin, dabigatran etexilate, apixaban and clopidogrel in this model by administering them in diet or in the drinking water to mice for 1-4 weeks. All of these marketed drugs significantly increased GI bleeding in Apc(min/+) mice, but not in wild-type mice. Although different exposure profiles of these antithrombotic agents make it challenging to compare the bleeding risk of compounds, our results indicate that the Apc(min/+) mouse may be a sensitive preclinical model for assessing the spontaneous GI bleeding risk of novel antithrombotic agents.

  8. Bleeding after expandable nitinol stent placement in patients with esophageal and upper gastrointestinal obstruction: incidence, management, and predictors.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Jin; Song, Ho-Young; Nam, Deok Ho; Ko, Heung Kyu; Park, Jung-Hoon; Na, Han Kyu; Lee, Jong Jin; Kang, Min Kyoung

    2014-11-01

    Placement of self-expandable nitinol stents is useful for the treatment of esophageal and upper gastrointestinal (GI) obstruction. However, complications such as stent migration, tumor overgrowth, and bleeding occur. Although stent migration and tumor overgrowth are well documented in previous studies, the occurrence of bleeding has not been fully evaluated. To evaluate the incidence, management strategies, and predictors of bleeding after placement of self-expandable nitinol stents in patients with esophageal and upper GI obstruction. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and results of computed tomography and endoscopy of 1485 consecutive patients with esophageal and upper GI obstructions who underwent fluoroscopically guided stent placement. Bleeding occurred in 25 of 1485 (1.7%) patients 0 to 348 days after stent placement. Early stent-related bleeding occurred in 10 patients (40%) and angiographic embolization was used for 5/10. Late bleeding occurred in 15 patients (60%) and endoscopic hemostasis was used for 7/15. Twenty-two of 25 (88%) patients with bleeding had received prior radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Bleeding is a rare complication after placement of expandable nitinol stents in patients with esophageal and upper GI obstruction, but patients with early bleeding may require embolization for control. Care must be exercised on placing stents in patients who have received prior radiotherapy or chemotherapy. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma in a patient under anticoagulant agents presenting as upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carrilero Zaragoza, Gabriel; Egea Valenzuela, Juan; Moya Arnao, María; Muñoz Tornero, María; Jijón Crespín, Roxanna; Tomas Pujante, Paula; Iglesias Jorquera, Elena; Parra García, Josefa; Sánchez Velasco, Eduardo; Pereñíguez López, Ana; Miras López, Manuel; Fuster Quiñonero, Matilde; Carballo Álvarez, Fernando

    2016-12-01

    We present the case of a 44-year-old woman with past history of repeated miscarriage and Budd-Chiari syndrome secondary to primary myelofibrosis. Because of this she was under treatment with oral anticoagulant agents. The patient was admitted in hospital as she presented with gastrointestinal bleeding (melena), asthenia and progressive anemia. In an initial upper endoscopy an extrinsic duodenal compression associated with an ulcer on the posterior face of the first portion of duodenum and upper duodenal knee was observed. In the following days a huge spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma due to anticoagulation was diagnosed by computed tomography. This was treated with a percutaneous drainage and withdrawal of the antithrombotic drugs. The evolution of the patient was initially satisfactory but she suffered subclavian and jugular vein thrombosis, and reintroduction of anticoagulant agents at the lowest therapeutic doses was required.

  10. An unusual and fatal case of upper gastrointestinal perforation and bleeding secondary to foreign body ingestion.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Rosario; Tacchella, Tiziana; Lo Pinto, Sara; Bonsignore, Alessandro; Ventura, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    We report a fatal case of gastrointestinal perforation and hemorrhage secondary to the ingestion of a foreign body. While engaged in an amateur futsal competition, an apparently healthy young man suddenly collapsed and his respiration ceased. Autopsy revealed a 3-mm circular perforation on the gastric wall fundus with a significant amount of clotted blood within the gastric lumen. On inspection, a foreign body consisting of a bristle-like hair, later identified via electron microscopy to be a cat vibrissa, i.e. a whisker, was found along the perforation margin. Thus, the inadvertent ingestion of fine, sharp objects (even a cat whisker) can lead to gastric perforation and bleeding, which might prove fatal under given circumstances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  11. Safety of enteral feeding in patients with open abdomen, upper gastrointestinal bleed, and perforation peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Alexandra; Seres, David S

    2012-08-01

    Provision of enteral nutrition (EN) has historically been withheld after major abdominal operations until bowel activity returns. Evidence suggests that EN is safe in critically ill patients with a variety of illnesses, specifically after abdominal surgery. There is a strong association between poor nutrition status and worse outcomes in critically ill patients. The fear has been that EN, by virtue of increased luminal pressure or demand to the splanchnic circulation, may compromise the integrity of anastomotic repairs and place patients at risk for complications. In this review, the authors analyze the safety of EN in the setting of the open abdomen, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and perforation peritonitis, with evidence from published clinical trials and meta-analyses.

  12. A jejunal GIST presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel obstruction secondary to intussusception.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Peter; Lanzon-Miller, Sandro

    2015-11-02

    A 68-year-old man with episodes of overt obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding was investigated with multiple upper and lower GI endoscopies, CT enterography and capsule endoscopy, but no cause was found. He then presented acutely with small bowel obstruction. A laparotomy revealed complete small bowel obstruction secondary to jejunal intussusception over a 4 cm intraluminal polyp. Following resection and primary anastomosis, histology revealed that the polyp was a GI stromal tumour (GIST). This is an exceptionally uncommon presentation of a rare tumour. It is surprising that this tumour was not detected by CT enterography and not seen on capsule endoscopy. Immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis of the GIST suggested that it had a low risk of metastatic disease, but a high risk of recurrence. Staging CT scans did not reveal evidence of distal spread. The patient is currently receiving 3 years of chemotherapy with imatinib. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. An Unusual Cause of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Acute Esophageal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tokala, Madhusudhan R.; Dhillon, Sonu; Pisoh, Watcoun-Nchinda; Walayat, Saqib; Vanar, Vishwas; Puli, Srinivas R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also called “black esophagus,” is a condition characterized by circumferential necrosis of the esophagus with universal distal involvement and variable proximal extension with clear demarcation at the gastroesophageal junction. It is an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is recognized with distinct and striking mucosal findings on endoscopy. The patients are usually older and are critically ill with shared comorbidities, which include atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic renal insufficiency, and malnutrition. Alcoholism and substance abuse could be seen in younger patients. Patients usually have systemic hypotension along with upper abdominal pain in the background of clinical presentation of hematemesis and melena. The endoscopic findings confirm the diagnosis and biopsy is not always necessary unless clinically indicated in atypical presentations. Herein we present two cases with distinct clinical presentation and discuss the endoscopic findings along with a review of the published literature on the management of AEN. PMID:27642529

  14. A Giant Brunneroma Causing Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Severe Anemia Requiring Transfusion and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Laclé, Miangela M.; Borel Rinkes, Inne H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Brunner's gland hamartoma, also called hyperplasia, adenoma, and Brunneroma, is an extremely rare benign proliferative lesion of Brunner's glands in the duodenum. While being mostly small and asymptomatic, they can result in gastrointestinal bleeding and obstruction. We report the case of a 54-year-old man presenting with melena and severe anemia requiring blood transfusion. CT scans showed a large mass of 8 cm in diameter, presumably arising in the duodenum. Endoscopic biopsies were not conclusive. As we were unable to determine the nature of the mass preoperatively and due to the severe symptoms, its size, and the uncertain malignant potential, a classic Whipple procedure was performed. The resected specimen showed extensive proliferation of Brunner's glands without signs of malignancy. PMID:28299229

  15. A Giant Brunneroma Causing Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Severe Anemia Requiring Transfusion and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Nicola C; Laclé, Miangela M; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; Molenaar, Izaak Q; Hagendoorn, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Brunner's gland hamartoma, also called hyperplasia, adenoma, and Brunneroma, is an extremely rare benign proliferative lesion of Brunner's glands in the duodenum. While being mostly small and asymptomatic, they can result in gastrointestinal bleeding and obstruction. We report the case of a 54-year-old man presenting with melena and severe anemia requiring blood transfusion. CT scans showed a large mass of 8 cm in diameter, presumably arising in the duodenum. Endoscopic biopsies were not conclusive. As we were unable to determine the nature of the mass preoperatively and due to the severe symptoms, its size, and the uncertain malignant potential, a classic Whipple procedure was performed. The resected specimen showed extensive proliferation of Brunner's glands without signs of malignancy.

  16. [Intestinal venous vascular malformation: Unusual etiology of gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatrics. Case report].

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Inés S; Steimberg, Clarisa; Udaquiola, Julia; González, Lucio; Liberto, Daniel; Cieri, Patricio; Peralta, Oscar; Orsi, Marina

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal vascular malformations, especially those in the right colon, are a frequent cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they are a very rare condition in children. Symptoms include acute hemorrhage, intestinal obstruction, or chronic anemia of uncertain etiology, which is the most frequent form of presentation but the most difficult to diagnose and thus properly treat. We report the case of an 11 year old boy admitted to the Emergency Room with abdominal pain, vomits, hemodynamic decompensation, who required expansion and blood transfusion. With history ofrecurrent bloody stools since infancy with repeated normal endoscopies and Tc99 scintigraphy with chronic anemia and no improvement despite adequate treatment. In the last admission, the videocolonoscopy detected a venous vascular malformation in the ileocecal region. The angiography and the entero multislice computer tomography scanner were valuable tools to confirm the diagnosis and to select the appropriate surgical procedure for this rare condition. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  17. Hypovolemic shock due to severe gastrointestinal bleeding in a child taking an herbal syrup.

    PubMed

    Moro, Paola Angela; Flacco, Valerio; Cassetti, Federica; Clementi, Valentina; Colombo, Maria Laura; Chiesa, Giulia Maria; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Raschetti, Roberto; Santuccio, Carmela

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 4-years-old boy who was admitted with hypovolemic shock due to a severe gastrointestinal bleeding. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS) showed hiatus hernia, erosions and ulcerations of the lower esophagus, possibly due to a gastroesophageal reflux, and a small duodenal erosion. The child was previously healthy and he had never shown any symptoms related to this condition. The only product taken by the child in the previous days was a syrup containing several herbs, among which Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim. and Salix spp. (known to contain salicylates), marketed as food and prescribed by his paediatrician to treat a mild cold accompanied by fever. Quali-quantitative analysis confirmed the presence of salicylates in the syrup. Naranjo algorithm showed a probable correlation between the onset of symptoms and the consumption of the herbal remedy. The child recovered after receiving intensive care. The product was withdrawn from Italian market.

  18. Study protocol: first nationwide comparative audit of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Kathryn; Guy, Richard; Uberoi, Raman; Seeney, Frances; Collins, Gary; Grant-Casey, John; Mortensen, Neil; Murphy, Mike; Jairath, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a common indication for emergency hospitalisation worldwide. In contrast to upper GIB, patient characteristics, modes of investigation, transfusion, treatment and outcomes are poorly described. There are minimal clinical guidelines to inform care pathways and the use of endoscopy, including (diagnostic and therapeutic yields), interventional radiology and surgery are poorly defined. As a result, there is potential for wide variation in practice and clinical outcomes. Methods and analysis The UK Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Audit is a large nationwide audit of adult patients acutely admitted with LGIB or those who develop LGIB while hospitalised for another reason. Consecutive, unselected presentations with LGIB will be enrolled prospectively over a 2-month period at the end of 2015 and detailed data will be collected on patient characteristics, comorbidities, use of anticoagulants, transfusion, timing and modalities of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, clinical outcome, length of stay and mortality. These will be audited against predefined minimum standards of care for LGIB. It is anticipated that over 80% of all acute hospitals in England and some hospitals in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will participate. Data will be collected on the availability and organisation of care, provision of diagnostic and therapeutic GI endoscopy, interventional radiology, surgery and transfusion protocols. Ethics and dissemination This audit will be conducted as part of the national comparative audit programme of blood transfusion through collaboration with specialists in gastroenterology, surgery and interventional radiology. Individual reports will be provided to each participant site as well as an overall report and disseminated through specialist societies. Results will also be published in peer-reviewed journals. The study has been funded by National Health Services (NHS) Blood and Transplant and the

  19. Variability in the management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Europe: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Angel; Aabakken, Lars; Fonseca, Jorge; Mungan, Zeynel; Papatheodoridis, George; Piessevaux, Hubert; Rotondano, Gianluca; Nuevo, Javier; Tafalla, Monica

    2012-12-01

    Despite recent advances in endoscopic and pharmacological management, nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is still associated with considerable mortality and morbidity that vary between countries. The European Survey of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding (ENERGiB) reported clinical outcomes across Europe (Belgium, Greece, Italy, Norway, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey) and evaluated management strategies in a "real-world" European setting. This article presents the differences in clinical management strategies among countries participating in ENERGiB. Adult patients consecutively presenting with overt NVUGIB at 123 participating hospitals over a 2-month period were included. Data relevant to the initial NVUGIB episode and for up to 30 days afterwards were collected retrospectively from patient medical records. The number of evaluable patients was 2,660; patient demographics and clinical characteristics were similar across countries. There was wide between-country variability in the area and speciality of the NVUGIB management team and unit transfer rates after the initial hospital assessment. The mean time from admission to endoscopy was <1 day only in Italy and Spain. Wide variation in the use of preendoscopy (35.0-88.7%) and relatively consistent (86.5-96.0%) postendoscopic pharmacological therapy rates were observed. There was substantial by-country variability in the rate of therapeutic procedures performed during endoscopy (24.9-47.6%). NVUGIB-related healthcare resource consumption was high and variable (days hospitalized, mean 5.4-8.7 days; number of endoscopies during hospitalization, mean 1.1-1.7). ENERGiB demonstrates that there are substantial differences in the management of patients with acute NVUGIB episodes across Europe, and that in many cases the guideline recommendations for the management of NVUGIB are not being followed.

  20. Late gastrointestinal bleeding after infrarenal aortic grafting: a 16-year experience.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Paolo; Dalainas, Ilias; Ramponi, Fabio; Dell'Aglio, Daniela; Casana, Renato; Nano, Giovanni; Malacrida, Giovanni; Tealdi, Domenico G

    2007-01-01

    To review the manifestation and management of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by secondary aortoenteric fistula (AEF) after infrarenal aortic grafting. Between 1991 and 2006, nine patients underwent emergency treatment for secondary AEF localized in the duodenum (78%), ileum (11%), or sigmoid colon (11%). Three (33%) patients suffered hypovolemic shock. There were two (22%) real fistulas and seven (78%) paraprosthetic fistulas. Graft infection was confirmed in four (45%) patients and four (45%) had proximal sterile pseudoaneurysms. Surgical management consisted of graft removal with (n = 5) or without simultaneous extra-anatomic bypass (n = 1), in situ Dacron graft interposition (n = 3), ileo-duodenorrhaphy (n = 8), sigmoidectomy with colostomy (n = 1), and segmentary ileectomy (n = 1). Endografting was used only as a temporary measure to control bleeding in two patients. The mortality rate was 55% (n = 5). There were no intraoperative deaths, but 75% of the septic patients, 66% of those with preoperative hemodynamic instability, 50% of those with pseudoaneurysms, and 100% of those who required bowel resection died during the early postoperative period. Moreover, all of the surviving patients suffered early postoperative morbidity, resulting in prolonged intensive care unit stay and hospitalization. Secondary AEF is life-threatening, difficult to treat, and associated with high morbidity and mortality, especially in patients with sepsis or hemodynamic instability and those requiring bowel resection.

  1. Do NSAIDs and ASA Cause More Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Elderly than Adults?

    PubMed

    Kocoglu, Hakan; Oguz, Basak; Dogan, Hakan; Okuturlar, Yildiz; Hursitoglu, Mehmet; Harmankaya, Ozlem; Altuntas, Yuksel; Kumbasar, Abdulbaki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. NSAIDs and ASA may cause upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) both in adults and in elderly. There is no study that compares this increased bleeding risk between adult and elderly subjects. Methods. A total of 524 patients with UGIB were included in this study. The data of patients were, respectively, analyzed. Results. NSAIDs and ASA-associated UGIB rates were similar between <65 years (345 patients) (group 1) and ≥65 years (179 patients) (group 2) (28.4% versus 23.5%, p = 0.225 and 13% versus 19%, p = 0.071, resp.). Warfarin-associated UGIB was found significantly higher in group 2 than group 1. Elderly patients with NSAID-associated UGIB had significantly higher length of stay (LoS) and CoH than adult patients with NSAID-associated UGIB (p = 0.002 and 0.001, resp.). Elderly patients with ASA-associated UGIB had significantly higher CoH than adult patients with NSAID-associated UGIB. Conclusions. Using NSAIDs without gastroprotective drugs or using ASA with gastroprotective drugs in elderly patients is as safe as in adult patients. Not only should adding gastroprotective drugs to ASA or NSAID be based on their risk of UGIB, but the cost of hospitalization of ASA or NSAID-associated UGIB should be considered.

  2. Comparison of Three Risk Scores to Predict Outcomes of Severe Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Marine; Jensen, Dennis M.; Ohning, Gordon V.; Kovacs, Thomas O.; Jutabha, Rome; Ghassemi, Kevin A.; Machicado, Gustavo A.; Dulai, Gareth S.; Jensen, Mary Ellen; Gornbein, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Improved medical decisions by using a score at the initial patient triage level may lead to improvements in patient management, outcomes, and resource utilization. There is no validated score for management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) unlike for upper GIB. The aim of our study was to compare the accuracies of 3 different prognostic scores (CURE Hemostasis prognosis score, Charlston index and ASA score) for the prediction of 30 day rebleeding, surgery and death in severe LGIB. Methods Data on consecutive patients hospitalized with severe GI bleeding from January 2006 to October 2011 in our two-tertiary academic referral centers were prospectively collected. Sensitivities, specificities, accuracies and area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) were computed for three scores for predictions of rebleeding, surgery and mortality at 30 days. Results 235 consecutive patients with LGIB were included between 2006 and 2011. 23% of patients rebled, 6% had surgery, and 7.7% of patients died. The accuracies of each score never reached 70% for predicting rebleeding or surgery in either. The ASA score had a highest accuracy for predicting mortality within 30 days (83.5%) whereas the CURE Hemostasis prognosis score and the Charlson index both had accuracies less than 75% for the prediction of death within 30 days. Conclusions ASA score could be useful to predict death within 30 days. However a new score is still warranted to predict all 30 days outcomes (rebleeding, surgery and death) in LGIB. PMID:25599218

  3. Simple risk factors to predict urgent endoscopy in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding pre-endoscopically

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianzong; Hu, Duanming; Tang, Wen; Hu, Chuanyin; Lu, Qin; Li, Juan; Zhu, Jianhong; Xu, Liming; Sui, Zhenyu; Qian, Mingjie; Wang, Shaofeng; Yin, Guojian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of this study is to evaluate how to predict high-risk nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) pre-endoscopically. A total of 569 NVUGIB patients between Match 2011 and January 2015 were retrospectively studied. The clinical characteristics and laboratory data were statistically analyzed. The severity of NVUGIB was based on high-risk NVUGIB (Forrest I–IIb), and low-risk NVUGIB (Forrest IIc and III). By logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic curve, simple risk score systems were derived which predicted patients’ risks of potentially needing endoscopic intervention to control bleeding. Risk score systems combined of patients’ serum hemoglobin (Hb) ≤75 g/L, red hematemesis, red stool, shock, and blood urine nitrogen ≥8.5 mmol/L within 24 hours after admission were derived. As for each one of these clinical signs, the relatively high specificity was 97.9% for shock, 96.4% for red stool, 85.5% for red hematemesis, 76.7% for Hb ≤75 g/L, and the sensitivity was 50.8% for red hematemesis, 47.5% for Hb ≤75 g/L, 14.2% for red stool, and 10.9% for shock. When these 5 clinical signs were presented as a risk score system, the highest area of receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.746, with sensitivity 0.675 and specificity 0.733, which discriminated well with high-risk NVUGIB. These simple risk factors identified patients with high-risk NVUGIB of needing treatment to manage their bleeding pre-endoscopically. Further validation in the clinic was required. PMID:27367977

  4. Randomized pragmatic trial of nasogastric tube placement in patients with upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rockey, Don C; Ahn, Chul; de Melo, Silvio W

    2017-04-01

    The value of nasogastric (NG) tube placement in patients with upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding (UGIB) is unclear. We therefore aimed to determine the usefulness of NG tube placement in patients with UGIB. The study was a single-blind, randomized, prospective, non-inferiority study comparing NG placement (with aspiration and lavage) to no NG placement (control). The primary outcome was the probability that physicians could predict the presence of a high-risk lesion (ie, requiring endoscopic therapy). 140 patients in each arm were included; baseline clinical features were similar in each group. The probability that there would be a high-risk lesion in the control arm was predicted to be 35% compared with 39% in the NG arm (after NG placement)-a probability difference of -4% (95% CI -12% to 3%), which confirmed non-inferiority of the 2 arms (p=0.002). All patients underwent endoscopy and all patients with high-risk lesions had endoscopic therapy. Physicians predicted the specific culprit lesion in 38% (53/140) and 39% (55/140) of patients in the control and NG (after NG placement) groups, respectively. The presence of coffee grounds or red blood in the NG aspirate did not change physician assessments. Pain, nasal bleeding, or failure of NG occurred in 47/140 (34%) patients. There were no differences in rebleeding rates or mortality. In patients with acute UGIB, the ability of physicians to predict culprit bleeding lesions and/or the presence of high-risk lesions was poor. Routine NG placement did not improve physician's predictive ability, did not affect outcomes, and was complicated in one-third of patients. NCT00689754. Copyright © 2017 American Federation for Medical Research.

  5. Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Rescue treatment with a modified cyanoacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Grassia, Roberto; Capone, Pietro; Iiritano, Elena; Vjero, Katerina; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Martinotti, Mario; Rozzi, Gabriele; Buffoli, Federico

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a modified cyanoacrylate [N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate associated with methacryloxysulfolane (NBCA + MS)] to treat non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NV-UGIB). METHODS In our retrospective study we took into account 579 out of 1177 patients receiving endoscopic treatment for NV-UGIB admitted to our institution from 2008 to 2015; the remaining 598 patients were treated with other treatments. Initial hemostasis was not achieved in 45 of 579 patients; early rebleeding occurred in 12 of 579 patients. Thirty-three patients were treated with modified cyanoacrylate: 27 patients had duodenal, gastric or anastomotic ulcers, 3 had post-mucosectomy bleeding, 2 had Dieulafoy’s lesions, and 1 had duodenal diverticular bleeding. RESULTS Of the 45 patients treated endoscopically without initial hemostasis or with early rebleeding, 33 (76.7%) were treated with modified cyanoacrylate glue, 16 (37.2%) underwent surgery, and 3 (7.0%) were treated with selective transarterial embolization. The mean age of patients treated with NBCA + MS (23 males and 10 females) was 74.5 years. Modified cyanoacrylate was used in 24 patients during the first endoscopy and in 9 patients experiencing rebleeding. Overall, hemostasis was achieved in 26 of 33 patients (78.8%): 19 out of 24 (79.2%) during the first endoscopy and in 7 out of 9 (77.8%) among early rebleeders. Two patients (22.2%) not responding to cyanoacrylate treatment were treated with surgery or transarterial embolization. One patient had early rebleeding after treatment with cyanoacrylate. No late rebleeding during the follow-up or complications related to the glue injection were recorded. CONCLUSION Modified cyanoacrylate solved definitively NV-UGIB after failure of conventional treatment. Some reported life-threatening adverse events with other formulations, advise to use it as last option. PMID:28082813

  6. Four patients with gastrointestinal bleeding identified by a modified in vivo technique with labeled red blood cells sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Chao, Kang-Hung; Huang, Cheng-Kai; Luzhbin, Dmytro; Wu, Jay

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy (GIBS) offers the advantage of continuous monitoring of patients to localize the site of gastrointestinal bleeding. In this study, a modified in vivo labeling method with sedimentation of the labeled red blood cells (RBC) was applied to remove free technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) and increase labeling efficiency. Four patients were studied. A modified in vivo RBC labeling method was used. After 10 minutes of RBC sedimentation, patients' blood plasma in the upper part of the syringe was removed, and the erythrocytes labeled with (99m)Tc were re-administered to the patient. Serial dynamic scintiphotos were taken during the first 60 minutes. Delayed static images were acquired up to 22 hours after injection. The labeling efficiency of (99m)Tc-RBC increased up to 93%. GIBS can be performed after 20 hours post-injection and provide accurate diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding. No false positive findings due to free (99m)Tc accumulation were observed for the four patients. The modified in vivo method with sedimentation is a simple and effective way to increase the labeling efficiency and thus the diagnosis for the detection of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  7. Ankaferd Blood Stopper for controlling gastrointestinal bleeding due to distinct benign lesions refractory to conventional antihemorrhagic measures

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Mevlut; Onal, Ibrahim Koral; Akdogan, Meral; Kekilli, Murat; Arhan, Mehmet; Sayilir, Abdurrahim; Oztas, Erkin; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the hemostatic efficacy of the Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS, Ankaferd Health Products Ltd, Turkey) hemostatic agent for controlling gastrointestinal bleeding associated with various benign lesions refractory to conventional antihemorrhagic measures. METHODS: The records of all patients who underwent upper and lower endoscopy procedures at the Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Teaching and Research Hospital (Ankara, Turkey) between April 2008 and June 2009 were reviewed. Patients in whom ABS was used as a primary or adjuvant hemostatic agent were included in the study. Rates of bleeding control and postprocedural complications were documented. RESULTS: Hemostasis with no immediate complications was achieved in all patients within seconds of endoscopic application of ABS. CONCLUSIONS: ABS may have a role as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant to conventional modalities used to control gastrointestinal bleeding. Prospective controlled studies are needed to help establish its efficacy and, perhaps, offer a comparison with conventional hemostatic interventions. PMID:20559581

  8. [Clinical epidemiological characteristics and change trend of upper gastrointestinal bleeding over the past 15 years].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinping; Cui, Yi; Wang, Jinhui; Chen, Baili; He, Yao; Chen, Minhu

    2017-04-25

    To investigate the clinical epidemiology change trend of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) over the past 15 years. Consecutive patients who was diagnosed as continuous UGIB in the endoscopy center of The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun-Yat University during the period from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 1998 and the period from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2013 were enrolled in this study. Their gender, age, etiology, ulcer classification, endoscopic treatment and hospitalization mortality were compared between two periods. In periods from 1997 to 1998 and 2012 to 2013, the detection rate of UGIB was 9.99%(928/9 287) and 4.49%(1 092/24 318)(χ(2)=360.089, P=0.000); the percentage of male patients was 73.28%(680/928) and 72.44% (791/1 092) (χ(2)=0.179, P=0.672), and the onset age was (47.3±16.4) years and (51.4±18.2) years (t=9.214, P=0.002) respectively. From 1997 to 1998, the first etiology of UGIB was peptic ulcer bleeding, accounting for 65.2%(605/928)[duodenal ulcer 47.8%(444/928), gastric ulcer 8.3%(77/928), stomal ulcer 2.3%(21/928), compound ulcer 6.8%(63/928)],the second was cancer bleeding(7.0%,65/928), and the third was esophageal and gastric varices bleeding (6.4%,59/928). From 2012 to 2013, peptic ulcer still was the first cause of UGIB, but the ratio obviously decreased to 52.7%(575/1092)(χ(2)=32.467, P=0.000)[duodenal ulcer 31.9%(348/1092), gastric ulcer 9.4%(103/1092), stomal ulcer 2.8%(30/1092), compound ulcer 8.6%(94/1092)]. The decreased ratio of duodenal ulcer bleeding was the main reason (χ(2)=53.724, P=0.000). Esophageal and gastric varices bleeding became the second cause (15.1%,165/1 092, χ(2)=38.976, P=0.000), and cancer was the third cause (9.2%,101/1 092, χ(2)=3.352, P=0.067). The largest increasing amplitude of the onset age was peptic ulcer bleeding [(46.2±16.7) years vs. (51.9±18.9) years, t=-5.548, P=0.000), and the greatest contribution to the amplitude was duodenal ulcer bleeding [(43.4±15.9) years vs. (48.4±19

  9. Capsule Endoscopy in the Assessment of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is defined as persistent or recurrent bleeding associated with negative findings on upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopic evaluations. The diagnosis and management of patients with OGIB is particularly challenging because of the length and complex loops of the small intestine. Capsule endoscopy (CE) is 1 diagnostic modality that is used to determine the etiology of bleeding. Objectives The objective of this analysis was to review the diagnostic accuracy, safety, and impact on health outcomes of CE in patients with OGIB in comparison with other diagnostic modalities. Data Sources A literature search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published between 2007 and 2013. Review Methods Data on diagnostic accuracy, safety, and impact on health outcomes were abstracted from included studies. Quality of evidence was assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). Results The search yielded 1,189 citations, and 24 studies were included. Eight studies reported diagnostic accuracy comparing CE with other diagnostic modalities. Capsule endoscopy has a higher sensitivity and lower specificity than magnetic resonance enteroclysis, computed tomography, and push enteroscopy. Capsule endoscopy has a good safety profile with few adverse events, although comparative safety data with other diagnostic modalities are limited. Capsule endoscopy is associated with no difference in patient health-related outcomes such as rebleeding or follow-up treatment compared with push enteroscopy, small-bowel follow-through, and angiography. Limitations There was significant heterogeneity in estimates of diagnostic accuracy, which prohibited a statistical summary of findings. The analysis was also limited by the fact that there is no

  10. Validity of peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses in administrative databases: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Montedori, Alessandro; Abraha, Iosief; Chiatti, Carlos; Cozzolino, Francesco; Orso, Massimiliano; Luchetta, Maria Laura; Rimland, Joseph M; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Administrative healthcare databases are useful to investigate the epidemiology, health outcomes, quality indicators and healthcare utilisation concerning peptic ulcers and gastrointestinal bleeding, but the databases need to be validated in order to be a reliable source for research. The aim of this protocol is to perform the first systematic review of studies reporting the validation of International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision and 10th version (ICD-9 and ICD-10) codes for peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses. Methods and analysis MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library databases will be searched, using appropriate search strategies. We will include validation studies that used administrative data to identify peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses or studies that evaluated the validity of peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding codes in administrative data. The following inclusion criteria will be used: (a) the presence of a reference standard case definition for the diseases of interest; (b) the presence of at least one test measure (eg, sensitivity, etc) and (c) the use of an administrative database as a source of data. Pairs of reviewers will independently abstract data using standardised forms and will evaluate quality using the checklist of the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) criteria. This systematic review protocol has been produced in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Protocol (PRISMA-P) 2015 statement. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required given that this is a protocol for a systematic review. We will submit results of this study to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. The results will serve as a guide for researchers validating administrative healthcare databases to determine appropriate case definitions for peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal

  11. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding as a result of fistula between the iliac artery and sigmoid colon in patient with advanced testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Santos, Vanessa Prado dos; Razuk, Álvaro Filho; Júnior, Valter Castelli; Caffaro, Roberto Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Fistula between arteries and the gastrointestinal tract are a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, but potentially fatal. The recognition and early treatment can modify the patient prognosis. We report a case of a patient with previous surgery for seminoma of cryptorchidic testicle, with massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding. We performed the diagnosis and surgical treatment of the fistula between left external iliac artery and sigmoid colon. The patient was successfully treated by external iliac artery ligation and left colectomy.

  12. Capsule Endoscopy in the Assessment of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Palimaka, S; Blackhouse, Gord; Goeree, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background Small-bowel capsule endoscopy is a tool used to visualize the small bowel to identify the location of bleeds in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Capsule endoscopy is currently funded in Ontario in cases where there has been a failure to identify a source of bleeding via conventional diagnostic procedures. In Ontario, capsule endoscopy is a diagnostic option for patients whose findings on esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, and push enteroscopy have been negative (i.e., the source of bleeding was not found). Objectives This economic analysis aims to estimate the budget impact of different rates of capsule endoscopy use as a complement to push enteroscopy procedures in patients aged 18 years and older. Data Sources Population-based administrative databases for Ontario were used to identify patients receiving push enteroscopy and small-bowel capsule endoscopy in the fiscal years 2008 to 2012. Review Methods A systematic literature search was performed to identify economic evaluations of capsule endoscopy for the investigation of OGIB. Studies were assessed for their methodological quality and their applicability to the Ontarian setting. An original budget impact analysis was performed using data from Ontarian administrative sources and published literature. The budget impact was estimated for different levels of use of capsule endoscopy as a complement to push enteroscopy due to the uncertain clinical utility of the capsule based on current clinical evidence. The analysis was conducted from the provincial public payer perspective. Results With varying rates of capsule endoscopy use, the budgetary impact spans from savings of $510,000,1 when no (0%) push enteroscopy procedures are complemented with capsule endoscopy, to $2,036,000, when all (100%) push enteroscopy procedures are complemented with capsule endoscopy. A scenario where 50% of push enteroscopy procedures are complemented with capsule endoscopy (expected use based on expert opinion

  13. External validation of scoring systems in risk stratification of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Anchu, Anna Cherian; Mohsina, Subair; Sureshkumar, Sathasivam; Mahalakshmy, T; Kate, Vikram

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to externally validate the four commonly used scoring systems in the risk stratification of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB). Patients of UGIB who underwent endoscopy within 24 h of presentation were stratified prospectively using the pre-endoscopy Rockall score (PRS) >0, complete Rockall score (CRS) >2, Glasgow Blatchford bleeding scores (GBS) >3, and modified GBS (m-GBS) >3 scores. Patients were followed up to 30 days. Prognostic accuracy of the scores was done by comparing areas under curve (AUC) in terms of overall risk stratification, re-bleeding, mortality, need for intervention, and length of hospitalization. One hundred and seventy-five patients were studied. All four scores performed better in the overall risk stratification on AUC [PRS = 0.566 (CI: 0.481-0.651; p-0.043)/CRS = 0.712 (CI: 0.634-0.790); p<0.001)/GBS = 0.810 (CI: 0.744-0.877; p->0.001); m-GBS = 0.802 (CI: 0.734-0.871; p<0.001)], whereas only CRS achieved significance in identifying re-bleed [AUC-0.679 (CI: 0.579-0.780; p = 0.003)]. All the scoring systems except PRS were found to be significantly better in detecting 30-day mortality with a high AUC (CRS = 0.798; p-0.042)/GBS = 0.833; p-0.023); m-GBS = 0.816; p-0.031). All four scores demonstrated significant accuracy in the risk stratification of non-variceal patients; however, only GBS and m-GBS were significant in variceal etiology. Higher cutoff scores achieved better sensitivity/specificity [RS > 0 (50/60.8), CRS > 1 (87.5/50.6), GBS > 7 (88.5/63.3), m-GBS > 7(82.3/72.6)] in the risk stratification. GBS and m-GBS appear to be more valid in risk stratification of UGIB patients in this region. Higher cutoff values achieved better predictive accuracy.

  14. Importance of Heparin Provocation and SPECT/CT in Detecting Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding on 99mTc-RBC Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Haghighatafshar, Mahdi; Gheisari, Farshid; Ghaedian, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We presented a pediatric case with a history of intermittent melena for 3 years because of angiodyplasia of small intestine. The results of frequent upper gastrointestinal endoscopies and colonoscopies as well as both 99mTc-red blood cell (RBC) and Meckel's scintigraphies for several times were negative in detection of bleeding site. However, 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) after heparin augmentation detected a site of bleeding in the distal ileum which later was confirmed during surgery with final diagnosis of angiodysplasia. It could be stated that heparin provocation of bleeding before 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy accompanied by fused SPECT/CT images should be kept in mind for management of intestinal bleeding especially in difficult cases. PMID:26313771

  15. [Capsule endoscopy and obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: does the form of presentation matter?].

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Javier; Téllez Villajos, Luis; Aicart-Ramos, Marta; Crespo Pérez, Laura; Graus Morales, Javier; Boixeda de Miguel, Daniel; Albillos Martínez, Agustín

    2015-02-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is defined as bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract with no obvious cause after assessment with upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. In these cases, the source is suspected to be in the small bowel. Obscure bleeding can be occult or overt. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and analytical characteristics and findings on capsule endoscopy in patients with OGIB and to determine the factors related to the detection of lesions in both forms of presentation. We performed a retrospective study of capsule endoscopies carried out between November 2009 and November 2012 for OGIB. We analyzed 284 capsule endoscopies in 272 patients. Initially, 12 procedures could not be evaluated and were repeated. A total of 272 procedures were finally included in the analysis. The results of 114 (41.9%) capsule endoscopies were normal. Compared with patients with occult OGIB, those with overt OGIB were significantly older (70.2 vs. 67.5 years; p = 0.04), consumed more NSAID (24.2% vs. 11.9%; p = 0.01), had higher hemoglobin levels (9.3 vs. 10.4; p < 0,001) and more frequently required transfusion (64.5% vs 32.2%; p < 0.001). No differences were found between the two forms of presentation in the detection of canker sores-ulcers and polyps-masses. Vascular lesions were more frequently detected in overt than in occult OGIB (40.3% vs. 25.7%, respectively), (p < 0.05). When the total number of diagnoses carried out by capsule endoscopy was analyzed, no differences were found in diagnostic yield between overt OGIB (57%) and occult OGIB (54%), (p = 0.6). In overt OGIB, multivariate analysis showed that the variables that significantly predicted the detection of lesions on capsule endoscopy were consumption of medication NSAID (OR 2.75; p = 0.01), antiplatelets and anticoagulants (OR 2.64; p = 0.03) and analytical data hemoglobin (OR 3.23; p < 0.001) and INR (OR 1.8; p = 0.02). In occult OGIB, multivariate analysis showed that the

  16. Safety and efficacy of single-balloon enteroscopy in management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Koul, Abhinav; Pham, Donald M; Nanda, Arjun; Woods, Kevin E; Keilin, Steven D

    2017-03-01

    Background and study aims Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are currently the standard of care in treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure waiting for heart transplant as well as destination therapy for non-transplant candidates. However, patients with LVADs are at increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding due to the device's unique effects on hemodynamics. A major source of gastrointestinal bleeding in these patients are gastrointestinal angioectasias located within the small bowel that can only be reached with deep enteroscopy. The goal of our study was to determine the safety and efficacy of single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) in treating gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with LVADs. Patients and methods We present a retrospective case series performed on patients with LVADs who underwent SBE to treat episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding. All procedures were performed at Emory University Hospital by a single endoscopist. Patient demographics, diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding, episodes of re-bleeding, and procedure-related complications were examined. Results A total of 27 SBE procedures performed in 14 patients were reviewed. SBE was performed in an antegrade approach in 89 % (24/27) of cases. Deep intubation was achieved in all antegrade procedures, with the distal jejunum reached in 79 % (19/24) of cases. The diagnostic yield was 78 %. There were no reported complications associated with the procedures. Conclusions SBE is a safe and effective modality to manage gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with LVADs.

