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Sample records for observational study time

  1. The survival time of chocolates on hospital wards: covert observational study

    PubMed Central

    Moualed, Daniel J; Nicolson, Phillip L R; Adjei, Felicia D; Cakebread, Holly E; Duehmke, Rudolf M; Martin, Claire A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To quantify the consumption of chocolates in a hospital ward environment. Design Multicentre, prospective, covert observational study. Setting Four wards at three hospitals (where the authors worked) within the United Kingdom. Participants Boxes of Quality Street (Nestlé) and Roses (Cadbury) on the ward and anyone eating these chocolates. Intervention Observers covertly placed two 350 g boxes of Quality Street and Roses chocolates on each ward (eight boxes were used in the study containing a total of 258 individual chocolates). These boxes were kept under continuous covert surveillance, with the time recorded when each chocolate was eaten. Main outcome measure Median survival time of a chocolate. Results 191 out of 258 (74%) chocolates were observed being eaten. The mean total observation period was 254 minutes (95% confidence interval 179 to 329). The median survival time of a chocolate was 51 minutes (39 to 63). The model of chocolate consumption was non-linear, with an initial rapid rate of consumption that slowed with time. An exponential decay model best fitted these findings (model R2=0.844, P<0.001), with a survival half life (time taken for 50% of the chocolates to be eaten) of 99 minutes. The mean time taken to open a box of chocolates from first appearance on the ward was 12 minutes (95% confidence interval 0 to 24). Quality Street chocolates survived longer than Roses chocolates (hazard ratio for survival of Roses v Quality Street 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.53 to 0.93, P=0.014). The highest percentages of chocolates were consumed by healthcare assistants (28%) and nurses (28%), followed by doctors (15%). Conclusions From our observational study, chocolate survival in a hospital ward was relatively short, and was modelled well by an exponential decay model. Roses chocolates were preferentially consumed to Quality Street chocolates in a ward setting. Chocolates were consumed primarily by healthcare assistants and nurses, followed by doctors

  2. Mandatory Nap Times and Group Napping Patterns in Child Care: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Staton, Sally L; Smith, Simon S; Hurst, Cameron; Pattinson, Cassandra L; Thorpe, Karen J

    2017-01-01

    Policy provision for naps is typical in child care settings, but there is variability in the practices employed. One practice that might modify children's early sleep patterns is the allocation of a mandatory nap time in which all children are required to lie on their beds without alternate activity permitted. There is currently limited evidence of the effects of such practices on children's napping patterns. This study examined the association between duration of mandatory nap times and group-level napping patterns in child care settings. Observations were undertaken in a community sample of 113 preschool rooms with a scheduled nap time (N = 2,114 children). Results showed that 83.5% of child care settings implemented a mandatory nap time (range = 15-145 min) while 14.2% provided alternate activities for children throughout the nap time period. Overall, 31% of children napped during nap times. Compared to rooms with ≤ 30 min of mandatory nap time, rooms with 31-60 min and > 60 min of mandatory nap time had a two-and-a-half and fourfold increase, respectively, in the proportion of children napping. Nap onset latency did not significantly differ across groups. Among preschool children, exposure to longer mandatory nap times in child care may increase incidence of napping.

  3. Time to publication for publicly funded clinical trials in Australia: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Linn Beate; Clarke, Philip; Graves, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine the length of time between receiving funding and publishing the protocol and main paper for randomised controlled trials. Design An observational study using survival analysis. Setting Publicly funded health and medical research in Australia. Participants Randomised controlled trials funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia between 2008 and 2010. Main outcome measures Time from funding to the protocol paper and main results paper. Multiple variable survival models examining whether study characteristics predicted publication times. Results We found 77 studies with a total funding of $A59 million. The median time to publication of the protocol paper was 6.4 years after funding (95% CI 4.1 to 8.1). The proportion with a published protocol paper 8 years after funding was 0.61 (95% CI 0.48 to 0.74). The median time to publication of the main results paper was 7.1 years after funding (95% CI 6.3 to 7.6). The proportion with a published main results paper 8 years after funding was 0.72 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.87). The HRs for how study characteristics might influence timing were generally close to one with narrow CIs, the notable exception was that a longer study length lengthened the time to the main paper (HR=0.62 per extra study year, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.89). Conclusions Despite the widespread registration of clinical trials, there remain serious concerns of trial results not being published or being published with a long delay. We have found that these same concerns apply to protocol papers, which should be publishable soon after funding. Funding agencies could set a target of publishing the protocol paper within 18 months of funding. PMID:28336734

  4. Fibromyalgia Outcomes Over Time: Results from a Prospective Observational Study in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Caroline P.; Adams, Edgar H.; Udall, Margarita; Masters, Elizabeth T.; Mann, Rachael M.; Daniel, Shoshana R.; McElroy, Heather J.; Cappelleri, Joseph C.; Clair, Andrew G.; Hopps, Markay; Staud, Roland; Mease, Philip; Silverman, Stuart L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Longitudinal research on outcomes of patients with fibromyalgia is limited. Objective: To assess clinician and patient-reported outcomes over time among fibromyalgia patients. Methods: At enrollment (Baseline) and follow-up (approximately 2 years later), consented patients were screened for chronic widespread pain (CWP), attended a physician site visit to determine fibromyalgia status, and completed an online questionnaire assessing pain, sleep, function, health status, productivity, medications, and healthcare resource use. Results: Seventy-six fibromyalgia patients participated at both time points (at Baseline: 86.8% white, 89.5% female, mean age 50.9 years, and mean duration of fibromyalgia 4.1 years). Mean number of tender points at each physician visit was 14.1 and 13.5, respectively; 11 patients no longer screened positive for CWP at follow-up. A majority reported medication use for pain (59.2% at Baseline, 62.0% at Follow-up). The most common medication classes were opioids (32.4%), SSRIs (16.9%), and tramadol (14.1%) at Follow-up. Significant mean changes over time were observed for fibromyalgia symptoms (modified American College of Rheumatology 2010 criteria: 18.4 to 16.9; P=0.004), pain interference with function (Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form: 5.9 to 5.3; P=0.013), and sleep (Medical Outcomes Study-Sleep Scale: 58.3 to 52.7; P=0.004). Patients achieving ≥2 point improvement in pain (14.5%) experienced greater changes in pain interference with function (6.8 to 3.4; P=0.001) and sleep (62.4 to 51.0; P=0.061). Conclusion: Fibromyalgia patients reported high levels of burden at both time points, with few significant changes observed over time. Outcomes were variable among patients over time and were better among those with greater pain improvement. PMID:28077978

  5. [Registration of observational studies: it is time to comply with the Declaration of Helsinki requirement].

    PubMed

    Dal-Ré, Rafael; Delgado, Miguel; Bolumar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Publication bias is a serious deficiency in the current system of disseminating the results of human research studies. Clinical investigators know that, from an ethical standpoint, they should prospectively register clinical trials in a public registry before starting them. In addition, it is believed that this approach will help to reduce publication bias. However, most studies conducted in humans are observational rather than experimental. It is estimated that less than 2% out of 2 million concluded or ongoing observational studies have been registered. The 2013 revision of the Declaration of Helsinki requires registration of any type of research study involving humans or identifiable samples or data. It is proposed that funding agencies, such as the Fondo de Investigaciones Sanitarias, as well as private companies, require preregistration of observational studies before providing funding. It is also proposed that Research Ethics Committees which, following Spanish regulation, have been using the Declaration as the framework for assessing the ethics of clinical trials with medicines since 1990, should follow the same provisions for the assessment of health-related observational studies: therefore, they should require prospective registration of studies before granting their final approval. This would allow observational study investigators to be educated in complying with an ethical requirement recently introduced in the most important ethical code for research involving humans.

  6. Synoptical Auroral Ovals: A Comparison study with TIMED/GUVI Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, K.; Paxton, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Whether the aurora Australis is a mirror image of its northern hemispheric counterpart is a question that auroral physicists have been wanting to answer. Owing to geophysical constraints, especially the large offset between the location of the southern magnetic and southern geographic poles, there is a paucity of information about the aurora Australis. Comparisons of some instantansous global-scale northern and southern auroras acquired conjugately by Polar and IMAGE spacecraft recently have shown mixed results. In this study, we present data from a different source to provide insight into the global morphology and behavior of the auroral oval. Approximately 20,000 Earth's disk FUV images acquired from the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) on-board NASA's Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite between February 2002 and February 2006 are processed and analyzed. Synoptic auroral distributions for the northern and southern ovals are derived. Our study result reveals that the statistical oval is nearly hemispherically symmetric (within ±80%). Several known features in the morphology of the aurora Borealis are also observed in the Southern Hemisphere: For instance, the auroral midday gap and the premidnight maximum. The hemispherical symmetry of the auroras deteriorates as the partition of solar illumination in the two hemisphere polar region becomes asymmetric. It is estimated that the solar illumination effect accounts for up to ~50% of the hemispheric asymmetry. We found evidence that suggests that the aurora is suppressed under sunlit conditions in the South just as it is in the North. We also found that the auroral energy flux increases monotonically with the increase of the solar zenith angle. These results suggest that ionospheric conductivity plays an active role in regulating magnetospheric energy deposition in the auroral zone.

  7. Impact of Structured Rounding Tools on Time Allocation During Multidisciplinary Rounds: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kannampallil, Thomas G; Patel, Vimla L; Patel, Bela; Almoosa, Khalid F

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent research has shown evidence of disproportionate time allocation for patient communication during multidisciplinary rounds (MDRs). Studies have shown that patients discussed later during rounds receive lesser time. Objective The aim of our study was to investigate whether disproportionate time allocation effects persist with the use of structured rounding tools. Methods Using audio recordings of rounds (N=82 patients), we compared time allocation and communication breakdowns between a problem-based Subjective, Objective, Assessment, and Plan (SOAP) and a system-based Handoff Intervention Tool (HAND-IT) rounding tools. Results We found no significant linear dependence of the order of patient presentation on the time spent or on communication breakdowns for both structured tools. However, for the problem-based tool, there was a significant linear relationship between the time spent on discussing a patient and the number of communication breakdowns (P<.05)––with an average of 1.04 additional breakdowns with every 120 seconds in discussion. Conclusions The use of structured rounding tools potentially mitigates disproportionate time allocation and communication breakdowns during rounds, with the more structured HAND-IT, almost completely eliminating such effects. These results have potential implications for planning, prioritization, and training for time management during MDRs. PMID:27940423

  8. Medical work Assessment in German hospitals: a Real-time Observation study (MAGRO) – the study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mache, Stefanie; Groneberg, David A

    2009-01-01

    Background The increasing economic pressure characterizes the current situation in health care and the need to justify medical decisions and organizational processes due to limited financial resources is omnipresent. Physicians tend to interpret this development as a decimation of their own medical influence. This becomes even more obvious after a change in hospital ownership i.e. from a public to a private profit oriented organization. In this case each work procedure is revised. To date, most research studies have focused mainly on differences between hospitals of different ownership regarding financial outcomes and quality of care, leaving important organizational issues unexplored. Little attention has been devoted to the effects of hospital ownership on physicians' working routines. The aim of this observational real time study is to deliver exact data about physicians' work at hospitals of different ownership. Methods The consequences of different management types on the organizational structures of the physicians' work situation and on job satisfaction in the ward situation are monitored by objective real time studies and multi-level psycho diagnostic measurements. Discussion This study is unique in its focus. To date no results have been found for computer-based real time studies on work activity in the clinical field in order to objectively evaluate a physician's work-related stress. After a complete documentation of the physicians' work processes the daily work flow can be estimated and systematically optimized. This can stimulate an overall improvement of health care services in Germany. PMID:19505318

  9. Observation on Surface Change of Fragile Glass: Temperature - Time Dependence Studied by X-Ray Reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kikkawa, Hiroyuki; Kitahara, Amane; Takahashi, Isao

    2004-04-30

    The structural change of a fragile glass surface close to the glass transition temperature Tg is studied by using X-ray reflectivity. Measurements were performed on surfaces of maltitol, which is a typical polyalcohol fragile glass with Tg = 320K. Upon both heating and cooling, we find the following features which are also noticed in silicate glass surfaces: (i) On heating, the surface morphology indicates a variation at temperatures below Tg; (ii) A drastic increase in surface roughness occurs at a temperature about 333K on heating, which is 13K higher than Tg; (iii) During the cooling of the sample, formation of a low-density surface layer (3nm at 293K) is observed. Prior to the crystallization, nm - {mu}m sized domains were grown at the surface, which might not be reported for other glasses.

  10. Timing of Pars Plana Vitrectomy in Management of Gunshot Perforating Eye Injury: Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghoraba, Hammouda Hamdy; Mansour, Hosam Osman; Abdelfattah, Haithem Mamon; Elgemai, Emad Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report the difference in either anatomical or functional outcome of vitreoretinal intervention in cases of gunshot perforating eye injury if done 2–4 weeks or after the 4th week after the original trauma. Patients were treated with pars plana vitrectomy and silicon oil. Surgeries were performed in the period from February 2011 until the end of December 2014. 253 eyes of 237 patients were reviewed. 46 eyes were excluded. 207 eyes of 197 patients were analyzed. The included eyes were classified based on the timing of vitrectomy in relation to the initial trauma into two groups: 149 eyes (the first group) operated on between the 3rd and the 4th week and 58 eyes (the second group) operated on after the 4th week after the trauma. Following one surgical intervention, in the first group, attached retina was achieved in 93.28% of patients. In the second group, attached retina was achieved in 96.55% of patients. All RD cases could be attached by a second surgery. Visual acuity improved in 81.21% of patients, did not change in 15.43% of patients, and declined in 3.35% of patients. In the second group, visual acuity improved in 81.03% of patients, did not change in 12.06% of patients, and worsened in 6.89% of patients. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in either anatomical or functional results. We recommend interfering before the 5th week after the trauma as retinal detachment is encountered more in cases operated on after the 4th week. The visual outcome depends on the site of entry and exit (the route of gunshot). PMID:27781127

  11. AstroSat CZT Imager Observations of GRB 151006A: Timing, Spectroscopy, and Polarization Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. R.; Chand, Vikas; Hingar, M. K.; Iyyani, S.; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A. P. K.; Malkar, J. P.; Paul, D.; Bhalerao, V. B.; Bhattacharya, D.; Dewangan, G. C.; Pawar, Pramod; Vibhute, A. M.; Chattopadhyay, T.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Vadawale, S. V.; Vagshette, N.; Basak, R.; Pradeep, P.; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S.; Vinod, P.; Navalgund, K. H.; Pandiyan, R.; Sarma, K. S.; Seetha, S.; Subbarao, K.

    2016-12-01

    AstroSat is a multi-wavelength satellite launched on 2015 September 28. The CZT Imager of AstroSat on its very first day of operation detected a long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), namely GRB 151006A. Using the off-axis imaging and spectral response of the instrument, we demonstrate that the CZT Imager can localize this GRB correctly to about a few degrees, and it can provide, in conjunction with Swift, spectral parameters similar to those obtained from Fermi/GBM. Hence, the CZT Imager would be a useful addition to the currently operating GRB instruments (Swift and Fermi). Specifically, we argue that the CZT Imager will be most useful for the short hard GRBs by providing localization for those detected by Fermi and spectral information for those detected only by Swift. We also provide preliminary results on a new exciting capability of this instrument: the CZT Imager is able to identify Compton scattered events thereby providing polarization information for bright GRBs. GRB 151006A, in spite of being relatively faint, shows hints of a polarization signal at 100-300 keV (though at a low significance level). We point out that the CZT Imager should provide significant time resolved polarization measurements for GRBs that have fluence three times higher than that of GRB 151006A. We estimate that the number of such bright GRBs detectable by the CZT Imager is five to six per year. The CZT Imager can also act as a good hard X-ray monitoring device for possible electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave events.

  12. Time since death and decomposition of the human body: variables and observations in case and experimental field studies.

    PubMed

    Mann, R W; Bass, W M; Meadows, L

    1990-01-01

    Much of the difficulty in determining the time since death stems from the lack of systematic observation and research on the decomposition rate of the human body. Continuing studies conducted at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, provide useful information on the impact of carrion insect activity, ambient temperature, rainfall, clothing, burial and depth, carnivores, bodily trauma, body weight, and the surface with which the body is in contact. This paper reports findings and observations accumulated during eight years of research and case studies that may clarify some of the questions concerning bodily decay.

  13. a Study on the SAR Data Observation Time for the Classification of Planting Condition of Paddy Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, A.; Kondo, A.; Mochizuki, K.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, cultivation methods of rice have been diversified due to the low cost of rice-growing techniques. For example, there is direct sowing of seed rice in paddy field in addition to the practice of usual paddy field to flooding at the time of planting. The yield of the usual paddy field and the direct sowing is different even though the same varieties are grown in the same area. It is necessary to grasp by performing classification for the usual paddy field or direct sowing for the management of agricultural crops. The main objective of this study was to select the observation time for the classification of paddy fields' planting conditions by utilizing Synthetic Aperture Radar TerraSAR-X satellite. The planting conditions included the usual planting of rice, the direct sowing of rice and the soybean. We selected the observation time by the statistical distance of the microwave backscattering in each paddy field for maximizing the planting condition classification. In addition, the satellite data observation timing considered the processing time of the analysis and the acquisition costs. The acquisition was performed 4 periods from 2 periods in the rice growing season and the planting phase. In the current study, we were able to classify the usual planting of rice, the direct sowing of rice and the soybean by TerraSAR-X data for the later planting of rice during mid-May and initial growth of rice in early June.

  14. Does type of hospital ownership influence physicians' daily work schedules? An observational real-time study in German hospital departments

    PubMed Central

    Mache, Stefanie; Scutaru, Cristian; Vitzthum, Karin; Quarcoo, David; Schöffel, Norman; Welte, Tobias; Klapp, Burghard F; Groneberg, David A

    2009-01-01

    Background During the last two decades the German hospital sector has been engaged in a constant process of transformation. One obvious sign of this is the growing amount of hospital privatization. To date, most research studies have focused on the effects of privatization regarding financial outcomes and quality of care, leaving important organizational issues unexplored. Yet little attention has been devoted to the effects of privatization on physicians' working routines. The aim of this observational real-time study is to deliver exact data about physicians' work at hospitals of different ownership. By analysing working hours, further impacts of hospital privatization can be assessed and areas of improvement identified. Methods Observations were made by shadowing 100 physicians working in private, for-profit or non-profit as well as public hospital departments individually during whole weekday shifts in urban German settings. A total of 300 days of observations were conducted. All working activities were recorded, accurate to the second, by using a mobile personal computer. Results Results have shown significant differences in physicians' working activities, depending on hospital ownership, concerning working hours and time spent on direct and indirect patient care. Conclusion This is the first real-time analysis on differences in work activities depending on hospital ownership. The study provides an objective insight into physicians' daily work routines at hospitals of different ownership, with additional information on effects of hospital privatization. PMID:19473487

  15. An Empirical Method of Detecting Time-Dependent Confounding: An Observational Study of Next Day Delirium in a Medical ICU.

    PubMed

    Murphy, T E; Van Ness, P H; Araujo, K L B; Pisani, M A

    Longitudinal research on older persons in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) is often complicated by the time-dependent confounding of concurrently administered interventions such as medications and intubation. Such temporal confounding can bias the respective longitudinal associations between concurrently administered treatments and a longitudinal outcome such as delirium. Although marginal structural models address time-dependent confounding, their application is non-trivial and preferably justified by empirical evidence. Using data from a longitudinal study of older persons in the MICU, we constructed a plausibility score from 0 - 10 where higher values indicate higher plausibility of time-dependent confounding of the association between a time-varying explanatory variable and an outcome. Based on longitudinal plots, measures of correlation, and longitudinal regression, the plausibility scores were compared to the differences in estimates obtained with non-weighted and marginal structural models of next day delirium. The plausibility scores of the three possible pairings of daily doses of fentanyl, haloperidol, and intubation indicated the following: low plausibility for haloperidol and intubation, moderate plausibility for fentanyl and haloperidol, and high plausibility for fentanyl and intubation. Comparing multivariable models of next day delirium with and without adjustment for time-dependent confounding, only intubation's association changed substantively. In our observational study of older persons in the MICU, the plausibility scores were generally reflective of the observed differences between coefficients estimated from non-weighted and marginal structural models.

  16. Timed Rise from Floor as a Predictor of Disease Progression in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mazzone, Elena S.; Coratti, Giorgia; Sormani, Maria Pia; Messina, Sonia; Pane, Marika; D'Amico, Adele; Colia, Giulia; Fanelli, Lavinia; Berardinelli, Angela; Gardani, Alice; Lanzillotta, Valentina; D’Ambrosio, Paola; Petillo, Roberta; Cavallaro, Filippo; Frosini, Silvia; Bello, Luca; Bonfiglio, Serena; De Sanctis, Roberto; Rolle, Enrica; Forcina, Nicola; Magri, Francesca; Vita, Gianluca; Palermo, Concetta; Donati, Maria Alice; Procopio, Elena; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Baranello, Giovanni; Mongini, Tiziana; Pini, Antonella; Battini, Roberta; Pegoraro, Elena; Torrente, Yvan; Previtali, Stefano C.; Bruno, Claudio; Politano, Luisa; Comi, Giacomo P.; D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of timed items, and more specifically, of the time to rise from the floor, has been reported as an early prognostic factor for disease progression and loss of ambulation. The aim of our study was to investigate the possible effect of the time to rise from the floor test on the changes observed on the 6MWT over 12 months in a cohort of ambulant Duchenne boys. Subjects and methods A total of 487 12-month data points were collected from 215 ambulant Duchenne boys. The age ranged between 5.0 and 20.0 years (mean 8.48 ±2.48 DS). Results The results of the time to rise from the floor at baseline ranged from 1.2 to 29.4 seconds in the boys who could perform the test. 49 patients were unable to perform the test at baseline and 87 at 12 month The 6MWT values ranged from 82 to 567 meters at baseline. 3 patients lost the ability to perform the 6mwt at 12 months. The correlation between time to rise from the floor and 6MWT at baseline was high (r = 0.6, p<0.01). Conclusions Both time to rise from the floor and baseline 6MWT were relevant for predicting 6MWT changes in the group above the age of 7 years, with no interaction between the two measures, as the impact of time to rise from the floor on 6MWT change was similar in the patients below and above 350 m. Our results suggest that, time to rise from the floor can be considered an additional important prognostic factor of 12 month changes on the 6MWT and, more generally, of disease progression. PMID:26982196

  17. FIRE I - Extended Time Observations Data Sets

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-08-01

    FIRE I - Extended Time Observations Data Sets First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) I - Extended Time Observations were conducted in Utah. Relevant Documents:  FIRE Project Guide FIRE I - Extended Time Observations Home Page SCAR-B Block:  ...

  18. Are risk factors common to thyroid cancer and nodule? A forty years observational time-trend study.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Angelo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Romani, Rossana; Di Coscio, Giancarlo; Nicolini, Andrea; Simoncini, Tommaso; Russo, Matteo; Mechanick, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    A progressive increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer (TC) has been reported over the last few decades. This either reflects the increased number of newly discovered and accurately selected thyroid nodules with more sensitive technologies and a relative more potent carcinogenic effect of pathogenetic factors in malignant, but not benign nodules. This observational time-trend study addresses this issue by analysing the proportion of TC within 8411 consecutive thyroid nodule (TN) patients evaluated in Pisa by the same pathology Department and individual clinician over a four-decade period. From 1972 to 1979 surgery was used to detect TC among the TN patients: 1140 TN patients were operated on and 35 cancers were detected (3.1% of all the TN patients). Subsequently, needle aspiration techniques were used to select TN for surgery. From 1980 to 1992, 5403 TN patients were examined, 483 were selected for surgery, and 150 cancers were found (2.8% of all the TN patients). From 1993 to 2010, 1568 TN patients were examined, 143 were selected for surgery, and 46 cancers were found (2.9% of all the TN patients). Therefore, in the University Hospital of Pisa, and independent of preoperative TN selection protocols, these proportions of TN eventually found to harbor TC remained statistically unchanged over 40 years (p = 0.810). This finding suggests that pathogenic risk factors and more sensitive diagnostic technologies did not differentially affect the incidence of TN and TC.

  19. Clinical characteristics of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus at the time of insulin initiation: INSTIGATE observational study in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Dilla, Tatiana; Reviriego, Jesús; Castell, Conxa; Goday, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Little information is available on the management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) in regular clinical practice, prior to and at the point of initiating treatment with insulin. The INSTIGATE study provides a description of the clinical profile of the patient with DM2 who begins treatment with insulin in both primary and secondary care. A total of 224 patients who had been diagnosed with DM2, were not responding to oral treatment, and began receiving insulin were included in the INSTIGATE study in Spain. Demographic data were collected, as well as data on macro- and microvascular complications of diabetes and comorbidities, past medical history of diabetes and oral treatment administered, the clinical severity of diabetes (HbA1c concentration) and insulin treatment initiated. Mean age of the sample was 65.4 years and 56.7% were men. There were 87% of patients who had a diagnosis of at least one significant comorbidity, notably hypertension and hyperlipidemia. The patient profile for metabolic syndrome was met by 75.1% of the patients. There was a higher incidence of macrovascular complications (38.4%) than microvascular complications (16.1%). Prior to insulin initiation, the most recent mean HbA1c was 9.2%. The majority of patients had been treated in the last 12 months with sulfonylureas and/or metformin (69.6 and 57.6%). The most common treatment prior to insulinization was the co-administration of two oral antidiabetics (OADs) (37.5%). Patients with DM2 observed in the study presented with elevated mean HbA1c and body mass index levels, comorbidities and complications related to diabetes at the time of insulin initiation. Changes and adjustments in treatment from diagnosis of diabetes occur when HbA1c levels are far above those recommended by the IDF (International Diabetes Federation), a factor which could be contributing to the development of both macrovascular and microvascular complications in the patient profile described in the study. PMID

  20. Observation of a discrete time crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Hess, P. W.; Kyprianidis, A.; Becker, P.; Lee, A.; Smith, J.; Pagano, G.; Potirniche, I.-D.; Potter, A. C.; Vishwanath, A.; Yao, N. Y.; Monroe, C.

    2017-03-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking is a fundamental concept in many areas of physics, including cosmology, particle physics and condensed matter. An example is the breaking of spatial translational symmetry, which underlies the formation of crystals and the phase transition from liquid to solid. Using the analogy of crystals in space, the breaking of translational symmetry in time and the emergence of a ‘time crystal’ was recently proposed, but was later shown to be forbidden in thermal equilibrium. However, non-equilibrium Floquet systems, which are subject to a periodic drive, can exhibit persistent time correlations at an emergent subharmonic frequency. This new phase of matter has been dubbed a ‘discrete time crystal’. Here we present the experimental observation of a discrete time crystal, in an interacting spin chain of trapped atomic ions. We apply a periodic Hamiltonian to the system under many-body localization conditions, and observe a subharmonic temporal response that is robust to external perturbations. The observation of such a time crystal opens the door to the study of systems with long-range spatio-temporal correlations and novel phases of matter that emerge under intrinsically non-equilibrium conditions.

  1. Observation of a discrete time crystal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Hess, P W; Kyprianidis, A; Becker, P; Lee, A; Smith, J; Pagano, G; Potirniche, I-D; Potter, A C; Vishwanath, A; Yao, N Y; Monroe, C

    2017-03-08

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking is a fundamental concept in many areas of physics, including cosmology, particle physics and condensed matter. An example is the breaking of spatial translational symmetry, which underlies the formation of crystals and the phase transition from liquid to solid. Using the analogy of crystals in space, the breaking of translational symmetry in time and the emergence of a 'time crystal' was recently proposed, but was later shown to be forbidden in thermal equilibrium. However, non-equilibrium Floquet systems, which are subject to a periodic drive, can exhibit persistent time correlations at an emergent subharmonic frequency. This new phase of matter has been dubbed a 'discrete time crystal'. Here we present the experimental observation of a discrete time crystal, in an interacting spin chain of trapped atomic ions. We apply a periodic Hamiltonian to the system under many-body localization conditions, and observe a subharmonic temporal response that is robust to external perturbations. The observation of such a time crystal opens the door to the study of systems with long-range spatio-temporal correlations and novel phases of matter that emerge under intrinsically non-equilibrium conditions.

  2. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: III. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by a Fourier-Domain Study of Anti-correlated Transit Timing Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Carter, Joshua A.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Ragozzine, Darin; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames /UC, Santa Barbara

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anticorrelations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems, Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27 and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate.

  3. An observational study of night time aerosol concentrations in the lower atmosphere at a tropical coastal station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswaran, K.; Rajeev, K.; Sen Gupta, K.

    1997-09-01

    Aerosol number densities in the lower troposphere measured by a bistatic CW lidar are used to study their altitude structure in the nocturnal mixing region and its association with stratified turbulence. In the early night hours the aerosol concentration shows a maximum just above the daytime Thermal Internal Boundary Layer. This maximum disappears in the late night hours. The integrated aerosol content in the first 1 km shows a general decrease during the post-midnight hours. Stratified aerosol layers are observed in the nocturnal mixing region during the post-midnight period. The association between these stratified aerosol layers and the prevailing atmospheric stability condition in this region is studied using the altitude profiles of different meteorological parameters obtained from pilot balloon and tethered balloonsonde observations.

  4. The Prospective, Observational, Multicenter, Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) Study: Comparative Effectiveness of a Time-varying Treatment with Competing Risks

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, John B.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Fox, Erin E.; Wade, Charles E.; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Bai, Yu; Brasel, Karen J.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Cotton, Bryan A.; Matijevic, Nena; Muskat, Peter; Myers, John G.; Phelan, Herb A.; White, Christopher E.; Zhang, Jiajie; Rahbar, Mohammad H.

    2013-01-01

    Context Hemorrhagic shock is the leading potentially preventable cause of death after injury. Transfusion of early and increased ratios of plasma and platelets to red blood cells (RBCs) has been associated with decreased mortality; however conflicting reports and the time-varying nature of transfusions and hemorrhagic death raise concern for the validity of the clinical conclusions drawn from the retrospective data. Objective To relate in-hospital mortality to: 1) early transfusion of plasma and/or platelets and 2) time-varying plasma:RBC and platelet:RBC ratios. Design Prospective cohort study documenting the timing of transfusions during active resuscitation and patient outcomes. Data were analyzed using time-dependent proportional hazards models. Setting Ten US Level 1 trauma centers. Patients Adult trauma patients surviving for 30 minutes after admission, transfused at least 1 unit RBC within 6 hours of admission (n=1245, the original study group) and at least 3 total units (of RBC, plasma or platelets) within 24 hours (n=905, the analysis group). Main outcome measure In-hospital mortality Results Plasma:RBC and platelet:RBC ratios were not constant over the first 24 hours (p<.001 for both). In a multivariable time-dependent Cox model, increased ratios of plasma:RBC (adjusted hazard ratio, HR=0.31, 95% CI=0.16–0.58) and platelets:RBC (adjusted HR=0.55, 95% CI=0.31–0.98) were independently associated with decreased 6-hour mortality, when hemorrhagic death predominated. In the first 6 hours, patients with ratios < 1:2 were 3–4 times more likely to die than patients with ratios ≥1:1. After 24 hours, plasma and platelet ratios were unassociated with mortality, when competing risks from non-hemorrhagic causes prevailed. Conclusions Higher plasma and platelet ratios early in resuscitation were associated with decreased mortality in patients transfused at least three units of blood products during the first 24 hours after admission. Among survivors at 24 hours

  5. X ray timing observations and gravitational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, Peter F.; Wood, Kent S.

    1989-01-01

    Photon-rich x ray observations on bright compact galactic sources will make it possible to detect many fast processes that may occur in these systems on millisecond and submillisecond timescales. Many of these processes are of direct relevance to gravitational physics because they arise in regions of strong gravity near neutron stars and black holes where the dynamical timescales for compact objects of stellar mass are milliseconds. To date, such observations have been limited by the detector area and telemetry rates available. However, instruments such as the proposed X ray Large Array (XLA) would achieve collecting areas of about 100 sq m. This instrument has been described elsewhere (Wood and Michelson 1988) and was the subject of a recent prephase A feasibility study at Marshall Space Flight Center. Observations with an XLA class instrument will directly impact five primary areas of astrophysics research: the attempt to detect gravitational radiation, the study of black holes, the physics of mass accretion onto compact objects, the structure of neutron stars and nuclear matter, and the characterization of dark matter in the universe. Those observations are discussed that are most directly relevant to gravitational physics: the search for millisecond x ray pulsars that are potential sources of continuous gravitational radiation; and the use of x ray timing observations to probe the physical conditions in extreme relativistic regions of space near black holes, both stellar-sized and supermassive.

  6. Impacts of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident on emergency medical service times in Soma District, Japan: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Tomohiro; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Nomura, Shuhei; Leppold, Claire; Takahara, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Yuki; Fujioka, Sho; Kami, Masahiro; Kato, Shigeaki; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the influence of the 3.11 triple disaster (earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident) on the emergency medical service (EMS) system in Fukushima. Methods Total EMS time (from EMS call to arrival at a hospital) was assessed in the EMS system of Soma district, located 10–40 km north of the nuclear plant, from 11 March to 31 December 2011. We defined the affected period as when total EMS time was significantly extended after the disasters compared with the historical control data from 1 January 2009 to 10 March 2011. To identify risk factors associated with the extension of total EMS time after the disasters, we investigated trends in 3 time segments of total EMS time; response time, defined as time from an EMS call to arrival at the location, on-scene time, defined as time from arrival at the location to departure, and transport time, defined as time from departure from the location to arrival at a hospital. Results For the affected period from week 0 to week 11, the median total EMS time was 36 (IQR 27–52) minutes, while that in the predisaster control period was 31 (IQR 24–40) min. The percentage of transports exceeding 60 min in total EMS time increased from 8.2% (584/7087) in the control period to 22.2% (151/679) in the affected period. Among the 3 time segments, there was the most change in transport time (standardised mean difference: 0.41 vs 0.13–0.17). Conclusions EMS transport was significantly delayed for ∼3 months, from week 1 to 11 after the 3.11 triple disaster. This delay may be attributed to malfunctioning emergency hospitals after the triple disaster. PMID:27683521

  7. Prognosis and serum creatinine levels in acute renal failure at the time of nephrology consultation: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Valdivieso, Jose Ramon; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Monedero, Pablo; de Irala, Jokin; Lavilla, Francisco Javier

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between acute serum creatinine changes in acute renal failure (ARF), before specialized treatment begins, and in-hospital mortality, recovery of renal function, and overall mortality at 6 months, on an equal degree of ARF severity, using the RIFLE criteria, and comorbid illnesses. Methods Prospective cohort study of 1008 consecutive patients who had been diagnosed as having ARF, and had been admitted in an university-affiliated hospital over 10 years. Demographic, clinical information and outcomes were measured. After that, 646 patients who had presented enough increment in serum creatinine to qualify for the RIFLE criteria were included for subsequent analysis. The population was divided into two groups using the median serum creatinine change (101%) as the cut-off value. Multivariate non-conditional logistic and linear regression models were used. Results A ≥ 101% increment of creatinine respect to its baseline before nephrology consultation was associated with significant increase of in-hospital mortality (35.6% vs. 22.6%, p < 0.001), with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.81 (95% CI: 1.08–3.03). Patients who required continuous renal replacement therapy in the ≥ 101% increment group presented a higher increase of in-hospital mortality (62.7% vs 46.4%, p = 0.048), with an adjusted odds ratio of 2.66 (95% CI: 1.00–7.21). Patients in the ≥ 101% increment group had a higher mean serum creatinine level with respect to their baseline level (114.72% vs. 37.96%) at hospital discharge. This was an adjusted 48.92% (95% CI: 13.05–84.79) more serum creatinine than in the < 101% increment group. Conclusion In this cohort, patients who had presented an increment in serum level of creatinine of ≥ 101% with respect to basal values, at the time of nephrology consultation, had increased mortality rates and were discharged from hospital with a more deteriorated renal function than those with similar Liano

  8. Asteroidal occultation timed by four UK observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, H.

    2000-04-01

    The occultation of a 9th magnitude star by the minor planet (49) Pales at 01.00 on Monday January 17 was the first such event to be timed by more than one observer at different locations on the track in the UK (see Figure 1). It was also seen from Hungary, and by three sets of observers in Canada and the USA, but unfortunately heavy cloud prevented observation across most of Europe.

  9. Effect of timing of first postnatal care home visit on neonatal mortality in Bangladesh: a observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Saifuddin; Arifeen, Shams El; Darmstadt, Gary L; Rosecrans, Amanda M; Mannan, Ishtiaq; Rahman, Syed M; Begum, Nazma; Mahmud, Arif B A; Seraji, Habibur R; Williams, Emma K; Winch, Peter J; Santosham, Mathuram; Black, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of the timing of first postnatal home visit by community health workers on neonatal mortality. Design Analysis of prospectively collected data using time varying discrete hazard models to estimate hazard ratios for neonatal mortality according to day of first postnatal home visit. Data source Data from a community based trial of neonatal care interventions conducted in Bangladesh during 2004-5. Main outcome measure Neonatal mortality. Results 9211 live births were included. Among infants who survived the first day of life, neonatal mortality was 67% lower in those who received a visit on day one than in those who received no visit (adjusted hazard ratio 0.33, 95% confidence interval 0.23 to 0.46; P<0.001). For those infants who survived the first two days of life, receiving the first visit on the second day was associated with a 64% lower neonatal mortality than in those who did not receive a visit (adjusted hazard ratio 0.36, 0.23 to 0.55; P<0.001). First visits on any day after the second day of life were not associated with reduced mortality. Conclusions In developing countries, especially where home delivery with unskilled attendants is common, postnatal home visits within the first two days of life by trained community health workers can significantly reduce neonatal mortality. PMID:19684100

  10. Observing Reality on Different Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyushin, Alexey

    2005-10-01

    In the first part of the paper, I examine cases of acceleration of perception and cognition and provide my explanation of the mechanism of the effect. The explanation rests on the conception of neuronal temporal frames, or windows of simultaneity. Frames have different standard durations and yield to stretching and compressing. I suggest it to be the cause of the effect, as well as the ground for differences in perceptive time scales of living beings. In the second part, I apply the conception of temporal frames to model observation in the extended time scales that reach far beyond the temporal perceptive niche of individual living beings. Duration of a frame is taken as the basic parameter setting a particular time scale. By substituting a different frame duration, we set a hypothetical time scale and emulate observing reality in a wider or a narrower angle of embracing events in time. I discuss the status of observer in its relation to objective reality, and examine how reality does change its appearance when observed in different time scales.

  11. {GUVI} Observations of Night Time Ionospheric Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C. M.; Christensen, A. B.; Walterscheid, R. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Meng, C. I.; Craven, J. D.; Meier, R. R.; Strickland, D. J.; Crowley, G.

    2002-05-01

    The TIMED spacecraft is currently mapping the nighttime Earth disk and limb with the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI). Images are made in the OI 135.6 nm line which is excited by the recombination of O+ ions. The intensity in these disk images is related to the total electron content of the ionosphere and density profiles can be recovered from the limb scans. Prominent in these images are UV signatures of the Equatorial Anomaly that was first imaged by the DE-1 satellite. Data is currently available from essentially the same local time and is suitable for the study of the longitudinal dependence of the Anomalies. It is known that the Earth's ionosphere shows the occurrence large longitudinal and latitudinal variations in the F-region plasma density that change with season and solar cycle. These plasma density fluctuations occur over a very large range of scale sizes and have been observed by for about three decades by satellites [e.g., ISIS 2, ESRO-4, Atmosphere Explorers, Dynamics Explorer-2, San Marco II, DMSP, etc.]. Their morphology, origin, day-to-day variability, and predictability are still not well understood. The GUVI night data that gives insight into these largest scale structures will be discussed.

  12. Skylab Earth Observation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This concept illustrates Skylab Earth observation studies, an Earth Resources Experiment Package (EREP). EREP was designed to explore the use of the widest possible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum for Earth resource investigations with sensors that recorded data in the visible, infrared, and microwave spectral regions. Resources subject to this study included a capability of mapping Earth resources and land uses, crop and forestry cover, health of vegetation, types of soil, water storage in snow pack, surface or near-surface mineral deposits, sea surface temperature, and the location of likely feeding areas for fish, etc. A significant feature of EREP was the ability of man to operate the sensors in a laboratory fashion.

  13. Precise Landslide Displacement Time Series from Continuous GPS Observations in Tectonically Active and Cold Regions: A Case Study in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddus, Y.; Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past 15 years, Global Positioning System (GPS) has been frequently used as a scientific tool to detect potential earth mass movements and to track creeping landslides. In this study, we investigated four-years of continuous GPS data (September 2006-July 2010) recorded at a landslide site in Alaska. This GPS station (AC55) was installed on an un-identified creeping site by the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) project, which was funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation. The landslide moves with a steady horizontal velocity of 5.5 cm/year toward NEE, and had a subsidence rate of 2.6 cm/year. There was a considerable correlation between annual snow loading and melting cycles and seasonal variations of the landslide displacements. The seasonal movements vary year to year with an average peak-to-peak amplitude of 1.5 cm and 1.0 cm in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. This study addresses three challenging issues in applying GPS for landslide monitoring in tectonically active and cold regions. The three challenges include (1) detecting GPS-derived positions that could be contaminated by the snow and ice accumulated on GPS antennas during cold seasons, (2) establishing a precise local reference frame and assessing its accuracy, and (3) excluding local seasonal ground motions from GPS-derived landslide displacements. The methods introduced in this study will be useful for GPS landslide monitoring in other tectonically active and/or cold regions.

  14. Efficacy of a real time optoelectronic device (TruScreen™) in detecting cervical intraepithelial pathologies: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Özgü, Emre; Yıldız, Yunus; Özgü, Burçin Salman; Öz, Murat; Danışman, Nuri; Güngör, Tayfun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of TruScreen™ (an objective optoelectronic cervical screening device) in improving the sensitivity of cervical screening programs either alone or in combination with Papanicolaou (PAP) smear or human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA screening. Material and Methods Our study was performed in 285 patients with abnormal Pap test results. TruScreen™ and HPV screening methods were performed in all participants. Consistency and differences between the tests were compared with cervical biopsy results. Results TruScreen™ was found to be an approach method in the determination of cervical pathologies (ROC curve area underlined=0.606) and with an 89.5% negative predictive value. HPV screening remains a counterpart to TruScreen™ with a 0.620 area underlined in the ROC curve and an 83% negative predictive value. Conclusion As determined in our study, TruScreen™ with a sensitivity of 86.1% can be used as a screening test with instant and not professional dependent results for cervical cancer screening. Avoiding from subjectivity in interpretation of Pap smears and requirement for pathologists, TruScreen™ can be a used for cervical cancer screening especially in countries with a low socio-economic status. The combination of TruScreen™ and HPV screening was not able to demonstrate a significant rise of effectiveness in screening. PMID:25788849

  15. The Impact of Heatwaves on Community Morbidity and Healthcare Usage: A Retrospective Observational Study Using Real-Time Syndromic Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sue; Elliot, Alex J.; Hajat, Shakoor; Bone, Angie; Bates, Chris; Smith, Gillian E.; Kovats, Sari

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the impact of a moderate heatwave on a range of presenting morbidities in England. Asthma, difficulty breathing, cerebrovascular accident, and cardiovascular symptoms were analysed using general practitioner in hours (GPIH), out of hours (GPOOH) and emergency department (ED) syndromic surveillance systems. Data were stratified by age group and compared between a heatwave year (2013) and non-heatwave years (2012, 2014). Incidence rate ratios were calculated to estimate the differential impact of heatwave compared to non-heatwave summers: there were no apparent differences for the morbidities tested between the 2013 heatwave and non-heatwave years. A subset of GPIH data were used to study individuals at higher risk from heatwaves based on their pre-existing disease. Higher risk patients were not more likely to present at GPs or ED than other individuals. Comparing GPIH consultations and ED attendances for myocardial infarction/ischaemia (MI), there was evidence of a fall in the presentation of MI during the heatwave, which was particularly noted in the 65–74 years age group (and over 75 years in ED attendances). These results indicate the difficulty in identifying individuals at risk from non-fatal health effects of heatwaves and hot weather. PMID:26784214

  16. The Impact of Heatwaves on Community Morbidity and Healthcare Usage: A Retrospective Observational Study Using Real-Time Syndromic Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sue; Elliot, Alex J; Hajat, Shakoor; Bone, Angie; Bates, Chris; Smith, Gillian E; Kovats, Sari

    2016-01-16

    We investigated the impact of a moderate heatwave on a range of presenting morbidities in England. Asthma, difficulty breathing, cerebrovascular accident, and cardiovascular symptoms were analysed using general practitioner in hours (GPIH), out of hours (GPOOH) and emergency department (ED) syndromic surveillance systems. Data were stratified by age group and compared between a heatwave year (2013) and non-heatwave years (2012, 2014). Incidence rate ratios were calculated to estimate the differential impact of heatwave compared to non-heatwave summers: there were no apparent differences for the morbidities tested between the 2013 heatwave and non-heatwave years. A subset of GPIH data were used to study individuals at higher risk from heatwaves based on their pre-existing disease. Higher risk patients were not more likely to present at GPs or ED than other individuals. Comparing GPIH consultations and ED attendances for myocardial infarction/ischaemia (MI), there was evidence of a fall in the presentation of MI during the heatwave, which was particularly noted in the 65-74 years age group (and over 75 years in ED attendances). These results indicate the difficulty in identifying individuals at risk from non-fatal health effects of heatwaves and hot weather.

  17. Stratospheric Transport Times From Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoor, P. M.; Lelieveld, J.; Boenisch, H.; Joeckel, P.; Steil, B.; Bruehl, C.; Strahan, S.

    2007-12-01

    Transport time scales in the stratosphere are crucial to understand and calculate the effects of chemical active species on stratospheric chemistry. In general CO2 or SF6 have been used to calculate mean ages of air in the stratosphere, whereas shorter lived trace gases like CO are used to investigate cross tropopause transport and mixing on short time-scales close to the tropopause. Besides mean ages and their assocated mean trace gas mixing ratios at a given point in the atmosphere other quantities of the trace gas distributions can be used to constrain stratospheric transport times, such as variability and slope. In particular the younger part of the age spectrum needs to be constrained since it determines the extent to which shorter lived compounds can be transported into the stratosphere. We investigate transport times in the stratosphere based on observations of CO, N2O and CO2 and test a new approach to deduce transport times. For that purpose we compare observations from the ER-2 and other platforms. The approach is applied to global models (ECHAM5/MESSy, Combo GMI) to identify barriers as well as regions of rapid mixing and transport.

  18. Direct observation of time reversal violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, J.

    2013-06-01

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of "in" and "out" states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

  19. Direct Observation of Thermal Equilibrium of Excited Triplet States of 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone. A Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Venkatraman Ravi; Rajkumar, Nagappan; Ariese, Freek; Umapathy, Siva

    2015-10-08

    The photochemistry of aromatic ketones plays a key role in various physicochemical and biological processes, and solvent polarity can be used to tune their triplet state properties. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the conformational structure and the solvent polarity induced energy level reordering of the two lowest triplet states of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) was carried out using nanosecond-time-resolved absorption (ns-TRA), time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopy, and time dependent-density functional theory (TD-DFT) studies. The ns-TRA of PQ in acetonitrile displays two bands in the visible range, and these two bands decay with similar lifetime at least at longer time scales (μs). Interestingly, TR(3) spectra of these two bands indicate that the kinetics are different at shorter time scales (ns), while at longer time scales they followed the kinetics of ns-TRA spectra. Therefore, we report a real-time observation of the thermal equilibrium between the two lowest triplet excited states of PQ, assigned to nπ* and ππ* of which the ππ* triplet state is formed first through intersystem crossing. Despite the fact that these two states are energetically close and have a similar conformational structure supported by TD-DFT studies, the slow internal conversion (∼2 ns) between the T(2)(1(3)nπ*) and T(1)(1(3)ππ*) triplet states indicates a barrier. Insights from the singlet excited states of PQ in protic solvents [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 142 , 24305 ] suggest that the lowest nπ* and ππ* triplet states should undergo hydrogen bond weakening and strengthening, respectively, relative to the ground state, and these mechanisms are substantiated by TD-DFT calculations. We also hypothesize that the different hydrogen bonding mechanisms exhibited by the two lowest singlet and triplet excited states of PQ could influence its ISC mechanism.

  20. Seismic Travel Time Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report consists of an introduction in which is given a list of published papers on the travel times of body waves together with brief comments on...velocity distribution in the outer core have been based on the travel times of SKS. However, SKS arrivals can only be observed satisfactorily for arc

  1. A Real-World Observational Study of Time to Treatment Intensification Among Elderly Patients with Inadequately Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ajmera, Mayank; Raval, Amit; Zhou, Steve; Wei, Wenhui; Bhattacharya, Rituparna; Pan, Chunshen; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Among elderly patients, the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is complicated by population heterogeneity and elderly-specific complexities. Few studies have been done to understand treatment intensification among elderly patients failing multiple oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs). OBJECTIVE To examine the association between time to treatment intensification of T2DM and elderly-specific patient complexities. METHODS In this observational, retrospective cohort study, elderly (aged ≥ 65 years) Medicare beneficiaries (n = 16,653) with inadequately controlled T2DM (hemoglobin A1c ≥ 8.0% despite 2 OADs) were included. Based on the consensus statement for diabetes care in elderly patients published by the American Diabetes Association and the American Geriatric Society, elderly-specific patient complexities were defined as the presence or absence of 5 geriatric syndromes: cognitive impairment; depression; falls and fall risk; polypharmacy; and urinary incontinence. RESULTS Overall, 48.7% of patients received intensified treatment during follow-up, with median time to intensification 18.5 months (95% CI = 17.7–19.3). Median time to treatment intensification was shorter for elderly patients with T2DM with polypharmacy (16.5 months) and falls and fall risk (12.7 months) versus those without polypharmacy (20.4 months) and no fall risk (18.6 months). Elderly patients with urinary incontinence had a longer median time to treatment intensification (18.6 months) versus those without urinary incontinence (14.6 months). The median time to treatment intensification did not significantly differ by the elderly-specific patient complexities that included cognitive impairment and depression. However, after adjusting for demographic, insurance, clinical characteristics, and health care utilization, we found that only polypharmacy was associated with time to treatment intensification (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.10; 95% CI = 1.04–1.15; P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS

  2. Obtaining a male circumcision prevalence rate of 80% among adults in a short time: An observational prospective intervention study in the Orange Farm township of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Esaie; Rain-Taljaard, Reathe; Tsepe, Motlalepule; Monkwe, Cornelius; Taljaard, Dirk; Hlatswayo, Florence; Xaba, Dumazile; Molomo, Tebogo; Lissouba, Pascale; Puren, Adrian; Auvert, Bertran

    2017-01-01

    World Health Organization recommends a target for the male circumcision prevalence rate of 80%. This rate will have a substantial impact on the human immunodeficiency virus-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic in Eastern and Southern Africa. The objective of the study was to assess whether an innovative intervention can lead to an increased voluntary male medical circumcision (VMMC) uptake among adults in a short time. This prospective observational study of a demand generation intervention was conducted in the township of Orange Farm (South Africa) in August to November 2015. In this community male circumcision prevalence rate among adults was stable between 2010 and 2015 at 55% and 57%, despite regular VMMC campaigns at community level and the presence of a VMMC clinic that offered free VMMC. The intervention took place in a random sample of 981 households where 522 men aged 18 to 49 years accepted to participate in the study. Among the 226 uncircumcised men, 212 accepted to be enrolled in the intervention study. A personal male circumcision adviser trained in interpersonal communication skills was assigned to each uncircumcised participant. The male circumcision advisers were trained to explain the risks and benefits of VMMC, and to discuss 24 possible reasons given by men for not being circumcised. Participants were then followed for 9 weeks. Each participant had a maximum of 3 motivational interviews at home. Participants who decided to be circumcised received financial compensation for their time equivalent to 2.5 days of work at the minimum South African salary rate. Among the 212 uncircumcised men enrolled in the intervention, 69.8% (148/212; 95% confidence interval [CI]; 63.4%-75.7%) agreed to be circumcised, which defines the uptake of the intervention. The male circumcision prevalence rate of the sample increased from 56.7% (296/522) to 81.4% (425/522; 77.9%-84.6%), P < 0.001, corresponding to a relative increase of 43.6% (95% CI: 35

  3. Classical method of coherence estimation based on mutual wavelet-spectra of time variations of studied processes observed in the Earth atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrutdinova, Antonina; Rizhov, Dmitriy; Magdeev, Konstantin

    In the present article the authors offer to conduct a research into influence exerted by solar effects (Wolf number) on time variations of average monthly values of the zonal wind, obtained in Kazan Federal University with the help of a meteoric radar complex KGU-M5 within the mesosphere - lower thermosphere during the period from 1978 to 2007. There exists a wide variety of signal processing methods that can be used to identify connection between two processes. A classical method of coherence calculation based on a mutual wavelet-spectrum has become widely used. Due to limited duration of the studied time series of dynamic parameters we have found coherent structures of time variations in solar activity (Wolf number) and zonal wind within the mesosphere-lower thermosphere for the scales of about 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, and 4-5 years. SCM values have been calculated for the most pronounced periodicities observed for scales of about 3 years during the period from 1986 to 1997. The average SCM value was equal to 0.75. Confidence interval of obtained SCM values was in the range of [0.54, 0.88] for the significance level As the atmosphere is a non-linear medium, this can lead to shifting and broadening of spectral components. In addition to the above mentioned periodicities (0.5 - 5 years), a wavelet spectrum calculated in the zonal wind field indicates possible presence of time periodicities in the range of 11-20 years.