  17. Safety and efficacy of single-balloon enteroscopy in management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with a left ventricular assist device

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Abhinav; Pham, Donald M.; Nanda, Arjun; Woods, Kevin E.; Keilin, Steven D.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are currently the standard of care in treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure waiting for heart transplant as well as destination therapy for non-transplant candidates. However, patients with LVADs are at increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding due to the device’s unique effects on hemodynamics. A major source of gastrointestinal bleeding in these patients are gastrointestinal angioectasias located within the small bowel that can only be reached with deep enteroscopy. The goal of our study was to determine the safety and efficacy of single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) in treating gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with LVADs. Patients and methods We present a retrospective case series performed on patients with LVADs who underwent SBE to treat episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding. All procedures were performed at Emory University Hospital by a single endoscopist. Patient demographics, diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding, episodes of re-bleeding, and procedure-related complications were examined. Results A total of 27 SBE procedures performed in 14 patients were reviewed. SBE was performed in an antegrade approach in 89 % (24/27) of cases. Deep intubation was achieved in all antegrade procedures, with the distal jejunum reached in 79 % (19/24) of cases. The diagnostic yield was 78 %. There were no reported complications associated with the procedures. Conclusions SBE is a safe and effective modality to manage gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with LVADs. PMID:28299353

  18. Left Ventricular Assist Devices Impact Hospital Resource Utilization Without Affecting Patient Mortality in Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Hinton, Alice; Chen, Alan; Mehta, Nishaki K; Eldika, Samer; Zhang, Cheng; Hussan, Hisham; Conwell, Darwin L; Krishna, Somashekar G

    2017-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are being utilized for management of end-stage heart failure and require systemic anticoagulation. Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is one of the most common adverse events following LVAD implantation. To investigate the impact of continuous-flow (CF) LVAD implants on outcomes of patients admitted with GIB. This is a cross-sectional study utilizing the Nationwide Inpatient Sample in the CF-LVAD era from 2010 to 2012. All adult admissions with a primary diagnosis of GIB were included. Among hospitalizations with GIB, patients with (cases) and without (controls) CF-LVAD implants were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. The main outcome measurements were in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and hospitalization costs. Among 1,002,299 hospitalizations for GIB, 1112 (0.11%) patients had CF-LVADs. Bleeding angiodysplasia accounted for a majority of GIB in CF-LVAD patients (35.4% of 1112). Multivariate analysis adjusting for demographic, hospital and etiological differences, site of GIB, and patient comorbidities revealed that CF-LVADs were not adversely associated with mortality in GIB (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.07-4.15). However, CF-LVADs independently accounted for prolonged hospitalization (3.5 days, 95% CI 2.6-4.6) and higher hospital charges ($37,032, 95% CI $7991-$66,074). In patients admitted with GIB, CF-LVAD implantation accounts for higher healthcare utilization, but is not adversely associated with mortality despite therapeutic anticoagulation, increased comorbidities, and comparatively delayed endoscopy. These findings are relevant as CF-LVADs are the dominant type of LVAD and are associated with increased risk of GIB compared to their predecessors.

  19. Risk assessment scores for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and their use in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Katy M; Stanley, Adrian J

    2015-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common cause for emergency admission to hospital representing a significant clinical as well as economic burden. UGIB encompasses a wide range of severities from life-threatening exsanguination to minor bleeding that may not require hospital admission. Patients with UGIB are often initially assessed and managed by junior doctors and non-gastroenterologists. Several risk scores have been created for the assessment of these patients, some requiring endoscopic data for calculation and others that are calculable from clinical data alone. A key question in clinical practice is how to accurately identify patients with UGIB at high risk of adverse outcome. Patients considered high risk are more likely to experience adverse outcomes and will require urgent intervention. In contrast, those patients with UGIB who are considered to be low risk could potentially be managed on an outpatient basis. The Glasgow Blatchford Score (GBS) appears best at identifying patients at low risk of requiring intervention or death and therefore may be best for use in clinical practice, allowing outpatient management in low risk cases. There has been some debate as to the optimal GBS cut-off score for safely identifying this low-risk group. Many guidelines suggest that patients with a GBS of zero can be safely managed as outpatients, but more recent studies have suggested that this threshold could potentially be safely increased to ≤1. Most other patients require inpatient endoscopy within 24 h and the full Rockall score remains important for risk assessment following endoscopy, particularly as it includes the endoscopic diagnosis. A minority of patients will require emergency endoscopy following resuscitation, but at present there is no evidence that risk scores can accurately identify this very high-risk group. Studies have shown the latest risk assessment score, the AIMS65, looks promising in the prediction of mortality. However, to date there is

  20. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK: patient characteristics, diagnoses and outcomes in the 2007 UK audit.

    PubMed

    Hearnshaw, Sarah A; Logan, Richard F A; Lowe, Derek; Travis, Simon P L; Murphy, Mike F; Palmer, Kelvin R

    2011-10-01

    To describe the patient characteristics, diagnoses and clinical outcomes of patients presenting with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) in the 2007 UK Audit. Multi-centre survey. All UK hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB. All adults (>16 years) presenting in or to UK hospitals with AUGIB between 1 May and 30 June 2007. Data on 6750 patients (median age 68 years) was collected from 208 participating hospitals. New admissions (n=5550) were younger (median age 65 years) than inpatients (n=1107, median age 71 years), with less co-morbidity (any co-morbidity 46% vs 71%, respectively). At presentation 9% (599/6750) had known cirrhosis, 26% a history of alcohol excess, 11% were taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and 28% aspirin. Peptic ulcer disease accounted for 36% of AUGIB and bleeding varices 11%. In 13% there was evidence of further bleeding after the first endoscopy. 1.9% underwent surgery and 1.2% interventional radiology for AUGIB. Median length of stay was 5 days. Overall mortality in hospital was 10% (675/6750, 95% CI 9.3 to 10.7), 7% in new admissions and 26% among inpatients. Mortality was highest in those with variceal bleeding (15%) and with malignancy (17%). AUGIB continues to result in substantial mortality although it appears to be lower than in 1993. Mortality is particularly high among inpatients and those bleeding from varices or upper gastrointestinal malignancy. Surgical or radiological interventions are little used currently.

  1. Comparison of risk scoring systems for patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding: international multicentre prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Loren; Dalton, Harry R; Ngu, Jing H; Schultz, Michael; Abazi, Roseta; Zakko, Liam; Thornton, Susan; Wilkinson, Kelly; Khor, Cristopher J L; Murray, Iain A; Laursen, Stig B

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the predictive accuracy and clinical utility of five risk scoring systems in the assessment of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Design International multicentre prospective study. Setting Six large hospitals in Europe, North America, Asia, and Oceania. Participants 3012 consecutive patients presenting over 12 months with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Main outcome measures Comparison of pre-endoscopy scores (admission Rockall, AIMS65, and Glasgow Blatchford) and post-endoscopy scores (full Rockall and PNED) for their ability to predict predefined clinical endpoints: a composite endpoint (transfusion, endoscopic treatment, interventional radiology, surgery, or 30 day mortality), endoscopic treatment, 30 day mortality, rebleeding, and length of hospital stay. Optimum score thresholds to identify low risk and high risk patients were determined. Results The Glasgow Blatchford score was best (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) 0.86) at predicting intervention or death compared with the full Rockall score (0.70), PNED score (0.69), admission Rockall score (0.66, and AIMS65 score (0.68) (all P<0.001). A Glasgow Blatchford score of ≤1 was the optimum threshold to predict survival without intervention (sensitivity 98.6%, specificity 34.6%). The Glasgow Blatchford score was better at predicting endoscopic treatment (AUROC 0.75) than the AIMS65 (0.62) and admission Rockall scores (0.61) (both P<0.001). A Glasgow Blatchford score of ≥7 was the optimum threshold to predict endoscopic treatment (sensitivity 80%, specificity 57%). The PNED (AUROC 0.77) and AIMS65 scores (0.77) were best at predicting mortality, with both superior to admission Rockall score (0.72) and Glasgow Blatchford score (0.64; P<0.001). Score thresholds of ≥4 for PNED, ≥2 for AIMS65, ≥4 for admission Rockall, and ≥5 for full Rockall were optimal at predicting death, with sensitivities of 65.8-78.6% and specificities of 65

  2. Life-threatening bleeding of a duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a teenager: a rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Valli, Piero V.; Valli, Carlo; Pfammatter, Thomas; Bauerfeind, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are per se infrequent and are exceptional in children or young adults. So far, only 2 cases of pediatric duodenal GISTs have been published. Here we report on the case of a 19-year-old female patient who was admitted in hemorrhagic shock due to arterial bleeding of a duodenal GIST located in immediate proximity to the major duodenal papilla. After several attempts of endoscopic hemostasis failed, the tumor bleeding was controlled with a second coil embolization of the pancreaticoduodenal arcades. PMID:27995183

  3. Pancreatitis-associated pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery presenting as lower gastrointestinal bleeding: treatment with transcatheter embolisation

    PubMed Central

    Taslakian, Bedros; Khalife, Mohammad; Faraj, Walid; Mukherji, Deborah; Haydar, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a known cause of pseudoaneurysms of the peripancreatic arteries, which can rarely rupture into various adjacent structures and become a source of life-threatening bleeding. The management is challenging and requires an individualised approach and multidisciplinary care. Herein, we present the case of a 24-year-old man in whom a splenic pseudoaneurysm ruptured into the adjacent infected pseudocyst, communicating with the colon by a fistulous tract, causing massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This was successfully managed by transcatheter arterial embolisation (TAE). PMID:23208811

  4. Under-diagnosing and under-treating iron deficiency in hospitalized patients with gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    El-Halabi, Mustapha M; Green, Michael S; Jones, Christopher; Salyers Jr, William J

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether patients hospitalized with gastrointestinal (GI) blood loss anemia are being checked and treated for iron deficiency. METHODS: Retrospective chart review was conducted for all patients admitted to a single tertiary care hospital between 11/1/2011 and 1/31/2012 for any type of GI bleeding. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients who had their iron studies checked during a hospitalization for GI blood loss anemia. Secondary outcomes included percentage of anemic GI bleeders who had adequate documentation of anemia and iron deficiency, and those who were treated for their iron deficiency. Then we tried to identify possible predictors of checking iron studies in an attempt to understand the thought process that physicians go through when managing these patients. Iron deficiency was defined as Iron saturation less than 15% or ferritin level less than 45 μg/L. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin level less than 13 g/dL for males and 12 g/dL for females. RESULTS: Three hundred and seven GI bleeders were hospitalized during the study period, and 282 of those (91.9%) had anemia during their hospital stay. Ninety-five patients (30.9%) had iron studies performed during hospitalization, and 45 of those (47.4%) were actually found to be iron deficient. Only 29 of those 45 iron deficient patients were discharged home on iron supplements. Of the 282 patients that had anemia during hospitalization, 50 (17.7%) had no documentation of the anemia in their hospital chart. Of the 45 patients that had lab proven iron deficiency anemia (IDA), only 22 (48.5%) had documentation of IDA in at least one note in their chart. Predictors of checking iron studies in anemic GI bleeders were lower mean corpuscular volume, documentation of anemia, having fecal occult blood testing, not having hematemesis or past history of GI bleeding. There were no significant differences between the teaching and non-teaching services in any patient characteristics or outcomes

  5. Impact of fecal occult blood on obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: observational study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Watabe, Hirotsugu; Yamada, Atsuo; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Yamaji, Yutaka; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-07

    To elucidate the association between small bowel diseases (SBDs) and positive fecal occult blood test (FOBT) in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Between February 2008 and August 2013, 202 patients with OGIB who performed both capsule endoscopy (CE) and FOBT were enrolled (mean age; 63.6 ± 14.0 years, 118 males, 96 previous overt bleeding, 106 with occult bleeding). All patients underwent immunochemical FOBTs twice prior to CE. Three experienced endoscopists independently reviewed CE videos. All reviews and consensus meeting were conducted without any information on FOBT results. The prevalence of SBDs was compared between patients with positive and negative FOBT. CE revealed SBDs in 72 patients (36%). FOBT was positive in 100 patients (50%) and negative in 102 (50%). The prevalence of SBDs was significantly higher in patients with positive FOBT than those with negative FOBT (46% vs 25%, P = 0.002). In particular, among patients with occult OGIB, the prevalence of SBDs was higher in positive FOBT group than negative FOBT group (45% vs 18%, P = 0.002). On the other hand, among patients with previous overt OGIB, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of SBDs between positive and negative FOBT group (47% vs 33%, P = 0.18). In disease specific analysis among patients with occult OGIB, the prevalence of ulcer and tumor were higher in positive FOBT group than negative FOBT group. In multivariate analysis, only positive FOBT was a predictive factors of SBDs in patients with OGIB (OR = 2.5, 95%CI: 1.4-4.6, P = 0.003). Furthermore, the trend was evident among patients with occult OGIB who underwent FOBT on the same day or a day before CE. The prevalence of SBDs in positive vs negative FOBT group were 54% vs 13% in patients with occult OGIB who underwent FOBT on the same day or the day before CE (P = 0.001), while there was no significant difference between positive and negative FOBT group in those who underwent FOBT two or more days

  6. Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding originating from a fourth-stage duodenal diverticulum: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rioux, Louis; Groseilliers, Sylvain Des; Fortin, Michel; Mutch, David O.

    1996-01-01

    Duodenal diverticulum is well-known pathologic entity. Most such diverticula are asymptomatic and located on the second stage of the duodenum. The diagnosis is most often established by endoscopy or upper gastrointestinal radiography. Hemorrhage has been described but is an infrequent complication. We report on a patient who presented with massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding, originating from a fourth-stage duodenal diverticulum. The diagnosis was made with a combination of arteriography and scanning with technetium 99-labelled red cells. Diverticulectomy was performed with a successful outcome. This report underlines the diagnostic limits of fiberoptic endoscopy for hemorrhagic lesions located past the third stage of the duodenum. PMID:8956821

  7. Recurrent severe gastrointestinal bleeding and malabsorption due to extensive habitual megacolon

    PubMed Central

    Mecklenburg, Ingo; Leibig, Markus; Weber, Christof; Schmidbauer, Stefan; Folwaczny, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Dilatation of the colon and the rectum, which is not attributable to aganglionosis, is a rare finding and can be the result of intractable chronic constipation. We report a rare case of a 29-year-old male patient with impressive megacolon, in whom Hirschsprung’s or Chagas disease was ruled out. In the present case, dilatation of the colon was most likely due to a behavioral disorder with habitual failure of defecation. Chronic stool retention led to a bizarre bulging of the large bowel with displacement of the other abdominal organs and severe occult blood loss. Because of two episodes of life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding despite conventional treatment of constipation, a surgical approach for bowel restoration was necessary. Temporary loop ileostomy had to be performed for depressurization of the large bowel and the subsequent possibility for effective antegrade colonic lavage to remove impacted stools. Shortly after the operation, the patient was healthy and could easily manage the handling of the ileostomy. However, the course of the megacolon in this young adult cannot be predicted and the follow-up will have to reveal if regression of this extreme colonic distension with reestablishment of regular rectal perception will occur. PMID:16437700

  8. Novel Therapeutic Strategies in the Management of Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Ari; Jang, Sunguk

    2016-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the most common etiology of which is peptic ulcer disease, remains a persistent challenge despite a reduction in both its incidence and mortality. Both pharmacologic and endoscopic techniques have been developed to achieve hemostasis, with varying degrees of success. Among the pharmacologic therapies, proton pump inhibitors remain the mainstay of treatment, as they reduce the risk of rebleeding and requirement for recurrent endoscopic evaluation. Tranexamic acid, a derivative of the amino acid lysine, is an antifibrinolytic agent whose role requires further investigation before application. Endoscopically delivered pharmacotherapy, including Hemospray (Cook Medical), EndoClot (EndoClot Plus Inc.), and Ankaferd Blood Stopper (Ankaferd Health Products), in addition to standard epinephrine, show promise in this regard, although their mechanisms of action require further investigation. Non-pharmacologic endoscopic techniques use one of the following two methods to achieve hemostasis: ablation or mechanical tamponade, which may involve using endoscopic clips, cautery, argon plasma coagulation, over-the-scope clipping devices, radiofrequency ablation, and cryotherapy. This review aimed to highlight these novel and fundamental hemostatic strategies and the research supporting their efficacy. PMID:27744662

  9. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding as the First Manifestation of Wegener’s Granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkoli, Hamid; Zobeiri, Mehdi; Salesi, Mansour; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Wegener’s granulomatosis is an uncommon inflammatory disease that manifests as vasculitis, granulomatosis, and necrosis. It usually involves the upper and lower respiratory tracts and kidneys. Although it may essentially involve any organ, gastrointestinal (GI) involvement is notably uncommon. A 20-year-old male patient presented with epigastric pain, vomiting, hematemesis, and melena. On physical examination, he was pale. There was no abdominal tenderness or organomegaly. Upper GI endoscopy revealed dark blue-colored infiltrative lesions in prepyloric area. Evaluation of the biopsy sample showed mononuclear cell infiltration in the submucosal area, hyperplastic polyp, and chronic gastritis. High dose proton pump inhibitor and adjunctive supportive measures were given but no change in the follow-up endoscopy was detected. During hospital course, he developed intermittent fever and serum creatinine elevation. 12 days after admission, he developed dyspnea, tachypnea, and painful swelling of metacarpophalangeal joints, and maculopapular rash in extensor surface of the right forearm. Chest radiography showed pulmonary infiltration. Serum c-ANCA titer was strongly positive and skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The patient received methylprednisolone pulse, which resulted in complete recovery of symptoms and gastric lesion. The present case indicates that GI bleeding may be the first manifestation of Wegener’s granulomatosis. Moreover, it should be emphasized that gastric biopsy is not characteristic or diagnostic in such patients. PMID:27698975

  10. Efficacy of computed image modification of capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Tomoaki; Arai, Makoto; Sato, Toru; Nakagawa, Tomoo; Maruoka, Daisuke; Tsuboi, Masaru; Hata, Sachio; Arai, Eiji; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether flexible spectral color enhancement (FICE) improves diagnostic yields of capsule endoscopy (CE) for obscure gastro-intestinal bleeding (OGIB). METHODS: The study subjects consisted of 81 patients. Using FICE, there were three different sets with different wavelengths. Using randomly selected sets of FICE, images of CE were evaluated again by two individuals who were not shown the conventional CE reports and findings. The difference between FICE and conventional imaging was examined. RESULTS: The overall diagnostic yields in FICE sets 1, 2, 3 and conventional imaging (48.1%) were 51.9%, 40.7%, 51.9% and 48.1%, respectively, which showed no statistical difference compared to conventional imaging. The total numbers of detected lesions per examination in FICE imaging and conventional imaging were 2.5 ± 2.1 and 1.8 ± 1.7, respectively, which showed a significant difference (P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: The diagnostic yield for OGIB is not improved by FICE. However, FICE can detect significantly more small bowel lesions compared to conventional imaging. PMID:23125901

  11. Efficacy of computed image modification of capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Tomoaki; Arai, Makoto; Sato, Toru; Nakagawa, Tomoo; Maruoka, Daisuke; Tsuboi, Masaru; Hata, Sachio; Arai, Eiji; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2012-09-16

    To investigate whether flexible spectral color enhancement (FICE) improves diagnostic yields of capsule endoscopy (CE) for obscure gastro-intestinal bleeding (OGIB). The study subjects consisted of 81 patients. Using FICE, there were three different sets with different wavelengths. Using randomly selected sets of FICE, images of CE were evaluated again by two individuals who were not shown the conventional CE reports and findings. The difference between FICE and conventional imaging was examined. The overall diagnostic yields in FICE sets 1, 2, 3 and conventional imaging (48.1%) were 51.9%, 40.7%, 51.9% and 48.1%, respectively, which showed no statistical difference compared to conventional imaging. The total numbers of detected lesions per examination in FICE imaging and conventional imaging were 2.5 ± 2.1 and 1.8 ± 1.7, respectively, which showed a significant difference (P = 0.01). The diagnostic yield for OGIB is not improved by FICE. However, FICE can detect significantly more small bowel lesions compared to conventional imaging.

  12. Endoscopic management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding in children: Time for a radical rethink.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mike; Belsha, Dalia

    2016-02-01

    Currently we are no nearer than 10 or 20years ago providing a safe, adequate, and effective round-the-clock endoscopic services for acute life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding in children. Preventable deaths are occurring still, and it is a tragedy. This is owing to a number of factors which require urgent attention. Skill-mix and the ability of available endoscopists in the UK are woeful. Manpower is spread too thinly and not concentrated in centers of excellence, which is necessary given the relative rarity of the presentation. Adult gastroenterologists are increasingly reticent regarding their help in increasingly litigious times. Recent work on identification of those children likely to require urgent endoscopic intervention has mirrored scoring systems that have been present in adult circles for many years and may allow appropriate and timely intervention. Recent technical developments such as that of Hemospray® may lower the threshold of competency in dealing with this problem endoscopically, thus allowing lives to be saved. Educational courses, mannequin and animal model training are important but so will be appropriate credentialing of individuals for this skill-set. Assessment of competency will become the norm and guidelines on a national level in each country mandatory if we are to move this problem from the "too difficult" to the "achieved". It is an urgent problem and is one of the last emergencies in pediatrics that is conducted poorly. This cannot and should not be allowed to continue unchallenged.

  13. Out-of-hours endoscopy for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Pedroto, Isabel Maria Teixeira; Azevedo Maia, Luís Araújo; Durão Salgueiro, Paulo Sérgio; Teles de Sampaio, Elvira Manuela Costa Moreira; Küttner de Magalhães, Ricardo Sigalho; Barbosa Magalhães, Maria João de Sousa; Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo Jorge; Pereira Dias, Cláudia Camila Rodrigues; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário

    2015-04-01

    Most countries lack a well-coordinated approach to out-of-hours endoscopy. Economic constraints and lack of resources have been identified as important barriers. To assess the performance evaluation of an out-of-hours emergency endoscopy model of care. During a 3 year period (January 2010 to December 2012), data from consecutive outpatients (n = 332) with non-variceal acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding admitted or transferred to a single referral hospital were prospectively collected. 34% (n = 113) were direct admissions whereas 66% (n = 219) were transferred from other hospitals. Median time to upper endoscopy esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was 6 h and 7.7 h for direct admissions and transferred, respectively. EGD was performed within 24 h in 90% of the patients. Rebleeding, in-hospital mortality, 30 day mortality and need for surgery were respectively 9.8%, 5.8%, 7.4%, and 6.6% and were not significantly different between the two groups. Age, malignancy, and moderate to high clinical Rockall risk score were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in both groups. Age remained as an important predictor of main outcomes in transferred patients, while comorbidities differed according to admission status and predictable outcomes. This gastroenterology emergency model improved access and equity to out-of-hours endoscopy in an effective, safe, and timely way, recognized by the rates and the homogeneity observed in the outcomes, between transferred patients and direct admissions.

  14. "First look" unsedated transnasal esogastroduodenoscopy in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding? A prospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rivory, Jérôme; Lépilliez, Vincent; Gincul, Rodica; Guillaud, Olivier; Vallin, Mélanie; Bouffard, Yves; Sagnard, Pierre; Ponchon, Thierry; Dumortier, Jérôme

    2014-04-01

    With small diameter endoscopes, transnasal esophagogastroduodenoscopy (t-EGD) is routinely performed. The aim of this prospective observational study was to evaluate the role of t-EGD for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). One hundred and forty-five consecutive patients (mean age, 66±18.4 years) with suspicion of UGIB were classified a priori into 3 groups according to initial clinical presentation: (1) intensive care unit with EGD under sedation, (2) endoscopy unit with EGD under transient sedation and (3) unsedated t-EGD as "first look". Demographic, clinical and biological parameters, Rockall and Blatchford scores, endoscopic diagnosis and treatment, and outcome were analysed. Unsedated t-EGD was attempted in 89 patients, performed in 52 (5 failures, 28 contraindications) and the procedure was converted under sedation for 2 patients. Based on ASA classification, clinical (blood pressure, hemodynamical failure) and biological variables (hemoglobin, platelets, creatinine), these patients were less severe than in the other groups. Pre-endoscopic Rockall and Blatchford scores were significantly lower in this group. More patients in this group presented significant cardiovascular co-morbidity (47.2%), taking aspirin, clopidogrel and/or anticoagulant. Our results strongly support that "first look" unsedated t-EGD can avoid unnecessary sedation in selected patients with UGIB, presenting a low probability for endoscopic haemostatic treatment and high sedation risks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Octreotide in the management of recurrent gastrointestinal bleed in patients supported by continuous flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y; Hashim, Taimoor; Tallaj, Jose A; Acharya, Deepak; Holman, William; Kirklin, James; Pamboukian, Salpy V

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is the most common cause of readmission in patients supported by continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVAD). We describe our experience in the off-label use of octreotide in the management of recurrent GI bleed in this population. Of 116 patients implanted with a CF-LVAD at our institution, seven had recurrent GI bleeding unresponsive to conventional management and were started in chronic octreotide injections. Hospitalizations due to GI bleeding, number of packed red blood cells transfused, and number of endoscopic procedures were compared 3 months before and after octreotide treatment. In the overall cohort, there were no differences in these three endpoints. When one patient with differing characteristics was excluded from the analysis there was a trend (p = 0.06) to a reduction of hospitalizations due to GI bleeding, number of blood transfusions, and number of endoscopic procedures. Octreotide exhibit a favorable trend in the frequency of admissions, blood transfusions, and endoscopic procedures in most patients with recurrent GI bleed. Further prospective studies are needed to clarify its benefits in this population.

  16. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  17. A case of a pseudo colonic mass causing gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a left ventricular assist device

    PubMed Central

    Huntington, Justin T.; Plews, Robert L.; Mansfield, Sara A.; Drosdeck, Joseph M.; Evans, David C.

    2016-01-01

    There are many complications associated with the left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), including gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). We present a case of a pseudo colonic mass visualized on colonoscopy during workup for GIB in an LVAD patient necessitating a right colectomy with final pathology negative for malignancy. A review of the literature in regards to the pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of this interesting condition is included. PMID:27722118

  18. An Unusual Case of Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Isolated Gallbladder Varices in a Patient with Pancreatic Cancer Complicated by Portal Biliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kubachev, Kubach; Abdullaev, Elbrus; Zarkua, Nonna; Abdullaev, Abakar; Fokin, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy is the complex of abnormalities of extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts, cystic duct, and gallbladder, arising as a result of extrahepatic portal vein obstruction and noncirrhotic portal fibrosis, which can be caused by coagulopathies, tumors, inflammation, postoperative complications, dehydration, and neonatal umbilical vein catheterization. We report a case of a 55-year-old male patient with the history of pancreatic cancer and cholecystoenteric anastomosis presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding from gallbladder varices via the anastomosis. PMID:27800195

  19. The economics of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a US managed-care setting: a retrospective, claims-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Cryer, B L; Wilcox, C M; Henk, H J; Zlateva, G; Chen, L; Zarotsky, V

    2010-03-01

    To assess 12-month healthcare resource utilization and costs associated with upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding events. Patients hospitalized with a UGI bleeding event were identified in US national health-plan claims data (1999-2003) and propensity matched to control patients without UGI bleeding in the same health plan. Matching criteria included age, gender, index date, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, geographic region, and prior medical utilization. A total of 9,033 UGI-bleed patients and 579,018 control patients met the inclusion criteria, yielding 4,651 matched pairs. After matching, differences between the UGI bleed and general population cohorts remained for office visits, ER visits, and ER costs during the 6-month baseline period prior to the index date. During the 12 months following the index date, both UGI-related healthcare utilization and total healthcare, medical, and pharmacy costs incurred by the UGI-bleed cohort were significantly greater (p< 0.0001) than those incurred by the general population cohort (mean of $20,405 vs. 3,652), even after excluding the initial hospitalization costs (mean of $11,228 vs. 3,652). Costs were primarily due to inpatient hospitalizations (mean of $13,059 for the UGI-bleed cohort vs. $729 for the general population cohort) and ambulatory services (mean of $4,037 for the UGI-bleed cohort vs. $1,537 for the general population cohort). Sixteen percent of the UGI-bleed cohort had a GI-related hospitalization, and about 40% of total costs occurred after the initial hospitalization. Patients with UGI bleeds experienced significantly higher (p< 0.0001) 12-month health-resource utilization and costs than patients without UGI bleeds. This study provides empirical evidence of the long-term economic burden associated with UGI bleeding. Interpretation of the results should take into account the lack of available information in claims data that could have an effect on study outcomes, such as particular clinical and disease

  20. Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (2015, Nanchang, China).

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Li, Zhao Shen

    2016-02-01

    Acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ANVUGIB) is one of the most common medical emergencies in China and worldwide. In 2009, we published the "Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding" for the patients in China; however, during the past years numerous studies on the diagnosis and treatment of ANVUGIB have been conducted, and the management of ANVUGIB needs to be updated. The guidelines were updated after the databases including PubMed, Embase and CNKI were searched to retrieve the clinical trials on the management of ANVUGIB. The clinical trials were evaluated for high-quality evidence, and the advances in definitions, diagnosis, etiology, severity evaluation, treatment and prognosis of ANVUGIB were carefully reviewed, the recommendations were then proposed. After several rounds of discussions and revisions among the national experts of digestive endoscopy, gastroenterology, radiology and intensive care, the 2015 version of "Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding" was successfully developed by the Chinese Journal of Internal Medicine, National Medical Journal of China, Chinese Journal of Digestion and Chinese Journal of Digestive Endoscopy. It shall be noted that although much progress has been made, the clinical management of ANVUGIB still needs further improvement and refinement, and high-quality randomized trials are required in the future. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. One hundred and one over-the-scope-clip applications for severe gastrointestinal bleeding, leaks and fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Wedi, Edris; Gonzalez, Susana; Menke, Detlev; Kruse, Elena; Matthes, Kai; Hochberger, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy and clinical outcome of patients treated with an over-the-scope-clip (OTSC) system for severe gastrointestinal hemorrhage, perforations and fistulas. METHODS: From 02-2009 to 10-2012, 84 patients were treated with 101 OTSC clips. 41 patients (48.8%) presented with severe upper-gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, 3 (3.6%) patients with lower-GI bleeding, 7 patients (8.3%) underwent perforation closure, 18 patients (21.4%) had prevention of secondary perforation, 12 patients (14.3%) had control of secondary bleeding after endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and 3 patients (3.6%) had an intervention on a chronic fistula. RESULTS: In 78/84 patients (92.8%), primary treatment with the OTSC was technically successful. Clinical primary success was achieved in 75/84 patients (89.28%). The overall mortality in the study patients was 11/84 (13.1%) and was seen in patients with life threatning upper GI hemorrhage. There was no mortality in any other treatment group. In detail OTSC application lead to a clinical success in 35/41 (85.36%) patients with upper GI bleeding and in 3/3 patients with lower GI bleeding. Technical success of perforation closure was 100% while clinical success was seen in 4/7 cases (57.14%) due to attendant circumstances unrelated to the OTSC. Technical and clinic success was achieved in 18/18 (100%) patients for the prevention of bleeding or perforation after endoscopic mucosal resection and ESD and in 3/3 cases of fistula closure. Two application-related complications were seen (2%). CONCLUSION: This largest single center experience published so far confirms the value of the OTSC for GI emergencies and complications. Further clinical experience will help to identify optimal indications for its targeted and prophylactic use. PMID:26855543

  2. 64-section multiphase CT enterography as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Jaswinder Singh; Zargar, Showkat Ali; Rashid, Wasim; Shaheen, Feroz; Singh, Manjeet; Javid, Gul; Ali, Sadaf; Khan, Bashir Ahmad; Yattoo, Ghulam Nabi; Shah, Altaf; Gulzar, Ghulam Mohamad; Khan, Mushtaq Ahmed; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2012-04-01

    Small bowel follow through (SBFT) and enteroclysis have low sensitivity in picking up lesions in obscure gastrointestinal bleed (OGIB). Computed tomographic enterography (CT-EG), performed with 64-slice multiphase CT system by using large volumes of ingested neutral enteric contrast material, has high spatial and temporal resolution in visualization of the small bowel wall and lumen. The role of 64-slice multiphase CT-EG in the evaluation of OGIB is still evolving, and data on this role are scarce. We evaluated the efficacy of 64-slice multiphase CT-EG using polyethylene glycol (PEG) electrolyte solution as neutral contrast in patients of OGIB. CT-EG was performed with 64-slice multiphase CT system using large volume (2,000 mL) of PEG electrolyte solution as oral contrast in patients of OGIB. Thirty-five patients (21 men, age 41.4 [13.5] y, range 19-70 year) with OGIB underwent CT-EG; 20 patients had overt OGIB whereas 15 patients had occult OGIB. Among 15 patients with occult OGIB, 10 patients had iron deficiency anemia (IDA) with fecal occult blood test (FOBT) positive and 5 had IDA with FOBT negative. Thirty-two patients (92 %) completed the procedure successfully. The total time taken for the ingestion of 2,000 mL of PEG electrolyte solution was median 64 (range 60-78) minutes. Adequate luminal distension of small bowel was seen in 29 (90.6 %) patients for successful interpretation of radiological images. Fifteen of 32 (46.9 %) patients had positive findings on CT-EG; 12 of them underwent exploratory laparotomy. The surgical findings were in conformity with CT-EG findings in all patients, which included gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST; n = 6), carcinoid (1), Meckel's diverticulum (1), small bowel adenocarcinoma (2) and jejunal vascular malformation (2). 64-slice multiphase CT-EG is a useful investigation in the evaluation of both occult and overt OGIB.

  3. Validity of peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses in administrative databases: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Montedori, Alessandro; Abraha, Iosief; Chiatti, Carlos; Cozzolino, Francesco; Orso, Massimiliano; Luchetta, Maria Laura; Rimland, Joseph M; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2016-09-15

    Administrative healthcare databases are useful to investigate the epidemiology, health outcomes, quality indicators and healthcare utilisation concerning peptic ulcers and gastrointestinal bleeding, but the databases need to be validated in order to be a reliable source for research. The aim of this protocol is to perform the first systematic review of studies reporting the validation of International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision and 10th version (ICD-9 and ICD-10) codes for peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library databases will be searched, using appropriate search strategies. We will include validation studies that used administrative data to identify peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses or studies that evaluated the validity of peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding codes in administrative data. The following inclusion criteria will be used: (a) the presence of a reference standard case definition for the diseases of interest; (b) the presence of at least one test measure (eg, sensitivity, etc) and (c) the use of an administrative database as a source of data. Pairs of reviewers will independently abstract data using standardised forms and will evaluate quality using the checklist of the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) criteria. This systematic review protocol has been produced in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Protocol (PRISMA-P) 2015 statement. Ethics approval is not required given that this is a protocol for a systematic review. We will submit results of this study to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. The results will serve as a guide for researchers validating administrative healthcare databases to determine appropriate case definitions for peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding, as well as to perform outcome research using

  4. Prevalence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk factors among the general population and osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Yun, Jae Moon; Chang, Chong Bum; Piao, Heng; Yu, Su Jong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the prevalence of possible risk factors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and their age-group specific trend among the general population and osteoarthritis patients. METHODS We utilized data from the National Health Insurance Service that included claims data and results of the national health check-up program. Comorbid conditions (peptic ulcer, diabetes, liver disease, chronic renal failure, and gastroesophageal reflux disease), concomitant drugs (aspirin, clopidogrel, cilostazol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid, anticoagulants, and SSRI), personal habits (smoking, and alcohol consumption) were considered as possible UGIB risk factors. We randomly imputed the prevalence of infection in the data considering the age-specific prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in Korea. The prevalence of various UGIB risk factors and the age-group specific trend of the prevalence were identified. Prevalence was compared between osteoarthritis patients and others. RESULTS A total of 801926 subjects (93855 osteoarthritis patients) aged 20 and above were included. The prevalence of individual and concurrent multiple risk factors became higher as the age increased. The prevalence of each comorbid condition and concomitant drug were higher in osteoarthritis patients. Thirty-five point zero two percent of the overall population and 68.50% of osteoarthritis patients had at least one or more risk factors of UGIB. The prevalence of individual and concurrent multiple risk factors in younger age groups were also substantial. Furthermore, when personal habits (smoking, and alcohol consumption) and H. pylori infection were included, the prevalence of concurrent multiple risk factors increased greatly even in younger age groups. CONCLUSION Prevalence of UGIB risk factors was high in elderly population, but was also considerable in younger population. Patient with osteoarthritis was at higher UGIB risk than those without osteoarthritis

  5. Diagnostic and therapeutic treatment modalities for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Oakland, Kathryn; Isherwood, Jennifer; Lahiff, Conor; Goldsmith, Petra; Desborough, Michael; Colman, Katherine S; Guy, Richard; Uberoi, Raman; Murphy, Michael F; East, James E; Hopewell, Sally; Jairath, Vipul

    2017-10-01

     Investigations for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) include flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, computed tomographic angiography (CTA), and angiography. All may be used to direct endoscopic, radiological or surgical treatment, although their optimal use is unknown. The aims of this study were to determine the diagnostic and therapeutic yields of endoscopy, CTA, and angiography for managing LGIB, and their influence on rebleeding, transfusion, and hospital stay.  A systematic search of MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL was undertaken to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and nonrandomized studies of intervention (NRSIs) published between 2000 and 12 November 2015 in patients hospitalized with LGIB. Separate meta-analyses were conducted, presented as pooled odds (ORs) or risk ratios (RR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs).  Two RCTs and 13 NRSIs were included, none of which examined flexible sigmoidoscopy, or compared endotherapy with embolization, or investigated the timing of CTA or angiography. Two NRSIs (57 - 223 participants) comparing colonoscopy and CTA were of insufficient quality for synthesis but showed no difference in diagnostic yields between the two interventions. One RCT and 4 NRSIs (779 participants) compared early colonoscopy (< 24 hours) with colonoscopy performed later; meta-analysis of the NRSIs demonstrated higher diagnostic and therapeutic yields with early colonoscopy (OR 1.86, 95 %CI 1.12 to 2.86, P  = 0.004 and OR 3.08, 95 %CI 1.93 to 4.90, P  < 0.001, respectively) and reduced length of stay (mean difference 2.64 days, 95 %CI 1.54 to 3.73), but no difference in transfusion or rebleeding.  In LGIB there is a paucity of high-quality evidence, although the limited studies on the timing of colonoscopy suggest increased rates of diagnosis and therapy with early colonoscopy.

  6. CT enterography in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Chen, Jun-qiang; Liu, Jin-lu; Qin, Xin-gan; Huang, Yuan

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this article is to provide a comprehensive and update overview of clinical application of CT enterography (CTE) in the evaluation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). We performed a systematic review of relevant literatures in PubMed, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library and pooled the yield of CTE and the incremental yield (IY) of CTE over an alternate modality. A total of 18 studies (n = 660) reported the yield of CTE in evaluating OGIB and the pooled yield was 40% (95% confidence interval (CI): 33-49%). Seven studies (n = 279) compared the yield of CTE with capsule endoscopy (CE). The yield for CTE and CE for all findings was 34% and 53%, respectively (IY = -19%, 95% CI = -34% to -4%). When considering the types of identified lesions, the yield was significantly different for vascular and inflammatory lesions but not significantly different for neoplastic or other lesions. Two studies (n = 63) compared the yield of CTE with double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). The yield for CTE and DBE was 38% and 78%, respectively (IY = -40%, 95% CI = -55% to -25%). Three studies (n = 49) compared the yield of CTE with digital subtraction angiography. The yield for CTE and digital subtraction angiography was 64% and 60%, respectively (IY = 4%, 95% CI = -40% to 47%). CTE is an excellent diagnostic tool in patients with OGIB. It may play a complementary role to CE and can be used as a triage tool prior to DBE in evaluating OGIB. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  7. Route selection for double-balloon endoscopy, based on capsule transit time, in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masanao; Ohmiya, Naoki; Shirai, Osamu; Takenaka, Hiroyuki; Morishima, Kenji; Miyahara, Ryoji; Ando, Takafumi; Watanabe, Osamu; Kawashima, Hiroki; Itoh, Akihiro; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi

    2010-06-01

    Double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) utilizes both oral and anal routes. The proper selection of the initial route is important for more rapid management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). The aim of this retrospective study was to clarify the accuracy of the transit time of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) to the lesion as a predictive indicator for the decision on the initial DBE route. Of 172 patients who underwent both DBE and VCE, 65 who were diagnosed with small-intestinal hemorrhagic lesions by both means were enrolled. The relation between VCE transit time to the lesion and the DBE route by which the lesion was discovered was analyzed, distinguishing between 46 complete and 19 incomplete VCEs. Among the 46 patients with a complete VCE, the transit time and position of the lesion were strongly correlated. The best cutoff values for route selection by the VCE transit time from capsule intake and from the duodenal bulb to the lesion, determined using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, were 60% and 50%, respectively, of the transit time to the cecum. At that point, the accuracy of route selection was 90% and 94%, respectively. Positions shown by VCE for ileal lesions tended to be more proximal than those shown by surgery. In the 19 patients with incomplete VCEs, the best cutoff for transit time was 180 min from the duodenal bulb. The VCE transit time was useful for determining the route for DBE in OGIB. This parameter was most accurate when the cutoff value for the selection was half of the small-bowel transit time in the complete VCE examination.

  8. Prevalence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk factors among the general population and osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Yun, Jae Moon; Chang, Chong Bum; Piao, Heng; Yu, Su Jong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2016-12-28

    To assess the prevalence of possible risk factors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and their age-group specific trend among the general population and osteoarthritis patients. We utilized data from the National Health Insurance Service that included claims data and results of the national health check-up program. Comorbid conditions (peptic ulcer, diabetes, liver disease, chronic renal failure, and gastroesophageal reflux disease), concomitant drugs (aspirin, clopidogrel, cilostazol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid, anticoagulants, and SSRI), personal habits (smoking, and alcohol consumption) were considered as possible UGIB risk factors. We randomly imputed the prevalence of infection in the data considering the age-specific prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in Korea. The prevalence of various UGIB risk factors and the age-group specific trend of the prevalence were identified. Prevalence was compared between osteoarthritis patients and others. A total of 801926 subjects (93855 osteoarthritis patients) aged 20 and above were included. The prevalence of individual and concurrent multiple risk factors became higher as the age increased. The prevalence of each comorbid condition and concomitant drug were higher in osteoarthritis patients. Thirty-five point zero two percent of the overall population and 68.50% of osteoarthritis patients had at least one or more risk factors of UGIB. The prevalence of individual and concurrent multiple risk factors in younger age groups were also substantial. Furthermore, when personal habits (smoking, and alcohol consumption) and H. pylori infection were included, the prevalence of concurrent multiple risk factors increased greatly even in younger age groups. Prevalence of UGIB risk factors was high in elderly population, but was also considerable in younger population. Patient with osteoarthritis was at higher UGIB risk than those without osteoarthritis. Physicians should consider

  9. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and cardiovascular events due to NSAIDs in the diabetic elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungmee; Lee, Joongyub; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Dong Ho; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) and cardiovascular (CV) risks such as myocardial infarction or stroke associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use among elderly patients with diabetes. Methods Using a nationwide claims database covering 2008–2012, we conducted a cohort study of patients with diabetes aged ≥65 years. Among the 117 610 patients, NSAID users and non-users were propensity score matched, excluding any who had experienced a potentially confounding event in the year prior to cohort entry. Multivariate Cox regression models treating death as competing risk were used. Results There were 2184 (1.86%) cases of GIB and NSAID users had an adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.68 (95% CI 1.54 to 1.83) of GIB risk after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities and recent medications compared to NSAID non-users. There were 9333 (7.94%) cases of myocardial infarction or stroke with an aHR of 1.20 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.25). The risk of GIB was higher in patients with liver disease and renal failure, while that of CV events was higher in patients who received anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, aspirin and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The number needed to harm was 111 for GIB and 77 for CV events. Among different NSAIDs, nimesulide increased the risk of GIB and ketorolac increased the risk of CV events compared to celecoxib (aHR 2.60 and 3.13, respectively). Conclusions Elderly patients with diabetes treating NSAIDs had a significantly higher risk of both upper GIB and CV events compared to NSAID non-users, and the risk varied among different NSAIDs regardless of cyclooxygenase-2 activity. PMID:26719806

  10. Mortality associated with gastrointestinal bleeding in children: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Attard, Thomas M; Miller, Mikaela; Pant, Chaitanya; Kumar, Ashwath; Thomson, Mike

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the clinical characteristics of children with gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) who died during the course of their admission. METHODS We interrogated the Pediatric Hospital Information System database, including International Classification of Diseases, Current Procedural Terminology and Clinical Transaction Classification coding from 47 pediatric tertiary centers extracting the population of patients (1-21 years of age) admitted (inpatient or observation) with acute, upper or indeterminate GIB (1/2007-9/2015). Descriptive statistics, unadjusted univariate and adjusted multivariate analysis of the associations between patient characteristics and treatment course with mortality was performed with mortality as primary and endoscopy a secondary outcome of interest. All analyses were performed using the R statistical package, v.3.2.3. RESULTS The population with GIB was 19528; 54.6% were male, overall mortality was 2.07%; (0.37% in patients with the principal diagnosis of GIB). When considering only the mortalities in which GIB was the principal diagnosis, 48% (12 of 25 principal diagnosis GIB mortalities) died within the first 3 d of admission, whereas 19.8% of secondary diagnosis GIB patients died with 3 d of admission. Patients who died were more likely to have received octreotide (19.8% c.f. 4.04%) but tended to have not received proton pump inhibitor therapy in the first 48 h, and far less likely to have undergone endoscopy during their admission (OR = 0.489, P < 0.0001). Chronic liver disease associated with a greater likelihood of endoscopy. Mortalities were significantly more likely to have multiple complex chronic conditions. CONCLUSION GIB associated mortality in children is highest within 7 d of admission. Multiple comorbidities are a risk factor whereas early endoscopy during the admission is protective. PMID:28321162

  11. Characteristics and outcomes of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; Pausawasdi, Nonthalee; Laosanguaneak, Nuttiya; Bubthamala, Jakkrapan; Tanwandee, Tawesak; Leelakusolvong, Somchai

    2011-08-28

    To characterize the effects of age on clinical presentations and endoscopic diagnoses and to determine outcomes after endoscopic therapy among patients aged ≥ 65 years admitted for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) compared with those aged < 65 years. Medical records and an endoscopy data-base of 526 consecutive patients with overt UGIB ad-mitted during 2007-2009 were reviewed. The initial presentations and clinical course within 30 d after endoscopy were obtained. A total of 235 patients aged ≥ 65 years constituted the elderly population (mean age of 74.2 ± 6.7 years, 63% male). Compared to young patients, the elderly patients were more likely to present with melena (53% vs 30%, respectively; P < 0.001), have comorbidities (69% vs 54%, respectively; P < 0.001), and receive antiplatelet agents (39% vs 10%, respectively; P < 0.001). Interestingly, hemodynamic instability was observed less in this group (49% vs 68%, respectively; P < 0.001). Peptic ulcer was the leading cause of UGIB in the elderly patients, followed by varices and gastropathy. The elderly and young patients had a similar clinical course with regard to the utilization of endoscopic therapy, requirement for transfusion, duration of hospital stay, need for surgery [relative risk (RR), 0.31; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.03-2.75; P = 0.26], rebleeding (RR, 1.44; 95% CI, 0.92-2.25; P = 0.11), and mortality (RR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.57-2.11; P = 0.77). In Cox's regression analysis, hemodynamic instability at presentation, background of liver cirrhosis or disseminated malignancy, transfusion requirement, and development of rebleeding were significantly associated with 30-d mortality. Despite multiple comorbidities and the concomitant use of antiplatelets in the elderly patients, advanced age does not appear to influence adverse outcomes of acute UGIB after therapeutic endoscopy.

  12. Promoting the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeds among junior doctors: a quality improvement project

    PubMed Central

    Saunsbury, Emma; Allison, Emma; colleypriest, ben

    2015-01-01

    Though they are knowledgeable, foundation year one (FY1) doctors can lack skills and confidence in acute situations due to inexperience. This was witnessed when a new FY1 on call attended an acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB), a common emergency with a 10% in hospital mortality rate. We aimed to improve FY1s’ ability to manage these critical patients through simulation based teaching, before and after the introduction of an algorithm summarising current guidelines. After assessing the FY1s’ perceived level of confidence in managing UGIBs, they individually attended a simulation session which evaluated specific aspects of their assessment and management plans. Immediate debriefing and subsequent teaching sessions reinforced learning points, with an algorithm instituted as an aide mémoire to improve efficiency. A repeat simulation session assessed improvements in both subjective confidence and objective management targets. All FY1s expressed improved confidence in managing patients with UGIBs. There were improvements across the board in their assessment and management, notably: verbalisation of concern for hypotension increased to 100% (from 60%), two points of intravenous access requested in 100% of cases (from 53%), and a 76 second reduction in time to call for senior support. Collectively, these individual aspects led to improved patient care. Effective management of acute patients is best learnt through exposure, and simulation based teaching provides a safe but powerful modality to aid transition from textbook theory to ward situations. Algorithms can streamline care and hasten the stabilisation of patients. This project reinforces generic competencies that FY1s can translate to their management of not only UGIBs, but many acute presentations, providing a convincing argument for broader simulation use in FY1 teaching. PMID:26732056

  13. Using an ‘action set’ for the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Charles; Hamilton, Mark; Epstein, Owen; Negus, Rupert; Peachey, Tim; Kaul, Arvind; O’Beirne, James

    2013-01-01

    Background: We studied the management of patients with acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (AUGIB) at the Royal Free Hospital. The aim was to compare our performance with the national standard and determine ways of improving the delivery of care in accordance with the recently published ‘Scope for improvement’ report. Methods: We randomly selected patients who presented with haematemesis, melaena, or both, and had an oesophageogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) between April and October 2009. We developed local guidelines and presented our findings in various forums. We collaborated with the British Medical Journal’s Evidence Centre and Cerner Millennium electronic patient record system to create an electronic ‘Action Set’ for the management of patients presenting with AUGIB. We re-audited using the same standard and target. Results: With the action set, documentation of pre-OGD Rockall scores increased significantly (p ≤ 0.0001). The differences in the calculation and documentation of post-OGD full Rockall scores were also significant between the two audit loops (p = 0.007). Patients who inappropriately received proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) before endoscopy were reduced from 73.8% to 33% (p = 0.02). Patients receiving PPIs after OGD were also reduced from 66% to 50% (p = 0.01). Discharges of patients whose full Rockall score was less than or equal to two increased from 40% to 100% (p = 0.43). Conclusion: The use of the Action Set improved calculation and documentation of risk scores and facilitated earlier hospital discharge for low-risk patients. Significant improvements were also seen in inappropriate use of PPIs. Actions sets can improve guideline adherence and can potentially promote cost-cutting and improve health economics. PMID:24179478

  14. Promoting the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeds among junior doctors: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Saunsbury, Emma; Allison, Emma; Colleypriest, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Though they are knowledgeable, foundation year one (FY1) doctors can lack skills and confidence in acute situations due to inexperience. This was witnessed when a new FY1 on call attended an acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB), a common emergency with a 10% in hospital mortality rate. We aimed to improve FY1s' ability to manage these critical patients through simulation based teaching, before and after the introduction of an algorithm summarising current guidelines. After assessing the FY1s' perceived level of confidence in managing UGIBs, they individually attended a simulation session which evaluated specific aspects of their assessment and management plans. Immediate debriefing and subsequent teaching sessions reinforced learning points, with an algorithm instituted as an aide mémoire to improve efficiency. A repeat simulation session assessed improvements in both subjective confidence and objective management targets. All FY1s expressed improved confidence in managing patients with UGIBs. There were improvements across the board in their assessment and management, notably: verbalisation of concern for hypotension increased to 100% (from 60%), two points of intravenous access requested in 100% of cases (from 53%), and a 76 second reduction in time to call for senior support. Collectively, these individual aspects led to improved patient care. Effective management of acute patients is best learnt through exposure, and simulation based teaching provides a safe but powerful modality to aid transition from textbook theory to ward situations. Algorithms can streamline care and hasten the stabilisation of patients. This project reinforces generic competencies that FY1s can translate to their management of not only UGIBs, but many acute presentations, providing a convincing argument for broader simulation use in FY1 teaching.

  15. The surgical management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a 12-year experience.

    PubMed

    Clarke, M G; Bunting, D; Smart, N J; Lowes, J; Mitchell, S J

    2010-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a common reason for admission to gastroenterologists, with only 2% of patients requiring surgical intervention. The aim of this study was to review the surgical management of patients with non-variceal AUGIB in a single institution over a 12-year period and compare practice with recognised regional and national standards. Data was collected retrospectively for all patients undergoing surgery for AUGIB between September 1995 and September 2007. Audit standards included the local hospital protocol, British Society of Gastroenterology Endoscopy Committee guidelines and the UK Comparative Audit of AUGIB and the Use of Blood. 53 patients were identified, of which 41 case notes were available. Mean (range) age of the patients was 75.8 (45-92) years. 56% had pre-existing cardiorespiratory comorbidity and 63% were taking anti-inflammatory drugs. Pre-operative Rockall score was >or=7 in 46% and ASA score was >or=3 in 65% of patients. 56% of operations were performed by the registrar, compared with 20% reported nationally. All cases after 2004 were performed by the consultant. No operations were performed after midnight beyond 1999. 23 (56%) patients suffered post-operative complications compared with 55% reported nationally; cardiorespiratory (n = 16), wound infection (n = 7) and rebleed (n = 6). 37% required intensive care support and median length of hospital stay was 13 days. In-hospital mortality rate was 10%, compared with 30% reported nationally and this increased with rising Rockall, Blatchford, APACHE-2, P-POSSUM and Charlson scores. These findings highlight the high rate of morbidity and mortality associated with surgical treatment for AUGIB. The small volume of cases and reduction in registrar operating raises training issues. An integrated approach with greater use of interventional radiology is likely to play a greater role in the future. Copyright 2010 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  16. Hypoalbuminemia in the outcome of patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    González-González, J A; Vázquez-Elizondo, G; Monreal-Robles, R; García-Compean, D; Borjas-Almaguer, O D; Hernández-Velázquez, B; Maldonado-Garza, H J

    The role of serum albumin level in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGB) has not been extensively studied. Our aim was to evaluate the role of serum albumin on admission in terms of in-hospital mortality in patients with NVUGB. Patients admitted with NVUGB during a 4-year period were prospectively included. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected. ROC curve analysis was used to determine the cutoff value for serum albumin on admission that made a distinction between deceased patients and survivors with respect to serum albumin on admission, as well as its overall performance compared with the Rockall score. 185 patients with NVUGB were evaluated. Men predominated (56.7%) and a mean age of 59.1±19.9 years was found. Mean serum albumin on admission was 2.9±0.9g/dl with hypoalbuminemia (< 3.5g/dl) detected on admission in 71.4% of cases. The ROC curve found that the best value for predicting hospital mortality was an albumin level of 3.1g/dl (AUROC 0.738). Mortality in patients with albumin ≥ 3.2g/dl was 1.2% compared with 11.2% in patients with albumin<3.2g/dl (P=.009; OR 9.7, 95%CI 1.2-76.5). There was no difference in overall performance between the albumin level (AUORC 0.738) and the Rockall score (AUROC 0.715) for identifying mortality. Patients with hypoalbuminemia presenting with NVUGB have a greater in-hospital mortality rate. The serum albumin level and the Rockall score perform equally in regard to identifying the mortality rate. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. The utility of upper endoscopy in patients with concomitant upper gastrointestinal bleeding and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sauyu; Konstance, Richard; Jollis, James; Fisher, Deborah A

    2006-12-01

    Patients who present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in the setting of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may have suffered an UGIB that subsequently led to an AMI or endured an AMI and subsequently suffered a UGIB as a consequence of anticoagulation. We hypothesized that patients in the former group bled from more severe upper tract lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors for endoscopic therapy in patients who suffer a concomitant UGIB and AMI. Retrospective, single center medical record abstraction of hospital admissions from January 1, 1996-December 31, 2002. During the study period, 183 patients underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) within 7 days of suffering an AMI and UGIB (AMI group N=105, UGIB group N=78). A higher proportion of patients in the UGIB group (41%) was found to have high-risk UGI lesions requiring endoscopic treatment compared to patients in the AMI group (17%; P < 0.004). UGIB as the inciting event and patients suffering from hematemesis and hemodynamic instability were significantly associated with requiring endoscopic therapy. Although predominantly diagnostic, endoscopic findings in the AMI group did alter the decision to perform cardiac catheterization in 43% of patients. Severe complications occurred in 1% (95% confidence interval, 0%-4%) of patients. We conclude that in patients suffering from concomitant UGIB and AMI, urgent endoscopy was most beneficial in patients with UGIB as the initial event and those presenting with hematemesis and hemodynamic instability. In patients without these clinical features, urgent endoscopy may be delayed, unless cardiac management decisions are dependent on endoscopic findings.

  18. Comparison of four technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding in a sheep model

    SciTech Connect

    Owunwanne, A.; Al-Wafai, I.; Vallgren, S.; Sadek, S.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Yacoub, T.

    1988-01-01

    Four Tc-99 radiopharmaceuticals, Tc-99m sulphur colloid, Tc-99m red blood cells (RBCs), Tc-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3), and Tc-99m DTPA, were studied in an experimental animal model for detection and localization of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding site in both the upper and lower abdomen. With Tc-99m sulphur colloid and Tc-99m RBCs, it was possible to detect and localize the GI bleeding site in the lower abdomen. With Tc-99m MAG3, it was possible to visualize the bleeding site in both the upper and lower abdomen. However, Tc-99m MAG3 is partially excreted by the liver into the bile, hence it will be difficult to use Tc-99m MAG3 to localize the GI bleeding site in the lower abdomen. With Tc-99m DTPA, it was possible to detect and localize the GI bleeding site simultaneously in both upper and lower abdomen. The overall background radioactivity was reduced considerably by diuresis with frusemide and catheterization of the urinary bladder.

  19. Comparison of the Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding among Different Statin Exposures with Concomitant Administration of Warfarin: Electronic Health Record-Based Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dahye; Yoon, Dukyong; Lim, Sun Gyo; Hong, Ji Man; Park, Rae Woong; Lee, Jin Soo

    2016-01-01

    Patients who should be treated with both warfarin and a statin are frequently seen in vascular clinics. The risk for bleeding and potential drug interactions should be considered when prescribing both medications together. This study aimed to compare the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding among different statin exposures with concomitant administration of warfarin. This is a single-hospital retrospective cohort study. We included patients who were concomitantly exposed to one of four statins (pravastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, and rosuvastatin) and warfarin for up to 2 years (730 days). The observation period ended when a gastrointestinal bleeding event occurred or the observation was censored. Within-class comparisons were used, and 1:1 matching using a propensity score was performed for comparisons between each statin and all of the other statins. Kaplan-Meier analyses with log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were conducted to determine associations with the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Data were analyzed for 1,686 patients who were concomitantly administered a statin and warfarin. Log-rank tests for the gastrointestinal bleeding-free survival rate showed that the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding was significantly lower in the pravastatin group (p = 0.0499) and higher in the rosuvastatin group (p = 0.009). In the Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, the hazard ratio of 5.394 for gastrointestinal bleeding based on statin exposure in the rosuvastatin group was significant (95% confidence interval, 1.168-24.916). There was a relatively high risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with rosuvastatin when administered concomitantly with warfarin.

  20. Small bowel capsule endoscopy for the investigation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: When we should do it and what should we expect.

    PubMed

    Viazis, N; Anastasiou, J; Karamanolis, D G

    2016-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is defined as bleeding of unknown origin that persists or recurs (i.e. recurrent or persistent iron deficiency anemia, fecal occult blood test positivity or visible bleeding) after a negative initial workout that necessarily includes gastroscopy and colonoscopy. In clinical practice, small bowel capsule endoscopy is recommended as a third stage examination in these patients, since it is a simple, safe, non-invasive and reliable test. To date there are three available small bowel capsule systems that have gained FDA approval and their diagnostic yield has shown to be superior to other diagnostic modalities for the investigation of the small bowel in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The test should be performed as close to the bleeding episode as possible and the administration of a purgative bowel preparation before the administration of capsule endoscopy is recommended by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). Issues that still remain to be solved are the definition of bleeding lesions and what really represents a positive finding, as well as the question of whether the outcome of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is altered after the test, i.e. to better define subgroups of patients that will mostly benefit from capsule endoscopy. In the future small bowel capsule endoscopy might be able to get guided, while tissue samples might be available as well. (Acta gastro-enterol. belg., 2016, 79, 355-362).

  1. Acute Middle Gastrointestinal Bleeding Risk Associated with NSAIDs, Antithrombotic Drugs, and PPIs: A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Niikura, Ryota; Yamada, Atsuo; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Shimbo, Takuro; Kobayashi, Yuka; Okamoto, Makoto; Mitsuno, Yuzo; Ogura, Keiji; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Akiyama, Junichi; Uemura, Naomi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Middle gastrointestinal bleeding (MGIB) risk has not been fully investigated due to its extremely rare occurrence and the need for multiple endoscopies to exclude upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This study investigated whether MGIB is associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), low-dose aspirin (LDA), thienopyridines, anticoagulants, and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), and whether PPI use affects the interactions between MGIB and antithrombotic drugs. Methods In this multicenter, hospital-based, case-control study, 400 patients underwent upper and lower endoscopy, 80 had acute overt MGIB and 320 had no bleeding and were matched for age and sex as controls (1:4). MGIB was additionally evaluated by capsule and/or double-balloon endoscopy, after excluding upper and lower GI bleeding. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) for MGIB risk were calculated using conditional logistic regression. To estimate the propensity score, we employed a logistic regression model for PPI use. Results In patients with MGIB, mean hemoglobin level was 9.4 g/dL, and 28 patients (35%) received blood transfusions. Factors significantly associated with MGIB were chronic kidney disease (p<0.001), liver cirrhosis (p = 0.034), NSAIDs (p<0.001), thienopyridines (p<0.001), anticoagulants (p = 0.002), and PPIs (p<0.001). After adjusting for these factors, NSAIDs (AOR, 2.5; p = 0.018), thienopyridines (AOR, 3.2; p = 0.015), anticoagulants (AOR, 4.3; p = 0.028), and PPIs (AOR; 2.0; p = 0.021) were independently associated with MGIB. After adjusting for propensity score, the use of PPIs remained an independent risk factors for MGIB (AOR, 1.94; p = 0.034). No significant interactions were observed between PPIs and NSAIDs (AOR, 0.7; p = 0.637), LDA (AOR, 0.3; p = 0.112), thienopyridine (AOR, 0.7, p = 0.671), or anticoagulants (AOR, 0.5; p = 0.545). Conclusions One-third of patients with acute small intestinal bleeding required blood transfusion. NSAIDs

  2. A benign gastric ulcer eroding into a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm presenting as a massive upper gastrointestinal bleed

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Shareef M.; Moradian, Simon; Ahmed, Mohammed; Ahmed, Umair; Shaheen, Samuel; Stalin, Vasanth

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding secondary to a ruptured splenic artery (SA) pseudoaneurysm into the stomach is a rare but a life-threatening condition. Owing to the low prevalence, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. A frail 77-year-old Caucasian female presented with epigastric pain and hematemesis. Endoscopy was non-diagnostic for an etiology. She then underwent diagnostic angiography that revealed an SA pseudoaneurysm with active contrast extravasation into the stomach. Subsequent transcatheter arterial coil embolization was conducted of the SA. The patient was subsequently taken for a partial gastrectomy, distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. She had an uncomplicated postoperative course. Diagnosis of an UGI bleeding secondary to a ruptured SA pseudoaneurysm into the stomach remains difficult. However, we report that in a hemodynamically stable patient, a multidisciplinary approach can be taken, with interval optimization of the patient prior to definitive surgery for a satisfactory outcome. PMID:25413998

  3. Restrictive vs liberal blood transfusion for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: rationale and protocol for a cluster randomized feasibility trial.

    PubMed

    Jairath, Vipul; Kahan, Brennan C; Gray, Alasdair; Doré, Caroline J; Mora, Ana; Dyer, Claire; Stokes, Elizabeth A; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Bailey, Adam A; Dallal, Helen; Everett, Simon M; James, Martin W; Stanley, Adrian J; Church, Nicholas; Darwent, Melanie; Greenaway, John; Le Jeune, Ivan; Reckless, Ian; Campbell, Helen E; Meredith, Sarah; Palmer, Kelvin R; Logan, Richard F A; Travis, Simon P L; Walsh, Timothy S; Murphy, Michael F

    2013-07-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is the commonest reason for hospitalization with hemorrhage in the UK and the leading indication for transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs). Observational studies suggest an association between more liberal RBC transfusion and adverse patient outcomes, and a recent randomised trial reported increased further bleeding and mortality with a liberal transfusion policy. TRIGGER (Transfusion in Gastrointestinal Bleeding) is a pragmatic, cluster randomized trial which aims to evaluate the feasibility and safety of implementing a restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion policy in adult patients admitted with AUGIB. The trial will take place in 6 UK hospitals, and each centre will be randomly allocated to a transfusion policy. Clinicians throughout each hospital will manage all eligible patients according to the transfusion policy for the 6-month trial recruitment period. In the restrictive centers, patients become eligible for RBC transfusion when their hemoglobin is <8 g/dL. In the liberal centers patients become eligible for transfusion once their hemoglobin is <10 g/dL. All clinicians will have the discretion to transfuse outside of the policy but will be asked to document the reasons for doing so. Feasibility outcome measures include protocol adherence, recruitment rate, and evidence of selection bias. Clinical outcome measures include further bleeding, mortality, thromboembolic events, and infections. Quality of life will be measured using the EuroQol EQ-5D at day 28, and the costs associated with hospitalization for AUGIB in the UK will be estimated. Consent will be sought from participants or their representatives according to patient capacity for use of routine hospital data and day 28 follow up. The study has ethical approval for conduct in England and Scotland. Results will be analysed according to a pre-defined statistical analysis plan and disseminated in peer reviewed publications to relevant stakeholders. The

  4. [Upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a perforated gastric ulcer into left atrium, after esophageal resection and gastric replacement of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Bulat, Cr; Grigorovici, A; Timofte, D; Bîşcă, L; Doniga, S; Damian, Mihaela

    2003-01-01

    Using the stomach as a substitution after oesophagectomy is the most common method. The stomach brought intra thoracic it seems that maintains or regains its capacity to secrete hydrochloric acid and therefore can develop specific conditions, despite total denervation following bilateral troncular vagotomy. We are presenting the case of a young patient who was operated on for a corrosive esophagitis. She had an oesophagectomy and a transposition of the stomach to the posterior mediastinum and anastomosed to the cervical esophagus. She presents with upper gastro-intestinal bleeding from gastric ulcer penetrating into the left atrium.

  5. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding associated with solitary rectal ulcer in a patient with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Bes, C; Dağlı, Ü; Yılmaz, F; Soy, M

    2015-09-16

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare benign disorder that has a wide range of clinical presentations and variable endoscopic findings which makes it difficult to diagnose and treat. The clinical and endoscopic picture in this condition can also mimic malign ulceration, malignancy or Crohn's disease. Behçet's disease can affect the gastrointestinal tract. However to the best of our knowledge, no case with solitary rectal ulceration has been reported so far in literature. We herein present a patient diagnosed with Behçet's disease admitted to our clinic with rectal bleeding due to solitary rectal ulceration.

  6. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Is an Independent Risk Factor for Poor Prognosis in GIST Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Li, Yuji; Dong, Ming; Kong, Fanmin

    2017-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of prognosis of GIST was used to assess the prognostic effects of hemorrhage of digestive tract induced by mucosal invasion of primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors and related mechanisms. The conclusion is that GISTs with gastrointestinal hemorrhage are more likely to recur, which indicates poor prognosis. Therefore, gastrointestinal hemorrhage may be used as a significant indicator to assess the prognosis of patients. PMID:28589146

  7. Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection Syndrome Presenting as Severe, Recurrent Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Leading to a Diagnosis of Cushing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Brittany; Chi, Nai-Wen; Hansen, Lawrence A.; Lee, Roland R.; U, Hoi-Sang; Savides, Thomas J.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old male immigrant from Ethiopia presented for consultation after 3 years of hematochezia/melena requiring > 25 units of blood transfusions. Physical examination revealed severe proximal muscle wasting and weakness, central obesity, proptosis, and abdominal striae, accompanied by eosinophilia, elevated hemoglobin A1c, elevated 24-hour urinary cortisol, lack of suppression of 8 am cortisol levels by 1 mg dexamethasone, and inappropriately elevated random adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level. Histopathological examination of gastrointestinal biopsies showed large numbers of Strongyloides stercoralis, indicating Strongyloides hyperinfection. Treatment with 2 days of ivermectin led to resolution of gastrointestinal bleeding. This syndrome was due to chronic immunosuppression from a pituitary ACTH (corticotroph) microadenoma, of which resection led to gradual normalization of urine cortisol, improved glycemic control, resolution of eosinophilia, and no recurrence of infection. PMID:26195463

  8. Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection Syndrome Presenting as Severe, Recurrent Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Leading to a Diagnosis of Cushing Disease.

    PubMed

    Yee, Brittany; Chi, Nai-Wen; Hansen, Lawrence A; Lee, Roland R; U, Hoi-Sang; Savides, Thomas J; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2015-10-01

    A 50-year-old male immigrant from Ethiopia presented for consultation after 3 years of hematochezia/melena requiring > 25 units of blood transfusions. Physical examination revealed severe proximal muscle wasting and weakness, central obesity, proptosis, and abdominal striae, accompanied by eosinophilia, elevated hemoglobin A1c, elevated 24-hour urinary cortisol, lack of suppression of 8 am cortisol levels by 1 mg dexamethasone, and inappropriately elevated random adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level. Histopathological examination of gastrointestinal biopsies showed large numbers of Strongyloides stercoralis, indicating Strongyloides hyperinfection. Treatment with 2 days of ivermectin led to resolution of gastrointestinal bleeding. This syndrome was due to chronic immunosuppression from a pituitary ACTH (corticotroph) microadenoma, of which resection led to gradual normalization of urine cortisol, improved glycemic control, resolution of eosinophilia, and no recurrence of infection.

  9. Systematic reviews of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Leontiadis, G I; Sreedharan, A; Dorward, S; Barton, P; Delaney, B; Howden, C W; Orhewere, M; Gisbert, J; Sharma, V K; Rostom, A; Moayyedi, P; Forman, D

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in the prevention and treatment of acute upper gastrointestinal (UGI) haemorrhage, as well as to compare this with H2-receptor antagonist (H2RA), Helicobacter pylori eradication (in infected patients) or no therapy, for the prevention of first and/or subsequent bleeds among patients who continue to use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Also to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of PPI therapy, compared with other treatments, for the prevention of subsequent bleeds in patients who had previously experienced peptic ulcer (PU) bleeding. Electronic databases and major conference proceedings were searched up to February 2006. Data were collected from the systematic reviews addressing each research objective. These were then entered into an economic model to compare the costs and quality-adjusted life-days of alternative management strategies over a 28-day period for patients who have had UGI bleeding. A Markov model with a Monte Carlo simulation used data from the systematic reviews to identify the most cost-effective treatment strategy for the prevention of UGI bleeding (first and subsequent) among NSAID users using an outcome of costs per quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) over a lifetime from age 50 years. PPI treatment initiated after endoscopic diagnosis of PU bleeding significantly reduced re-bleeding and surgery compared with placebo or H2RA. Although there was no evidence of an overall effect of PPI treatment on all-cause mortality, PPIs significantly reduced mortality in subgroups when studies conducted in Asia were examined in isolation or when the analysis was confined to patients with high-risk endoscopic findings. PPI treatment initiated prior to endoscopy in UGI bleeding significantly reduced the proportion of patients with stigmata of recent haemorrhage (SRH) at index endoscopy compared with placebo or H2RA, but there was no evidence that PPI

  10. Recurrent Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Ileal GIST Diagnosed by Video Capsule Endoscopy-A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jie; Lamsen, Marie; Coron, Roger; Deliana, Danila; Siddiqui, Sabah; Rangraj, Madhu; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the ileum is an extremely rare cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Case Report. An 89-year-old man was admitted with melana. He had extensive PMH of CAD post-CABG/AICD, AAA repair, chronic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, lung cancer after resection, and recurrent GIB. Prior EGDs, colonoscopies, and upper device-assisted enteroscopy showed duodenal ulcer, A-V malformation s/p cauterization, and angioectasia. On admission, Hb was 6.0 g/dL. An endoscopic capsule study showed an ulcerated tumor in the ileum. CT showed no distant metastasis. The lesion was resected successfully and confirmed as a high-grade GIST. The patient was discharged with no further bleeding. Discussion. Early diagnosis for patients with ileal GIST is often challenging. Video capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy could be useful diagnostic tools. Surgical removal is the first line for a resectable GIST. Imatinib has become the standard therapy. Conclusion. This is a unique case of an ileal GIST in a patient with recurrent GIB which was diagnosed by video capsule. Complicated medical comorbidities often lead to a significant delay in diagnosis. Therefore, we recommend that if GIB does not resolve after appropriate treatments for known causes, the alternative diagnosis for occult GIB must be considered, including malignancy such as GIST.