  4. Effect of reconstruction methods and x-ray tube current–time product on nodule detection in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom: A crossed-modality JAFROC observer study

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J. D.; Chakraborty, D. P.; Szczepura, K.; Tootell, A. K.; Vamvakas, I.; Manning, D. J.; Hogg, P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate nodule detection in an anthropomorphic chest phantom in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) and filtered back projection (FBP) over a range of tube current–time product (mAs). Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study: (i) an anthropomorphic chest phantom was loaded with spherical simulated nodules of 5, 8, 10, and 12 mm in diameter and +100, −630, and −800 Hounsfield units electron density; this would generate CT images for the observer study; (ii) a whole-body dosimetry verification phantom was used to ultimately estimate effective dose and risk according to the model of the BEIR VII committee. Both phantoms were scanned over a mAs range (10, 20, 30, and 40), while all other acquisition parameters remained constant. Images were reconstructed with both AIDR3D and FBP. For the observer study, 34 normal cases (no nodules) and 34 abnormal cases (containing 1–3 nodules, mean 1.35 ± 0.54) were chosen. Eleven observers evaluated images from all mAs and reconstruction methods under the free-response paradigm. A crossed-modality jackknife alternative free-response operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis method was developed for data analysis, averaging data over the two factors influencing nodule detection in this study: mAs and image reconstruction (AIDR3D or FBP). A Bonferroni correction was applied and the threshold for declaring significance was set at 0.025 to maintain the overall probability of Type I error at α = 0.05. Contrast-to-noise (CNR) was also measured for all nodules and evaluated by a linear least squares analysis. Results: For random-reader fixed-case crossed-modality JAFROC analysis, there was no significant difference in nodule detection between AIDR3D and FBP when data were averaged over mAs [F(1, 10) = 0.08, p = 0.789]. However, when data were averaged over reconstruction methods, a significant difference was seen between multiple pairs of mAs settings

  5. Distracted Biking: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Elizabeth Suzanne; Arabian, Sandra Strack; Breeze, Janis L; Salzler, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Commuting via bicycle is a very popular mode of transportation in the Northeastern United States (US). Boston, MA has seen a rapid increase in bicycle ridership over the past decade which has raised concerns and awareness about bicycle safety. An emerging topic in this field is distracted bicycle riding. This study was conducted to provide descriptive data on the prevalence and type of distracted bicycling in Boston at different times of day. This was a cross-sectional study in which observers tallied bicyclists at four high traffic intersections in Boston during various peak commuting hours for two types of distractions: auditory (ear buds/phones in or on ears), and visual/tactile (electronic device or other object in hand). Nineteen hundred seventy-four bicyclists were observed and 615 (31.2%, 95% CI: 29%-33%) were distracted. Of those observed, auditory distractions were the most common (N= 349 [17.7%, 95% CI: 16%-19%], p=0.0003) followed by visual/tactile distractions (N= 266 [13.5%, 95% CI: 12%-15%]). The highest proportion (40.7%, 95% CI: 35%-46%) of distracted bicyclists was observed during the midday commute (between 13:30-15:00). Distracted bicycling is a prevalent safety concern in the city of Boston, as almost one-third of all bicyclists exhibited distracted behavior. Education and public awareness campaigns should be designed to decrease distracted bicycling behaviors and promote bicycle safety in Boston. An awareness of the prevalence of distracted biking can be utilized to promote bicycle safety campaigns dedicated to decreasing distracted bicycling and to provide a baseline against which improvements can be measured. PMID:26953533

  6. Observational Timing Study on the SAT Reasoning Test™ for Test-Takers with Learning Disabilities and/or AD/HD. Research Report No. 2006-4. ETS RR-06-23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahalan-Laitusis, Cara; King, Teresa C.; Cline, Frederick; Bridgeman, Brent

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide information on actual time used by students with disabilities on the new SAT®. This study observed students with learning disabilities (LD) and/or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) as they took SAT items under strict time limits and recorded the amount of time taken for each item. The study is…

  7. Direct Observation of Academic Learning Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Rich

    1987-01-01

    Classroom variables associated with academic learning time (ALT)--instructional time, on-task behavior, and student success rate--are positively related to student achievement. Guidelines and forms are provided for teachers and supervisors to gather objective and usable information on these ALT components through direct classroom observation…

  8. Dose–response association of screen time-based sedentary behaviour in children and adolescents and depression: a meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingli; Wu, Lang; Yao, Shuqiao

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression represents a growing public health burden. Understanding how screen time (ST) in juveniles may be associated with risk of depression is critical for the development of prevention and intervention strategies. Findings from studies addressing this question thus far have been inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of data related to this question. Methods The meta-analysis was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA guideline. We searched the electronic databases of PubMed, Web of Science and EBSCO systematically (up to 6 May 2015). OR was adopted as the pooled measurement of association between ST and depression risk. Dose–response was estimated by a generalised least squares trend estimation. Results Twelve cross-sectional studies and four longitudinal studies (including 1 cohort study) involving a total of 127 714 participants were included. Overall, higher ST in preadolescent children and adolescents was significantly associated with a higher risk of depression (OR=1.12; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.22). Screen type, age, population and reference category acted as significant moderators. Compared with the reference group who had no ST, there was a non-linear dose–response association of ST with a decreasing risk of depression at ST<2 h/day, with the lowest risk being observed for 1 h/day (OR=0.88; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Conclusions Our meta-analysis suggests that ST in children and adolescents is associated with depression risk in a non-linear dose–response manner. PMID:26552416

  9. Explanation and observability of diffraction in time

    SciTech Connect

    Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Munoz, J.; Ban, Yue

    2011-04-15

    Diffraction in time (DIT) is a fundamental phenomenon in quantum dynamics due to time-dependent obstacles and slits. It is formally analogous to diffraction of light, and is expected to play an increasing role in the design of coherent matter wave sources, as in the atom laser, to analyze time-of-flight information and emission from ultrafast pulsed excitations, and in applications of coherent matter waves in integrated atom-optical circuits. We demonstrate that DIT emerges robustly in quantum waves emitted by an exponentially decaying source and provide a simple explanation of the phenomenon, as an interference of two characteristic velocities. This allows for its controllability and optimization.

  10. The Observational Learning of a Timing Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Anne Marie; And Others

    Current social learning theory proposes that motor skill information which is acquired by means of observational strategies is stored cognitively in the form of a conceptual representation. The latter is then said to be used as a basis for response production and as a standard for response corrections which occur as a function of performance…

  11. Emergency room visits for respiratory conditions in children increased after Guagua Pichincha volcanic eruptions in April 2000 in Quito, Ecuador Observational Study: Time Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Naumova, Elena N; Yepes, Hugo; Griffiths, Jeffrey K; Sempértegui, Fernando; Khurana, Gauri; Jagai, Jyotsna S; Játiva, Edgar; Estrella, Bertha

    2007-01-01

    Background This study documented elevated rates of emergency room (ER) visits for acute upper and lower respiratory infections and asthma-related conditions in the children of Quito, Ecuador associated with the eruption of Guagua Pichincha in April of 2000. Methods We abstracted 5169 (43% females) ER records with primary respiratory conditions treated from January 1 – December 27, 2000 and examined the change in pediatric ER visits for respiratory conditions before, during, and after exposure events of April, 2000. We applied a Poisson regression model adapted to time series of cases for three non-overlapping disease categories: acute upper respiratory infection (AURI), acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI), and asthma-related conditions in boys and girls for three age groups: 0–4, 5–9, and 10–15 years. Results At the main pediatric medical facility, the Baca Ortiz Pediatric Hospital, the rate of emergency room (ER) visits due to respiratory conditions substantially increased in the three weeks after eruption (RR = 2.22, 95%CI = [1.95, 2.52] and RR = 1.72 95%CI = [1.49, 1.97] for lower and upper respiratory tract infections respectively. The largest impact of eruptions on respiratory distress was observed in children younger than 5 years (RR = 2.21, 95%CI = [1.79, 2.73] and RR = 2.16 95%CI = [1.67, 2.76] in boys and girls respectively). The rate of asthma and asthma-related diagnosis doubled during the period of volcano fumarolic activity (RR = 1.97, 95%CI = [1.19, 3.24]). Overall, 28 days of volcanic activity and ash releases resulted in 345 (95%CI = [241, 460]) additional ER visits due to respiratory conditions. Conclusion The study has demonstrated strong relationship between ash exposure and respiratory effects in children. PMID:17650330

  12. Prevalence of preoperative anaemia in patients having first-time cardiac surgery and its impact on clinical outcome. A retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Kim, C J; Connell, H; McGeorge, A D; Hu, R

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of anaemia is increasing globally. It has a close association with perioperative blood transfusion which, in turn, results in an increased risk of postoperative complications. Undesirable effects are not only limited to short-term, but also have long-term implications. Despite this, many patients undergo cardiac surgery with undiagnosed and untreated anaemia. We designed a retrospective, observational study to estimate the prevalence of anaemia in patients having cardiac surgery in Auckland District Health Board, blood transfusion rates and associated clinical outcome. Two hundred of seven hundred and twelve (28.1%) patients were anaemic. Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion rates were significantly higher in the anaemic group compared to the non-anaemic group (160 (80%) vs. 192 (38%), p-value <0.0001, RR (CI 95%) 2.133 (1.870-2.433)). Transfusion rates for fresh frozen plasma (FFP), cryoprecipitate and platelets were also higher in the anaemic group. Anaemia was significantly associated with the development of new infection (14 (7%) vs. 15 (2.9%), p-value 0.0193, RR (CI 95%) 2.389 (1.175-4.859)), prolonged ventilation time (47.01 hours vs. 23.59 hours, p-value 0.0076) and prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay (80.23 hours vs. 50.27, p-value 0.0011). Preoperative anaemia is highly prevalent and showed a clear link with significantly higher transfusion rates and postoperative morbidity. It is vital that a preoperative management plan for the correction of anaemia should be sought to improve patient safety and outcome.

  13. Summary of Sonic Boom Rise Times Observed During FAA Community Response Studies over a 6-Month Period in the Oklahoma City Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maglieri, Domenic J.; Sothcott, Victor E.

    1990-01-01

    The sonic boom signature data acquired from about 1225 supersonic flights, over a 6-month period in 1964 in the Oklahoma City area, was enhanced with the addition of data relating to rise times and total signature duration. These later parameters, not available at the time of publication of the original report on the Oklahoma City sonic boom exposures, are listed in tabular form along with overpressure, positive impulse, positive duration, and waveform category. Airplane operating information along with the surface weather observations are also included. Sonic boom rise times include readings to the 1/2, 3/4, and maximum overpressure values. Rise time relative probabilities for various lateral locations from the ground track of 0, 5, and 10 miles are presented along with the variation of rise times with flight altitude. The tabulated signature data, along with corresponding airplane operating conditions and surface and upper level atmospheric information, are also available on electronic files to provide it in the format for more efficient and effective utilization.

  14. Do celebrity endorsements matter? Observational study of BRCA gene testing and mastectomy rates after Angelina Jolie’s New York Times editorial

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect on BRCA testing and mastectomy rates of a widely viewed 2013 New York Times editorial by public figure Angelina Jolie that endorsed BRCA testing and announced Jolie’s decision to undergo preventive mastectomy. Design Observational study with difference-in-difference analysis. Setting Commercially insured US population. Participants Women aged 18-64 years with claims in the Truven MarketScan commercial claims database (n=9 532 836). Main outcome measures Changes in BRCA testing rates in the 15 business days before versus after 14 May 2013 (editorial date) compared with the change in the same period in 2012; mastectomy rates in the months before and after publication, both overall and within 60 days of BRCA testing among women who were tested; national estimates of incremental tests and expenditures associated with Jolie’s article in the 15 days after publication. Results Daily BRCA test rates increased immediately after the 2013 editorial, from 0.71 tests/100 000 women in the 15 business days before to 1.13 tests/100 000 women in the 15 business days after publication. In comparison, daily test rates were similar in the same period in 2012 (0.58/100 000 women in the 15 business days before 14 May versus 0.55/100 000 women in the 15 business days after), implying a difference-in-difference absolute daily increase of 0.45 tests/100 000 women or a 64% relative increase (P<0.001). The editorial was associated with an estimated increase of 4500 BRCA tests and $13.5m (£10.8m; €12.8) expenditure nationally among commercially insured adult women in those 15 days. Increased BRCA testing rates were sustained throughout 2013. Overall mastectomy rates remained unchanged in the months after publication, but 60 day mastectomy rates among women who had a BRCA test fell from 10% in the months before publication to 7% in the months after publication, suggesting that women who underwent tests as a result of to the editorial

  15. Cost-effectiveness of blood culture and a multiplex real-time PCR in hematological patients with suspected sepsis: an observational propensity score-matched study.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Nicasio; Sambri, Vittorio; Corti, Consuelo; Ghidoli, Nadia; Tolomelli, Giulia; Paolucci, Michela; Clerici, Daniela; Carletti, Silvia; Greco, Raffaella; Tassara, Michela; Pizzorno, Beatrice; Zaniolo, Orietta; Povero, Massimiliano; Pradelli, Lorenzo; Burioni, Roberto; Stanzani, Marta; Landini, Maria Paola; Ciceri, Fabio; Clementi, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the costs and clinical outcomes of episodes of suspected sepsis in hematological patients. A propensity score-matched study was planned, comparing a retrospective cohort managed with standard assays and a prospective cohort managed with the addition of a molecular assay. Diagnostic procedures and therapy were considered as costs variables. The primary clinical endpoint was sepsis-related mortality, whereas the length of each suspected sepsis episode was investigated as a secondary endpoint. A total of 137 and 138 episodes in the prospective and the retrospective cohorts were studied, respectively; 101 pairs of highly matched episodes were analyzed, evidencing a trend of higher mortality in the retrospective cohort. No difference in length of suspected sepsis episode was observed. Significant savings were observed in the prospective cohort, especially due to reduced costs in antifungal therapy. The apparently more expensive molecular assay favored a more rational use of economic resources without influencing, and probably improving, the clinical outcome.

  16. The role of sleep timing in children's observational learning.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwijk, Frank J; Benjamins, Jeroen S; Migliorati, Filippo; de Nooijer, Jacqueline A; van Someren, Eus J W; van Gog, Tamara; van der Werf, Ysbrand D

    2015-11-01

    Acquisition of information can be facilitated through different learning strategies, classically associated with either declarative or procedural memory modalities. The consolidation of the acquired information has been positively associated with sleep. In addition, subsequent performance was better when acquisition was quickly followed by sleep, rather than daytime wakefulness. Prior studies with adults have indicated the viability of the alternative learning strategy of observational learning for motor skill acquisition, as well as the importance of sleep and sleep timing. However, relatively little research has been dedicated to studying the importance of sleep for the consolidation of procedural memory in children. Therefore, this study investigated whether children could encode procedural information through observational learning, and whether sleep timing could affect subsequent consolidation and performance. School-aged children aged 9-12years (N=86, 43% male, Mage=10.64years, SD=.85) were trained on a procedural fingertapping task through observation, either in the morning or evening; creating immediate wake and immediate sleep groups, respectively. Performance was evaluated the subsequent evening or morning on either a congruent or incongruent task version. Observation and task execution was conducted using an online interface, allowing for remote participation. Performance of the immediate wake group was lower for a congruent version, expressed by a higher error rate, opposed to an incongruent version; an effect not observed in the immediate sleep group. This finding showed that observational learning did not improve performance in children. Yet, immediate sleep prevented performance reduction on the previously observed task. These results support a benefit of sleep in observational learning in children, but in a way different from that seen in adults, where sleep enhanced performance after learning by observation.

  17. QUADRENNIAL MCNP TIMING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    E. C. SELCOW; B. D. LANSRUD

    2000-09-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, is widely used around the world for many radiation protection and shielding applications. As a well-known standard it is also an excellent vehicle for assessing the relative performance of scientific computing platforms. Every three-to-four years a new version of MCNP is released internationally by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For each of the past few releases, we have also done a timing study to assess the progress of scientific computing platforms and software. These quadrennial timing studies are valuable to the radiation protection and shielding community because (a) they are performed by a recognized scientific team, not a computer vendor, (b) they use an internationally recognized code for radiation protection and shielding calculations, (c) they are eminently reproducible since the code and the test problems are internationally distributed. Further, if one has a computer platform, operating system, or compiler not presented in our results, its performance is directly comparable to the ones we report because it can use the same code, data, and test problems as we used. Our results, using a single processor per platform, indicate that hardware advances during the past three years have improved performance by less than a factor of two and software improvements have had a marginal effect on performance. The most significant impacts on performance have resulted from developments in multiprocessing and multitasking. The other most significant advance in the last three years has been the accelerated improvements in personal computers. In the last timing study, the tested personal computer was approximately a factor of four slower that the fastest machine tested, a DEC Alphastation 500. In the present study, the fastest PC tested was less than a factor of two slower than the fastest platform, which is a Compaq

  18. Transiting Primary Eclipse Photometric Follow-up Observations and Transit Timing Variations Studies of WASP-43 b and TrES-3 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Ji, J. H.; Dong, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Two photometric follow-up observations for transiting primary eclipse of WASP-43 b and four for TrES-3 b are performed using the Xuyi Near-Earth Object Survey Telescope. After differential photometry and light curve analysis, physical parameters of the two systems are obtained and are in good match with the literatures. Combining with transit data from many literatures, the residuals (O-C) of observations of both systems transits are fitted with the linear and quadratic terms. With the linear fitting, the periods and transit timing variations (TTVs) of the planets are obtained, and no obvious periodic TTV signal is found in either system after analysis. The maximum mass of perturbing planet located at 1:2 mean motion resonance (MMR) of WASP-43 b and TrES-3 b are estimated to be 1.826 and 1.504 Earth mass, respectively. By quadratic fitting, it is confirmed that WASP-43 b may have long-term TTV which means an orbital decay. The decay rate is shown to be dot{P} =(-0.005248 ± 0.001714) s\\cdotyr^{-1}, and is compared with the previous results. Based on this, the lower limit of the stellar tidal quality parameter of WASP-43 is calculated to be Q'_{*} ≥ 1.5×10^5, and the remaining lifetime of the planets of both systems is presented for different Q'_{*} values accordingly.

  19. The Effect of Handwashing at Recommended Times with Water Alone and With Soap on Child Diarrhea in Rural Bangladesh: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Luby, Stephen P.; Halder, Amal K.; Huda, Tarique; Unicomb, Leanne; Johnston, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Standard public health interventions to improve hand hygiene in communities with high levels of child mortality encourage community residents to wash their hands with soap at five separate key times, a recommendation that would require mothers living in impoverished households to typically wash hands with soap more than ten times per day. We analyzed data from households that received no intervention in a large prospective project evaluation to assess the relationship between observed handwashing behavior and subsequent diarrhea. Methods and Findings Fieldworkers conducted a 5-hour structured observation and a cross-sectional survey in 347 households from 50 villages across rural Bangladesh in 2007. For the subsequent 2 years, a trained community resident visited each of the enrolled households every month and collected information on the occurrence of diarrhea in the preceding 48 hours among household residents under the age of 5 years. Compared with children living in households where persons prepared food without washing their hands, children living in households where the food preparer washed at least one hand with water only (odds ratio [OR] = 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.57–1.05), washed both hands with water only (OR = 0.67; 95% CI = 0.51–0.89), or washed at least one hand with soap (OR = 0.30; 95% CI = 0.19–0.47) had less diarrhea. In households where residents washed at least one hand with soap after defecation, children had less diarrhea (OR = 0.45; 95% CI = 0.26–0.77). There was no significant association between handwashing with or without soap before feeding a child, before eating, or after cleaning a child's anus who defecated and subsequent child diarrhea. Conclusions These observations suggest that handwashing before preparing food is a particularly important opportunity to prevent childhood diarrhea, and that handwashing with water alone can significantly reduce childhood diarrhea. Please

  20. The influence of time from injury to surgery on motor recovery and length of hospital stay in acute traumatic spinal cord injury: an observational Canadian cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Marcel F; Noonan, Vanessa K; Fallah, Nader; Fisher, Charles G; Finkelstein, Joel; Kwon, Brian K; Rivers, Carly S; Ahn, Henry; Paquet, Jérôme; Tsai, Eve C; Townson, Andrea; Attabib, Najmedden; Bailey, Christopher S; Christie, Sean D; Drew, Brian; Fourney, Daryl R; Fox, Richard; Hurlbert, R John; Johnson, Michael G; Linassi, A G; Parent, Stefan; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    To determine the influence of time from injury to surgery on neurological recovery and length of stay (LOS) in an observational cohort of individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI), we analyzed the baseline and follow-up motor scores of participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry to specifically assess the effect of an early (less than 24 h from injury) surgical procedure on motor recovery and on LOS. One thousand four hundred and ten patients who sustained acute tSCIs with baseline American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grades A, B, C, or D and were treated surgically were analyzed to determine the effect of the timing of surgery (24, 48, or 72 h from injury) on motor recovery and LOS. Depending on the distribution of data, we used different types of generalized linear models, including multiple linear regression, gamma regression, and negative binomial regression. Persons with incomplete AIS B, C, and D injuries from C2 to L2 demonstrated motor recovery improvement of an additional 6.3 motor points (SE=2.8 p<0.03) when they underwent surgical treatment within 24 h from the time of injury, compared with those who had surgery later than 24 h post-injury. This beneficial effect of early surgery on motor recovery was not seen in the patients with AIS A complete SCI. AIS A and B patients who received early surgery experienced shorter hospital LOS. While the issues of when to perform surgery and what specific operation to perform remain controversial, this work provides evidence that for an incomplete acute tSCI in the cervical, thoracic, or thoracolumbar spine, surgery performed within 24 h from injury improves motor neurological recovery. Early surgery also reduces LOS.

  1. Phase Behavior and Implications for Travel time Observables (PHASE 2)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    perturbation behavior of travel time observables due to sound -speed perturbations. OBJECTIVES The objective is to study the behavior of the wave-theoretic...location, as well as on the sound -speed distribution ( )c x , where x is the spatial variable. Thus, perturbations ( )c x give rise to perturbations in...arrival pattern, where the index spans the arrival peaks. As the sound speed changes the peaks of the arrival pattern are deformed and displaced

  2. Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing time tracking and efficiency measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Richard G. Kron; William N. Boroski

    2002-10-16

    Accurate and consistent time tracking is essential for evaluating the efficiency of survey observing operations and identifying areas that need improvement. Off the shelf time tracking software, which requires users to enter activities by hand, proved tedious to use and insufficiently exible. In this paper, we present an alternate time tracking system developed specifically for Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing. This system uses an existing logging system, murmur, to log the beginning and ending times of tracked circumstances, including activities, weather, and problems which effect observing. Operations software automatically generates most entries for routine observing activities; in a night of routine observing, time tracking requires little or no attention from the observing staff. A graphical user interface allows observers to make entries marking time lost to weather and equipment, and to correct inaccurate entries made by the observing software. The last is necessary when the change in activity is not marked by a change in the state of the software or instruments, or when the time is used for engineering or other observing not part of routine survey data collection. A second utility generates reports of time usage from these logs. These reports include totals for the time spent for each observing task, time lost to weather and problems, efficiency statistics for comparison with the survey baseline, and a detailed listing of what activities and problems were present in any covered time period.

  3. Observational Study of Travelers' Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Meuris

    1995-03-01

    Background: European air travelers returning from Algeria, Egypt, Mexico, Morocco, and Tunisia were interviewed about their experience of travelers' diseases upon arrival in Brussels. Diarrhea was mentioned by 37% of the adults and 27% of the children. These subjects were questioned about the types of measures taken, type and duration of drug treatment (if any), and about duration of diarrhea and side effects experienced. Methods: Final analysis was performed based on 2160 interviews. The largest proportion of diarrhea was reported in the age group 15-24 years (46%). Results: The majority of the 2160 subjects had opted for drug treatment (81%): 927 subjects for loperamide alone, 235 for loperamide in combination with nifuroxazide, and 178 for nifuroxazide alone. Other drugs had been used less frequently. The median time to recovery was 2.4 days with loperamide compared to 3.2 days with nifuroxazide and to 3.4 days for the no-treatment group. Conclusions: A stratification of the results by severity of the diarrhea suggests a rank of antidiarrheal potency as follows: loperamide > nifuroxazide > no-drug treatment. The side effect with the highest incidence was constipation (2.4% with loperamide). (J Travel Med 2:11-15, 1995) Travelers' diarrhea is usually defined as the passage of at least three unformed stools per day or any number of such stools when accompanied by fever, abdominal cramping, or vomiting. The definition may be broadened to include more trivial bowel disturbance.1,2 The duration of this self-limited disease generally is 3 to 5 days. Medical intervention aims at shortening the duration of disease, thus allowing the sufferer to resume his or her usual activities at an early stage. A shortened period of recovery to physical well-being has obvious favorable economic implications if the traveler is on business and may help the maintenance of a desired level of quality of life while a traveler is on holiday. An observational study of various medical

  4. PM(2.5) Characterization for Time Series Studies: Organic Molecular Marker Speciation Methods and Observations from Daily Measurements in Denver.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Steven J; Williams, Daniel E; Garcia, Jessica K; Vedal, Sverre; Hannigan, Michael P

    2009-04-01

    Particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM(2.5)) has been shown to have a wide range of adverse health effects and consequently is regulated in accordance with the US-EPA's National Ambient Air Quality Standards. PM(2.5) originates from multiple primary sources and is also formed through secondary processes in the atmosphere. It is plausible that some sources form PM(2.5) that is more toxic than PM(2.5) from other sources. Identifying the responsible sources could provide insight into the biological mechanisms causing the observed health effects and provide a more efficient approach to regulation. This is the goal of the Denver Aerosol Sources and Health (DASH) study, a multi-year PM(2.5) source apportionment and health study.The first step in apportioning the PM(2.5) to different sources is to determine the chemical make-up of the PM(2.5). This paper presents the methodology used during the DASH study for organic speciation of PM(2.5). Specifically, methods are covered for solvent extraction of non-polar and semi-polar organic molecular markers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Vast reductions in detection limits were obtained through the use of a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet along with other method improvements. Results are presented for the first 1.5 years of the DASH study revealing seasonal and source-related patterns in the molecular markers and their long-term correlation structure. Preliminary analysis suggests that point sources are not a significant contributor to the organic molecular markers measured at our receptor site. Several motor vehicle emission markers help identify a gasoline/diesel split in the ambient data. Findings show both similarities and differences when compared with other cities where similar measurements and assessments have been made.

  5. Time to virological failure with atazanavir/ritonavir and lopinavir/ritonavir, with or without an H2-receptor blocker, not significantly different in HIV observational database study.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Philip H; Nassar, Naiel

    2008-08-01

    A retrospective electronic database study was conducted to determine any differences in time to virological failure and percent of virological failure among HIV-infected patients concurrently receiving H2-blockers versus patients not receiving these agents while receiving atazanavir (ATV)/ritonavir (r) or lopinavir (LPV)/r-containing antiretroviral treatment regimens. Data were culled from October 2003 (when ATV became commercially available) through February 2006. Virological failure was defined as (1) two plasma HIV-1 RNA levels >400 copies/mL after at least one HIV-1 RNA level below the level of detection or (2) failure to achieve an HIV-1 RNA <400 copies/mL within 24 weeks. Data from 267 ATV/r-treated patients who met the case definition were compared with data from 670 LPV/r-treated patients. Approximately 10% of the ATV/r group received concurrent H2-blockers when compared with 20% of the LPV/r group. Multivariate analysis showed no statistically significant differences regarding time to virological failure between or among the four subgroups, adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics (P = 0.79, log-rank test). At 750 days following treatment initiation, the proportion of patients not experiencing virological failure was 56% in the ATV/r-blocker subgroup, 48% in the ATV/r-alone subgroup, 45% in the LPV/r-alone subgroup and 42% in the LPV/r-blocker subgroup.

  6. Screening for seemingly healthy newborns with congenital cytomegalovirus infection by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction using newborn urine: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Oh-ishi, Tsutomu; Arai, Takashi; Sakata, Hideaki; Adachi, Nodoka; Asanuma, Satoshi; Oguma, Eiji; Kimoto, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Jiro; Fujita, Hidetoshi; Uesato, Tadashi; Fujita, Jutaro; Shirato, Ken; Ohno, Hideki; Kizaki, Takako

    2017-01-01

    Objective Approximately 8–10% of newborns with asymptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection develop sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). However, the relationship between CMV load, SNHL and central nervous system (CNS) damage in cCMV infection remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the relationship between urinary CMV load, SNHL and CNS damage in newborns with cCMV infection. Study design The study included 23 368 newborns from two maternity hospitals in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. Urine screening for cCMV infection (quantitative real-time PCR) and newborn hearing screening (automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) testing) were conducted within 5 days of birth to examine the incidence of cCMV infection and SNHL, respectively. CNS damage was assessed by MRI of cCMV-infected newborns. Results The incidence of cCMV infection was 60/23 368 (0.257%; 95% CI 0.192% to 0.322%). The geometric mean urinary CMV DNA copy number in newborns with cCMV was 1.79×106 copies/mL (95% CI 7.97×105 to 4.02×106). AABR testing revealed abnormalities in 171 of the 22 229 (0.769%) newborns whose parents approved hearing screening. Of these 171 newborns, 22 had SNHL (12.9%), and 5 of these 22 were infected with cCMV (22.7%). Newborns with both cCMV and SNHL had a higher urinary CMV DNA copy number than newborns with cCMV without SNHL (p=0.036). MRI revealed CNS damage, including white matter abnormalities, in 83.0% of newborns with cCMV. Moreover, newborns with CNS damage had a significantly greater urinary CMV load than newborns without CNS damage (p=0.013). Conclusions We determined the incidence of cCMV infection and urinary CMV DNA copy number in seemingly healthy newborns from two hospitals in Saitama Prefecture. SNHL and CNS damage were associated with urinary CMV DNA copy number. Quantification of urinary CMV load may effectively predict the incidence of late-onset SNHL and neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:28110288

  7. Observational study of terrestrial eigenvibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Roger A.

    1982-03-01

    A comprehensive analysis has been made of analog and digital recordings of eigenvibration ground motion obtained following four great earthquakes; August 1976 (Philippines), August 1977 (Indonesia), September 1979 (West Irian), and December 1979 (Colombia). The time series (ranging in length from ˜28 to ˜140 h) are assumed to be linear combinations of damped harmonics in the presence of noise. Tables are calculated from values of the four parameters: Θ, used in describing eigenvibrations, period of oscillation, amplitude, damping factor Q, and phase together with their statistical uncertainties (53 spheroidal modes, 0S 4to0S 48, and 13 torsional modes, 0T 8to0T 45). The estimation procedures are by the methods of complex demodulation and non-linear regression that specifically incorporate into the basic model the decaying aspect of the oscillations. These methods, extended to simultaneous estimations of groups of modes, help to eliminate measurement error and measurement bias from estimations of Θ. The result is that overtone modes very near in frequency to fundamental modes can, under certain conditions, be resolved through a non-linear regression technique, although parameter uncertainties are underestimated in general. Of the time series analyzed, 17 were from a northern California regional network of ultra-long period seismographs at Berkeley (three components), Jamestown (vertical component), and Whiskeytown (vertical component) following the four listed earthquakes. The other 7 time series were recorded digitally by the worldwide IDA network following the 1977 Indonesian earthquake. Weighted regional and worldwide averages were made for period and Q of each eigenvibration mode. From the theoretical viewpoint, comparisons of measured period, Q, amplitude, and phase for all modes analyzed led to five conclusions. First, there are no detectable systematic shifts in period, Q, or phase of eigenvibrations within a region whose dimensions are less than a

  8. Global normal mode planetary wave activity: a study using TIMED/SABER observations from the stratosphere to the mesosphere-lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Sherine Rachel; Kumar, Karanam Kishore

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive study of three normal mode travelling planetary waves, namely the quasi-16, -10 and -5 day waves, is carried out globally using 5 years (2003-2007) of TIMED/SABER temperature measurements from the stratosphere to the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) by employing the two dimensional Fourier decomposition technique. From preliminary analysis, it is found that significant amplitudes of normal modes are confined to wave numbers-2 (westward propagating modes) to 2 (eastward propagating modes). The westward propagating quasi 16-day waves with zonal wave number 1 (W1; W1 refers to westward propagating wave with zonal wave number 1) peaks over winter-hemispheric high latitudes with northern hemisphere (NH) having higher amplitudes as compared to their southern hemispheric (SH) counterpart. The W1 quasi 16-day waves exhibit a double peak structure in altitude over winter hemispheric high latitudes. The eastward propagating quasi 16-day waves with wave number 1 (E1; E1 refers to eastward propagating wave with zonal wave number 1) exhibits similar features as that of W1 waves in the NH. In contrast, the E1 quasi 16-day waves in the SH show larger amplitudes as compared to the W1 waves and they do not exhibit double peak structure in altitude. Similar to the quasi 16-day waves, the quasi 10- and 5-day wave amplitudes with respect to their wavenumbers are delineated. Unlike quasi-16 and -10 day waves, quasi-5 day waves peak during vernal equinox both in the SH and NH. The peak activity of the W1 quasi-5 day wave is centered around 40°N and 40°S exhibiting symmetry with respect to the equator. A detailed discussion on the height-latitude structure, interannual variability and inter-hemispheric propagation of quasi 16-, 10- and 5-day waves are discussed. The significance of the present study lies in establishing the 5-year climatology of normal mode planetary waves from the stratosphere to the MLT region including their spatial-temporal evolution, which are

  9. Timing and Location of Medical Emergency Team Activation Is Associated with Seriousness of Outcome: An Observational Study in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, Takeo; Nakada, Taka-aki; Kawaguchi, Rui; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Abe, Ryuzo; Oda, Shigeto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The medical emergency team (MET) can be activated anytime and anywhere in a hospital. We hypothesized the timing and location of MET activation are associated with seriousness of outcome. Materials and Methods We tested for an association of clinical outcomes with timing and location using a university hospital cohort in Japan (n = 328). The primary outcome was short-term serious outcome (unplanned ICU admission after MET activation or death at scene). Results Patients for whom the MET was activated in the evening or night-time had significantly higher rates of short-term serious outcome than those for whom it was activated during the daytime (vs. evening: adjusted OR = 2. 53, 95% CI = 1.24–5.13, P = 0.010; night-time: adjusted OR = 2.45, 95% CI = 1.09–5.50, P = 0.030). Patients for whom the MET was activated in public space had decreased short-term serious outcome compared to medical spaces (public space: adjusted OR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.07–0.54, P = 0.0017). Night-time (vs. daytime) and medical space (vs. public space) were significantly associated with higher risks of unexpected cardiac arrest and 28-day mortality. Conclusions Patients for whom the MET was activated in the evening/night-time, or in medical space, had a higher rate of short-term serious outcomes. Taking measures against these risk factors may improve MET performance. PMID:28030644

  10. Peer Observation: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einwaechter, Nelson Frederick, Jr.

    This thesis describes a peer observation program implemented among American and Japanese teachers in the English Department of Hiroshima College of Foreign Languages, a two-year vocational college in Hiroshima, Japan. Each participant functioned as both an observer and observee, while pre- and post-observation meetings were held between the…

  11. The Classroom Experiences of Pupils with Special Educational Needs in Mainstream Primary Schools--1976 to 2012. What Do Data from Systematic Observation Studies Reveal about Pupils' Educational Experiences over Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Rob

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of an analysis of primary-aged pupils' educational experiences over a 35 year period. Data drawn from a set of large-scale systematic observation studies, conducted in the UK between 1976 and 2012, are used to describe pupils' average classroom experiences at six points in time over this period. These data are then used…

  12. Lead Time Study,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    2 Findings and Analysis ........................................ 2 Conclusions and Summary ...................................... 10 ...Recommendations .............................................. 10 Appendix I Listing of Studies and Documents Reviewed ................ 12 Appendix 2...components were delivered by the contractor 10 -13 months after contract award. It should be noted that, in order to accomplish the 10 -13 months deliveries, the

  13. High time resolutions observations of Cygnus X-3 with EXOSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, M.; van der Klis, M.

    1994-12-01

    We have studied the fast timing behavior of Cygnus X-3 using the entire EXOSAT ME dataset on this source, consisting of 22 observations that cover a total of 320 000 seconds. This large amount of data allowed us to measure the rapid (greater than 1 Hz) X-ray variability of the source to an unprecedented accuracy of 0.2% fractional rms amplitude. Above 256 Hz, the power of the X-ray count rate fluctuations is significantly below the level predicted from Poisson statistics modified by the known dead time processes in the instrument. We developed an improved empirical method for predicting the Poisson level in EXOSAT ME High Time Resolution 3 (HTR3) and HTR5 data, and use it in our present analysis. None of the four other X-ray sources studied had a weaker noise-component in the region 1-256 Hz as the power spectra of Cygnus X-3. An instrumental effect could therefore not be excluded. If the effect is instrumental, the 99% confidence upper limit on the 1-256 Hz rapid variability of Cygnus X-3 is 0.6% rms. The consequences of these results for previously reported EXOSAT HTR observations are briefly discussed. We compare our results to the predictions of the stellar wind model for Cygnus X-3. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to investigate the signal-attenuating effect of the wind. For the most likely wind parameters, the intrinsic source variability is found to be either very strong (approximately 60% rms), unlike seen in any other X-ray source at similar luminosity, or to be less than or approximately 12%, which would be consistent with a black hole candidate in the high state, or a low magnetic field neutron star.

  14. Real Time Monitoring of Flooding from Microwave Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galantowicz, John F.; Frey, Herb (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new method for making high-resolution flood extent maps (e.g., at the 30-100 m scale of digital elevation models) in real-time from low-resolution (20-70 km) passive microwave observations. The method builds a "flood-potential" database from elevations and historic flood imagery and uses it to create a flood-extent map consistent with the observed open water fraction. Microwave radiometric measurements are useful for flood monitoring because they sense surface water in clear-or-cloudy conditions and can provide more timely data (e.g., compared to radars) from relatively wide swath widths and an increasing number of available platforms (DMSP, ADEOS-II, Terra, NPOESS, GPM). The chief disadvantages for flood mapping are the radiometers' low resolution and the need for local calibration of the relationship between radiances and open-water fraction. We present our method for transforming microwave sensor-scale open water fraction estimates into high-resolution flood extent maps and describe 30-day flood map sequences generated during a retrospective study of the 1993 Great Midwest Flood. We discuss the method's potential improvement through as yet unimplemented algorithm enhancements and expected advancements in microwave radiometry (e.g., improved resolution and atmospheric correction).

  15. Optimal observation time window for forecasting the next earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Omi, Takahiro; Shinomoto, Shigeru; Kanter, Ido

    2011-02-15

    We report that the accuracy of predicting the occurrence time of the next earthquake is significantly enhanced by observing the latest rate of earthquake occurrences. The observation period that minimizes the temporal uncertainty of the next occurrence is on the order of 10 hours. This result is independent of the threshold magnitude and is consistent across different geographic areas. This time scale is much shorter than the months or years that have previously been considered characteristic of seismic activities.

  16. Observation of infiltration experiments with time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Ursula; Ganz, Christina; Altfelder, Sven; Günther, Thomas; Duijnisveld, Wilhelmus; Grissemann, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    Recent progress in the development of resistivity equipment enables the real time observation of infiltration processes through the vadose zone. In order to study the advantages and limitations of the method infiltration experiments are carried out for different soil types at various locations. All sites are subsequently excavated and investigated in detail. For an improved verification of the resistivity data the most recent experiment is conducted using a colour tracer. Two infiltration experiments are carried out in sandy soil. The location is Fuhrberg, close to Hannover, Germany. The area has been intensively studied for soil research purposes for more than 30 years. During both infiltration experiments water (110 l/80 l) is infiltrated for a period of 4.5 h and 8 h, respectively, and the infiltration process is observed by ERT. The resistivity measurements are conducted using a 3D-dipole-dipole configuration with electrode distances of 20 cm in the centre of the infiltration field. The whole resistivity array consists of 200 and 300 electrodes, respectively. The second experiment uses increased electrode spacing in the border area in order to enable the resolution of the deeper groundwater table (3.5 m during the second experiment compared to about 1.2 m for the first experiment). Immediately after completion of the resistivity measurements TDR and tensiometer measurements are carried out in 5-8 slices of the excavated infiltration area over a period of several days. The colour tracer used during the second experiment clearly outlines the infiltration plume with sharp outer limits. The ERT inversion depicts the shape of the plume successfully. Time lapse ERT interpretation reveals the development of the plume in time. The combination of ERT interpretation and TDR measurements enables the construction of the relationship between water content and resistivity as reconstructed by ERT using an Archie approach. By using this function water content changes can be

  17. Science Studies from Archived Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Manweiler, J. W.; Patterson, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Goals for spaceflight investigations include the discovery and characterization of physical features of the in- situ and remote environment. Abundant successes of flight investigations are easily documented. Prudent scientific practice dictates that to the maximum extent possible, observations should be well-characterized, reliably catalogued, and knowledgeably interpreted. This is especially true of data sets used in the publication of results in the reviewed literature. Typical scientific standards include making primary data numbers available to other investigators for replicated study. While NASA's contracts with investigators have required that data be submitted to agency official archives, the details, completeness (especially of ancillary and metadata) and forms differ from investigation to investigation and project to project. After several generations of improvements and refinements, modern computing and communications technology makes it possible to link multiple data sets at multiple locations through a unified data model. Virtual Observatories provide the overall organizational structures and SPASE-compliant XML defines the data granules that can be located. Proofs of the feasibility and value of this latest approach remain to be seen, but its ultimate goal of improving archival research using flight-derived data sets appears to depend on user acceptance and efficient use of the VxO resources. Criteria based on the authors experience in science derived from archival sources follow: 1. Interfaces and tools must be easy to learn, easy to use, and reliable. 2. Data numbers must be promptly downloadable in plain text. 3. Data must be available in or readily converted to physical units using calibrations and algorithms easily traceable as part of the search. Knowledge about (or heritage of) specific data items present in the science literature must be associated with the search for that item. 4. Data items must be trustworthy, having quoted uncertainties and

  18. The Effect of Pulsar Timing Noise and Glitches on Timing Analysis for Ground Based Telescopes Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oña-Wilhelmi, E.; de Jager, O. C.; Contreras, J. L.; de los Reyes, R.; Fonseca, V.; López, M.; Lucarelli, F.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    Pulsed emission from a number of gamma-ray pulsars is expected to be detectable with next generation ground-based gamma-ray telescopes such as MAGIC and possibly H.E.S.S. within a few hours of observations. The sensitivity is however not sufficient to enable a detection within a few seconds as reached by radio surveys. In some cases we may be fortunate to do a period search given a few hours' data, but if the signal is marginal, the correct period parameters must be known to allow a folding of the gamma-ray arrival times. The residual phases are then sub jected to a test for uniformity from which the significance of a signal can be assessed. If contemporary radio parameters are not available, we have to extrap olate archival radio parameters to the observation time in question. Such an extrap olation must then be accurate enough to avoid significant pulse smearing. The pulsar ephemerides from the archival data of HartRAO and Princeton (b etween 1989 and 1998) provide an excellent opportunity to study the accuracy of extrap olations of such ephemerides to the present moment, if an appropriate time shift is intro duced. The aim of this study is to investigate the smear in the gamma-ray pulse profile during a single night of observations.

  19. Linear system identification via backward-time observer models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Phan, Minh Q.

    1992-01-01

    Presented here is an algorithm to compute the Markov parameters of a backward-time observer for a backward-time model from experimental input and output data. The backward-time observer Markov parameters are decomposed to obtain the backward-time system Markov parameters (backward-time pulse response samples) for the backward-time system identification. The identified backward-time system Markov parameters are used in the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm to identify a backward-time state-space model, which can be easily converted to the usual forward-time representation. If one reverses time in the model to be identified, what were damped true system modes become modes with negative damping, growing as the reversed time increases. On the other hand, the noise modes in the identification still maintain the property that they are stable. The shift from positive damping to negative damping of the true system modes allows one to distinguish these modes from noise modes. Experimental results are given to illustrate when and to what extent this concept works.

  20. The relationship between knowledge of pain neurophysiology and fear avoidance in people with chronic pain: A point in time, observational study.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Claire; Bradnam, Lynley; Barr, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pain is prevalent in the western world; however fear of pain often has a greater impact than the degree of initial injury. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between knowledge of the neurophysiology of pain and fear avoidance in individuals diagnosed with chronic pain. Twenty-nine people with chronic musculoskeletal pain were recruited and completed questionnaires to determine their understanding of pain neurophysiology and the degree of their fear avoidance beliefs. There was an inverse relationship between knowledge of pain neurophysiology and the level of fear avoidance. Patients with higher pain knowledge reported less fear avoidance and lower perceived disability due to pain. There was no relationship with the educational level or compensable status for either variable. The findings suggest that fear avoidance is positively influenced by neurophysiology of pain education, so that a higher level of pain knowledge is associated with less activity-related fear. The clinical implication is that reducing fear avoidance/kinesiophobia using neurophysiology of pain education in people with chronic pain may provide an effective strategy to help manage fear avoidance and related disability in the chronic pain population in order to improve treatment outcomes.

  1. Finite-Time Control by Observer-Based Output Feedback for Linear Discrete-Time Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Hitoshi

    In this paper we consider finite-time stabilization and finite-time boundedness control problems for time-varying discrete-time systems. We give a set of sufficient conditions, in terms of difference LMIs, for the existence of observer-based output feedback controllers that make the system finite-time stable and finite-time bounded. We then reduce the obtained results to the ones for time-invariant discrete-time systems and derive numerically tractable sufficient conditions given by LMIs. We also show numerical examples to illustrate the design methods of observer-based output feedback controllers.

  2. RXTE Observation of Cygnus X-1. Report 2; TIming Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Vaughan, Brian A.; Wilms, Joern; Dove, James B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1998-01-01

    We present timing analysis for a Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observation of Cygnus X-1 in its hard/low state. This was the first RXTE observation of Cyg X-1 taken after it transited back to this state from its soft/high state. RXTE's large effective area, superior timing capabilities, and ability to obtain long, uninterrupted observations have allowed us to obtain measurements of the power spectral density (PSD), coherence function, and Fourier time lags to a decade lower in frequency and half a decade higher in frequency than typically was achieved with previous instruments. Notable aspects of our observations include a weak 0.005 Hz feature in the PSD coincident with a coherence recovery; a 'hardening' of the high-frequency PSD with increasing energy; a broad frequency range measurement of the coherence function, revealing rollovers from unity coherence at both low and high frequency; and an accurate determination of the Fourier time lags over two and a half decades in frequency. As has been noted in previous similar observations, the time delay is approximately proportional to f(exp -0.7), and at a fixed Fourier frequency the time delay of the hard X-rays compared to the softest energy channel tends to increase logarithmically with energy. Curiously, the 0.01-0.2 Hz coherence between the highest and lowest energy bands is actually slightly greater than the coherence between the second highest and lowest energy bands. We carefully describe all of the analysis techniques used in this paper, and we make comparisons of the data to general theoretical expectations. In a companion paper, we make specific comparisons to a Compton corona model that we have successfully used to describe the energy spectral data from this observation.

  3. RHESSI Timing Studies: Multithermal Delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2007-06-01

    We investigate the energy-dependent timing of thermal emission in solar flares using high-resolution spectra and demodulated time profiles from the RHESSI instrument. We model for the first time the spectral-temporal hard X-ray flux f(ɛ,t) in terms of a multitemperature plasma governed by thermal conduction cooling. In this quantitative model we characterize the multitemperature differential emission measure distribution (DEM) and nonthermal spectra with power-law functions. We fit this model to the spectra and energy-dependent time delays of a representative data set of 89 solar flares observed with RHESSI during 2002-2005. Eliminating weak flares, we find 65 events suitable for fitting and obtain in 44 events (68%) a satisfactory fit that is consistent with the theoretical model. The best-fit results yield a thermal-nonthermal crossover energy of ɛth=18.0+/-3.4 keV, nonthermal spectral indices of γnth=3.5+/-1.1 (at ~30-50 keV), thermal multispectral indices of γth=6.9+/-0.9 (at ~10-20 keV), and thermal conduction cooling times of τc0=101.6+/-0.6 s at ɛth=1 keV (or T0=11.6 MK), which scale with temperature as τc(T)~T-β with β=2.7+/-1.2, consistent with the theoretically expected scaling of τc(T)~T-5/2 for thermal conduction cooling. The (empirical) Neupert effect is consistent with this theoretical model in the asymptotic limit of long cooling times. This study provides clear evidence that all analyzed flares are consistent with the model of a multitemperature plasma distribution and with thermal conduction as dominant cooling mechanism (at flare temperatures of T>~10 MK). Our modeling of energy-dependent time delays provides an alternative method for separating multithermal from nonthermal spectral components based on information in the time domain, in contrast to previous spectral fitting methods.

  4. Local-time Variation of Nitric Oxide: Modeling and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. Y. T.; Bailey, S. M.; Yonker, J. D.; Venkataramani, K.; Deng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    NO, a minor species in the thermosphere, is an important indicator of energy balance. It also has the lowest ionization threshold so is the terminal ion in the ionospheric E-region. Solar soft X-ray energy between 0.1 and 7 nm is absorbed mostly in the lower thermosphere between 100 and 150 km. Photoelectrons are created and initiate chains of photochemical reactions which leads to the production of nitric oxide (NO). On the other hand, solar irradiance longer than 150 nm destroys NO. In this study, observation of the local-time variation of NO abundance in the lower thermosphere is derived from the Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS) measurements in summer 2010. Soft X-ray and EUV irradiance from the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) is used to drive the NOx1D model during the same period of time. By comparing variation of NO abundance at local sunlit hours, the effects of solar irradiance on thermospheric NO photochemistry in the model are examined.

  5. Arrival Time Distribution by the New Observation System at Taro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuyama, H.; Obara, Hitoshi; Kuramochi, Hiroshi; Ono, Shunichi; Origasa, Satoru; Mochida, Akinori; Sakuyama, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Noboru

    2003-07-01

    The arrival time distribution of EAS has been observed by using Ultra Fast Cherenkov detector (UFC) and oscilloscope at Taro observatory since 1995 (sea level 200m). The EAS array is arranged 169 sets of 0.25m2 scintillation detectors in the shape of a lattice at intervals of 1.5m and about 40 scintillation detectors which consists of 1m2 and 0.25m2 is arranged in the peripheral part. Then, it consists of 8 fast timing detectors. The UFC detector is installed in the palce of about 20m from the trigger center. The observation system of a UFC detector was changed from the autumn of 2000. The outline of a new observation system and EAS arrival time distribution are reported.