  11. Recurrent Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Ileal GIST Diagnosed by Video Capsule Endoscopy—A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lamsen, Marie; Coron, Roger; Deliana, Danila; Rangraj, Madhu; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the ileum is an extremely rare cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Case Report. An 89-year-old man was admitted with melana. He had extensive PMH of CAD post-CABG/AICD, AAA repair, chronic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, lung cancer after resection, and recurrent GIB. Prior EGDs, colonoscopies, and upper device-assisted enteroscopy showed duodenal ulcer, A-V malformation s/p cauterization, and angioectasia. On admission, Hb was 6.0 g/dL. An endoscopic capsule study showed an ulcerated tumor in the ileum. CT showed no distant metastasis. The lesion was resected successfully and confirmed as a high-grade GIST. The patient was discharged with no further bleeding. Discussion. Early diagnosis for patients with ileal GIST is often challenging. Video capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy could be useful diagnostic tools. Surgical removal is the first line for a resectable GIST. Imatinib has become the standard therapy. Conclusion. This is a unique case of an ileal GIST in a patient with recurrent GIB which was diagnosed by video capsule. Complicated medical comorbidities often lead to a significant delay in diagnosis. Therefore, we recommend that if GIB does not resolve after appropriate treatments for known causes, the alternative diagnosis for occult GIB must be considered, including malignancy such as GIST. PMID:24027646

  12. Endoscopic Management of Gastrointestinal Leaks and Bleeding with the Over-the-Scope Clip: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Mahesh Kumar; Rai, Vijay Kumar; Goenka, Usha; Tiwary, Indrajit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The over-the-scope clip (OTSC) is a device used for endoscopic closure of perforations, leaks and fistulas, and for endoscopic hemostasis. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of OTSC. Methods Between October 2013 and November 2015, 12 patients underwent OTSC placement by an experienced endoscopist. OTSC was used for the closure of gastrointestinal (GI) leaks and fistula in six patients, three of which were iatrogenic (esophageal, gastric, and duodenal) and three of which were inflammatory. In six patients, OTSC was used for hemostasis of non-variceal upper GI bleeding. Endoscopic tattooing using India ink was used to assist the accurate placement of the clip. Results All subjects except one with a colonic defect experienced immediate technical success as well as long-term clinical success, during a mean follow-up of 6 weeks. Only one clip was required to close each of the GI defects and to achieve hemostasis in all patients. There were no misfirings or complications of clips. The procedure was well tolerated, and patients were hospitalized for an average of 8 days (range, 3 to 10). Antiplatelet therapy was continued in patients with GI bleeding. Conclusions In our experience, OTSC was safe and effective for the closure of GI defect and to achieve hemostasis of non-variceal GI bleeding. PMID:27802375

  13. [Applying uncertainty theory in caring for the family of a von Willebrand disease patient experiencing first time upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Chung, Ai-Lun; Shun, Shiow-Ching; Lin, Chih-Yu

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this report was to describe the nursing experience in helping a primary caregiver cope with uncertainty as his mother experienced upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding underlying von Willebrand disease and Scleromyxedema in an Emergency Department between 10 and 18 July 2008. Mishel's Uncertainty Theory was applied to assess the caregiver's uncertainty and patient disease progression. Data were collected through clinical observation, chart review, and interviews. The caregiver's nursing problems were identified as (1) uncertainty caused by symptoms of the rare disease and the probability of recurrent bleeding in the future; (2) uncertainty caused by lack of knowledge about the disease; (3) uncertainty caused by lack of confidence in home caring issues after UGI bleeding. During the nursing period, we provided clinical information related to the disease and offered psychological support to the caregiver based on our Mishel's Uncertainty Scale assessment. Successful strategies utilized by our intervention helped the caregiver reduce level of uncertainty, increase confidence to care for his mother, and improve the quality of further home care.

  14. Prevalence, management, and outcomes of patients with coagulopathy after acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Jairath, Vipul; Kahan, Brennan C; Stanworth, Simon J; Logan, Richard F A; Hearnshaw, Sarah A; Travis, Simon P L; Palmer, Kelvin R; Murphy, Michael F

    2013-05-01

    Coagulopathy after major hemorrhage has been found to be an independent risk factor for mortality after traumatic bleeding. It is unclear whether similar associations are present in other causes of major hemorrhage. We describe the prevalence, use of plasma, and outcomes of patients with coagulopathy after acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB). This study was a multicenter UK national audit. Data were collected prospectively on consecutive admissions with upper gastrointestinal bleeding over a 2-month period to 212 UK hospitals. Coagulopathy was defined as an international normalized ratio (INR) of at least 1.5. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between coagulopathy and patient-related outcome measures of mortality, rebleeding, and need for surgery and/or radiologic intervention. A total of 4478 patients were included in the study. Coagulopathy was present in 16.4% (444/2709) of patients in whom an INR was recorded. Patients with coagulopathy were more likely to present with hemodynamic shock (45% vs. 36%), have a higher clinical Rockall score (4 vs. 2), receive red blood cell transfusion (79% vs. 48%) and have high-risk stigmata of hemorrhage at endoscopy (34% vs. 25%). After adjustment for confounders the presence of a coagulopathy was associated with a fivefold increased in the odds of mortality (odds ratio, 5.63; 95% confidence interval, 3.09-10.27; p < 0.001). Only 35% of patients with coagulopathy received fresh-frozen plasma transfusion. Coagulopathy was prevalent in 16% of patients after NVUGIB and independently associated with more than a fivefold increase in the odds of in-hospital mortality. Wide variation in plasma use exists indicates clinical uncertainty regarding optimal practice. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  15. A systematic review of transarterial embolization versus emergency surgery in treatment of major nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Andrew D; Dilworth, Mark P; Powell, Susan L; Atherton, Helen; Griffiths, Ewen A

    2014-01-01

    Background Emergency surgery or transarterial embolization (TAE) are options for the treatment of recurrent or refractory nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Surgery has the disadvantage of high rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Embolization has become more available and has the advantage of avoiding laparotomy in this often unfit and elderly population. Objective To carry out a systematic review and meta-analysis of all studies that have directly compared TAE with emergency surgery in the treatment of major upper gastrointestinal bleeding that has failed therapeutic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Methods A literature search of Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and Google Scholar was performed. The primary outcomes were all-cause mortality and rates of rebleeding. The secondary outcomes were length of stay and postoperative complications. Results A total of nine studies with 711 patients (347 who had embolization and 364 who had surgery) were analyzed. Patients in the TAE group were more likely to have ischemic heart disease (odds ratio [OR] =1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33, 2.98; P=0.0008; I2=67% [random effects model]) and be coagulopathic (pooled OR =2.23; 95% CI: 1.29, 3.87; P=0.004; I2=33% [fixed effects model]). Compared with TAE, surgery was associated with a lower risk of rebleeding (OR =0.41; 95% CI: 0.22, 0.77; P<0.0001; I2=55% [random effects]). There was no difference in mortality (OR =0.70; 95% CI: 0.48, 1.02; P=0.06; I2=44% [fixed effects]) between TAE and surgery. Conclusion When compared with surgery, TAE had a significant increased risk of rebleeding rates after TAE; however, there were no differences in mortality rates. These findings are subject to multiple sources of bias due to poor quality studies. These findings support the need for a well-designed clinical trial to ascertain which technique is superior. PMID:24790465

  16. Endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal bleeding: is routine second-look necessary?

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Chiu, Philip W Y; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2009-12-01

    The benefit of routine repeat endoscopy after endoscopic hemostasis in the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is controversial. The aim of this Review is to evaluate the efficacy of second-look endoscopy by examining the evidence from published, randomized, clinical trials. Outcome measurements included recurrent bleeding, surgery, mortality, blood transfusion, and length of hospital stay. Studies were categorized into those in which endoscopy was performed with endoscopic injection or thermal coagulation. On the basis of existing evidence, second-look endoscopy with heater probe reduces the risk of recurrent bleeding, but has no effect on overall mortality or the need for surgery. Therefore, routine second-look endoscopy cannot be recommended. Selected high-risk patients may benefit from second-look endoscopy, but the use of high-dose intravenous PPIs may obviate the need for this procedure.

  17. Management for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in elderly patients: the experience of a tertiary university hospital.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Koichiro; Kurumi, Hiroki; Takeda, Yohei; Yashima, Kazuo; Isomoto, Hajime

    2017-04-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) is the main cause of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). Endoscopic treatment and acid suppression with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are most important in the management of PUB and these treatments have reduced mortality. However, elderly patients sometimes have a poor prognostic outcome due to severe comorbidities. A retrospective study was performed on 504 cases with acute non-variceal UGIB who were examined in our hospital, in order to reveal the risk factor of a poor outcome in elderly patients. Two hundred and thirty-four cases needed hemostasis; 11 cases had unsuccessful endoscopic treatments; 31 cases had re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis. Forty-three cases died within 30 days after the initial urgent endoscopy, but only seven cases died from bleeding. Elderly patients aged over 65 years had more severe comorbidities, and were prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulation agents, more frequently, compared with non-elderly patients. The significant risk factor of needing hemostatic therapy was the taking of two or more NSAIDs, antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulation agents. The most important risk of a poor outcome in elderly patients was various kinds of severe comorbidities. And so, it is important to predict such an outcome in these cases. AIMS65 is a simple and relatively useful scoring system that predicts the risk of a poor outcome in UGIB. High-score patients via AIMS65 were associated with a high mortality rate because of death from comorbidities. The elderly patients in whom were prescribed two or more NSAIDs, antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulation agents, should have UGIB prevented using a PPI. The most significant risk of a poor outcome in elderly patients was severe comorbidities. We recommend that elderly patients with UGIB should be estimated as having a poor outcome as soon as possible via the risk scoring system AIMS65.

  18. Management for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in elderly patients: the experience of a tertiary university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kurumi, Hiroki; Takeda, Yohei; Yashima, Kazuo; Isomoto, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Background Peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) is the main cause of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). Endoscopic treatment and acid suppression with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are most important in the management of PUB and these treatments have reduced mortality. However, elderly patients sometimes have a poor prognostic outcome due to severe comorbidities. Methods A retrospective study was performed on 504 cases with acute non-variceal UGIB who were examined in our hospital, in order to reveal the risk factor of a poor outcome in elderly patients. Results Two hundred and thirty-four cases needed hemostasis; 11 cases had unsuccessful endoscopic treatments; 31 cases had re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis. Forty-three cases died within 30 days after the initial urgent endoscopy, but only seven cases died from bleeding. Elderly patients aged over 65 years had more severe comorbidities, and were prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulation agents, more frequently, compared with non-elderly patients. The significant risk factor of needing hemostatic therapy was the taking of two or more NSAIDs, antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulation agents. The most important risk of a poor outcome in elderly patients was various kinds of severe comorbidities. And so, it is important to predict such an outcome in these cases. AIMS65 is a simple and relatively useful scoring system that predicts the risk of a poor outcome in UGIB. High-score patients via AIMS65 were associated with a high mortality rate because of death from comorbidities. Conclusions The elderly patients in whom were prescribed two or more NSAIDs, antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulation agents, should have UGIB prevented using a PPI. The most significant risk of a poor outcome in elderly patients was severe comorbidities. We recommend that elderly patients with UGIB should be estimated as having a poor outcome as soon as possible via the

  19. A comparison of surgery versus transcatheter angiographic embolization in the treatment of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding uncontrolled by endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ang, Daphne; Teo, Eng Kiong; Tan, Andrew; Ibrahim, Salleh; Tan, Poh Seng; Ang, Tiing Leong; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2012-08-01

    Patients with recurrent nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding who have failed endoscopic therapy pose a challenge. Percutaneous transcatheter angiographic embolization (TAE) is an alternative to surgery but remains controversial. This study compares the treatment outcomes in patients with recurrent nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A retrospective single-centre study of consecutive patients who underwent TAE (January 2007-December 2010) compared with patients treated surgically (January 2004-December 2010) was conducted. Patient demographics, comorbidities, rebleeding rates, length of stay and mortality were compared. Thirty [23 men; age (SD) 66.5±15.6 years] and 63 [41 men; age (SD) 68.2±15.0 years, NS] patients underwent TAE and surgery after a mean (SD) of 1.7±1.0 and 2.1±1.1 (NS) gastroscopies, respectively, for gastric ulcers (n=28), duodenal ulcers (n=53), small-bowel diverticuli (n=7), jejunal ulcer (n=1) and gastric Dieulafoy's lesions (n=2). Ten (33.3%) and 44 (69.8%) patients who underwent TAE and surgery, respectively, had an American Society of Anesthesiologists status of at least 2 (P=0.001). Higher rebleeding rates were observed after TAE compared with surgery [n=14 (46.7%) vs. 8 (12.7%), P=0.001]; however, there were no significant differences in 30-day mortality (16.7 vs. 19.0%, NS), complication rates (46.7 vs. 60.3%, NS) and length of stay (45.1±9.8 vs. 25.5±18.1 days, P=0.06). Twenty-four out of 30 patients (80%) who underwent TAE achieved haemostasis after a median (SD) of 2.0 (1.2) TAE procedures. Rebleeding occurred in five out of seven patients (71%) who underwent TAE for small-bowel diverticular bleeding. TAE averted the need for surgery in high-risk patients. Its role in low surgical risk patients or patients with small-bowel diverticular bleeding requires further study.

  20. The "Prometeo" study: online collection of clinical data and outcome of Italian patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Del Piano, Mario; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Cipolletta, Livio; Zambelli, Alessandro; Chilovi, Fausto; Di Matteo, Giovanni; Pagliarulo, Michela; Ballarè, Marco; Rotondano, Gianluca

    2013-04-01

    To implement an online, prospective collection of clinical data and outcome of patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in Italy ("Prometeo" study). Epidemiology, clinical features, and outcomes of nonvariceal UGIB are mainly known by retrospective studies and are probably changing. Data were collected by 13 Gastrointestinal Units in Italy from June 2006 to June 2007 (phase 1) and from December 2008 to December 2009 (phase 2): an interim analysis of data was performed between the 2 phases to optimize the online database. All the patients consecutively admitted for acute nonvariceal UGIB were enrolled. Demographic and clinical data were collected, a diagnostic endoscopy performed, with endoscopic hemostasis if indicated. One thousand four hundred thirteen patients (M=932, mean age±SD=66.5±15.8; F=481, mean age±SD=74.2±14.6) were enrolled. Comorbidities were present in 83%. 52.4% were treated with acetyl salicylic acid or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): only 13.9% had an effective gastroprotection. Previous episodes of UGIB were present in 13.3%. Transfusion were needed in 43.9%. Shock was present in 9.3%. Endoscopic diagnosis was made in 93.2%: peptic lesions were the main cause of bleeding (duodenal ulcer 36.2%, gastric ulcer 29.6%, gastric/duodenal erosions 10.9%). At endoscopy, Helicobacter pylori was searched in 37.2%, and found positive in 51.3% of tested cases. Early rebleeding was observed in 5.4%: surgery was required in 14.3% of them. Bleeding-related death occurred in 4.0%: at multivariate analysis, the risk of death was correlated with female sex [odds ratio (OR=2.19, P=0.0089)], presence of neoplasia (OR=2.70, P=0.0057) or multiple comorbidities (OR=5.04, P=0.0280), shock at admission (OR=4.55, P=0.0001), and early rebleeding (OR=1.47, P=0.004). Prometeo database has provided an up-to-date picture of acute nonvariceal UGIB in Italy: patients are elderly, predominantly males, and with important

  1. Is Occult Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding a Definite Indication for Capsule Endoscopy? A Retrospective Analysis of Diagnostic Yield in Patients with Occult versus Overt Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Watari, Ikue; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Nakano, Makoto; Aoyama, Taiki; Yoshida, Shigeto; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim. Usefulness of capsule endoscopy (CE) for diagnosing small-bowel lesions in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) has been reported. Most reports have addressed the clinical features of overt OGIB, with few addressing occult OGIB. We aimed to clarify whether occult OGIB is a definite indication for CE. Methods. We retrospectively compared the cases of 102 patients with occult OGIB and 325 patients with overt OGIB, all having undergone CE. The diagnostic yield of CE and identification of various lesion types were determined in cases of occult OGIB versus overt OGIB. Results. There was no significant difference in diagnostic yield between occult and overt OGIB. The small-bowel lesions in cases of occult OGIB were diagnosed as ulcer/erosive lesions (n = 18, 18%), vascular lesions (n = 11, 11%), and tumors (n = 4, 3%), and those in cases of overt OGIB were diagnosed as ulcer/erosive lesions (n = 51, 16%), vascular lesions (n = 31, 10%), and tumors (n = 20, 6%). Conclusion. CE detection rates and CE identification of various small-bowel diseases do not differ between patients with occult versus overt OGIB. CE should be actively performed for patients with either occult or overt OGIB.

  2. Peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to choledochoduodenal fistula: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XI, BIN; JIA, JUN-JUN; LIN, BING-YI; GENG, LEI; ZHENG, SHU-SEN

    2016-01-01

    Peptic ulcers are an extremely common condition, usually occurring in the stomach and proximal duodenum. However, cases of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications are extremely rare and hard to treat. The present case reinforces the requirement for the early recognition and correct treatment of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications. A 67-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain, fever and melena. The laboratory results showed anemia (hemoglobin 62 g/l) and hypoproteinemia (23 g/l). Abdominal imaging examinations revealed stones in the gallbladder and right liver, with air in the dilated intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed due to a deformed pylorus. The patient was finally diagnosed with peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to a choledochoduodenal fistula during an emergency pancreatoduodenectomy, which was performed due to a massive hemorrhage of the GI tract. The patient recovered well after the surgery. PMID:26870237

  3. [Gastrointestinal bleeding and delirium, challenges in the diagnosis of gallstone ileus: A case report and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Espinosa, Francisco; Gálvez-Romero, José Luis; Falfán-Moreno, Jesús; Guerrero-Martínez, Gustavo Adolfo; Vargas-Solís, Facundo

    2017-01-19

    Gallstone ileus is a non-strangulated mechanical obstruction of the small bowel or colon as a result of the passage of gallstones through a biliary enteric fistula. It is a rare complication of cholelithiasis, affects patients over 65 years, and the disease occurs predominantly in females. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult due to the lack of specific signs and symptoms in elderly patients with multiple comorbidities. A 93-year-old female presenting with a one-week history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, electrolyte imbalance and community- acquired pneumonia pneumonia. During her prolonged hospital stay she presented an intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis of gallstone ileus was made by CT scan. Despite surgical treatment, she died due to late diagnosis. Gallstone ileus is a rare pathology, difficulty in diagnosis prolongs hospital stay, which directly influences mortality. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. Predictors of favourable outcome in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: implications for early discharge?

    PubMed

    Rotondano, Gianluca; Cipolletta, Livio; Koch, Maurizio; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Grossi, Enzo; Marmo, Riccardo

    2014-03-01

    There is a lack of validated predictors on which to decide the timing of discharge in patients already hospitalized for upper nonvariceal bleeding. Identify factors that appear to protect nonvariceal bleeders from the development of negative outcome (rebleeding, surgery, death). Secondary analysis of two prospective multicenter studies. Multivariate analyses for each investigated outcome were performed; a single model was developed including all factors that were statistically significant in each sub-model. A final score was developed to predict favourable outcomes. Prognostic accuracy was tested with ROC curve analysis. Out of 2398 patients, 211 (8.8%) developed one or more adverse outcomes: 87 (3.63%) had rebleeding, 46 (1.92%) needed surgery and 107 (4.46%) died. Predictors of favourable prognosis were: ASA score 1 or 2, absence of neoplasia, outpatient bleeding, use of low-dose aspirin, no need for transfusions, clean-based ulcer, age <70 years, no haemodynamic instability successful endoscopic diagnosis/therapy, no Dieulafoy's lesion at endoscopy, no hematemesis on presentation and no need for endoscopic treatment. Overall prognostic accuracy of the model was 83%. The final score accurately identified 20-30% of patients that eventually do not develop any negative outcome. The "good luck score" may be a useful tool in deciding when to discharge a patient already hospitalized for acute non-variceal bleeding. Copyright © 2013 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hepatic cirrhosis: clinical course and mortality prediction.

    PubMed

    Afessa, B; Kubilis, P S

    2000-02-01

    We conducted this study to describe the complications and validate the accuracy of previously reported prognostic indices in predicting the mortality of cirrhotic patients hospitalized for upper GI bleeding. This prospective, observational study included 111 consecutive hospitalizations of 85 cirrhotic patients admitted for GI bleeding. Data obtained included intensive care unit (ICU) admission status, Child-Pugh score, the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), organ failure, and inhospital mortality. The performances of Garden's, Gatta's, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II prognostic systems in predicting mortality were assessed. Patients' mean age was 48.7 yr, and the median APACHE II and Child-Pugh scores were 17 and 9, respectively. Their ICU admission rate was 71%. Organ failure developed in 57%, and SIRS in 46% of the patients. Nine patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and three patients had hepatorenal syndrome. The inhospital mortality was 21%. The APACHE II, Garden's, and Gatta' s predicted mortality rates were 39%, 24%, and 20%, respectively, and their areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were 0.78, 0.70, and 0.71, respectively. The AUC for Child-Pugh score was 0.76. SIRS and organ failure develop in many patients with hepatic cirrhosis hospitalized for upper GI bleeding, and are associated with increased mortality. Although the APACHE II prognostic system overestimated the mortality of these patients, the receiver operating characteristic curves did not show significant differences between the various prognostic systems.

  6. Second look endoscopy in acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Philip Wai Yan

    2013-12-01

    Bleeding peptic ulcer remained an important cause of hospitalization worldwide. Primary endoscopic hemostasis achieved more than 90% of initial hemostasis for bleeding peptic ulcer. Recurrent bleeding amounted to 15% after therapeutic endoscopy, and rebleeding is an important risk factor to peptic ulcer related mortality. Routine second look endoscopy was one of the strategies targeted at prevention of rebleeding. The objective of second look endoscopy was to treat persistent stigmata of recent hemorrhage before rebleeding. Three meta-analyses showed that performance of routine second look endoscopy significantly reduced ulcer rebleeding especially when the endoscopic therapy was performed with thermal coagulation. Two cost-effectiveness analyses, however, demonstrated that selective instead of routine second look endoscopy is the most cost-effective approach to prevent ulcer rebleeding. While international consensus and guidelines did not recommend routine performance of second look endoscopy for prevention of ulcer rebleeding, further research should focus on identification of patients with high risk of rebleeding and investigate the effect of selective second look endoscopy in prevention of rebleeding among these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adherence to guidelines: A national audit of the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The REASON registry

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yidan; Barkun, Alan N; Martel, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess process of care in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) using a national cohort, and to identify predictors of adherence to ‘best practice’ standards. METHODS: Consecutive charts of patients hospitalized for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding across 21 Canadian hospitals were reviewed. Data regarding initial presentation, endoscopic management and outcomes were collected. Results were compared with ‘best practice’ using established guidelines on NVUGIB. Adherence was quantified and independent predictors were evaluated using multivariable analysis. RESULTS: Overall, 2020 patients (89.4% NVUGIB, variceal in 10.6%) were included (mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.4 years; 38.4% female). Endoscopy was performed in 1612 patients: 1533 with NVUGIB had endoscopic lesions (63.1% ulcers; high-risk stigmata in 47.8%). Early endoscopy was performed in 65.6% and an assistant was present in 83.5%. Only 64.5% of patients with high-risk stigmata received endoscopic hemostasis; 9.8% of patients exhibiting low-risk stigmata also did. Intravenous proton pump inhibitor was administered after endoscopic hemostasis in 95.7%. Rebleeding and mortality rates were 10.5% and 9.4%, respectively. Multivariable analysis revealed that low American Society of Anesthesiologists score patients had fewer assistants present during endoscopy (OR 0.63 [95% CI 0.48 to 0.83), a hemoglobin level <70 g/L predicted inappropriate high-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor use in patients with low-risk stigmata, and endoscopies performed during regular hours were associated with longer delays from presentation (OR 0.33 [95% CI 0.24 to 0.47]). CONCLUSION: There was variability between the process of care and ‘best practice’ in NVUGIB. Certain patient and situational characteristics may influence guideline adherence. Dissemination initiatives must identify and focus on such considerations to improve quality of care. PMID:25314356

  8. [Early evaluation of anaemia in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding: venous blood gas analysis compared to conventional laboratory].

    PubMed

    Benítez Cantero, José Manuel; Jurado García, Juan; Ruiz Cuesta, Patricia; González Galilea, Angel; Muñoz García-Borruel, María; García Sánchez, Valle; Gálvez Calderón, Carmen

    2013-10-19

    Evaluation of patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGB) requires early clinical evaluation and analysis. The aim of this study is to evaluate early concordance of hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (HTC) levels determined by conventional venous blood gas analysis (VBG) and by conventional Laboratory in Emergencies (LAB). Observational and prospective study of patients admitted in the Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage Unit with both high and low AGB. Demographic and clinical variables and simultaneous venous blood samples were obtained to determine Hb and HTC by VBG and LAB. Concordance in both methods was analysed by intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. One hundred and thirty-two patients were included: 87 (65.9%) males, average age 66.8 years. VBG overestimated Hb in 0.49 g/dl (95% confidence interval: 0.21-0.76) with respect to LAB. Concordance was very high in Hb (ICC 0.931) and high in HTC (0.899), with the Bland-Altman graphs showing both concordance and overestimation of Hb levels determined by VBG. In 19 patients (14.39%), Hb by VBG exceeded in more than 1g/dL the final determination obtained by LAB. Early determination of Hb and HTC in patients with AGB by VBG provides reliable results in the initial evaluation of anaemia. VBG systematically overestimates Hb values by less than 0.5 g/dl, and therefore clinical and hemodynamic evaluation of the bleeding patient should prevail over analytical results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of ornithine phenylacetate (OCR-002) in lowering plasma ammonia after upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Cots, Meritxell; Concepción, Mar; Arranz, José Antonio; Simón-Talero, Macarena; Torrens, Maria; Blanco-Grau, Albert; Fuentes, Inma; Suñé, Pilar; Alvarado-Tapias, Edilmar; Gely, Cristina; Roman, Eva; Mínguez, Beatriz; Soriano, German; Genescà, Joan; Córdoba, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Ornithine phenylacetate (OP) has been proven effective in lowering ammonia plasma levels in animals, and to be well tolerated in cirrhotic patients. A trial to assess OP efficacy in lowering plasma ammonia levels versus placebo in cirrhotic patients after an upper gastrointestinal bleeding was performed. The primary outcome was a decrease in venous plasma ammonia at 24 hours. A total of 38 consecutive cirrhotic patients were enrolled within 24 hours of an upper gastrointestinal bleed. Patients were randomized (1:1) to receive OP (10 g/day) or glucosaline for 5 days. The primary outcome was not achieved. A progressive decrease in ammonia was observed in both groups, being slightly greater in the OP group, with significant differences only at 120 hours. The subanalysis according to Child-Pugh score showed a statistically significant ammonia decrease in Child-Pugh C-treated patients at 36 hours, as well as in the time-normalized area under the curve (TN-AUC) 0-120 hours in the OP group [40.16 μmol/l (37.7-42.6); median (interquartile range) (IQR)] versus placebo group [65.5 μmol/l (54-126);p = 0.036]. A decrease in plasma glutamine levels was observed in the treated group compared with the placebo group, and was associated with the appearance of phenylacetylglutamine in urine. Adverse-event frequency was similar in both groups. No differences in hepatic encephalopathy incidence were observed. OP failed to significantly decrease plasma ammonia at the given doses (10 g/day). Higher doses of OP might be required in Child-Pugh A and B patients. OP appeared well tolerated.

  10. Adherence to guidelines: a national audit of the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The REASON registry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Barkun, Alan N; Martel, Myriam

    2014-10-01

    To assess process of care in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) using a national cohort, and to identify predictors of adherence to 'best practice' standards. Consecutive charts of patients hospitalized for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding across 21 Canadian hospitals were reviewed. Data regarding initial presentation, endoscopic management and outcomes were collected. Results were compared with 'best practice' using established guidelines on NVUGIB. Adherence was quantified and independent predictors were evaluated using multivariable analysis. Overall, 2020 patients (89.4% NVUGIB, variceal in 10.6%) were included (mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.4 years; 38.4% female). Endoscopy was performed in 1612 patients: 1533 with NVUGIB had endoscopic lesions (63.1% ulcers; high-risk stigmata in 47.8%). Early endoscopy was performed in 65.6% and an assistant was present in 83.5%. Only 64.5% of patients with high-risk stigmata received endoscopic hemostasis; 9.8% of patients exhibiting low-risk stigmata also did. Intravenous proton pump inhibitor was administered after endoscopic hemostasis in 95.7%. Rebleeding and mortality rates were 10.5% and 9.4%, respectively. Multivariable analysis revealed that low American Society of Anesthesiologists score patients had fewer assistants present during endoscopy (OR 0.63 [95% CI 0.48 to 0.83), a hemoglobin level <70 g⁄L predicted inappropriate high-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor use in patients with low-risk stigmata, and endoscopies performed during regular hours were associated with longer delays from presentation (OR 0.33 [95% CI 0.24 to 0.47]). There was variability between the process of care and 'best practice' in NVUGIB. Certain patient and situational characteristics may influence guideline adherence. Dissemination initiatives must identify and focus on such considerations to improve quality of care.

  11. Impact of ornithine phenylacetate (OCR-002) in lowering plasma ammonia after upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ventura-Cots, Meritxell; Concepción, Mar; Arranz, José Antonio; Simón-Talero, Macarena; Torrens, Maria; Blanco-Grau, Albert; Fuentes, Inma; Suñé, Pilar; Alvarado-Tapias, Edilmar; Gely, Cristina; Roman, Eva; Mínguez, Beatriz; Soriano, German; Genescà, Joan; Córdoba, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ornithine phenylacetate (OP) has been proven effective in lowering ammonia plasma levels in animals, and to be well tolerated in cirrhotic patients. A trial to assess OP efficacy in lowering plasma ammonia levels versus placebo in cirrhotic patients after an upper gastrointestinal bleeding was performed. The primary outcome was a decrease in venous plasma ammonia at 24 hours. Methods: A total of 38 consecutive cirrhotic patients were enrolled within 24 hours of an upper gastrointestinal bleed. Patients were randomized (1:1) to receive OP (10 g/day) or glucosaline for 5 days. Results: The primary outcome was not achieved. A progressive decrease in ammonia was observed in both groups, being slightly greater in the OP group, with significant differences only at 120 hours. The subanalysis according to Child–Pugh score showed a statistically significant ammonia decrease in Child–Pugh C-treated patients at 36 hours, as well as in the time-normalized area under the curve (TN-AUC) 0–120 hours in the OP group [40.16 μmol/l (37.7–42.6); median (interquartile range) (IQR)] versus placebo group [65.5 μmol/l (54–126);p = 0.036]. A decrease in plasma glutamine levels was observed in the treated group compared with the placebo group, and was associated with the appearance of phenylacetylglutamine in urine. Adverse-event frequency was similar in both groups. No differences in hepatic encephalopathy incidence were observed. Conclusions: OP failed to significantly decrease plasma ammonia at the given doses (10 g/day). Higher doses of OP might be required in Child–Pugh A and B patients. OP appeared well tolerated. PMID:27803737

  12. Gallbladder bleeding-related severe gastrointestinal bleeding and shock in a case with end-stage renal disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jun-Li; Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Gallbladder (GB) bleeding is very rare and it is caused by cystic artery aneurysm and rupture, or GB wall rupture. For GB rupture, the typical findings are positive Murphy's sign and jaundice. GB bleeding mostly presented as hemobilia. This is the first case presented with severe GI bleeding because of GB rupture-related GB bleeding. After comparing computed tomography, one gallstone spillage was noticed. In addition to gallstones, uremic coagulopathy also worsens the bleeding condition. This is also the first case that patients with GB spillage-related rupture and bleeding were successfully treated by nonsurgical management. Clinicians should bear in mind the rare causes of GI bleeding. Embolization of the bleeding artery should be attempted as soon as possible.

  13. Gastrointestinal bleeding after high intake of omega-3 fatty acids, cortisone and antibiotic therapy: a case study.

    PubMed

    Detopoulou, Paraskevi; Papamikos, Vasilios

    2014-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids exert a plethora of physiological actions including triglycerides lowering, reduction of inflammatory indices, immunomodulation, anti- thrombotic effects and possibly promotion of exercise performance. Their use is widespread and for commonly ingested doses their side- effects are minimal. We report a case of a 60 y amateur athlete who consumed about 20 g omega-3 fatty acids daily from supplements and natural sources for a year. After the intake of cortisone and antibiotics he presented duodenum ulcer and bleeding although he had no previous history of gastrointestinal problems. Although several animal data support gastro-protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids in the present case they were not able to prevent ulcer generation. The present observation may be explained by (i) the high dose of omega-3 fatty acids and their effect on bleeding, (ii) the fact that cortisone increases their oxidation and may render them proinflammatory, (iii) other antithrombotic microconstituents included in the consumed cod-oil and/or the diet of the subject and (iv) the differences in the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems of well- trained subjects. Further studies are needed to substantiate any possible interaction of cortisone and omega-3 fatty acids in wide ranges of intake.

  14. A benign gastric ulcer eroding into a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm presenting as a massive upper gastrointestinal bleed.

    PubMed

    Syed, Shareef M; Moradian, Simon; Ahmed, Mohammed; Ahmed, Umair; Shaheen, Samuel; Stalin, Vasanth

    2014-11-20

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding secondary to a ruptured splenic artery (SA) pseudoaneurysm into the stomach is a rare but a life-threatening condition. Owing to the low prevalence, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. A frail 77-year-old Caucasian female presented with epigastric pain and hematemesis. Endoscopy was non-diagnostic for an etiology. She then underwent diagnostic angiography that revealed an SA pseudoaneurysm with active contrast extravasation into the stomach. Subsequent transcatheter arterial coil embolization was conducted of the SA. The patient was subsequently taken for a partial gastrectomy, distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. She had an uncomplicated postoperative course. Diagnosis of an UGI bleeding secondary to a ruptured SA pseudoaneurysm into the stomach remains difficult. However, we report that in a hemodynamically stable patient, a multidisciplinary approach can be taken, with interval optimization of the patient prior to definitive surgery for a satisfactory outcome. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014.

  15. Safety and efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization for lower gastrointestinal bleeding: a single-center experience with 112 patients.

    PubMed

    Hur, Saebeom; Jae, Hwan Jun; Lee, Myungsu; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook

    2014-01-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) and to determine the prognostic factors that affect clinical outcome. All patients diagnosed with LGIB by angiography at a single institution from April 2006 to January 2013 were included in a retrospective study. The rates of technical success, early recurrent bleeding, major complications, clinical success, and in-hospital mortality for transcatheter arterial embolization were determined. The influence of possible prognostic factors on the outcome was analyzed. A total of 112 patients were included (36 with small-bowel LGIB, 36 with colon LGIB, and 40 with rectal LGIB). N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) was the embolic agent for 84 patients (75.0%), whereas gelatin sponge pledgets (n = 20), microcoils (n = 2), polyvinyl alcohol particles with adjunctive gelatin sponge pledgets (n = 1), and blood clots (n = 1) were used in the other patients. The technical success rate was 96.4%. For the entire group, the rates of early recurrent bleeding, major complications, clinical success, and in-hospital mortality were 17.4%, 4.6%, 74.5%, and 25.0%, respectively. These were 15.2%, 4.8%, 75.3%, and 26.2%, respectively, in the NBCA group. Hematologic malignancy, immobilization status, and coagulopathy were significant prognostic factors for clinical outcomes. Transcatheter arterial embolization is a safe and effective treatment for LGIB. NBCA could be used as a primary embolic agent for this procedure. © 2013 The Society of Interventional Radiology Published by SIR All rights reserved.

  16. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  17. Decreased plasma and tissue isoleucine levels after simulated gastrointestinal bleeding by blood gavages in chronic portacaval shunted rats.

    PubMed Central

    Olde Damink, S W; Dejong, C H; Deutz, N E; Soeters, P B

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previously, arterial concentrations of the essential branched chain amino acid isoleucine (Ile) were found to have decreased by more than 50% after gastrointestinal haemorrhage in patients and after intragastric blood administration in healthy humans and pigs. Hypothetically, this induced hypoisoleucinaemia could deplete tissue Ile pools. AIMS: To study the effect of repeated blood gavages on arterial and tissue Ile levels during normal and impaired liver function. SUBJECTS: Male Wistar rats. METHODS: 14 days after portacaval shunting or sham surgery, rats received 3 ml bovine erythrocytes or saline at 0, 1, 2, and 3 hours via a gastrostomy catheter in the duodenum. At 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours arterial blood and at 8 hours intestine, liver, muscle, and cerebral cortex were sampled for determination of ammonia and amino acid concentrations. RESULTS: In both groups repeated blood administration resulted in a marked decrease in plasma Ile (40-60%). This was accompanied by decreased tissue Ile concentrations in liver (50%), muscle (40-60%), and cerebral cortex (40-50%), but unaltered intestinal Ile levels. In contrast, the arterial and tissue concentrations of ammonia, urea, and of most amino acids increased, most strikingly of the other two branched chain amino acids, valine and leucine. CONCLUSIONS: Simulated gastrointestinal bleeding by blood gavages in rats with and without impaired liver function leads to hypoisoleucinaemia and decreased tissue Ile pools. PMID:9135535

  18. Relevance of surgery in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Dango, S; Beißbarth, T; Weiss, E; Seif Amir Hosseini, A; Raddatz, D; Ellenrieder, V; Lotz, J; Ghadimi, B M; Beham, A

    2017-05-01

    Upper GI bleeding remains one of the most common emergencies with a substantial overall mortality rate of up to 30%. In severe ill patients, death does not occur due to failure of hemostasis, either medical or surgical, but mainly from comorbidities, treatment complications, and decreased tolerated blood loss. Management strategies have changed dramatically over the last two decades and include primarily endoscopic intervention in combination with acid-suppressive therapy and decrease in surgical intervention. Herein, we present one of the largest patient-based analysis assessing clinical parameters and outcome in patients undergoing endoscopy with an upper GI bleeding. Data were further analyzed to identify potential new risk factors and to investigate the role of surgery. In this retrospective study, we aimed to analyze outcome of patients with an UGIB and data were analyzed to identify potential new risk factors and the role of surgery. Data collection included demographic data, laboratory results, endoscopy reports, and details of management including blood administration, and surgery was carried out. Patient events were grouped and defined as "overall" events and "operated," "non-operated," and "operated and death" as well as "non-operated and death" where appropriate. Blatchford, clinical as well as complete Rockall-score analysis, risk stratification, and disease-related mortality rate were calculated for each group for comparison. Overall, 253 patients were eligible for analysis: endoscopy was carried out in 96% of all patients, 17% needed surgical intervention after endoscopic failure of bleeding control due to persistent bleeding, and the remaining 4% of patients were subjected directly to surgery. The median length of stay to discharge was 26 days. Overall mortality was 22%; out of them, almost 5% were operated and died. Anticoagulation was associated with a high in-hospital mortality risk (23%) and was increased once patients were taken to surgery (43

  19. Successful Case of Somatostatin Analog Stopping Gastrointestinal Bleeding, One of the Most Frequent Complications After Simultaneous Pancreas-kidney Transplantation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, S; Fujio, A; Tokodai, K; Hara, Y; Nakanishi, C; Goto, H; Kamei, T; Kawagishi, N; Ohuchi, N; Satomi, S

    2016-04-01

    Pancreas transplantation has the highest surgical complication rate of all routinely performed organ transplantation procedures. The complications are not only caused by the pancreas itself but also occur due to issues with the transplant recipient. We report the case of a patient who experienced massive gastrointestinal bleeding after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK), which was stopped successfully using somatostatin analog. The patient was a 45-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus type 1 who underwent SPK with enteric drainage. She had melena 5 days after SPK. At first, we suspected that the melena was caused by the transplanted duodenum because of rejection and ischemic changes. The patient experienced severe bleeding 9 days after SPK. We quickly performed open surgery and inserted an endoscope from the recipient's ileum to investigate the transplanted duodenum. However, no bleeding source was found, including in the transplanted duodenum and the recipient's ileum end. We determined that the bleeding source was the recipient's ascending colon. We attempted to perform endovascular treatment but could not detect the source of the bleeding; therefore, we used somatostatin analog to let the blood vessels shrink and reduce pancreatic output. Thereafter, the function of the transplanted pancreas and kidney gradually recovered, and the recipient was discharged 154 days after SPK. Gastrointestinal bleeding is a lethal complication and has several different causes, such as mucosal rejection, ischemic changes, and exocrine output of the pancreas graft. Somatostatin analog is one of the most acceptable treatments for patients who have gastrointestinal bleeding after SPK. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Novel Easy-to-Use Prediction Scheme for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Cologne-WATCH (C-WATCH) Risk Score.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Vera; Neubauer, Henrik; Heinzler, Julia; Smarczyk, Anna; Hellmich, Martin; Bowe, Andrea; Kuetting, Fabian; Demir, Muenevver; Pelc, Agnes; Schulte, Sigrid; Toex, Ullrich; Nierhoff, Dirk; Steffen, Hans-Michael

    2015-09-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is the leading indication for emergency endoscopy. Scoring schemes have been developed for immediate risk stratification. However, most of these scores include endoscopic findings and are based on data from patients with nonvariceal bleeding. The aim of our study was to design a pre-endoscopic score for acute UGIB--including variceal bleeding--in order to identify high-risk patients requiring urgent clinical management. The scoring system was developed using a data set consisting of 586 patients with acute UGIB. These patients were identified from the emergency department as well as all inpatient services at the University Hospital of Cologne within a 2-year period (01/2007-12/2008). Further data from a cohort of 322 patients who presented to our endoscopy unit with acute UGIB in 2009 served for external/temporal validation.Clinical, laboratory, and endoscopic parameters, as well as further data on medical history and medication were retrospectively collected from the electronic clinical documentation system. A multivariable logistic regression was fitted to the development set to obtain a risk score using recurrent bleeding, need for intervention (angiography, surgery), or death within 30 days as a composite endpoint. Finally, the obtained risk score was evaluated on the validation set. Only C-reactive protein, white blood cells, alanine-aminotransferase, thrombocytes, creatinine, and hemoglobin were identified as significant predictors for the composite endpoint. Based on the regression coefficients of these variables, an easy-to-use point scoring scheme (C-WATCH) was derived to estimate the risk of complications from 3% to 86% with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.723 in the development set and 0.704 in the validation set. In the validation set, no patient in the identified low-risk group (0-1 points), but 38.7% of patients in the high-risk group (≥ 2 points) reached the composite endpoint. Our easy-to-use scoring

  1. Gangliocytic paraganglioma, a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Endoscopic ultrasound findings presented

    SciTech Connect

    Smithline, A.E.; Hawes, R.H.; Kopecky, K.K.; Cummings, O.W.; Kumar, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Gangliocytic paraganglioma (GP) is an uncommon benign neurogenic tumor of the digestive tract that is usually located in the descending duodenum. Patients with GP usually present with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, which reflects the tendency of the tumor to ulcerate the mucosa. The authors report a patient in whom the tumor was overlooked on routine radiologic examinations and initial endoscopy. It was discovered in the distal transverse duodenum at small bowel enteroscopy. The findings of endoscopic ultrasonography are correlated with radiographic and histologic examination. 10 refs.

  2. Unexplained gastrointestinal bleed due to arteriobiliary fistula after percutaneous liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Smirniotopoulos, John; Barone, Paul; Schiffman, Marc

    We represent a case of a 54-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with right upper quadrant abdominal pain and melena three weeks after percutaneous liver biopsy. He was found to have anemia secondary to an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, unresponsive to multiple blood transfusions. Angiography later revealed an arteriobiliary fistula with contrast extravasation entering the duodenum. The fistula was successfully embolized and the patient was discharged without complication. This report demonstrates the importance in considering a vascular intrahepatic fistula in patients with right upper quadrant abdominal pain after remote liver biopsy.

  3. A fibreoptic endoscopic study of upper gastrointestinal bleeding at Bugando Medical Centre in northwestern Tanzania: a retrospective review of 240 cases.

    PubMed

    Jaka, Hyasinta; Koy, Mheta; Liwa, Anthony; Kabangila, Rodrick; Mirambo, Mariam; Scheppach, Wolfgang; Mkongo, Eliasa; McHembe, Mabula D; Chalya, Phillipo L

    2012-07-03

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is recognized as a common and potentially life-threatening abdominal emergency that needs a prompt assessment and aggressive emergency treatment. A retrospective study was undertaken at Bugando Medical Centre in northwestern Tanzania between March 2010 and September 2011 to describe our own experiences with fibreoptic upper GI endoscopy in the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in our setting and compare our results with those from other centers in the world. A total of 240 patients representing 18.7% of all patients (i.e. 1292) who had fibreoptic upper GI endoscopy during the study period were studied. Males outnumbered female by a ratio of 2.1:1. Their median age was 37 years and most of patients (60.0%) were aged 40 years and below. The vast majority of the patients (80.4%) presented with haematemesis alone followed by malaena alone in 9.2% of cases. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alcohol and smoking prior to the onset of bleeding was recorded in 7.9%, 51.7% and 38.3% of cases respectively. Previous history of peptic ulcer disease was reported in 22(9.2%) patients. Nine (3.8%) patients were HIV positive. The source of bleeding was accurately identified in 97.7% of patients. Diagnostic accuracy was greater within the first 24 h of the bleeding onset, and in the presence of haematemesis. Oesophageal varices were the most frequent cause of upper GI bleeding (51.3%) followed by peptic ulcers in 25.0% of cases. The majority of patients (60.8%) were treated conservatively. Endoscopic and surgical treatments were performed in 30.8% and 5.8% of cases respectively. 140 (58.3%) patients received blood transfusion. The median length of hospitalization was 8 days and it was significantly longer in patients who underwent surgical treatment and those with higher Rockall scores (P < 0.001). Rebleeding was reported in 3.3% of the patients. The overall mortality rate of 11.7% was significantly

  4. [A case of cholecysto-gastro-colonic fistula with upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Park, Min Kyu; Chung, Yun Jin; Baek, In Yub; Kim, Hyeong Seok; Bae, Sang Soo; Lee, Su Ok; Lee, Kyoung Suk; Kwon, Jong Kyu

    2013-05-01

    Biliary enteric fistula is an abnormal pathway often caused by biliary disease. It is difficult to diagnose the disease because patients have nonspecific symptoms. A 67-year-old woman presented with hematemesis and melena. She was diagnosed with Dieulafoy lesion on the gastric antrum and underwent endoscopic hemostasis using hemoclips. Follow-up upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed an abnormal opening on a previous treated site that was suggestive of biliary enteric fistula. Abdomen simple X-ray and abdominal dynamic CT scan showed pneumobilia and cholecysto-gastric fistula. The patient had cholecystectomy and wedge resection of the gastric antrum, followed by right extended hemicolectomy because of severe adhesive lesion between the gallbladder and colon. She was diagnosed with cholecysto-gastro-colic fistula postoperatively. We report on this case and give a brief review of the literatures.

  5. High-altitude gastrointestinal bleeding: An observation in Qinghai-Tibetan railroad construction workers on Mountain Tanggula

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tian-Yi; Ding, Shou-Quan; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Jian-Hou; Dai, Rui-Chen; Zhu, Dong-Chun; Liang, Bao-Zhu; Qi, De-Tang; Sun, Yong-Fu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in people from lowland to high altitude and in workers on Mountain Tanggula and its causes as well as treatment and prophylaxis. METHODS: From 2001 to October 2003, we studied GIB in 13 502 workers constructing the railroad on Mountain Tanggula which is 4905 m above the sea level. The incidence of GIB in workers at different altitudes was recorded. Endoscopy was performed when the workers evacuated to Golmud (2808 m) and Xining (2261 m). The available data on altitude GIB were analyzed. RESULTS: The overall incidence of GIB was 0.49% in 13 502 workers. The incidence increased with increasing altitude. The onset of symptoms in most patients was within three weeks after arrival at high altitude. Bleeding manifested as hematemesis, melaena or hematochezia, and might be occult. Endoscopic examination showed that the causes of altitude GIB included hemorrhage gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, and gastric erosion. Experimental studies suggested that acute gastric mucosal lesion (AGML) could be induced by hypoxic and cold stress, which might be the pathogenesis of altitude GIB. Those who consumed large amount of alcohol, aspirin or dexamethasone were at a higher risk of developing GIB. Persons who previously suffered from peptic ulcer or high-altitude polycythemia were also at risk of developing GIB. Early diagnosis, evacuation, and treatment led to early recovery. CONCLUSION: GIB is a potentially life threatening disease, if it is not treated promptly and effectively. Early diagnosis, treatment and evacuation lead to an early recovery. Death due to altitude GIB can be avoided if early symptoms and signs are recognized. PMID:17278202

  6. High-altitude gastrointestinal bleeding: an observation in Qinghai-Tibetan railroad construction workers on Mountain Tanggula.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tian-Yi; Ding, Shou-Quan; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Jian-Hou; Dai, Rui-Chen; Zhu, Dong-Chun; Liang, Bao-Zhu; Qi, De-Tang; Sun, Yong-Fu

    2007-02-07

    To investigate the gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in people from lowland to high altitude and in workers on Mountain Tanggula and its causes as well as treatment and prophylaxis. From 2001 to October 2003, we studied GIB in 13502 workers constructing the railroad on Mountain Tanggula which is 4905 m above the sea level. The incidence of GIB in workers at different altitudes was recorded. Endoscopy was performed when the workers evacuated to Golmud (2808 m) and Xining (2261 m). The available data on altitude GIB were analyzed. The overall incidence of GIB was 0.49% in 13502 workers. The incidence increased with increasing altitude. The onset of symptoms in most patients was within three weeks after arrival at high altitude. Bleeding manifested as hematemesis, melaena or hematochezia, and might be occult. Endoscopic examination showed that the causes of altitude GIB included hemorrhage gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, and gastric erosion. Experimental studies suggested that acute gastric mucosal lesion (AGML) could be induced by hypoxic and cold stress, which might be the pathogenesis of altitude GIB. Those who consumed large amount of alcohol, aspirin or dexamethasone were at a higher risk of developing GIB. Persons who previously suffered from peptic ulcer or high-altitude polycythemia were also at risk of developing GIB. Early diagnosis, evacuation, and treatment led to early recovery. GIB is a potentially life threatening disease, if it is not treated promptly and effectively. Early diagnosis, treatment and evacuation lead to an early recovery. Death due to altitude GIB can be avoided if early symptoms and signs are recognized.

  7. Risk Factors for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Patients Taking Selective COX-2 Inhibitors: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xi-Hsuan; Young, Shih-Hao; Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Peng, Yen-Ling; Chen, Ping-Hsien; Lin, Chung-Chi; Chen, Wei-Ming; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lee, Fa-Yauh

    2017-04-28

     Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (coxibs) are associated with less upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) than traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (tNSAIDs). However, they also increase the risk of UGIB in high-risk patients. We aimed to identify the risk factors of UGIB in coxibs users. Retrospective cohort study. 2000-2010 National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. Patients taking coxibs as the study group and patients not taking any coxibs as controls. After age, gender, and comorbidity matching by propensity score, 12,145 coxibs users and 12,145 matched controls were extracted for analysis. The primary end point was the occurrence of UGIB. Cox multivariate proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the risk factors for UGIB among all the enrollees and coxibs users. During a mean follow-up of three years, coxibs users had significantly higher incidence of UGIB than matched controls ( P  <   0.001, log-rank test). Cox regression analysis showed that coxibs increased risk of UGIB in all participants (hazard ratio = 1.37, 95% confidence interval = 1.19-1.55, P  < 0.001). Independent risk factors for UGIB among coxibs users were age, male gender, diabetes, chronic renal disease, cirrhosis, history of peptic ulcer disease, PU bleeding (PUB), Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) infection, and concomitant use of tNSAIDs, acetylsalicylic acid, or thienopyridines. Among coxibs users, H. pylori infection and history of PUB were especially important risk factors for UGIB. Further studies are needed to determine whether proton pump inhibitors might play a protective role in these at-risk patients.

  8. Outcome of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with coronary artery disease: A matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Thanapirom, Kessarin; Ridtitid, Wiriyaporn; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Thungsuk, Rattikorn; Noophun, Phadet; Wongjitrat, Chatchawan; Luangjaru, Somchai; Vedkijkul, Padet; Lertkupinit, Comson; Poonsab, Swangphong; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Hansomburana, Piyathida; Pornthisarn, Bubpha; Thongbai, Thirada; Mahachai, Varocha; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat

    2016-01-01

    The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) increases in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) due to the frequent use of antiplatelets. There is some data reporting on treatment outcomes in CAD patients presenting with UGIB. We aim to determine the clinical characteristics and outcomes of UGIB in patients with CAD, compared with non-CAD patients. We conducted a prospective multi-center cohort study (THAI UGIB-2010) that enrolled 981 consecutive hospitalized patients with acute UGIB. A matched case-control analysis using this database, which was collected from 11 tertiary referral hospitals in Thailand between January 2010 and September 2011, was performed. Of 981 hospitalized patients with UGIB, there were 61 CAD patients and 244 gender-matched non-CAD patients (ratio 1:4). UGIB patients with CAD were significantly older, and had more frequently used antiplatelets and warfarin than in non-CAD patients. Compared with non-CAD, the CAD patients had significantly higher Glasgow-Blatchford score, full and pre-endoscopic Rockall score and full. Peptic ulcer in CAD patients was identified more often than in non-CAD patients. UGIB patients with CAD and non-CAD had similar outcomes with regard to mortality rate, re-bleeding, surgery, embolization, and packed erythrocyte transfusion. However, CAD patients had longer duration of hospital stays than non-CAD patients. Two CAD patients died from cardiac arrest after endoscopy, whereas three non-CAD patients died from pneumonia and acute renal failure during their hospitalization. In Thailand, patients presenting with UGIB, concomitant CAD did not affect clinical outcome of treatment, compared with non-CAD patients, except for longer hospital stay.

  9. Mucormycosis as a rare cause of severe gastrointestinal bleeding after multivisceral transplantation.

    PubMed

    Irtan, S; Lamerain, M; Lesage, F; Verkarre, V; Bougnoux, M-E; Lanternier, F; Zahar, J R; Salvi, N; Talbotec, C; Lortholary, O; Lacaille, F; Chardot, C

    2013-12-01

    Mucormycosis, an emerging fungal infection in solid organ transplant patients, is mostly located in rhino-orbito-cerebral, pulmonary, and cutaneous areas, or disseminated with poor prognosis. A 4-year-old girl with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction syndrome underwent a modified multivisceral transplantation, including half of the stomach, the duodeno-pancreas, the small bowel, and the right colon. On postoperative day 5, a digestive perforation was suspected. Surgical exploration found a small necrotic area on the native stomach, which was externally drained. The next day, massive gastric bleeding occurred. During the emergency laparotomy, 2 hemorrhagic ulcers were found and resected from the transplanted stomach. Pathology and fungal culture showed mucormycosis caused by Lichtheimia (formerly Absidia) ramosa in both the transplanted and native stomach. High-dose intravenous liposomal amphotericin B was immediately started. No other site of fungal infection was found. The child recovered, and 3 years after transplantation, is alive and well, off parenteral nutrition. The originality of this case is the very early presentation after transplantation, the unusual site, and the complete recovery after rapid medico-surgical management. The origin of the fungus and treatment are discussed.

  10. iPad-based primary 2D reading of CT angiography examinations of patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Faggioni, L; Neri, E; Bargellini, I; Scalise, P; Calcagni, F; Mantarro, A; D'Ippolito, G; Bartolozzi, C

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the iPad (Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) for two-dimensional (2D) reading of CT angiography (CTA) studies performed for suspected acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. 24 CTA examinations of patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding confirmed (19/24, 79.2%) or ruled out (5/24, 20.8%) by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were retrospectively reviewed by three independent readers on a commercial picture archiving communication system (PACS) workstation and on an iPad with Retina Display® 64 GB (Apple Inc.). The time needed to complete reading of every CTA examination was recorded, as well as the rate of detection of arterial bleeding and identification of suspected bleeding arteries on both devices. Overall, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values for bleeding detection were not significantly different while using the iPad and workstation (0.774 vs 0.847, 0.947 vs 0.895, 0.6 vs 0.8, 0.9 vs 0.944 and 0.750 vs 0.667, respectively; p > 0.05). In DSA-positive cases, the iPad and workstation allowed correct identification of the bleeding source in 17/19 cases (89.5%) and 15/19 cases (78.9%), respectively (p > 0.05). Finally, the time needed to complete reading of every CTA study was significantly shorter using the iPad (169 ± 74 vs 222 ± 70 s, respectively; p < 0.01). Compared with a conventional PACS workstation, iPad-based preliminary 2D reading of CTA studies has comparable diagnostic accuracy for detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and can be significantly faster. The iPad could be used by on-call interventional radiologists for immediate decision on percutaneous embolization in patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  11. Use of endoscopy for management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK: results of a nationwide audit.

    PubMed

    Hearnshaw, Sarah A; Logan, Richard F A; Lowe, Derek; Travis, Simon P L; Murphy, Mike F; Palmer, Kelvin R

    2010-08-01

    To examine the use of endoscopy in the UK for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) and compare with published standards. To assess the organisation of endoscopy services for AUGIB in the UK. To examine the relationship between outcomes and out of hours (OOH) service provision. Multi-centre cross sectional clinical audit. All UK hospitals accepting admissions with AUGIB. All adults (>or=16 yrs) presenting with AUGIB between 1st May and 30th June 2007. Collection A custom designed web-based reporting tool was used to collect data on patient characteristics, comorbidity and haemodynamic status at presentation to calculate the Rockall score, use and timing of endoscopy, treatment including endoscopic, rebleeding and in-hospital mortality. A mailed questionnaire was used to collect data on facilities and service organisation. Data on 6750 patients (median age 68 years) were analysed from 208 hospitals. 74% underwent inpatient endoscopy; of these 50% took place within 24 h of presentation, 82% during normal working hours and 3% between midnight and 8 am. Of patients deemed high-risk (pre-endoscopy Rockall score >or=5) only 55% were endoscoped within 24 h and 14% waited >or=72 h for endoscopy. Lesions with a high risk of rebleeding were present in 28% of patients of whom 74% received endoscopic therapy. Further bleeding was evident in 13% and mortality in those endoscoped was 7.4% (95% CI 6.7% to 8.1%). In 52% of hospitals a consultant led out of hours (OOH) endoscopy rota existed; in these hospitals 20% of first endoscopies were performed OOH compared with 13% in those with no OOH rota and endoscopic therapy was more likely to be administered (25% vs 21% in hospitals with no OOH rota). The risk adjusted mortality ratio was higher (1.21, p=0.10, (95%CI 0.96 to 1.51)) in hospitals without such rotas. This audit has found continuing delays in performing endoscopy after AUGIB and underutilisation of standard endoscopic therapy particularly for variceal bleeding. In

  12. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Trials to Ascertain Fatal Gastrointestinal Bleeding Events Attributable to Preventive Low-Dose Aspirin: No Evidence of Increased Risk.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Peter C; Morgan, Gareth; Galante, Julieta; Chia, John W K; Dolwani, Sunil; Graziano, J Michael; Kelson, Mark; Lanas, Angel; Longley, Marcus; Phillips, Ceri J; Pickering, Janet; Roberts, Stephen E; Soon, Swee S; Steward, Will; Morris, Delyth; Weightman, Alison L

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin has been shown to lower the incidence and the mortality of vascular disease and cancer but its wider adoption appears to be seriously impeded by concerns about gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Unlike heart attacks, stroke and cancer, GI bleeding is an acute event, usually followed by complete recovery. We propose therefore that a more appropriate evaluation of the risk-benefit balance would be based on fatal adverse events, rather than on the incidence of bleeding. We therefore present a literature search and meta-analysis to ascertain fatal events attributable to low-dose aspirin. In a systematic literature review we identified reports of randomised controlled trials of aspirin in which both total GI bleeding events and bleeds that led to death had been reported. Principal investigators of studies in which fatal events had not been adequately described were contacted via email and asked for further details. A meta-analyses was then performed to estimate the risk of fatal gastrointestinal bleeding attributable to low-dose aspirin. Eleven randomised trials were identified in the literature search. In these the relative risk (RR) of 'major' incident GI bleeding in subjects who had been randomised to low-dose aspirin was 1.55 (95% CI 1.33, 1.83), and the risk of a bleed attributable to aspirin being fatal was 0.45 (95% CI 0.25, 0.80). In all the subjects randomised to aspirin, compared with those randomised not to receive aspirin, there was no significant increase in the risk of a fatal bleed (RR 0.77; 95% CI 0.41, 1.43). The majority of the adverse events caused by aspirin are GI bleeds, and there appears to be no valid evidence that the overall frequency of fatal GI bleeds is increased by aspirin. The substantive risk for prophylactic aspirin is therefore cerebral haemorrhage which can be fatal or severely disabling, with an estimated risk of one death and one disabling stroke for every 1,000 people taking aspirin for ten years. These adverse effects of

  13. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Trials to Ascertain Fatal Gastrointestinal Bleeding Events Attributable to Preventive Low-Dose Aspirin: No Evidence of Increased Risk

    PubMed Central

    Dolwani, Sunil; Graziano, J. Michael; Lanas, Angel; Longley, Marcus; Phillips, Ceri J.; Roberts, Stephen E.; Soon, Swee S.; Steward, Will

    2016-01-01

    Background Aspirin has been shown to lower the incidence and the mortality of vascular disease and cancer but its wider adoption appears to be seriously impeded by concerns about gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Unlike heart attacks, stroke and cancer, GI bleeding is an acute event, usually followed by complete recovery. We propose therefore that a more appropriate evaluation of the risk-benefit balance would be based on fatal adverse events, rather than on the incidence of bleeding. We therefore present a literature search and meta-analysis to ascertain fatal events attributable to low-dose aspirin. Methods In a systematic literature review we identified reports of randomised controlled trials of aspirin in which both total GI bleeding events and bleeds that led to death had been reported. Principal investigators of studies in which fatal events had not been adequately described were contacted via email and asked for further details. A meta-analyses was then performed to estimate the risk of fatal gastrointestinal bleeding attributable to low-dose aspirin. Results Eleven randomised trials were identified in the literature search. In these the relative risk (RR) of ‘major’ incident GI bleeding in subjects who had been randomised to low-dose aspirin was 1.55 (95% CI 1.33, 1.83), and the risk of a bleed attributable to aspirin being fatal was 0.45 (95% CI 0.25, 0.80). In all the subjects randomised to aspirin, compared with those randomised not to receive aspirin, there was no significant increase in the risk of a fatal bleed (RR 0.77; 95% CI 0.41, 1.43). Conclusions The majority of the adverse events caused by aspirin are GI bleeds, and there appears to be no valid evidence that the overall frequency of fatal GI bleeds is increased by aspirin. The substantive risk for prophylactic aspirin is therefore cerebral haemorrhage which can be fatal or severely disabling, with an estimated risk of one death and one disabling stroke for every 1,000 people taking aspirin

  14. Why do mortality rates for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding differ around the world? A systematic review of cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Jairath, Vipul; Martel, Myriam; Logan, Richard F A; Barkun, Alan N

    2012-08-01

    Discrepancies exist in reported mortality rates of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB). To perform a systematic review assessing possible reasons for these disparate findings and to more reliably compare them. The MEDLINE, EMBASE and ISI Web of Knowledge databases were searched for studies reporting mortality rates in NVUGIB involving adults and published in English. To ensure robust and contemporary estimates, studies spanning 1996 to January 2011 that included more than 1000 patients were selected. Eighteen of 3077 studies were selected. Ten studies used administrative databases and the remaining eight used registries. The mortality rates reported in these studies ranged from 1.1% in Japan to 11% in Denmark. There were variations in reported mortality rates among countries and also within countries. Reasons for these disparities included a spectrum of quality in reporting as well as heterogeneous definitions of case ascertainment, differing patient populations with regard to severity of presentation and associated comorbidities, varying durations of follow-up and different health care system-related practices. Wide differences in reported NVUGIB mortality rates are attributable to differences in adopted methodologies and populations studied. More uniform standards in reporting are needed; only then can true observed variations enable a better understanding of causes of death and pave the way to improved patient outcomes.

  15. Clinical Performance of Prediction Rules and Nasogastric Lavage for the Evaluation of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Dakik, Hassan K.; Srygley, F. Douglas; Chiu, Shih-Ting; Chow, Shein-Chung

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The majority of patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) are admitted for urgent endoscopy as it can be difficult to determine who can be safely managed as an outpatient. Our objective was to compare four clinical prediction scoring systems: Glasgow Blatchford Score (GBS) and Clinical Rockall, Adamopoulos, and Tammaro scores in a sample of patients presenting to the emergency department of a large US academic center. Methods. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients during 2008–2010. Our outcome was significant UGIB defined as high-risk stigmata on endoscopy, or receipt of blood transfusion or surgery, or death. Results. A total of 393 patients met inclusion criteria. The GBS was the most sensitive for detecting significant UGIB at 98.30% and had the highest negative predictive value (90.00%). Adding nasogastric lavage data to the GBS increased the sensitivity to 99.57%. Conclusions. Of all four scoring systems compared, the GBS demonstrated the highest sensitivity and negative predictive value for identifying a patient with a significant UGIB. Therefore, patients with a 0 score can be safely managed as an outpatient. Our results also suggest that performing a nasogastric lavage adds little to the diagnosis UGIB. PMID:28246528

  16. Timing or Dosing of Intravenous Proton Pump Inhibitors in Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Has Low Impact on Costs.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Adam, Viviane; Teich, Vanessa; Barkun, Alan

    2016-10-01

    High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) post endoscopy are recommended in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), as they improve outcomes of patients with high-risk lesions. Determine the budget impact of using different PPI regimens in treating non-variceal UGIB, including pre- and post-endoscopic use, continuous infusion (high dose), and intermittent bolus (twice daily) dosing. A budget impact analysis using a decision model informed with data from the literature adopting a US third party payer's perspective with a 30-day time horizon was used to determine the total cost per patient (US$2014) presenting with acute UGIB. The base-case employing high-dose pre- and post-endoscopic IV PPI was compared with using only post-endoscopic PPI. For each, continuous or intermittent dosing regimens were assessed with associated incremental costs. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. The overall cost per patient is $11,399 when high-dose IV PPIs are initiated before endoscopy. The incremental costs are all inferior in alternate-case scenarios: $106 less if only post-endoscopic high-dose IVs are used; with intermittent IV bolus dosing, the savings are $223 if used both pre and post endoscopy and $191 if only administered post endoscopy. Subgroup analysis suggests cost savings in patients with clean-base ulcers who are discharged early after endoscopy. Results are robust to sensitivity analysis. The incremental costs of using different IV PPI regimens are modest compared with total per patient costs.

  17. Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAIDs peptic ulcers: a descriptive study on patients referred to Taleghani hospital with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Rajabalinia, Hasan; Ghobakhlou, Mehdi; Nikpour, Shahriar; Dabiri, Reza; Bahriny, Rasoul; Sherafat, Somayeh Jahani; Moghaddam, Pardis Ketabi

    2012-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the number and proportion of various causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and actual numbers of non-NSAID, non-Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) peptic ulcers seen in endoscopy of these patients. Background The number and the proportion of patients with non- H.pylori, non-NSAIDs peptic ulcer disease leading to upper gastrointestinal bleeding is believed to be increasing after eradication therapy for H.pylori. Patients and methods Medical records of patients referred to the emergency room of Taleghani hospital from 2010 with a clinical diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (hematemesis, coffee ground vomiting and melena) were included in this study. Patients with hematochezia with evidence of a source of bleeding from upper gastrointestinal tract in endoscopy were also included in this study. Results In this study, peptic ulcer disease (all kinds of ulcers) was seen in 61 patients which were about 44.85% of abnormalities seen on endoscopy of patients. Among these 61 ulcers, 44 were duodenal ulcer, 22 gastric ulcer (5 patients had the both duodenal and gastric ulcers). Multiple biopsies were taken and be sent to laboratory for Rapid Urease Test and pathological examination. About 65.53% of patients had ulcers associated with H.pylori, 9.83% had peptic ulcer disease associated with NSAIDs and 11.47% of patients had ulcers associated with both H.pylori and consumption of NSAIDs. 13.11% of patients had non-NSAIDs non- H.pylori peptic ulcer disease. Conclusion The results of this study supports the results of other studies that suggest the incidence of H.pylori infection related with duodenal ulcer is common, and that non-H pylori and non-NSAIDs duodenal ulcer is also common. PMID:24834225

  18. Successful treatment of bleeding large duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour in a patient under dual antiplatelet therapy after recent drug-eluting coronary stent implantation

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Keita; Fujikawa, Takahisa; Kuramitsu, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 69-year-old man who started dual antiplatelet therapy (APT) with aspirin and clopidogrel after recent implantation of drug-eluting coronary stent and developed massive bleeding due to large duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). Following endoscopic haemostasis and discontinuation of dual APT, neoadjuvant chemotherapy with imatinib was started under continuation of ‘single’ APT with aspirin. A good chemotherapeutic response was achieved without recurrence of bleeding, and subsequent less invasive surgical resection of the tumour was performed, while preoperative single APT was continued for prevention of stent thrombosis. The patient recovered well without any thromboembolic or bleeding events. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy and subsequent less invasive surgery under continuation of APT is one of the preferred approaches for patients with duodenal GIST with severe thromboembolic comorbidities, as in the current case. PMID:24777088

  19. The aetiology, management and clinical outcome of upper gastrointestinal bleeding among patients admitted at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre in Moshi, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Suba, Mwanahawa; Ayana, Segni Mekonnen; Mtabho, Charles M; Kibiki, Gibson S

    2010-10-01

    Upper gastro-intestinal (GI) bleeding is a life-threatening emergency that results in high morbidity and mortality and therefore requires admission to hospital for urgent diagnosis and management. The aim of this study was to determine the causes of upper GI bleeding and clinical outcome of patients admitted to medical department with the diagnosis of upper GI bleeding. A retrospective study of records of all upper GI bleeding patients who were admitted to medical department, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC) from January 2007 to December 2008 was conducted. A total of 130 patients (13-96 years old) were enrolled in the study, whereby 73 (56.2%) were males. The causes of bleeding, all endoscopically diagnosed included oesophageal varices in 55 (42.3%) cases, followed by duodenal ulcers 20 (15.4%), hemorrhagic/erosive gastritis 10 (7.7%), gastric ulcer 6 (4.6%) and Mallory Weiss tear 2 (1.5%). No cause was identified in the remaining 27 % of cases. Conservative medical therapy alone was carried out in 52.3% of the patients. Endoscopic therapy was used in 61 (46.9%) of patients. Only 2 (1.5%) patients underwent surgical intervention. The overall mortality at discharge was 17%, while 107 (82%) patients were discharged improved. In conclusion, the commonest causes of upper GI bleeding are oesophageal varices and duodenal ulcer. Most cases of upper GI bleeding were successfully treated with pharmacologic and endoscopic treatment. The high mortality may be influenced by delayed presentation to health facilities, and comorbidities. There is a need for strengthening preventive programmes and conducting studies to identify predictors of outcome of upper GI bleeding to develop evidence based management protocols.

  20. [Is there a place for the Glasgow-Blatchford score in the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding?].

    PubMed

    Jerraya, Hichem; Bousslema, Amine; Frikha, Foued; Dziri, Chadli

    2011-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a frequent cause for emergency hospital admission. Most severity scores include in their computation the endoscopic findings. The Glasgow-Blatchford score is a validated score that is easy to calculate based on simple clinical and biological variables that can identify patients with a low or a high risk of needing a therapeutic (interventional endoscopy, surgery and/ or transfusions). To validate retrospectively the Glasgow-Blatchford Score (GBS). The study examined all patients admitted in both the general surgery department as of Anesthesiology of the Regional Hospital of Sidi Bouzid. There were 50 patients, which the mean age was 58 years and divided into 35 men and 15 women. In all these patients, we calculated the GBS. Series were divided into 2 groups, 26 cases received only medical treatment and 24 cases required transfusion and / or surgery. Univariate analysis was performed for comparison of these two groups then the ROC curve was used to identify the 'Cut off point' of GBS. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) with confidence interval 95% were calculated. The SGB was significantly different between the two groups (p <0.0001). Using the ROC curve, it was determined that for the threshold of GBS ³ 7, Se = 96% (88-100%), Sp = 69% (51-87%), PPV = 74% (59 -90%) and NPV = 95% (85-100%). This threshold is interesting as to its VPN. Indeed, if GBS <7, we must opt for medical treatment to the risk of being wrong in only 5% of cases. The Glasgow-Blatchford score is based on simple clinical and laboratory variables. It can recognize in the emergency department the cases that require medical treatment and those whose support could need blood transfusions and / or surgical treatment.