  6. Inflow rate, a time-symmetric observable obeying fluctuation relations.

    PubMed

    Baiesi, Marco; Falasco, Gianmaria

    2015-10-01

    While entropy changes are the usual subject of fluctuation theorems, we seek fluctuation relations involving time-symmetric quantities, namely observables that do not change sign if the trajectories are observed backward in time. We find detailed and integral fluctuation relations for the (time-integrated) difference between entrance rate and escape rate in mesoscopic jump systems. Such inflow rate, which is even under time reversal, represents the discrete-state equivalent of the phase-space contraction rate. Indeed, it becomes minus the divergence of forces in the continuum limit to overdamped diffusion. This establishes a formal connection between reversible deterministic systems and irreversible stochastic ones, confirming that fluctuation theorems are largely independent of the details of the underling dynamics.

  7. JPL pulsar timing observations. IV - Excess phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, G. S.; Krause-Polstorff, J.

    1986-01-01

    Previously published tables of geocentric arrival times for 24 pulsars covering a 12 year span are extended here to 14.5 years. The list of pulsars is extended by nine, most of which were observed for about 4 years. Known positins of these new objects are confirmed, and limits on the proper motions are obtained. Large phase excursions in PSR 0525 + 21 are found. The orbital parameters of the binary pulsar 0820 + 02 are tentatively confirmed. Short-term timing noise in excess of that expected from receiver considerations alone is established. Variations in the timing residuals for the original 24 pulsars are analyzed for correlations with other observable parameters. Little significant correlation with changes in pulse shape or energy or with the drift correction is found on time scales of 500 pulses or longer.

  8. Towards Near Real-time Convective Rainfall Observations over Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoedjes, Joost; Said, Mohammed; Becht, Robert; Kifugo, Shem; Kooiman, André; Limo, Agnes; Maathuis, Ben; Moore, Ian; Mumo, Mark; Nduhiu Mathenge, Joseph; Su, Bob; Wright, Iain

    2013-04-01

    The existing meteorological infrastructure in Kenya is poorly suited for the countrywide real-time monitoring of precipitation. Rainfall radar is not available, and the existing network of rain gauges is sparse and challenging to maintain. This severely restricts Kenya's capacity to warn for, and respond to, weather related emergencies. Furthermore, the lack of accurate rainfall observations severely limits Kenya's climate change adaptation capabilities. Over the past decade, the mobile telephone network in Kenya has expanded rapidly. This network makes extensive use of terrestrial microwave (MW) links, received signal level (RSL) data from which can be used for the calculation of rainfall intensities. We present a novel method for the near-real time observation of convective rainfall over Kenya, based on the combined use of MW RSL data and Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite data. In this study, the variable density rainfall information derived from several MW links is scaled up using MSG data to provide full rainfall information coverage for the region surrounding the links. Combining MSG data and MW link derived rainfall data for several adjacent MW links makes it possible to make the distinction between wet and dry pixels. This allows the disaggregation of the MW link derived rainfall intensities. With the distinction between wet and dry pixels made, and the MW derived rainfall intensities disaggregated, these data can then be used to develop instantaneous empirical relationships linking rainfall intensities to cloud physical properties. These relationships are then used to calculate rainfall intensities for the MSG scene. Since both the MSG and the MW data are available at the same temporal resolution, unique empirical coefficients can be determined for each interval. This approach ensures that changes in convective conditions from one interval to the next are taken into account. Initial results from a pilot study, which took place from November 2012

  9. Late time observations of candidate high-z GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, Davide; Gaensler, Bryan; Murphy, Tara; Hancock, Paul; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Salvaterra, Ruben; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    2014-04-01

    This is a discovery (NAPA) proposal to detect the late time radio afterglow of candidates high redshift gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Our selection criteria (no redshift information at the time of the request, type of trigger, high-energy flux and duration) are based on information immediately available through the Swift/BAT telescope and ground based telescopes. Radio observations play a crucial role in determining the energetics of the GRB explosion, and will therefore directly point towards exceptional progenitors.

  10. Time Delays of Blazar Flares Observed at Different Wavebands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    2000-01-01

    Correlated variability at different frequencies can probe the structure and physics of the jet of a blazar on size scales much smaller than can be resolved by telescopes and interferometers. I discuss some observations of frequency dependent time lags and how these place constraints on models for the nonthermal emission in blazars. The time lags can be either positive (high frequency variations leading those at lower frequencies) or negative, while simultaneous flares are also possible.

  11. Global Night-Time Lights for Observing Human Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hipskind, Stephen R.; Elvidge, Chris; Gurney, K.; Imhoff, Mark; Bounoua, Lahouari; Sheffner, Edwin; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Pettit, Donald R.; Fischer, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We present a concept for a small satellite mission to make systematic, global observations of night-time lights with spatial resolution suitable for discerning the extent, type and density of human settlements. The observations will also allow better understanding of fine scale fossil fuel CO2 emission distribution. The NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey recommends more focus on direct observations of human influence on the Earth system. The most dramatic and compelling observations of human presence on the Earth are the night light observations taken by the Defence Meteorological System Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Beyond delineating the footprint of human presence, night light data, when assembled and evaluated with complementary data sets, can determine the fine scale spatial distribution of global fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Understanding fossil fuel carbon emissions is critical to understanding the entire carbon cycle, and especially the carbon exchange between terrestrial and oceanic systems.

  12. Timing the Geminga Pulsar with Gamma-Ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, J. R.; Halpern, Jules P.; Caraveo, P. A.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present the COS-B/EGRET 1997 ephemeris for the rotation of the Geminga pulsar. This ephemeris is derived from high-energy gamma-ray observations that span 24 yr. The recently obtained accurate position and proper motion are assumed. A cubic ephemeris predicts the rotational phase of Geminga with errors smaller than 50 milliperiods for all existing high-energy gamma-ray observations that span a 24.2 yr timing baseline. The braking index obtained is 17 +/- 1. Further observation is required to ascertain whether this high value truly reflects the rotational energy loss mechanism, or whether it is a manifestation of timing noise. The ephemeris parameters are sufficiently constrained so that timing noise will be the limitation on forward extrapolation. If Geminga continues to rotate without a glitch, as it has for at least 23 yr, we expect this ephemeris to continue to describe the phase, with an error of less than 100 milliperiods, until 2008. Statistically significant timing residuals are detected in the EGRET data that depart from the cubic ephemeris at a level of 30 milliperiods. Although this could simply be an additional manifestation of timing noise, the EGRET timing residuals appear to have a sinusoidal modulation that is consistent with a planet of mass 1.7/sin i solar mass, orbiting Geminga at a radius of 3.3 AU.

  13. Late time observations of candidate high-z GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, Davide; Gaensler, Bryan; Murphy, Tara; Hancock, Paul; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Salvaterra, Ruben; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    2014-04-01

    This is a targeted proposal to detect late time radio afterglow of a sample of potentially high redshift gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Our targets have been selected from detections of the the last two years by the Swift/BAT telescope. Radio observations play a crucial role in determining the energetics of the GRB explosion, and will therefore directly point towards exceptional progenitors.

  14. Computerized Systems for Collecting Real-Time Observational Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahng, SungWoo; Iwata, Brian

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 15 developers of computerized real-time observation systems found many systems have incorporated laptop or handheld computers as well as bar-code scanners. Most systems used IBM-compatible software, and ranged from free to complete systems costing more than $1,500. Data analysis programs were included with most programs. (Author/CR)

  15. Ionospheric observations made by a time-interleaved Doppler ionosonde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Kenneth J. W.

    2008-10-01

    Mid-latitude HF observations of ionospheric Doppler velocity as a function of frequency are reported here as observed over a quiet 24-h period by a KEL IPS71 ionosonde operating at a 5-min sampling rate. The unique time-interleaving technique used in this ionosonde provided a Doppler resolution of 0.04 Hz over a Doppler range of ±2.5 Hz at each sounding frequency via FFT processing and is described here for the first time. The time-interleaving technique can be applied to other types of ionosonde as well as to other applications. The measurements described were made at a middle latitude site (Salisbury, South Australia). Doppler variations (<30 min) were ever present throughout the day and showed short-period TID characteristics. The day-time Doppler shift was found to closely follow the rate-of-change of foF2 as predicted by a simple parabolic layer model. The descending cusp in short-period TIDs is shown to mark an abrupt change with increasing frequency from negative towards positive Doppler shift with the greatest change in Doppler shift being observed below the cusp. The “smilergram” is introduced as observed in both F2 and Sporadic E. The characteristic curve in Doppler versus group height at a single frequency is described and related to changes in reflection symmetry, velocity and depth of moving ionospheric inhomogeneities.

  16. Direct Observations of PMC Local Time Variations by Aura OMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Shettle, Eric P.; Thomas, Gary E.; Olivero, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite obtains unique measurements for polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) analysis. Its wide cross-track viewing swath and high along-track spatial resolution makes it possible to directly evaluate PMC occurrence frequency and brightness variations between 6S" and 8S' latitude as a function of local time over a 12-14 h continuous period. OMI PMC local time variations are closely coupled to concurrent variations in measurement scattering angle, so that ice phase function effects must be considered when interpreting the observations. Two different phase functions corresponding to bright and faint clouds are examined in this analysis. OMI observations show maximum frequency and albedo values at 8-10 h local time in the Northern Hemisphere, with decreasing amplitude at higher latitudes. Southern Hemisphere values reach a minimum at 18-20 h LT. Larger variations are seen in Northern Hemisphere data. No statistically significant longitudinal dependence was seen.

  17. Technical and Observational Challenges for Future Time-Domain Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Joshua S.

    2012-04-01

    By the end of the last decade, robotic telescopes were established as effective alternatives to the traditional role of astronomer in planning, conducting and reducing time-domain observations. By the end of this decade, machines will play a much more central role in the discovery and classification of time-domain events observed by such robots. While this abstraction of humans away from the real-time loop (and the nightly slog of the nominal scientific process) is inevitable, just how we will get there as a community is uncertain. I discuss the importance of machine learning in astronomy today, and project where we might consider heading in the future. I will also touch on the role of people and organisations in shaping and maximising the scientific returns of the coming data deluge.

  18. Simultaneous Spectral and Timing Observations of Accreting Neuron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this proposal is to perform simultaneous x-ray spectral and millisecond timing observations of accreting neutron stars to further our understanding of their accretion dynamics and in the hope of using these systems as probes of the physics of strong gravitational fields. NAG5-9104 is the successor grant to NAG5-8408. Observations using the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and BeppoSAX were performed of 4U1702-429, 4U1735-44, and Cyg X-2. Unfortunately, only a small fraction of the approved observing time was obtained for the first two targets and the data are of limited scientific value. Data analysis has been completed on the observations of Cyg X-2. We discovered a correlation between the frequency of the horizontal branch oscillations (HBO) and a soft, thermal component of the x-ray spectrum likely associated with emission from the accretion disk. This correlation may place constraints on models of the oscillations. A paper based on these results appeared in the Astrophysical Journal.

  19. Observation Impacts for Longer Forecast Lead-Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, R.; Gelaro, R.; Todling, R.

    2013-12-01

    Observation impact on forecasts evaluated using adjoint-based techniques (e.g. Langland and Baker, 2004) are limited by the validity of the assumptions underlying the forecasting model adjoint. Most applications of this approach have focused on deriving observation impacts on short-range forecasts (e.g. 24-hour) in part to stay well within linearization assumptions. The most widely used measure of observation impact relies on the availability of the analysis for verifying the forecasts. As pointed out by Gelaro et al. (2007), and more recently by Todling (2013), this introduces undesirable correlations in the measure that are likely to affect the resulting assessment of the observing system. Stappers and Barkmeijer (2012) introduced a technique that, in principle, allows extending the validity of tangent linear and corresponding adjoint models to longer lead-times, thereby reducing the correlations in the measures used for observation impact assessments. The methodology provides the means to better represent linearized models by making use of Gaussian quadrature relations to handle various underlying non-linear model trajectories. The formulation is exact for particular bi-linear dynamics; it corresponds to an approximation for general-type nonlinearities and must be tested for large atmospheric models. The present work investigates the approach of Stappers and Barkmeijer (2012)in the context of NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric data assimilation system (ADAS). The goal is to calculate observation impacts in the GEOS-5 ADAS for forecast lead-times of at least 48 hours in order to reduce the potential for undesirable correlations that occur at shorter forecast lead times. References [1]Langland, R. H., and N. L. Baker, 2004: Estimation of observation impact using the NRL atmospheric variational data assimilation adjoint system. Tellus, 56A, 189-201. [2] Gelaro, R., Y. Zhu, and R. M. Errico, 2007: Examination of various

  20. Assessing observational studies of medical treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hartz, Arthur; Bentler, Suzanne; Charlton, Mary; Lanska, Douglas; Butani, Yogita; Soomro, G Mustafa; Benson, Kjell

    2005-01-01

    Background Previous studies have assessed the validity of the observational study design by comparing results of studies using this design to results from randomized controlled trials. The present study examined design features of observational studies that could have influenced these comparisons. Methods To find at least 4 observational studies that evaluated the same treatment, we reviewed meta-analyses comparing observational studies and randomized controlled trials for the assessment of medical treatments. Details critical for interpretation of these studies were abstracted and analyzed qualitatively. Results Individual articles reviewed included 61 observational studies that assessed 10 treatment comparisons evaluated in two studies comparing randomized controlled trials and observational studies. The majority of studies did not report the following information: details of primary and ancillary treatments, outcome definitions, length of follow-up, inclusion/exclusion criteria, patient characteristics relevant to prognosis or treatment response, or assessment of possible confounding. When information was reported, variations in treatment specifics, outcome definition or confounding were identified as possible causes of differences between observational studies and randomized controlled trials, and of heterogeneity in observational studies. Conclusion Reporting of observational studies of medical treatments was often inadequate to compare study designs or allow other meaningful interpretation of results. All observational studies should report details of treatment, outcome assessment, patient characteristics, and confounding assessment. PMID:16137327

  1. RXTE Observation of Cygnus X-1: Spectra and Timing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilms, J.; Dove, J.; Nowak, M.; Vaughan, B. A.

    1997-01-01

    We present preliminary results from the analysis of an R.XTE observation of Cyg X-1 in the hard state. We show that the observed X-ray spectrum can be explained with a model for an accretion disk corona (ADC), in which a hot sphere is situated inside of a cold accretion disk (similar to an advection dominated model). ADC Models with a slab-geometry do not successfully fit the data. In addition to the spectral results we present the observed temporal properties of Cyg X-1, i.e. the coherence-function and the time-lags, and discuss the constraints the. temporal properties imply for the accretion geometry in Cyg X-1.

  2. Astrometric observations of Hevelius and derived values of ΔT (dynamical time - universal time).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünsch, J.

    About 1500 meridian altitudes of the Sun observed by Johannes Hevelius (1611 - 1687) at Danzig in the years 1652 - 1679 and about 1160 distances of fixed stars from the lunar limb obtained in 1658 - 1679 as well as 48 occultations of stars by the Moon were analyzed with the aim to obtain a value of the time difference ΔT = ET - UT between ephemeris time and universal time for the period of Hevelius' observations. This time difference is a measure of the "clock error" of the rotation of the Earth, caused mainly by secular deceleration due to tidal friction.

  3. Mobile/Real-Time Seafloor Seismic Observation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, H.; Kawaguchi, K.; Mikada, H.; Suyehiro, K.

    2001-12-01

    Since 1997, Japan Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC) started a project to develop submarine cable systems for building a series of geophysical observation network at active seismogenic zones around Japan. These cabled systems are very powerful tool for real-time and long-term geophysical observation. However, it has weakness in mobility compared to a land or a free-fall, pop-up ocean bottom observation systems. We developed an adaptable observation system with a concept to realize both mobile and real-time observations. This system consists of a Branch Multiplexer (B-MUX), a Joint Multiplexer (J-MUX), a fiber cable, a battery pack and a sensor package. The B-MUX branches the main optical-fiber line and allows to install J-MUX at the end of the branched line. The J-MUX is a hub for adaptable observatories, which can be accept up to 4 satellite stations extending up to 10 km distance away. All this setup can be done using a towed vehicle and ROV. No cable ship is required. First of all, a broadband seismometer (3-component Guralp CMG-1T system) was installed off Kushiro-Tokachi, Hokkaido, at a water depth of 2133 m, in July 2001. Real-time seismic data are being successfully acquired at 100 Hz sampling rate. The system has an advantage which the sensor control signals can be transmitted from the land station and are demultiplexed and distributed by the telemetry unit to the each interface through the B-MUX. The battery pack can operate the sensor system for 7.5 months. Several large teleseismic earthquake (M > 6.5) were recorded with high S/N. The prominent microseism peak at 0.2 Hz divides into long- and short-period quiet bands. The longer period band between 0.03 and 0.1 Hz provides a low-noise window for the detection of long-period body waves and higher mode Rayleigh waves propagated from the teleseismic earthquakes. Our mobile observation system provides an opportunity to extend existing seafloor observation network, and that any geo

  4. Earth Observing System: Global Observations to Study the Earth's Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by which scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During the last couple of years, four EOS science missions were launched, representing observations of (i) total solar irradiance, (ii) Earth radiation budget, (iii) land cover & land use change, (iv) ocean processes (vector wind, sea surface temperature, and ocean color), (v) atmospheric processes (aerosol and cloud properties, water vapor, and temperature and moisture profiles), and (vi) tropospheric chemistry. In succeeding years many more satellites will be launched that will contribute immeasurably to our understanding of the Earth's environment. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using NASA's Earth science data to examine land use and natural hazards, environmental air quality, including: dust storms over the worlds deserts, cloud and radiation properties, sea surface temperature, and winds over the ocean, with a special emphasis on satellite observations available for studying the southern African environment.

  5. Cluster observations of non-time continuous magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Simon N.; Demekhov, Andrei G.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Ganushkina, Natalia Y.; Sibeck, David G.; Balikhin, Michael A.

    2016-10-01

    Equatorial magnetosonic waves are normally observed as temporally continuous sets of emissions lasting from minutes to hours. Recent observations, however, have shown that this is not always the case. Using Cluster data, this study identifies two distinct forms of these non-temporally continuous emissions. The first, referred to as rising tone emissions, are characterized by the systematic onset of wave activity at increasing proton gyroharmonic frequencies. Sets of harmonic emissions (emission elements) are observed to occur periodically in the region ±10° off the geomagnetic equator. The sweep rate of these emissions maximizes at the geomagnetic equator. In addition, the ellipticity and propagation direction also change systematically as Cluster crosses the geomagnetic equator. It is shown that the observed frequency sweep rate is unlikely to result from the sideband instability related to nonlinear trapping of suprathermal protons in the wave field. The second form of emissions is characterized by the simultaneous onset of activity across a range of harmonic frequencies. These waves are observed at irregular intervals. Their occurrence correlates with changes in the spacecraft potential, a measurement that is used as a proxy for electron density. Thus, these waves appear to be trapped within regions of localized enhancement of the electron density.

  6. Observing Anthropometric and Acanthosis Nigrican Changes among Children Over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Jennifer; Northrup, Karen; Wittberg, Richard; Lilly, Christa; Cottrell, Lesley

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the anthropometrics and acanthosis nigricans (AN) in a sample of 7,337 children at two assessments. Four groups of children were identified based on the presence of AN at both time points: those who never had the marker, those who gained the marker, those who lost the marker, and those who maintained the marker. Group…

  7. Remote Observations of Ion Temperatures in the Quiet Time Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, A. M.; Buzulukova, N.; Goldstein, J.; McComas, D. J.; Scime, E. E.; Spence, H.; Fok, M. C.; Tallaksen, K.

    2011-01-01

    Ion temperature analysis of the first energetic neutral atom images of the quiet -time, extended magnetosphere provides evidence of multiple regions of ion heating. This study confirms the existence of a dawn -dusk asymmetry in ion temperature predicted for quiescent magnetospheric conditions by Spence and Kivelson (1993) and demonstrates that it is an inherent magnetospheric feature.

  8. Causal Structure Learning over Time: Observations and Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rottman, Benjamin M.; Keil, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    Seven studies examined how people learn causal relationships in scenarios when the variables are temporally dependent--the states of variables are stable over time. When people intervene on X, and Y subsequently changes state compared to before the intervention, people infer that X influences Y. This strategy allows people to learn causal…

  9. Time-of-flight observation of electron swarm in methane

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, H.; Date, H.; Yoshida, K.; Shimozuma, M.

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports on the evolution of an isolated electron swarm, which is experimentally observed as spatial distributions at every moment. This observation is assumed to directly correspond to the conventional time-of-flight theory. We have measured the spatial distribution of electrons using a double-shutter technique in the drift tube, where a shutter electrode to collect electrons can be slid along the field (E/N) direction in order to capture a relative electron number at a certain range of location. As a typical parameter defined by this spatial distribution, the center-of-mass drift velocity (W{sub r}) is determined for methane gas. The result is compared with the mean-arrival-time drift velocity (W{sub m}) defined from the arriving electron number at fixed positions. We have also performed a theoretical analysis in which a Fourier transformed Boltzmann equation is solved to deduce both of the drift velocities from a dispersion relationship. The difference between W{sub r} and W{sub m} at high E/Ns (above 200 Td) is clearly ascertained in the experimental and theoretical investigations, which is attributable to the occurrence of ionization events.

  10. Observational constraints on late-time {lambda}(t) cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C.; Dantas, M. A.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2008-04-15

    The cosmological constant {lambda}, i.e., the energy density stored in the true vacuum state of all existing fields in the Universe, is the simplest and the most natural possibility to describe the current cosmic acceleration. However, despite its observational successes, such a possibility exacerbates the well-known {lambda} problem, requiring a natural explanation for its small, but nonzero, value. In this paper we study cosmological consequences of a scenario driven by a varying cosmological term, in which the vacuum energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, {lambda}{proportional_to}H. We test the viability of this scenario and study a possible way to distinguish it from the current standard cosmological model by using recent observations of type Ia supernova (Supernova Legacy Survey Collaboration), measurements of the baryonic acoustic oscillation from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the position of the first peak of the cosmic microwave background angular spectrum from the three-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe.

  11. Challenges to Deriving Climate Time Series From Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, F. J.; Mears, C. A.

    2005-12-01

    Satellites have been observing the Earth's weather and climate since the launch of TIROS-1 in 1960. As satellite and sensor technology advanced over the next two decades, the accuracy of the satellite observations improved to the point of being useful for climate monitoring. The launch of the first Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) in October 1978 and the first Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) in June 1987 mark the beginning of research-quality time series for several important climate state variables, including tropospheric temperature and water vapor, cloud and rain water, and ocean surface winds. In this talk, we will illustrate the many obstacles that must be overcome to convert raw satellite measurements into climate data records. Probably the most pivotal issue is sensor calibration. Although an on-board self-calibrating apparatus is part of each satellite sensor, the accuracy of the calibration system is limited and in some cases unexpected calibration problems occurred on-orbit. The lack of exact calibration leads to a second problem: merging sensors flying on many different satellites into one consistent decadal time series. Also drifts in the satellites' orbits, both in altitude and local time of day, must be carefully taken into account else spurious signals will enter the time series. In addition to these technical difficulties, programmatic problems present a different set of hurdles that must be overcome. The maintenance of a long-term climate record may necessitate sustaining a long-term research activity requiring continuity in both expert staffing and funding. The alternative of computing climate records in an operational rather than research environment creates a new set of problems. As the satellite sensor technology continues to advance into the next decade, new challenges will arise. The new sensors will have different channel sets, viewing geometries, and orbital characteristics. Their complexity will be an order of magnitude greater than

  12. Promoting discovery and access to real time observations produced by regional coastal ocean observing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. M.; Snowden, D. P.; Bochenek, R.; Bickel, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the U.S. coastal waters, a network of eleven regional coastal ocean observing systems support real-time coastal and ocean observing. The platforms supported and variables acquired are diverse, ranging from current sensing high frequency (HF) radar to autonomous gliders. The system incorporates data produced by other networks and experimental systems, further increasing the breadth of the collection. Strategies promoted by the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) ensure these data are not lost at sea. Every data set deserves a description. ISO and FGDC compliant metadata enables catalog interoperability and record-sharing. Extensive use of netCDF with the Climate and Forecast convention (identifying both metadata and a structured format) is shown to be a powerful strategy to promote discovery, interoperability, and re-use of the data. To integrate specialized data which are often obscure, quality control protocols are being developed to homogenize the QC and make these data more integrate-able. Data Assembly Centers have been established to integrate some specialized streams including gliders, animal telemetry, and HF radar. Subsets of data that are ingested into the National Data Buoy Center are also routed to the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) of the World Meteorological Organization to assure wide international distribution. From the GTS, data are assimilated into now-cast and forecast models, fed to other observing systems, and used to support observation-based decision making such as forecasts, warnings, and alerts. For a few years apps were a popular way to deliver these real-time data streams to phones and tablets. Responsive and adaptive web sites are an emerging flexible strategy to provide access to the regional coastal ocean observations.

  13. Real-Time Observation of Cell and Carbon Nanotube Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michelle; Broman, Melanie; Mathews, Claire; McPherson, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been widely researched for disease diagnosis and drug delivery applications. However, its impact on biological systems is yet to be sufficiently understood. We studied optical imaging of Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells exposed to various carbon nanotubes concentrations at various time points. The cell stress due to carbon nanotubes exposure is accessed via morphological changes of the CHO cells. Data showed that cell death increases with increasing carbon nanotube concentration and time exposure. To continuously view such changes of any one individual cell, we constructed an optically transparent miniaturized incubator that fits on a microscope stage. This specific incubator is able to maintain desirable temperature, humidity, and CO2 concentration to allow proper cell growth. Such incubator can be used to track real-time interactions of any cells and nanomaterials for future data collection.

  14. Real-time observation of liposome bursting induced by acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazunari; Horii, Keitaro; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Izumi

    2014-10-06

    We show the bursting process of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) liposomes in response to the addition of acetonitrile, a small toxic molecule widely used in the fields of chemistry and industry. The percentage of destroyed liposomes is reduced upon decreasing the acetonitrile fraction in the aqueous solution and vesicle bursting is not observed at volume ratios of 4:6 and below. This indicates that a high fraction of acetonitrile causes the bursting of liposomes, and it is proposed that this occurs through insertion of the molecules into outer leaflet of the lipid bilayer. The elapsed time between initial addition of acetonitrile and liposome bursting at each vesicle is also measured and demonstrated to be dependent on the volume fraction of acetonitrile and the vesicle size.

  15. Observation of Broadband Time-Dependent Rabi Shifting in Microplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, Ryan; Filin, Alex; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.

    2009-11-13

    Coherent broadband radiation in the form of Rabi sidebands is observed when a ps probe laser propagates through a weakly ionized, electronically excited microplasma generated in the focus of an intense pump beam. The sidebands arise from the interaction of the probe beam with pairs of excited states of a constituent neutral atom via the probe-induced Rabi oscillation. Sideband shifting of >90 meV from the probe carrier frequency results in an effective bandwidth of 200 meV. The sidebands are controlled by the intensity and temporal profile of the probe pulse; with amplitude and shift in agreement with the predictions of a time-dependent generalized Rabi cycling model.

  16. Exploiting Dragon Envisat Times Series and Other Earth Observation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marie, Tiphanie; Lai, Xijun; Huber, Claire; Chen, Xiaoling; Uribe, Carlos; Huang, Shifeng; Lafaye, Murielle; Yesou, Herve

    2010-10-01

    Earth Observation data were used for mapping potential Schistosomiasis japonica distribution, within Poyang Lake (Jiangxi Province, PR China). In the first of two steps, areas suitable for the development of Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host snail of Schistosoma japonicum, were derived from submersion time parameters and vegetation community indicators. Y early maps from 2003 to 2008 indicate five principally potential endemic areas: Poyang Lake National Nature Reserve, Dalianzi Hu, Gan Delta, Po Jiang and Xi He. Monthly maps showing the annual dynamic of potential O. hupensis presence areas were obtained from December 2005 to December 2008. In a second step human potential transmission risk was handled through the mapping of settlements and the identification of some human activities. The urban areas and settlements were mapped all around the lake and fishing net locations in the central part of Poyang Lake were identified. Finally, data crossing of the different parameters highlight the potential risk of transmission in most of the fishing nets areas.

  17. Effects of Atorvastatin Dose and Concomitant Use of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Renal Function Changes over Time in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease: A Prospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek-Surdacka, Ewa; Świerszcz, Jolanta; Surdacki, Andrzej

    2016-02-02

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and statins are widely used in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Our aim was to compare changes in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) over time in subjects with stable CAD according to atorvastatin dose and concomitant use of ACEI. We studied 78 men with stable CAD referred for an elective coronary angiography who attained the then-current guideline-recommended target level of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) cholesterol below 2.5 mmol/L in a routine fasting lipid panel on admission and were receiving atorvastatin at a daily dose of 10-40 mg for ≥3 months preceding the index hospitalization. Due to an observational study design, atorvastatin dosage was not intentionally modified for other reasons. GFR was estimated during index hospitalization and at about one year after discharge from our center. Irrespective of ACEI use, a prevention of kidney function loss was observed only in those treated with the highest atorvastatin dose. In 38 subjects on ACEI, both of the higher atorvastatin doses were associated with increasing beneficial effects on GFR changes (mean ± SEM: -4.2 ± 2.4, 1.1 ± 1.6, 5.2 ± 2.4 mL/min per 1.73 m² for the 10-mg, 20-mg and 40-mg atorvastatin group, respectively, p = 0.02 by ANOVA; Spearman's rho = 0.50, p = 0.001 for trend). In sharp contrast, in 40 patients without ACEI, no significant trend effect was observed across increasing atorvastatin dosage (respective GFR changes: -1.3 ± 1.0, -4.7 ± 2.1, 4.8 ± 3.6 mL/min per 1.73 m², p = 0.02 by ANOVA; rho = 0.08, p = 0.6 for trend). The results were substantially unchanged after adjustment for baseline GFR or time-dependent variations of LDL cholesterol. Thus, concomitant ACEI use appears to facilitate the ability of increasing atorvastatin doses to beneficially modulate time-dependent changes in GFR in men with stable CAD.

  18. Ways of learning: Observational studies versus experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaffer, T.L.; Johnson, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Manipulative experimentation that features random assignment of treatments, replication, and controls is an effective way to determine causal relationships. Wildlife ecologists, however, often must take a more passive approach to investigating causality. Their observational studies lack one or more of the 3 cornerstones of experimentation: controls, randomization, and replication. Although an observational study can be analyzed similarly to an experiment, one is less certain that the presumed treatment actually caused the observed response. Because the investigator does not actively manipulate the system, the chance that something other than the treatment caused the observed results is increased. We reviewed observational studies and contrasted them with experiments and, to a lesser extent, sample surveys. We identified features that distinguish each method of learning and illustrate or discuss some complications that may arise when analyzing results of observational studies. Findings from observational studies are prone to bias. Investigators can reduce the chance of reaching erroneous conclusions by formulating a priori hypotheses that can be pursued multiple ways and by evaluating the sensitivity of study conclusions to biases of various magnitudes. In the end, however, professional judgment that considers all available evidence is necessary to render a decision regarding causality based on observational studies.

  19. Radar and satellite observations of the storm time cleft

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Foster, J.C.; Holt, J.M.; Redus, R.H.; Rich, F.J.

    1990-08-01

    During the magnetic storm of February 8-9, 1986, the region of strong ion convection in the vicinity of the dayside cusp expanded equatorward into the field of view of the Millstone Hill radar at lower mid-latitudes. High-speed (>1.5 km/s) poleward ion flows were found at latitudes as low as 60 deg invariant latitude, at least 10 deg lower than the typical cleft/cusp position for moderately disturbed (Kp>4) magnetospheric conditions. The ion velocity pattern responded promptly to changes in the interplanetary magnetic field By direction. The large-scale two-dimensional convection pattern across the dayside was well resolved using radar azimuth scan data at Millstone Hill, thus enabling us to place the fine-scale radar/satellite observations of the storm time cusp and cleft in the context of the large-scale pattern. We present a detailed comparison of radar and DMSP F7 satellite observations in the prenoon sector during a period of Kp > 7, to examine the low-altitude signatures of various plasma regions in the vicinity of the cusp. The combination of particle precipitation, magnetic field perturbation, radar measurements of ion heating, and convection consistently suggests the unusual low-latitude position of cusp at 65 invariant latitude.

  20. Simultaneous Spectral and Timing Observations of Accreting Neuron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.; West, Donald K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this proposal was to perform simultaneous x-ray spectral and millisecond timing observations of accreting neutron stars to further our understanding of their accretion dynamics and in the hope of using these systems as probes of the physics of strong gravitational fields. Observations of the neutron star binaries 4U0614+091, 4U1728-34, 4U1820-30, and Cyg X-2 were carried out with RXTE and BeppoSAX, ASCA, and Chandra (not all simultaneously). In addition, archival data were analyzed for 4U0614+091 and 4U1820-30. This investigation led to publication of three papers in peer-reviewed journals. These are listed below. In addition, the results were presented at several meetings including the two poster presentations listed below. Dr. Santina Piraino visited SAO for 4 months during 2000 to collaborate on analysis of the data from NAG5-8408 and NAG5-9104.

  1. The Home Observation Assessment Method (HOAM): Real-Time Naturalistic Observation of Families in Their Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinglass, Peter

    The vast bulk of psychosocial research data about the family are derived from two basic sources: self-report, retrospective data obtained by questionnaires or interviews; and direct observations of behavior occurring in a laboratory or treatment setting. Despite an emerging enthusiasm for the notion of studying behavior in its natural environment…

  2. Local Time Dependence of Jovian Radio Emissions Observed by Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Groene, J. B.

    1999-01-01

    Galileo has been in orbit around Jupiter since December 1995. All the orbits are equatorial and elliptical, with apogees between 60 R(sub J) - 142 R(sub J) and perigees from 8 - 12 R(sub J). Since orbit injection, the plasma wave instrument (PWS) has been collecting data over specific intervals of each of the orbits at all local times and a range of different radial distances. We present the results of a survey of the data for the frequency range 300 kHz to 5.6 MHz, which includes the hectometric (HOM) and low-frequency decametric (DAM) emissions. The results indicate that both the HOM and DAM emission are more intense and occur more frequently in the midnight sector of Jupiter. This is in analogy to Earth and consistent with a magnetic substorm source for a portion of the radio emissions in this frequency range. Another peak in the power levels is observed on the Jovian dayside in the local time range 11 hrs < LT < 12 hrs. This peak does not have a terrestrial counterpart. We speculate that this dayside peak may be a result of sampling near perigee, but we cannot rule out the possibility that this is not the case.

  3. Funding Full-Time Study through Part-Time Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Mark; Evans, Carl; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

    2009-01-01

    Full-time students engaged in part-time studies have been a subject of increasing academic attention. This study extends work in this area by examining: the extent to which full-time undergraduate students undertake part-time employment, the reasons for working whilst studying full-time and the extent to which students relate their part-time…

  4. Real-time molecular scale observation of crystal formation.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Roy E; Houben, Lothar; Wolf, Sharon G; Leitus, Gregory; Lang, Zhong-Ling; Carbó, Jorge J; Poblet, Josep M; Neumann, Ronny

    2017-04-01

    How molecules in solution form crystal nuclei, which then grow into large crystals, is a poorly understood phenomenon. The classical mechanism of homogeneous crystal nucleation proceeds via the spontaneous random aggregation of species from liquid or solution. However, a non-classical mechanism suggests the formation of an amorphous dense phase that reorders to form stable crystal nuclei. So far it has remained an experimental challenge to observe the formation of crystal nuclei from five to thirty molecules. Here, using polyoxometallates, we show that the formation of small crystal nuclei is observable by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. We observe both classical and non-classical nucleation processes, depending on the identity of the cation present. The experiments verify theoretical studies that suggest non-classical nucleation is the lower of the two energy pathways. The arrangement in just a seven-molecule proto-crystal matches the order found by X-ray diffraction of a single bulk crystal, which demonstrates that the same structure was formed in each case.

  5. Optimizing Spectral Resolution and Observation Time for Measurements of Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalfa, N.; Meadows, V. S.; Domagal-Goldman, S. D.

    2009-12-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) is a NASA mission concept that will attempt to characterize and search for habitability and life on extrasolar planets. While detection of a planet in the habitable zone increases the probability that the planet is habitable, planetary characterization will be required to confirm habitability and thereby test predictions of the position of the habitable zone. The TPF-I mission will accomplish this with an interferometer, allowing the detection of Earth-mass planets around stars up to 15 pc away and production of mid-infrared spectra from those planets. The focus on the mid-infrared region of the spectrum (7-20 mm) is beneficial because this is where energy from Earth-like planets is strongest relative to the flux from their parent stars. To discover if such planets are habitable we need to know not only what to look for - biosignatures and indicators of habitability - but also how to look. In other words, we must determine the trade-off in telescope properties that will provide the best science return. Extensive models have been made of Earth-like planets to describe many planetary properties, including atmospheric chemistry and surface temperature. Those properties may be derived for extrasolar planets using these models if spectra are obtained for the target planet. When modeling a planet, we can calculate a very high-resolution spectrum that can show the detailed absorption features of gases such as CO2, H2O, and O3. However, the telescope resolution will necessarily be limited by low photon fluxes from the distant targets. Alternatively, the telescope could spend more time taking in photons from each target planet. A balance may have to be struck between the numbers of targets observed and the quality of the data obtained for each target. We will present a number of simulations of TPF instrument measurements of terrestrial spectra that parametrize spectral resolution and observation time. The relative errors of these various

  6. Near Real Time website for IASI observations of atmospheric anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayer, Catherine; Grainger, Don; Marsh, Kevin; Carboni, Elisa; Ventress, Lucy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Rapid analysis of satellite observations of the state of the atmosphere and the contaminant levels within it can be used for pollution monitoring, forest fire detection and volcanic activity monitoring. There are numerous operational satellite instruments for which this is possible. The IASI instruments, currently flying on board the MetOp-A and MetOp-B satellite platforms, are used to produce Near Real Time (NRT) data using analysis algorithms developed by Oxford University. The data is then displayed on a website within 3 hours of measurement. This allows for the semi-continuous monitoring of the state of the atmosphere over most of the globe, both in daylight and at night. Global coverage is achieved 4 times per day, which is a significant advantage over most of the alternatives, either geostationary, giving limited spatial coverage, or UV instruments which are only able to observe during the daylight side of the orbit. The website includes flags for atmospheric contaminants detectable by IASI, including dust, biomass burning-derived species and volcanic ash and SO2. In the near future, the website will be developed to also include a quantitative estimate of the mass loading of SO2 contained within any volcanic cloud. Emissions of volcanic products, such as ash and SO2, are useful indicators of a change in the activity level of a volcano. Since many volcanoes are only monitored by remote sensing methods, such as satellite instruments, this can be the only such indicator available. These emissions are also dangerous to passing aircraft, causing damage to external surfaces of the plane and to the engines, sometimes leading to failure. Evacuation of regions surrounding volcanoes, and cessation or diversion of air traffic around actively erupting volcanoes is costly and highly disruptive but is sometimes required. Up to date information is of critical importance as to when to make these sensitive decisions. An archive of data will be available to allow for easy

  7. United States Forest Disturbance Trends Observed Using Landsat Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, Jeffrey G.; Goward, Samuel N.; Kennedy, Robert E.; Cohen, Warren B.; Moisen, Gretchen G.; Schleeweis, Karen; Huang, Chengquan

    2013-01-01

    Disturbance events strongly affect the composition, structure, and function of forest ecosystems; however, existing U.S. land management inventories were not designed to monitor disturbance. To begin addressing this gap, the North American Forest Dynamics (NAFD) project has examined a geographic sample of 50 Landsat satellite image time series to assess trends in forest disturbance across the conterminous United States for 1985-2005. The geographic sample design used a probability-based scheme to encompass major forest types and maximize geographic dispersion. For each sample location disturbance was identified in the Landsat series using the Vegetation Change Tracker (VCT) algorithm. The NAFD analysis indicates that, on average, 2.77 Mha/yr of forests were disturbed annually, representing 1.09%/yr of US forestland. These satellite-based national disturbance rates estimates tend to be lower than those derived from land management inventories, reflecting both methodological and definitional differences. In particular the VCT approach used with a biennial time step has limited sensitivity to low-intensity disturbances. Unlike prior satellite studies, our biennial forest disturbance rates vary by nearly a factor of two between high and low years. High western US disturbance rates were associated with active fire years and insect activity, while variability in the east is more strongly related to harvest rates in managed forests. We note that generating a geographic sample based on representing forest type and variability may be problematic since the spatial pattern of disturbance does not necessarily correlate with forest type. We also find that the prevalence of diffuse, non-stand clearing disturbance in US forests makes the application of a biennial geographic sample problematic. Future satellite-based studies of disturbance at regional and national scales should focus on wall-to-wall analyses with annual time step for improved accuracy.

  8. Observing Protein & Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study

    Cancer.gov

    The Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study was designed to assess dietary measurement error by comparing results from self-reported dietary intake data with four dietary biomarkers: doubly labeled water and urinary nitrogen, sodium, and potassium.

  9. Community Engagement in Observational Human Exposure Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although observational human exposure studies do not deliberately expose participants to chemicals or environmental conditions, merely involving people as research participants and conducting research inside homes raises ethical issues. Community engagement offers a promising st...

  10. Century Scale Evaporation Trend: An Observational Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bounoui, Lahouari

    2012-01-01

    Several climate models with different complexity indicate that under increased CO2 forcing, runoff would increase faster than precipitation overland. However, observations over large U.S watersheds indicate otherwise. This inconsistency between models and observations suggests that there may be important feedbacks between climate and land surface unaccounted for in the present generation of models. We have analyzed century-scale observed annual runoff and precipitation time-series over several United States Geological Survey hydrological units covering large forested regions of the Eastern United States not affected by irrigation. Both time-series exhibit a positive long-term trend; however, in contrast to model results, these historic data records show that the rate of precipitation increases at roughly double the rate of runoff increase. We considered several hydrological processes to close the water budget and found that none of these processes acting alone could account for the total water excess generated by the observed difference between precipitation and runoff. We conclude that evaporation has increased over the period of observations and show that the increasing trend in precipitation minus runoff is correlated to observed increase in vegetation density based on the longest available global satellite record. The increase in vegetation density has important implications for climate; it slows but does not alleviate the projected warming associated with greenhouse gases emission.

  11. A Numerical Climate Observing Network Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef

    2003-01-01

    This project was concerned with three related questions of an optimal design of a climate observing system: 1. The spatial sampling characteristics required from an ARGO system. 2. The degree to which surface observations from ARGO can be used to calibrate and test satellite remote sensing observations of sea surface salinity (SSS) as it is anticipated now. 3. The more general design of an climate observing system as it is required in the near future for CLIVAR in the Atlantic. An important question in implementing an observing system is that of the sampling density required to observe climate-related variations in the ocean. For that purpose this project was concerned with the sampling requirements for the ARGO float system, but investigated also other elements of a climate observing system. As part of this project we studied the horizontal and vertical sampling characteristics of a global ARGO system which is required to make it fully complementary to altimeter data with the goal to capture climate related variations on large spatial scales (less thanAttachment: 1000 km). We addressed this question in the framework of a numerical model study in the North Atlantic with an 1/6 horizontal resolution. The advantage of a numerical design study is the knowledge of the full model state. Sampled by a synthetic float array, model results will therefore allow to test and improve existing deployment strategies with the goal to make the system as optimal and cost-efficient as possible. Attachment: "Optimal observations for variational data assimilation".

  12. Observational and Modeling Study of Mesopheric Bores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughmiller, P.; Kelley, M.; Hickey, M.

    In our studies of the dynamics of the upper atmosphere, some of the most intriguing mesospheric phenomena we observe high over the Hawaiian night skies are internal bores. These events affecting chemiluminescence are documented in monochromatic airglow images taken by high performance all-sky CCD imaging systems operating at the Maui Space Surveillance Site on top of Haleakala Crater. Data is collected as part of the ongoing, collaborative Maui - Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MALT) campaign, jointly sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Bolstered by the Maui-MALT dataset, several theories now exist for mesospheric bores, agreeing in principle that they are likely nonlinear structures spawned by gravity waves and propagating within ducted waveguide regions, such as thermal inversion layers. A new investigation will model optical emissions using a robust, time-dependent, chemical dynamics model to explore the airglow response to ducted gravity waves and, in turn, the geographical and vertical coupling relationships which may exist.

  13. Toward storm-time ionosphere forecast using GNSS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Charles; Chen, Chia-Hung; Liu, Tiger J. Y.; Chen, Wei-Han

    2016-04-01

    Previous theoretical simulations of the mid- and low-latitude ionospheric responses to space weather events have indicated general features of electron density disturbances. The magnetic storm produced penetration electric field and neutral wind disturbances lead to formation of various storm-time ionospheric electron density structures, such as super plasma fountain, equatorial electron density trough and F3 layer, as well as long-lasting global ionosphere suppression. We attempt to model these storm-related ionospheric electron density structures using the global assimilative ionospheric model that assimilates electron densities taken from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC and TEC from ground-based GNSS receivers. Using the ensemble Kalman filter with consideration of ion densities, electric potential, thermospheric neutral wind and compositions as update variables, we study the performance and forecast capability of the assimilative model. The assimilative model could be utilized for ionosphere forecast in near future.

  14. Information and Complexity Measures Applied to Observed and Simulated Soil Moisture Time Series

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Time series of soil moisture-related parameters provides important insights in functioning of soil water systems. Analysis of patterns within these time series has been used in several studies. The objective of this work was to compare patterns in observed and simulated soil moisture contents to u...

  15. Real-time observation of epitaxial graphene domain reorientation

    DOE PAGES

    Thuermer, Konrad; Foster, Michael E.; Bartelt, Norman Charles; ...

    2015-04-20

    Graphene films grown by vapour deposition tend to be polycrystalline due to the nucleation and growth of islands with different in-plane orientations. Here, using low-energy electron microscopy, we find that micron-sized graphene islands on Ir(111) rotate to a preferred orientation during thermal annealing. We observe three alignment mechanisms: the simultaneous growth of aligned domains and dissolution of rotated domains, that is, ‘ripening’; domain boundary motion within islands; and continuous lattice rotation of entire domains. By measuring the relative growth velocity of domains during ripening, we estimate that the driving force for alignment is on the order of 0.1 meV permore » C atom and increases with rotation angle. A simple model of the orientation-dependent energy associated with the moiré corrugation of the graphene sheet due to local variations in the graphene–substrate interaction reproduces the results. This study suggests new strategies for improving the van der Waals epitaxy of 2D materials.« less

  16. Real-time observation of epitaxial graphene domain reorientation

    SciTech Connect

    Thuermer, Konrad; Foster, Michael E.; Bartelt, Norman Charles; Rogge, Paul C.; McCarty, Kevin F.; Dubon, Oscar D.; Bartelt, Norman C.

    2015-04-20

    Graphene films grown by vapour deposition tend to be polycrystalline due to the nucleation and growth of islands with different in-plane orientations. Here, using low-energy electron microscopy, we find that micron-sized graphene islands on Ir(111) rotate to a preferred orientation during thermal annealing. We observe three alignment mechanisms: the simultaneous growth of aligned domains and dissolution of rotated domains, that is, ‘ripening’; domain boundary motion within islands; and continuous lattice rotation of entire domains. By measuring the relative growth velocity of domains during ripening, we estimate that the driving force for alignment is on the order of 0.1 meV per C atom and increases with rotation angle. A simple model of the orientation-dependent energy associated with the moiré corrugation of the graphene sheet due to local variations in the graphene–substrate interaction reproduces the results. This study suggests new strategies for improving the van der Waals epitaxy of 2D materials.

  17. Rater Drift and Time Trends in Classroom Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casabianca, Jodi M.; Lockwood, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Classroom observation protocols, in which observers rate multiple dimensions of teaching according to established protocols (either live in the classroom, or post-hoc from lesson videos), are increasingly being used in both research and policy contexts. However, scores generated from these protocols have many sources of error. Day to day variation…

  18. Novae a theoretical and observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soraisam, Monika D.

    2016-02-01

    In this thesis, we present studies relating to novae that include both theoretical and ob- servational aspects. Being hosted by accreting white dwarfs (WDs), they have drawn attention in the context of the supernova Ia (SN Ia) progenitor problem. In the case of the nova explosion, the WD host is not disrupted. Instead, it continues to supply energy, even after the optical outbust, via stable nuclear burning of the remnant hydrogen envelope that survived the outburst. Accordingly, nova emission progresses toward the harder part of the electromagnetic spectrum, where it lasts longer than in the optical regime. As a consequence, novae are found to constitute the majority of the observed supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs). This is particularly well established for the galaxy M31. For high mass accretion rates in the unstable nuclear burning regime (or nova regime), there is evidence that significant mass accumulation by the WD is possible. This paved the way for SN Ia progenitor models in the single degenerate (SD) scenario involving novae. Based on the statistics of novae in M31, which is the most frequently used target for nova surveys, we investigate the role that novae may play in producing SNe Ia. Using multicycle nova evolution models and the observationally inferred nova rate in M31, we estimate the maximal SN Ia rate that novae can produce, assuming that all of the involved WDs reach the Chandrasekhar mass. Comparing this rate to the observationally inferred SN Ia rate for M31 constrains the contribution of the nova channel to the SN Ia rate to 2-7%. Additionally, we demonstrate that a more powerful diagnostic can be obtained from statistics of fast novae, which are characterized by decline times t2 10 days. Most novae resulting from a typical SD SN Ia progenitor accreting in the nova regime are fast. Specifically, as the WD in the nova grows in mass, it produces novae more frequently and with decreasing decline times. We therefore investigate how efficiently fast

  19. Earth Observing System: Global Observations to Study the Earth's Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by which scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During the last couple of years, four EOS science missions were launched, representing observations of (1) total solar irradiance, (2) Earth radiation budget, (3) land cover & land use change, (4) ocean processes (vector wind, sea surface temperature, and ocean color), (5) atmospheric processes (aerosol and cloud properties, water vapor, and temperature and moisture profiles), and (6) tropospheric chemistry. In succeeding years many more satellites will be launched that will contribute immeasurably to our understanding of the Earth's environment. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using NASA's Earth science data to examine land use and natural hazards, environmental air quality, including dust storms over the world's deserts, cloud and radiation properties, sea surface temperature, and winds over the ocean.

  20. Child Study and Observation: Child Development 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Joanna

    This syllabus outlines the structure, objectives, and lesson plans for Child Development 101, a twelve-week course on child study and observation offered at Chaffey Community College. A statement of the educational philosophy upon which the course was developed precedes a list of course objectives, competencies, and the grading system. The bulk of…

  1. Workplace Education Initiative: Case Studies and Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astrein, Bruce; And Others

    Seven workplace education projects funded in the first year of the Massachusetts Workplace Education Initiative are reported. This report includes both general observations and specific information in case studies of the projects. Overall information is provided on students served, the importance of partnerships, the emphasis on…

  2. Regression modeling of longitudinal data with outcome-dependent observation times: extensions and comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kay See; French, Benjamin; Troxel, Andrea B

    2014-11-30

    Conventional longitudinal data analysis methods assume that outcomes are independent of the data-collection schedule. However, the independence assumption may be violated, for example, when a specific treatment necessitates a different follow-up schedule than the control arm or when adverse events trigger additional physician visits in between prescheduled follow-ups. Dependence between outcomes and observation times may introduce bias when estimating the marginal association of covariates on outcomes using a standard longitudinal regression model. We formulate a framework of outcome-observation dependence mechanisms to describe conditional independence given observed observation-time process covariates or shared latent variables. We compare four recently developed semi-parametric methods that accommodate one of these mechanisms. To allow greater flexibility, we extend these methods to accommodate a combination of mechanisms. In simulation studies, we show how incorrectly specifying the outcome-observation dependence may yield biased estimates of covariate-outcome associations and how our proposed extensions can accommodate a greater number of dependence mechanisms. We illustrate the implications of different modeling strategies in an application to bladder cancer data. In longitudinal studies with potentially outcome-dependent observation times, we recommend that analysts carefully explore the conditional independence mechanism between the outcome and observation-time processes to ensure valid inference regarding covariate-outcome associations.

  3. TIME-DEPENDENT INFRARED STUDIES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    INFRARED RESEARCH, TIME , INFRARED PHENOMENA, INFRARED RADIATION, INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY, HIGH ALTITUDE, SOLAR ATMOSPHERE, TRANSMISSIONS(MECHANICAL), VIBRATION, QUANTUM THEORY, CALIBRATION, INFRARED SCANNING.