  1. A Prospective Study of Alcohol Consumption and Smoking and the Risk of Major Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Men

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Singh, Prashant; Boylan, Matthew R.; Piawah, Sorbarikor; Cao, Yin; Chan, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Data regarding smoking and alcohol consumption and risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) are sparse and conflicting. We assessed the risk of major GIB associated with smoking and alcohol consumption in a large, prospective cohort. Methods We prospectively studied 48,000 men in the Health Professional follow-up Study (HPFS) who were aged 40–75 years at baseline in 1986. We identified men with major GIB requiring hospitalization and/or blood transfusion via biennial questionnaires and chart review. Results We documented 305 episodes of major GIB during 26 years of follow-up. Men who consumed >30 g/day of alcohol had a multivariable relative risk (RR) of 1.43 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88–2.35; P for trend 0.006) for major GIB when compared with nondrinkers. Alcohol consumption appeared to be primarily related to upper GIB (multivariable RR for >30 g/day vs. nondrinkers was 1.35; 95% CI, 0.66–2.77; P for trend 0.02). Men who consumed ≥ 5 drinks/week vs. < 1 drink/month of liquor had a multivariable RR of 1.72 (95% CI, 1.26–2.35, P for trend <0.001). Wine and beer were not significantly associated with major GIB. The risk of GIB associated with NSAIDs/aspirin use increased with greater alcohol consumption (multivariable RR 1.37; 95% CI, 0.85–2.19 for 1-14g/day of alcohol, RR 1.75; 95% CI, 1.07–2.88 for ≥ 15g/day compared to nondrinkers). Smoking was not significantly associated with GIB. Conclusions Alcohol consumption, but not smoking, was associated with an increased risk of major GIB. Associations were most notable for upper GIB associated with liquor intake. Alcohol appeared to potentiate the risk of NSAID-associated GIB. PMID:27824864

  2. Risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation associated with low-dose aspirin as plain and enteric-coated formulations

    PubMed Central

    de Abajo, Francisco J; García Rodríguez, Luis A

    2001-01-01

    Background The use of low-dose aspirin has been reported to be associated with an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal complications (UGIC). The coating of aspirin has been proposed as an approach to reduce such a risk. To test this hypothesis, we carried out a population based case-control study. Methods We identified incident cases of UGIC (bleeding or perforation) aged 40 to 79 years between April 1993 to October 1998 registered in the General Practice Research Database. Controls were selected randomly from the source population. Adjusted estimates of relative risk (RR) associated with current use of aspirin as compared to non use were computed using unconditional logistic regression. Results We identified 2,105 cases of UGIC and selected 11,500 controls. Among them, 287 (13.6%) cases and 837 (7.3%) controls were exposed to aspirin, resulting in an adjusted RR of 2.0 (1.7-2.3). No clear dose-effect was found within the range of 75-300 mg. The RR associated with enteric-coated formulations (2.3, 1.6-3.2) was similar to the one of plain aspirin (1.9, 1.6-2.3), and no difference was observed depending on the site. The first two months of treatment was the period of greater risk (RR= 4.5, 2.9-7.1). The concomitant use of aspirin with high-dose NSAIDs greatly increased the risk of UGIC (13.3, 8.5-20.9) while no interaction was apparent with low-medium doses (2.2, 1.0-4.6). Conclusions Low-dose aspirin increases by twofold the risk of UGIC in the general population and its coating does not modify the effect. Concomitant use of low-dose aspirin and NSAIDs at high doses put patients at a specially high risk of UGIC. PMID:11228592

  3. Differences in the clinical course of 516 Japanese patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding between weekday and weekend admissions.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Minoru; Manabe, Noriaki; Murao, Takahisa; Osawa, Motoyasu; Hirai, Shinsuke; Fukushima, Shinya; Shogen, Yo; Nakato, Rui; Ishii, Manabu; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Hata, Jiro; Shiotani, Akiko

    2017-09-19

    Patients suspected of having upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) admitted during the weekend tend to have a poor outcome in western countries. However, no Japanese studies have been reported on this matter. We aimed to evaluate differences in the clinical course of patients with UGIB between weekday and weekend admissions in Japan. Medical records of patients who had undergone emergency endoscopy for UGIB were retrospectively reviewed. The severity of UGIB was evaluated using the Glasgow-Blatchford (GB) and AIMS65 score. Patients in whom UGIB was stopped and showed improved iron deficiency anemia after admission were considered as having a good clinical course. We reviewed 516 consecutive patients and divided them into two groups: Group A (daytime admission on a weekday: 234 patients) and Group B (nighttime or weekend admission: 282 patients). There was no significant difference in GB and AIM65 scores between the Groups. The proportions of patients with good clinical course were not significantly different between groups (A, 67.5% and B, 67.0%; p = .90). However, patients in Group B underwent hemostatic treatments more frequently compared with those in Group A (58.5% vs 47.4%, p = .012). Multivariate analysis showed that taking acid suppressants, no need for blood transfusions, use of hemostatic treatments, and GB score <12 were associated with a good clinical course. There were no significant differences in the clinical outcomes of patients with UGIB admitted during daytime on weekdays and those admitted at nighttime or weekends partly owing to the sufficient performance of endoscopic hemostatic treatments.

  4. Comparison of magnetic resonance enteroclysis and capsule endoscopy with balloon-assisted enteroscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Wiarda, B M; Heine, D G N; Mensink, P; Stolk, M; Dees, J; Hazenberg, H J A; Stoker, J; Kuipers, E J

    2012-07-01

    New modalities are available for visualization of the small bowel in patients with possible obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB), but their performance requires further comparison. This study compared the diagnostic yield of magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE) and capsule endoscopy in patients with OGIB, using balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BAE) as the reference standard. Consecutive consenting patients who were referred for evaluation of OGIB were prospectively included. Patients underwent MRE followed by capsule endoscopy and BAE. Patients with high grade stenosis at MRE did not undergo capsule endoscopy. The reference standard was BAE findings in visualized small-bowel segments and expert panel consensus for segments not visualized during BAE. Over a period of 26 months, 38 patients were included (20 female [53 %]; mean age 58 years, range 28 - 75 years). Four patients (11 %) did not undergo capsule endoscopy due to high grade small-bowel stenosis at MRE (n = 3; 8 %) or timing issues (n = 1; 3 %). Capsule endoscopy was non-diagnostic in one patient. The reference standard identified abnormal findings in 20 patients (53 %). MRE had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of 21 %, 100 %, infinity, and 0.79, respectively. The corresponding values for capsule endoscopy were 61 %, 85 %, 4.1, and 0.46. The reference standard and capsule endoscopy did not differ in percent positive findings (P = 0.34), but MRE differed significantly from the reference BAE (P < 0.001). Capsule endoscopy was superior to MRE for detecting abnormalities (P = 0.0015). Capsule endoscopy performed better than MRE in the detection of small-bowel abnormality in patients with OGIB. MRE may be considered as an alternative for the initial examination in patients with clinical suspicion of small-bowel stenosis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Outcomes following acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in relation to time to endoscopy: results from a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Jairath, V; Kahan, B C; Logan, R F A; Hearnshaw, S A; Doré, C J; Travis, S P L; Murphy, M F; Palmer, K R

    2012-08-01

    Despite the established efficacy of therapeutic endoscopy, the optimum timeframe for performing endoscopy in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) remains unclear. The aim of the current audit study was to examine the relationship between time to endoscopy and clinical outcomes in patients presenting with NVUGIB. This study was a prospective national audit performed in 212 UK hospitals. Regression models examined the relationship between time to endoscopy and mortality, rebleeding, need for surgery, and length of hospital stay. In 4478 patients, earlier endoscopy ( < 12 hours) was not associated with a lower mortality or need for surgery compared with later ( > 24 hours) endoscopy (odds ratio [OR] for mortality 0.98, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.88 - 1.09 for endoscopy > 24 hours vs. < 12 hours; P = 0.70). In patients receiving therapeutic endoscopy, there was a nonsignificant trend towards an increase in rebleeding associated with later endoscopy (OR 1.13, 95 %CI 0.97 - 1.32 for endoscopy > 24 hours vs. < 12 hours), with the converse seen in patients not requiring therapeutic endoscopy (OR 0.83, 95 %CI 0.73 - 0.95 for endoscopy > 24 hours vs. < 12 hours; interaction P = 0.003). Later endoscopy ( > 24 hours) was associated with an increase in risk-adjusted length of hospital stay (1.7 days longer, 95 %CI 1.39 - 1.99 vs. < 12 hours; P < 0.001). Earlier endoscopy was not associated with a reduction in mortality or need for surgery. However, it was associated with an increased efficiency of care and potentially improved control of hemorrhage in higher risk patients, supporting the routine use of early endoscopy unless specific contraindications exist. These results may help inform the debate about emergency endoscopy service provision. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Use of electronic personal health records to identify patients at risk for aspirin-induced gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anita N; Kogut, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the utility of electronic personal health records (ePHRs) to identify patients with potential risk factors for aspirin-induced upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). ER-Card, LLC. a for-profit ePHR company located in Rhode Island from October 2008 to May 2010. Clinical pharmacists reviewed the records of 615 patients enrolled in an ePHR service. Records included patient self-report of all known medical conditions, current prescription medications, and self-care therapies utilized. Pharmacists reviewed ePHR profiles for actual or potential medication-related problems. Patients taking low-dose aspirin (81 mg-325 mg daily) were screened for known additional risk factors for aspirin-induced UGIB. Patients identified were notified to contact their provider for information and/or providers were contacted directly by pharmacists with therapy recommendations. Number of patients at increased risk for aspirin-induced UGIB as a result of concomitant medications. Ninety-seven patients (16% of total records screened) with an average age of 72.1 years had risk factors for aspirin induced UGIB. In addition to daily aspirin therapy patients reported regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (38%), other antiplatelet agents (22%), anticoagulants (24%), corticosteroids (4%), or a combination of these medications (12%). None of the patients included in this analysis reported use of prescribed or overthe-counter gastroprotective therapy (such as proton-pump inhibitors or histamine-2 receptor antagonists). Pharmacist screening of patient self-reported health information as part of an ePHR service can result in the detection of a significant number of patients at increased risk for aspirin-induced UGIB.

  7. Barriers to the implementation of practice guidelines in managing patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: A qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sean M; Murray, Suzanne; Dupuis, Martin; Dawes, Martin; Hawes, Ian A; Barkun, Alan N

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Guidelines for the management of patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) are inconsistently applied by health care providers, potentially resulting in suboptimal care and patient outcomes. A needs assessment was performed to assess health care providers’ barriers to the implementation of these guidelines in Canada. METHODS: Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted by trained research personnel with 22 selectively sampled health care professionals actively treating and managing NVUGIB patients, including emergency room physicians (ER), intensivists (ICU), gastroenterologists (GI), gastroenterology nurses and hospital administrators. Participants were chosen from a representative sample of six Canadian community- and academic-based hospitals that participated in a national Canadian audit on the management of NVUGIB. RESULTS: Participants reported substantive gaps in the implementation of NVUGIB guidelines that included the following: lack of knowledge of the specifics of the NVUGIB guidelines (ER, ICU, nurses); limited belief in the value of guidelines, especially in areas where evidence is lacking (ER, ICU); limited belief in the value of available tools to support implementation of guidelines (GI); lack of knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of health care professions and disciplines, and lack of effective collaboration skills (ER, ICU and GI); variability of knowledge and skills of health care professionals within professions (eg, variability of nurses’ knowledge and skills in endoscopic procedures); and perceived overuse of intravenous proton pump inhibitor treatment, with limited concern regarding cost or side effect implications (all participants). CONCLUSIONS: In the present study population, ER, ICU and nurses did not adhere to NVUGIB guidelines because they were neither aware of nor familiar with them, whereas the GI lack of adherence to NVUGIB guidelines was influenced more by

  8. Impact of INR monitoring, reversal agent use, heparin bridging, and anticoagulant interruption on rebleeding and thromboembolism in acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Moriyasu, Shiori; Shimbo, Takuro; Okubo, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Yokoi, Chizu; Yanase, Mikio; Akiyama, Junichi; Uemura, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulant management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) during the pre-endoscopic period has not been fully addressed in American, European, or Asian guidelines. This study sought to evaluate the risks of rebleeding and thromboembolism in anticoagulated patients with acute GIB. Baseline, endoscopy, and outcome data were reviewed for 314 patients with acute GIB: 157 anticoagulant users and 157 age-, sex-, and important risk-matched non-users. Data were also compared between direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) and warfarin users. Between anticoagulant users and non-users, of whom 70% underwent early endoscopy, no endoscopy-related adverse events or significant differences were found in the rate of endoscopic therapy need, transfusion need, rebleeding, or thromboembolism. Rebleeding was associated with shock, comorbidities, low platelet count and albumin level, and low-dose aspirin use but not HAS-BLED score, any endoscopic results, heparin bridge, or international normalized ratio (INR) ≥ 2.5. Risks for thromboembolism were INR ≥ 2.5, difference in onset and pre-endoscopic INR, reversal agent use, and anticoagulant interruption but not CHA2DS2-VASc score, any endoscopic results, or heparin bridge. In patients without reversal agent use, heparin bridge, or anticoagulant interruption, there was only one rebleeding event and no thromboembolic events. Warfarin users had a significantly higher transfusion need than DOACs users. Endoscopy appears to be safe for anticoagulant users with acute GIB compared with non-users. Patient background factors were associated with rebleeding, whereas anticoagulant management factors (e.g. INR correction, reversal agent use, and drug interruption) were associated with thromboembolism. Early intervention without reversal agent use, heparin bridge, or anticoagulant interruption may be warranted for acute GIB.

  9. [Prospective validation of the Rockall Scoring System in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Cayetano Heredia Hospital Lima- Peru].

    PubMed

    Espinoza Ríos, Jorge; Huerta-Mercado Tenorio, Jorge; Huerta-Mercado Tenorio, Jorge; Lindo Ricce, Mayra; García Encinas, Carlos; Rios Matteucci, Sathya; Vila Gutierrez, Sandro; Pinto Valdivia, José; De Los Rios Senmache, Raúl; Piscoya Rivera, Alejandro; Bussalleu Rivera, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The present study intends to validate the Rockall Score in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) in our current medical setting and to find the value that best discriminates between patients with high or low risk of mortality, rebleeding and the need of more than two units of packed red blood cells (PRBC). A descriptive prospective study was made from patients who arrived to Cayetano Heredia Hospital's emergency department between February 2007 and January 2008 due to UGB symptoms (hematemesis, coffe ground remit melena or hematoquezia). The Rockall score was used to determine severity of UGB and to stratify patients with higher risk of mortality or rebleeding. All patients were interviewed and any additional information was gathered from medical history records and emergency and hospitalization endoscopic procedure reports. During the study all patients were evaluated for rebleeding, the number of units of PRBCs needed and mortality rate. 163 patients were included in our study, 107 (65.64%) were male and 56 (34.36%) female, 8 were excluded due to lack of an endoscopic procedure. The remaining 155 patients were studied to evaluate the discriminative ability of the scoring system, and to determine which value best distinguishes high and low severity patients using Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC) and calculated area under the curve. The data analysis showed patients with a Rockall Score e 5 had an increased mortality rate compared to lower score with an area under the curve of 0.807, meaning an accurate relationship between mortality and a score e 5. For rebleeding and the need of two packed red blood cells for transfusion, the area under the curve were 0.65 and 0.64 respectively showing a low predictive value. The Rockall scoring system is useful to identify patients with high mortality risk, but not to predict rebleeding or the need for blood transfusion in our hospital.

  10. [Incidence and predictive factors of iron deficiency anemia after acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding without portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Planella de Rubinat, Montserrat; Teixidó Amorós, Montserrat; Ballester Clau, Raquel; Trujillano Cabello, Javier; Ibarz Escuer, Mercedes; Reñé Espinet, Josep Maria

    2015-11-01

    There are few studies on iron deficiency anemia (IDA) after non-variceal acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients without portal hypertension. To define the incidence of IDA after UGIB, to characterize the predictive factors for IDA and to design algorithms that could help physicians identify those patients who could benefit from iron therapy. We registered 391 patients with UGIB between April 2007 and May 2009. Patients with portal hypertension and those with clinical or/and biological conditions that could affect the ferrokinetic pattern were excluded. Blood analyses were performed, including ferric parameters upon admission, on the 5th day, and on the 30th day after the hemorrhage episode. We used a multiple logistic regression model and a classification and regression tree model. A total of 124 patients were included, of which 76 (61.3%) developed IDA 30 days after UGIB. The predictive variables were age >75 years (P=.037; OR 3.9; 95% CI: 1.3-11.6), initial urea level >80mg/dL (P=.027; OR 2.9; 95% CI: 1.1-7.6), initial ferritin level ≤65ng/dL (P=.002; OR 7.6; 95% CI: 2.9-18.5), initial hemoglobin level ≤100g/L (P=.003; OR 3.2; 95% CI: 1.3-8.0), hemoglobin level on the 5th day ≤100g/L (P<.001; OR 14.9; 95% CI: 3.6-61.1) and the value of the transferrin saturation index on the 5th day <10% (p<0.001; OR 7.2; 95% CI: 2.6-20.3). Most patients with UGIB developed IDA 30 days after the episode. Identification of the predictive factors for IDA may help to establish guidelines for the administration of iron therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  11. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin administration in upper gastrointestinal bleeding: an updated meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Rubayat; Nguyen, Douglas L.; Sohail, Umair; Almashhrawi, Ashraf A.; Ashraf, Imran; Puli, Srinivas R.; Bechtold, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients suffering from upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), adequate visualization is essential during endoscopy. Prior to endoscopy, erythromycin administration has been shown to enhance visualization in these patients; however, guidelines have not fully adopted this practice. Thus, we performed a comprehensive, up-to-date meta-analysis on the issue of erythromycin administration in this patient population. Methods After searching multiple databases (November 2015), randomized controlled trials on adult subjects comparing administration of erythromycin before endoscopy in UGIB patients to no erythromycin or placebo were included. Pooled estimates of adequacy of gastric mucosa visualized, need for second endoscopy, duration of procedure, length of hospital stay, units of blood transfused, and need for emergent surgery using odds ratio (OR) or mean difference (MD) were calculated. Heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. Results Eight studies (n=598) were found to meet the inclusion criteria. Erythromycin administration showed statistically significant improvement in adequate gastric mucosa visualization (OR 4.14; 95% CI: 2.01-8.53, P<0.01) while reduced the need for a second-look endoscopy (OR 0.51; 95% CI: 0.34-0.77, P<0.01) and length of hospital stay (MD -1.75; 95% CI: -2.43 to -1.06, P<0.01). Duration of procedure (P=0.2), units of blood transfused (P=0.08), and need for emergent surgery (P=0.88) showed no significant differences. Conclusion Pre-endoscopic erythromycin administration in UGIB patients significantly improves gastric mucosa visualization while reducing length of hospital stay and the need for second-look endoscopy. PMID:27366031

  12. Early clinical experience of the safety and efficacy of EndoClot in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Sabina; Al-Bakir, Ibrahim; Bhuva, Meha; Patel, Jay; Fullard, Mark; Leahy, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: EndoClot is a novel topical hemostatic powder approved for use in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This study examines its impact as rescue therapy in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding for which standard endoscopic therapy failed to achieve hemostasis. Methods: This observational study covered a 24-month period. Data were collated from patients treated with EndoClot for comparison with a cohort of patients managed with standard endoscopic therapy. End points of this study included immediate hemostasis, 30-day rebleed rate, 30-day mortality rate, and adverse events. Results: Between April 1, 2012, and March 31, 2014, gastroscopic procedures were performed in 1009 patients, of whom 173 required endoscopic therapy. EndoClot was used in 21 patients, with immediate hemostasis achieved in all cases, a 30-day rebleed rate of 4.8 % (95 % confidence interval [95 %CI] – 4.34 % to 3.94 %), and a 30-day mortality rate of 19.0 % (95 %CI 2.29 % – 35.91 %). Despite higher risk bleeds in this cohort of patients, Fisher's exact test demonstrated no significant difference between their 30-day mortality rate (P = 0.51) and rebleed rate (P = 0.31) and those of the patients treated with standard endoscopic hemostatic techniques. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that EndoClot can be used both safely and effectively in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26716120

  13. Analysis of Dosimetric Parameters Associated With Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Gemcitabine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Akira; Shibuya, Keiko; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To identify the dosimetric parameters associated with gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from 40 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy and weekly gemcitabine. Treatment-related acute GI toxicity and upper GI bleeding (UGB) were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 4.0. The dosimetric parameters (mean dose, maximal absolute dose which covers 2 cm{sup 3} of the organ, and absolute volume receiving 10-50 Gy [V{sub 10-50}]) of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and a composite structure of the stomach and duodenum (StoDuo) were obtained. The planning target volume was also obtained. Univariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive factors for the risk of grade 2 or greater acute GI toxicity and grade 3 or greater UGB, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 4-37). The actual incidence of acute GI toxicity was 33%. The estimated incidence of UGB at 1 year was 20%. Regarding acute GI toxicity, a V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach was the best predictor, and the actual incidence in patients with V{sub 50} <16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach vs. those with V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} was 9% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.001). Regarding UGB, V{sub 50} of {>=}33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo was the best predictor, and the estimated incidence at 1 year in patients with V{sub 50} <33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo vs. those with V{sub 50} {>=}33 cm{sup 3} was 0% vs. 44%, respectively (p = 0.002). The dosimetric parameters correlated highly with one another. Conclusion: The irradiated absolute volume of the stomach and duodenum are important for the risk of acute GI toxicity and UGB. These results could be helpful in escalating the radiation doses using novel

  14. Risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with or without concurrent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory use: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Anglin, Rebecca; Yuan, Yuhong; Moayyedi, Paul; Tse, Frances; Armstrong, David; Leontiadis, Grigorios I

    2014-06-01

    There is emerging concern that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may be associated with an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, and that this risk may be further increased by concurrent use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) medications. Previous reviews of a relatively small number of studies have reported a substantial risk of upper GI bleeding with SSRIs; however, more recent studies have produced variable results. The objective of this study was to obtain a more precise estimate of the risk of upper GI bleeding with SSRIs, with or without concurrent NSAID use. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, the Cochrane central register of controlled trials (through April 2013), and US and European conference proceedings were searched. Controlled trials, cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies that reported the incidence of upper GI bleeding in adults on SSRIs with or without concurrent NSAID use, compared with placebo or no treatment were included. Data were extracted independently by two authors. Dichotomous data were pooled to obtain odds ratio (OR) of the risk of upper GI bleeding with SSRIs +/- NSAID, with a 95% confidence interval (CI). The main outcome and measure of the study was the risk of upper GI bleeding with SSRIs compared with placebo or no treatment. Fifteen case-control studies (including 393,268 participants) and four cohort studies were included in the analysis. There was an increased risk of upper GI bleeding with SSRI medications in the case-control studies (OR=1.66, 95% CI=1.44,1.92) and cohort studies (OR=1.68, 95% CI=1.13,2.50). The number needed to harm for upper GI bleeding with SSRI treatment in a low-risk population was 3,177, and in a high-risk population it was 881. The risk of upper GI bleeding was further increased with the use of both SSRI and NSAID medications (OR=4.25, 95% CI=2.82,6.42). SSRI medications are associated with a modest increase in the risk of upper GI bleeding, which is lower than has

  15. Gastrointestinal safety of celecoxib versus naproxen in patients with cardiothrombotic diseases and arthritis after upper gastrointestinal bleeding (CONCERN): an industry-independent, double-blind, double-dummy, randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Chan, Francis K L; Ching, Jessica Y L; Tse, Yee Kit; Lam, Kelvin; Wong, Grace L H; Ng, Siew C; Lee, Vivian; Au, Kim W L; Cheong, Pui Kuan; Suen, Bing Y; Chan, Heyson; Kee, Ka Man; Lo, Angeline; Wong, Vincent W S; Wu, Justin C Y; Kyaw, Moe H

    2017-06-17

    Present guidelines are conflicting for patients at high risk of both cardiovascular and gastrointestinal events who continue to require non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We hypothesised that a cyclooxygenase-2-selective NSAID plus proton-pump inhibitor is superior to a non-selective NSAID plus proton-pump inhibitor for prevention of recurrent ulcer bleeding in concomitant users of aspirin with previous ulcer bleeding. For this industry-independent, double-blind, double-dummy, randomised trial done in one academic hospital in Hong Kong, we screened patients with arthritis and cardiothrombotic diseases who were presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, were on NSAIDs, and require concomitant aspirin. After ulcer healing, an independent staff member randomly assigned (1:1) patients who were negative for Helicobacter pylori with a computer-generated list of random numbers to receive oral administrations of either celecoxib 100 mg twice per day plus esomeprazole 20 mg once per day or naproxen 500 mg twice per day plus esomeprazole 20 mg once per day for 18 months. All patients resumed aspirin 80 mg once per day. Both patients and investigators were masked to their treatments. The primary endpoint was recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding within 18 months. The primary endpoint and secondary safety endpoints were analysed in the modified intention-to-treat population. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00153660. Between May 24, 2005, and Nov 28, 2012, we enrolled 514 patients, assigning 257 patients to each study group, all of whom were included in the intention-to-treat population. Recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding occurred in 14 patients in the celecoxib group (nine gastric ulcers and five duodenal ulcers) and 31 patients in the naproxen group (25 gastric ulcers, three duodenal ulcers, one gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer, and two bleeding erosions). The cumulative incidence of recurrent bleeding in 18 months

  16. Gastrointestinal (GI) Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... GERD) in Adults Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants ...

  17. Evaluation of Superselective Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate in Treating Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Retrospective Study on Seven Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Li, Gang; Yu, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the safety and efficacy of superselective transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) in treating lower gastrointestinal bleeding caused by angiodysplasia. Methods. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the clinical data of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding caused by angiodysplasia. The patients were treated with superselective TAE with NBCA between September 2013 and March 2015. Angiography was performed after the embolization. The clinical signs including melena, anemia, and blood transfusion treatment were evaluated. The complications including abdominal pain and intestinal ischemia necrosis were recorded. The patients were followed up to evaluate the efficacy in the long run. Results. Seven cases (2 males, 5 females; age of 69.55 ± 2.25) were evaluated in the study. The embolization was successfully performed in all cases. About 0.2–0.8 mL (mean 0.48 ± 0.19 mL) NCBA was used. Immediate angiography after the embolization operation showed that the abnormal symptoms disappeared. The patients were followed up for a range of 2–19 months and six patients did not reoccur. No serious complications, such as femoral artery puncture point anomaly, vascular injury, and intestinal necrosis perforation were observed. Conclusion. For the patients with refractory and repeated lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to angiodysplasia, superselective TAE with NBCA seem to be a safe and effective alternative therapy when endoscopy examination and treatment do not work. PMID:27528867

  18. Splenosis involving the gastric fundus, a rare cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Reinglas, Jason; Perdrizet, Kirstin; Ryan, Stephen E; Patel, Rakesh V

    2016-01-01

    Splenosis, the autotransplantation of splenic tissue following splenic trauma, is uncommonly clinically significant. Splenosis is typically diagnosed incidentally on imaging or at laparotomy and has been mistakenly attributed to various malignancies and pathological conditions. On the rare occasion when splenosis plays a causative role in a pathological condition, a diagnostic challenge may ensue that can lead to a delay in both diagnosis and treatment. The following case report describes a patient presenting with a massive upper gastrointestinal bleed resulting from arterial enlargement within the gastric fundus secondary to perigastric splenosis. The cause of the bleeding was initially elusive and this case highlights the importance of a thorough clinical history when faced with a diagnostic challenge. Treatment options, including the successful use of transarterial embolization in this case, are also presented.

  19. Angiography and the gastrointestinal bleeder

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, S.

    1982-05-01

    The role of angiography in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage is discussed. Three categories of gastrointestinal bleeding are considered: upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroesophageal varices, upper gastrointestinal bleeding of arterial or capillary origin, and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The advantages and disadvantages of angiography are compared with those of radionuclide scanning and endoscopy or colonoscopy. It is anticipated that, as radionuclide scans are more widely employed, angiography will eventually be performed only in those patients with positive scans.

  20. Assessment of serum angiogenic factors as a diagnostic aid for small bowel angiodysplasia in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Holleran, Grainne; Hussey, Mary; Smith, Sinead; McNamara, Deirdre

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the use of serum levels of angiopoietin-1 (Ang1), Ang2 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) as predictive factors for small bowel angiodysplasia (SBA). METHODS Serum samples were collected from patients undergoing capsule endoscopy for any cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) or anaemia. Based on small bowel findings patients were divided into 3 groups: (1) SBA; (2) other bleeding causes; and (3) normal, according to diagnosis. Using ELISA technique we measured serum levels of Ang1, Ang2 and TNFα and compared mean and median levels between the groups based on small bowel diagnosis. Using receiver operator curve analysis we determined whether any of the factors were predictive of SBA. RESULTS Serum samples were collected from a total of 120 patients undergoing capsule endoscopy for OGIB or anaemia: 40 with SBA, 40 with other causes of small bowel bleeding, and 40 with normal small bowel findings. Mean and median serum levels were measured and compared between groups; patients with SBA had significantly higher median serum levels of Ang2 (3759 pg/mL) compared to both other groups, with no significant differences in levels of Ang1 or TNFα based on diagnosis. There were no differences in Ang2 levels between the other bleeding causes (2261 pg/mL) and normal (2620 pg/mL) groups. Using Receiver Operator Curve analysis, an Ang2 level of > 2600 pg/mL was found to be predictive of SBA, with an area under the curve of 0.7. Neither Ang1 or TNFα were useful as predictive markers. CONCLUSION Elevations in serum Ang2 are specific for SBA and not driven by other causes of bleeding and anaemia. Further work will determine whether Ang2 is useful as a diagnostic or prognostic marker for SBA. PMID:28868182

  1. Diagnostic performance of Baveno IV criteria in cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding: analysis of the F7 liver-1288 study population.

    PubMed

    Thabut, D; D'Amico, G; Tan, P; De Franchis, R; Fabricius, S; Lebrec, D; Bosch, J; Bendtsen, F

    2010-12-01

    The definition of failure to control bleeding agreed upon at the Baveno IV consensus meeting, included the Adjusted Blood Requirement Index [ABRI: number of blood units/(final-initial hematocrit+0.01)]. ABRI ≥0.75 denotes failure. However, timing for hematocrit measurements was not defined. The aims of this study were: (1) to assess the Baveno IV criteria performance to classify treatment success or failure to control bleeding at 5 days, (2) to determine the appropriate timing for hematocrit. Two hundred and forty-two cirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal bleeding were independently classified by three clinical experts according to the Baveno IV criteria, by analysis of the database of a randomized trial. ABRI was calculated by using the closest hematocrit to the 5 day time point from the first trial product administration (ABRI-1) or after the latest transfusion within the 5-day period (ABRI-2). The gold standard for success/failure for 5-day control of bleeding was the clinical judgment of the three independent observers based on all the clinical and follow-up data. Inter-observer agreement for the final outcome assessment was 0.82 and a final consensus was obtained in 236/242 patients. Inter-observer agreement on patient classification with Baveno IV criteria was 0.70 with ABRI-1 and 0.84 with ABRI-2. c-statistics for correct patients classification were 0.86 for ABRI-1, 0.84 for ABRI-2, and 0.88 for Baveno IV criteria without ABRI. ABRI-1 caused misclassification of 27 patients and ABRI-2 of 39. Baveno IV criteria are accurate to assess outcome of patients with variceal bleeding. There is a substantial observer variability linked to timing of hematocrits for ABRI calculation. With the current definition ABRI does not add to the performance of the other criteria. Copyright © 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute lower gastroenteric bleeding retrospective analysis (the ALGEBRA study): an analysis of the triage, management and outcomes of patients with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Brackman, Matthew R; Gushchin, Vadim V; Smith, Lee; Demory, Michelle; Kirkpatrick, John R; Stahl, Thomas

    2003-02-01

    Many algorithms have been developed for patients with acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage (ALGIH). Their clinical usefulness is not readily apparent. It is important first to observe patterns in admission, triage, and management to formulate hypotheses as to how outcomes might be affected. We reviewed patient charts with the diagnosis of gastrointestinal hemorrhage from June 1998 to January 2001. Patients with ALGIH were entered into a database. We defined patients as having ALGIH if presentation included melena or hematochezia. Patients with hematemesis, bloody nasogastric aspirate, or occult fecal blood were excluded. Observations were made on 420 patients. Seventy-six per cent of patients were admitted to the medical service. Lower endoscopy was the first diagnostic method in 33 per cent. Medical management comprised 52 per cent of first management strategies. Surgeons used angiography (3% vs 1%) or surgery (25% vs 5%) more than other services. Fourteen per cent of patients managed with endoscopy, 16 per cent medically, 17 per cent with surgery, and 67 per cent with interventional radiology required two or more subsequent packed red blood cell transfusions. Mean admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 9.2 whereas that for those with mortality was 13.5. We conclude that the construction of a database will allow for formation and testing of hypotheses in managing ALGIH.

  3. A comparative study of chemical and immunological method of fecal occult blood test in the diagnosis of occult lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Yeasmin, F; Ali, M A; Rahman, M A; Sultana, T; Rahman, M Q; Ahmed, A N N

    2013-08-01

    Fecal occult blood test is the most widely used screening test for diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding disorders specially colorectal carcinoma. Among the various methods of fecal occult blood tests, chemical method is being used commonly, but the method has some drawbacks like low participation rate, high false positive rate, low sensitivity etc. To overcome these short comings, newer immunological method was introduced. This study evaluated the role of immunological method of fecal blood test in the diagnosis of occult lower GIT bleeding. Stool samples from two hundred patients were examined by both chemical and immunological method. The patients who were positive by any or both methods of occult blood test, were advised for colonoscopy. During colonoscopy tissues were taken for histopathology which was the gold standard of this study. Among 110 OBT positive patients pathological lesions were detected in 65 patients by colonoscopy and histopathology. The diseases detected by colonoscopy and histopathology 18 colorectal polyp, 8 colorectal cancer, 24 ulcerative lesions and 5 inflammatory bowel disease etc. Regarding comparative analysis of chemical and immunological method, the higher sensitivity (95.4% vs. 49.2%), specificity (44.4% vs. 37.8%), accuracy (74.5% vs. 44.5%), PPV (71.3% vs. 53.3%) and NPV (87% vs. 34%) of immunological method than chemical method was observed. Thus immunological method of fecal occult blood test was appeared to be a better alternative to conventional chemical method of fecal occult blood test in the diagnosis of occult lower GIT bleeding.

  4. The Progetto Nazionale Emorragia Digestiva (PNED) system vs. the Rockall score as mortality predictors in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: A multicenter prospective study.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Omaña, R; Alfaro-Reynoso, J A; Cruz-Chávez, C E; Velarde-Ruiz Velasco, A; Flores-Ramírez, D I; Romero-Hernández, I; Donato-Olguín, I; García-Samper, X; Bautista-Santos, A; Reyes-Bastidas, M; Millán-Marín, E

    The predictive scale for mortality risk in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) proposed by Italy's PNED (Progetto Nazionale Emorragia Digestiva) group has not been validated in Latin America since its original publication. To compare the PNED system and the Rockall score as mortality predictors in patients hospitalized for NVUGIB. A multicenter, prospective, cross-sectional, analytic study was conducted that recruited patients diagnosed with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding within the time frame of 2011 to 2015. Six Mexican hospital centers participated in the study. The Rockall and PNED system scores were calculated, classifying the patients as having mild, moderate, or severe disease. The association between mortality and risk was determined through the chi-square test and relative risk (RR) calculation. Statistical significance was set at a P<.05. Information on 198 patients was collected. Only 8 patients (4%) died from causes directly associated with bleeding. According to the Rockall score, 46 patients had severe disease (23.2%), 5 of whom died, with a RR of 5.5 (CI 1.35-22.02, P=.006). In relation to the PNED, only 8 patients had severe disease (4%), 5 of whom died, with a RR of 38.7 (CI 11.4-137.3, P=.001). The PNED system was more selective for classifying a case as severe, but it had a greater predictive capacity for mortality, compared with the Rockall score. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. SPECT/CT with a hybrid imaging system in the study of lower gastrointestinal bleeding with technetium-99m red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, O; Spanu, A; Tagliabue, L; Filippi, L; Danieli, R; Palumbo, B; Del Sole, A; Madeddu, G

    2009-06-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a complex clinical problem that requires disciplined evaluation for successful management. This study was conducted to evaluate the applicability of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) in patients with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding undergoing scintigraphy with 99mTc-labelled red blood cells (RBC), and to assess the additional clinical value of fused images when compared to the standard radionuclide scan. Twenty-seven patients presenting with acute lower GI tract hemorrhage were studied with conventional dynamic and planar 99mTc-RBC imaging. In 19 patients with positive findings on scans taken within 6 hours, a SPECT/CT study was immediately performed using a hybrid system composed of a dual-head, variable angle gamma camera and an X-ray tube. The number of patients in whom SPECT/CT changed the scintigraphic interpretation with regard to the presence or site of GI blood loss as confirmed by other diagnostic or therapeutical procedures was recorded. Image fusion was easy and successful in all patients showing perfect correspondence between SPECT and CT data and allowing precise anatomical localization of the sites of 99mTc-RBC extravasation. SPECT/CT had significant impact on the scintigraphic results in 7/19 patients (36.8%): in 6 patients it precisely localized the bleeding foci whose location could not be identified in standard scans and in one it excluded the presence of an active GI hemorrhage. SPECT/CT with a hybrid system is feasible and useful for facilitating imaging interpretation and improving the accuracy of 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy in patients with acute lower GI bleeding.