  4. Effect of Information Load and Time on Observational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslin, Gavin; Hodges, Nicola J.; Williams, A. Mark

    2009-01-01

    We examined whether altering the amount of and moment when visual information is presented affected observational learning for participants practicing a bowling skill. On Day 1, four groups practiced a cricket bowling action. Three groups viewed a full-body point-light model, the model's bowling arm, or between-limb coordination of the model's…

  5. Determination of the distance between two adjacent stations, the observational vertical increment and the observational time interval in optimum sense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Dongxian

    1985-08-01

    Considering the observational error, the truncation error and the requirements of numerical weather prediction, three formulas for determining the distance between two adjacent stations d 1, the observational vertical increment Δ p 1 and the observational time interval Δ t 1 in optimum sense, have been derived. Since they depend on the shortest wavelength concerned and the ratio of maximum observational error to wave amplitude, the results are quite different for different scale systems. For the filtered model the values of d 1, Δ p 1, and Δ t 1 general come near those required in the MANUAL on the GOS published in 1980 by WMO. But for the primitive equation model the estimated value of Δ t 1 is much less than those required in the filtered model case. Therefore, it is improper to study the fast moving and developing processes of the atmospheric motion only on the basis of the conventional observations. It seems to be necessary to establish an optimum composite observational system including the surface-based system and the space-based system.

  6. Kalman Filtering USNO's GPS Observations for Improved Time Transfer Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutsell, Steven T.

    1996-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) Master Control Station (MCS) performs the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) time transfer mission by uploading and broadcasting predictions of the GPS-UTC offset in subframe 4 of the GS navigation message. These predictions are based on only two successive daily data points obtained from the US Naval Observatory (USNO). USNO produces these daily smoothed data points by performing a least-squares fit on roughly 38 hours worth of data from roughly 160 successive 13-minute tracks of GPS satellites. Though sufficient for helping to maintain a time transfer error specification of 28 ns (1 Sigma), the MCS's prediction algorithm does not make the best use of the available data from from USNO, and produces data that can degrade quickly over extended prediction spans. This paper investigates how, by applying Kalman filtering to the same available tracking data, the MCS could improve its estimate of GPS-UTC, and in particular, the GPS-UTC A(sub 1) term. By refining the A(sub 1) (frequency) estimate for GPS-UTC predictions, error in GPS time transfer could drop significantly. Additional, the risk of future spikes in GPS's time transfer error could similarly be minimized, by employing robust Kalman filtering for GPS-UTC predictions.

  7. High Time Resolution Studies with the GBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska, Natalia; Lynch, Ryan S.

    2017-01-01

    The detection of neutron stars 49 years ago has created many new and independent branches of research. In 1967, fast rotating neutron stars, or pulsars, became the first objects of this kind to be discovered at radio wavelengths -- more than 30years after their theoretical prediction.In spite of numerous studies throughout the years, the mechanism of the observed radio emission of pulsars is still not understood. Recent technological developments allow observations of pulsars with time resolutions extending into the nanoseconds range, providing a unique insight into the momentary state of a pulsar.Radio giant pulses are known to occur non-periodically in certain phase ranges, exhibit much higher peak flux densities than regular pulses, and to have pulse widths ranging from the micro- to nanoseconds. Their characteristics make them suitable for high time resolution studies. We present the first high time resolution observations of the original millisecond pulsar PSR B1937+21 carried out with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Radio Telescope.

  8. Induced Time-Reversal Symmetry Breaking Observed in Microwave Billiards

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, B.; Friedrich, T.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Richter, A.; Schaefer, F.; Harney, H. L.; Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2007-02-16

    Using reciprocity, we investigate the breaking of time-reversal (T) symmetry due to a ferrite embedded in a flat microwave billiard. Transmission spectra of isolated single resonances are not sensitive to T violation, whereas those of pairs of nearly degenerate resonances do depend on the direction of time. For their theoretical description a scattering matrix model from nuclear physics is used. The T-violating matrix elements of the effective Hamiltonian for the microwave billiard with the embedded ferrite are determined experimentally as functions of the magnetization of the ferrite.

  9. Induced time-reversal symmetry breaking observed in microwave billiards.

    PubMed

    Dietz, B; Friedrich, T; Harney, H L; Miski-Oglu, M; Richter, A; Schäfer, F; Weidenmüller, H A

    2007-02-16

    Using reciprocity, we investigate the breaking of time-reversal (T) symmetry due to a ferrite embedded in a flat microwave billiard. Transmission spectra of isolated single resonances are not sensitive to T violation, whereas those of pairs of nearly degenerate resonances do depend on the direction of time. For their theoretical description a scattering matrix model from nuclear physics is used. The T-violating matrix elements of the effective Hamiltonian for the microwave billiard with the embedded ferrite are determined experimentally as functions of the magnetization of the ferrite.

  10. Real-time observation of collective excitations in photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemell, C.; Neppl, S.; Wachter, G.; Tőkési, K.; Ernstorfer, R.; Feulner, P.; Kienberger, R.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2015-06-01

    Ejection of an electron by absorption of an extreme ultraviolet (xuv) photon probes the many-electron response of a solid well beyond the single-particle picture. Photoemission spectra feature complex correlation satellite structures signifying the simultaneous excitation of single or multiple plasmons. The time delay of the plasmon satellites relative to the main line can be resolved in attosecond streaking experiments. Time-resolved photoemission thus provides the key to discriminate between intrinsic and extrinsic plasmon excitation. We demonstrate the determination of the branching ratio between intrinsic and extrinsic plasmon generation for simple metals.

  11. Time Resolved Atmospheric Carbon Satellite Observations from Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, David; Worden, Helen

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from CHRONOS (Commercially Hosted spectroRadiometer Observations and New Opportunities for Science). The primary goal of this mission is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Both CO and CH4 are chemical precursors of tropospheric ozone pollution. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution. The CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth Venture TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution

  12. Finding the times that SMMR observed a ship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In order to facilitate the coincidence calculations, the coordinates of the ship and the satellite were transformed to the ECO system in which the equatorial plane is the plane of the satellite's orbit. The transformation matrices for each step are presented. The ship could be observed when it was in a band about the equator in the ECO system. The width of the band was determined by the scan pattern of the instrument.

  13. Time Resolved Atmospheric Carbon Satellite Observations from Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, D. P.; Worden, H. M.; Deeter, M. N.; Worden, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from CHRONOS (Commercially Hosted spectroRadiometer Observations and New Opportunities for Science). The primary goal of this mission is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Both CO and CH4 are chemical precursors of tropospheric ozone pollution. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution. The CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth Venture TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution

  14. Active Control of Compressor Surge Using a Real Time Observer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    Engines at the Georgia No. 98-GT-475, 1998. Institute of Technology sponsored by the U.S. Army 12. Grauer , F., Volgmann, W., Stoff, H. and Breuer...Verlag, 1991. 11-10 PAPER -11, J. Prasad Question (F. Grauer , Germany) Was the detector influenced by the blade passing frequencies? Reply No, the...observer could be selected to operate over a range of frequencies, thus eliminat- ing other frequencies. Question (F. Grauer , Germany) Do you expect your

  15. Near-Real-Time Earth Observation Data Supporting Wildfire Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosia, V. G.; Zajkowski, T.; Quayle, B.

    2013-12-01

    During disaster events, the most critical element needed by responding personnel and management teams is situational intelligence / awareness. During rapidly-evolving events such as wildfires, the need for timely information is critical to save lives, property and resources. The wildfire management agencies in the US rely heavily on remote sensing information both from airborne platforms as well as from orbital assets. The ability to readily have information from those systems, not just data, is critical to effective control and damage mitigation. NASA has been collaborating with the USFS to mature and operationalize various asset-information capabilities to effect improved knowledge of fire-prone areas, monitor wildfire events in real-time, assess effectiveness of fire management strategies, and provide rapid, post-fire assessment for recovery operations. Specific examples of near-real-time remote sensing asset utility include daily MODIS data employed to assess fire potential / wildfire hazard areas, and national-scale hot-spot detection, airborne thermal sensor collected during wildfire events to effect management strategies, EO-1 ALI 'pointable' satellite sensor data to assess fire-retardant application effectiveness, and Landsat 8 and other sensor data to derive burn severity indices for post-fire remediation work. These cases of where near-real-time data is used operationally during the previous few fire seasons will be presented.

  16. Time as an Observable in Nonrelativistic Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, G. E.

    2003-01-01

    The argument follows from the viewpoint that quantum mechanics is taken not in the usual form involving vectors and linear operators in Hilbert spaces, but as a boundary value problem for a special class of partial differential equations-in the present work, the nonrelativistic Schrodinger equation for motion of a structureless particle in four- dimensional space-time in the presence of a potential energy distribution that can be time-as well as space-dependent. The domain of interest is taken to be one of two semi-infinite boxes, one bounded by two t=constant planes and the other by two t=constant planes. Each gives rise to a characteristic boundary value problem: one in which the initial, input values on one t=constant wall are given, with zero asymptotic wavefunction values in all spatial directions, the output being the values on the second t=constant wall; the second with certain input values given on both z=constant walls, with zero asymptotic values in all directions involving time and the other spatial coordinates, the output being the complementary values on the z=constant walls. The first problem corresponds to ordinary quantum mechanics; the second, to a fully time-dependent version of a problem normally considered only for the steady state (time-independent Schrodinger equation). The second problem is formulated in detail. A conserved indefinite metric is associated with space-like propagation, where the sign of the norm of a unidirectional state corresponds to its spatial direction of travel.

  17. Ozone Lidar Observations for Air Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lihua; Newchurch, Mike; Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Huang, Guanyu; Pour-Biazar, Arastoo; Koshak, William; Follette-Cook, Melanie B.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; McGee, Thomas J.; Sullivan, John T.; Langford, Andrew O.; Senff, Christoph J.; Alvarez, Raul; Eloranta, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone lidars are well suited to measuring the high spatio-temporal variability of this important trace gas. Furthermore, lidar measurements in conjunction with balloon soundings, aircraft, and satellite observations provide substantial information about a variety of atmospheric chemical and physical processes. Examples of processes elucidated by ozone-lidar measurements are presented, and modeling studies using WRF-Chem, RAQMS, and DALES/LES models illustrate our current understanding and shortcomings of these processes.

  18. Time to Tango: expertise and contextual anticipation during action observation.

    PubMed

    Amoruso, Lucía; Sedeño, Lucas; Huepe, David; Tomio, Ailin; Kamienkowski, Juan; Hurtado, Esteban; Cardona, Juan Felipe; Álvarez González, Miguel Ángel; Rieznik, Andrés; Sigman, Mariano; Manes, Facundo; Ibáñez, Agustín

    2014-09-01

    Predictive theories of action observation propose that we use our own motor system as a guide for anticipating and understanding other people's actions through the generation of context-based expectations. According to this view, people should be better in predicting and interpreting those actions that are present in their own motor repertoire compared to those that are not. We recorded high-density event-related potentials (ERPs: P300, N400 and Slow Wave, SW) and source estimation in 80 subjects separated by their level of expertise (experts, beginners and naïves) as they observed realistic videos of Tango steps with different degrees of execution correctness. We also performed path analysis to infer causal relationships between ongoing anticipatory brain activity, evoked semantic responses, expertise measures and behavioral performance. We found that anticipatory activity, with sources in a fronto-parieto-occipital network, early discriminated between groups according to their level of expertise. Furthermore, this early activity significantly predicted subsequent semantic integration indexed by semantic responses (N400 and SW, sourced in temporal and motor regions) which also predicted motor expertise. In addition, motor expertise was a good predictor of behavioral performance. Our results show that neural and temporal dynamics underlying contextual action anticipation and comprehension can be interpreted in terms of successive levels of contextual prediction that are significantly modulated by subject's prior experience.

  19. Non-parametric estimation for the difference or ratio of median failure times for paired observations.

    PubMed

    Jung, S H; Su, J Q

    1995-02-15

    We propose a non-parametric method to calculate a confidence interval for the difference or ratio of two median failure times for paired observations with censoring. The new method is simple to calculate, does not involve non-parametric density estimates, and is valid asymptotically even when the two underlying distribution functions differ in shape. The method also allows missing observations. We report numerical studies to examine the performance of the new method for practical sample sizes.

  20. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VIII. CATALOG OF TRANSIT TIMING MEASUREMENTS OF THE FIRST TWELVE QUARTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mazeh, Tsevi; Nachmani, Gil; Holczer, Tomer; Sokol, Gil; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Ragozzine, Darin; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Rowe, Jason F.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Zucker, Shay; Agol, Eric; Carter, Joshua A.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Steffen, Jason H.; Welsh, William

    2013-10-01

    Following the works of Ford et al. and Steffen et al. we derived the transit timing of 1960 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) using the pre-search data conditioning light curves of the first twelve quarters of the Kepler data. For 721 KOIs with large enough signal-to-noise ratios, we obtained also the duration and depth of each transit. The results are presented as a catalog for the community to use. We derived a few statistics of our results that could be used to indicate significant variations. Including systems found by previous works, we have found 130 KOIs that showed highly significant times of transit variations (TTVs) and 13 that had short-period TTV modulations with small amplitudes. We consider two effects that could cause apparent periodic TTV—the finite sampling of the observations and the interference with the stellar activity, stellar spots in particular. We briefly discuss some statistical aspects of our detected TTVs. We show that the TTV period is correlated with the orbital period of the planet and with the TTV amplitude.

  1. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler. VIII. Catalog of Transit Timing Measurements of the First Twelve Quarters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazeh, Tsevi; Nachmani, Gil; Holczer, Tomer; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Sokol, Gil; Rowe, Jason F.; Zucker, Shay; Agol, Eric; Carter, Joshua A.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Ragozzine, Darin; Steffen, Jason H.; Welsh, William

    2013-10-01

    Following the works of Ford et al. and Steffen et al. we derived the transit timing of 1960 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) using the pre-search data conditioning light curves of the first twelve quarters of the Kepler data. For 721 KOIs with large enough signal-to-noise ratios, we obtained also the duration and depth of each transit. The results are presented as a catalog for the community to use. We derived a few statistics of our results that could be used to indicate significant variations. Including systems found by previous works, we have found 130 KOIs that showed highly significant times of transit variations (TTVs) and 13 that had short-period TTV modulations with small amplitudes. We consider two effects that could cause apparent periodic TTV—the finite sampling of the observations and the interference with the stellar activity, stellar spots in particular. We briefly discuss some statistical aspects of our detected TTVs. We show that the TTV period is correlated with the orbital period of the planet and with the TTV amplitude.

  2. An observational study of quiescent novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, V. S.

    1990-01-01

    Quiescent novae are close binary stars which are characterised by the presence of Balmer and HeII emission lines in their optical spectra. In high-inclination systems, standard theory predicts that one should observe double-peaked emission line profiles which are eclipsed once every orbital period. However, the emission lines of eclipsing quiescent novae are single-peaked and uneclipsed, in obvious conflict with currently held beliefs on the nature of these systems. It is the purpose of this thesis to solve this long-standing problem and so arrive at a theoretical model for quiescent novae which is consistent with the observational evidence. The first part of the thesis sets the scene to the problem by presenting an overview of the conflicting observational and theoretical results. The second part then reports on a number of new observations obtained during the course of this work which have shed new light on the problem. The results of these new observations are presented in Part III of the thesis, where one chapter is devoted to each of the three objects studied (V1315 Aquilae, SW Sextantis and DW Ursae Majoris). The final part of the thesis is a discussion and comparison of the various results presented in Part III. Using these results, a series of observational constraints are defined which are then applied to a number of existing theoretical models. In the case of V1315 Aql and SW Sex, the very stringent set of constraints results in there being no single model capable of explaining the observed phenomena. DW UMa is even more enigmatic, appearing in a previously unseen low-state during which the mass transfer rate appears to have reduced dramatically and the optical spectra are dominated by Balmer emission from the inner face of the secondary star. The implications of these new observations for the wider field of cataclysmic variables are discussed, followed by a short summary of future work necessary to validate the origin, evolution and behaviour of the

  3. Observing Evolutionary Entropy in Relation to Body Size Over Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idgunji, S.; Zhang, H.; Payne, J.; Heim, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Second Law of Thermodynamics, according to Clausius, states that entropy will always increase in the universe, meaning systems will break down and become simple and chaotic. However, this is seemingly contradicted by the existence of living organisms, which can have highly complex and organized systems. Furthermore, there is a greater contradiction in the theory of evolution, which sees organisms growing larger and becoming more complex over time. Our research project revolved around whether organisms actually became more complex over time, and correlating these findings with the body size of these organisms. We analyzed the relationship between body size and cell types of five different marine phyla: arthropods, brachiopods, chordates, echinoderms, and mollusks. We attempted to find a relation between the biovolume of these different phyla and the number of specialized cell types that they had, which is a common measure of biocomplexity. In addition, we looked at the metabolic intensity, which is the mass-specific rate of energy processing applied to an organism's size, because it is also correlated to genetic complexity. Using R programming, we tested for correlations between these factors. After applying a Pearson correlation test, we discovered a generally positive correlation between the body sizes, number of cell types, and metabolic intensities of these phyla. However, one exception is that there is a negative correlation between the body size and metabolic intensity of echinoderms. Overall, we can see that marine organisms tend to evolve larger and more complex over time, and that is a very interesting find. Our discovery yielded many research questions and problems that we would like to solve, such as how the environment is thermodynamically affected by these organisms.

  4. PBO Integrated Real-Time Observing Sites at Volcanic Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mencin, D.; Jackson, M.; Borsa, A.; Feaux, K.; Smith, S.

    2009-05-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory, an element of NSF's EarthScope program, has six integrated observatories in Yellowstone and four on Mt St Helens. These observatories consist of some combination of borehole strainmeters, borehole seismometers, GPS, tiltmeters, pore pressure, thermal measurements and meteorological data. Data from all these instruments have highly variable data rates and formats, all synchronized to GPS time which can cause significant congestion of precious communication resources. PBO has been experimenting with integrating these data streams to both maximize efficiency and minimize latency through the use of software that combines the streams, like Antelope, and VPN technologies.

  5. The NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Stephen; Maier, Mark; Di Pietro, David

    2016-01-01

    NOAA is beginning a study, the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture (NSOSA) study, to plan for the future operational environmental satellite system that will follow GOES and JPSS, beginning about 2030. This is an opportunity to design a modern architecture with no pre-conceived notions regarding instruments, platforms, orbits, etc. The NSOSA study will develop and evaluate architecture alternatives to include partner and commercial alternatives that are likely to become available. The objectives will include both functional needs and strategic characteristics (e.g., flexibility, responsiveness, sustainability). Part of this study is the Space Platform Requirements Working Group (SPRWG), which is being commissioned by NESDIS. The SPRWG is charged to assess new or existing user needs and to provide relative priorities for observational needs in the context of the future architecture. SPRWG results will serve as input to the process for new foundational (Level 0 and Level 1) requirements for the next generation of NOAA satellites that follow the GOES-R, JPSS, DSCOVR, Jason-3, and COSMIC-2 missions.

  6. Advanced Earth Observation System Instrumentation Study (aeosis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R.; Grant, F.; Malchow, H.; Walker, B.

    1975-01-01

    Various types of measurements were studied for estimating the orbit and/or attitude of an Earth Observation Satellite. An investigation was made into the use of known ground targets in the earth sensor imagery, in combination with onboard star sightings and/or range and range rate measurements by ground tracking stations or tracking satellites (TDRSS), to estimate satellite attitude, orbital ephemeris, and gyro bias drift. Generalized measurement equations were derived for star measurements with a particular type of star tracker, and for landmark measurements with a multispectral scanner being proposed for an advanced Earth Observation Satellite. The use of infra-red horizon measurements to estimate the attitude and gyro bias drift of a geosynchronous satellite was explored.

  7. Advanced Earth Observation System Instrumentation Study (AEOSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Var, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility, practicality, and cost are investigated for establishing a national system or grid of artificial landmarks suitable for automated (near real time) recognition in the multispectral scanner imagery data from an earth observation satellite (EOS). The intended use of such landmarks, for orbit determination and improved mapping accuracy is reviewed. The desirability of using xenon searchlight landmarks for this purpose is explored theoretically and by means of experimental results obtained with LANDSAT 1 and LANDSAT 2. These results are used, in conjunction with the demonstrated efficiency of an automated detection scheme, to determine the size and cost of a xenon searchlight that would be suitable for an EOS Searchlight Landmark Station (SLS), and to facilitate the development of a conceptual design for an automated and environmentally protected EOS SLS.

  8. Observing Holliday junction branch migration one step at a time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Taekjip

    2004-03-01

    During genetic recombination, two homologous DNA molecules undergo strand exchange to form a four-way DNA (Holliday) junction and the recognition and processing of this species by branch migration and junction resolving enzymes determine the outcome. We have used single molecule fluorescence techniques to study two intrinsic structural dynamics of the Holliday junction, stacking conformer transitions and spontaneous branch migration. Our studies show that the dynamics of branch migration, resolved with one base pair resolution, is determined by the stability of conformers which in turn depends on the local DNA sequences. Therefore, the energy landscape of Holliday junction branch migation is not uniform, but is rugged.

  9. Real-time observation of epitaxial graphene domain reorientation

    PubMed Central

    Rogge, Paul C.; Thürmer, Konrad; Foster, Michael E.; McCarty, Kevin F.; Dubon, Oscar D.; Bartelt, Norman C.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene films grown by vapour deposition tend to be polycrystalline due to the nucleation and growth of islands with different in-plane orientations. Here, using low-energy electron microscopy, we find that micron-sized graphene islands on Ir(111) rotate to a preferred orientation during thermal annealing. We observe three alignment mechanisms: the simultaneous growth of aligned domains and dissolution of rotated domains, that is, ‘ripening'; domain boundary motion within islands; and continuous lattice rotation of entire domains. By measuring the relative growth velocity of domains during ripening, we estimate that the driving force for alignment is on the order of 0.1 meV per C atom and increases with rotation angle. A simple model of the orientation-dependent energy associated with the moiré corrugation of the graphene sheet due to local variations in the graphene–substrate interaction reproduces the results. This work suggests new strategies for improving the van der Waals epitaxy of 2D materials. PMID:25892219

  10. Real-time observation of epitaxial graphene domain reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogge, Paul C.; Thürmer, Konrad; Foster, Michael E.; McCarty, Kevin F.; Dubon, Oscar D.; Bartelt, Norman C.

    2015-04-01

    Graphene films grown by vapour deposition tend to be polycrystalline due to the nucleation and growth of islands with different in-plane orientations. Here, using low-energy electron microscopy, we find that micron-sized graphene islands on Ir(111) rotate to a preferred orientation during thermal annealing. We observe three alignment mechanisms: the simultaneous growth of aligned domains and dissolution of rotated domains, that is, `ripening' domain boundary motion within islands; and continuous lattice rotation of entire domains. By measuring the relative growth velocity of domains during ripening, we estimate that the driving force for alignment is on the order of 0.1 meV per C atom and increases with rotation angle. A simple model of the orientation-dependent energy associated with the moiré corrugation of the graphene sheet due to local variations in the graphene-substrate interaction reproduces the results. This work suggests new strategies for improving the van der Waals epitaxy of 2D materials.

  11. Stability of Teachers' Classroom Instruction across Classes and Time of Observation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shwu-yong Liou; Waxman, Hersholt C.

    The stability of teacher behavior has been one of the most important areas of process-product research. This study was designed to investigate teacher stability in the context of math instruction across classes and times of observation in order to assess the relationship between teaching styles and student learning outcomes. Specifically the study…

  12. Talk, Tools, and Tensions: Observing Biological Talk over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Doris; Crain, Rhiannon; Brandt, Carol; Loomis, Molly; Wheaton, Mele; Bennett, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study is to explore new tools for analyzing scientific sense-making in out-of-school settings. Although such measures are now common in science classroom research, dialogically based methodological approaches are relatively new to informal learning research. Such out-of-classroom settings have more recently become a breeding…

  13. Observability of nonlinear dynamics: Normalized results and a time-series approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Luis A.; Bastos, Saulo B.; Alves, Marcela A.; Letellier, Christophe

    2008-03-01

    This paper investigates the observability of nonlinear dynamical systems. Two difficulties associated with previous studies are dealt with. First, a normalized degree observability is defined. This permits the comparison of different systems, which was not generally possible before. Second, a time-series approach is proposed based on omnidirectional nonlinear correlation functions to rank a set of time series of a system in terms of their potential use to reconstruct the original dynamics without requiring the knowledge of the system equations. The two approaches proposed in this paper and a former method were applied to five benchmark systems and an overall agreement of over 92% was found.

  14. Globally Gridded Satellite observations for climate studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knapp, K.R.; Ansari, S.; Bain, C.L.; Bourassa, M.A.; Dickinson, M.J.; Funk, C.; Helms, C.N.; Hennon, C.C.; Holmes, C.D.; Huffman, G.J.; Kossin, J.P.; Lee, H.-T.; Loew, A.; Magnusdottir, G.

    2011-01-01

    Geostationary satellites have provided routine, high temporal resolution Earth observations since the 1970s. Despite the long period of record, use of these data in climate studies has been limited for numerous reasons, among them that no central archive of geostationary data for all international satellites exists, full temporal and spatial resolution data are voluminous, and diverse calibration and navigation formats encumber the uniform processing needed for multisatellite climate studies. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) set the stage for overcoming these issues by archiving a subset of the full-resolution geostationary data at ~10-km resolution at 3-hourly intervals since 1983. Recent efforts at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center to provide convenient access to these data include remapping the data to a standard map projection, recalibrating the data to optimize temporal homogeneity, extending the record of observations back to 1980, and reformatting the data for broad public distribution. The Gridded Satellite (GridSat) dataset includes observations from the visible, infrared window, and infrared water vapor channels. Data are stored in Network Common Data Format (netCDF) using standards that permit a wide variety of tools and libraries to process the data quickly and easily. A novel data layering approach, together with appropriate satellite and file metadata, allows users to access GridSat data at varying levels of complexity based on their needs. The result is a climate data record already in use by the meteorological community. Examples include reanalysis of tropical cyclones, studies of global precipitation, and detection and tracking of the intertropical convergence zone.

  15. Real-time retrieval of precipitable water vapor from GPS and BeiDou observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixian; Li, Xingxing; Nilsson, Tobias; Ning, Tong; Heinkelmann, Robert; Ge, Maorong; Glaser, Susanne; Schuh, Harald

    2015-09-01

    The rapid development of the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) brings a promising prospect for the real-time retrieval of zenith tropospheric delays (ZTD) and precipitable water vapor (PWV), which is of great benefit for supporting the time-critical meteorological applications such as nowcasting or severe weather event monitoring. In this study, we develop a real-time ZTD/PWV processing method based on Global Positioning System (GPS) and BDS observations. The performance of ZTD and PWV derived from BDS observations using real-time precise point positioning (PPP) technique is carefully investigated. The contribution of combining BDS and GPS for ZTD/PWV retrieving is evaluated as well. GPS and BDS observations of a half-year period for 40 globally distributed stations from the International GNSS Service Multi-GNSS Experiment and BeiDou Experiment Tracking Network are processed. The results show that the real-time BDS-only ZTD series agree well with the GPS-only ZTD series in general: the RMS values are about 11-16 mm (about 2-3 mm in PWV). Furthermore, the real-time ZTD derived from GPS-only, BDS-only, and GPS/BDS combined solutions are compared with those derived from the Very Long Baseline Interferometry. The comparisons show that the BDS can contribute to real-time meteorological applications, slightly less accurately than GPS. More accurate and reliable water vapor estimates, about 1.3-1.8 mm in PWV, can be obtained if the BDS observations are combined with the GPS observations in the real-time PPP data processing. The PWV comparisons with radiosondes further confirm the performance of BDS-derived real-time PWV and the benefit of adding BDS to standard GPS processing.

  16. Long-time observation of meteor induced layers with ionosonde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, Kamil; Akchurin, Adel

    2016-07-01

    It is considered that the main theory explaining appearance of sporadic E is the theory of wind shear, which means (includes) the presence and movement of nodes converging tidal wind through the height region of the most frequent occurrence Es (120-140km) [Mathew et. all, 1998]. However, the appearance of intense layers, following its name, are sporadic, and such variability cannot to explain by the influence of tidal waves only. Another indication inconsistency theory of wind shear is the appearance of so-called transient Es layers [Maruiama, 2003]. The distinctive feature of this trace is the high critical frequency (> 5 MHz), a constant height, weak amplitude, all trace semitransparent and short lifetime [Maruiama et. all, 2003 and 2008 and references there]. Because of duration, such layer is opposite to the traditional persistent Es layer, which we do not consider in this paper. Various researchers have used different terms for such spontaneous Es, it is meteor echo, meteor induced Es, spontaneously formed sporadic Es patches resulting of the Fresnel scattering from a region of enhanced plasma density along the meteor trail, transitory Es and transient Es. Since the term transient Es is unstable, to avoid confusion, we will stick to this term. Since meteor echo is not fully satisfy this term by some parameter, we will describe the properties of transient Es based on the ionogram properties and not from physics of its origin. We used data from our ionosonde with one-minute ionogram repetition rate for 2010-2014 years. For processing performed a method are using to select beatings and the ionosphere reflectivity of the layers by means A-, H-and AΣ-map [Akchurin, 2011; Yusupov, 2014]. This maps allow to collect transient Es appearance over a long-time. Such statistics comparison with meteor showers activity showed good agreement. It shows the presence of the transient Es formation mechanism, which coupling with meteors.

  17. Time Resolved Studies Of Adsorbed Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J.; Nicol, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    A time-resolved Fourier transform IR study of ethyne adsorbed on ZnNaA zeolite yields results very different from those reported for related systems. Initially two species (A and B) are formed by the interaction of C2H2 with the cations. Whereas species A (π-bonded C2H2) was found to be removed immediately on evacuation, species B (probably Zn-acetylide) was not fully removed after 60 mins evacuation. In the presence of the gas phase, bands due to Species A decreased slowly in intensity as new bands due to adsorbed ethanal were observed.

  18. Extending single molecule fluorescence observation time by amplitude-modulated excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisley, Lydia; Chang, Wei-Shun; Cooper, David; Mansur, Andrea P.; Landes, Christy F.

    2013-09-01

    We present a hardware-based method that can improve single molecule fluorophore observation time by up to 1500% and super-localization by 47% for the experimental conditions used. The excitation was modulated using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) synchronized to the data acquisition and inherent data conversion time of the detector. The observation time and precision in super-localization of four commonly used fluorophores were compared under modulated and traditional continuous excitation, including direct total internal reflectance excitation of Alexa 555 and Cy3, non-radiative Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) excited Cy5, and direct epi-fluorescence wide field excitation of Rhodamine 6G. The proposed amplitude-modulated excitation does not perturb the chemical makeup of the system or sacrifice signal and is compatible with multiple types of fluorophores. Amplitude-modulated excitation has practical applications for any fluorescent study utilizing an instrumental setup with time-delayed detectors.

  19. Murchison Widefield Array Observations of Anomalous Variability: A Serendipitous Night-time Detection of Interplanetary Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D. L.; Tingay, S. J.; Manoharan, P. K.; Macquart, J. P.; Hancock, P.; Morgan, J.; Mitchell, D. A.; Ekers, R. D.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C.; Murphy, T.; Oberoi, D.; Cairns, I. H.; Feng, L.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hurley Walker, N.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston Hollitt, M.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2015-08-01

    We present observations of high-amplitude rapid (2 s) variability toward two bright, compact extragalactic radio sources out of several hundred of the brightest radio sources in one of the 30^\\circ × 30^\\circ Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) Epoch of Reionization fields using the MWA at 155 MHz. After rejecting intrinsic, instrumental, and ionospheric origins we consider the most likely explanation for this variability to be interplanetary scintillation (IPS), likely the result of a large coronal mass ejection propagating from the Sun. This is confirmed by roughly contemporaneous observations with the Ooty Radio Telescope. We see evidence for structure on spatial scales ranging from <1000 to \\gt {10}6 km. The serendipitous night-time nature of these detections illustrates the new regime that the MWA has opened for IPS studies with sensitive night-time, wide-field, low-frequency observations. This regime complements traditional dedicated strategies for observing IPS and can be utilized in real-time to facilitate dedicated follow-up observations. At the same time, it allows large-scale surveys for compact (arcsec) structures in low-frequency radio sources despite the 2\\prime resolution of the array.

  20. Reported Significant Observation (RSO) studies. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Eicher, R.W.

    1992-12-01

    The Reported Significant Observation (RSO) study used in the field of safety is an information-gathering technique where employee-participants describe situations they have personally witnessed involving good and bad practices and safe and unsafe conditions. This information is useful in the risk assessment process because it focuses on hazards and thereby facilitates their elimination. However, RSO cannot be the only component in a risk assessment program. Used by the Air Force in their aviation psychology program and further developed by John C. Flanagan, RSO is more commonly known as the ``Critical Incident Technique.`` However, the words ``Critical`` and ``Incident`` had other connotations in nuclear safety, prompting early users within the Aerojet Nuclear Company to coin the more fitting title of ``Reported Significant Observations.`` The technique spread slowly in the safety field primarily because the majority of users were researchers interested in after-the-fact data, with application to everyday problems and behavioral factors. RSO was formally recognized as a significant hazard reduction tool during the development of the Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT) program for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The Department of Energy (DOE) has, in turn, adopted MORT for its system safety program, and this has resulted in RSO being a modern and viable technique for DOE contractor safety programs.

  1. Studies of the observed and theoretical variations of atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Julius

    1990-01-01

    The four related topics covered include: (1) distributions of total and upper atmospheric ozone and their time and space variations; (2) observed and theoretical models of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) ozone variation; (3) radiative processes in the upper atmosphere; and (4) relations between ozone and solar variations. The results of these studies are presented. They come from twenty-three published papers.

  2. Observations and predictions of eclipse times by astronomers in the pre-telescopic period.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, J. M.

    Eclipses of the Sun and Moon are among the most impressive of celestial events. It is therefore unsurprising that they have played an important role in the astronomy and astrology of most early cultures. Many hundreds of references to eclipses are found in the writings of the chroniclers and astronomers of the pre-telescopic world. In particular, the astronomers of Babylon, Ancient Greece, the Islamic Near East. Later Medieval and Renaissance Europe, China, and Japan, recorded a large number of observations and predictions of the time of an eclipse. The present study contains an extensive compilation of all known timed reports of eclipse observations and predictions made by astronomers in the pre-telescopic period. By performing a basic analysis of the recorded times, it has been possible to trace the gradual development of the techniques used by the astronomers to observe and predict eclipses. In order to conduct this analysis, it has been necessary to investigate a number of other problems including the dating of damaged observational accounts, the units of time used by the early astronomers, and the methods by which the Babylonians predicted eclipses. Many of these questions have not previously been answered. Therefore, the results of this study provide important information regarding the astronomies of these early cultures.

  3. Using Momentary Time Sampling to Estimate Minutes of Physical Activity in Physical Education: Validation of Scores for the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Edward M.; Coleman, Karen J.; Lensegrav, Tera L.; Fallon, Jennifer A.

    2006-01-01

    The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) is a direct observation system specifically developed for use during physical education (PE; McKenzie, 1991; McKenzie, Sallis, & Nader, 1991). The purpose of this study was to validate the estimates of time spent in various physical activity intensities obtained with the paper and pencil…

  4. [The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies].

    PubMed

    von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G; Egger, Matthias; Pocock, Stuart J; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Vandenbroucke, Jan P

    2008-01-01

    Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) initiative developed recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover three main study designs: cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. We convened a 2-day workshop in September, 2004, with methodologists, researchers, and journal editors to draft a checklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE statement) that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies. A detailed explanation and elaboration document is published separately and is freely available on the websites of PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Epidemiology. We hope that the STROBE statement will contribute to improving the quality of reporting of observational studies.

  5. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies.

    PubMed

    von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G; Egger, Matthias; Pocock, Stuart J; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Vandenbroucke, Jan P

    2014-12-01

    Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Initiative developed recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover three main study designs: cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. We convened a 2-day workshop in September 2004, with methodologists, researchers, and journal editors to draft a checklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE Statement) that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies. A detailed Explanation and Elaboration document is published separately and is freely available on the Web sites of PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Epidemiology. We hope that the STROBE Statement will contribute to improving the quality of reporting of observational studies.

  6. Observing Expertise-Related Actions Leads to Perfect Time Flow Estimations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yin-Hua; Pizzolato, Fabio; Cesari, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of the time of exposure of a picture portraying an action increases as a function of the amount of movement implied in the action represented. This effect suggests that the perceiver creates an internal embodiment of the action observed as if internally simulating the entire movement sequence. Little is known however about the timing accuracy of these internal action simulations, specifically whether they are affected by the level of familiarity and experience that the observer has of the action. In this study we asked professional pianists to reproduce different durations of exposure (shorter or longer than one second) of visual displays both specific (a hand in piano-playing action) and non-specific to their domain of expertise (a hand in finger-thumb opposition and scrambled-pixels) and compared their performance with non-pianists. Pianists outperformed non-pianists independently of the time of exposure of the stimuli; remarkably the group difference was particularly magnified by the pianists’ enhanced accuracy and stability only when observing the hand in the act of playing the piano. These results for the first time provide evidence that through musical training, pianists create a selective and self-determined dynamic internal representation of an observed movement that allows them to estimate precisely its temporal duration. PMID:23405131

  7. Radiation energy budget studies using collocated AVHRR and ERBE observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, S.A.; Inoue, Toshiro

    1994-03-01

    Changes in the energy balance at the top of the atmosphere are specified as a function of atmospheric and surface properties using observations from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner. By collocating the observations from the two instruments, flown on NOAA-9, the authors take advantage of the remote-sensing capabilities of each instrument. The AVHRR spectral channels were selected based on regions that are strongly transparent to clear sky conditions and are therefore useful for characterizing both surface and cloud-top conditions. The ERBE instruments make broadband observations that are important for climate studies. The approach of collocating these observations in time and space is used to study the radiative energy budget of three geographic regions: oceanic, savanna, and desert. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Studying evolved stars with Herschel observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Santos, João Manuel

    2016-07-01

    A systematic inspection of the far-infrared (FIR) properties of evolved stars allows not only to constrain physical models, but also to understand the chemical evolution that takes place in the end of their lives. In this work we intend to study the circumstellar envelopes (CSE) on a sample of stars in the THROES catalogue from AGB/post-AGB stars to planetary nebulae using photometry and spectroscopy provided by the PACS instrument on-board Herschel telescope. In the first part we are interested in obtaining an estimate of the size of FIR emitting region and to sort our targets in two classes: point-like and extended. Secondly, we focus on the molecular component of the envelope traced by carbon monoxide (CO) rotational lines. We conduct a line survey on a sample of evolved stars by identifying and measuring flux of both 12CO and 13CO isotopologues in the PACS range, while looking at the overall properties of the sample. Lastly, we will be interested in obtaining physical parameters of the CSE, namely gas temperature, mass and mass-loss rate on a sample of carbon stars. For that, we make use of PACS large wavelength coverage, which enables the simultaneous study of a large number of CO transitions, to perform the rotational diagram analysis. We report the detection of CO emission in a high number of stars from the catalogue, which were mostly classified as point-like targets with a few exceptions of planetary nebulae. High J rotational number transitions were detected in a number of targets, revealing the presence of a significant amount of hot gas (T ˜ 400-900 K) and high mass-loss rates. We conclude that Herschel/PACS is in a privileged position to detect a new population of warmer gas, typically missed in sub-mm/mm observations.

  9. STRengthening analytical thinking for observational studies: the STRATOS initiative.

    PubMed

    Sauerbrei, Willi; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Altman, Douglas G; le Cessie, Saskia; Carpenter, James

    2014-12-30

    The validity and practical utility of observational medical research depends critically on good study design, excellent data quality, appropriate statistical methods and accurate interpretation of results. Statistical methodology has seen substantial development in recent times. Unfortunately, many of these methodological developments are ignored in practice. Consequently, design and analysis of observational studies often exhibit serious weaknesses. The lack of guidance on vital practical issues discourages many applied researchers from using more sophisticated and possibly more appropriate methods when analyzing observational studies. Furthermore, many analyses are conducted by researchers with a relatively weak statistical background and limited experience in using statistical methodology and software. Consequently, even 'standard' analyses reported in the medical literature are often flawed, casting doubt on their results and conclusions. An efficient way to help researchers to keep up with recent methodological developments is to develop guidance documents that are spread to the research community at large. These observations led to the initiation of the strengthening analytical thinking for observational studies (STRATOS) initiative, a large collaboration of experts in many different areas of biostatistical research. The objective of STRATOS is to provide accessible and accurate guidance in the design and analysis of observational studies. The guidance is intended for applied statisticians and other data analysts with varying levels of statistical education, experience and interests. In this article, we introduce the STRATOS initiative and its main aims, present the need for guidance documents and outline the planned approach and progress so far. We encourage other biostatisticians to become involved.

  10. STRengthening Analytical Thinking for Observational Studies: the STRATOS initiative

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbrei, Willi; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Altman, Douglas G; le Cessie, Saskia; Carpenter, James

    2014-01-01

    The validity and practical utility of observational medical research depends critically on good study design, excellent data quality, appropriate statistical methods and accurate interpretation of results. Statistical methodology has seen substantial development in recent times. Unfortunately, many of these methodological developments are ignored in practice. Consequently, design and analysis of observational studies often exhibit serious weaknesses. The lack of guidance on vital practical issues discourages many applied researchers from using more sophisticated and possibly more appropriate methods when analyzing observational studies. Furthermore, many analyses are conducted by researchers with a relatively weak statistical background and limited experience in using statistical methodology and software. Consequently, even ‘standard’ analyses reported in the medical literature are often flawed, casting doubt on their results and conclusions. An efficient way to help researchers to keep up with recent methodological developments is to develop guidance documents that are spread to the research community at large. These observations led to the initiation of the strengthening analytical thinking for observational studies (STRATOS) initiative, a large collaboration of experts in many different areas of biostatistical research. The objective of STRATOS is to provide accessible and accurate guidance in the design and analysis of observational studies. The guidance is intended for applied statisticians and other data analysts with varying levels of statistical education, experience and interests. In this article, we introduce the STRATOS initiative and its main aims, present the need for guidance documents and outline the planned approach and progress so far. We encourage other biostatisticians to become involved. PMID:25074480

  11. Observing the dynamics of supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays.

    PubMed

    Mingarelli, C M F; Grover, K; Sidery, T; Smith, R J E; Vecchio, A

    2012-08-24

    Pulsar timing arrays are a prime tool to study unexplored astrophysical regimes with gravitational waves. Here, we show that the detection of gravitational radiation from individually resolvable supermassive black hole binary systems can yield direct information about the masses and spins of the black holes, provided that the gravitational-wave-induced timing fluctuations both at the pulsar and at Earth are detected. This in turn provides a map of the nonlinear dynamics of the gravitational field and a new avenue to tackle open problems in astrophysics connected to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes. We discuss the potential, the challenges, and the limitations of these observations.

  12. Probability distributions of molecular observables computed from Markov models. II. Uncertainties in observables and their time-evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodera, John D.; Noé, Frank

    2010-09-01

    Discrete-state Markov (or master equation) models provide a useful simplified representation for characterizing the long-time statistical evolution of biomolecules in a manner that allows direct comparison with experiments as well as the elucidation of mechanistic pathways for an inherently stochastic process. A vital part of meaningful comparison with experiment is the characterization of the statistical uncertainty in the predicted experimental measurement, which may take the form of an equilibrium measurement of some spectroscopic signal, the time-evolution of this signal following a perturbation, or the observation of some statistic (such as the correlation function) of the equilibrium dynamics of a single molecule. Without meaningful error bars (which arise from both approximation and statistical error), there is no way to determine whether the deviations between model and experiment are statistically meaningful. Previous work has demonstrated that a Bayesian method that enforces microscopic reversibility can be used to characterize the statistical component of correlated uncertainties in state-to-state transition probabilities (and functions thereof) for a model inferred from molecular simulation data. Here, we extend this approach to include the uncertainty in observables that are functions of molecular conformation (such as surrogate spectroscopic signals) characterizing each state, permitting the full statistical uncertainty in computed spectroscopic experiments to be assessed. We test the approach in a simple model system to demonstrate that the computed uncertainties provide a useful indicator of statistical variation, and then apply it to the computation of the fluorescence autocorrelation function measured for a dye-labeled peptide previously studied by both experiment and simulation.

  13. Dependability of data derived from time sampling methods with multiple observation targets.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Austin H; Chafouleas, Sandra M; Briesch, Amy M

    2017-03-01

    In this study, generalizability theory was used to examine the extent to which (a) time-sampling methodology, (b) number of simultaneous behavior targets, and (c) individual raters influenced variance in ratings of academic engagement for an elementary-aged student. Ten graduate-student raters, with an average of 7.20 hr of previous training in systematic direct observation and 58.20 hr of previous direct observation experience, scored 6 videos of student behavior using 12 different time-sampling protocols. Five videos were submitted for analysis, and results for observations using momentary time-sampling and whole-interval recording suggested that the majority of variance was attributable to the rating occasion, although results for partial-interval recording generally demonstrated large residual components comparable with those seen in prior research. Dependability coefficients were above .80 when averaging across 1 to 2 raters using momentary time-sampling, and 2 to 3 raters using whole-interval recording. Ratings derived from partial-interval recording needed to be averaged over 3 to 7 raters to demonstrate dependability coefficients above .80. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. The feasibility and applications of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring, thromboelastography and transit-time flow measurement in living-related renal transplantation surgery: results of a prospective pilot observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Delayed graft function (DGF) remains a significant and detrimental postoperative phenomenon following living-related renal allograft transplantation, with a published incidence of up to 15%. Early therapeutic vasodilatory interventions have been shown to improve DGF, and modifications to immunosuppressive regimens may subsequently lessen its impact. This pilot study assesses the potential applicability of perioperative non-invasive cardiac output monitoring (NICOM), transit-time flow monitoring (TTFM) of the transplant renal artery and pre-/perioperative thromboelastography (TEG) in the early prediction of DGF and perioperative complications. Methods Ten consecutive living-related renal allograft recipients were studied. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring commenced immediately following induction of anaesthesia and was maintained throughout the perioperative period. Doppler-based TTFM was performed during natural haemostatic pauses in the transplant surgery: immediately following graft reperfusion and following ureteric implantation. Central venous blood sampling for TEG was performed following induction of anaesthesia and during abdominal closure. Results A single incidence of DGF was seen within the studied cohort and one intra-operative (thrombotic) complication noted. NICOM confirmed a predictable trend of increased cardiac index (CI) following allograft reperfusion (mean CI - clamped: 3.17 ± 0.29 L/min/m2, post-reperfusion: 3.50 ± 0.35 L/min/m2; P < 0.05) mediated by a significant reduction in total peripheral resistance. Reduced TTFM at the point of allograft reperfusion (227 ml/min c.f. mean; 411 ml/min (95% CI: 358 to 465)) was identified in a subject who experienced intra-operative transplant renal artery thrombosis. TEG data exhibited significant reductions in clot lysis (LY30 (%): pre-op: 1.0 (0.29 to 1.71), post reperfusion 0.33 (0.15 to 0.80); P = 0.02) and a trend towards increased clot initiation following

  15. Time-resolved High Spectral Resolution Observation of 2MASSW J0746425+200032AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Prato, Lisa; Mawet, Dimitri

    2017-03-01

    Many brown dwarfs (BDs) exhibit photometric variability at levels from tenths to tens of percents. The photometric variability is related to magnetic activity or patchy cloud coverage, characteristic of BDs near the L–T transition. Time-resolved spectral monitoring of BDs provides diagnostics of cloud distribution and condensate properties. However, current time-resolved spectral studies of BDs are limited to low spectral resolution (R ∼ 100) with the exception of the study of Luhman 16 AB at a resolution of 100,000 using the VLT+CRIRES. This work yielded the first map of BD surface inhomogeneity, highlighting the importance and unique contribution of high spectral resolution observations. Here, we report on the time-resolved high spectral resolution observations of a nearby BD binary, 2MASSW J0746425+200032AB. We find no coherent spectral variability that is modulated with rotation. Based on simulations, we conclude that the coverage of a single spot on 2MASSW J0746425+200032AB is smaller than 1% or 6.25% if spot contrast is 50% or 80% of its surrounding flux, respectively. Future high spectral resolution observations aided by adaptive optics systems can put tighter constraints on the spectral variability of 2MASSW J0746425+200032AB and other nearby BDs.

  16. ERP-Variations on Time Scales Between Hours and Months Derived From GNSS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R.; Englich, S.; Mendes Cerveira, P.

    2007-05-01

    Current observations gained by the space geodetic techniques, especially VLBI, GPS and SLR, allow for the determination of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs - polar motion, UT1/LOD) with unprecedented accuracy and temporal resolution. This presentation focuses on contributions to the ERP recovery provided by satellite navigation systems (primarily GPS). The IGS (International GNSS Service), for example, currently provides daily polar motion with an accuracy of less than 0.1mas and LOD estimates with an accuracy of a few microseconds. To study more rapid variations in polar motion and LOD we established in a first step a high resolution (hourly resolution) ERP-time series from GPS observation data of the IGS network covering the year 2005. The calculations were carried out by means of the Bernese GPS Software V5.0 considering observations from a subset of 113 fairly stable stations out of the IGS05 reference frame sites. From these ERP time series the amplitudes of the major diurnal and semidiurnal variations caused by ocean tides are estimated. After correcting the series for ocean tides the remaining geodetic observed excitation is compared with variations of atmospheric excitation (AAM). To study the sensitivity of the estimates with respect to the applied mapping function we applied both the widely used NMF (Niell Mapping Function) and the VMF1 (Vienna Mapping Function 1). In addition, based on computations covering two months in 2005, the potential improvement due to the use of additional GLONASS data will be discussed.

  17. Study Time, Motivation and Students' Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youssef, Anga A.

    A study investigating the relationship between motivation, study time, and student achievement in second language courses has as subjects 97 tenth- and eleventh-grade English speakers in introductory French, German, and Spanish courses. Two surveys measured motivational factors and the amount of time spent studying the second language. Motivation…

  18. Studies of Accreting Neutron Stars with RXTE Cycle 4 Observations: III: TOO Observations of Atoll Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG 5-9244 provided funds for the research projects 'ASM-Triggered TOO Observations of Kilohertz Oscillations in Five Atoll Sources' and 'Further Measurements of the Kilohertz Oscillations in 4U 1705-44' approved under the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Guest Observer Program Cycle 4 and funded under the 1999 NASA Astrophysics Data Program. The principal investigator of the observing time proposals was Dr. E. C. Ford (U. of Amsterdam). The grant was funded for one year beginning 3/15/2000. The original ADP proposal was submitted by Prof. Jan van Paradijs, who passed away in 1999 before the funds were distributed. Prof. Wilham S. Padesas administered the grant during the period of performance. In spite of a wealth of observational data on the kHz QPO in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), the interpretation of this phenomenon is currently uncertain because the pairs of kHz QPO peaks and the oscillations seen in some Type I X-ray bursts are almost, but not quite, connected by a simple beat frequency relation. Further systematic studies of systems with known QPOs are required in order to better understand the phenomenon. The proposals were intended to contribute to a solution to this confusion by observing the sources as they vary over a wide range of X-ray flux. RXTE target-of-opportunity observations of six transient atoll sources, 4U 0614+09, KS 1732-260, Ser X-1, 4U 1702-42, 4U 1820-30 and 4U 1705-44 were to be performed at various flux levels based on ASM measurements.

  19. Reconciliation of Waiting Time Statistics of Solar Flares Observed in Hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; McTiernan, James M.

    2010-07-01

    We study the waiting time distributions of solar flares observed in hard X-rays with ISEE-3/ICE, HXRBS/SMM, WATCH/GRANAT, BATSE/CGRO, and RHESSI. Although discordant results and interpretations have been published earlier, based on relatively small ranges (<2 decades) of waiting times, we find that all observed distributions, spanning over 6 decades of waiting times (Δt ≈ 10-3-103 hr), can be reconciled with a single distribution function, N(Δt) vprop λ0(1 + λ0Δt)-2, which has a power-law slope of p ≈ 2.0 at large waiting times (Δt ≈ 1-1000 hr) and flattens out at short waiting times Δt <~ Δt 0 = 1/λ0. We find a consistent breakpoint at Δt 0 = 1/λ0 = 0.80 ± 0.14 hr from the WATCH, HXRBS, BATSE, and RHESSI data. The distribution of waiting times is invariant for sampling with different flux thresholds, while the mean waiting time scales reciprocically with the number of detected events, Δt 0 vprop 1/n det. This waiting time distribution can be modeled with a nonstationary Poisson process with a flare rate λ = 1/Δt that varies as f(λ) vprop λ-1exp - (λ/λ0). This flare rate distribution requires a highly intermittent flare productivity in short clusters with high rates, separated by relatively long quiescent intervals with very low flare rates.