  6. Incidence of cardiovascular events and gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving clopidogrel with and without proton pump inhibitors: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Rhanderson N; Benjo, Alexandre M; DiNicolantonio, James J; Garcia, Daniel C; Macedo, Francisco Y B; El-Hayek, Georges; Nadkarni, Girish N; Gili, Sebastiano; Iannaccone, Mario; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Reilly, John P

    2015-01-01

    Background Dual antiplatelet therapy is the standard of care after coronary stent placement but increases the bleeding risk. The effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on clopidogrel metabolism have been described, but the clinical significance is not yet definitive. We aimed to do an updated meta-analysis comparing outcomes in patients receiving clopidogrel with and without PPIs. Methods We systematically searched PubMed, Scopus and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled observational studies in patients taking clopidogrel stratified by concomitant PPI use. Heterogeneity was examined with the Cochran Q test and I2 statistics; p values inferior to 0.10 and I2 >25% were considered significant for heterogeneity. Results We included 39 studies with a total of 214 851 patients, of whom 73 731 (34.3%) received the combination of clopidogrel and a PPI. In pooled analysis, all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis and cerebrovascular accidents were more common in patients receiving both drugs. However, among 23 552 patients from eight RCTs and propensity-matched studies, there were no significant differences in mortality or ischaemic events between groups. The use of PPIs in patients taking clopidogrel was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Conclusions The results of our meta-analysis suggest that PPIs are a marker of increased cardiovascular risk in patients taking clopidogrel, rather than a direct cause of worse outcomes. The pharmacodynamic interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel most likely has no clinical significance. Furthermore, PPIs have the potential to decrease gastrointestinal bleeding in clopidogrel users. PMID:26196021

  7. Implications of small-bowel transit time in the detection rate of capsule endoscopy: A multivariable multicenter study of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Girelli, Carlo Maria; Soncini, Marco; Rondonotti, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    AIM To define the role of small-bowel transit time in the detection rate of significant small-bowel lesions. METHODS Small-bowel capsule endoscopy records, prospectively collected from 30 participating centers in the Lombardy Registry from October 2011 to December 2013, were included in the study if the clinical indication was obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and the capsule reached the cecum. Based on capsule findings, we created two groups: P2 (significant findings) and P0-1 (normal/negligible findings). Groups were compared for age, gender, small-bowel transit time, type of instrument, modality of capsule performance (outpatients vs inpatients), bowel cleanliness, and center volume. RESULTS We retrieved and scrutinized 1,433 out of 2,295 capsule endoscopy records (62.4%) fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Patients were 67 ± 15 years old, and 815 (57%) were males. In comparison with patients in the P0-1 group, those in the P2 group (n = 776, 54%) were older (P < 0.0001), had a longer small-bowel transit time (P = 0.0015), and were more frequently examined in low-volume centers (P < 0.001). Age and small-bowel transit time were correlated (P < 0.001), with age as the sole independent predictor on multivariable analysis. Findings of the P2 group were artero-venous malformations (54.5%), inflammatory (23.6%) and protruding (10.4%) lesions, and luminal blood (11.5%). CONCLUSION In this selected, prospectively collected cohort of small-bowel capsule endoscopy performed for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, a longer small-bowel transit time was associated with a higher detection rate of significant lesions, along with age and a low center volume, with age serving as an independent predictor. PMID:28216977

  8. Use of SSRI, But Not SNRI, Increased Upper and Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Lung; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Lin, Xi-Hsuan; Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Peng, Yen-Ling; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh

    2015-11-01

    Selective serotonin receptor inhibitor (SSRI) and serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) users have been reported to have an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), but their association with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is less studied. This study aimed to analyze the incidence of UGIB and LGIB among SSRI users, SNRI users, and controls.Using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, 9753 subjects who were taking serotonin reuptake inhibitors (8809 with SSRIs, and 944 with SNRIs), and 39,012 age, sex, and enrollment time-matched controls were enrolled at a 1:4 ratio. The log-rank test was used to analyze differences in the cumulative hazard of UGIB and LGIB between groups. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was used to evaluate the independent risk factors for UGIB and LGIB.During the 10-year follow-up period from 2000 to 2010, SSRI users, but not SNRI users, had significantly higher incidences of UGIB and LGIB than the controls (P < 0.001; log-rank test). The use of SSRIs, but not SNRIs, was independently associated with an increased risk of UGIB (hazard ratio [HR]:1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.67-2.31) and LGIB (HR: 2.96, 95% CI: 2.46-3.57) after adjusting for age, sex, underlying comorbidities, and medications.The long-term use of SSRIs significantly increased the risk of UGIB and LGIB, and caused more LGIB than UGIB in the general population after adjusting for possible confounding factors, but the association between SNRIs and GIB is insignificant. Further prospective studies are needed to clarify this important issue.

  9. Implications of small-bowel transit time in the detection rate of capsule endoscopy: A multivariable multicenter study of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Carlo Maria; Soncini, Marco; Rondonotti, Emanuele

    2017-01-28

    To define the role of small-bowel transit time in the detection rate of significant small-bowel lesions. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy records, prospectively collected from 30 participating centers in the Lombardy Registry from October 2011 to December 2013, were included in the study if the clinical indication was obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and the capsule reached the cecum. Based on capsule findings, we created two groups: P2 (significant findings) and P0-1 (normal/negligible findings). Groups were compared for age, gender, small-bowel transit time, type of instrument, modality of capsule performance (outpatients vs inpatients), bowel cleanliness, and center volume. We retrieved and scrutinized 1,433 out of 2,295 capsule endoscopy records (62.4%) fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Patients were 67 ± 15 years old, and 815 (57%) were males. In comparison with patients in the P0-1 group, those in the P2 group (n = 776, 54%) were older (P < 0.0001), had a longer small-bowel transit time (P = 0.0015), and were more frequently examined in low-volume centers (P < 0.001). Age and small-bowel transit time were correlated (P < 0.001), with age as the sole independent predictor on multivariable analysis. Findings of the P2 group were artero-venous malformations (54.5%), inflammatory (23.6%) and protruding (10.4%) lesions, and luminal blood (11.5%). In this selected, prospectively collected cohort of small-bowel capsule endoscopy performed for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, a longer small-bowel transit time was associated with a higher detection rate of significant lesions, along with age and a low center volume, with age serving as an independent predictor.

  10. Real-Time PCR for Diagnosing Helicobacter pylori Infection in Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Comparison with Other Classical Diagnostic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Jesús; Belda, Sofía; Santibáñez, Miguel; Sola-Vera, Javier; Galiana, Antonio; Ruiz-García, Montserrat; Brotons, Alicia; López-Girona, Elena; Girona, Eva; Sillero, Carlos; Royo, Gloria

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic usefulness of quantification of the H. pylori genome in detection of infection in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB). A total of 158 consecutive patients with digestive disorders, 80 of whom had clinical presentation of UGB, were studied. The number of microorganisms was quantified using a real-time PCR system which amplifies the urease gene with an internal control for eliminating the false negatives. A biopsy sample from the antrum and corpus of each patient was processed. The rapid urease test, culture, histological study, stool antigen test, and breath test were done. The gold standard was a positive culture or positive results in at least two of the other techniques. When a positive result was defined as any number of microorganisms/human cell, the sensitivity of real-time PCR was greater in bleeding patients, especially in the gastric corpus: 68.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 52.3 to 84.5%) in non-UGB patients versus 91.5% (95% CI, 79.6 to 97.6%) in UGB patients. When a positive result was defined as a number of microorganisms/human cell above the optimal value that maximizes the Youden index (>3.56 microorganisms/human cell in the antrum and >2.69 in the corpus), the sensitivity and specificity in UGB patients were over 80% in both antrum and corpus. Our findings suggest that some bleeding patients with infection caused by H. pylori may not be correctly diagnosed by classical methods, and such patients could benefit from the improved diagnosis provided by real-time PCR. However, the clinical significance of a small number of microorganisms in patients with negative results in classical tests should be evaluated. PMID:22837325

  11. The setting up and running of a cross-county out-of-hours gastrointestinal bleed service: a possible blueprint for the future.

    PubMed

    Shokouhi, Bahman N; Khan, Mohammad; Carter, Martyn J; Khan, Nasser Q; Mills, Philip; Morris, Danielle; Rowlands, David E; Samsheer, Kote; Sargeant, Ian R; McIntyre, Peter B; Greenfield, Simon M

    2013-07-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) results in 25 000 hospital admissions annually. Patients admitted at weekends with AUGIB have increased mortality, and guidelines advise out-of-hours endoscopy. We present retrospective data from our service involving the interhospital transfer of patients. We pooled resources of two neighbouring general hospitals, just north of London. Emergency endoscopy is performed at the start of the list followed by elective endoscopy in the endoscopy unit on Saturday and Sunday mornings. From Friday evening to Sunday morning, patients admitted to Queen Elizabeth II Hospital (QEII) are medically stabilised and transferred to Lister Hospital by ambulance. 240 endoscopies were performed out of hours from December 2007 to March 2011. Of these, 54 patients were transferred: nine had emergency endoscopy at QEII as they were medically unstable; eight of the patients transferred required therapeutic intervention for active bleeding. The mean pre-endoscopy Rockall score of those transferred was 2.5. We examined the records of 51 of the 54 patients transferred. There were three deaths within 30 days after endoscopy not associated with the transfer process. 19 (37%) patients had reduced hospitalisation after having their endoscopy at the weekend. The introduction of the out-of-hours endoscopy service in our trust has had multiple benefits, including patients consistently receiving timely emergency endoscopy, significantly reduced disruption to emergency operating theatres, and participation of endoscopy nurses ensures a better and safer experience for patients, and better endoscopy decontamination. We suggest our model is safe and feasible for other small units wishing to set up their own out-of-hours endoscopy service to adopt.

  12. First-line endoscopic treatment with OTSC in patients with high-risk non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: preliminary experience in 40 cases.

    PubMed

    Manno, Mauro; Mangiafico, Santi; Caruso, Angelo; Barbera, Carmelo; Bertani, Helga; Mirante, Vincenzo G; Pigò, Flavia; Amardeep, Khanna; Conigliaro, Rita

    2016-05-01

    The over-the-scope clip (OTSC; Ovesco, Tübingen, Germany) is a novel endoscopic clipping device designed for tissue approximation. The device has been used in the closure of fistulas and perforations. We hereby report a series of patients with high-risk non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) lesions in whom OTSCs were used as first-line endoscopic treatment. We prospectively collected and retrospectively analysed data over a period of 12 months from October 2013 to November 2014 from all consecutive patients who underwent emergency endoscopy for acute severe high-risk NVUGIB and were treated with OTSC as primary first-line therapy. We included forty consecutive patients with mean age 69 years (range 25-94 years). All patients were treated with the non-traumatic version of the OTSC system (23 with the 11 mm version and 17 with the 12 mm version). Indications for OTSC treatment included gastric ulcer with large vessel (Forrest IIa) (n = 8, 20 %), duodenal ulcer (Forrest Ib) (n = 7, 18 %), duodenal ulcer with large vessel (Forrest IIa) (n = 6, 15 %), Dieulafoy's lesion (n = 6, 15 %) and other secondary indications (n = 13, 32 %). Technical success and primary haemostasis were achieved in all patients (100 %). No re-bleeding, need for surgical or radiological embolization treatment or other complications were observed during the follow-up period of 30 days. We conclude OTSC placement as a first-line endoscopic treatment seems to be effective, safe and easy to perform and should be considered in patients with high-risk NVUGIB lesions.

  13. Occult gastrointestinal bleeding in high-risk intensive care unit patients receiving antacid prophylaxis: frequency and significance.

    PubMed

    Derrida, S; Nury, B; Slama, R; Marois, F; Moreau, R; Soupison, T; Sicot, C

    1989-02-01

    Gastroccult reagent was used every 4 h to detect blood in gastric juice in 41 ICU patients at risk of GI bleeding (GB) and receiving antacid prophylaxis (gastric pH greater than 3.5). Of the present patients, 27% (11/41) had at least one episode of occult GB (three consecutive positive determinations; a total of 14 episodes). Endoscopy identified acute gastroduodenal mucosal lesions (stress ulcers) as the most frequent lesion in this group (eight patients). Sepsis was the most frequent underlying condition associated with occult GB due to stress ulcer. Hematemesis occurred in 36% (4/11) of patients with occult GB and was due to stress ulcer in three patients and to benign gastric tumor in one. No overt GB occurred in the absence of previous occult GB. We conclude that: a) risk of GB persists in critically ill ICU patients in spite of antacid prophylaxis (gastric pH greater than 3.5); b) high-risk patients can be identified through periodic testing for the presence of blood in gastric juice using the reagent; c) when occult GB occurs, treatment should be based on the endoscopy results. In the absence of acute gastroduodenal mucosal lesions, antacid prophylaxis should not be modified, and specific treatment of the identified lesion(s) should be initiated. In the presence of stress lesions, antacid prophylaxis should be reinforced if the pH of the gastric content is less than 3.5 and a septic complication should be actively sought if the pH is greater than 3.5.

  14. Heterotopic pancreas in Meckel's diverticulum in a 7-year-old child with intussusception and recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: case report and literature review focusing on diagnostic controversies.

    PubMed

    Riccardo, Guanà; Valeria, Bucci; Giulia, Carbonaro; Alessia, Cerrina; Luisa, Ferrero; Elisabetta, Teruzzi; Alessandro, Mussa; Isabella, Morra; Jürgen, Schleef

    2014-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum, the most common congenital abnormality of the small intestine, may be associated to heterotopic pancreas, often diagnosed incidentally on histopathological examination. Intussusception affects infants between the ages of 5 and 9 months, but it may also occur in older children, teenagers and adults, and in some cases can be derived by a Meckel's diverticulum resulting in acute abdomen. We analyse the management and the recent literature on similar cases, describing diagnostic options. In May 2013, a 7-year-old girl admitted to our hospital with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, was discovered to have an ileoileal intussusception with a leading Meckel's diverticulum with heterotopic pancreatic tissue. This association is rare evidence in children and its proper management can be controversial, in particular from a diagnostic point of view. In such cases, preoperative radiological diagnosis can be only suspected in the presence of suggestive signs, more often depicted by ultrasound or computed tomography scan. During laparotomy an accurate exploration of all ileum is recommended, for the possibility to find others heterotopic segments.

  15. Positive predictive value of ICD-9th codes for upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation in the Sistema Informativo Sanitario Regionale database.

    PubMed

    Cattaruzzi, C; Troncon, M G; Agostinis, L; García Rodríguez, L A

    1999-06-01

    We identified patients whose records in the Sistema Informativo Sanitario Regionale database in the Italian region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia showed a code of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and perforation according to codes of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9th revision. The validity of site- and lesion-specific codes (531 to 534) and nonspecific codes (5780, 5781, and 5789) was ascertained through manual review of hospital clinical records. The initial group was made of 1779 potential cases of UGIB identified with one of these codes recorded. First, the positive predictive values (PPV) were calculated in a random sample. As a result of the observed high PPV of 531 and 532 codes, additional hospital charts were solely requested for all remaining potential cases with 533, 534, and 578 ICD-9 codes. The overall PPV reached a high of 97% for 531 and 532 site-specific codes, 84% for 534 site-specific codes, and 80% for 533 lesion-specific codes, and a low of 59% for nonspecific codes. These data suggest a considerable research potential for this new computerized health care database in Southern Europe.

  16. Usefulness of the Delta Neutrophil Index to Predict 30-Day Mortality in Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kong, Taeyoung; In, Sangkook; Park, Yoo Seok; Lee, Hye Sun; Lee, Jong Wook; You, Je Sung; Chung, Hyun Soo; Park, Incheol; Chung, Sung Phil

    2017-10-01

    The delta neutrophil index (DNI), reflecting the fraction of circulating immature granulocytes, is associated with increased mortality in patients with systemic inflammation. It is rapidly and easily measured while performing a complete blood count. This study aimed to determine whether the DNI can predict short-term mortality in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH). We retrospectively identified consecutive patients (>18 years old) with UGIH admitted to the ED from January 1, 2015 to February 28, 2016. The diagnosis of UGIH was confirmed using clinical, laboratory, and endoscopic findings. The DNI was determined on each day of hospitalization. The outcome of interest was 30-day mortality. Overall, 432 patients with UGIH met our inclusion criteria. The multivariate Cox regression model demonstrated that higher DNI values on days 0 (hazard ratio [HR], 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.17; P = 0.012) and 1 (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.06-1.24; P = 0.001) were strong independent predictors of short-term mortality. Further, a DNI >1% at ED admission was associated with an increased risk (HR, 40.9; 95% CI, 20.8-80.5; P < 0.001) of 30-day mortality. The optimal cut-off value for DNI on day 1 was 2.6%; this was associated with an increased hazard of 30-day mortality following UGIH (HR, 7.85; 95% CI, 3.59-17.15; P < 0.001). The DNI can be measured rapidly and simply at ED admission without additional cost or time burden. Increased DNI values independently predict 30-day mortality in patients with UGIH.

  17. Lactulose is highly potential in prophylaxis of hepatic encephalopathy in patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding: results of a controlled randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Liu, Qingsen; Song, Jie; Tong, Muhong; Peng, Lihua; Liang, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) is an important precipitating factor for the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in cirrhotic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of lactulose in a controlled randomized trial for prophylaxis of HE after UGB. 128 cirrhotic patients with UGB were consecutively classified according to Child-Pugh criteria and randomized to receive lactulose (group A, n = 63) or no lactulose (group B, n = 65) treatment after the symptoms of active bleeding disappeared. Curative effects were observed for 6 days. Two patients in group A and 11 in group B had developed HE; the incidence rates were 3.2 and 16.9% (χ(2) 5.2061, p < 0.05). After treatment, a significant increase in ammonia level and higher number connection test (NCT) in the non-lactulose group, median blood ammonia levels (60.0 vs. 52.0), p < 0.05, and median NCT (43 vs. 38), p < 0.05, were observed. Patients who had developed HE had a significantly higher baseline Child-Turcotte-Pugh score (10.15 ±1.82 vs. 6.35 ± 1.60, p < 0.05), alanine aminotransferase (111.25 ± 91.62 vs. 48.32 ± 47.45, p < 0.05), aspartate aminotransferase (171.42 ± 142.68 vs. 46.33 ± 42.68, p < 0.05), total bilirubin (73.44 ± 47.20 vs. 29.75 ± 22.08, p < 0.05), serum albumin (24.65 ± 5.04 vs. 33.43 ± 6.49, p < 0.05), plasma prothrombin time (22.18 ± 4.60 vs. 17.12 ± 4.62, p < 0.05), and lower hemoglobin level (72.31 ± 15.15 vs. 87.45 ± 19.79, p < 0.05) as compared to patients who did not develop HE. On unconditional logistic regression analysis, patients who had developed HE were significantly associated with a higher baseline Child-Turcotte-Pugh score (OR 9.92, 95% CI 1.94-50.63, p < 0.05) and lactulose therapy (OR 0.02, 95% CI 0-0.74, p < 0.05) but were not associated with other parameters. Lactulose is an effective prophylaxis agent of HE for cirrhotic patients who had developed UGB. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. [The incidence, clinical characteristics and risk factors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients taking dual antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention in south China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z F; Sha, W H; Tan, G Y; Wang, Q Y

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the incidence, clinical characteristics and risk factors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who were administrated with aspirin and clopidogrel dual antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). ACS patients who had undergone PCI in the cardiovascular institute of Guangdong General Hospital from September 2009 to August 2014 were retrospectively enrolled.The incidence of UGIB and clinical characteristics of ACS patients on dual antiplatelet therapy for 1 year after PCI were analyzed.Risk factors of UGIB were screened in the cohort of patients and sex and age matched controls with ratio 1∶3. A total of 9 118 ACS patients had undergone PCI and UGIB occurred in 189 patients (2.07%, 189/9 118) from September 2009 to August 2014. UGIB patients with history over one year, gastrointestinal tumors or varices or negative endoscopy were excluded.Thus the revised incidence of UGIB occurred was 0.61% in 56 patients (0.61%, 56/9 118) and appeared to decline year by year.Most patients (91.07%, 51/56) had melena or stool occult blood positive (OB+ ), while others had bloody stool or haematemesis.Most UGIB were ulcer-related which was proved by endoscopy, accounting for 67.86% (38/56). There were 24 cases with duodenal ulcer, 13 with gastric ulcer and 1 with complex ulcer, while others were gastric erosion, gastritis and duodenitis.The risk factors of UGIB were previous history of peptic ulcer (P<0.01) and renal impairment (P<0.01). On the other side, PPI intake was a protective factor (P<0.05). The incidence of new-onset ACS was 1.44% (50/3 464) in PPI group, compared with 1.34% (76/5 654) in no PPI group (P>0.05). PPI use for the prevention of UGIB after PCI didn't increase the recurrence of ACS. The incidence of UGIB is 0.61% in ACS patients on dual antiplatelet therapy (aspirin and clopidogrel) for 1 year after PCI and falls year by year.Administration of PPI after PCI protects

  19. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding as a risk factor for dialysis and all-cause mortality: a cohort study of chronic kidney disease patients in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chih-Chia; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Wang, I-Kuan; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Objective Impaired renal function is associated with higher risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with chronic kidney disease and not on dialysis (CKD-ND). It is unclear if UGIB increases risk of chronic dialysis. The aim of the study was to investigate risk of chronic dialysis in CKD-ND patients with UGIB. Setting All CKD-ND stage 3–5 patients of a CKD programme in one hospital between 2003 and 2009 were enrolled and prospectively followed until September 2012. Primary and secondary outcome measures Chronic dialysis (dialysis for more than 3 months) started and all-cause mortality. The risk of chronic dialysis was analysed using Cox proportional hazard regression with adjustments for age, gender and renal function, followed by competing-risks analysis. Results We analysed 3126 CKD-ND patients with a mean age of 65±14 years for 2.8 years. Of 3126 patients, 387 (12.4%) patients developed UGIB, 989 (31.6%) patients started chronic dialysis and 197 (6.3%) patients died. UGIB increased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR (aHR): 1.51, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.13) and the risk of chronic dialysis (aHR; 1.29, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.50). The subdistribution HR (SHR) of UGIB for chronic dialysis (competing event: all-cause mortality) was 1.37 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.64) in competing-risks analysis with adjustments for age, renal function, gender, diabetes, haemoglobin, albumin and urine protein/creatinine ratio. Conclusions UGIB is associated with increased risk of chronic dialysis and all-cause mortality in patients with CKD-ND stages 3–5. This association is independent of age, gender, basal renal function, haemoglobin, albumin and urine protein levels. PMID:27150184

  20. Risk of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Cohort of New Users of Low-Dose ASA for Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Rodríguez, Luis A García

    2010-01-01

    The Health Improvement Network UK primary care database was used to identify a cohort of 38 077 individuals aged 50-84 years with a first prescription of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 75-300 mg/day) for secondary prevention of cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events during 2000-2007. From this cohort, 169 incident cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) were identified. Controls with no UGIB (n = 2000) were frequency-matched to the cases by age, sex, and follow-up time. A nested case-control analysis was performed to determine risk factors associated with UGIB. The incidence of UGIB was 1.1 per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 1.0-1.3). Low-dose ASA users with a history of peptic ulcer disease had an increased risk of UGIB compared with those without (Relative Risk [RR], 4.59; 95% CI, 2.87-7.33). Concomitant use of ASA and clopidogrel (RR, 1.61; 95% CI, 0.85-3.05) or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; RR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.77-4.82) conferred an increased risk of UGIB compared with ASA monotherapy. Discontinuation of ASA therapy (RR: 0.71, 95% CI, 0.42-1.20) and PPI co-treatment given since the start of ASA therapy (RR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.33-0.96) were associated with a reduced risk of UGIB. In conclusion, in a cohort of individuals receiving low-dose ASA for secondary prevention of cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events, patients with a history of peptic ulcer disease, or who were receiving clopidogrel or NSAIDs had an increased risk of UGIB. The prescription of PPI therapy at the initiation of low-dose ASA reduced the risk of UGIB by almost half.

  1. Similar Efficacy of Proton-Pump Inhibitors vs H2-Receptor Antagonists in Reducing Risk of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding or Ulcers in High-Risk Users of Low-Dose Aspirin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Francis K L; Kyaw, Moe; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Cheong, Pui Kuan; Lee, Vivian; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Naito, Yuji; Watanabe, Toshio; Ching, Jessica Y L; Lam, Kelvin; Lo, Angeline; Chan, Heyson; Lui, Rashid; Tang, Raymond S Y; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Tse, Yee Kit; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Handa, Osamu; Nebiki, Hiroko; Wu, Justin C Y; Abe, Takashi; Mishiro, Tsuyoshi; Ng, Siew C; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    It is not clear whether H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) reduce the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in aspirin users at high risk. We performed a double-blind randomized trial to compare the effects of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) vs a H2RA antagonist in preventing recurrent upper GI bleeding and ulcers in high-risk aspirin users. We studied 270 users of low-dose aspirin (≤325 mg/day) with a history of endoscopically confirmed ulcer bleeding at 8 sites in Hong Kong and Japan. After healing of ulcers, subjects with negative results from tests for Helicobacter pylori resumed aspirin (80 mg) daily and were assigned randomly to groups given a once-daily PPI (rabeprazole, 20 mg; n = 138) or H2RA (famotidine, 40 mg; n = 132) for up to 12 months. Subjects were evaluated every 2 months; endoscopy was repeated if they developed symptoms of upper GI bleeding or had a reduction in hemoglobin level greater than 2 g/dL and after 12 months of follow-up evaluation. The adequacy of upper GI protection was assessed by end points of recurrent upper GI bleeding and a composite of recurrent upper GI bleeding or recurrent endoscopic ulcers at month 12. During the 12-month study period, upper GI bleeding recurred in 1 patient receiving rabeprazole (0.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1%-5.1%) and in 4 patients receiving famotidine (3.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%-8.1%) (P = .16). The composite end point of recurrent bleeding or endoscopic ulcers at month 12 was reached by 9 patients receiving rabeprazole (7.9%; 95% CI, 4.2%-14.7%) and 13 patients receiving famotidine (12.4%; 95% CI, 7.4%-20.4%) (P = .26). In a randomized controlled trial of users of low-dose aspirin at risk for recurrent GI bleeding, a slightly lower proportion of patients receiving a PPI along with aspirin developed recurrent bleeding or ulcer than of patients receiving an H2RA with the aspirin, although this difference was not statistically significant. ClincialTrials.gov no: NCT01408186. Copyright © 2017 AGA

  2. Rare Jejunal Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Christman, Emily; Hassell, Lewis A.; Kastens, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) secondary to jejunal diverticulosis (JD) is very rare. Delay in establishing a diagnosis is common and GIB from JD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report an illustrative case diagnosed by push enteroscopy and managed with surgery. PMID:27800518

  3. Risk of upper gastrointestinal ulcer bleeding associated with selective cyclo‐oxygenase‐2 inhibitors, traditional non‐aspirin non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs, aspirin and combinations

    PubMed Central

    Lanas, A; García‐Rodríguez, L A; Arroyo, M T; Gomollón, F; Feu, F; González‐Pérez, A; Zapata, E; Bástida, G; Rodrigo, L; Santolaria, S; Güell, M; de Argila, C M; Quintero, E; Borda, F; Piqué, J M

    2006-01-01

    Background The risks and benefits of coxibs, non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and aspirin treatment are under intense debate. Objective To determine the risk of peptic ulcer upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) associated with the use of coxibs, traditional NSAIDs, aspirin or combinations of these drugs in clinical practice. Methods A hospital‐based, case–control study in the general community of patients from the National Health System in Spain. The study included 2777 consecutive patients with endoscopy‐proved major UGIB because of the peptic lesions and 5532 controls matched by age, hospital and month of admission. Adjusted relative risk (adj RR) of UGIB determined by conditional logistic regression analysis is provided. Results Use of non‐aspirin‐NSAIDs increased the risk of UGIB (adj RR 5.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.5 to 6.2). Among non‐aspirin‐NSAIDs, aceclofenac (adj RR 3.1; 95% CI 2.3 to 4.2) had the lowest RR, whereas ketorolac (adj RR 14.4; 95% CI 5.2 to 39.9) had the highest. Rofecoxib treatment increased the risk of UGIB (adj RR 2.1; 95% CI 1.1 to 4.0), whereas celecoxib, paracetamol or concomitant use of a proton pump inhibitor with an NSAID presented no increased risk. Non‐aspirin antiplatelet treatment (clopidogrel/ticlopidine) had a similar risk of UGIB (adj RR 2.8; 95% CI 1.9 to 4.2) to cardioprotective aspirin at a dose of 100 mg/day (adj RR 2.7; 95% CI 2.0 to 3.6) or anticoagulants (adj RR 2.8; 95% CI 2.1 to 3.7). An apparent interaction was found between low‐dose aspirin and use of non‐aspirin‐NSAIDs, coxibs or thienopyridines, which increased further the risk of UGIB in a similar way. Conclusions Coxib use presents a lower RR of UGIB than non‐selective NSAIDs. However, when combined with low‐dose aspirin, the differences between non‐selective NSAIDs and coxibs tend to disappear. Treatment with either non‐aspirin antiplatelet or cardioprotective aspirin has a similar risk of UGIB. PMID

  4. Costs and quality of life associated with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK: cohort analysis of patients in a cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, H E; Stokes, E A; Bargo, D; Logan, R F; Mora, A; Hodge, R; Gray, A; James, M W; Stanley, A J; Everett, S M; Bailey, A A; Dallal, H; Greenaway, J; Dyer, C; Llewelyn, C; Walsh, T S; Travis, S P L; Murphy, M F; Jairath, V

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Data on costs associated with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) are scarce. We provide estimates of UK healthcare costs, indirect costs and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for patients presenting to hospital with AUGIB. Setting Six UK university hospitals with >20 AUGIB admissions per month, >400 adult beds, 24 h endoscopy, and on-site access to intensive care and surgery. Participants 936 patients aged ≥18 years, admitted with AUGIB, and enrolled between August 2012 and March 2013 in the TRIGGER trial of AUGIB comparing restrictive versus liberal red blood cell (RBC) transfusion thresholds. Primary and secondary outcome measures Healthcare resource use during hospitalisation and postdischarge up to 28  days, unpaid informal care, time away from paid employment and HRQoL using the EuroQol EQ-5D at 28  days were measured prospectively. National unit costs were used to value resource use. Initial in-hospital treatment costs were upscaled to a UK level. Results Mean initial in-hospital costs were £2458 (SE=£216) per patient. Inpatient bed days, endoscopy and RBC transfusions were key cost drivers. Postdischarge healthcare costs were £391 (£44) per patient. One-third of patients received unpaid informal care and the quarter in paid employment required time away from work. Mean HRQoL for survivors was 0.74. Annual initial inhospital treatment cost for all AUGIB cases in the UK was estimated to be £155.5 million, with exploratory analyses of the incremental costs of treating hospitalised patients developing AUGIB generating figures of between £143 million and £168 million. Conclusions AUGIB is a large burden for UK hospitals with inpatient stay, endoscopy and RBC transfusions as the main cost drivers. It is anticipated that this work will enable quantification of the impact of cost reduction strategies in AUGIB and will inform economic analyses of novel or existing interventions for AUGIB. Trial registration number ISRCTN

  5. Costs and quality of life associated with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK: cohort analysis of patients in a cluster randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Campbell, H E; Stokes, E A; Bargo, D; Logan, R F; Mora, A; Hodge, R; Gray, A; James, M W; Stanley, A J; Everett, S M; Bailey, A A; Dallal, H; Greenaway, J; Dyer, C; Llewelyn, C; Walsh, T S; Travis, S P L; Murphy, M F; Jairath, V

    2015-04-29

    Data on costs associated with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) are scarce. We provide estimates of UK healthcare costs, indirect costs and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for patients presenting to hospital with AUGIB. Six UK university hospitals with >20 AUGIB admissions per month, >400 adult beds, 24 h endoscopy, and on-site access to intensive care and surgery. 936 patients aged ≥18 years, admitted with AUGIB, and enrolled between August 2012 and March 2013 in the TRIGGER trial of AUGIB comparing restrictive versus liberal red blood cell (RBC) transfusion thresholds. Healthcare resource use during hospitalisation and postdischarge up to 28  days, unpaid informal care, time away from paid employment and HRQoL using the EuroQol EQ-5D at 28  days were measured prospectively. National unit costs were used to value resource use. Initial in-hospital treatment costs were upscaled to a UK level. Mean initial in-hospital costs were £2458 (SE=£216) per patient. Inpatient bed days, endoscopy and RBC transfusions were key cost drivers. Postdischarge healthcare costs were £391 (£44) per patient. One-third of patients received unpaid informal care and the quarter in paid employment required time away from work. Mean HRQoL for survivors was 0.74. Annual initial inhospital treatment cost for all AUGIB cases in the UK was estimated to be £155.5 million, with exploratory analyses of the incremental costs of treating hospitalised patients developing AUGIB generating figures of between £143 million and £168 million. AUGIB is a large burden for UK hospitals with inpatient stay, endoscopy and RBC transfusions as the main cost drivers. It is anticipated that this work will enable quantification of the impact of cost reduction strategies in AUGIB and will inform economic analyses of novel or existing interventions for AUGIB. ISRCTN85757829 and NCT02105532. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  6. Dual-source dual-energy CT angiography with virtual non-enhanced images and iodine map for active gastrointestinal bleeding: image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic performance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Hou, Xin-Yi; Xue, Hua-Dan; Li, Xiao-Guang; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Qian, Jia-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Zhu, Hua-Dong

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical feasibility of dual-source dual-energy CT angiography (DSDECTA) with virtual non-enhanced images and iodine map for active gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). From June 2010 to December 2012, 112 consecutive patients with clinical signs of active GIB underwent DSDECTA with true non-enhanced (TNE), arterial phase with single-source mode, and portal-venous phase with dual-energy mode (100 kVp/230 mAs and Sn 140 kVp/178 mAs). Virtual non-enhanced CT (VNE) image sets and iodine map were reformatted from 'Liver VNC' software. The mean CT number, noise, signal to noise ratio (SNR), image quality and radiation dose were compared between TNE and VNE image sets. Two radiologists, blinded to clinical data, interpreted images from DSDECTA with TNE (protocol 1), and DSDECTA with VNE and iodine map (protocol 2) respectively, with discordant interpretation resolved by consensus. The standards of reference included digital subtraction angiography, endoscopy, surgery, or final pathology reports. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was undertaken and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated for CT protocols 1 and 2, respectively. There was no significant difference in mean CT numbers of all organs (including liver, pancreas, spleen, kidney, abdominal aorta, and psoas muscle) (P>0.05). Lower noise and higher SNR were found on VNE images than TNE images (P<0.05). Image quality of VNE was lower than that of TNE without significant difference (P>0.05). The active GIB source was identified in 84 patients, 83 (83/84, 98.8%) of which were confirmed by one or more reference standard. The AUC was 0.935±0.027 and 0.947±0.026 for protocols 1 and 2, respectively. There was no significant difference between protocols 1 and 2 for diagnostic performance (Z=1.672, P>0.05). The radiation dose reduction achieved by omitting the TNE acquisition was (30.11±6.32)%. DSDECTA with arterial phase with single-source mode, portal-venous phase with dual-energy mode and

  7. Risk factors associated with NSAID-induced upper gastrointestinal bleeding resulting in hospital admissions: A cross-sectional, retrospective, case series analysis in valencia, spain

    PubMed Central

    Marco, José Luis; Amariles, Pedro; Boscá, Beatriz; Castelló, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background NSAIDs are a significant cause of drug-related hospital admissions and deaths. The therapeutic effects of NSAIDs have been associated with the risk for developing adverse events, mainly in the gastrointestinal tract. Objectives The focus of this study was to identify the most common risk factors associated with NSAID-induced upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) resulting in hospital admissions. A secondary end point was the relationship between use of gastroprotective treatment and relevant risk factors to NSAID-induced UGIB in the selected population. Methods This study was a cross-sectional, retrospective, case-series analysis of NSAID-induced UGIB resulting in hospital admission to the Requena General Hospital, Valencia, Spain, occurring from 1997 to 2005. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes were used to identify UGIB admissions associated with NSAIDs. To estimate the probability of association between UGIB and the use of NSAIDs, the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability was used. Patients were categorized as high-risk to develop UGIB if they met ≥1 of the following risk criteria (relevant risk factors): aged ≥65 years (age risk factor); peptic ulcer disease or NSAID gastropathy occurring in the year before their hospital admission (history risk factor); and concomitant use of other NSAIDs, systemic corticoids, oral anticoagulants, or platelet aggregation inhibitors (concomitant medication risk factor). Patients were categorized as candidates to use gastroprotections if they met ≥1 of the relevant risk factors. Patients were categorized as users of gastroprotective treatment if they used proton pump inhibitors, histamine H2-receptor antagonists, or misoprostol at hospital admission. Results This study comprised 209 cases of NSAID-induced UGIB (129 men, 80 women: mean [SD] age, 71.5 [13.8] years; 128 [61.2%] receiving acetyl salicylic acid [ASA], with 72 [34.4%] receiving low

  8. First-line endoscopic treatment with over-the-scope clips significantly improves the primary failure and rebleeding rates in high-risk gastrointestinal bleeding: A single-center experience with 100 cases

    PubMed Central

    Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Glatz, Torben; Walker, Christine; Fischer, Andreas; Thimme, Robert

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate rebleeding, primary failure (PF) and mortality of patients in whom over-the-scope clips (OTSCs) were used as first-line and second-line endoscopic treatment (FLET, SLET) of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB, LGIB). METHODS A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database identified all patients with UGIB and LGIB in a tertiary endoscopic referral center of the University of Freiburg, Germany, from 04-2012 to 05-2016 (n = 93) who underwent FLET and SLET with OTSCs. The complete Rockall risk scores were calculated from patients with UGIB. The scores were categorized as < or ≥ 7 and were compared with the original Rockall data. Differences between FLET and SLET were calculated. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to evaluate the factors that influenced rebleeding after OTSC placement. RESULTS Primary hemostasis and clinical success of bleeding lesions (without rebleeding) was achieved in 88/100 (88%) and 78/100 (78%), respectively. PF was significantly lower when OTSCs were applied as FLET compared to SLET (4.9% vs 23%, P = 0.008). In multivariate analysis, patients who had OTSC placement as SLET had a significantly higher rebleeding risk compared to those who had FLET (OR 5.3; P = 0.008). Patients with Rockall risk scores ≥ 7 had a significantly higher in-hospital mortality compared to those with scores < 7 (35% vs 10%, P = 0.034). No significant differences were observed in patients with scores < or ≥ 7 in rebleeding and rebleeding-associated mortality. CONCLUSION Our data show for the first time that FLET with OTSC might be the best predictor to successfully prevent rebleeding of gastrointestinal bleeding compared to SLET. The type of treatment determines the success of primary hemostasis or primary failure. PMID:27895403

  9. Bleeding Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, you either do not have enough platelets or ... don't work the way they should. Bleeding disorders can be the result of other diseases, such ...