  20. A statistical study of merging galaxies: Theory and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Tapan K.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the expected frequency of merging galaxies is conducted, using the impulsive approximation. Results indicate that if we consider mergers involving galaxy pairs without halos in a single crossing time or orbital period, the expected frequency of mergers is two orders of magnitude below the observed value for the present epoch. If we consider mergers involving several orbital periods or crossing times, the expected frequency goes up by an order of magnitude. Preliminary calculation indicate that if we consider galaxy mergers between pairs with massive halos, the merger is very much hastened.

  1. Exploiting crowdsourced observations: High-resolution mapping of real-time urban air quality throughout Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Castell, Nuria; Vallejo, Islen; van den Bossche, Joris; Lahoz, William; Bartonova, Alena

    2016-04-01

    With the technology of air quality sensors improving rapidly in recent years and with an increasing number of initiatives for collecting air quality information being established worldwide, there is a rapidly increasing amount of information on air quality. Such datasets can provide unprecedented spatial detail and thus exhibit a significant potential for allowing to create observation-based high-resolution maps of air quality in the urban environment. However, most datasets of observations made within a citizen science or crowdsourcing framework tend to have highly variable characteristics in terms of quantity, accuracy, measured parameters, and representativeness, and many more. It is therefore currently unknown how to best exploit this information for mapping purposes. In order to address this challenge we present a novel approach for combining crowdsourced observations of urban air quality with model information, allowing us to produce near-real-time, high-resolution maps of air quality in the urban environment. The approach is based on data fusion techniques, which allow for combining observations with model data in a mathematically objective way and therefore provide a means of adding value to both the observations and the model. The observations are improved by filling spatio-temporal gaps in the data and the model is improved by constraining it with observations. The model further provides detailed spatial patterns in areas where no observations are available. As such, data fusion of observations from high-density low-cost sensor networks together with air quality models can contribute to significantly improving urban-scale air quality mapping. The system has been implemented to run in an automated fashion in near real-time (once every hour) for several cities in Europe. Evaluation of the methodology is being carried out using the leave-one-out cross validation technique and simulated datasets. We present case studies demonstrating the methodology for

  2. Transit Timing Study of Kepler Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiwei

    2015-08-01

    Kepler space telescope has found over 4000 transiting planet candidates. Transit timing is a powerful tool to study these transit planet candidates. In this talk, I will talk about two transit timing techniques, i.e., transit timing variation (TTV) and transit duration (TD), which enable confirming their planetary nature and obtaining insight into their orbital properties.

  3. Space- and time-resolved observation of extreme laser frequency upshifting during ultrafast-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Giulietti, A.; Koester, P.; Levato, T.; Pathak, N. C.; André, A.; Dobosz Dufrénoy, S.; Monot, P.; Giulietti, D.; Hosokai, T.; Kotaki, H.; Labate, L.; Gizzi, L. A.; Nuter, R.

    2013-08-15

    A 65-fs, 800-nm, 2-TW laser pulse propagating through a nitrogen gas jet has been experimentally studied by 90° Thomson scattering. Time-integrated spectra of scattered light show unprecedented broadening towards the blue which exceeds 300 nm. Images of the scattering region provide for the first time a space- and time-resolved description of the process leading quite regularly to such a large upshift. The mean shifting rate was as high as δλ/δt ≈ 3 Å/fs, never observed before. Interferometry shows that it occurs after partial laser defocusing. Numerical simulations prove that such an upshift is consistent with a laser-gas late interaction, when laser intensity has decreased well below relativistic values (a{sub 0}≪ 1) and ionization process involves most of the laser pulse. This kind of interaction makes spectral tuning of ultrashort intense laser pulses possible in a large spectral range.

  4. Potential New Lidar Observations for Cloud Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, Dave; Hu, Yong; Narir, Amin; Cai, Xia

    2015-01-01

    The response of clouds to global warming represents a major uncertainty in estimating climate sensitivity. These uncertainties have been tracked to shallow marine clouds in the tropics and subtropics. CALIOP observations have already been used extensively to evaluate model predictions of shallow cloud fraction and top height (Leahy et al. 2013; Nam et al 2012). Tools are needed to probe the lowest levels of the troposphere. The large footprint of satellite lidars gives large multiple scattering from clouds which presents new possibilities for cloud retrievals to constrain model predictions.

  5. First-time comet observations at the National Observatory of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oklay, N.; Vincent, J.

    2014-07-01

    activity structures are investigated and simulations of dust tail are performed. On December 2013, we performed the first comet spectroscopy, targeting comet 154P and, additionally, observed comet C/2013 R1 in the Bessell R, B, and V filters. Results: Some additional gas filters for comet observations would be very useful for further observations. Fortunately, the budget for them is approved for 2014, and they are in the selection process. This will significantly improve future comet observations at TUG. T100: Imaging of fast-moving bright comets (like ISON) can be achieved by using short exposure times on the remotely operable T100 telescope, but non-sidereal tracking has to be improved for the observation of fast-moving small bodies of the solar system. Studies on the improvement of T100's tracking have already started at TUG. RTT150: Non-sidereal tracking is excellent and allowed us to take spectra of comet 154P. For future, we have established collaboration with the Rosetta mission and will monitor comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko starting from spring 2015. We are also ready for Gaia follow-up observations of solar-system objects with RTT150 (max. 5 nights/yr), T100 (max. 80 h/yr), and T60 (10--15 % of the total observing time).

  6. Storm time response of the midlatitude thermosphere: Observations from a network of Fabry-Perot interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makela, Jonathan J.; Harding, Brian J.; Meriwether, John W.; Mesquita, Rafael; Sanders, Samuel; Ridley, Aaron J.; Castellez, Michael W.; Ciocca, Marco; Earle, Gregory D.; Frissell, Nathaniel A.; Hampton, Donald L.; Gerrard, Andrew J.; Noto, John; Martinis, Carlos R.

    2014-08-01

    Observations of thermospheric neutral winds and temperatures obtained during a geomagnetic storm on 2 October 2013 from a network of six Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) deployed in the Midwest United States are presented. Coincident with the commencement of the storm, the apparent horizontal wind is observed to surge westward and southward (toward the equator). Simultaneous to this surge in the apparent horizontal winds, an apparent downward wind of approximately 100 m/s lasting for 6 h is observed. The apparent neutral temperature is observed to increase by approximately 400 K over all of the sites. Observations from an all-sky imaging system operated at the Millstone Hill observatory indicate the presence of a stable auroral red (SAR) arc and diffuse red aurora during this time. We suggest that the large sustained apparent downward winds arise from contamination of the spectral profile of the nominal thermospheric 630.0 nm emission by 630.0 nm emission from a different (nonthermospheric) source. Modeling demonstrates that the effect of an additional population of 630.0 nm photons, with a distinct velocity and temperature distribution, introduces an apparent Doppler shift when the combined emissions from the two sources are analyzed as a single population. Thus, the apparent Doppler shifts should not be interpreted as the bulk motion of the thermosphere, calling into question results from previous FPI studies of midlatitude storm time thermospheric winds. One possible source of contamination could be fast O related to the infusion of low-energy O+ ions from the magnetosphere. The presence of low-energy O+ is supported by observations made by the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron spectrometer instruments on the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft, which show an influx of low-energy ions during this period. These results emphasize the importance of distributed networks of instruments in understanding the complex dynamics that occur in the upper atmosphere during

  7. Western scrub-jays allocate longer observation time to more valuable information.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Arii; Grodzinski, Uri; Clayton, Nicola S

    2014-07-01

    When humans mentally reconstruct past events and imagine future scenarios, their subjective experience of mentally time travelling is accompanied by the awareness of doing so. Despite recent popularity of studying episodic memory in animals, such phenomenological consciousness has been extremely difficult to demonstrate without agreed behavioural markers of consciousness in non-linguistic subjects. We presented western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) with a task requiring them to allocate observing time between two peepholes to see food being hidden in either of two compartments, one where observing the hiding location was necessary to later relocate the food, and another where food could easily be found without watching. Jays first separately experienced these consequences of possessing information in each compartment and subsequently, once given a choice, made more looks and spent more time looking into the compartment where information was necessary than into the compartment where it was unnecessary. Thus, the jays can collect information to solve a future problem. Moreover, they can differentiate sources of information according to their potential value and modify behaviour to efficiently collect important, usable information. This is the first evidence of metacognition in a species that passes the behavioural criteria for both retrospective and prospective mental time travel.

  8. Part Time Study in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neville, Colin

    This document, which is intended for adults considering enrolling in part-time study in higher education, examines the objectives and experiences of adults who have pursued part-time study in higher education in the United Kingdom. The following reasons why adults return to higher education are discussed: personal development; self-fulfillment;…

  9. Studies of Tropical/Mid-Latitude Exchange Using UARS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avallone, Linnea

    2001-01-01

    At the time this proposal was submitted, recent publications had suggested an important role for transport of midlatitude air into the tropical lower stratosphere. Most of these studies had employed data that gave only a time-averaged picture, making it difficult to determine the nature of the transport processes responsible for the observed behavior. We proposed to analyze observations of long-lived trace gases, such as nitric acid, methane, nitrous oxide, and chlorofluorocarbons, made from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, to investigate the seasonal behavior of mixing between the midlatitudes and tropics. We planned to construct probability distributions of the concentrations of these species over small altitude ranges and to compare them to expectations based on modeled mean concentrations and knowledge of instrument precision. Differences from expectation were to be analyzed with respect to meteorological parameters to determine whether wave activity may have induced apparent mixing.

  10. A new approach to calibrate steady groundwater flow models with time series of head observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obergfell, C.; Bakker, M.; Maas, C.

    2012-04-01

    We developed a new method to calibrate aquifer parameters of steady-state well field models using measured time series of head fluctuations. Our method is an alternative to standard pumping tests and is based on time series analysis using parametric impulse response functions. First, the pumping influence is isolated from the overall groundwater fluctuation observed at monitoring wells around the well field, and response functions are determined for each individual well. Time series parameters are optimized using a quasi-Newton algorithm. For one monitoring well, time series model parameters are also optimized by means of SCEM-UA, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm, as a control on the validity of the parameters obtained by the faster quasi-Newton method. Subsequently, the drawdown corresponding to an average yearly pumping rate is calculated from the response functions determined by time series analysis. The drawdown values estimated with acceptable confidence intervals are used as calibration targets of a steady groundwater flow model. A case study is presented of the drinking water supply well field of Waalwijk (Netherlands). In this case study, a uniform aquifer transmissivity is optimized together with the conductance of ditches in the vicinity of the well field. Groundwater recharge or boundary heads do not have to be entered, which eliminates two import sources of uncertainty. The method constitutes a cost-efficient alternative to pumping tests and allows the determination of pumping influences without changes in well field operation.

  11. Relativistic Electron Precipitation: An Observational Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    information. Four hours of continuous data was collected and transmitted each tape recorder dump. Over the life of the satellite, approximately 25% data...Langmuir probe to make relative density fluctuations. Broadband signals (.05 - 16 kHz) were transmitted in real time to ground stations for 15 min periods...912756444007 - 00~~~~~~2 ?420 212 0060046 26 712 g4 -69.~ WA02431 7626 M4423 1024 415 6474080 COO to2 700 1633S 1932 4495 74390.. COD t$429 o 393032

  12. Spectral characteristics of steady quiet-time EMIC waves observed at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Park, Jong-Sun; Omura, Yoshiharu; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Lee, Dong-Hun; Kim, Gi-Jeong; Jin, Ho; Lee, Ensang; Kwon, Hyuck-Jin

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the spectral properties of quiet-time electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves following a steady quiet condition, which is defined with Kp values ≤1 during 12 h, using GOES 10, 11, and 12 magnetometer data for solar minimum years 2007-2008. We identified 6584 steady quiet-time EMIC wave samples using a semiautomated procedure. Approximately 82% of the samples were observed in the morning-to-early afternoon sector (0700-1500 magnetic local time) with a maximum occurrence near noon, and their peak frequencies were mostly in the He band. We found that the occurrence rate of steady quiet-time EMIC waves is higher than that of EMIC waves for all or quiet geomagnetic conditions (Dst > 0 nT or AE < 100 nT) reported in previous studies by a factor of 2 or more. The frequency ratio fpeak (sample's peak frequency)/fH+ (the local proton gyrofrequency) of the He-band waves (˜0.11-0.16) under steady quiet conditions is lower than that (˜0.14-0.24) in previous studies. These results may be due to the fact that the plasmasphere expanded more frequently to the geosynchronous region under extremely quiet geomagnetic conditions in 2007-2008 than the periods selected in previous studies. The amplitude and frequency of He-band EMIC waves for nonlinear wave growth are examined as changing cold plasma density at geosynchronous orbit. We confirm that the spectral properties of observed EMIC waves are in good agreement with the nonlinear theory.

  13. Experimental land observing data system feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. L.; Kraiman, H.

    1982-01-01

    An end-to-end data system to support a Shuttle-based Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) mission in the mid-1980's was defined. The experimental Land Observing System (ELOS) is discussed. A ground system that exploits extensive assets from the LANDSAT-D Program to effectively meet the objectives of the ELOS Mission was defined. The goal of 10 meter pixel precision, the variety of data acquisition capabilities, and the use of Shuttle are key to the mission requirements, Ground mission management functions are met through the use of GSFC's Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC). The MLA Image Generation Facility (MIGF) combines major hardware elements from the Applications Development Data System (ADDS) facility and LANDSAT Assessment System (LAS) with a special purpose MLA interface unit. LANDSAT-D image processing techniques, adapted to MLA characteristics, form the basis for the use of existing software and the definition of new software required.

  14. The application of time-lapse photography for the observation of snow processes in mountainous catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvelmann, J.; Pohl, S.; Weiler, M.

    2012-04-01

    For the forecast of snowmelt flood events in mountainous catchments it is very important to know the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the snowcover. Topography and vegetation have the most important influence on the spatio-temporal variability of the snowcover. In order to accomplish a continuous observation of the quantity and the status of the snowcover, an extensive measurement network consisting of numerous standalone snow and meteorological sensors and time-lapse photography was established in three catchments in the Black Forest, a typical mid latitude medium elevation mountain range. Catchments with different topographic characteristic and areal extent were specifically chosen for this study. Within the catchments, a stratified sampling design was used to cover a wide range of altitudes and exposures. In order to investigate the influence of a vegetation cover on the snow processes beneath sensors and cameras have been installed under the forest canopy and on adjacent open field sites, respectively. In the presented study the application of spatially distributed time-lapse cameras for the observation of snow processes and snowcover properties at the catchment scale will be discussed. Image analysis software was applied to extract information about snowdepth, snow albedo and canopy interception from the digital images. A measurement scale with a black/white board was installed in the focus of every camera to allow a determination of the snowdepth at every camera location while the black/white board was used to provide a white balance for the albedo estimation. The albedo provides important information about the status of the snowcover and its temporal evolution is a crucial factor for the snowmelt energy balance. Furthermore the time-lapse images provided a continuous observation of the forest canopy allowing the estimation of the interception efficiency and the temporal evolution of the snow interception for different topographic situations

  15. Observational Study of Contracts Processing at 29 CTSA Sites

    PubMed Central

    Kiriakis, James; Gaich, Nicholas; Johnston, S Claiborne; Kitterman, Darlene; Rosenblum, Daniel; Salberg, Libby; Rifkind, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We measured contracts Final Negotiation (FN) and Full Execution (FE) times using shared definitions in a prospective observational study of management of contracts for clinical trials at 29 CTSA institutions. Median FN and FE times were reached in 39 and 91 days, respectively; mean times for FN and FE were 55 and 103 days, respectively. Individual site medians ranged from 3 to 116 days for FN and 34 to 197 days for FE. The use of Master Agreements (MAs) and Previously Negotiated Terms (PNTs) was associated with significant reduction of FN times by a mean of 33 days (p<0) and 22 days (p<0.001), respectively. PNTs, but not MAs, were associated with significantly reduced FE time (22 days, p<.007). Gap analysis revealed a gap of 22 days between contracts negotiation and Institutional Review Board (IRB) review and intervals of 33 days (contracts) and 48 days (IRB review) during which the process steps were being conducted alone, suggesting a potential benefit with parallel processing. These baseline data support a plan to investigate root causes of prolonged study startup time by examining causes of variation and outliers. PMID:23919362

  16. Observational study of contracts processing at 29 CTSA sites.

    PubMed

    Kiriakis, James; Gaich, Nicholas; Johnston, S Claiborne; Kitterman, Darlene; Rosenblum, Daniel; Salberg, Libby; Rifkind, Adam

    2013-08-01

    We measured contracts final negotiation (FN) and full execution (FE) times using shared definitions in a prospective observational study of management of contracts for clinical trials at 29 CTSA institutions. Median FN and FE times were reached in 39 and 91 days, respectively; mean times for FN and FE were 55 and 103 days, respectively. Individual site medians ranged from 3 to 116 days for FN and 34 to 197 days for FE. The use of master agreements (MAs) and previously negotiated terms (PNTs) was associated with significant reduction of FN times by a mean of 33 days (p < 0) and 22 days (p < 0.001), respectively. PNTs, but not MAs, were associated with significantly reduced FE time (22 days, p < 0.007). Gap analysis revealed a gap of 22 days between contracts negotiation and Institutional Review Board (IRB) review and intervals of 33 days (contracts) and 48 days (IRB review) during which the process steps were being conducted alone, suggesting a potential benefit with parallel processing. These baseline data support a plan to investigate root causes of prolonged study start-up time by examining causes of variation and outliers.

  17. Observations of breakup processes of liquid jets using real-time X-ray radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Char, J. M.; Kuo, K. K.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1988-01-01

    To unravel the liquid-jet breakup process in the nondilute region, a newly developed system of real-time X-ray radiography, an advanced digital image processor, and a high-speed video camera were used. Based upon recorded X-ray images, the inner structure of a liquid jet during breakup was observed. The jet divergence angle, jet breakup length, and fraction distributions along the axial and transverse directions of the liquid jets were determined in the near-injector region. Both wall- and free-jet tests were conducted to study the effect of wall friction on the jet breakup process.

  18. Learning characteristics of a space-time neural network as a tether skiprope observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Villarreal, James A.; Jani, Yashvant; Copeland, Charles

    1992-01-01

    The Software Technology Laboratory at JSC is testing a Space Time Neural Network (STNN) for observing tether oscillations present during retrieval of a tethered satellite. Proper identification of tether oscillations, known as 'skiprope' motion, is vital to safe retrieval of the tethered satellite. Our studies indicate that STNN has certain learning characteristics that must be understood properly to utilize this type of neural network for the tethered satellite problem. We present our findings on the learning characteristics including a learning rate versus momentum performance table.

  19. Learning characteristics of a space-time neural network as a tether skiprope observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Villarreal, James A.; Jani, Yashvant; Copeland, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The Software Technology Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center is testing a Space Time Neural Network (STNN) for observing tether oscillations present during retrieval of a tethered satellite. Proper identification of tether oscillations, known as 'skiprope' motion, is vital to safe retrieval of the tethered satellite. Our studies indicate that STNN has certain learning characteristics that must be understood properly to utilize this type of neural network for the tethered satellite problem. We present our findings on the learning characteristics including a learning rate versus momentum performance table.

  20. Observation of coherence in the time-reversed relativistic photoelectric effect.

    PubMed

    Tashenov, S; Banaś, D; Beyer, H; Brandau, C; Fritzsche, S; Gumberidze, A; Hagmann, S; Hillenbrand, P-M; Jörg, H; Kojouharov, I; Kozhuharov, Ch; Lestinsky, M; Litvinov, Yu A; Maiorova, A V; Schaffner, H; Shabaev, V M; Spillmann, U; Stöhlker, Th; Surzhykov, A; Trotsenko, S

    2014-09-12

    The photoelectric effect has been studied in the regime of hard x rays and strong Coulomb fields via its time-reversed process of radiative recombination (RR). In the experiment, the relativistic electrons recombined into the 2p_{3/2} excited state of hydrogenlike uranium ions, and both the RR x rays and the subsequently emitted characteristic x rays were detected in coincidence. This allowed us to observe the coherence between the magnetic substates in a highly charged ion and to identify the contribution of the spin-orbit interaction to the RR process.

  1. Long term variability in migrating diurnal tide observed by the TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killeen, T. L.; Wu, Q.; Solomon, S. C.; Ortland, D. A.; Skinner, W. R.; Niciejewski, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    We will examine the temporal variations of migrating diurnal tide in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere using the TIMED Doppler interferometer neutral wind data. The stratosphere QBO is the major source for the interannual variability of the migrating tide in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Buy examine the tidal variations using spectral analysis method, we plan to examine long term variations in the migrating diurnal tides beyond these related to the QBO. The TIDI data will allow us to examine the diurnal tide variation at different latitudes and altitudes. We will also study stratosphere observations in search of possible connections to changes in the stratosphere.

  2. Time-varying spatial data integration and visualization: 4 Dimensions Environmental Observations Platform (4-DEOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciello, Rossana; Coviello, Irina; Filizzola, Carolina; Genzano, Nicola; Lisi, Mariano; Mazzeo, Giuseppe; Pergola, Nicola; Sileo, Giancanio; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2014-05-01

    In environmental studies the integration of heterogeneous and time-varying data, is a very common requirement for investigating and possibly visualize correlations among physical parameters underlying the dynamics of complex phenomena. Datasets used in such kind of applications has often different spatial and temporal resolutions. In some case superimposition of asynchronous layers is required. Traditionally the platforms used to perform spatio-temporal visual data analyses allow to overlay spatial data, managing the time using 'snapshot' data model, each stack of layers being labeled with different time. But this kind of architecture does not incorporate the temporal indexing neither the third spatial dimension which is usually given as an independent additional layer. Conversely, the full representation of a generic environmental parameter P(x,y,z,t) in the 4D space-time domain could allow to handle asynchronous datasets as well as less traditional data-products (e.g. vertical sections, punctual time-series, etc.) . In this paper we present the 4 Dimensions Environmental Observation Platform (4-DEOS), a system based on a web services architecture Client-Broker-Server. This platform is a new open source solution for both a timely access and an easy integration and visualization of heterogeneous (maps, vertical profiles or sections, punctual time series, etc.) asynchronous, geospatial products. The innovative aspect of the 4-DEOS system is that users can analyze data/products individually moving through time, having also the possibility to stop the display of some data/products and focus on other parameters for better studying their temporal evolution. This platform gives the opportunity to choose between two distinct display modes for time interval or for single instant. Users can choose to visualize data/products in two ways: i) showing each parameter in a dedicated window or ii) visualize all parameters overlapped in a single window. A sliding time bar, allows

  3. Towards real-time assimilation of crowdsourced observations in hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, Maurizio; Verlaan, Martin; Alfonso, Leonardo; Norbiato, Daniele; Monego, Martina; Ferri, Michele; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    The continued technological advances have stimulated the spread of low-cost sensors that can be used by citizens to provide crowdsourced observations (CO) of different hydrological variables. An example of such low-cost sensors is a staff gauge connected to a QR code on which people can read the water level indication and send the measurement via a mobile phone application. The goal of this study is to assess the combined effect of the assimilation of CO coming from a distributed network of low-cost sensors, and the existing streamflow observations from physical sensors, on the performance of a semi-distributed hydrological model. The methodology is applied to the Bacchiglione catchment, North East of Italy, where an early warning system is used by the Alto Adriatico Water Authority to issue forecasted water level along the river network which cross important cities such as Vicenza and Padua. In this study, forecasted precipitation values are used as input in the hydrological model to estimate the simulated streamflow hydrograph used as boundary condition for the hydraulic model. Observed precipitation values are used to generate realistic synthetic streamflow values with various characteristics of arrival frequency and accuracy, to simulate CO coming at irregular time steps. These observations are assimilated into the semi-distributed model using a Kalman filter based method. The results of this study show that CO, asynchronous in time and with variable accuracy, can still improve flood prediction when integrated in hydrological models. When both physical and low-cost sensors are located at the same places, the assimilation of CO gives the same model improvement than the assimilation of physical observations only for high number of non-intermittent sensors. However, the integration of observations from low-cost sensors and single physical sensors can improve the flood prediction even when small a number of intermittent CO are available. This study is part of the

  4. Landmark estimation of survival and treatment effects in observational studies.

    PubMed

    Parast, Layla; Griffin, Beth Ann

    2017-04-01

    Clinical studies aimed at identifying effective treatments to reduce the risk of disease or death often require long term follow-up of participants in order to observe a sufficient number of events to precisely estimate the treatment effect. In such studies, observing the outcome of interest during follow-up may be difficult and high rates of censoring may be observed which often leads to reduced power when applying straightforward statistical methods developed for time-to-event data. Alternative methods have been proposed to take advantage of auxiliary information that may potentially improve efficiency when estimating marginal survival and improve power when testing for a treatment effect. Recently, Parast et al. (J Am Stat Assoc 109(505):384-394, 2014) proposed a landmark estimation procedure for the estimation of survival and treatment effects in a randomized clinical trial setting and demonstrated that significant gains in efficiency and power could be obtained by incorporating intermediate event information as well as baseline covariates. However, the procedure requires the assumption that the potential outcomes for each individual under treatment and control are independent of treatment group assignment which is unlikely to hold in an observational study setting. In this paper we develop the landmark estimation procedure for use in an observational setting. In particular, we incorporate inverse probability of treatment weights (IPTW) in the landmark estimation procedure to account for selection bias on observed baseline (pretreatment) covariates. We demonstrate that consistent estimates of survival and treatment effects can be obtained by using IPTW and that there is improved efficiency by using auxiliary intermediate event and baseline information. We compare our proposed estimates to those obtained using the Kaplan-Meier estimator, the original landmark estimation procedure, and the IPTW Kaplan-Meier estimator. We illustrate our resulting reduction in bias

  5. Solar Activity Studies using Microwave Imaging Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the status of solar cycle 24 based on polar prominence eruptions (PEs) and microwave brightness enhancement (MBE) information obtained by the Nobeyama radioheliograph. The north polar region of the Sun had near-zero field strength for more than three years (2012-2015) and ended only in September 2015 as indicated by the presence of polar PEs and the lack of MBE. The zero-polar-field condition in the south started only around 2013, but it ended by June 2014. Thus the asymmetry in the times of polarity reversal switched between cycle 23 and 24. The polar MBE is a good proxy for the polar magnetic field strength as indicated by the high degree of correlation between the two. The cross-correlation between the high- and low-latitude MBEs is significant for a lag of approximately 5.5 to 7.3 years, suggesting that the polar field of one cycle indicates the sunspot number of the next cycle in agreement with the Babcock-Leighton mechanism of solar cycles. The extended period of near-zero field in the north-polar region should result in a weak and delayed sunspot activity in the northern hemisphere in cycle 25.

  6. Driving violations observed: an Australian study.

    PubMed

    Glendon, A Ian

    2007-08-01

    This study analyses 2,765 cases of driving behaviours in three Australian states - New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria. Data were gathered from in-car coordinated video and audio recording sequences in free-flowing traffic along two-, three- and four-lane highways with varying speed limits on all days of the week in daylight and fine weather conditions. Explanatory variables included driver age group and gender, passenger characteristics and vehicle age and type. Response variables included driving violations and other driving behaviours, including lane use, speeding, close following (tailgating), driver's hands position and mobile phone use. Data were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively. By focusing upon vehicle and driver characteristics, and their impact on driving behaviours, including identified violations, this study explores some implications both for future research and for traffic policy makers.

  7. Real-time in vitro observation of cavitation in a prosthetic heart valve.

    PubMed

    Lamson, T C; Stinebring, D R; Deutsch, S; Rosenberg, G; Tarbell, J M

    1991-01-01

    A technique for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on a prosthetic heart valve operating in a ventricular assist device under normal physiologic conditions has been developed. Considering the documented observation of cavitation erosion in heart valve components from human explants, and the potential risk of blood damage that cavitation presents, the technique developed in this study may prove useful in the design of prosthetic heart valves and ventricular assist devices. Cavitation of a glycerol blood analog fluid has been documented for a Medtronic/Hall prosthetic heart valve operating in a Penn State Electric Ventricular Assist Device. The ventricular assist device was operated in a mock circulatory system under normal physiologic conditions. The valve was located in the mitral position, with the cavitation occurring on the inlet side after valve closure. Bubble cavitation was seen on the valve occluder face, and vortex cavitation was observed at two locations in the vicinity of the valve occluder and housing. The cavity growth and collapse cycle for these forms of vaporous cavitation was less than 1 msec. Stroboscopic photography and stroboscopic videography with frame grabbing were used to document the cavity life cycle. With beat rate held constant, the cavity duration time was found to decrease with increasing mean venous return pressure.

  8. Time Series Analysis of Remote Sensing Observations for Citrus Crop Growth Stage and Evapotranspiration Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, S. A.; Chakraborty, M.; Suradhaniwar, S.; Adinarayana, J.; Durbha, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    Satellite based earth observation (EO) platforms have proved capability to spatio-temporally monitor changes on the earth's surface. Long term satellite missions have provided huge repository of optical remote sensing datasets, and United States Geological Survey (USGS) Landsat program is one of the oldest sources of optical EO datasets. This historical and near real time EO archive is a rich source of information to understand the seasonal changes in the horticultural crops. Citrus (Mandarin / Nagpur Orange) is one of the major horticultural crops cultivated in central India. Erratic behaviour of rainfall and dependency on groundwater for irrigation has wide impact on the citrus crop yield. Also, wide variations are reported in temperature and relative humidity causing early fruit onset and increase in crop water requirement. Therefore, there is need to study the crop growth stages and crop evapotranspiration at spatio-temporal scale for managing the scarce resources. In this study, an attempt has been made to understand the citrus crop growth stages using Normalized Difference Time Series (NDVI) time series data obtained from Landsat archives (http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/). Total 388 Landsat 4, 5, 7 and 8 scenes (from year 1990 to Aug. 2015) for Worldwide Reference System (WRS) 2, path 145 and row 45 were selected to understand seasonal variations in citrus crop growth. Considering Landsat 30 meter spatial resolution to obtain homogeneous pixels with crop cover orchards larger than 2 hectare area was selected. To consider change in wavelength bandwidth (radiometric resolution) with Landsat sensors (i.e. 4, 5, 7 and 8) NDVI has been selected to obtain continuous sensor independent time series. The obtained crop growth stage information has been used to estimate citrus basal crop coefficient information (Kcb). Satellite based Kcb estimates were used with proximal agrometeorological sensing system

  9. Observation of discrete time-crystalline order in a disordered dipolar many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soonwon; Choi, Joonhee; Landig, Renate; Kucsko, Georg; Zhou, Hengyun; Isoya, Junichi; Jelezko, Fedor; Onoda, Shinobu; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Khemani, Vedika; von Keyserlingk, Curt; Yao, Norman Y.; Demler, Eugene; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding quantum dynamics away from equilibrium is an outstanding challenge in the modern physical sciences. Out-of-equilibrium systems can display a rich variety of phenomena, including self-organized synchronization and dynamical phase transitions. More recently, advances in the controlled manipulation of isolated many-body systems have enabled detailed studies of non-equilibrium phases in strongly interacting quantum matter; for example, the interplay between periodic driving, disorder and strong interactions has been predicted to result in exotic ‘time-crystalline’ phases, in which a system exhibits temporal correlations at integer multiples of the fundamental driving period, breaking the discrete time-translational symmetry of the underlying drive. Here we report the experimental observation of such discrete time-crystalline order in a driven, disordered ensemble of about one million dipolar spin impurities in diamond at room temperature. We observe long-lived temporal correlations, experimentally identify the phase boundary and find that the temporal order is protected by strong interactions. This order is remarkably stable to perturbations, even in the presence of slow thermalization. Our work opens the door to exploring dynamical phases of matter and controlling interacting, disordered many-body systems.

  10. Controlling and observing nonseparability of phonons created in time-dependent 1D atomic Bose condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott; Michel, Florent; Parentani, Renaud

    2017-03-01

    We study the spectrum and entanglement of phonons produced by temporal changes in homogeneous one-dimensional atomic condensates. To characterize the experimentally accessible changes, we first consider the dynamics of the condensate when varying the radial trapping frequency, separately studying two regimes: an adiabatic one and an oscillatory one. Working in momentum space, we then show that in situ measurements of the density-density correlation function can be used to assess the nonseparability of the phonon state after such changes. We also study time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, paying particular attention to the role played by the adiabaticity of opening the trap on the nonseparability of the final state of atoms. In both cases, we emphasize that commuting measurements can suffice to assess nonseparability. Some recent observations are analyzed, and we make proposals for future experiments.

  11. A Time Allocation Study of University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Albert N.; Swann, Christopher A.; Bozeman, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Many previous time allocation studies treat work as a single activity and examine trade-offs between work and other activities. This paper investigates the at-work allocation of time among teaching, research, grant writing and service by science and engineering faculty at top US research universities. We focus on the relationship between tenure…

  12. Multiple indices method for real-time tsunami inundation forecast using a dense offshore observation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, N.; Aoi, S.; Hirata, K.; Suzuki, W.; Kunugi, T.; Nakamura, H.

    2015-12-01

    We started to develop a new methodology for real-time tsunami inundation forecast system (Aoi et al., 2015, this meeting) using densely offshore tsunami observations of the Seafloor Observation Network for Earthquakes and Tsunamis (S-net), which is under construction along the Japan Trench (Kanazawa et al., 2012, JpGU; Uehira et al., 2015, IUGG). In our method, the most important concept is involving any type and/or form uncertainties in the tsunami forecast, which cannot be dealt with any of standard linear/nonlinear least square approaches. We first prepare a Tsunami Scenario Bank (TSB), which contains offshore tsunami waveforms at the S-net stations and tsunami inundation information calculated from any possible tsunami source. We then quickly select several acceptable tsunami scenarios that can explain offshore observations by using multiple indices and appropriate thresholds, after a tsunami occurrence. At that time, possible tsunami inundations coupled with selected scenarios are forecasted (Yamamoto et al., 2014, AGU). Currently, we define three indices: correlation coefficient and two variance reductions, whose L2-norm part is normalized either by observations or calculations (Suzuki et al., 2015, JpGU; Yamamoto et al., 2015, IUGG). In this study, we construct the TSB, which contains various tsunami source models prepared for the probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment in the Japan Trench region (Hirata et al., 2014, AGU). To evaluate the propriety of our method, we adopt the fault model based on the 2011 Tohoku earthquake as a pseudo "observation". We also calculate three indices using coastal maximum tsunami height distributions between observation and calculation. We then obtain the correlation between coastal and offshore indices. We notice that the index value of coastal maximum tsunami heights is closer to 1 than the index value of offshore waveforms, i.e., the coastal maximum tsunami height may be predictable within appropriate thresholds defined for

  13. Real-time observation of fluctuations at the driven-dissipative Dicke phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Brennecke, Ferdinand; Mottl, Rafael; Baumann, Kristian; Landig, Renate; Donner, Tobias; Esslinger, Tilman

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the influence of dissipation on the driven Dicke quantum phase transition, realized by coupling external degrees of freedom of a Bose–Einstein condensate to the light field of a high-finesse optical cavity. The cavity provides a natural dissipation channel, which gives rise to vacuum-induced fluctuations and allows us to observe density fluctuations of the gas in real-time. We monitor the divergence of these fluctuations over two orders of magnitude while approaching the phase transition, and observe a behavior that deviates significantly from that expected for a closed system. A correlation analysis of the fluctuations reveals the diverging time scale of the atomic dynamics and allows us to extract a damping rate for the external degree of freedom of the atoms. We find good agreement with our theoretical model including dissipation via both the cavity field and the atomic field. Using a dissipation channel to nondestructively gain information about a quantum many-body system provides a unique path to study the physics of driven-dissipative systems. PMID:23818599

  14. Study of Time Reversal in Complex Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-02

    collapse in the time-reversed model; thus these distributions must be unique to each petal , as can be observed in figure 5. We will use the Flower ...in the simple case of a Flower machine having two time-reversed petals in figure 7 in section 2.3. 23 27 B.2 General case We wish to eliminate the...processes, using the conceptual formalism of the ?-machine. The causal irreversibility is examined, in particular for the class of Flower processes, and

  15. Simple bounds on fluctuations and uncertainty relations for first-passage times of counting observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrahan, Juan P.

    2017-03-01

    Recent large deviation results have provided general lower bounds for the fluctuations of time-integrated currents in the steady state of stochastic systems. A corollary are so-called thermodynamic uncertainty relations connecting precision of estimation to average dissipation. Here we consider this problem but for counting observables, i.e., trajectory observables which, in contrast to currents, are non-negative and nondecreasing in time (and possibly symmetric under time reversal). In the steady state, their fluctuations to all orders are bound from below by a Conway-Maxwell-Poisson distribution dependent only on the averages of the observable and of the dynamical activity. We show how to obtain the corresponding bounds for first-passage times (times when a certain value of the counting variable is first reached) and their uncertainty relations. Just like entropy production does for currents, dynamical activity controls the bounds on fluctuations of counting observables.

  16. Observed Parent Behaviors as Time-Varying Moderators of Problem Behaviors Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treble-Barna, Amery; Zang, Huaiyu; Zhang, Nanhua; Taylor, H. Gerry; Stancin, Terry; Yeates, Keith Owen; Wade, Shari L.

    2016-01-01

    Parent behaviors moderate the adverse consequences of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, it is unknown how these moderating effects change over time. This study examined the moderating effect of observed parent behaviors over time since injury on the relation between TBI and behavioral outcomes. Participants included children, ages…

  17. AB220. Relationships between intravaginal ejaculatory latency time and National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index in the four types of premature ejaculation syndromes: a large observational study in China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jingjing; Xu, Chuan; Zhang, Xiansheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective We assessed the associations between intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) and National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) in men with different PE syndromes. Methods From September 2011 to September 2012, a total of 4,000 men were enrolled from the Anhui province of China. Subjects were required to complete a verbal questionnaire, including demographic information, medical and sexual history (e.g., IELT), and self-estimated scales (e.g., NIH-CPSI). Results Of 3,016 of the men evaluated, 25.80% complained of premature ejaculation (PE). Distribution of the four PE syndromes among men with complaints of PE was as follows: LPE, 12.34%; APE, 18.77%; VPE, 44.09%; and SPE, 24.81%. Men with complaints of PE reported worse NIH-CPSI scores and lower IELT than men without complaints of PE (P<0.001 for all). Moreover, total and subdomain scores of NIH-CPSI were higher in men with APE, and IELT was higher in men with SPE. IELT was negatively associated with NIH-CPSI scores in men with complaints of PE. Negative relationships between total and subdomain scores of NIH-CPSI and IELT were stronger in men with APE (total scores: adjusted r=−0.68, P<0.001; pain symptoms: adjusted r=−0.70, P<0.001; urinary symptoms: adjusted r=−0.67, P<0.001; quality of life impact: adjusted r=−0.64, P<0.001). Conclusions Men with complaints of PE reported worse NIH-CPSI scores than men without complaints of PE. Relationships between IELT and NIH-CPSI scores were strongest in men with APE.

  18. Coordinated Regional Benefit Studies of Coastal Ocean Observing Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Ocean observing systems are a primary source of this information. Science Education and Communication: Real-time data from ocean observing systems...can be used to enhance science education in the classroom and can bring benefits directly to users of ocean observing information, such as

  19. Short-Time Glassy-like Dynamics Observed in Viscous Protein Solutions with Competing Potential Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Norman; Godfrin, Doug; Liu, Yun

    Structures in concentrated protein solutions caused by the combination of short-range attraction (SA) and long-range repulsion (LR) have been extensively studied due to their importance in understanding therapeutic protein formulations and the phase behavior in general. Despite extensive studies of kinetically arrested states in colloidal systems with short-range attraction, less is understood for the effect of an additional longer-range repulsion on model colloidal systems with a SA interaction. Highly purified lysozyme is used a model experimental system due to its stable globular structure and SALR interactions at low ionic strength that can be quantitatively modeled. The fluid microstructure and protein short time self diffusion are measured across a broad range of conditions by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron spin echo (NSE), respectively. Newtonian liquid behavior is observed at all concentrations, even with an increase of zero shear viscosity by almost four orders of magnitude with increasing concentration. However, dynamic measurements demonstrate a sub-diffusive regime at relatively short time scales for concentrated samples at low temperature. The formation of a heterogeneous density distribution is shown to produce localized regions of high density that reduce protein motion, giving it a glassy-like behavior at the short time scale. This heterogeneity occurs at the length scale associated with the intermediate range order driven by the competing potential features, distinguishable from heterogeneous colloidal gels.

  20. Magnetic Reconnection Sites Observed by the Cluster Spacecraft: Measurement of Short time scale electron effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, A. M.; Carozzi, T. C.; Gough, M. P.; Chambers, E. C.

    Several events have been observed by the Cluster spacecraft passing close to magnetic reconnection sites in the tail and magnetopause when the fleet configuration is at short spatial scale (spacecraft separation approximately 100 km). These events are studied in the context of corresponding short time scale electron behaviour which contribute to and result from the reconnection process. This is done primarily using Particle Correlator data from the DWP instruments on Cluster in conjunction with other data sets. The particle correlators use captured time series of electron particle counts accumulated in 12 microsecond time bins measured over the energy range of the PEACE HEEA sensor (40 eV to 26 KeV) and on which an auto-correlation is performed. The phenomena studied concerns beam properties, electron acceleration, interaction with waves and any indications of the electron diffusion processes that are occurring. These phenomena are quantified using measures of the strength of particle-particle interactions (general second order statistics on the electrons) and the Index of Dispersion (variance to mean ratio) indicating bunching or scattering processes.

  1. Supplementing Oscat winds with Saral Altika observations for cyclone studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niharika, K.; Usha Sundari, H. S. V.; Prasad, A. V. V.; Kumari, E. V. S. Sita; Dadhwal, V. K.; Ali, M. M.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate prediction of life cycle of cyclone is very critical to the disaster management practices. Since the cyclones originate over the oceans where in situ observations are limited, we have to resort to the remote sensing techniques. Both optical and microwave sensors help studying the cyclones. While scatterometer provide wind vectors, altimeters can give only wind speed. In this paper we present how altimeter measurements can supplement the scatterometer observations in determining the radius of maximum winds (RMW). Sustained maximum winds, indicator for the intensity of the cyclone, are within the eye wall of a cyclone at a distance of RMW. This parameter is also useful in predicting right time of the storm surge. In this paper we used the wind speed estimations from AltiKa, an altimeter operating at Ka band.

  2. Observation of quantum particles on a large space-time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, L. J.

    1994-10-01

    A quantum particle observed on a sufficiently large space-time scale can be described by means of classical particle trajectories. The joint distribution for large-scale multiple-time position and momentum measurements on a nonrelativistic quantum particle moving freely in R v is given by straight-line trajectories with probabilities determined by the initial momentum-space wavefunction. For large-scale toroidal and rectangular regions the trajectories are geodesics. In a uniform gravitational field the trajectories are parabolas. A quantum counting process on free particles is also considered and shown to converge in the large-space-time limit to a classical counting process for particles with straight-line trajectories. If the quantum particle interacts weakly with its environment, the classical particle trajectories may undergo random jumps. In the random potential model considered here, the quantum particle evolves according to a reversible unitary one-parameter group describing elastic scattering off static randomly distributed impurities (a quantum Lorentz gas). In the large-space-time weak-coupling limit a classical stochastic process is obtained with probability one and describes a classical particle moving with constant speed in straight lines between random jumps in direction. The process depends only on the ensemble value of the covariance of the random field and not on the sample field. The probability density in phase space associated with the classical stochastic process satisfies the linear Boltzmann equation for the classical Lorentz gas, which, in the limit h→0, goes over to the linear Landau equation. Our study of the quantum Lorentz gas is based on a perturbative expansion and, as in other studies of this system, the series can be controlled only for small values of the rescaled time and for Gaussian random fields. The discussion of classical particle trajectories for nonrelativistic particles on a macroscopic spacetime scale applies also to

  3. Elevated time-dependent strengthening rates observed in San Andreas Fault drilling samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Vogt, Christoph; Kopf, Achim J.

    2016-09-01

    The central San Andreas Fault in California is known as a creeping fault, however recent studies have shown that it may be accumulating a slip deficit and thus its seismogenic potential should be seriously considered. We conducted laboratory friction experiments measuring time-dependent frictional strengthening (healing) on fault zone and wall rock samples recovered during drilling at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), located near the southern edge of the creeping section and in the direct vicinity of three repeating microearthquake clusters. We find that for hold times of up to 3000 s, frictional healing follows a log-linear dependence on hold time and that the healing rate is very low for a sample of the actively shearing fault core, consistent with previous results. However, considering longer hold times up to ∼350,000 s, the healing rate accelerates such that the data for all samples are better described by a power law relation. In general, samples having a higher content of phyllosilicate minerals exhibit low log-linear healing rates, and the notably clay-rich fault zone sample also exhibits strong power-law healing when longer hold times are included. Our data suggest that weak faults, such as the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault, can accumulate interseismic shear stress more rapidly than expected from previous friction data. Using the power-law dependence of frictional healing on hold time, calculations of recurrence interval and stress drop based on our data accurately match observations of discrete creep events and repeating Mw = 2 earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault.

  4. Algorithmic recognition of anomalous time intervals in sea-level observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getmanov, V. G.; Gvishiani, A. D.; Kamaev, D. A.; Kornilov, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    The problem of the algorithmic recognition of anomalous time intervals in the time series of the sea-level observations conducted by the Russian Tsunami Warning Survey (RTWS) is considered. The normal and anomalous sea-level observations are described. The polyharmonic models describing the sea-level fluctuations on the short time intervals are constructed, and sea-level forecasting based on these models is suggested. The algorithm for the recognition of anomalous time intervals is developed and its work is tested on the real RTWS data.

  5. Combining satellite observations to develop a global soil moisture product for near-real-time applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enenkel, Markus; Reimer, Christoph; Dorigo, Wouter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Pfeil, Isabella; Parinussa, Robert; De Jeu, Richard

    2016-10-01

    The soil moisture dataset that is generated via the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) of the European Space Agency (ESA) (ESA CCI SM) is a popular research product. It is composed of observations from 10 different satellites and aims to exploit the individual strengths of active (radar) and passive (radiometer) sensors, thereby providing surface soil moisture estimates at a spatial resolution of 0.25°. However, the annual updating cycle limits the use of the ESA CCI SM dataset for operational applications. Therefore, this study proposes an adaptation of the ESA CCI product for daily global updates via satellite-derived near-real-time (NRT) soil moisture observations. In order to extend the ESA CCI SM dataset from 1978 to present we use NRT observations from the Advanced Scatterometer on-board the two MetOp satellites and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 on-board GCOM-W. Since these NRT observations do not incorporate the latest algorithmic updates, parameter databases and intercalibration efforts, by nature they offer a lower quality than reprocessed offline datasets. In addition to adaptations of the ESA CCI SM processing chain for NRT datasets, the quality of the NRT datasets is a main source of uncertainty. Our findings indicate that, despite issues in arid regions, the new CCI NRT dataset shows a good correlation with ESA CCI SM. The average global correlation coefficient between CCI NRT and ESA CCI SM (Pearson's R) is 0.80. An initial validation with 40 in situ observations in France, Spain, Senegal and Kenya yields an average R of 0.58 and 0.49 for ESA CCI SM and CCI NRT, respectively. In summary, the CCI NRT product is nearly as accurate as the existing ESA CCI SM product and, therefore, of significant value for operational applications such as drought and flood forecasting, agricultural index insurance or weather forecasting.

  6. Time-resolved visible/near-infrared spectrometric observations of the Galaxy 11 geostationary satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bédard, Donald; Wade, Gregg A.

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved spectrometric measurements of the Galaxy 11 geostationary satellite were collected on three consecutive nights in July 2014 with the 1.6-m telescope at the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic in Québec, Canada. Approximately 300 low-resolution spectra (R ≈ 700 , where R = λ / Δλ) of the satellite were collected each night, covering a spectral range between 425 and 850 nm. The two objectives of the experiment were to conduct material-type identification from the spectra and to study how the spectral energy distribution inferred from these measurements varied as the illumination and observation geometry changed on nightly timescales. We present results that indicate the presence of a highly reflective aluminized surface corresponding to the solar concentrator arrays of the Galaxy 11 spacecraft. Although other material types could not be identified using the spectra, the results showed that the spectral energy distribution of the reflected sunlight from the Galaxy 11 spacecraft varied significantly, in a systematic manner, over each night of observation. The variations were quantified using colour indices calculated from the time-resolved spectrometric measurements.

  7. Nonlinear Estimation of Discrete-Time Signals Under Random Observation Delay

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero-Aguila, R.; Jimenez-Lopez, J. D.; Nakamori, S.

    2008-11-06

    This paper presents an approximation to the nonlinear least-squares estimation problem of discrete-time stochastic signals using nonlinear observations with additive white noise which can be randomly delayed by one sampling time. The observation delay is modelled by a sequence of independent Bernoulli random variables whose values, zero or one, indicate that the real observation arrives on time or it is delayed and, hence, the available measurement to estimate the signal is not up-to-date. Assuming that the state-space model generating the signal is unknown and only the covariance functions of the processes involved in the observation equation are ready for use, a filtering algorithm based on linear approximations of the real observations is proposed.

  8. Annual report of the Mizusawa Astrogeodynamics Observatory. Time Service and geophysical observations for the year 1991.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This annual report consists of two parts. The first part shows the results of the time services, i.e., time and latitude observations with the PZT, comparison of UTC(NAOM) with the Loran C and GPS (Global Positioning System), and comparison of the atomic clocks at the Mizusawa Astrogeodynamics Observatory. The second part shows the results of the geophysical observations at the Esashi Earth Tides Station and the absolute gravity measurements.

  9. Crosstalk Studies of a Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryer, Jonathan

    2008-10-01

    The crosstalk between various pads of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) developed for the experiment MuSun was studied. Crosstalk between TPC pads must be studied and understood in order for proper muon path reconstruction to be obtained. A printed circuit board was developed to use capacitive coupling to transmit a signal pulse onto the TPC, where the crosstalk of the transmitted signal was studied.

  10. Direct mapping rather than motor prediction subserves modulation of corticospinal excitability during observation of actions in real time

    PubMed Central

    Gueugneau, Nicolas; Mc Cabe, Sofia I.; Villalta, Jorge I.; Grafton, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    Motor facilitation refers to the specific increment in corticospinal excitability (CSE) elicited by the observation of actions performed by others. To date, the precise nature of the mechanism at the basis of this phenomenon is unknown. One possibility is that motor facilitation is driven by a predictive process reminiscent of the role of forward models in motor control. Alternatively, motor facilitation may result from a model-free mechanism by which the basic elements of the observed action are directly mapped onto their cortical representations. Our study was designed to discern these alternatives. To this aim, we recorded the time course of CSE for the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) during observation of three grasping actions in real time, two of which strongly diverged in kinematics from their natural (invariant) form. Although artificially slow movements used in most action observation studies might enhance the observer's discrimination performance, the use of videos in real time is crucial to maintain the time course of CSE within the physiological range of daily actions. CSE was measured at 4 time points within a 240-ms window that best captured the kinematic divergence from the invariant form. Our results show that CSE of the FDI, not the ADM, closely follows the functional role of the muscle despite the mismatch between the natural and the divergent kinematics. We propose that motor facilitation during observation of actions performed in real time reflects the model-free coding of perceived movement following a direct mapping mechanism. PMID:25810483

  11. Direct mapping rather than motor prediction subserves modulation of corticospinal excitability during observation of actions in real time.

    PubMed

    Gueugneau, Nicolas; Mc Cabe, Sofia I; Villalta, Jorge I; Grafton, Scott T; Della-Maggiore, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    Motor facilitation refers to the specific increment in corticospinal excitability (CSE) elicited by the observation of actions performed by others. To date, the precise nature of the mechanism at the basis of this phenomenon is unknown. One possibility is that motor facilitation is driven by a predictive process reminiscent of the role of forward models in motor control. Alternatively, motor facilitation may result from a model-free mechanism by which the basic elements of the observed action are directly mapped onto their cortical representations. Our study was designed to discern these alternatives. To this aim, we recorded the time course of CSE for the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) during observation of three grasping actions in real time, two of which strongly diverged in kinematics from their natural (invariant) form. Although artificially slow movements used in most action observation studies might enhance the observer's discrimination performance, the use of videos in real time is crucial to maintain the time course of CSE within the physiological range of daily actions. CSE was measured at 4 time points within a 240-ms window that best captured the kinematic divergence from the invariant form. Our results show that CSE of the FDI, not the ADM, closely follows the functional role of the muscle despite the mismatch between the natural and the divergent kinematics. We propose that motor facilitation during observation of actions performed in real time reflects the model-free coding of perceived movement following a direct mapping mechanism.

  12. CAN LARGE TIME DELAYS OBSERVED IN LIGHT CURVES OF CORONAL LOOPS BE EXPLAINED IN IMPULSIVE HEATING?

    SciTech Connect

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikić, Zoran; Alexander, Caroline E.; Winebarger, Amy R. E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com E-mail: caroline.e.alexander@nasa.gov

    2016-02-20

    The light curves of solar coronal loops often peak first in channels associated with higher temperatures and then in those associated with lower temperatures. The delay times between the different narrowband EUV channels have been measured for many individual loops and recently for every pixel of an active region observation. The time delays between channels for an active region exhibit a wide range of values. The maximum time delay in each channel pair can be quite large, i.e., >5000 s. These large time delays make-up 3%–26% (depending on the channel pair) of the pixels where a trustworthy, positive time delay is measured. It has been suggested that these time delays can be explained by simple impulsive heating, i.e., a short burst of energy that heats the plasma to a high temperature, after which the plasma is allowed to cool through radiation and conduction back to its original state. In this paper, we investigate whether the largest observed time delays can be explained by this hypothesis by simulating a series of coronal loops with different heating rates, loop lengths, abundances, and geometries to determine the range of expected time delays between a set of four EUV channels. We find that impulsive heating cannot address the largest time delays observed in two of the channel pairs and that the majority of the large time delays can only be explained by long, expanding loops with photospheric abundances. Additional observations may rule out these simulations as an explanation for the long time delays. We suggest that either the time delays found in this manner may not be representative of real loop evolution, or that the impulsive heating and cooling scenario may be too simple to explain the observations, and other potential heating scenarios must be explored.

  13. First Observation of Low Energy Electron Neutrinos in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Acciarri, R.; et al.

    2016-10-13

    Liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) produce remarkable fidelity in the observation of neutrino interactions. The superior capabilities of such detectors to reconstruct the spatial and calorimetric information of neutrino events have made them the detectors of choice in a number of experiments, specifically those looking to observe electron neutrino ($\

  14. Assessing the Impact of Different Measurement Time Intervals on Observed Long-Term Wind Speed Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin-Molina, C.; Vicente-Serrano, S. M.; McVicar, T.; Jerez, S.; Revuelto, J.; López Moreno, J. I.

    2014-12-01

    During the last two decades climate studies have reported a tendency toward a decline in measured near-surface wind speed in some regions of Europe, North America, Asia and Australia. This weakening in observed wind speed has been recently termed "global stilling", showing a worldwide average trend of -0.140 m s-1 dec-1 during last 50-years. The precise cause of the "global stilling" remains largely uncertain and has been hypothetically attributed to several factors, mainly related to: (i) an increasing surface roughness (i.e. forest growth, land use changes, and urbanization); (ii) a slowdown in large-scale atmospheric circulation; (iii) instrumental drifts and technological improvements, maintenance, and shifts in measurements sites and calibration issues; (iv) sunlight dimming due to air pollution; and (v) astronomical changes. This study proposed a novel investigation aimed at analyzing how different measurement time intervals used to calculate a wind speed series can affect the sign and magnitude of long-term wind speed trends. For instance, National Weather Services across the globe estimate daily average wind speed using different time intervals and formulae that may affect the trend results. Firstly, we carried out a comprehensive review of wind studies reporting the sign and magnitude of wind speed trend and the sampling intervals used. Secondly, we analyzed near-surface wind speed trends recorded at 59 land-based stations across Spain comparing monthly mean wind speed series obtained from: (a) daily mean wind speed data averaged from standard 10-min mean observations at 0000, 0700, 1300 and 1800 UTC; and (b) average wind speed of 24 hourly measurements (i.e., wind run measurements) from 0000 to 2400 UTC. Thirdly and finally, we quantified the impact of anemometer drift (i.e. bearing malfunction) by presenting preliminary results (1-year of paired measurements) from a comparison of one new anemometer sensor against one malfunctioned anenometer sensor due

  15. Collaborative real-time motion video analysis by human observer and image exploitation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hild, Jutta; Krüger, Wolfgang; Brüstle, Stefan; Trantelle, Patrick; Unmüßig, Gabriel; Heinze, Norbert; Peinsipp-Byma, Elisabeth; Beyerer, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    Motion video analysis is a challenging task, especially in real-time applications. In most safety and security critical applications, a human observer is an obligatory part of the overall analysis system. Over the last years, substantial progress has been made in the development of automated image exploitation algorithms. Hence, we investigate how the benefits of automated video analysis can be integrated suitably into the current video exploitation systems. In this paper, a system design is introduced which strives to combine both the qualities of the human observer's perception and the automated algorithms, thus aiming to improve the overall performance of a real-time video analysis system. The system design builds on prior work where we showed the benefits for the human observer by means of a user interface which utilizes the human visual focus of attention revealed by the eye gaze direction for interaction with the image exploitation system; eye tracker-based interaction allows much faster, more convenient, and equally precise moving target acquisition in video images than traditional computer mouse selection. The system design also builds on prior work we did on automated target detection, segmentation, and tracking algorithms. Beside the system design, a first pilot study is presented, where we investigated how the participants (all non-experts in video analysis) performed in initializing an object tracking subsystem by selecting a target for tracking. Preliminary results show that the gaze + key press technique is an effective, efficient, and easy to use interaction technique when performing selection operations on moving targets in videos in order to initialize an object tracking function.

  16. Gamma-Ray Burst Arrival Time Localizations: Simultaneous Observations by Mars Observer, Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laros, J. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Hurley, K.; Kouveliotou, C.; McCollough, M. L.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Between 1992 October 4 and 1993 August 1, concurrent coverage by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), Mars Observer (MO), and Ulysses spacecraft was obtained for 78 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although most of these were below the MO and Ulysses thresholds, nine were positively detected by all three spacecraft, with data quality adequate for quantitative localization analysis. All were localized independently to approximately 2 deg accuracy by the CGRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). We computed arrival-time error boxes with larger dimensions ranging from a few arcminutes to the diameters of the BATSE-only boxes and with smaller dimensions in the arcminute range. Three events are of particular interest: GB 930704 (BATSE 2428) has been described as a possible repeater. The arrival-time information is consistent with that hypothesis, but only just so. The GB 930706 (2431) box, at approximately 1 min x 4 min, is the only one this small obtained since Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) entered the Venusian atmosphere in 1992 October. Sensitive radio and optical observations of this location were made within 8 and 9 days of the burst, but no counterpart candidates were identified. GB 930801 (2477) is the first GRB that had its localization improved by taking into account BATSE Earth occultation.

  17. Observational studies and the difficult quest for causality: lessons from vaccine effectiveness and impact studies.

    PubMed

    Lipsitch, Marc; Jha, Ayan; Simonsen, Lone

    2016-07-24

    Although randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCT) are critical to establish efficacy of vaccines at the time of licensure, important remaining questions about vaccine effectiveness (VE)-used here to include individual-level measures and population-wide impact of vaccine programmes-can only be answered once the vaccine is in use, from observational studies. However, such studies are inherently at risk for bias. Using a causal framework and illustrating with examples, we review newer approaches to detecting and avoiding confounding and selection bias in three major classes of observational study design: cohort, case-control and ecological studies. Studies of influenza VE, especially in seniors, are an excellent demonstration of the challenges of detecting and reducing such bias, and so we use influenza VE as a running example. We take a fresh look at the time-trend studies often dismissed as 'ecological'. Such designs are the only observational study design that can measure the overall effect of a vaccination programme [indirect (herd) as well as direct effects], and are in fact already an important part of the evidence base for several vaccines currently in use. Despite the great strides towards more robust observational study designs, challenges lie ahead for evaluating best practices for achieving robust unbiased results from observational studies. This is critical for evaluation of national and global vaccine programme effectiveness.

  18. 5 CFR 550.1002 - Compensatory time off for religious observances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... personal religious beliefs require the abstention from work during certain periods of time may elect to... religious observances when the employee's personal religious beliefs require that the employee abstain from... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Compensatory time off for...

  19. 5 CFR 550.1002 - Compensatory time off for religious observances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... personal religious beliefs require the abstention from work during certain periods of time may elect to... religious observances when the employee's personal religious beliefs require that the employee abstain from... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compensatory time off for...

  20. Observation of Time-Invariant Coherence in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Simulator.

    PubMed

    Silva, Isabela A; Souza, Alexandre M; Bromley, Thomas R; Cianciaruso, Marco; Marx, Raimund; Sarthour, Roberto S; Oliveira, Ivan S; Lo Franco, Rosario; Glaser, Steffen J; deAzevedo, Eduardo R; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-10-14

    The ability to live in coherent superpositions is a signature trait of quantum systems and constitutes an irreplaceable resource for quantum-enhanced technologies. However, decoherence effects usually destroy quantum superpositions. It was recently predicted that, in a composite quantum system exposed to dephasing noise, quantum coherence in a transversal reference basis can stay protected for an indefinite time. This can occur for a class of quantum states independently of the measure used to quantify coherence, and it requires no control on the system during the dynamics. Here, such an invariant coherence phenomenon is observed experimentally in two different setups based on nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature, realizing an effective quantum simulator of two- and four-qubit spin systems. Our study further reveals a novel interplay between coherence and various forms of correlations, and it highlights the natural resilience of quantum effects in complex systems.

  1. Real-time observation of the conformational dynamics of mitochondrial Hsp70 by spFRET.

    PubMed

    Sikor, Martin; Mapa, Koyeli; von Voithenberg, Lena Voith; Mokranjac, Dejana; Lamb, Don C

    2013-05-29

    The numerous functions of the important class of molecular chaperones, heat shock proteins 70 (Hsp70), rely on cycles of intricate conformational changes driven by ATP-hydrolysis and regulated by cochaperones and substrates. Here, we used Förster resonance energy transfer to study the conformational dynamics of individual molecules of Ssc1, a mitochondrial Hsp70, in real time. The intrinsic dynamics of the substrate-binding domain of Ssc1 was observed to be uncoupled from the dynamic interactions between substrate- and nucleotide-binding domains. Analysis of the fluctuations in the interdomain separation revealed frequent transitions to a nucleotide-free state. The nucleotide-exchange factor Mge1 did not induce ADP release, as expected, but rather facilitated binding of ATP. These results indicate that the conformational cycle of Ssc1 is more elaborate than previously thought and provide insight into how the Hsp70s can perform a wide variety of functions.

  2. Observation of Time-Invariant Coherence in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Isabela A.; Souza, Alexandre M.; Bromley, Thomas R.; Cianciaruso, Marco; Marx, Raimund; Sarthour, Roberto S.; Oliveira, Ivan S.; Lo Franco, Rosario; Glaser, Steffen J.; deAzevedo, Eduardo R.; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O.; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-10-01

    The ability to live in coherent superpositions is a signature trait of quantum systems and constitutes an irreplaceable resource for quantum-enhanced technologies. However, decoherence effects usually destroy quantum superpositions. It was recently predicted that, in a composite quantum system exposed to dephasing noise, quantum coherence in a transversal reference basis can stay protected for an indefinite time. This can occur for a class of quantum states independently of the measure used to quantify coherence, and it requires no control on the system during the dynamics. Here, such an invariant coherence phenomenon is observed experimentally in two different setups based on nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature, realizing an effective quantum simulator of two- and four-qubit spin systems. Our study further reveals a novel interplay between coherence and various forms of correlations, and it highlights the natural resilience of quantum effects in complex systems.

  3. Effects of action observation on corticospinal excitability: Muscle specificity, direction, and timing of the mirror response.

    PubMed

    Naish, Katherine R; Houston-Price, Carmel; Bremner, Andrew J; Holmes, Nicholas P

    2014-11-01

    Many human behaviours and pathologies have been attributed to the putative mirror neuron system, a neural system that is active during both the observation and execution of actions. While there are now a very large number of papers on the mirror neuron system, variations in the methods and analyses employed by researchers mean that the basic characteristics of the mirror response are not clear. This review focuses on three important aspects of the mirror response, as measured by modulations in corticospinal excitability: (1) muscle specificity; (2) direction; and (3) timing of modulation. We focus mainly on electromyographic (EMG) data gathered following single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), because this method provides precise information regarding these three aspects of the response. Data from paired-pulse TMS paradigms and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) are also considered when we discuss the possible mechanisms underlying the mirror response. In this systematic review of the literature, we examine the findings of 85 TMS and PNS studies of the human mirror response, and consider the limitations and advantages of the different methodological approaches these have adopted in relation to discrepancies between their findings. We conclude by proposing a testable model of how action observation modulates corticospinal excitability in humans. Specifically, we propose that action observation elicits an early, non-specific facilitation of corticospinal excitability (at around 90ms from action onset), followed by a later modulation of activity specific to the muscles involved in the observed action (from around 200ms). Testing this model will greatly advance our understanding of the mirror mechanism and provide a more stable grounding on which to base inferences about its role in human behaviour.

  4. Using radiative kernels to compare feedback behavior over different time scales in CMIP output and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shell, K. M.; Flink, M. M.; Jonko, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate climate projections require an understanding of feedback behavior on centennial timescales. Unfortunately, satellite and reanalysis observations are available only for the last few decades. We seek to determine the extent to which the relatively short observation-based records can constrain model estimates of long-term (century-scale) climate change in response to anthropogenic forcing. The radiative kernel technique allows us to study feedbacks related to temperature, water vapor, surface albedo, and clouds in a consistent fashion. We are using Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) simulations to determine whether (modeled) feedbacks differ for interannual- and decadal-scale versus centennial-scale climate change. We also are comparing short-term feedbacks derived from satellite (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, AIRS) and reanalysis (ERA-Interim) data with modeled feedbacks. We use two strategies. The first is the standard kernel technique where feedbacks are determined by differencing mean variables between two states. Preliminary work with CMIP3 indicates that averaging periods (e.g., 10 years versus 20 years) can change feedback estimates by more 20%. In general, we expect longer averaging periods to result in more accurate estimates of feedbacks. However, transient GCMs runs (as well as observational data sets) may be only a few decades long. In these cases, we must determine the best averaging period to balance the increase of noise caused by a shorter averaging period and the decrease of climate signal resulting from averaging periods that are closer together. To address this issue, the second strategy is a modified kernel technique where anomalies from the mean climate are combined with the kernel for every month of the time series. This technique is more appropriate in cases where there is not a large external forcing. We are calculating feedbacks in the CMIP5 simulations using both strategies with different averaging periods and start

  5. Timing and regional patterns of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Stefanie; Willmes, Sascha; Dierking, Wolfgang; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    The better understanding of temporal variability and regional distribution of surface melt on Antarctic sea ice is crucial for the understanding of atmosphere-ocean interactions and the determination of mass and energy budgets of sea ice. Since large regions of Antarctic sea ice are covered with snow during most of the year, observed inter-annual and regional variations of surface melt mainly represents melt processes in the snow. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms that drive snowmelt, both at different times of the year and in different regions around Antarctica. In this study we combine two approaches for observing both surface and volume snowmelt by means of passive microwave satellite data. The former is achieved by measuring diurnal differences of the brightness temperature TB at 37 GHz, the latter by analyzing the ratio TB(19GHz)/TB(37GHz). Moreover, we use both melt onset proxies to divide the Antarctic sea ice cover into characteristic surface melt patterns from 1988/89 to 2014/15. Our results indicate four characteristic melt types. On average, 43% of the ice-covered ocean shows diurnal freeze-thaw cycles in the surface snow layer, resulting in temporary melt (Type A), less than 1% shows continuous snowmelt throughout the snowpack, resulting in strong melt over a period of several days (Type B), 19% shows Type A and B taking place consecutively (Type C), and for 37% no melt is observed at all (Type D). Continuous melt is primarily observed in the outflow of the Weddell Gyre and in the northern Ross Sea, usually 20 days after the onset of temporary melt. Considering the entire data set, snowmelt processes and onset do not show significant temporal trends. Instead, areas of increasing (decreasing) sea-ice extent have longer (shorter) periods of continuous snowmelt.

  6. Space-time extreme wind waves: Observation and analysis of shapes and heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetazzo, Alvise; Barbariol, Francesco; Bergamasco, Filippo; Carniel, Sandro; Sclavo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    .H.G.., Benetazzo, A., Bergamasco, F., Bertotti, L., Carniel, S., Cavaleri, L., Chao, Y.Y., Chawla, A., Ricchi, A., Sclavo, M., Tolman, H., 2015. Space-Time Wave Extremes in WAVEWATCH III: Implementation and Validation for the Adriatic Sea Case Study, in: 14th International Workshop on Wave Hindcasting and Forecasting. November, 8-13, Key West, Florida (USA). - Benetazzo, A., Barbariol, F., Bergamasco, F., Torsello, A., Carniel, S., Sclavo, M., 2015. Observation of extreme sea waves in a space-time ensemble. J. Phys. Oceanogr. 45, 2261-2275. - Boccotti, P., 1983. Some new results on statistical properties of wind waves. Appl. Ocean Res. 5, 134-140. - Fedele, F., 2012. Space-Time Extremes in Short-Crested Storm Seas. J. Phys. Oceanogr. 42, 1601-1615.

  7. Solar Flare Predictions Using Time Series of SDO/HMI Observations and Machine Learning Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilonidis, Stathis; Bobra, Monica; Couvidat, Sebastien

    2015-08-01

    Solar active regions are dynamic systems that can rapidly evolve in time and produce flare eruptions. The temporal evolution of an active region can provide important information about its potential to produce major flares. In this study, we build a flare forecasting model using supervised machine learning methods and time series of SDO/HMI data for all the flaring regions with magnitude M1.0 or higher that have been observed with HMI and several thousand non-flaring regions. We define and compute hundreds of features that characterize the temporal evolution of physical properties related to the size, non-potentiality, and complexity of the active region, as well as its flaring history, for several days before the flare eruption. Using these features, we implement and test the performance of several machine learning algorithms, including support vector machines, neural networks, decision trees, discriminant analysis, and others. We also apply feature selection algorithms that aim to discard features with low predictive power and improve the performance of the machine learning methods. Our results show that support vector machines provide the best forecasts for the next 24 hours, achieving a True Skill Statistic of 0.923, an accuracy of 0.985, and a Heidke skill score of 0.861, which improve the scores obtained by Bobra and Couvidat (2015). The results of this study contribute to the development of a more reliable and fully automated data-driven flare forecasting system.

  8. Ecosystems resilience to drought: indicators derived from time-series of Earth Observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Monica; Fernández, Nestor; Delibes, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Increasing our understanding of how ecosystems differ in their vulnerability to extreme climatic events such as drought is critical. Resilient ecosystems are capable to cope with climatic perturbations retaining the same essential function, structure and feedbacks. However, if the effect of a perturbation is amplified, abrupt shifts can occur such as in desertification processes. Empirical indicators of robustness and resilience to drought events could be developed from time series of Earth Observation (EO) data. So far, the information content of EO time series for monitoring ecosystem resilience has been underutilized, being mostly limited to detection of greening or rainfall use efficiency (RUE) trends at interannual time-scales. Detection of thresholds, shifts, extremes, and hysteresis processes is still in its infancy using EO data. Only recently some studies are starting to utilize this avenue of research using vegetation indices with some controversy due to the substitution of time by space. In drylands, where ecosystem functioning is largely controlled by rainfall, a key variable for monitoring is evapotranspiration as it connects the energy, water and carbon cycles. It can be estimated using EO data using a surface energy balance approach. In this work we propose the use of new empirical indicators of resilience to drought derived from EO time series. They are extracted from analyses of lagged cross-correlations between rainfall and evapotranspiration anomalies at several time-steps. This allows elucidating as well if an observed extreme ecological response can be attributed to a climate extreme. Additionally, increases in autocorrelation have been proposed to detect losses of resilience or changes in recovery capacity from a perturbation. Our objective was to compare rates of recovery from drought of different ecosystems in the natural park of Doñana (Spain) composed of wetlands, pine forest, shrublands with and without access to groundwater. The

  9. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. V. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATION CANDIDATES IN THE FIRST SIXTEEN MONTHS FROM POLYNOMIAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric B.; Ragozzine, Darin; Holman, Matthew J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Barclay, Thomas; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; and others

    2012-09-10

    Transit timing variations provide a powerful tool for confirming and characterizing transiting planets, as well as detecting non-transiting planets. We report the results of an updated transit timing variation (TTV) analysis for 1481 planet candidates based on transit times measured during the first sixteen months of Kepler observations. We present 39 strong TTV candidates based on long-term trends (2.8% of suitable data sets). We present another 136 weaker TTV candidates (9.8% of suitable data sets) based on the excess scatter of TTV measurements about a linear ephemeris. We anticipate that several of these planet candidates could be confirmed and perhaps characterized with more detailed TTV analyses using publicly available Kepler observations. For many others, Kepler has observed a long-term TTV trend, but an extended Kepler mission will be required to characterize the system via TTVs. We find that the occurrence rate of planet candidates that show TTVs is significantly increased ({approx}68%) for planet candidates transiting stars with multiple transiting planet candidates when compared to planet candidates transiting stars with a single transiting planet candidate.

  10. Time Dependent Nonequilibrium Ionization of Transition Region Lines Observed with IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo H.; Gudiksen, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The properties of nonstatistical equilibrium ionization of silicon and oxygen ions are analyzed in this work. We focus on five solar targets (quiet Sun; coronal hole; plage; quiescent active region, AR; and flaring AR) as observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS is best suited for this work owing to the high cadence (up to 0.5 s), high spatial resolution (up to 0.″32), and high signal-to-noise ratios for O iv λ1401 and Si iv λ1402. We find that the observed intensity ratio between lines of three times ionized silicon and oxygen ions depends on their total intensity and that this correlation varies depending on the region observed (quiet Sun, coronal holes, plage, or active regions) and on the specific observational objects present (spicules, dynamic loops, jets, microflares, or umbra). In order to interpret the observations, we compare them with synthetic profiles taken from 2D self-consistent radiative MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere, where the statistical equilibrium or nonequilibrium treatment of silicon and oxygen is applied. These synthetic observations show vaguely similar correlations to those in the observations, i.e., between the intensity ratios and their intensities, but only in the nonequilibrium case do we find that (some of) the observations can be reproduced. We conclude that these lines are formed out of statistical equilibrium. We use our time-dependent nonequilibrium ionization simulations to describe the physical mechanisms behind these observed properties.

  11. TIME DEPENDENT NONEQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION OF TRANSITION REGION LINES OBSERVED WITH IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Pontieu, Bart De; Hansteen, Viggo H.; Gudiksen, Boris

    2016-01-20

    The properties of nonstatistical equilibrium ionization of silicon and oxygen ions are analyzed in this work. We focus on five solar targets (quiet Sun; coronal hole; plage; quiescent active region, AR; and flaring AR) as observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS is best suited for this work owing to the high cadence (up to 0.5 s), high spatial resolution (up to 0.″32), and high signal-to-noise ratios for O iv λ1401 and Si iv λ1402. We find that the observed intensity ratio between lines of three times ionized silicon and oxygen ions depends on their total intensity and that this correlation varies depending on the region observed (quiet Sun, coronal holes, plage, or active regions) and on the specific observational objects present (spicules, dynamic loops, jets, microflares, or umbra). In order to interpret the observations, we compare them with synthetic profiles taken from 2D self-consistent radiative MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere, where the statistical equilibrium or nonequilibrium treatment of silicon and oxygen is applied. These synthetic observations show vaguely similar correlations to those in the observations, i.e., between the intensity ratios and their intensities, but only in the nonequilibrium case do we find that (some of) the observations can be reproduced. We conclude that these lines are formed out of statistical equilibrium. We use our time-dependent nonequilibrium ionization simulations to describe the physical mechanisms behind these observed properties.

  12. Developing a Methodology for Observing Stress-Induced Temporal Variations in Travel Time: A Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, P. G.; Niu, F.; Daley, T. M.; Majer, E. L.

    2005-12-01

    The dependence of crack properties on stress means that crustal seismic velocity exhibits stress dependence. This dependence constitutes, in principle, a powerful means of studying transient changes in stress at seismogenic depth through the repeat measurement of travel time from a controlled source. While the scientific potential of this stress dependence has been known for decades, time-dependent seismic imaging has yet to become a reliable means of measuring subsurface stress changes in fault-zone environments. This is due to 1) insufficient delay-time precision necessary to detect small changes in stress, and 2) the difficulty in establishing a reliable in-situ calibration between stress and seismic velocity. These two problems are coupled because the best sources of calibration, solid-earth tides and barometric pressure, produce weak stress perturbations of order 10{2}-10{3} Pa that require precision in the measurement of the fractional velocity change dlnv of order 10-6, based on laboratory experiments. We have thus focused on developing a methodology that is capable of providing this high level of precision. For example, we have shown that precision in dlnv is maximized when there are Q/π wavelengths in the source-receiver path. This relationship provides a means of selecting an optimal geometry and/or source characteristic frequency in the planning of experiments. We have initiated a series of experiments to demonstrate the detectability of these stress-calibration signals in progressively more tectonically relevant settings. Initial tests have been completed on the smallest scale, with two boreholes 17 m deep and 3 meters apart. We have used a piezoelectric source (0.1ms source pulse repeated every 100ms) and a string of 24 hydrophones to record P waves with a dominant frequency of 10KHz. Recording was conducted for 160 hours. The massive stacking of ~36,000 high-SNR traces/hr leads to delay-time precision of 6ns (hour sampling) corresponding to dlnv

  13. Generation of real-time mode high-resolution water vapor fields from GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chen; Penna, Nigel T.; Li, Zhenhong

    2017-02-01

    Pointwise GPS measurements of tropospheric zenith total delay can be interpolated to provide high-resolution water vapor maps which may be used for correcting synthetic aperture radar images, for numeral weather prediction, and for correcting Network Real-time Kinematic GPS observations. Several previous studies have addressed the importance of the elevation dependency of water vapor, but it is often a challenge to separate elevation-dependent tropospheric delays from turbulent components. In this paper, we present an iterative tropospheric decomposition interpolation model that decouples the elevation and turbulent tropospheric delay components. For a 150 km × 150 km California study region, we estimate real-time mode zenith total delays at 41 GPS stations over 1 year by using the precise point positioning technique and demonstrate that the decoupled interpolation model generates improved high-resolution tropospheric delay maps compared with previous tropospheric turbulence- and elevation-dependent models. Cross validation of the GPS zenith total delays yields an RMS error of 4.6 mm with the decoupled interpolation model, compared with 8.4 mm with the previous model. On converting the GPS zenith wet delays to precipitable water vapor and interpolating to 1 km grid cells across the region, validations with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer near-IR water vapor product show 1.7 mm RMS differences by using the decoupled model, compared with 2.0 mm for the previous interpolation model. Such results are obtained without differencing the tropospheric delays or water vapor estimates in time or space, while the errors are similar over flat and mountainous terrains, as well as for both inland and coastal areas.

  14. Near Real-Time Determination of Earthquake Source Parameters for Tsunami Early Warning from Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manneela, Sunanda; Srinivasa Kumar, T.; Nayak, Shailesh R.

    2016-06-01

    Exemplifying the tsunami source immediately after an earthquake is the most critical component of tsunami early warning, as not every earthquake generates a tsunami. After a major under sea earthquake, it is very important to determine whether or not it has actually triggered the deadly wave. The near real-time observations from near field networks such as strong motion and Global Positioning System (GPS) allows rapid determination of fault geometry. Here we present a complete processing chain of Indian Tsunami Early Warning System (ITEWS), starting from acquisition of geodetic raw data, processing, inversion and simulating the situation as it would be at warning center during any major earthquake. We determine the earthquake moment magnitude and generate the centroid moment tensor solution using a novel approach which are the key elements for tsunami early warning. Though the well established seismic monitoring network, numerical modeling and dissemination system are currently capable to provide tsunami warnings to most of the countries in and around the Indian Ocean, the study highlights the critical role of geodetic observations in determination of tsunami source for high-quality forecasting.

  15. Real-time observation of nanoscale topological transitions in epitaxial PbTe/CdTe heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Groiss, H. E-mail: istvan.daruka@jku.at; Daruka, I. E-mail: istvan.daruka@jku.at; Springholz, G.; Schäffler, F.; Koike, K.; Yano, M.; Hesser, G.; Zakharov, N.; Werner, P.

    2014-01-01

    The almost completely immiscible PbTe/CdTe heterostructure has recently become a prototype system for self-organized quantum dot formation based on solid-state phase separation. Here, we study by real-time transmission electron microscopy the topological transformations of two-dimensional PbTe-epilayers into, first, a quasi-one-dimensional percolation network and subsequently into zero-dimensional quantum dots. Finally, the dot size distribution coarsens by Ostwald ripening. The whole transformation sequence occurs during all stages in the fully coherent solid state by bulk diffusion. A model based on the numerical solution of the Cahn-Hilliard equation reproduces all relevant morphological and dynamic aspects of the experiments, demonstrating that this standard continuum approach applies to coherent solids down to nanometer dimensions. As the Cahn-Hilliard equation does not depend on atomistic details, the observed morphological transformations are general features of the model. To confirm the topological nature of the observed shape transitions, we developed a parameter-free geometric model. This, together with the Cahn-Hilliard approach, is in qualitative agreement with the experiments.

  16. Advanced SuperDARN meteor wind observations based on raw time series analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, M.; Yukimatu, A. S.; Holdsworth, D. A.; Lester, M.

    2009-04-01

    The meteor observation technique based on SuperDARN raw time series analysis has been upgraded. This technique extracts meteor information as biproducts and does not degrade the quality of normal SuperDARN operations. In the upgrade the radar operating system (RADOPS) has been modified so that it can oversample every 15 km during the normal operations, which have a range resolution of 45 km. As an alternative method for better range determination a frequency domain interferometry (FDI) capability was also coded in RADOPS, where the operating radio frequency can be changed every pulse sequence. Test observations were conducted using the CUTLASS Iceland East and Finland radars, where oversampling and FDI operation (two frequencies separated by 3 kHz) were simultaneously carried out. Meteor ranges obtained in both ranging techniques agreed very well. The ranges were then combined with the interferometer data to estimate meteor echo reflection heights. Although there were still some ambiguities in the arrival angles of echoes because of the rather long antenna spacing of the interferometers, the heights and arrival angles of most of meteor echoes were more accurately determined than previously. Wind velocities were successfully estimated over the height range of 84 to 110 km. The FDI technique developed here can be further applied to the common SuperDARN operation, and study of fine horizontal structures of F region plasma irregularities is expected in the future.

  17. Time lapse seismic observations and effects of reservoir compressibility at Teal South oil field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nayyer

    corrected for, indicate water encroachment at the base of the producing reservoir. I also identify specific sites of leakage from various unproduced reservoirs, the result of regional pressure blowdown as explained in previous studies; those earlier studies, however, were unable to identify direct evidence of fluid movement. Of particular interest is the identification of one site where oil apparently leaked from one reservoir into a "new" reservoir that did not originally contain oil, but was ideally suited as a trap for fluids leaking from the neighboring spill-point. With continued pressure drop, oil in the new reservoir increased as more oil entered into the reservoir and expanded, liberating gas from solution. Because of the limited volume available for oil and gas in that temporary trap, oil and gas also escaped from it into the surrounding formation. I also note that some of the reservoirs demonstrate time-lapse changes only in the "gas cap" and not in the oil zone, even though gas must be coming out of solution everywhere in the reservoir. This is explained by interplay between pore-fluid modulus reduction by gas saturation decrease and dry-frame modulus increase by frame stiffening. In the second part of this work, I examine various rock-physics models in an attempt to quantitatively account for frame-stiffening that results from reduced pore-fluid pressure in the producing reservoir, searching for a model that would predict the unusual AVO features observed in the time-lapse prestack and stacked data at Teal South. While several rock-physics models are successful at predicting the time-lapse response for initial production, most fail to match the observations for continued production between Phase I and Phase II. Because the reservoir was initially overpressured and unconsolidated, reservoir compaction was likely significant, and is probably accomplished largely by uniaxial strain in the vertical direction; this implies that an anisotropic model may be required

  18. Handling time in economic evaluation studies.

    PubMed

    Permsuwan, Unchalee; Guntawongwan, Kansinee; Buddhawongsa, Piyaluk

    2014-05-01

    The discount rates and time horizons used in a health technology assessment (HTA) can have a significant impact on the results, and thus the prioritization of technologies. Therefore, it is important that clear guidance be provided on the appropriate discount rates for cost and health effect and appropriate time horizons. In this paper we conduct a review of relevant case studies and guidelines and provide guidance for all researchers conducting economic evaluations of health technologies in the Thai context. A uniform discount rate of 3% is recommended for both costs and health effects in base case analyses. A sensitivity analysis should also be conducted, with a discount range of 0-6%. For technologies where the effects are likely to sustain for at least 30y ears, a rate of 4% for costs and 2% for health effects is recommended. The time horizon should be long enough to capture the full costs and effects of the programs.

  19. Change Semantic Constrained Online Data Cleaning Method for Real-Time Observational Data Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yulin; Lin, Hui; Li, Rongrong

    2016-06-01

    Recent breakthroughs in sensor networks have made it possible to collect and assemble increasing amounts of real-time observational data by observing dynamic phenomena at previously impossible time and space scales. Real-time observational data streams present potentially profound opportunities for real-time applications in disaster mitigation and emergency response, by providing accurate and timeliness estimates of environment's status. However, the data are always subject to inevitable anomalies (including errors and anomalous changes/events) caused by various effects produced by the environment they are monitoring. The "big but dirty" real-time observational data streams can rarely achieve their full potential in the following real-time models or applications due to the low data quality. Therefore, timely and meaningful online data cleaning is a necessary pre-requisite step to ensure the quality, reliability, and timeliness of the real-time observational data. In general, a straightforward streaming data cleaning approach, is to define various types of models/classifiers representing normal behavior of sensor data streams and then declare any deviation from this model as normal or erroneous data. The effectiveness of these models is affected by dynamic changes of deployed environments. Due to the changing nature of the complicated process being observed, real-time observational data is characterized by diversity and dynamic, showing a typical Big (Geo) Data characters. Dynamics and diversity is not only reflected in the data values, but also reflected in the complicated changing patterns of the data distributions. This means the pattern of the real-time observational data distribution is not stationary or static but changing and dynamic. After the data pattern changed, it is necessary to adapt the model over time to cope with the changing patterns of real-time data streams. Otherwise, the model will not fit the following observational data streams, which may led

  20. TIME-TAG mode of STIS observations using the MAMA detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash; Danks, Anthony; Baum, Stefi; Balzano, Vicki; Kraemer, Steve; Kutina, Ray; Sears, William

    1995-04-01

    We summarize the time-tag mode of STIS observations using the MAMA detectors, both in imaging and spectroscopic modes. After a brief outline on the MAMA detector characteristics and the astronomical applications of the time-tag mode, the general philosophy and the details of the data management strategy are described in detail. The GO specifications, and the consequent different modes of data transfer strategy are outlined. Restrictions on maximum data rates, integration times, and BUFFER-TIME requirements are explained. A few cases where the subarray option would be useful are outlined.

  1. Timing and regional patterns of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Stefanie; Willmes, Sascha; Dierking, Wolfgang; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2016-08-01

    An improved understanding of the temporal variability and the spatial distribution of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice is crucial to better quantify atmosphere-ice-ocean interactions, in particular sea-ice mass and energy budgets. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms that drive snowmelt, both at different times of the year and in different regions around Antarctica. In this study, we combine diurnal brightness temperature differences (dTB(37 GHz)) and ratios (TB(19 GHz)/TB(37 GHz)) to detect and classify snowmelt processes. We distinguish temporary snowmelt from continuous snowmelt to characterize dominant melt patterns for different Antarctic sea-ice regions from 1988/1989 to 2014/2015. Our results indicate four characteristic melt types. On average, 38.9 ± 6.0% of all detected melt events are diurnal freeze-thaw cycles in the surface snow layer, characteristic of temporary melt (Type A). Less than 2% reveal immediate continuous snowmelt throughout the snowpack, i.e., strong melt over a period of several days (Type B). In 11.7 ± 4.0%, Type A and B take place consecutively (Type C), and for 47.8 ± 6.8% no surface melt is observed at all (Type D). Continuous snowmelt is primarily observed in the outflow of the Weddell Gyre and in the northern Ross Sea, usually 17 days after the onset of temporary melt. Comparisons with Snow Buoy data suggest that also the onset of continuous snowmelt does not translate into changes in snow depth for a longer period but might rather affect the internal stratigraphy and density structure of the snowpack. Considering the entire data set, the timing of snowmelt processes does not show significant temporal trends.

  2. Fe XIV Synoptic Observations as a Predictor for the Time of Solar Maximum in Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altrock, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In 2012 (Am. Geophys. Union Fall Meeting, Abstract SH12A-05) and 2013 (Solar Phys. Online First, DOI 10.1007/s11207-012-0216-1) Altrock discussed the status of Cycle 24 relative to synoptic observations ofFe XIV from Sacramento Peak (http://nsosp.nso.edu/corona). He found that using earlier cycles, in which solar maximum occurred when Fe XIV emission features associated with the classic "Rush to the Poles" reached latitudes 76 ± 2 degrees, the *northern hemisphere* Fe XIV features predicted a maximum in the north at 2011.6 ± 0.3. This was confirmed by hemispheric sunspot numbers from SIDC (http://www.sidc.be/silso/) and sunspot areas from NASA MSFC http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/greenwch.shtml). The earlier papersalso noted that southern high-latitude Fe XIV emission indicated the possibility of a southern maximum early in 2014. At low latitudes, earlier cycles reached solar maximum when Fe XIV emission features reached latitudes 20 ± 1.7 degrees. In 2013, these features were at 21 and 15 degrees in the north, again indicating that northern maximum had already occurred. In the south, the Fe XIV features were at 24 degrees. Gopalswamy et al. (2012, Ap. J. Let. 750:L42) come to similar conclusions from a study of microwave brightness and prominence eruptions. This paper will extend the previous studies up to 2014 to include the recent extraordinary surge of activity in the southern hemisphere. In particular we will examine in more detail the relationship between hemispheric Fe XIV emission features and both global and hemispheric sunspot numbers to see (i) if the previous studies correctly predicted the times of hemispheric solar maxima and (ii) what we can learn from the inclusion of two more years of data. The observations used herein are the result of a cooperative program of the Air Force Research Laboratory and the National Solar Observatory.

  3. Fe XIV Synoptic Observations as a Predictor for the Time of Solar Maximum in Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altrock, Ph D., R. C.

    2014-12-01

    In 2012 (Am. Geophys. Union Fall Meeting, Abstract SH12A-05) and 2013 (Solar Phys. Online First, DOI 10.1007/s11207-012-0216-1) Altrock discussed the status of Cycle 24 relative to synoptic observations of Fe XIV from Sacramento Peak (http://nsosp.nso.edu/corona). He found that using earlier cycles, in which solar maximum occurred when Fe XIV emission features associated with the classic "Rush to the Poles" reached latitudes 76° ± 2°, the northern hemisphere Fe XIV features predicted a maximum in the north at 2011.6 ± 0.3. This was confirmed by hemispheric sunspot numbers from SIDC (http://www.sidc.be/silso/) and sunspot areas from NASA MSFC (http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/greenwch.shtml). The earlier papers also noted that southern high-latitude Fe XIV emission indicated the possibility of a southern maximum early in 2014. At low latitudes, earlier cycles reached solar maximum when Fe XIV emission features reached latitudes 20° ± 1.7°. In 2013, these features were at 21° and 15° in the north, again indicating that northern maximum had already occurred. In the south, the Fe XIV features were at 24°. Gopalswamy et al. (2012, Ap. J. Let. 750:L42) came to similar conclusions from a study of microwave brightness and prominence eruptions. This paper will extend the previous studies up to 2014 to include the recent extraordinary surge of activity in the southern hemisphere. In particular we will examine in more detail the relationship between hemispheric Fe XIV emission features and both global and hemispheric sunspot numbers to see (i) if the previous studies correctly predicted the times of hemispheric solar maxima and (ii) what we can learn from the inclusion of two more years of data. The observations used herein are the result of a cooperative program of the Air Force Research Laboratory and the National Solar Observatory.

  4. Ionogram height time intensity observations of descending sporadic E layers at mid-latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldoupis, C.; Meek, C.; Christakis, N.; Pancheva, D.; Bourdillon, A.

    2006-02-01

    A new methodology of ionosonde height time intensity (HTI) analysis is introduced which allows the investigation of sporadic E layer (Es) vertical motion and variability. This technique, which is useful in measuring descent rates and tidal periodicities of Es, is applied on ionogram recordings made during a summer period from solstice to equinox on the island of Milos (36.7°N; 24.5°E). On the average, the ionogram HTI analysis revealed a pronounced semidiurnal periodicity in layer descent and occurrence. It is characterized by a daytime layer starting at 120 km near 06 h local time (LT) and moving downward to altitudes below 100 km by about 18 h LT when a nighttime layer appears above at ˜125 km. The latter moves also downward but at higher descent rates (1.6 2.2 km/h) than the daytime layer (0.8 1.5 km/h). The nighttime Es is weaker in terms of critical sporadic E frequencies (foEs), has a shorter duration, and tends to occur less during times close to solstice. Here, a diurnal periodicity in Es becomes dominant. The HTI plots often show the daytime and nighttime Es connecting with weak traces in the upper E region which occur with a semidiurnal, and at times terdiurnal, periodicity. These, which are identified as upper E region descending intermediate layers (DIL), play an important role in initiating and reinforcing the sporadic E layers below 120 125 km. The observations are interpreted by considering the downward propagation of wind shear convergent nodes that associate with the S2,3 semidiurnal tide in the upper E region and the S1,1 diurnal tide in the lower E region. The daytime sporadic E layer is attributed to the confluence of semidiurnal and diurnal convergent nodes, which may explain the well-known pre-noon daily maximum observed in foEs. The nighttime layer is not well understood, although most likely it is associated with the intrusion of the daytime DIL into the lower E region due to vertical wind shear convergence nodes descending with the

  5. Real-time observation of DNA repair: 2-aminopurine as a molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Rajagopal; Butcher, Christina E.; Oh, Dennis H.

    2008-02-01

    Triplex forming oligos (TFOs) that target psoralen photoadducts to specific DNA sequences have generated interest as a potential agent in gene therapy. TFOs also offer an opportunity to study the mechanism of DNA repair in detail. In an effort to understand the mechanism of DNA repair at a specific DNA sequence in real-time, we have designed a plasmid containing a psoralen reaction site adjacent to a TFO binding site corresponding to a sequence within the human interstitial collagenase gene. Two 2-aminopurine residues incorporated into the purine-rich strand of the TFO binding site and located within six nucleotides of the psoralen reaction site serve as molecular probes for excision repair events involving the psoralen photoadducts on that DNA strand. In duplex DNA, the 2-aminopurine fluorescence is quenched. However, upon thermal or formamide-induced denaturation of duplex DNA to single stranded DNA, the 2-aminopurine fluorescence increases by eight fold. These results suggest that monitoring 2-aminopurine fluorescence from plasmids damaged by psoralen TFOs may be a method for measuring excision of single-stranded damaged DNA from the plasmid in cells. A fluorescence-based molecular probe to the plasmid may significantly simplify the real-time observation of DNA repair in both populations of cells as well as single cells.

  6. Quasi- and pseudo-maximum likelihood estimators for discretely observed continuous-time Markov branching processes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Hyrien, Ollivier

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with quasi- and pseudo-likelihood estimation in a class of continuous-time multi-type Markov branching processes observed at discrete points in time. “Conventional” and conditional estimation are discussed for both approaches. We compare their properties and identify situations where they lead to asymptotically equivalent estimators. Both approaches possess robustness properties, and coincide with maximum likelihood estimation in some cases. Quasi-likelihood functions involving only linear combinations of the data may be unable to estimate all model parameters. Remedial measures exist, including the resort either to non-linear functions of the data or to conditioning the moments on appropriate sigma-algebras. The method of pseudo-likelihood may also resolve this issue. We investigate the properties of these approaches in three examples: the pure birth process, the linear birth-and-death process, and a two-type process that generalizes the previous two examples. Simulations studies are conducted to evaluate performance in finite samples. PMID:21552356

  7. Real-time observation of interfering crystal electrons in high-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Hohenleutner, M; Langer, F; Schubert, O; Knorr, M; Huttner, U; Koch, S W; Kira, M; Huber, R

    2015-07-30

    Acceleration and collision of particles has been a key strategy for exploring the texture of matter. Strong light waves can control and recollide electronic wavepackets, generating high-harmonic radiation that encodes the structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules and lays the foundations of attosecond science. The recent discovery of high-harmonic generation in bulk solids combines the idea of ultrafast acceleration with complex condensed matter systems, and provides hope for compact solid-state attosecond sources and electronics at optical frequencies. Yet the underlying quantum motion has not so far been observable in real time. Here we study high-harmonic generation in a bulk solid directly in the time domain, and reveal a new kind of strong-field excitation in the crystal. Unlike established atomic sources, our solid emits high-harmonic radiation as a sequence of subcycle bursts that coincide temporally with the field crests of one polarity of the driving terahertz waveform. We show that these features are characteristic of a non-perturbative quantum interference process that involves electrons from multiple valence bands. These results identify key mechanisms for future solid-state attosecond sources and next-generation light-wave electronics. The new quantum interference process justifies the hope for all-optical band-structure reconstruction and lays the foundation for possible quantum logic operations at optical clock rates.

  8. Observing microscopic structures of a relativistic object using a time-stretch strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, E.; Evain, C.; Le Parquier, M.; Szwaj, C.; Bielawski, S.; Manceron, L.; Brubach, J.-B.; Tordeux, M.-A.; Ricaud, J.-P.; Cassinari, L.; Labat, M.; Couprie, M.-E.; Roy, P.

    2015-05-01

    Emission of light by a single electron moving on a curved trajectory (synchrotron radiation) is one of the most well-known fundamental radiation phenomena. However experimental situations are more complex as they involve many electrons, each being exposed to the radiation of its neighbors. This interaction has dramatic consequences, one of the most spectacular being the spontaneous formation of spatial structures inside electrons bunches. This fundamental effect is actively studied as it represents one of the most fundamental limitations in electron accelerators, and at the same time a source of intense terahertz radiation (Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, or CSR). Here we demonstrate the possibility to directly observe the electron bunch microstructures with subpicosecond resolution, in a storage ring accelerator. The principle is to monitor the terahertz pulses emitted by the structures, using a strategy from photonics, time-stretch, consisting in slowing-down the phenomena before recording. This opens the way to unpreceeded possibilities for analyzing and mastering new generation high power coherent synchrotron sources.

  9. Observing microscopic structures of a relativistic object using a time-stretch strategy

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, E.; Evain, C.; Le Parquier, M.; Szwaj, C.; Bielawski, S.; Manceron, L.; Brubach, J.-B.; Tordeux, M.-A.; Ricaud, J.-P.; Cassinari, L.; Labat, M.; Couprie, M.-E; Roy, P.

    2015-01-01

    Emission of light by a single electron moving on a curved trajectory (synchrotron radiation) is one of the most well-known fundamental radiation phenomena. However experimental situations are more complex as they involve many electrons, each being exposed to the radiation of its neighbors. This interaction has dramatic consequences, one of the most spectacular being the spontaneous formation of spatial structures inside electrons bunches. This fundamental effect is actively studied as it represents one of the most fundamental limitations in electron accelerators, and at the same time a source of intense terahertz radiation (Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, or CSR). Here we demonstrate the possibility to directly observe the electron bunch microstructures with subpicosecond resolution, in a storage ring accelerator. The principle is to monitor the terahertz pulses emitted by the structures, using a strategy from photonics, time-stretch, consisting in slowing-down the phenomena before recording. This opens the way to unpreceeded possibilities for analyzing and mastering new generation high power coherent synchrotron sources. PMID:26020859

  10. An observer for a velocity-sensorless VTOL aircraft with time-varying measurement delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qing; Liu, Jinkun

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a kind of state observer for a velocity-sensorless vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft with bounded time-varying delay in its measurement outputs. The proposed observer predicts current state variables based on the delayed outputs, and the estimated state variables can be considered as the actual state variables for feedback control scheme design. Since the delay is time-varying, compared to the constant delay case, different analysis theory must be employed. Under the assumption that the delays are identical for different outputs and bounded input, the asymptotic convergence property of the estimation error based on Lyapunov-Razumikhin theorem is proved. A relative large time delay for the VTOL aircraft in the outputs has been tested in the numerical simulation, and the simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed observer.

  11. Observer-based approximate optimal tracking control for time-delay systems with external disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hao; Tang, Gong-You

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a successive approximation design approach of observer-based optimal tracking controllers for time-delay systems with external disturbances. To solve a two-point boundary value problem with time-delay and time-advance terms and obtain the optimal tracking control law, two sequences of vector differential equations are constructed first. Second, the convergence of the sequences of the vector differential equations is proved to guarantee the existence and uniqueness of the control law. Third, a design algorithm of the optimal tracking control law is presented and the physically realisable problem is addressed by designing a disturbance state observer and a reference input state observer. An example of an industrial electric heater is given to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  12. Decentralized Observer with a Consensus Filter for Distributed Discrete-Time Linear Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Mandic, Milan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a decentralized observer with a consensus filter for the state observation of a discrete-time linear distributed systems. In this setup, each agent in the distributed system has an observer with a model of the plant that utilizes the set of locally available measurements, which may not make the full plant state detectable. This lack of detectability is overcome by utilizing a consensus filter that blends the state estimate of each agent with its neighbors' estimates. We assume that the communication graph is connected for all times as well as the sensing graph. It is proven that the state estimates of the proposed observer asymptotically converge to the actual plant states under arbitrarily changing, but connected, communication and sensing topologies. As a byproduct of this research, we also obtained a result on the location of eigenvalues, the spectrum, of the Laplacian for a family of graphs with self-loops.

  13. MELODIST - An open-source MEteoroLOgical observation time series DISaggregation Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Kristian; Hanzer, Florian; Winter, Benjamin; Marke, Thomas; Strasser, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Automatic weather station recordings at sub-daily time steps are being used as input data for various applications in many disciplines such as hydrology or ecology. Evaluations at sub-daily time steps for multi-decadal periods are thereby of great interest due to their climatological representativeness. However, the availability of continuous hourly meteorological time series is restricted to a small number of decades with records covering the full length of three decades being an exception. In contrast, daily observations are available with much better spatial and temporal coverage, i.e. higher network density and longer, multi-decadal records. To benefit from the huge amount of available daily meteorological observations worldwide, disaggregation methods are suitable tools to derive, e.g., hourly out of daily time series. We present an open-source software package, written in Python, that can be used to fill the gap between the advantages of daily time series and methods requiring time series of the meteorological variables with higher temporal resolution. MELODIST (MEteoroLOgical observation time series DISaggregation Tool) includes methods to independently disaggregate the most relevant meteorological variables including (i) precipitation, (ii) temperature, (iii) humidity, (iv) wind speed, and (v) radiation data for a given location. This poster gives a brief review of the available methods applicable for each variable, and also provides a sample application and insights on model performance.