  10. Bleeding gums

    MedlinePlus

    ... periodontal exam. DO NOT use tobacco, since it makes bleeding gums worse. Control gum bleeding by applying pressure directly on the gums with a gauze pad soaked in ice water. If you have been diagnosed with a ...

  11. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  12. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  13. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a young patient with Budd Chiari syndrome due to a mutation of factor V Leiden: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dina, Ion; Iacobescu, Claudia; Goldis, Adrian

    2013-06-01

    Budd Chiari syndrome or hepatic venous outflow obstruction is a complex entity with multiple etiologies and various clinical manifestations. It is often difficult to establish the diagnosis. The most common cause is a hypercoagulable state due to either genetic disorders of blood coagulation or several acquired conditions such as hematological diseases, tumors, infections, chronic inflammatory diseases, pregnancy. The most common clinical presentation is hepatomegaly, abdominal pain and ascites, but the onset can also be dramatical and life threatening with upper digestive bleeding due to portal hypertension through postsinusoidal blockage. We report the case of a young patient with a coagulation disorder secondary to a mutation of factor V Leiden, who presented with upper digestive bleeding as the first manifestation of Budd Chiari syndrome and who also was associated with myocardial infarction in his past medical history.

  14. Recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to cytomegalovirus-associated colonic ulcer in a non human immunodeficiency virus infected patient: timely diagnosis and treatment averted surgery.

    PubMed

    Lim, L-G; Rajnakova, A; Yan, B; Salto-Tellez, M; Lim, L-L

    2009-11-01

    Mr C, a 68-year-old Chinese male with diabetes mellitus, previous stroke and ischaemic cardiomyopathy on clopidogrel, presented with haematochezia. Colonoscopy showed a sigmoid ulcer, which was treated endoscopically. Histology of the biopsy from the ulcer revealed non-specific changes. However, he presented with recurrent bleeding from this non-healing sigmoid ulcer. A review of the histologic specimen revealed CMV intranuclear inclusion bodies. He was treated with intravenous ganciclovir, with no further hematochezia.

  15. Management of gastrointestinal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, S; Watts, D; Kinnear, M

    2002-01-01

    A variety of endoscopic haemostatic techniques have enabled major advances in the management of not only bleeding peptic ulcers and bleeding varices, but also in a variety of bleeding lesions in the small intestine and in the colon. Indeed, the development and widespread implementation of endoscopic haemostasis has been one of the most important developments in clinical gastroenterology in the past two decades. An increasingly ageing cohort of patients with multiple co-morbidity are being treated and therefore improving the outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding continues to pose major challenges. PMID:11796865

  16. Continued use of low-dose aspirin may increase risk of bleeding after gastrointestinal endoscopic submucosal dissection: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Chen, Jingdi; Ding, Qianshan; Yang, Dongmei; Yu, Honggang; Lin, Jun

    2017-08-09

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection has been widely accepted. At present, the number of antiplatelet (APT) users has been growing. Moreover, because of high risks of thromboembolism, some patients need to continuously receive APT agents. The relationship between hemorrhage and continuous therapy with low-dose aspirin (LDA) remains controversial. A systematic search was conducted; studies were screened out- if data of no-anticoagulant/APT drugs use and interrupted and continued-LDA use were reported separately. The Newcastle-scale was chosen to assess the quality of the included studies. Review Manager 5.2 was used for quality assessment statistical analysis, and the odd ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Pooled data suggested a significantly higher bleeding ratio in the LDA-continued group compared to both the LDA-interrupted group (OR=2.05, 95% CI=1.05-3.99) and no-anticoagulant/APT group (OR=2.89, 95% CI=1.86-4.47). However, the LDA-interrupted group did not differ significantly from the no-anticoagulant/APT group. The en bloc resection rates of the LDA-continued group versus the LDA-interrupted group, the LDA-continued group versus no-anticoagulant/APT group, and the LDA-interrupted group versus the no-anticoagulant/APT group were similar (OR=0.82, 95% CI=0.21-3.24, p=0.78; OR=0.80, 95% CI=0.24-2.65, p=0.71; OR=1.41, 95% CI=0.38-5.24, p=0.60, respectively). There is an extremely high ratio of bleeding in the LDA-continued group compared to both the LDA-interrupted group and no-anticoagulant/APT group. All groups had similar ratios of en bloc resection.

  17. Managing acute upper GI bleeding, preventing recurrences.

    PubMed

    Albeldawi, Mazen; Qadeer, Mohammed A; Vargo, John J

    2010-02-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is common and potentially life-threatening and needs a prompt assessment and aggressive medical management. All patients need to undergo endoscopy to diagnose, assess, and possibly treat any underlying lesion. In addition, patients found to have bleeding ulcers should receive a proton pump inhibitor, the dosage and duration of treatment depending on the endoscopic findings and clinical factors.

  18. Protective value of TIPS against the development of hydrothorax/ascites and upper gastrointestinal bleeding after balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO).

    PubMed

    Saad, Wael Ea; Wagner, Cynthia Cindy; Lippert, Allison; Al-Osaimi, Abdullah; Davies, Mark G; Matsumoto, Alan H; Angle, John Fritz; Caldwell, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of post-balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) ascites/hepatic hydrothorax and rebleeding rate (variceal and non-variceal) in the presence and absence of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). A retrospective audit of consecutive patients undergoing BRTO was performed (August 2007-October 2010). The population was divided into two groups: patients who underwent BRTO only (BRTO-only group) and those who underwent BRTO in the presence of TIPS (BRTO+TIPS group). Post-BRTO rebleeding was categorized for the source of bleeding. Ascites and/or hepatic hydrothorax were categorized according to clinical severity. Comparisons, utilizing the Kaplan-Meier method, between both groups were made for patient survival, incidence of ascites/hydrothorax, and rebleeding. Thirty-nine patients underwent BRTO (three technical failures of BRTO-only group). Of the 36 technically successful BRTO procedures, 27 patients (75%) underwent BRTO-only and 9 patients (25%) underwent BRTO in the presence of a TIPS. Pre-BRTO ascites/hydrothorax resolved in BRTO-only vs. BRTO+TIPS in 7% (N=2/27) and 56% (N=5/9), respectively (P=0.006). The ascites/hydrothorax free rate at 6, 12, and 24 months after BRTO for BRTO-only vs. BRTO+TIPS was 58%, 43%, 29%, and 100%, 100%, 100%, respectively (P=0.01). Recurrent hemorrhage for BRTO-only vs. BRTO+TIPS groups, and for the same time periods was 9%, 9%, 21% vs. 0%, 0%, 0%, respectively (P=0.03). The 1-year patient survival of both groups (80-88%) was similar (P>0.05). This study concludes that the presence of TIPS has a protective value against the development of post-BRTO ascites/hydrothorax as well as recurrent hemorrhage but this does not translate to improved patient survival.

  19. Endovascular Management of Acute Enteric Bleeding from Pancreas Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Semiz-Oysu, Aslihan; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2007-04-15

    Arterioenteric fistula is a rare but serious complication of enteric drained pancreas transplant, which may lead to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. We present 3 patients with failed enteric drained pancreas transplants and massive gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to arterioenteric fistula. One patient was treated by embolization and the 2 others by stent graft placement. Bleeding was successfully controlled in all cases, at follow up of 5 days, 8 months, and 12 months, respectively. One patient died 24 days after embolization, of unknown causes.

  20. [Gastrointestinal bezoars].

    PubMed

    Espinoza González, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal bezoars are a concretion of indigested material that can be found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and some animals. This material forms an intraluminal mass, more commonly located in the stomach. During a large period of history animal bezoars were considered antidotes to poisons and diseases. We report a historical overview since bezoars stones were thought to have medicinal properties. This magic conception was introduced in South America by Spanish conquerors. In Chile, bezoars are commonly found in a camelid named guanaco (Lama guanicoe). People at Central Chile and the Patagonia believed that bezoar stones had magical properties and they were traded at very high prices. In Santiago, during the eighteenth century the Jesuit apothecary sold preparations of bezoar stones. The human bezoars may be formed by non-digestible material like cellulose (phytobezoar), hair (trichobezoar), conglomerations of medications or his vehicles (pharmacobezoar or medication bezoar), milk and mucus component (lactobezoar) or other varieties of substances. This condition may be asymptomatic or can produce abdominal pain, ulceration, gastrointestinal bleeding, gastric outlet obstruction, perforation and mechanical intestinal obstruction. We report their classification, diagnostic modalities and treatment.

  1. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  2. Occult gastric bleeding demonstrated by bone scan and Tc-99m-DTPA renal scan

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Leiter, B.E.; Weitzman, F.; Shapiro, J.H.

    1981-10-01

    A patient is described who had coagulopathy and clinically intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding. The bleeding site was clearly shown on renal and bone imaging performed at a time when the patient was considered clinically to have stopped bleeding. A bleeding gastric ulcer was subsequently demonstrated by radionuclide and contrast angiography, and at surgery.

  3. Gastrointestinal Bleeding - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemoccult Test Проба на скрытую кровь (Гемоккульттест) - ... displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  4. Small bowel bleeding: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Gunjan, Deepak; Sharma, Vishal; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine is an uncommon site of gastro-intestinal (GI) bleeding; however it is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding. It may require multiple blood transfusions, diagnostic procedures and repeated hospitalizations. Angiodysplasia is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding, particularly in the elderly. Inflammatory lesions and tumours are the usual causes of small intestinal bleeding in younger patients. Capsule endoscopy and deep enteroscopy have improved our ability to investigate small bowel bleeds. Deep enteroscopy has also an added advantage of therapeutic potential. Computed tomography is helpful in identifying extra-intestinal lesions. In cases of difficult diagnosis, surgery and intra-operative enteroscopy can help with diagnosis and management. The treatment is dependent upon the aetiology of the bleed. An overt bleed requires aggressive resuscitation and immediate localisation of the lesion for institution of appropriate therapy. Small bowel bleeding can be managed by conservative, radiological, pharmacological, endoscopic and surgical methods, depending upon indications, expertise and availability. Some patients, especially those with multiple vascular lesions, can re-bleed even after appropriate treatment and pose difficult challenge to the treating physician. PMID:24874805

  5. Multicentre, open-label, randomised, parallel-group, superiority study to compare the efficacy of octreotide therapy 40 mg monthly versus standard of care in patients with refractory anaemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding from small bowel angiodysplasias: a protocol of the OCEAN trial

    PubMed Central

    van Geenen, E J M; Drenth, J P H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal angiodysplasias are an important cause of difficult-to-manage bleeding, especially in older patients. Endoscopic coagulation of angiodysplasias is the mainstay of treatment, but may be difficult for small bowel angiodysplasias because of the inability to reach them for endoscopic intervention. Some patients are red blood cell (RBC) transfusion dependent due to frequent rebleeding despite endoscopic treatment. In small cohort studies, octreotide appears to decrease the number of bleeding episodes in patients with RBC transfusion dependency due to gastrointestinal angiodysplasias. This trial will assess the efficacy of octreotide in decreasing the need for RBC transfusions and parenteral iron in patients with anaemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding of small bowel angiodysplasias despite endoscopic intervention. Study design Randomised controlled, superiority, open-label multicentre trial. Participants 62 patients will be included with refractory anaemia due to small bowel angiodysplasias, who are RBC transfusion or iron infusion dependent despite endoscopic intervention and oral iron supplementation. Intervention Patients will be randomly assigned (1:1) to standard care or 40 mg long-acting octreotide once every 4 weeks for 52 weeks, in addition to standard care. The follow-up period is 8 weeks. Main outcome measures The primary outcome is the difference in the number of blood and iron infusions between the year prior to inclusion and the treatment period of 1 year. Important secondary outcomes are the per cent change in the number of rebleeds from baseline to end point, adverse events and quality of life. Ethics and dissemination The trial received ethical approval from the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects and from the local accredited Medical Research Ethics Committee of the region Arnhem-Nijmegen, the Netherlands (reference number: 2014-1433). Results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and

  6. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, other varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding, including: Drugs called ...

  7. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... periods; Intermenstrual bleeding; Spotting; Metrorrhagia Images Female reproductive anatomy Bleeding between periods Uterus References Bulun SE. The physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  8. Blood thinners and gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    As the number of diagnostic and therapeutic gastrointestinal endoscopies is increasing, and there is an increase in number of patients taking blood thinners, we are seeing more and more patients on blood thinners prior to endoscopic procedures. Gastrointestinal bleeding or thromboembolism can occur in this category of patients in the periendoscopic period. To better manage these patients, endoscopists should have a clear concept about the various blood thinners in the market. Patients’ risk of thromboembolism off anticoagulation, and the risk of bleeding from endoscopic procedures should be assessed prior to endoscopy. The endoscopic procedure should be done when it is safe to do it. PMID:27668068

  9. Management of gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Hilsden, R. J.; Shaffer, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a common problem that requires prompt recognition and management to prevent serious morbidity and mortality. Management goals are stabilization of the patient with vigorous fluid resuscitation followed by investigation and definitive treatment of the bleeding source. Endoscopy is often the initial diagnostic test and allows therapeutic measures to be performed at the same time. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8563510

  10. Factors Associated With Major Bleeding Events

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Shaun G.; Wojdyla, Daniel M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; White, Harvey D.; Paolini, John F.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Patel, Manesh R.; Sherwood, Matthew W.; Becker, Richard C.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hacke, Werner; Singer, Daniel E.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Breithardt, Gunter; Fox, Keith A. A.; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to report additional safety results from the ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation). Background The ROCKET AF trial demonstrated similar risks of stroke/systemic embolism and major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding (principal safety endpoint) with rivaroxaban and warfarin. Methods The risk of the principal safety and component bleeding endpoints with rivaroxaban versus warfarin were compared, and factors associated with major bleeding were examined in a multivariable model. Results The principal safety endpoint was similar in the rivaroxaban and warfarin groups (14.9 vs. 14.5 events/100 patient-years; hazard ratio: 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 0.96 to 1.11). Major bleeding risk increased with age, but there were no differences between treatments in each age category (<65, 65 to 74, ≥75 years; pinteraction = 0.59). Compared with those without (n = 13,455), patients with a major bleed (n = 781) were more likely to be older, current/prior smokers, have prior gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, mild anemia, and a lower calculated creatinine clearance and less likely to be female or have a prior stroke/transient ischemic attack. Increasing age, baseline diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥90 mm Hg, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were independently associated with major bleeding risk; female sex and DBP <90 mm Hg were associated with a decreased risk. Conclusions Rivaroxaban and warfarin had similar risk for major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding. Age, sex, DBP, prior GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were associated with the risk of major bleeding. (An Efficacy and Safety Study of Rivaroxaban With Warfarin for the Prevention of Stroke and Non-Central Nervous System Systemic Embolism in Patients With Non

  11. Life-threatening bleeding from gastric mucosal angiokeratomas during anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eungu; Kim, Yoon-Myung; Kim, Dae-Hee; Yoo, Han-Wook; Lee, Beom Hee

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Angiokeratomas are the earliest manifestation of Fabry disease (FD), and the extent of their appearance is related to disease severity. Angiokeratomas are mostly found on cutaneous regions. Patient concerns, diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes: Here we report an FD patient with widespread gastrointestinal angiokeratomas who developed life-threatening bleeding following anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. Lessons: Careful observation for gastrointestinal bleeding is warranted for patients on anticoagulation with extensive cutaneous angiokeratomas. Furthermore, our experience suggests that surveillance is needed to assess the prevalence and extent of gastrointestinal angiokeratomas in patients with FD. PMID:28178158

  12. Obscure bleeding colonic duplication responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Jérémie; Projetti, Fabrice; Legros, Romain; Valgueblasse, Virginie; Sarabi, Matthieu; Carrier, Paul; Fredon, Fabien; Bouvier, Stéphane; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Sautereau, Denis

    2013-09-21

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male admitted to our academic hospital with massive rectal bleeding. Since childhood he had reported recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and had two exploratory laparotomies 5 and 2 years previously. An emergency abdominal computed tomography scan, gastroscopy and colonoscopy, performed after hemodynamic stabilization, were considered normal. High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was initiated and bleeding stopped spontaneously. Two other massive rectal bleeds occurred 8 h after each cessation of PPI which led to a hemostatic laparotomy after negative gastroscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy. This showed long tubular duplication of the right colon, with fresh blood in the duplicated colon. Obscure lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a difficult medical situation and potentially life-threatening. The presence of ulcerated ectopic gastric mucosa in the colonic duplication explains the partial efficacy of PPI therapy. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding responding to empiric anti-acid therapy should probably evoke the diagnosis of bleeding ectopic gastric mucosa such as Meckel's diverticulum or gastrointestinal duplication, and gastroenterologists should be aware of this potential medical situation.

  13. 21 CFR 876.5980 - Gastrointestinal tube and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gastrointestinal tube and accessories. 876.5980... tube and accessories. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal tube and accessories is a device that..., gastrointestinal string and tubes to locate internal bleeding, double lumen tube for intestinal decompression...

  14. 21 CFR 876.5980 - Gastrointestinal tube and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gastrointestinal tube and accessories. 876.5980... tube and accessories. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal tube and accessories is a device that..., gastrointestinal string and tubes to locate internal bleeding, double lumen tube for intestinal decompression...

  15. 21 CFR 876.5980 - Gastrointestinal tube and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gastrointestinal tube and accessories. 876.5980... tube and accessories. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal tube and accessories is a device that..., gastrointestinal string and tubes to locate internal bleeding, double lumen tube for intestinal decompression...

  16. Investigation of the excluded stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: The role of percutaneous endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Kanwar RS; McKinney, J Mark; Stark, Mark E; Bouras, Ernest P

    2008-01-01

    Accessing the bypassed portion of the stomach via conventional endoscopy is difficult following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. However, endoscopic examination of the stomach and small bowel is possible through percutaneous access into the bypassed stomach (BS) with a combined radiologic and endoscopic technique. We present a case of obscure overt gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding where the source of bleeding was thought to be from the BS. After conventional endoscopic methods failed to examine the BS, percutaneous endoscopy (PE) was used as an alternative to surgical exploration. PMID:18350638

  17. Investigation of the excluded stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: the role of percutaneous endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kanwar-Rs; McKinney, J-Mark; Stark, Mark-E; Bouras, Ernest-P

    2008-03-28

    Accessing the bypassed portion of the stomach via conventional endoscopy is difficult following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. However, endoscopic examination of the stomach and small bowel is possible through percutaneous access into the bypassed stomach (BS) with a combined radiologic and endoscopic technique. We present a case of obscure overt gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding where the source of bleeding was thought to be from the BS. After conventional endoscopic methods failed to examine the BS, percutaneous endoscopy (PE) was used as an alternative to surgical exploration.

  18. GASTROINTESTINAL EOSINOPHILIA

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Li; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2007-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Gastrointestinal eosinophilia, as a broad term for abnormal eosinophil accumulation in the GI tract, involves many different disease identities. These diseases include primary eosinophil associated gastrointestinal diseases, gastrointestinal eosinophilia in HES and all gastrointestinal eosinophilic states associated with known causes. Each of these diseases has its unique features but there is no absolute boundary between them. All three groups of GI eosinophila are described in this chapter although the focus is on primary gastrointestinal eosinophilia, i.e. EGID. PMID:17868858

  19. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  20. Bleeding during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... throwing up blood or your vomit looks like coffee grounds Long or heavy periods (women) Headaches that do not go away or are very bad Blurry or double vision Abdominal pains Alternative Names Cancer treatment - bleeding; Chemotherapy - bleeding; Radiation - bleeding; Bone marrow ...

  1. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  2. Why Do Patients Bleed?

    PubMed Central

    Curnow, Jennifer; Pasalic, Leonardo; Favaloro, Emmanuel J.

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing surgical procedures can bleed for a variety of reasons. Assuming that the surgical procedure has progressed well and that the surgeon can exclude surgical reasons for the unexpected bleeding, then the bleeding may be due to structural (anatomical) anomalies or disorders, recent drug intake, or disorders of hemostasis, which may be acquired or congenital. The current review aims to provide an overview of reasons that patients bleed in the perioperative setting, and it also provides guidance on how to screen for these conditions, through consideration of appropriate patient history and examination prior to surgical intervention, as well as guidance on investigating and managing the cause of unexpected bleeding. PMID:28824979

  3. [Prophylaxis for stress ulcer bleeding in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Avendaño-Reyes, J M; Jaramillo-Ramírez, H

    2014-01-01

    The critically ill patient can develop gastric erosions and, on occasion, stress ulcers with severe gastrointestinal bleeding that can be fatal. The purpose of this review was to provide current information on the pathophysiology, risk factors, and prophylaxis of digestive tract bleeding from stress ulcers in the intensive care unit. We identified articles through a PubMed search, covering the years 1970 to 2013. The most relevant articles were selected using the search phrases "stress ulcer", "stress ulcer bleeding prophylaxis", and "stress-related mucosal bleeding" in combination with "intensive care unit". The incidence of clinically significant bleeding has decreased dramatically since 1980. The most important risk factors are respiratory failure and coagulopathy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) are used in stress ulcer bleeding prophylaxis. Both drugs have been shown to be superior to placebo in reducing the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding and PPIs are at least as effective as H2RAs. Early enteral feeding has been shown to reduce the risk for stress ulcer bleeding, albeit in retrospective studies. Admittance to the intensive care unit in itself does not justify prophylaxis. PPIs are at least as effective as H2RAs. We should individualize the treatment of each patient in the intensive care unit, determining risk and evaluating the need to begin prophylaxis. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. Metastatic Testicular Choriocarcinoma: A Rare Cause of Upper GI Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Jacqueline; Armstrong, Sharon; Walsh, Shaun; Groome, Max; Mowat, Craig

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an otherwise healthy 18-year-old man who presented with melena. Endoscopy revealed an ulcerated mass in the stomach and pathology confirmed this to be a malignant, poorly differentiated choriocarcinoma. Further imaging showed a left testicular mass with evidence of pulmonary, gastric, and brain metastases, and blood tests revealed an hCG level of 32,219 U/L. He was diagnosed with advanced metastatic testicular choriocarcinoma and underwent intensive induction chemotherapy and an orchidectomy. Metastatic testicular choriocarcinoma is a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26504875

  5. Bleeding and cupping.

    PubMed Central

    Turk, J. L.; Allen, E.

    1983-01-01

    Bleeding and cupping have been used in medicine since ancient times in the treatment of fevers and local inflammatory disorders. Local bleeding, by 'wet cupping', was effected by a scarificator or by leeches. John Hunter recommended venesection in moderation but preferred leeches for local bleeding. Bleeding as an accepted therapeutic practice went out of vogue in the middle of the nineteenth century as a result of the introduction of modern scientific methods. Dry cupping and the use of leeches, as counter irritants, persisted until the middle of this century. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6338802

  6. Gastrointestinal complications of von Recklinghausen's disease: two case reports and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, I; Dukhno, O; Ovnat, A; Levy, I

    2003-12-01

    There are few reports of the association between neurofibromatosis (von Recklinghausen's disease) and large, solid stromal tumours of the gastrointestinal tract. The prevalence of gastrointestinal involvement in von Recklinghausen's disease has been estimated at 11%-25%. Some associated gastrointestinal stromal tumours present clinically as bowel obstruction, perforation or gastrointestinal bleeding. We recently treated two patients with this condition who presented with gastrointestinal bleeding and were diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumours. We report the unique aspects of these cases and discuss the diagnostic and management problems that are posed by this unusual association.

  7. Reliability measures in managing GI bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, Amnon

    2012-06-01

    Multiple procedures and devices are used in a complex interplay to diagnose and treat GI bleeding. To model how a large variety of diagnostic and therapeutic components interact in the successful management of GI bleeding. The analysis uses the concept of reliability block diagrams from probability theory to model management outcome. Separate components of the management process are arranged in a serial or parallel fashion. If the outcome depends on the function of each component individually, such components are modeled to be arranged in series. If components complement each other and can mutually compensate for each of their failures, such components are arranged in a parallel fashion. General endoscopy practice. Patients with GI bleeding of unknown etiology. All available endoscopic and radiographic means to diagnose and treat GI bleeding. Process reliability in achieving hemostasis. Serial arrangements tend to reduce process reliability, whereas parallel arrangements increase it. Whenever possible, serial components should be bridged and complemented by additional alternative (parallel) routes of operation. Parallel components with low individual reliability can still contribute to overall process reliability as long as they function independently of other pre-existing alternatives. Probability of success associated with individual components is partly unknown. Modeling management of GI bleeding by a reliability block diagram provides a useful tool in assessing the impact of individual endoscopic techniques and administrative structures on the overall outcome. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  9. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Small Bowel Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Lauren B; Fidler, Jeff L; Cave, David R; Leighton, Jonathan A

    2015-09-01

    Bleeding from the small intestine remains a relatively uncommon event, accounting for ~5-10% of all patients presenting with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given advances in small bowel imaging with video capsule endoscopy (VCE), deep enteroscopy, and radiographic imaging, the cause of bleeding in the small bowel can now be identified in most patients. The term small bowel bleeding is therefore proposed as a replacement for the previous classification of obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). We recommend that the term OGIB should be reserved for patients in whom a source of bleeding cannot be identified anywhere in the GI tract. A source of small bowel bleeding should be considered in patients with GI bleeding after performance of a normal upper and lower endoscopic examination. Second-look examinations using upper endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and/or colonoscopy can be performed if indicated before small bowel evaluation. VCE should be considered a first-line procedure for small bowel investigation. Any method of deep enteroscopy can be used when endoscopic evaluation and therapy are required. VCE should be performed before deep enteroscopy if there is no contraindication. Computed tomographic enterography should be performed in patients with suspected obstruction before VCE or after negative VCE examinations. When there is acute overt hemorrhage in the unstable patient, angiography should be performed emergently. In patients with occult hemorrhage or stable patients with active overt bleeding, multiphasic computed tomography should be performed after VCE or CTE to identify the source of bleeding and to guide further management. If a source of bleeding is identified in the small bowel that is associated with significant ongoing anemia and/or active bleeding, the patient should be managed with endoscopic therapy. Conservative management is recommended for patients without a source found after small bowel investigation, whereas repeat diagnostic investigations are recommended

  10. Bleeding Meckel's diverticulum diagnosis: an unusual indication for computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Danzer, D; Gervaz, P; Platon, A; Poletti, P A

    2003-01-01

    Despite the wide use of modern investigation techniques, the diagnosis of complications related to Meckel's diverticulum (MD) remains difficult. Arteriography is commonly indicated for acute bleeding, and radionuclide scans may help in identifying the site of intestinal hemorrhage. In contrast, computed tomography (CT) is usually considered little use in the diagnosis of bleeding MD. We present the case of a young patient with massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage, in whom the diagnosis of MD bleeding was preoperatively made with contrast-enhanced CT after two negatives arteriographies.

  11. [The pewter bleeding bowls].

    PubMed

    Renner, Claude

    2004-01-01

    In the late seventeenth century, then along the eighteen and nineteenth centuries the amount of the bloodlettings was measured by means of three pewter bleeding bowls that held three ounces of blood, about 300 millilitres. In the middle of the nineteenth century new and large bleeding bowls with metric graduations were manufactured only by the Parisian potters.

  12. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  13. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  14. New Trends in Acute Management of Colonic Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Grassi, Veronica; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Tabola, Renata; Poli, Giulia; Avenia, Stefano; Farinella, Eleonora; Arezzo, Alberto; Vettoretto, Nereo; D’Andrea, Vito; Binda, Gian Andrea; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colonic diverticular disease is the most common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. In the past, this condition was usually managed with urgent colectomy. Recently, the development of endoscopy and interventional radiology has led to a change in the management of colonic diverticular bleeding. The aim of this systematic review is to define the best treatment for colonic diverticular bleeding. A systematic bibliographic research was performed on the online databases for studies (randomized controlled trials [RCTs], observational trials, case series, and case reports) published between 2005 and 2014, concerning patients admitted with a diagnosis of diverticular bleeding according to the PRISMA methodology. The outcomes of interest were: diagnosis of diverticulosis as source of bleeding; incidence of self-limiting diverticular bleeding; management of non self-limiting bleeding (endoscopy, angiography, surgery); and recurrent diverticular bleeding. Fourteen studies were retrieved for analysis. No RCTs were found. Eleven non-randomized clinical controlled trials (NRCCTs) were included in this systematic review. In all studies, the definitive diagnosis of diverticular bleeding was always made by urgent colonoscopy. The colonic diverticular bleeding stopped spontaneously in over 80% of the patients, but a re-bleeding was not rare. Recently, interventional endoscopy and angiography became the first-line approach, thus relegating emergency colectomy to patients presenting with hemodynamic instability or as a second-line treatment after failure or complications of hemostasis with less invasive treatments. Colonoscopy is effective to diagnose diverticular bleeding. Nowadays, interventional endoscopy and angiographic treatment have gained a leading role and colectomy should only be entertained in case of failure of the former. PMID:26554768

  15. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  16. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  17. Esophageal Dieulafoy's lesion: an exceedingly rare cause of massive upper GI bleeding.

    PubMed

    Malliaras, George P; Carollo, Andrea; Bogen, Gregg

    2016-06-14

    Dieulafoy's lesion, a dilated aberrant submucosal vessel which erodes the overlying epithelium, is a relatively rare but potentially fatal cause of gastrointestinal (Gl) bleeding. The esophagus is a very rare location for the lesion. Here we present a case of massive upper GI bleeding, secondary to this remarkably rare occurrence, which was amendable to endoscopic intervention.

  18. [Digestive bleeding due to jejunal diverticula: A case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Blake-Siemsen, Jorge Cuauhtémoc; Kortright-Farías, Marisol; Casale-Menier, Dante Rafael; Gámez-Araujo, Jesús

    2017-01-02

    Bleeding from the small bowel is a rare pathology that represents 5-10% of gastrointestinal bleeding; 0.06% to 5% of cases are due to the presence of diverticula of the small intestine. The majority of diverticula are asymptomatic and present symptoms when there is a complication. We present the case of a 53-year-old male with a history of chronic renal failure and hypertension. While he was hospitalized due to cerebrovascular disease he recurrently presented lower gastrointestinal bleeding that required blood transfusion on several occasions. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding and colon bleeding were ruled out by endoscopy. It was not until an arteriography was performed that we identified bleeding at proximal jejunum level, and therefore we performed a laparotomy. We present the studies and management that the patient underwent. Although jejunal diverticula are rare, they must be included in the differential diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding when present in a patient. Arteriography is a study of great use in locating the site, provided the bleeding is more than 0.5ml/minute. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. [Heterotopic pancreas is a rare cause of bleeding and intestinal intussusception].

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mette Winther; Østergaard, John R; Tøtterup, Anders; Jespersen, Marie Louise; Grønbæk, Henning

    2015-01-12

    A young female had neurofibromatosis, annular pancreas and heterotopic pancreas, a combination not previously described. The tumour caused bleeding and intussusception of the distal part of the small intestine. An extensive range of examinations was initiated; however, the diagnosis was not clarified until explorative laparoscopy was performed. Heterotopic pancreas is worth considering as an infrequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and invagination.

  20. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in the pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, David; Stavropoulos, Stavros; Iqbal, Shahzad; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2014-01-01

    About 20000 gastrointestinal endoscopies are performed annually in America in pregnant women. Gastrointestinal endoscopy during pregnancy raises the critical issue of fetal safety in addition to patient safety. Endoscopic medications may be potentially abortifacient or teratogenic. Generally, Food and Drug Administration category B or C drugs should be used for endoscopy. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) seems to be relatively safe for both mother and fetus based on two retrospective studies of 83 and 60 pregnant patients. The diagnostic yield is about 95% when EGD is performed for gastrointestinal bleeding. EGD indications during pregnancy include acute gastrointestinal bleeding, dysphagia > 1 wk, or endoscopic therapy. Therapeutic EGD is experimental due to scant data, but should be strongly considered for urgent indications such as active bleeding. One study of 48 sigmoidoscopies performed during pregnancy showed relatively favorable fetal outcomes, rare bad fetal outcomes, and bad outcomes linked to very sick mothers. Sigmoidoscopy should be strongly considered for strong indications, including significant acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding, chronic diarrhea, distal colonic stricture, suspected inflammatory bowel disease flare, and potential colonic malignancy. Data on colonoscopy during pregnancy are limited. One study of 20 pregnant patients showed rare poor fetal outcomes. Colonoscopy is generally experimental during pregnancy, but can be considered for strong indications: known colonic mass/stricture, active lower gastrointestinal bleeding, or colonoscopic therapy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) entails fetal risks from fetal radiation exposure. ERCP risks to mother and fetus appear to be acceptable when performed for ERCP therapy, as demonstrated by analysis of nearly 350 cases during pregnancy. Justifiable indications include symptomatic or complicated choledocholithiasis, manifested by jaundice, cholangitis, gallstone

  1. Gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts.

    PubMed

    Dioverti, M Veronica; Cawcutt, Kelly A; Abidi, Maheen; Sohail, M Rizwan; Walker, Randall C; Osmon, Douglas R

    2015-12-01

    Invasive mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection in immunocompromised hosts, but it carries a high mortality rate. Primary gastrointestinal disease is the least frequent form of presentation. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical in the management; however, symptoms are typically non-specific in gastrointestinal disease, leading to delayed therapy. To describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts, we reviewed all cases of primary gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts reported in English literature as well as in our Institution from January 1st 1991 to December 31st 2013 for a total of 31 patients. About 52% of patients underwent solid organ transplant (SOT), while the rest had an underlying haematologic malignancy. Abdominal pain was the most common presenting symptom, followed by gastrointestinal bleeding and fever. Gastric disease was more common in SOT, whereas those with haematologic malignancy presented with intestinal disease (P = 0.002). Although gastrointestinal mucormycosis remains an uncommon condition in immunocompromised hosts, it carries significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in cases with intestinal involvement. A high index of suspicion is of utmost importance to institute early and appropriate therapy and improve outcomes.

  2. Bleeding complications associated with anticoagulant therapy in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Nieto, José Antonio; Ruíz-Gamietea, Angeles; López-Jiménez, Luciano; García-Bragado, Ferran; Quintavalla, Roberto; Monreal, Manuel

    2010-04-01

    Cancer patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) have an increased incidence of bleeding complications while on anticoagulant therapy. RIETE is an ongoing registry of consecutive patients with acute VTE. We tried to identify which cancer patients are at a higher risk for major bleeding. Up to May 2009, 4,709 patients with active cancer had been enrolled in RIETE registry. During the first 3 months of anticoagulant therapy, 200 (4.2%) patients developed major bleeding. Then, 38 (0.8%) further patients bled beyond the first 90 days of therapy, 3 bled after withholding anticoagulant therapy. The most common sites of bleeding were the gastrointestinal tract (118 patients, 49%), genitourinary system (43 patients, 18%) and the brain (27 patients, 11%). In all, 160 patients (66%) died within 30 days after bleeding: 88 (55%) died of bleeding, 3 (1.9%) died of recurrent pulmonary embolism. Major bleeding is a frequent and severe complication in cancer patients with VTE, even beyond the third month. One third of the patients who bled died due the bleeding event.

  3. [OMEPRAZOL VS RANITIDINE IN UPPER DIGESTIVE BLEEDING

    PubMed

    Regis R, Regina; Bisso A, Aland; Rebaza, Segundo

    1999-01-01

    Pectic ulcer is the most frequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. The homeostatic mechanism of bleeding, and coagulation, does not happen with values of pH less than 5,0. Therefore neutralization of gastric acidity (pH more than 5,0) is a recourse of control, improve the evolution and healing of peptic ulcer and to avoid a new bleeding. The aim of this study was to compare the results of treatment with omeprazole and ranitidine, in 57 patients admitted at emergency room of the Hospital Central de la Polic a Nacional del Per with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcer, using Forrest classification. Patients received omeprazole 40 mg in bolus IV, followed by continuos infusion of 8 mg/hour for 72 hours (group A) or ranitidine 50 mg IV each 8 hours for 72 hours (group B). A new endoscopy was made 72 hours after admission demostrated a succesful therapy in both group. Bleeding stopped in 26/27 patients in group A (96,2%) and in 23/30 patients in group B (76,6%) (p<0,05). The results of this study show that the omeprazole IV is more effective than ranitidine IV in the control of UGB because of peptic ulcer and provides a faster healing.

  4. ENDOSCOPIC THERAPY OF SEVERE ULCER BLEEDING

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Thomas O.G.; Jensen, Dennis M.

    2013-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding secondary to ulcer disease occurs commonly and results in significant patient morbidity and medical expense. After initial resuscitation, carefully performed endoscopy provides an accurate diagnosis of the source of the UGI hemorrhage and can reliably identify those high-risk subgroups that may benefit most from endoscopic hemostasis. Large channel therapeutic endoscopes are recommended. Endoscopists should be very experienced in management of patients with UGI hemorrhage including the use of various hemostatic devices. For patients with major stigmata of ulcer hemorrhage – active arterial bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel and adherent clot – combination therapy with epinephrine injection and either thermal coaptive coagulation (with multipolar or heater probe), or endoclips is recommended. High dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors are recommended as concomitant therapy with endoscopic hemostasis of major stigmata. Patients with minor stigmata or clean-based ulcers will not be