  14. Real-time single-molecule observations of proteins at the solid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, Blake Brianna

    Non-specific protein adsorption to solid surfaces is pervasive and observed across a broad spectrum of applications including biomaterials, separations, pharmaceuticals, and biosensing. Despite great interest in and considerable literature dedicated to the phenomena, a mechanistic understanding of this complex phenomena is lacking and remains controversial, partially due to the limits of ensemble-averaging techniques used to study it. Single-molecule tracking (SMT) methods allow us to study distinct protein dynamics (e.g. adsorption, desorption, diffusion, and intermolecular associations) on a molecule-by-molecule basis revealing the protein population and spatial heterogeneity inherent in protein interfacial behavior. By employing single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (SM-TIRFM), we have developed SMT methods to directly observe protein interfacial dynamics at the solid-liquid interface to build a better mechanistic understanding of protein adsorption. First, we examined the effects of surface chemistry (e.g. hydrophobicity, hydrogen-bonding capacity), temperature, and electrostatics on isolated protein desorption and interfacial diffusion for fibrinogen (Fg) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Next, we directly and indirectly probed the effects of protein-protein interactions on interfacial desorption, diffusion, aggregation, and surface spatial heterogeneity on model and polymeric thin films. These studies provided many useful insights into interfacial protein dynamics including the following observations. First, protein adsorption was reversible, with the majority of proteins desorbing from all surface chemistries within seconds. Isolated protein-surface interactions were relatively weak on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces (apparent desorption activation energies of only a few kBT). However, proteins could dynamically and reversibly associate at the interface, and these interfacial associations led to proteins remaining on the

  15. Extended time observations of California marine stratocumulus clouds from GOES for July 1983-1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Harrison, Edwin F.; Young, David F.

    1990-01-01

    One of the goals of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) is to relate the relatively small scale (spatial and temporal) Intensive Field Observations (IFO) to larger time and space domains embodied in the Extended Time Observations (ETO) phase of the experiment. The data analyzed as part of the ETO are to be used to determine some climatological features of the limited area which encompasses the Marine Stratocumulus IFO which took place between 29 June and 19 July 1987 off the coast of southern California.

  16. Impact of curvature divergences on physical observers in a wormhole space-time with horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Rubiera-Garcia, D.; Sanchez-Puente, A.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of curvature divergences on physical observers in a black hole space-time, which, nonetheless, is geodesically complete is investigated. This space-time is an exact solution of certain extensions of general relativity coupled to Maxwell’s electrodynamics and, roughly speaking, consists of two Reissner-Nordström (or Schwarzschild or Minkowski) geometries connected by a spherical wormhole near the center. We find that, despite the existence of infinite tidal forces, causal contact is never lost among the elements making up the observer. This suggests that curvature divergences may not be as pathological as traditionally thought.

  17. Annual report of the Mizusawa Astrogeodynamics Observatory. Time Service and geophysical observations for the year 1992.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, S.

    This annual report for the year 1992 consists of two parts. The first part shows the results of the time services, i.e., time and latitude observations with the PZT, comparison of UTC(NAOM) with the Loran C and GPS (Global Positioning System), and comparison of the atomic clocks at the Mizusawa Astrogeodynamics Observatory. The PZT closed its activity in April 1993. Hence, the results in 1993 are also included in this volume. The second part shows the results of the geophysical observations at the Esashi Earth Tides Station and the absolute gravity measurements.

  18. Statistical comparison of inter-substorm timings in global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haiducek, J. D.; Welling, D. T.; Morley, S.; Ozturk, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorms are events in which energy stored in the magnetotail is released into the auroral zone and into the downstream solar wind. Because of the complex, nonlinear, and possibly chaotic nature of the substorm energy release mechanism, it may be extremely difficult to forecast individual substorms in the near term. However, the inter-substorm timing (the amount of time elapsed between substorms) can be reproduced in a statistical sense, as was demonstrated by Freeman and Morley (2004) using their Minimal Substorm Model (MSM), a simple solar-wind driven model with the only free parameter being a recurrence time. The goal of the present work is to reproduce the observed distribution of inter-substorm timings with a global MHD model. The period of 1-31 January 2005 was simulated using the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), driven by solar wind observations. Substorms were identified in the model output by synthesizing surface magnetometer data and by looking for tailward-moving plasmoids. Substorms identified in the MHD model are then compared with observational data from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) geostationary satellite energetic particle data, and surface magnetometer data. For each dataset (MHD model and observations), we calculate the substorm occurrence rate, and for the MHD model we additionally calculate the timing error of the substorm onsets relative to the observed substorms. Finally, we calculate distribution functions for the inter-substorm timings in both the observations and the model. The results of this analysis will guide improvements to the MHD-based substorm model, including the use of Hall MHD and embedded particle in cell (EPIC), leading to a better reproduction of the observed inter-substorm timings and an improved understanding of the underlying physical processes. ReferencesM. P. Freeman and S. K. Morley. A minimal substorm model that

  19. On the variability of Pacific Ocean tides at seasonal to decadal time scales: Observed vs modelled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlin, Adam Thomas

    Ocean tides worldwide have exhibited secular changes in the past century, simultaneous with a global secular rise in mean sea level (MSL). The combination of these two factors contributes to higher water levels, and may increase threats to coastal regions and populations over the next century. Equally as important as these long-term changes are the short-term fluctuations in sea levels and tidal properties. These fluctuations may interact to yield locally extreme water level events, especially when combined with storm surge. This study, presented in three parts, examines the relationships between tidal anomalies and MSL anomalies on yearly and monthly timescales, with a goal of diagnosing dynamical factors that may influence the long-term evolution of tides in the Pacific Ocean. Correlations between yearly averaged properties are denoted tidal anomaly trends (TATs), and will be used to explore interannual behavior. Correlations of monthly averaged properties are denoted seasonal tidal anomaly trends (STATs), and are used to examine seasonal behavior. Four tidal constituents are analyzed: the two largest semidiurnal (twice daily) constituents, M2 and S2, and the two largest diurnal (once daily) constituents, K1 and O1. Part I surveys TATs and STATs at 153 Pacific Ocean tide gauges, and discusses regional patterns within the entire Pacific Ocean. TATs with statistically significant relations between MSL and amplitudes (A-TATs) are seen at 89% of all gauges; 92 gauges for M2, 66 for S2, 82 for K1, and 59 for O1. TATs with statistically significant relations between tidal phase (the relative timing of high water of the tide) and MSL (P-TATs) are observed at 55 gauges for M2, 47 for S2, 42 for K1, and 61 for O1. Significant seasonal variations (STATs) are observed at about a third of all gauges, with the largest concentration in Southeast Asia. The effect of combined A-TATs was also considered. At selected stations, observed tidal sensitivity with MSL was extrapolated

  20. Observations of cold magnetospheric ions at geosynchronous orbit during times of high activity

    SciTech Connect

    Elphic, R.C.; Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Bame, S.J.

    1994-10-01

    Flowing, cold magnetospheric ions have been observed in conjunction with geosynchronous orbit magnetopause crossings since the earliest ATS and OGO missions. The authors have reported on the occurrence and convection of low-energy (10-100 eV) ions seen by multiple satellites in association with geosynchronous orbit magnetopause and low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) encounters. More generally, Los Alamos 3-D plasma instruments observe these ions following storm sudden commencements (SSCs), when activity levels are high. The ions appear to be convecting radially outward and usually westward at speeds of a few to several tens of kilometers per second. Often the energy spectra reveal peaks at energies appropriate for cold convecting H{sup +}, He{sup +} and O{sup +}. The occurrence frequency distribution of these dense cold ions is peaked near 1400 LT, with an overall range from 1000 to beyond 1800 LT. This local time distribution is greatly skewed from the overall plasmaspheric distribution, which peaks closer to 1800 LT. Multisatellite observations show that the ions are seen first at late afternoon local times and then at progressively earlier and earlier local times (though usually no earlier than 1000 LT). This apparent evolution in local time suggests that the late-afternoon plasmaspheric plasma moves out and dawnward during times of increased magnetospheric activity. The three-satellite observations also allow the authors to track cold plasma convection at multiple points in the magnetosphere, and potentially provide a glimpse of the large-scale convection pattern.

  1. Ethiopia's health extension workers use of work time on duty: time and motion study.

    PubMed

    Tilahun, Hibret; Fekadu, Binyam; Abdisa, Habtamu; Canavan, Maureen; Linnander, Erika; Bradley, Elizabeth H; Berman, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Ethiopia implemented an innovative community-based health program, called the health extension program, to enhance access to basic health promotion, disease prevention and selected curative services by establishing health posts in every village, also called kebeles, with average of 5000 people, staffed with two health extension workers (HEWs). This time and motion study was done to estimate the amount of time that HEWs spend on various work duties and to explore differences in urban compared with rural settings and among regions. A total of 44 HEWs were observed for 21 consecutive days, and time and motion data were collected using tablet computers. On average, HEWs were on duty for 15.5 days out of the 21 days of observation period, and on average, they stayed on duty for about 6 hours per day. Out of the total observed work time, the percentages of total time spent on various activities were as follows: providing health education or services (12.8%); participating in meetings and giving trainings (9.3%); conducting community mapping and mobilization (0.8%); recordkeeping, reporting, managing family folders (13.2%); managing commodities and supplies (1.3%); receiving supervision (3.2%); receiving training (1.6%); travel between work activities (15.5%); waiting for clients in the health post (or health centre in urban settings) (24.9%); building relationships in the community (13.3%); and other activities that could not be meaningfully categorized (4%). The proportion of time spent on different activities and the total time worked varied significantly between rural and urban areas and among the regions (at P < 0.05). Findings of this study indicate that only a minority of HEW time is spent on providing health education and services, and substantial time is spent waiting for clients. The efficiency of the HEW model may be improved by creating more demand for services or by redesigning service delivery modalities.

  2. Microscopic observation of carrier-transport dynamics in quantum-structure solar cells using a time-of-flight technique

    SciTech Connect

    Toprasertpong, Kasidit; Fujii, Hiromasa; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Kasamatsu, Naofumi; Kada, Tomoyuki; Asahi, Shigeo; Kita, Takashi; Wang, Yunpeng; Watanabe, Kentaroh

    2015-07-27

    In this study, we propose a carrier time-of-flight technique to evaluate the carrier transport time across a quantum structure in an active region of solar cells. By observing the time-resolved photoluminescence signal with a quantum-well probe inserted under the quantum structure at forward bias, the carrier transport time can be efficiently determined at room temperature. The averaged drift velocity shows linear dependence on the internal field, allowing us to estimate the quantum structure as a quasi-bulk material with low effective mobility containing the information of carrier dynamics. We show that this direct and real-time observation is more sensitive to carrier transport than other conventional techniques, providing better insights into microscopic carrier transport dynamics to overcome a device design difficulty.

  3. Solar coronal and magnetic field observations near the time of the 1988 March 18 solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    Sime, D.G.; Fisher, R.R.; Mickey, D.L.

    1988-10-01

    Observations made during the interval March 1-31, 1988, are presented which were designed to provide a synoptic context in which data from the March 18, 1988, total solar eclipse can be interpreted. Daily observations made with the Mark III K-coronameter and the H-alpha prominence monitor at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, along with photographic records of the Sun in H-alpha from the flare patrol at Mees Solar Observatory on Haleakala, Maui, are included. Observations of the longitudinal component of the photospheric magnetic field made at Mees Solar Observatory were also gathered around the period of the eclipse. Together with the white-light image of the corona at the eclipse, these coronal and magnetic field observations assembled into synoptic maps for this epoch, are presented. On the basis of these observations, an interpretation of the global density distribution of the corona at the time of the eclipse is constructed. 11 references.

  4. An LMI approach to discrete-time observer design with stochastic resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaz, Edwin Engin; Jeong, Chung Seop; Yaz, Yvonne Ilke

    2006-04-01

    Much of the recent work on robust control or observer design has focused on preservation of stability of the controlled system or the convergence of the observer in the presence of parameter perturbations in the plant or the measurement model. The present work addresses the important problem of stochastic resilience or non-fragility of a discrete-time Luenberger observer which is the maintenance of convergence and/or performance when the observer is erroneously implemented possibly due to computational errors i.e. round off errors in digital implementation or sensor errors, etc. A common linear matrix inequality framework is presented to address the stochastic resilient design problem for various performance criteria in the implementation based on the knowledge of an upper bound on the variance of the random error in the observer gain. Present results are compared to earlier designs for stochastic robustness. Illustrative examples are given to complement the theoretical results.

  5. Predicting exoplanet observability in time, contrast, separation, and polarization, in scattered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schworer, Guillaume; Tuthill, Peter G.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Polarimetry is one of the keys to enhanced direct imaging of exoplanets. Not only does it deliver a differential observable providing extra contrast, but when coupled with spectroscopy, it also reveals valuable information on the exoplanetary atmospheric composition. Nevertheless, angular separation and contrast ratio to the host-star make for extremely challenging observation. Producing detailed predictions for exactly how the expected signals should appear is of critical importance for the designs and observational strategies of tomorrow's telescopes. Aims: We aim at accurately determining the magnitudes and evolution of the main observational signatures for imaging an exoplanet: separation, contrast ratio to the host-star and polarization as a function of the orbital geometry and the reflectance parameters of the exoplanet. Methods: These parameters were used to construct a polarized-reflectance model based on the input of orbital parameters and two albedo values. The model is able to calculate a variety of observational predictions for exoplanets at any orbital time. Results: The inter-dependency of the three main observational criteria - angular separation, contrast ratio, polarization - result in a complex time-evolution of the system. They greatly affect the viability of planet observation by direct imaging. We introduce a new generic display of the main observational criteria, which enables an observer to determine whether an exoplanet is within detection limits: the Separation-POlarization-Contrast (SPOC) diagrams. Conclusions: We explore the complex effect of orbital and albedo parameters on the visibility of an exoplanet. The code we developed is available for public use and collaborative improvement on the python package index, together with its documentation. It is another step towards a full comprehensive simulation tool for predicting and interpreting the results of future observational exoplanetary discovery campaigns.

  6. Real-time data and communications services of NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, C. J.; Daniels, M.; Stossmeister, G.

    2011-12-01

    Near real-time information is critical for mission management of atmospheric observing systems. Advances in satellite communications and Internet distribution have allowed the Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) of NCAR to provide data, information and imagery to the scientists during evolving weather situations. Real-time data are necessary for updating interactive displays that show products from forecast models and many disparate observation systems (e.g. satellite, soundings, surface radars and aircraft in-situ observations). At the same time, network-based collaborative tools such as chat and web conferencing facilitate interactive participation between remote groups of scientists, engineers, operations centers and the observing platforms. In the recent PREDICT deployment of the NSF/NCAR GV research aircraft, dropsondes were released from the aircraft at 45,000 ft over a 1000 km x 1000 km area to give profiles of pressure, temperature, humidity and wind below the aircraft. Real-time data from the sondes was collected by the aircraft and relayed by satcom into the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) and assimilated into forecast models. The model forecast results were then fed back into ground-based and airborne displays (along with a multitude of observations) for enhanced decision-making and mission guidance. This environment of streaming data in real-time also allows more experts to look at data and compare it with other measurements. One particular benefit is that it alerts instrument operators on the ground and in the air to instrument problems, which can then be addressed very rapidly. The resulting communications and collaborations infrastructure results in unprecedented improvements to our data quality and rapid targeting of mission resources to important weather events. Using several examples, this presentation will provide an overview of current tools and processes in use at EOL, and future needs will be discussed.

  7. Apollo 16 time and motion study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubis, J. F.; Elrod, J. T.; Rusnak, R.; Barnes, J. E.; Saxon, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    A time and motion study is presented of astronaut lunar surface activity on Apollo 16 which consists of five distinct analyses: an evaluation of lunar mobility, a comparison of task performance in 1-g training and lunar EVA, a study of metabolic costs and adaptation, a discussion of falls, and retrieval of fallen objects. Two basic mobility patterns, the hop or canter and the traditional walking gait, were consistently utilized in longer traverses. The metabolic rates associated with these two mobility types, each used by a different astronaut, were relatively equivalent. The time to perform tasks on the lunar surface was significantly longer (on the order of 70%) than the time to perform the same tasks during the last 1-g training session. These results corroborated the findings on Apollo 15 and were not significantly different from them. There was general improvement in lunar EVA performance upon repetition of tasks. Metabolic rate (BTU/hr.) and metabolic cost (BTU) decreased over successive EVAs. Specifically, the metabolic rate associated with riding the lunar roving vehicle (LRV) decreased by approximately 18% from EVA 1 to EVA 2 and by 15% from EVA 2 to EVA 3.

  8. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfrich, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Helfrich addresses two perspectives from which to think about observation in the classroom: that of the teacher observing her classroom, her group, and its needs, and that of the outside observer coming into the classroom. Offering advice from her own experience, she encourages and defends both. Do not be afraid of the disruption of outside…

  9. Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joosten, Albert Max

    2016-01-01

    Joosten begins his article by telling us that love and knowledge together are the foundation for our work with children. This combination is at the heart of our observation. With this as the foundation, he goes on to offer practical advice to aid our practice of observation. He offers a "List of Objects of Observation" to help guide our…

  10. Modifying the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time to Measure Teacher Practices Related to Physical Activity Promotion: SOFIT+

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Webster, Collin A.; Erwin, Heather; Beighle, Aaron; Beets, Michael W.; Choukroun, Hadrien; Kaysing, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) is commonly used to measure variables related to physical activity during physical education (PE). However, SOFIT does not yield detailed information about teacher practices related to children's moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). This study describes the modification of SOFIT…

  11. Detection of individual atoms in helium buffer gas and observation of their real-time motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, C. L.; Prodan, J. V.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.; She, C. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Single atoms are detected and their motion measured for the first time to our knowledge by the fluorescence photon-burst method in the presence of large quantities of buffer gas. A single-clipped digital correlator records the photon burst in real time and displays the atom's transit time across the laser beam. A comparison is made of the special requirements for single-atom detection in vacuum and in a buffer gas. Finally, the probability distribution of the bursts from many atoms is measured. It further proves that the bursts observed on resonance are due to single atoms and not simply to noise fluctuations.

  12. Studies of Accreting Neutron Stars with RXTE Cycle 4 Observations: II: Too Observations of Transient LMXBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG 5-9045 provided funds for the research project 'TOO Observations of Transient LMxBs' approved under the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Guest Observer Program Cycle 4 and funded under the 1999 NASA Astrophysics Data Program. The principal investigator of the observing time proposal was Dr. M. Mendez (U. of Amsterdam). The grant was funded for one year beginning 3/1/2000. The original proposal was submitted by Prof. Jan van Paradijs, who passed away in 1999 before the funds were distributed. Prof. William S. Pauesas administered the grant during the period of performance. In spite of a wealth of observational data on the kHz QPO in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), the interpretation of this phenomenon is currently uncertain because the pairs of kHz QPO peaks and the oscillations seen in some Type I X-ray bursts are almost, but not quite, connected by a simple beat frequency relation. The proposal was intended to contribute to a solution to this confusion by making RXTE target-of-opportunity observations of two transient LMXBs, Aql X-1 and 4U 1608-52, if the sources became sufficiently bright.

  13. Observations of Time-Dependent Behavior in the Two-Layer Rayleigh-Benard System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andereck, C. David; Colovas, Peter W.; Degen, Michael M.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we present results from experiments with a system consisting of two immiscible fluid layers in rectangular and annular geometries, driven by a vertical temperature gradient. Time-dependent variations in the type of coupling observed between the two layers are described and characterized.

  14. A Few Observations and Remarks on Time Effectiveness of Interactive Electronic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdin, Martin; Turcáni, Milan

    2015-01-01

    In the paper, we point out several observations and remarks on time effectiveness of electronic testing, in particular of its new form (interactive tests). A test is often used as an effective didactic tool for evaluating the extent of gained cognitive capabilities. According to authors Rudman (1989) and Wang (2003) it is provable that the…

  15. On-line compensation of dead-time and inverter nonlinearity with disturbance voltage observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Beomseok; Kwon, Jung-Min; Kim, Jaehong

    2014-03-01

    This paper discusses and analyses a simple on-line compensation scheme for dead-time and inverter nonlinearity in the pulse width modulated (PWM) voltage source inverter (VSI). Dead-time effect and voltage drop in switching devices cause nonlinearity between reference and output voltage. In a conventional three-phase six-switch inverter, this nonideal condition adds extraneous harmonics that badly disturb voltage characteristics. In its turn, voltage disturbance causes distortion of the current waveform and degrades performance. In this paper, an on-line dead-time compensation method based on inverse dynamics control is proposed, and it is much simpler than conventional full/reduced order observation methods adopted in dead-time compensation. Disturbance voltages are observed on-line with no additional circuitry or off-line measurements. The observed disturbance voltages are fed back to the voltage reference for compensation. Stability problem of the proposed observer arisen from inverter delay and parameter mismatch was analysed. The proposed method is applied to a surface-mounted permanent-magnet synchronous motor (SPMSM) drive. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is validated by the experimental results.

  16. Modelling and mitigating refractive propagation effects in precision pulsar timing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, R. M.; Cordes, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    To obtain the most accurate pulse arrival times from radio pulsars, it is necessary to correct or mitigate the effects of the propagation of radio waves through the warm and ionized interstellar medium. We examine both the strength of propagation effects associated with large-scale electron-density variations and the methodology used to estimate infinite frequency arrival times. Using simulations of two-dimensional phase-varying screens, we assess the strength and non-stationarity of timing perturbations associated with large-scale density variations. We identify additional contributions to arrival times that are stochastic in both radio frequency and time and therefore not amenable to correction solely using times of arrival. We attribute this to the frequency dependence of the trajectories of the propagating radio waves. We find that this limits the efficacy of low-frequency (metre-wavelength) observations. Incorporating low-frequency pulsar observations into precision timing campaigns is increasingly problematic for pulsars with larger dispersion measures.

  17. Time-resolved observation of thermally activated rupture of a capillary-condensed water nanobridge

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, Wan; Sung, Baekman; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Jhe, Wonho

    2015-01-05

    The capillary-condensed liquid bridge is one of the most ubiquitous forms of liquid in nature and contributes significantly to adhesion and friction of biological molecules as well as microscopic objects. Despite its important role in nanoscience and technology, the rupture process of the bridge is not well understood and needs more experimental works. Here, we report real-time observation of rupture of a capillary-condensed water nanobridge in ambient condition. During slow and stepwise stretch of the nanobridge, we measured the activation time for rupture, or the latency time required for the bridge breakup. By statistical analysis of the time-resolved distribution of activation time, we show that rupture is a thermally activated stochastic process and follows the Poisson statistics. In particular, from the Arrhenius law that the rupture rate satisfies, we estimate the position-dependent activation energies for the capillary-bridge rupture.

  18. Observed and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhnke, Roland; Geomon, Ndacc Infrared, Modelling Working Group

    2010-05-01

    Institute of Technology (KIT), IMK-IFU, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, (16) University of Denver, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Denver, CO, USA, (17) National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO, USA, (18) NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, USA, (19) Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Steinbuch Centre for Computing, Karlsruhe, Germany Total column abundances of HCl and ClONO2, the primary components of the stratospheric inorganic chlorine (Cly) budget, and of HF have been retrieved from ground-based, high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded at 17 sites of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) located at latitudes between 80.05°N and 77.82°S. These data extend over more than 20 years (through 2007) during a period when the growth in atmospheric halogen loading has slowed in response to the Montreal Protocol (and ammendments). These observed time series are interpreted with calculations performed with a 2-D model, the 3-D chemistry-transport models (CTMs) KASIMA and SLIMCAT, and the 3-D chemistry-climate models (CCMs) EMAC and SOCOLv2.0. The observed Cly and in particular HCl column abundances decreases significantely since the end of the nineties at all stations, which is consistent with the observed changes in the halocarbon source gases, with an increasing rate in the last years. In contrast to Cly, the trend values for total column HF at the different stations show a less consistent behaviour pointing to the fact that the time development of the HF columns is peaking. There is a good overall qualitative agreement regarding trends between models and data. With respect to the CTMs the agreement improves if simulation results for measurement days only are used in the trend analysis instead of simulation results for each day.

  19. My New Zealand lesbian studies through time and times.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Alison J

    2012-01-01

    In this article Alison J. Laurie reflects on her political activism and how it informs her academic scholarship and research interests relating to lesbian studies in New Zealand. She concludes that her desire for social change and commitment to lesbian community development inspired her early activism and has continued to inform her activism as well as her academic research and writing. She discusses her involvement in lesbian and gay organizations and campaigns, in New Zealand, Scandinavia, the United States and the United Kingdom, and the ideas that have informed and influenced her work. She pioneered the first lesbian studies courses in New Zealand, initially through community education, and from 1990 for university credit, and considers the contribution these courses can make. Finally, she reflects on several of her articles, book chapters and books considering how her work has developed during the past 50 years.

  20. MAVEN Observations of Energy-Time Dispersed Electron Signatures in Martian Crustal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Y.; Mitchell, D. L.; Halekas, J. S.; McFadden, J. P.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Brain, D. A.; Larson, D. E.; Lillis, R. J.; Hara, T.; Livi, R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    Energy-time dispersed electron signatures are observed by the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission in the vicinity of strong Martian crustal magnetic fields. Analysis of pitch angle distributions indicates that these dispersed electrons are typically trapped on closed field lines formed above strong crustal magnetic sources. Most of the dispersed electron signatures are characterized by peak energies decreasing with time rather than increasing peak energies. These properties can be explained by impulsive and local injection of hot electrons into closed field lines and subsequent dispersion by magnetic drift of the trapped electrons. In addition, the dispersed flux enhancements are often bursty and sometimes exhibit clear periodicity, suggesting that the injection and trapping processes are intrinsically time dependent and dynamic. These MAVEN observations demonstrate that common physical processes can operate in both global intrinsic magnetospheres and local crustal magnetic fields.

  1. Time-resolved observation of interatomic excitation-energy transfer in argon dimers.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Tomoya; Cörlin, Philipp; Miteva, Tsveta; Gokhberg, Kirill; Kuleff, Alexander; Cederbaum, Lorenz S; Pfeifer, Thomas; Fischer, Andreas; Moshammer, Robert

    2017-03-14

    The ultrafast transfer of excitation energy from one atom to its neighbor is observed in singly charged argon dimers in a time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV)-pump IR-probe experiment. In the pump step, bound 3s-hole states in the dimer are populated by single XUV-photon ionization. The excitation-energy transfer at avoided crossings of the potential-energy curves leads to dissociation of the dimer, which is experimentally observed by further ionization with a time-delayed IR-probe pulse. From the measured pump-probe delay-dependent kinetic-energy release of coincident Ar(+) + Ar(+) ions, we conclude that the transfer of energy occurs on a time scale of about 800fs. This mechanism represents a fast relaxation process below the energy threshold for interatomic Coulombic decay.

  2. Research on real-time quality checking of the GPS static observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xianjian; Yan, Hongbo

    2015-12-01

    In order to avoid rework and improve the efficiency of GPS static observation, it is very important to control the quality of GPS data in real time. On the basis of analysis of observation data decoding and observation data quality indices, a new program was compiled for decoding the original observation data and calculating and analyzing the quality indices such as the multipath effect and cycle slips etc. and the quality indices can be displayed intuitively by graphics in realtime. Moreover, the experimental verification is carried out with the engineering practice, and the results proved the correctness and reliability of the designed software RTQC, which can provide guidance and help for the practical work.

  3. Case Study Observational Research: A Framework for Conducting Case Study Research Where Observation Data Are the Focus.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sonya J; Pullon, Susan R H; Macdonald, Lindsay M; McKinlay, Eileen M; Gray, Ben V

    2016-05-22

    Case study research is a comprehensive method that incorporates multiple sources of data to provide detailed accounts of complex research phenomena in real-life contexts. However, current models of case study research do not particularly distinguish the unique contribution observation data can make. Observation methods have the potential to reach beyond other methods that rely largely or solely on self-report. This article describes the distinctive characteristics of case study observational research, a modified form of Yin's 2014 model of case study research the authors used in a study exploring interprofessional collaboration in primary care. In this approach, observation data are positioned as the central component of the research design. Case study observational research offers a promising approach for researchers in a wide range of health care settings seeking more complete understandings of complex topics, where contextual influences are of primary concern. Future research is needed to refine and evaluate the approach.

  4. Cause versus association in observational studies in psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-08-01

    Hypotheses may be generated (and conclusions drawn) from observational studies in areas where information from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is unavailable. However, observational studies can only establish that significant associations exist between predictor and outcome variables. Observational studies cannot establish that the associations identified represent cause-and-effect relationships. This article discusses examples of associations that were identified in observational studies and that were subsequently refuted in RCTs. Examples are also provided of associations that have yet to be confirmed or refuted but that are nevertheless influential in psychopharmacologic practice. Explanations are offered about how confounding might explain significant relationships between variables that are not related by cause and effect. As a conclusion of this exercise, clinicians are cautioned against placing too much reliance on the findings of observational research.

  5. Real-time observation of the initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed

    Fazal, Furqan M; Meng, Cong A; Murakami, Kenji; Kornberg, Roger D; Block, Steven M

    2015-09-10

    Biochemical and structural studies have shown that the initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription proceeds in the following stages: assembly of the polymerase with general transcription factors and promoter DNA in a 'closed' preinitiation complex (PIC); unwinding of about 15 base pairs of the promoter DNA to form an 'open' complex; scanning downstream to a transcription start site; synthesis of a short transcript, thought to be about 10 nucleotides long; and promoter escape. Here we have assembled a 32-protein, 1.5-megadalton PIC derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and observe subsequent initiation processes in real time with optical tweezers. Contrary to expectation, scanning driven by the transcription factor IIH involved the rapid opening of an extended transcription bubble, averaging 85 base pairs, accompanied by the synthesis of a transcript up to the entire length of the extended bubble, followed by promoter escape. PICs that failed to achieve promoter escape nevertheless formed open complexes and extended bubbles, which collapsed back to closed or open complexes, resulting in repeated futile scanning.

  6. A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Zapanta, C M; Liszka, E G; Lamson, T C; Stinebring, D R; Deutsch, S; Geselowitz, D B; Tarbell, J M

    1994-11-01

    A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on a prosthetic heart valve has been developed. Cavitation of four blood analog fluids (distilled water, aqueous glycerin, aqueous polyacrylamide, and aqueous xanthan gum) has been documented for a Medtronic/Hall prosthetic heart valve. This method employed a Penn State Electrical Ventricular Assist Device in a mock circulatory loop that was operated in a partial filling mode associated with reduced atrial filling pressure. The observations were made on a valve that was located in the mitral position, with the cavitation occurring on the inlet side after valve closure on every cycle. Stroboscopic videography was used to document the cavity life cycle. Bubble cavitation was observed on the valve occluder face. Vortex cavitation was observed at two locations in the vicinity of the valve occluder and housing. For each fluid, cavity growth and collapse occurred in less than one millisecond, which provides strong evidence that the cavitation is vaporous rather than gaseous. The cavity duration time was found to decrease with increasing atrial pressure at constant aortic pressure and beat rate. The area of cavitation was found to decrease with increasing delay time at a constant aortic pressure, atrial pressure, and beat rate. Cavitation was found to occur in each of the fluids, with the most cavitation seen in the Newtonian fluids (distilled water and aqueous glycerin).

  7. Observational determination of the time delays in gravitational lens system Q2237+0305

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulik, V.; Schild, R.; Dudinov, V.; Nuritdinov, S.; Tsvetkova, V.; Burkhonov, O.; Akhunov, T.

    2006-03-01

    We present new brightness monitoring observations of the 4 components of gravitationally lensed system Q2237+0305, which show detection of an intrinsic quasar brightness fluctuation at a time of subdued microlensing activity, between June 27 and October 12, 2003. These data were used to determine the time delays between the arrivals of the four images. The measured delays are τ_BA≈-6, τ_CA≈35, and τ_DA≈2 h, so they confirm that the long history of brightness monitoring has produced significant detection of microlensing. However the error bars associated with the delays, of order 2 days, are too large to discriminate between competing macro-imaging models. Moreover, our simulations show that for the amplitude of this intrinsic fluctuation and for photometric errors intrinsic to optical monitoring from our 1.5-m telescope or from the OGLE monitoring, a daily sampled brightness record cannot produce reliable lags for model discrimination. We use our simulations to devise a strategy for future delay determination with optical data. Nevertheless, we regard these first estimates to be significant, since they are the first direct measurements of time delays made for this system from ground-based observations in the visual wavelengths. The detected highly correlated fluctuations of the four quasar images provide an extra confirmation of the gravitational-lens nature of Q2237+0305, and give observational justification to the extensive literature which attributes the quasar's previously observed brightness fluctuations to microlensing.

  8. In-Hospital Recruitment to Observational Studies of Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Ruth M.; Kunkel, Dorit; Fitton, Carolyn; Ashburn, Ann; Jenkinson, Damian

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine recruitment in three observational follow-up studies of patients with stroke, focusing on reasons for nonparticipation and the role of potential factors in explaining recruitment rates. It comprised secondary analysis of the three studies. Recruitment rates varied between the studies. Between 10 and 50%…

  9. Universal time variations of the auroral hemispheric power and their interhemispheric asymmetry from TIMED/GUVI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Xiaoli; Wang, Wenbin; Burns, Alan; Dou, Xiankang

    2016-10-01

    This paper quantitatively analyzes the auroral hemispheric power (HP) and its interhemispheric asymmetry as a function of universal time (UT) for geomagnetically quiet conditions (Kp 1-3) from Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/Global Ultraviolet Imager (TIMED/GUVI) imaging observations. The HP variation with UT can be approximately characterized as two cases: One is for similar HP variations in the equinoxes in the Northern Hemisphere and for the June solstices of both hemispheres, and the other is for similar HP patterns in the equinoxes in the Southern Hemisphere and for the December solstices of both hemispheres. In the equinoxes, the HP variations are interhemispherically asymmetric due to different occurrence time of the HP peak. In the solstices, the HP is generally interhemispherically symmetric in its diurnal variations, but there is interhemispheric asymmetry in the magnitudes of the maximum HP. For geomagnetically quiet conditions (Kp = 2), in the equinoxes relative interhemispheric differences are typically between 0 and 20%, with respect to the averaged HP from the two hemispheres, while during the solstices, the maximum relative interhemispheric asymmetry can be as large as 30% in December, but it is only 15% in June. These two cases are mainly associated with variations of auroral precipitation power in the night side sector (21:00-03:00 magnetic local time/MLT), which are primarily controlled by solar illumination conditions in both hemispheres and are also attributed to the difference in the geographical area of the auroral oval in the two hemispheres. Furthermore, the general interhemispheric symmetry of the HP variations in solstices suggests that auroral acceleration is not only controlled locally by solar illumination conditions, which has been well known previously, but also might be affected by processes in the precipitation source region.

  10. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  11. Time Series Spectroscopic and Photometric Observations of the Massive DAV BPM 37093

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Atsuko; Kepler, S. O.; Chene, Andre–Nicolas; Koester, D.; Provencal, J. L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Chote, Paul; Safeko, Ramotholo; Kanaan, Antonio; Romero, Alejandra; Corti, Mariela; Corti, Mariela; Kilic, Mukremin; Winget, D. E.

    2015-06-01

    BPM 37093 was the first of only a handful of massive (1.05+/-0.05 M⊙; Bergeron 2004;Koester & Allard 2000) white dwarf pulsators discovered (Kanaan et al. 1992). These stars are particularly interesting because the crystallized mass-fraction as a function of mass and temperature is poorly constrained by observation, yet this process adds 1-2 Gyr uncertainty in ages of the oldest white dwarf stars observed and hence, in the ages of associations that contain them (Abrikosov 1960; Kirzhnits 1960; Salpeter 1961). Last year, we discovered that ESO uses BPM 37093 as a standard star and extracted corresponding spectra from the public archive. The data suggested a large variation in the observed hydrogen line profiles that could potentially be due to pulsations, but the measurement did not reach a detection-quality threshold. To further explore this possibility, though, we obtained 4hrs of continuous time series spectroscopy of BPM 37093 with Gemini in the Northern Spring of 2014. We present our preliminary results from these data along with those from the accompanying time series photometric observations we gathered from Mt. John (New Zealand), South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO), Panchromatic Robotic optical Monitoring and Polarimetry Telescopes (PROMPT) in Chile, and Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito (Argentina) to support the Gemini observations.

  12. Obesity in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Norris, T; Hawton, K; Hamilton-Shield, J; Crawley, E

    2017-01-01

    Objective Identify the prevalence of obesity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) compared with healthy adolescents, and those identified with CFS in a population cohort. Design Cross-sectional analysis of multiple imputed data. Setting Data from UK paediatric CFS/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) services compared with data collected at two time points in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Patients 1685 adolescents who attended a CFS/ME specialist service between 2004 and 2014 and 13 978 adolescents aged approximately 13 years and 16 years participating in the ALSPAC study. Main outcome measures Body mass index (BMI) (kg/m2), sex-specific and age-specific BMI Z-scores (relative to the International Obesity Task Force cut-offs) and prevalence of obesity (%). Results Adolescents who had attended specialist CFS/ME services had a higher prevalence of obesity (age 13 years: 9.28%; age 16 years: 16.43%) compared with both adolescents classified as CFS/ME in ALSPAC (age 13 years: 3.72%; age 16 years: 5.46%) and those non-CFS in ALSPAC (age 13 years: 4.18%; age 16 years: 4.46%). The increased odds of obesity in those who attended specialist services (relative to non-CFS in ALSPAC) was apparent at both 13 years (OR: 2.31 (1.54 to 3.48)) and 16 years, with a greater likelihood observed at 16 years (OR: 4.07 (2.04 to 8.11)). Conclusions We observed an increased prevalence of obesity in adolescents who were affected severely enough to be referred to a specialist CFS/ME service. Further longitudinal research is required in order to identify the temporal relationship between the two conditions. PMID:27655658

  13. Aneurysm Study of Pipeline in an Observational Registry (ASPIRe)

    PubMed Central

    Kallmes, David F.; Brinjikji, Waleed; Boccardi, Edoardo; Ciceri, Elisa; Diaz, Orlando; Tawk, Rabih; Woo, Henry; Jabbour, Pascal; Albuquerque, Felipe; Chapot, Rene; Bonafe, Alain; Dashti, Shervin R.; Almandoz, Josser E. Delgado; Given, Curtis; Kelly, Michael E.; Cross, DeWitte T.; Duckwiler, Gary; Razack, Nasser; Powers, Ciaran J.; Fischer, Sebastian; Lopes, Demetrius; Harrigan, Mark R.; Huddle, Daniel; Turner, Raymond; Zaidat, Osama O.; Defreyne, Luc; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Cekirge, Saruhan; Fiorella, David; Hanel, Ricardo A.; Lylyk, Pedro; McDougall, Cameron; Siddiqui, Adnan; Szikora, Istvan; Levy, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Few prospective studies exist evaluating the safety and efficacy of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. The Aneurysm Study of Pipeline In an observational Registry (ASPIRe) study prospectively analyzed rates of complete aneurysm occlusion and neurologic adverse events following PED treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods We performed a multicenter study prospectively evaluating patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms treated with PED. Primary outcomes included (1) spontaneous rupture of the Pipeline-treated aneurysm; (2) spontaneous nonaneurysmal intracranial hemorrhage (ICH); (3) acute ischemic stroke; (4) parent artery stenosis, and (5) permanent cranial neuropathy. Secondary endpoints were (1) treatment success and (2) morbidity and mortality at the 6-month follow-up. Vascular imaging was evaluated at an independent core laboratory. Results One hundred and ninety-one patients with 207 treated aneurysms were included in this registry. The mean aneurysm size was 14.5 ± 6.9 mm, and the median imaging follow-up was 7.8 months. Twenty-four aneurysms (11.6%) were small, 162 (78.3%) were large and 21 (10.1%) were giant. The median clinical follow-up time was 6.2 months. The neurological morbidity rate was 6.8% (13/191), and the neurological mortality rate was 1.6% (3/191). The combined neurological morbidity/mortality rate was 6.8% (13/191). The most common adverse events were ischemic stroke (4.7%, 9/191) and spontaneous ICH (3.7%, 7/191). The complete occlusion rate at the last follow-up was 74.8% (77/103). Conclusions Our prospective postmarket study confirms that PED treatment of aneurysms in a heterogeneous patient population is safe with low rates of neurological morbidity and mortality. Patients with angiographic follow-up had complete occlusion rates of 75% at 8 months. PMID:27610126

  14. Energetic ionized helium in the quiet time radiation belts - Theory and comparison with observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of helium ion distributions in the inner magnetosphere are compared to observations made by ATS-6 and Explorer-45. Coupled transport equations for equatorially mirroring singly and doubly ionized helium ions in the steady state limit with an outer boundary of L = 7 are solved. Radial profiles and energy spectra are computed at all lower L values. Theoretical quiet time predictions are compared to satellite observations of energetic helium ions in the lower MeV range. It is found that the theory adequately represents the principal characteristics of the radiation belt helium ion population.

  15. 2D vs. 3D mammography observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, James Reza F.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using a mammography phantom was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this ne 3D mammography technique. In comparing 3D and 2D mammography there was no difference in calcification detection, and mass detection was better in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Given the limitations of the mammography phantom used, however, a clearer picture in comparing 3D and 2D mammography may be better acquired with the incorporation of human studies in the future.

  16. Safety of Tdap vaccine in pregnant women: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Petousis-Harris, Helen; Walls, Tony; Watson, Donna; Paynter, Janine; Graham, Patricia; Turner, Nikki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Actively recruit and intensively follow pregnant women receiving a dose of acellular pertussis vaccine for 4 weeks after vaccination. Design and settings A prospective observational study conducted in 2 New Zealand regions. Participants Women in their 28th–38th week of pregnancy, recruited from primary care and antenatal clinics at the time of Tdap administration. Telephone interviews were conducted at 48 h and 4 weeks postvaccination. Main outcomes measures Outcomes were injection site reactions, systemic symptoms and serious adverse events (SAEs). Where available, data have been classified and reported according to Brighton Collaboration definitions. Results 793 women participated with 27.9% receiving trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine concomitantly. 79% of participants reported mild or moderate pain and 2.6% severe pain. Any swelling was reported by 7.6%, induration by 12.0% (collected from 1 site only, n=326), and erythema by 5.8% of participants. Fever was reported by 17 (2.1%) participants, 14 of these occurred within 24 h. Headache, dizziness, nausea, myalgia or arthralgia was reported by <4% of participants, respectively, and fatigue by 8.4%. During the study period, there were 115 adverse events in 113 participants, most of which were minor. At the end of the reporting period, 31 events were classified as serious (eg, obstetric bleeding, hypertension, infection, tachycardia, preterm labour, exacerbation of pre-existing condition and pre-eclampsia). All had variable onset time from vaccination. There were two perinatal deaths. Clinician assessment of all SAEs found none likely to be vaccine related. Conclusions Vaccination with Tdap in pregnant women was well tolerated with no SAE likely to be caused by the vaccine. Trial registration number ACTRN12613001045707. PMID:27091823

  17. MOOSES: Multiple Option Observation System for Experimental Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapp, Jon; Wehby, Joseph

    The Multiple Option Observation System for Experimental Studies (MOOSES) is a flexible data collection and analysis package for applied behavioral research that addresses the needs of researchers interested in live coding of observational data. MOOSES allows the researcher to design a coding system for a particular research question. General types…

  18. Empirical Performance of Covariates in Education Observational Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Vivian C.; Valentine, Jeffrey C.; Miller-Bains, Kate

    2017-01-01

    This article summarizes results from 12 empirical evaluations of observational methods in education contexts. We look at the performance of three common covariate-types in observational studies where the outcome is a standardized reading or math test. They are: pretest measures, local geographic matching, and rich covariate sets with a strong…

  19. An Observational Study of Skilled Memory in Waitresses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Joy

    A two-phase study about skilled memory as it is used by waitresses included a participant-observer phase and an observational phase. Participants were three experienced waitresses who had worked at a midtown Manhattan restaurant for 14, 7, and 3 years respectively and a team of 5 confederate customers. Waitresses and customers wore microphones.…

  20. Electric field observations of time constants related to charging and charge neutralization processes in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Evans, D. S.; Troim, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Polar 5 electric field results are reviewed, and the transients from Polar 3 are presented. The phenomena are discussed from the standpoint of space charge. On the basis of the Polar 5 results, the large magnitude of the electric field from Polar 3 is seen as indicating that the observed space charge was probably within a few km or less of the payload. Reference is made to Cole's prediction (1960) that charges in the ionosphere would reach equilibrium with a time constant of the order of a few microsec. The processes involved in the two cases presented here require time constants of the order of ms. If the sheath dimensions are taken to be between 50 and 100 m, which is not considered unreasonable in view of the electric field measurements, then a qualitative estimate of the neutralization time would be the transit time for ions across the sheath. Since the kinetic velocity of a 1-eV proton is approximately 14 m/s, it would traverse the distance in 4 to 8 ms, assuming freedom of movement across magnetic field lines. This is the order of the decay times observed on Polar 5.

  1. Fast X-ray micro-CT for real-time 4D observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, H.; Yoshida, K.; Tsuji, T.; Koyama, T.; Tsusaka, Y.; Kagoshima, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Fast X-ray computed tomography (CT) system with sub-second order measurement for single CT acquisition has been developed. The system, consisting of a high-speed sample rotation stage and a high-speed X-ray camera, is constructed at synchrotron radiation beamline in order to utilize fully intense X-rays. A time-resolving CT movie (i.e. 4D CT) can be available by operating the fast CT system continuously. Real-time observation of water absorbing process of super-absorbent polymer (SAP) has been successfully performed with the 4D CT operation.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 4 Kepler systems transit timing observations (Steffen+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, J. H.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Ford, E. B.; Carter, J. A.; Desert, J.-M.; Fressin, F.; Holman, M. J.; Lissauer, J. J.; Moorhead, A. V.; Rowe, J. F.; Ragozzine, D.; Welsh, W. F.; Batalha, N. M.; Borucki, W. J.; Buchhave, L. A.; Bryson, S.; Caldwell, D. A.; Charbonneau, D.; Ciardi, D. R.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Everett, M. E.; Gautier, T. N., III; Gilliland, R. L.; Girouard, F. R.; Jenkins, J. M.; Horch, E.; Howell, S. B.; Isaacson, H.; Klaus, T. C.; Koch, D. G.; Latham, D. W.; Li, J.; Lucas, P.; MacQueen, P. J.; Marcy, G. W.; McCauliff, S.; Middour, C. K.; Morris, R. L.; Mullally, F. R.; Quinn, S. N.; Quintana, E. V.; Shporer, A.; Still, M.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thompson, S. E.; Twicken, J. D.; van Cleve, J.

    2013-03-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anticorrelations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems, Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27 and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate. (4 data files).

  3. Aging, Spirituality, and Time: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Black, Helen K.; Hannum, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the concepts of aging, time, spirituality, and future care needs in four randomly selected informants from a group of 54 never-married childless older women. Using data from the Generativity and Lifestyles of Older Women (GLOW) study, we questioned how women’s perceptions of these concepts came together in current older age. We employed cultural theory, (our theoretical framework), ethnography, (our methodological framework), and phenomenology, (our philosophical foundation) to produce a portrait of each woman interviewed. Through a three-session interview process, we elicited the women’s life stories, reasons for childlessness, and topics that emerged as significant to the women, including aging, a sense of time remaining, and spirituality. A key finding was that the context of each woman’s life, both biographical and historical, transpired as a foundation for these concepts. That is, a woman’s “place in time” shaped their experiences of aging, as well as her reasons for childlessness and perceptions of finitude. PMID:26539067

  4. Monotone spline-based least squares estimation for panel count data with informative observation times.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shirong; Liu, Li; Zhao, Xingqiu

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the statistical analysis of panel count data when the underlying recurrent event process and observation process may be correlated. For the recurrent event process, we propose a new class of semiparametric mean models that allows for the interaction between the observation history and covariates. For inference on the model parameters, a monotone spline-based least squares estimation approach is developed, and the resulting estimators are consistent and asymptotically normal. In particular, our new approach does not rely on the model specification of the observation process. The proposed inference procedure performs well through simulation studies, and it is illustrated by the analysis of bladder tumor data.

  5. Interaction between measurement time and observed Hugoniot cusp due to chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrane, S. D.; Brown, K. E.; Bolme, C. A.; Moore, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    Chemistry occurring on picosecond timescales can be observed through ultrafast laser shock drive experiments that measure Hugoniot data and transient absorption. The shock stress needed to induce chemical reactions on picosecond time scales is significantly larger than the stress needed to induce reactions on nanosecond time scales typical of gas gun and explosively driven plate impact experiments. This discrepancy is consistent with the explanation that increased shock stress leads to increased temperature, which drives thermally activated processes at a faster rate. While the data are qualitatively consistent with the interpretation of thermally dominated reactions, they are not a critical test of this interpretation. In this paper, we review data from several shocked liquids that illustrate a Hugoniot cusp due to volume changing reactions that occurs at higher shock stress states in picosecond experiments than in nanosecond to microsecond experiments. We also correlate the observed Hugoniot cusp states with transient absorption changes that occur due to the buildup of reaction products.

  6. Observations of entrainment and time variability in the HH 47 jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartigan, Patrick; Morse, Jon A.; Heathcote, Steve; Cecil, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    We present new Fabry-Perot images of the HH 47 jet that show the first clear evidence for entrainment in a jet from a young star. The material in the jet moves faster down the axis of the flow and slower at the edges, similar to viscous flow in a pipe. The higher excitation lines occur along the edges of the jet, as expected if entrainment accelerates and heats the ambient material. We confirm previous observations of multiple bow shocks in this system. Together, time variability and entrainment produce much of the observed shock-excited gas in this object. Our data show that the 'wiggles' along the jet are not caused by jet material tied to a spiraling magnetic field, but instead result from time variability, variable ejection angles, or inhomogeneities in the flow. The gas entrained in the HH 47 jet may be atomic; our results do not provide direct evidence that stellar jets drive molecular outflows.

  7. Chatanika radar observations relating to the latitudinal and local time variations of Joule heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.; Foster, J. C.; Doupnik, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of plasma convection made with the Chatanika incoherent scatter radar have been analyzed to give latitude/local time plots of the electric field contribution (E squared) to thermospheric Joule heating. The data, which plan the invariant latitude range 56 deg to 75 deg, show the presence of strong heating throughout the auroral regions. Of special interest are brief interludes of intense heating (greater than 50 mW/sq m) that are observed at nearly all local times and latitudes in response to magnetospheric disturbances. Further, there seem to be particular regions of the auroral oval where Joule heating seems to be continually enhanced above the broad background. The results of six 24-hour experiments are presented to illustrate summer and winter conditions. A shorter eight hour experiment is also given to show the characteristics of cleft heating, insofar as they are visible to the Chatanika radar.

  8. Observer-based predictive controller design with network-enhanced time-delay compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florin Caruntu, Constantin

    2015-02-01

    State feedback control is very attractive due to the precise computation of the gain matrix, but the implementation of a state feedback controller is possible only when all state variables are directly measurable. This condition is almost impossible to accomplish due to the excess number of required sensors or unavailability of states for measurement in most of the practical situations. Hence, the need for an estimator or observer is obvious to estimate all the state variables by observing the input and the output of the controlled system. As such, the goal of this paper is to provide a control design methodology based on a Luenberger observer design that can assure the closed-loop performances of a vehicle drivetrain with backlash, while compensating the network-enhanced time-varying delays. This goal is achieved in a sequential manner: firstly, a piecewise linear model of two inertias drivetrain, which takes into consideration the backlash nonlinearity and the network-enhanced time-varying delay effects is derived; then, a Luenberger observer which estimates the state variables is synthesized and the robust full state-feedback predictive controller based on flexible control Lyapunov functions is designed to explicitly take into account the bounds of the disturbances caused by time-varying delays and to guarantee also the input-to-state stability of the system in a non-conservative way. The full state-feedback predictive control strategy based on the Luenberger observer design was experimentally tested on a vehicle drivetrain emulator controlled through controller area network, with the aim of minimizing the backlash effects while compensating the network-enhanced delays.

  9. Ground-based observations of time variability in multiple active volcanoes on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, Julie A.; Spencer, John R.

    2010-10-01

    Since before the beginning of the Galileo spacecraft's Jupiter orbital tour, we have observed Io from the ground using NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). We obtained images of Io in reflected sunlight and in-eclipse at 2.3, 3.5, and 4.8 μm. In addition, we have measured the 3.5 μm brightness of an eclipsed Io as it is occulted by Jupiter. These lightcurves enable us to measure the brightness and one-dimensional location of active volcanoes on the surface. During the Galileo era, two volcanoes were observed to be regularly active: Loki and either Kanehekili and/or Janus. At least 12 other active volcanoes were observed for shorter periods of time, including one distinguishable in images that include reflected sunlight. These data can be used to compare volcano types and test volcano eruption models, such as the lava lake model for Loki.

  10. Local Time Variation of Water Ice Clouds on Mars as Observed by THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The move of the Odyssey spacecraft to an orbit with local time near 6:00 AM and PM enables systematic retrieval of water ice clouds at a time of day not accessible from Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, or previous Odyssey observations. Although surface temperature is reduced near sunrise and sunset compared to afternoon, THEMIS observations show that there is still sufficient thermal contrast between the surface and atmosphere over a range of latitudes near the sub-solar point to retrieve accurate aerosol optical depth. Because water ice clouds form by condensation, relatively small changes in atmospheric temperature can cause clouds to form or sublimate quickly, and there can be large changes in water ice cloud optical depth over the course of a day. Here we present recent retrievals of water ice aerosol optical depth from THEMIS observations. These retrievals show significant differences in cloud locations and opitcal depth compared against THEMIS retrievals from previous Mars Years that were taken at an earlier local time.

  11. Bayesian Techniques for Comparing Time-dependent GRMHD Simulations to Variable Event Horizon Telescope Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junhan; Marrone, Daniel P.; Chan, Chi-Kwan; Medeiros, Lia; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2016-12-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a millimeter-wavelength, very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment that is capable of observing black holes with horizon-scale resolution. Early observations have revealed variable horizon-scale emission in the Galactic Center black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). Comparing such observations to time-dependent general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations requires statistical tools that explicitly consider the variability in both the data and the models. We develop here a Bayesian method to compare time-resolved simulation images to variable VLBI data, in order to infer model parameters and perform model comparisons. We use mock EHT data based on GRMHD simulations to explore the robustness of this Bayesian method and contrast it to approaches that do not consider the effects of variability. We find that time-independent models lead to offset values of the inferred parameters with artificially reduced uncertainties. Moreover, neglecting the variability in the data and the models often leads to erroneous model selections. We finally apply our method to the early EHT data on Sgr A*.

  12. Time-Variable Gravity from Space: Quarter Century of Observations, Mysteries, and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2003-01-01

    Any large mass transport in the Earth system produces changes in the gravity field. Via the space geodetic technique of satellite-laser ranging in the last quarter century, the Earth's dynamic oblateness J2 (the lowest-degree harmonic component of the gravity field) has been observed to undergo a slight decrease -- until around 1998, when it switched quite suddenly to an increase trend which has continued to date. The secular decrease in J2 has long been attributed primarily to the post-glacial rebound in the mantle; the present increase signifies an even larger change in global mass distribution whose J2 effect overshadows that of the post-glacial rebound, at least over interannual timescales. Intriguing evidences have been found in the ocean water distribution, especially in the extratropical Pacific basins, that may be responsible for this J2 change. New techniques based on satellite-to-satellite tracking will yield greatly improved observations for time-variable gravity, with much higher precision and spatial resolution (i.e., much higher harmonic degrees). The most important example is the GRACE mission launched in March 2002, following the success of the CHAMP mission. In addition, although less precise than GRACE, the GPS/Meteorology constellation mission COSMIC, with 6 mini-satellites to be launched in late 2005, is expected to provide continued and complementary time-variable gravity observations. Such observations are becoming a new and powerful tool for remote sensing of geophysical fluid processes that involve larger-scale mass transports.

  13. Investigating nonlinear dynamics from time series: The influence of symmetries and the choice of observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letellier, Christophe; Aguirre, Luis A.

    2002-09-01

    When a dynamical system is investigated from a time series, one of the most challenging problems is to obtain a model that reproduces the underlying dynamics. Many papers have been devoted to this problem but very few have considered the influence of symmetries in the original system and the choice of the observable. Indeed, it is well known that there are usually some variables that provide a better representation of the underlying dynamics and, consequently, a global model can be obtained with less difficulties starting from such variables. This is connected to the problem of observing the dynamical system from a single time series. The roots of the nonequivalence between the dynamical variables will be investigated in a more systematic way using previously defined observability indices. It turns out that there are two important ingredients which are the complexity of the coupling between the dynamical variables and the symmetry properties of the original system. As will be mentioned, symmetries and the choice of observables also has important consequences in other problems such as synchronization of nonlinear oscillators.

  14. Decentralized finite-time attitude synchronization for multiple rigid spacecraft via a novel disturbance observer.

    PubMed

    Zong, Qun; Shao, Shikai

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates decentralized finite-time attitude synchronization for a group of rigid spacecraft by using quaternion with the consideration of environmental disturbances, inertia uncertainties and actuator saturation. Nonsingular terminal sliding mode (TSM) is used for controller design. Firstly, a theorem is proven that there always exists a kind of TSM that converges faster than fast terminal sliding mode (FTSM) for quaternion-descripted attitude control system. Controller with this kind of TSM has faster convergence and reduced computation than FTSM controller. Then, combining with an adaptive parameter estimation strategy, a novel terminal sliding mode disturbance observer is proposed. The proposed disturbance observer needs no upper bound information of the lumped uncertainties or their derivatives. On the basis of undirected topology and the disturbance observer, decentralized attitude synchronization control laws are designed and all attitude errors are ensured to converge to small regions in finite time. As for actuator saturation problem, an auxiliary variable is introduced and accommodated by the disturbance observer. Finally, simulation results are given and the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is testified.

  15. LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080319B: JET BREAK, HOST GALAXY, AND ACCOMPANYING SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Tanvir, N. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-10

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at {approx}11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E{sub jet} {approx}> 10{sup 52} erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) {approx} 27.0, rest frame M{sub B} {approx} -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event-a small host and bright SN-are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  16. Observations of Atlantic overturning variability and latitudinal coherence with GRACE time-variable gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landerer, Felix; Wiese, David; Bentel, Katrin; Watkins, Michael; Boening, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is a key mechanism of pole-ward planetary heat transport. Concerns about AMOC changes imply the need for a continuous, large-scale observation capability to detect and monitor changes on interannual to decadal time scales. Here we present measurements of AMOC component transport changes directly obtained from time-variable gravity observations of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites from 2003 until now. Recent improvements at JPL of monthly gravity field retrievals allow the detection of AMOC-related interannual bottom pressure anomalies and in turn LNADW transport estimates. In the Atlantic at 26N, these GRACE AMOC estimates are in good agreement with those from the Rapid Climate Change-Meridional Overturning Circulation and Heatflux Array (RAPID/MOCHA) . We extend the GRACE-based estimates of AMOC variability from the Southern Ocean to the Northern sinking branch to assess meridional coherence and discuss challenges of the GRACE observing system. Our results highlight the efficacy and utility of space-gravimetry for observing AMOC variations to evaluate latitudinal coherency and long-term variability.

  17. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamrin, M.; Norqvist, P.; Marghitu, O.; Vaivads, A.; Klecker, B.; Kistler, L. M.; Dandouras, I.

    2009-11-01

    In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009) [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs) in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data) at the altitude of about 15-20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs) and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs). By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1-10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005). The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1-10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  18. Experimental Study of Short-Time Brownian Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jianyong; Simha, Akarsh; Riegler, David; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We report our progress on the study of short-time Brownian motion of optically-trapped microspheres. In earlier work, we observed the instantaneous velocity of microspheres in gas and in liquid, verifying a prediction by Albert Einstein from 1907. We now report a more accurate test of the energy equipartition theorem for a particle in liquid. We also observe boundary effects on Brownian motion in liquid by setting a wall near the trapped particle, which changes the dynamics of the motion. We find that the velocity autocorrelation of the particle decreases faster as the particle gets closer to the wall.

  19. TDRSS/user satellite timing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgregor, D.; Douglas, F.; Kaul, R.

    1976-01-01

    A timing analysis for data readout through the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) was presented. Various time tagging approaches were considered and the resulting accuracies delineated. The TDRSS was also defined and described in detail.

  20. Annual report of the Mizusawa Astrogeodynamics Observatory. Time Service, geophysical observations and meteorological observations for the year 1993.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, S.

    This annual report for the year 1993 consists of three parts. The first part shows the results of comparisons of UTC(NAOM) with the Loran C and GPS (Global Positioning System), and among the cesium frequency standards. Part 2 reports the results of the tidal tilt and strain observations made at the Esashi Earth Tides Station and the gravity observations made with a superconducting gravimeter placed at the same station. Part 3 reports the results of the meteorological observations. Most of the results are presented graphically. However, numerical values of all the data are available in machine readable form on request.

  1. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: IV. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by Simple Physical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Steffen, Jason H.; Rowe, Jason F.; Carter, Joshua A.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Buchhave, Lars A.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames /Caltech

    2012-01-01

    Eighty planetary systems of two or more planets are known to orbit stars other than the Sun. For most, the data can be sufficiently explained by non-interacting Keplerian orbits, so the dynamical interactions of these systems have not been observed. Here we present 4 sets of lightcurves from the Kepler spacecraft, which each show multiple planets transiting the same star. Departure of the timing of these transits from strict periodicity indicates the planets are perturbing each other: the observed timing variations match the forcing frequency of the other planet. This confirms that these objects are in the same system. Next we limit their masses to the planetary regime by requiring the system remain stable for astronomical timescales. Finally, we report dynamical fits to the transit times, yielding possible values for the planets masses and eccentricities. As the timespan of timing data increases, dynamical fits may allow detailed constraints on the systems architectures, even in cases for which high-precision Doppler follow-up is impractical.

  2. Real-time seismic observation using new compact ocean bottom cabled system in Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, M.; Kanazawa, T.; Yamada, T.; Sakai, S.; Shiobara, H.; Mochizuki, K.; Machida, Y.; Shinbo, T.; Nakahigashi, K.; Utada, H.; Yamazaki, K.

    2010-12-01

    Ocean Bottom Cabled Seismometers (OBCS), where the sensors are equipped in a hermetically-sealed case and these cases are connected with cables, is the best solution for seismic observation in marine area. A few OBCSs, consisting of a few cabled seismometers, were developed based on a submarine telecommunication cable technology, and have been used over the past 25 years in Japan. Although the existing OBCSs have realized a significant contribution to the study of seismic activity, the number of seismometers is insufficient for high resolution observations of a marine area. Therefore we developed a new OBCS system to make a high density observation in the marine areas. In Japan, GPS observations with a dense station distribution revealed that the central coastal area of the Japan Sea has large strain rate, which is named the Niigata-Kobe Tectonic Zone (NKTZ). The formation of the NKTZ is believed to be related to the plate subduction. In the NKTZ, there were several large earthquakes with magnitude greater than 7. For example, Niigata earthquake occurred in 1963, and gave large damage. Because the source region of the Niigata earthquake was located in the Japan Sea off Niigata, central Japan and the number of seismic stations of the regional seismic network was limited at the occurrence, characteristics of the earthquake have not been revealed well. There is a possibility to clarify the nature of the Niigata earthquake by detailed research of the seismic activity at the present. Therefore we decided to install the first practical OBCS system in the source area of the Niigata earthquake. The developed OBCS uses small three accelerometers as a seismic sensor. The CS is controlled by Linux system. Data collected with a time stamp at each CS are transmitted using standard IP data transmission to landing station. The network of the OBCS has redundant configuration. The electronics unit, three seismometers, power unit including zener diodes, and six SPFs are mounted into

  3. Direct observation of electron emission and recombination processes by time domain measurements of charge pumping current

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Masahiro Watanabe, Tokinobu; Ono, Yukinori; Tsuchiya, Toshiaki

    2015-01-26

    To analyze the charge pumping (CP) sequence in detail, the source/drain electron current and the substrate hole current under the CP mode of transistors are simultaneously monitored in the time domain. Peaks are observed in both the electron and hole currents, which are, respectively, attributed to the electron emission from the interface defects and to the recombination with holes. The peak caused by the electron emission is found to consist of two components, strongly suggesting that the present time-domain measurement can enable us to resolve different kinds of interface defects. Investigating the correlation between the number of emitted and recombined electrons reveals that only one of the two components contributes to the CP current for the gate-pulse fall time from 6.25 × 10{sup −4} to 1.25 × 10{sup −2} s.

  4. Time-dependent MHD simulations of the solar wind outflow using interplanetary scintillation observations

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Tae K.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Borovikov, Sergey N.; ...

    2012-11-20

    Numerical modeling of the heliosphere is a critical component of space weather forecasting. The accuracy of heliospheric models can be improved by using realistic boundary conditions and confirming the results with in situ spacecraft measurements. To accurately reproduce the solar wind (SW) plasma flow near Earth, we need realistic, time-dependent boundary conditions at a fixed distance from the Sun. We may prepare such boundary conditions using SW speed and density determined from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations, magnetic field derived from photospheric magnetograms, and temperature estimated from its correlation with SW speed. In conclusion, we present here the time-dependent MHD simulationmore » results obtained by using the 2011 IPS data from the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory as time-varying inner boundary conditions and compare the simulated data at Earth with OMNI data (spacecraft-interspersed, near-Earth solar wind data).« less

  5. Time-dependent MHD simulations of the solar wind outflow using interplanetary scintillation observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae K.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Borovikov, Sergey N.; Clover, John M.; Jackson, Bernard V.; Yu, Hsiu-Shan

    2012-11-20

    Numerical modeling of the heliosphere is a critical component of space weather forecasting. The accuracy of heliospheric models can be improved by using realistic boundary conditions and confirming the results with in situ spacecraft measurements. To accurately reproduce the solar wind (SW) plasma flow near Earth, we need realistic, time-dependent boundary conditions at a fixed distance from the Sun. We may prepare such boundary conditions using SW speed and density determined from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations, magnetic field derived from photospheric magnetograms, and temperature estimated from its correlation with SW speed. In conclusion, we present here the time-dependent MHD simulation results obtained by using the 2011 IPS data from the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory as time-varying inner boundary conditions and compare the simulated data at Earth with OMNI data (spacecraft-interspersed, near-Earth solar wind data).

  6. Time Deployment Study for Annulus Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    REBERGER, D.W.

    2000-02-16

    Radioactive wastes from processing irradiated uranium fuels have been stored as alkaline slurries in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. Single-shell tanks (SST) and double-shell tanks (DST) of various sizes were used for waste storage. Of the total 177 tanks, there are 28 DSTs. DSTs are located in AN, AP, AW, AY, AZ, and SY tank farms in the 200 East (200E) and 200-West (200W) Areas. The storage capacities of the DSTs vary from 980,000 to 1,140,000 gal. DSTs are designed and constructed as an integral steel structure, i.e., an inner shell within an outer shell, so that any leak from the inner shell is confined within the annulus without impacting the environment. The inner shell provides primary containment for the wastes and the outer shell provides secondary containment in the form of an annulus. The annulus of a DST is equipped with a pump pit, leak detection probes, and other accessories. The existing annulus pumps in the DSTs need to be revamped with a new system to reduce operating costs and reduce the time to deploy a pumping system. The new pumping system will minimize the likelihood of a release of waste into the environment; improve capability of waste removal to the maximum extent possible to comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 and Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 40 CFR 265.193. This study addresses the time required to deploy an annulus pumping system designed to fit any DST after detection of a leak in the inner shell of the DST.

  7. Micromorphological changes over time observed in the Vestfold Podzol chronosequence, SE Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Daniela; Musztyfaga, Elżbieta; Sørensen, Rolf; Svendgård-Stokke, Siri; Rennert, Thilo; Sperstad, Ragnhild; Fuchs, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The Oslofjord region in SE-Norway has undergone steady glacio-isostatic uplift all over the Holocene. Hence, in the coastal areas land surface age continuously increases with elevation, providing ideal conditions for studying soil development with time. A chronosequence of soils on beach sand and sandy terraces of the Lågen River, showing progressive podzolisation with soil age, was studied in the Vestfold region, on the western side of the Oslofjord. In total, 31 pedons with soil ages ranging from 85 years (0.25 m a. s. l.) to ca. 10,150 years (62 m a. s. l.) were described and analysed. Soil ages were estimated by relating elevations of the sites to a Holocene relative sea level curve based on twelve AMS 14C-dates of gyttja from the isolation contact (marine/fresh water boundary) and six marine macrofossil 14C-dates (Sørensen et al., 2012). The climate in the study area is comparatively mild, with mean annual temperatures ranging from 5.3 °C (Ramnes) to 6.3 °C (Sandefjord, Larvik) and mean annual precipitation of 909 mm (Sandefjord) to 1150 mm (Stokke). The predominating vegetation is mixed forest. The parent material of the soils consists of 70-95% sand in most profiles, composed mainly of quartz and feldspars. Under these conditions, initial podzolisation becomes visible after 800-1200 years, and the development of a major Podzol requires about 6000 years. Bh and Bs horizons occur first in the 1220 year-old soil. Their combined thickness shows a logarithmic increase over time. Micromorphological changes of the Bh and Bs horizons with soil age include accumulation of increasing amounts of dark fine material in the Bh horizons and cloudy, iron-rich, reddish fine material in the Bs horizons over time. These accumulations turn the original coarse monic c/f-related distribution into chitonic and enaulic c/f-related distribution in the Bh and Bs horizons. The reddish colour of the granules of fine material in the Bs horizons becomes more intense with soil age. In

  8. "Lies, damned lies ..." and observational studies in comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Albert, Richard K

    2013-06-01

    A new federal initiative has allocated $1.1 billion to comparative effectiveness research, and many have emphasized the importance of including observational studies in this effort. The rationale for using observational studies to assess comparative effectiveness is based on concerns that randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are not "real world" because they enroll homogeneous patient populations, measure study outcomes that are not important to patients, use protocols that are overly complex, are conducted in specialized centers, and use study treatments that are not consistent with usual care, and that RCTs are not always feasible because of a lack of equipoise, the need to assess delayed endpoints, and concerns that they take years to complete and are expensive. This essay questions the validity of each of these proposed limitations, summarizes concerns raised about the accuracy of results generated by observational studies, provides some examples of discrepancies between results of observational studies and RCTs that pertain to pulmonary and critical care, and suggests that using observational studies for comparative effectiveness research may increase rather than decrease the cost of health care and may harm patients.

  9. Some Observations on Timing in the Speech of Deaf and Hearing Speakers. Report No. 2905.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Raymond S.; And Others

    The factor of timing on intelligible speech among normally-hearing persons was studied to determine some ways in which it differs from the speech of the deaf. Additional data was gathered on the temporal aspects of the speech of deaf and hearing children and hearing adults. The data corroborated earlier studies indicating that (1) deaf speakers…

  10. Synchronizaton and causality across time-scales of observed and modelled ENSO dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajcay, Nikola; Kravtsov, Sergey; Tsonis, Anastasios A.; Paluš, Milan

    2016-04-01

    Phase-phase and phase-amplitude interactions between dynamics on different temporal scales has been observed in ENSO dynamics, captured by the NINO3.4 index, using the approach for identification of cross-scale interactions introduced recently by Paluš [1]. The most pronounced interactions across scales are phase coherence and phase-phase causality in which the annual cycle influences the dynamics on the quasibiennial scale. The phase of slower phenomena on the scale 4-6 years influences not only the combination frequencies around the period one year, but also the phase of the annual cycle and also the amplitude of the oscillations in the quasibiennial range. In order to understand these nonlinear phenomena we investigate cross-scale interactions in synthetic, modelled NINO3.4 time series. The models taken into account were a selection of 96 historic runs from CMIP5 project, and two low-dimensional models - parametric recharge oscillator (PRO) [2], which is a two-dimensional dynamical model and a data-driven model based on the idea of linear inverse models [3]. The latter is a statistical model, in our setting 25-dimensional. While the two dimensions of the PRO model are not enough to capture all the cross-scale interactions, the results from the data-driven model are more promising and they resemble the interactions found in NINO3.4 measured data set. We believe that combination of models of different complexity will help to uncover mechanisms of the cross-scale interactions which might be the key for better understanding of the irregularities in the ENSO dynamics. This study is supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic within the Program KONTAKT II, Project No. LH14001. [1] M. Palus, Phys. Rev. Let. 112 078702 (2014) [2] K. Stein et al., J. Climate, 27, 14 (2014) [3] Kondrashov et al., J. Climate, 18, 21 (2005)

  11. Study of Saturn electrostatic discharges with high time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, V.; Mylostna, K.; Konovalenko, A.; Kolyadin, V.; Zarka, P.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Litvinenko, G.; Sidorchuk, M.; Rucker, H.; Fischer, G.; Cecconi, B.; Coffre, A.; Denis, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2013-09-01

    Ground-based observations of SED (Saturn Electrostatic Discharges) with high time resolution are the next stage of extraterrestrial atmospheric processes study. Due to extremely high intensity of Saturn's storm J (2010) [1] we have obtained the records with high signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio with the time resolution of 15 ns. It permitted us to investigate the microsecond structure of lightning and clearly distinguish SED in the presence of local interference in virtue of a dispersive delay of extraterrestrial planetary signals.

  12. Observation of Discrete Oscillations in the Plot of Cosmological Scale Factor vs. Lookback Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringermacher, Harry I.; Mead, Lawrence R

    2014-06-01

    We have observed damped longitudinal cosmological-scale oscillations in a unique model-independent plot of scale factor against lookback time. We measured 2 full, constant frequency, oscillations with a period of 0.15 Hubble times. This period corresponds to a fundamental frequency of approximately 7 cycles over the age of the universe, which we term 7 “Hubble-Hertz” (HHz). Transition-z values quoted in the literature generally fall near these oscillation minima and may explain the reported spread and deviation from the predicted ΛCDM value of approximately z = 0.77. We also observe second and third harmonics of the fundamental consistent with the spectrum of a sawtooth waveform. We propose a cosmological scalar field damped simple harmonic oscillator model for the observation - which fits well. On this time scale, the scalar field particle mass is extraordinarily small at 10^ -32 ev. Particles on this scale have been suggested in the literature as being associated with massive gravitons, in which case we may be observing longitudinal mode gravitational waves. A multiverse 5-D brane collision scenario is one possible source for the scalar field and waves. This scenario enables an estimate of the compacted 5th dimension radius at approximately 1,000,000 ly - the size of a galaxy dark matter halo. Our scalar field density parameter precisely replaces the ΛCDM dark matter density parameter in the Friedmann equations, resulting in identical data fits, and its present value matches the Planck value. We therefore posit that this scalar field manifests itself as the dark matter.

  13. Land and Atmosphere Near-Real-Time Capability for Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has seen a rapid increase in availability and usage of near-real-time data from satellite sensors. The EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) was not originally designed to provide data with sufficiently low latency to satisfy the requirements for near-real-time users. The EOS (Earth Observing System) instruments aboard the Terra, Aqua and Aura satellites make global measurements daily, which are processed into higher-level 'standard' products within 8-40 hours of observation and then made available to users, primarily earth science researchers. However, applications users, operational agencies, and even researchers desire EOS products in near-real-time to support research and applications, including numerical weather and climate prediction and forecasting, monitoring of natural hazards, ecological/invasive species, agriculture, air quality, disaster relief and homeland security. These users often need data much sooner than routine science processing allows, usually within 3 hours, and are willing to trade science product quality for timely access. While Direct Broadcast provides more timely access to data, it does not provide global coverage. In 2002, a joint initiative between NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), and the DOD (Department of Defense) was undertaken to provide data from EOS instruments in near-real-time. The NRTPE (Near Real Time Processing Effort) provided products within 3 hours of observation on a best-effort basis. As the popularity of these near-real-time products and applications grew, multiple near-real-time systems began to spring up such as the Rapid Response System. In recognizing the dependence of customers on this data and the need for highly reliable and timely data access, NASA's Earth Science Division sponsored the Earth Science Data and Information System Project (ESDIS)-led development of a new near-real-time system called

  14. Issues of reporting in observational studies in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, Jan M; O'Connor, Annette M

    2014-02-15

    Observational studies are common in veterinary medicine; the results may be used to inform decision-making, future research, or as inputs to systematic reviews or risk assessment. To be of use, the results must be published, all of the outcomes that were assessed must be included in the publication, and the research (methods and results) must be reported in sufficient detail that the reader can evaluate the internal and external validity. In human healthcare, concerns about the completeness of reporting - and evidence that poor reporting is associated with study results - have led to the creation of reporting guidelines; these include the STROBE statement for observational studies. There is evidence from a limited body of research that there also are reporting inadequacies in veterinary observational studies. There are differences between human and veterinary observational studies that might be relevant to recommendations for reporting. Such differences include: the use of observational studies in animal populations for simultaneously estimating disease frequency and risk-factor identification; the distinction between the animal owners who consent to participate and the animals that are the study subjects; and the complexity of organizational levels inherent in animal research (in particular, for studies in livestock species). In veterinary medicine, it is common to have clustering within outcomes (due to animal grouping) and clustering of predictor variables. We argue that there is a compelling need for the scientific community involved in veterinary observational studies to use the STROBE statement, use an amended version of STROBE, or to develop and use reporting guidelines that are specific to veterinary medicine to improve reporting of these studies.

  15. Empirical Storm-Time Correction to the International Reference Ionosphere Model E-Region Electron and Ion Density Parameterizations Using Observations from TIMED/SABER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christoper J.; Winick, Jeremy R.; Russell, James M., III; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Evans, David S.; Bilitza, Dieter; Xu, Xiaojing

    2007-01-01

    The response of the ionospheric E-region to solar-geomagnetic storms can be characterized using observations of infrared 4.3 micrometers emission. In particular, we utilize nighttime TIMED/SABER measurements of broadband 4.3 micrometers limb emission and derive a new data product, the NO+(v) volume emission rate, which is our primary observation-based quantity for developing an empirical storm-time correction the IRI E-region electron density. In this paper we describe our E-region proxy and outline our strategy for developing the empirical storm model. In our initial studies, we analyzed a six day storm period during the Halloween 2003 event. The results of this analysis are promising and suggest that the ap-index is a viable candidate to use as a magnetic driver for our model.

  16. TIMING OBSERVATIONS OF 27 PULSARS AT THE PUSHCHINO OBSERVATORY FROM 1978 TO 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Shabanova, T. V.; Pugachev, V. D.; Lapaev, K. A.

    2013-09-20

    We present results from timing observations of 27 pulsars made at the Pushchino Observatory over 33.5 yr between 1978 July and 2012 February. We also analyze archival Jet Propulsion Laboratory data of 10 pulsars to extend our individual data span to 43.5 yr. We detected a new phenomenon in the timing behavior of two pulsars, B0823+26 and B1929+10, that demonstrates a rapid change of pulsar rotation parameters such that the sign of the second derivative v-dot-dot is reversed. An analysis of the v-dot-dot changes showed that this process can be considered as a modulation process in v-dot-dot. We showed that the process of rapidly changing pulsar rotation parameters represents a new type of rotational irregularity that, together with three other types of rotational irregularities (discrete glitches, slow glitches, and quasi-periodic oscillations), forms a large-scale structure of timing noise. These effects are all the cause of the deviation of the timing behavior of most ordinary pulsars from a simple {nu}, {nu}-dot spin-down model. We found that all four types of observed rotational irregularities have an evolving nature. Irregularities in pulsar rotation rate pass through three evolutional stages that show that a certain type of rotational irregularity can occur only at a certain stage of pulsar rotation evolution. The age boundaries between different evolutionary stages are indistinct and diffusive. This fact is because different pulsars having similar properties evolve along different paths. The evolutionary scenario of the occurrence of rotational irregularities explains well many of the observed properties of pulsar rotation.

  17. Observations and modeling of exchange and residence time in tidal inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rynne, Patrick Forde

    also developed. In the transport model, a new definition of tidally driven exchange is presented and used to quantify how tidal exchange controls residence time in a lagoon. Residence time is found to be minimized for inlets that are restricted enough to produce energetic tidal flows, but broad enough to prevent a reduction in the tidal prism. To apply the methods derived from the idealized modeling to a real inlet system, a depth-averaged coupled Wave-Flow model of New River Inlet (NRI) in North Carolina is developed. NRI features a relatively narrow inlet that connects to an expansive estuary. The model is calibrated and verified with a collection of field observations obtained during the first ONR funded Inlet and River Mouth Dynamics Departmental Research Initiative (RIVET 1) field experiment. In situ flow, water level, wave and dye concentration observations are used to quantify model performance through a skill analysis. The methods developed to quantify residence time and tidal exchange in the idealized lagoon models are applied to the NRI model. The model is used to quantify residence time with parameters from each tidal cycle from May 1-20, 2012 to examine temporal variability. Through the modeling it is shown that residence time in an estuary is controlled primarily by the geometry of the system, and by the processes of tidal exchange and river flushing. Tidal exchange is further controlled by an assortment of factors including the geometry of the inlet, the magnitude of the tide, and any physical processes that draw water away from the inlet on both the ocean and estuary sides. The temporal variability of tidal exchange is attributed primarily to subtidal fluctuations of the tidal prism and secondarily to nearshore processes driven by wind and waves that produce longshore currents. The river flow at NRI, although weak, is shown to reduce the mean residence time by 14.6%. Future work is needed to develop an analytical expression for the mean residence time in

  18. Development of Real-Time Soil Carbon Ecoinformatics Infrastructure Using Observational Network Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, J.; Risk, D. A.; Nickerson, N. R.

    2010-12-01

    To understand and model the temporal variability of soil respiration, we need high frequency, long-term data sets for model development and validation. Three observational stations equipped with Continuous Timeseries-Forced Diffusion (CTFD) probes were deployed in the summer of 2010 across a 1000 km transect in Atlantic Canada. At half hourly resolution, each observational station records soil CO2 efflux from two (2) probes and from a suite of meteorological sensors and peripherals. Each station is equipped with telemetry and data is continuously downloaded, quality controlled, processed, and made available for online display via several CGI, Java, and Perl scripts (http://fluxlab.stfx.ca/fieldsites/). This small network is intended to be the beginning developments of a larger Ecoinformatics Network. This presentation will display early data from this network and summarize real-time modeling efforts. The high-frequency observations show extremely dynamic systems which demonstrate CO2 efflux dependency to temperature and other important environmental drivers; pronounced increases in CO2 efflux after rain; differences across spatial scales; and short-term lags in data owing to gas or thermal transport. Other measurement methods (i.e. chambers) may miss many of these short-term flux variations in the absence of continuous data collection. Intra-site temporal observations (at sub-meter scale) show that spatially variable fluxes have similar scales of amplitude variation. All sites seem to show similar scales of temporal variability but CO2 fluxes can lag between probes across various time scales. These results suggest that site variably may be captured by measurements at only a few representative locations with high temporal frequency. Observation efforts will continue to monitor over winter and will provide unique data measuring fluxes under the snow pack at the soil interface. A key goal of this Ecoinformatics Network system is to develop improved soil models

  19. CCD Observing and Dynamical Time Series Analysis of Active Galactic Nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Achotham Damodaran

    1995-01-01

    The properties, working and operations procedure of the Charge Coupled Device (CCD) at the 30" telescope at Rosemary Hill Observatory (RHO) are discussed together with the details of data reduction. Several nonlinear techniques of time series analysis, based on the behavior of the nearest neighbors, have been used to analyze the time series of the quasar 3C 345. A technique using Artificial Neural Networks based on prediction of the time series is used to study the dynamical properties of 3C 345. Finally, a heuristic model for variability of Active Galactic Nuclei is discussed.

  20. Estimating interevent time distributions from finite observation periods in communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelä, Mikko; Porter, Mason A.

    2015-11-01

    A diverse variety of processes—including recurrent disease episodes, neuron firing, and communication patterns among humans—can be described using interevent time (IET) distributions. Many such processes are ongoing, although event sequences are only available during a finite observation window. Because the observation time window is more likely to begin or end during long IETs than during short ones, the analysis of such data is susceptible to a bias induced by the finite observation period. In this paper, we illustrate how this length bias is born and how it can be corrected without assuming any particular shape for the IET distribution. To do this, we model event sequences using stationary renewal processes, and we formulate simple heuristics for determining the severity of the bias. To illustrate our results, we focus on the example of empirical communication networks, which are temporal networks that are constructed from communication events. The IET distributions of such systems guide efforts to build models of human behavior, and the variance of IETs is very important for estimating the spreading rate of information in networks of temporal interactions. We analyze several well-known data sets from the literature, and we find that the resulting bias can lead to systematic underestimates of the variance in the IET distributions and that correcting for the bias can lead to qualitatively different results for the tails of the IET distributions.

  1. AFM-TEM observations of effect of ``melt'' time on polytetrafluoroethylene morphology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalish, J. P.; Williams, R. A.; Wang, J.; Geil, P. H.; Long, T.-C.; Xu, P.

    2006-03-01

    TEM observations of PTFE dispersion particles dispersed on glass and held at 350 C or above for various times indicates that individual, > 0.1 mm long molecules wander individually on the substrate and can, with time in the ``melt,'' aggregate and form either flat-on or on-edge, folded chain single crystals. If ``trapped'' by cooling before aggregation, on-edge, single molecule, single crystals can form. All on-edge crystals, both individually and as the shish of shish-kebabs, have a ``double-striation'' appearance, suggested to arise from nucleation of the Pt/C shadowing material, used for the TEM image, on the folds at the top edge of the crystals. AFM observations have confirmed these suggestions and, furthermore, indicate the nascent, rod-like dispersion particles of a ``nano-emulsion,'' with a volume corresponding to a single molecule, have faceted ends. Combined with the TEM and ED observations that the molecular axis is parallel with the rod axis, not only must chain-folding occur during polymerization but the chain folds must be staggered on the end surfaces. P. H. Geil, et al., Adv. Polym. Sci., 180, 89 (2005).

  2. Estimating interevent time distributions from finite observation periods in communication networks.

    PubMed

    Kivelä, Mikko; Porter, Mason A

    2015-11-01

    A diverse variety of processes-including recurrent disease episodes, neuron firing, and communication patterns among humans-can be described using interevent time (IET) distributions. Many such processes are ongoing, although event sequences are only available during a finite observation window. Because the observation time window is more likely to begin or end during long IETs than during short ones, the analysis of such data is susceptible to a bias induced by the finite observation period. In this paper, we illustrate how this length bias is born and how it can be corrected without assuming any particular shape for the IET distribution. To do this, we model event sequences using stationary renewal processes, and we formulate simple heuristics for determining the severity of the bias. To illustrate our results, we focus on the example of empirical communication networks, which are temporal networks that are constructed from communication events. The IET distributions of such systems guide efforts to build models of human behavior, and the variance of IETs is very important for estimating the spreading rate of information in networks of temporal interactions. We analyze several well-known data sets from the literature, and we find that the resulting bias can lead to systematic underestimates of the variance in the IET distributions and that correcting for the bias can lead to qualitatively different results for the tails of the IET distributions.

  3. Teacher Effectiveness and Causal Inference in Observational Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Roderick A.

    2013-01-01

    An important target of education policy is to improve overall teacher effectiveness using evidence-based policies. Randomized control trials (RCTs), which randomly assign study participants or groups of participants to treatment and control conditions, are not always practical or possible and observational studies using rigorous quasi-experimental…

  4. PRECISE {gamma}-RAY TIMING AND RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF 17 FERMI {gamma}-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P. S.; Wolff, M. T.; Grove, J. E.; Gwon, C.; Kerr, M.; Parent, D.; Makeev, A.; Abdo, A. A.; Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kramer, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Rea, N.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Camilo, F.; Dormody, M.; Harding, A. K.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Michelson, P. F.

    2011-06-01

    We present precise phase-connected pulse timing solutions for 16 {gamma}-ray-selected pulsars recently discovered using the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope plus one very faint radio pulsar (PSR J1124-5916) that is more effectively timed with the LAT. We describe the analysis techniques including a maximum likelihood method for determining pulse times of arrival from unbinned photon data. A major result of this work is improved position determinations, which are crucial for multiwavelength follow-up. For most of the pulsars, we overlay the timing localizations on X-ray images from Swift and describe the status of X-ray counterpart associations. We report glitches measured in PSRs J0007+7303, J1124-5916, and J1813-1246. We analyze a new 20 ks Chandra ACIS observation of PSR J0633+0632 that reveals an arcminute-scale X-ray nebula extending to the south of the pulsar. We were also able to precisely localize the X-ray point source counterpart to the pulsar and find a spectrum that can be described by an absorbed blackbody or neutron star atmosphere with a hard power-law component. Another Chandra ACIS image of PSR J1732-3131 reveals a faint X-ray point source at a location consistent with the timing position of the pulsar. Finally, we present a compilation of new and archival searches for radio pulsations from each of the {gamma}-ray-selected pulsars as well as a new Parkes radio observation of PSR J1124-5916 to establish the {gamma}-ray to radio phase offset.

  5. WINDII observations and TIME-GCM simulations of O(1S) polar spirals during geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Gordon G.; Roble, Raymond G.; Cho, Young-Min

    2013-05-01

    daytime O(1S) emission at 557.7 nm observed at 250 km with the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) is dominantly excited by photoelectron impact on atomic oxygen, so the volume emission rate is normally a measure of the atomic oxygen concentration. Daily polar maps of the 250 km volume emission rate during geomagnetic disturbances display polar spirals extending out of the auroral region and down to the equator. Since the local time is fixed for a given latitude for a single day, the spiral maps form a spatio-temporal pattern in which the longitudinal variations cannot be distinguished from those in universal time. Simulations for 2 January 1993 implemented with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) using the equivalent satellite perspective show a remarkably similar spiral pattern. Hourly universal time simulations reveal a rapid equatorward expansion of the spirals during this modest geomagnetic event of Kp = 4.7, which are mirrored in the meridional and vertical winds. Simulations of the electron density show that the emission within the spirals is caused by the recombination of O2+ ions with electrons, and not the atomic oxygen enhancement itself. All of this strongly suggests that the spirals are in fact large-scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs), and comparisons of the WINDII data made with TID observations reported in the literature, including those made on the same day, support this conclusion. The TIME-GCM simulations suggest that a component of the spirals originates in the lower atmosphere and appears at thermospheric heights.

  6. Business list vs ground observation for measuring a food environment: saving time or waste of time (or worse)?

    PubMed

    Lucan, Sean C; Maroko, Andrew R; Bumol, Joel; Torrens, Luis; Varona, Monica; Berke, Ethan M

    2013-10-01

    In food-environment research, an alternative to resource-intensive direct observation on the ground has been the use of commercial business lists. We sought to determine how well a frequently used commercial business list measures a dense urban food environment like the Bronx, NY. On 155 Bronx street segments, investigators compared two different levels for matches between the business list and direct ground observation: lenient (by business type) and strict (by business name). For each level of matching, researchers calculated sensitivities and positive predictive values (PPVs) for the business list overall and by broad business categories: General Grocers (eg, supermarkets), Specialty Food Stores (eg, produce markets), Restaurants, and Businesses Not Primarily Selling Food (eg, newsstands). Even after cleaning the business list (eg, for cases of multiple listings at a single location), and allowing for inexactness in listed street addresses and spellings of business names, the overall performance of the business list was poor. For strict matches, the business list had an overall sensitivity of 39.3% and PPV of 45.5%. Sensitivities and PPVs by broad business categories were not meaningfully different from overall values, although sensitivity for General Grocers and PPV for Specialty Food Stores were particularly low: 26.2% and 32%, respectively. For lenient matches, sensitivities and PPVs were somewhat higher but still poor: 52.4% to 60% and 60% to 75%, respectively. The business list is inadequate to measure the actual food environment in the Bronx. If results represent performance in other settings, findings from prior studies linking food environments to diet and diet-related health outcomes using such business lists are in question, and future studies of this type should avoid relying solely on such business lists.

  7. Business list vs. ground observation for measuring a food environment: saving time or waste of time (or worse)?

    PubMed Central

    Lucan, Sean C.; Maroko, Andrew R.; Bumol, Joel; Torrens, Luis; Varona, Monica; Berke, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    In food-environment research, an alternative to resource-intensive direct observation on the ground has been the use of commercial business lists. We sought to determine how well a frequently-used commercial business list measures a dense urban food environment like the Bronx. On 155 Bronx street segments, investigators compared two different levels for “matches” between the business list and direct ground observation: lenient (by business type) and strict (by business name). For each level of matching, researchers calculated sensitivities and positive predictive values (PPVs) for the business list overall and by broad business categories: General grocers (e.g., supermarkets), Specialty-food stores (e.g., produce markets), Restaurants, and Businesses not primarily selling food (e.g., newsstands). Even after cleaning the business list (e.g., for cases of multiple listings at a single location), and allowing for inexactness in listed street addresses and spellings of business names, the overall performance of the business list was poor. For strict “matches”, the business list had an overall sensitivity of 39.3% and PPV of 45.5%. Sensitivities and PPVs by broad business categories were not meaningfully different from overall values, although sensitivity for General grocers and PPV for Specialty-food stores were particularly low: 26.2% and 32.0% respectively. For lenient “matches”, sensitivities and PPVs were somewhat higher but still poor: 52.4–60.0% and 60.0–75.0% respectively. The business list is inadequate to measures the actual food environment in the Bronx. If results represent performance in other settings, findings from prior studies linking food environments to diet and diet-related health outcomes using such business lists are in question, and future studies of this type should avoid relying solely on such business lists. PMID:23871107

  8. Active Bleeding after Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Observational Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Fellahi, Jean-Luc; Bertet, Héléna; Faucanie, Marie; Amour, Julien; Blanloeil, Yvonnick; Lanquetot, Hervé; Ouattara, Alexandre; Picot, Marie Christine

    2016-01-01

    Main Objectives To estimate the incidence of active bleeding after cardiac surgery (AB) based on a definition directly related on blood flow from chest drainage; to describe the AB characteristics and its management; to identify factors of postoperative complications. Methods AB was defined as a blood loss > 1.5 ml/kg/h for 6 consecutive hours within the first 24 hours or in case of reoperation for hemostasis during the first 12 postoperative hours. The definition was applied in a prospective longitudinal observational study involving 29 French centers; all adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were included over a 3-month period. Perioperative data (including blood product administration) were collected. To study possible variation in clinical practice among centers, patients were classified into two groups according to the AB incidence of the center compared to the overall incidence: “Low incidence” if incidence is lower and “High incidence” if incidence is equal or greater than overall incidence. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors of postoperative complications. Results Among 4,904 patients, 129 experienced AB (2.6%), among them 52 reoperation. Postoperative bleeding loss was 1,000 [820;1,375] ml and 1,680 [1,280;2,300] ml at 6 and 24 hours respectively. Incidence of AB varied between centers (0 to 16%) but was independent of in-centre cardiac surgical experience. Comparisons between groups according to AB incidence showed differences in postoperative management. Body surface area, preoperative creatinine, emergency surgery, postoperative acidosis and red blood cell transfusion were risk factors of postoperative complication. Conclusions A blood loss > 1.5 ml/kg/h for 6 consecutive hours within the first 24 hours or early reoperation for hemostasis seems a relevant definition of AB. This definition, independent of transfusion, adjusted to body weight, may assess real time bleeding occurring

  9. Observation of time-reversal violation in the B0 meson system.

    PubMed

    Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Voss, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Zambito, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Bernabeu, J; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Villanueva-Perez, P; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2012-11-21

    Although CP violation in the B meson system has been well established by the B factories, there has been no direct observation of time-reversal violation. The decays of entangled neutral B mesons into definite flavor states (B(0) or B(0)), and J/ψK(L)(0) or ccK(S)(0) final states (referred to as B(+) or B(-)), allow comparisons between the probabilities of four pairs of T-conjugated transitions, for example, B(0) → B(-) and B(-) → B(0), as a function of the time difference between the two B decays. Using 468 × 10(6) BB pairs produced in Υ(4S) decays collected by the BABAR detector at SLAC, we measure T-violating parameters in the time evolution of neutral B mesons, yielding ΔS(T)(+) = -1.37 ± 0.14(stat) ± 0.06(syst) and ΔS(T)(-) = 1.17 ± 0.18(stat) ± 0.11(syst). These nonzero results represent the first direct observation of T violation through the exchange of initial and final states in transitions that can only be connected by a T-symmetry transformation.

  10. On the non-equivalence of observables in phase-space reconstructions from recorded time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letellier, C.; Maquet, J.; LeSceller, L.; Gouesbet, G.; Aguirre, L. A.

    1998-10-01

    In practical problems of phase-space reconstruction, it is usually the case that the reconstruction is much easier using a particular recorded scalar variable. This seems to contradict the general belief that all variables of a dynamical system are equivalent in phase-space reconstruction problems. This paper will argue that, in many cases, the choice of a particular scalar time series from which to reconstruct the original dynamics could be critical. It is argued that different dynamical variables do not provide the same level of information (observability) of the underlying dynamics and, as a consequence, the quality of a global reconstruction critically depends on the recorded variable. Examples in which the choice of observables is critical are discussed and the level of information contained in a given variable is quantified in the case where the original system is known. A clear example of such a situation arises in the Rössler system for which the performance of a global vector field reconstruction technique is investigated using time series of variables x, y or z, taken one at a time.

  11. Titan through the time of Cassini: a database of VIMS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penteado, Paulo

    2010-04-01

    Since Cassini's arrival at Saturn, VIMS has recorded over 104 cubes, containing over 10^7 spectra. This still increasing amount of observations precludes direct inspection of all data, either to select the observations, or to identify the occurrence and time variation of specific spectral or spatial features. Additionally, many VIMS observations are taken as a large number of cubes with small spatial extent, which cannot be meaningfully visualized without assembling mosaics. This work presents titan_browse, a tool developed to deal with these difficulties. Titan_browse comprises both a database of observations, and a visualization tool to inspect them. The database contains every VIMS observation of Titan in the PDS archive, and provides a flexible query system, which can select individual cubes or spatial pixels based on arbitrary functions of the instrumental or photometric data. Once observations are selected, titan_browse can be used to directly inspect them, through mosaics in several map projections, or displaying images of selected bands, or spectra of selected spatial pixels. This allows users to interactively explore the data, to refine queries to obtain those most useful to the intended analysis. The selected cubes or spectra can them be directly exported from the database, either to an IDL session, or to files (one format being the original cubes, in ISIS format). The cubes used in the database were processed to contain more geometric information than either the original PDS files or those that are produced by the VIMS pipeline, including the coordinates of the edges of each spatial pixel (necessary for precise mosaics), and more information on the illumination angles (to aid in analyses of specular reflections). This version of the titan_browse is a complete reimplementation of its previous titan_browse, to overcome the previous coverage and performance limitations, and is the first to be made publicly available.

  12. Extreme wave analysis in the space-time domain: from observations to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbariol, Francesco; Alves, Jose-Henrique; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bergamasco, Filippo; Carniel, Sandro; Chao, Yung Y.; Chawla, Arun; Ricchi, Antonio; Sclavo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of extreme waves is one of the most dangerous marine hazards and one of the most challenging sea surface phenomena to be understood. Many severe accidents and casualties at sea are ascribed to the occurrence of abnormally high waves. Despite significant efforts to investigate their occurrence, up to now research has not yet provided exhaustive experimental and theoretical frameworks able to fully explain the development of extremely large waves (i.e. waves that are outlier from standard wave statistics). Recently, relying on the stereo-photogrammetric instrumentation known as "Wave Acquisition Stereo System", it was observed that the number of waves that can be labeled as "freak" increases significantly if the domain of observation is extended from the time (i.e. the classical point time series), to the space-time (i.e. a time sequence of sea surface snapshots covering an area). The empirical statistics of such extremely high waves gathered during a sea state over an area, outlying standard linear and nonlinear extreme value models, have been found in fair agreement with a statistical model accounting for the probability of a maximum crest height occurring in a space-time domain of given size. This model, developed by Fedele (2012) and extended to second order nonlinear waves by Benetazzo et al (2015), relies upon the Euler Characteristics approach of Adler and Taylor (2007), and upon the knowledge of kinematic and geometric properties of the sea state that can be obtained from the directional spectrum of the sea surface. Therefore, new efforts have been put on applying this approach to provide an interpretation of the occurrence of extreme crest heights in sea states, observed via stereo photography. Results have allowed the development of applications in ocean engineering and weather forecasting. In the former, the statistical model of Fedele has been used to investigate the role of metocean forcings on the space-time extremes of sea states. To

  13. A photonic microscope for observing real-time vibrations of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Arthur W.; Zhang, Mian; Wiederhecker, Gustavo; Lipson, Michal; McEuen, Paul L.

    Vibrational modes in suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are incredibly responsive to small forces, which makes them a prime candidate as nano-mechanical sensors. However, transducing this mechanical motion into detectable signals is a considerable challenge. Electrical detection, which has been the prevailing method thus far, suffers a significant impedance mismatch to macroscopic electronics and is thus susceptible to noise. We demonstrate an alternative: optical readout of CNT vibrations in real-time. By combining a unique CNT microtweezer platform with a high-finesse optical microdisk resonator, we dramatically enhance the naturally small optical cross-section of CNTs and thereby achieve unprecedented detection sensitivity. With this novel photonic microscope, we directly measure the thermal Brownian motion of CNTs and observe marked spectral diffusion at room temperature, shedding light on CNTs unique thermal physics. By further enhancing the optical coupling, we demonstrate optical amplification of CNT vibrations and directly observe period-doubling in the amplified state.

  14. Noctilucent clouds observed from the ground: sensitivity to mesospheric parameters and long-term time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertsev, Nikolay; Dalin, Peter; Perminov, Vladimir; Romejko, Vitaly; Dubietis, Audrius; Balčiunas, Ričardas; Černis, Kazimieras; Zalcik, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Long-term systematic observations of noctilucent clouds in the regions of Moscow (Russia), Vilnius (Lithuania), and La Ronge (Canada) are considered. Variables, describing the seasonal activity of noctilucent clouds, are discussed. It is shown that there are no statistically significant trends within time intervals of several recent decades. This result is compared to other known findings on trends in mesospheric clouds. Based on the data of the modern ground-based noctilucent cloud observing network in the northern hemisphere and simultaneous satellite data on mesospheric temperature and humidity, we estimate sensitivity of noctilucent clouds to the relative humidity of the upper mesosphere. Such an approach allows us to discuss possible changes of the upper-mesospheric relative humidity, which are consistent with a zero secular trend in noctilucent cloud activity.

  15. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: VII. Potentially interesting candidate systems from Fourier-based statistical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through Quarter six (Q6) of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  16. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VI. POTENTIALLY INTERESTING CANDIDATE SYSTEMS FROM FOURIER-BASED STATISTICAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David G.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Seader, Shawn; Twicken, Joseph D.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Welsh, William F.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Ciardi, David R.; Prsa, Andrej

    2012-09-10

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through quarter six of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  17. Genetically encoded sensors enable real-time observation of metabolite production

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jameson K.; Church, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Engineering cells to produce valuable metabolic products is hindered by the slow and laborious methods available for evaluating product concentration. Consequently, many designs go unevaluated, and the dynamics of product formation over time go unobserved. In this work, we develop a framework for observing product formation in real time without the need for sample preparation or laborious analytical methods. We use genetically encoded biosensors derived from small-molecule responsive transcription factors to provide a fluorescent readout that is proportional to the intracellular concentration of a target metabolite. Combining an appropriate biosensor with cells designed to produce a metabolic product allows us to track product formation by observing fluorescence. With individual cells exhibiting fluorescent intensities proportional to the amount of metabolite they produce, high-throughput methods can be used to rank the quality of genetic variants or production conditions. We observe production of several renewable plastic precursors with fluorescent readouts and demonstrate that higher fluorescence is indeed an indicator of higher product titer. Using fluorescence as a guide, we identify process parameters that produce 3-hydroxypropionate at 4.2 g/L, 23-fold higher than previously reported. We also report, to our knowledge, the first engineered route from glucose to acrylate, a plastic precursor with global sales of $14 billion. Finally, we monitor the production of glucarate, a replacement for environmentally damaging detergents, and muconate, a renewable precursor to polyethylene terephthalate and nylon with combined markets of $51 billion, in real time, demonstrating that our method is applicable to a wide range of molecules. PMID:26858408

  18. Real-time characterization of partially observed epidemics using surrogate models.

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, Cosmin; Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia; Crary, David; Sargsyan, Khachik; Cheng, Karen

    2011-09-01

    We present a statistical method, predicated on the use of surrogate models, for the 'real-time' characterization of partially observed epidemics. Observations consist of counts of symptomatic patients, diagnosed with the disease, that may be available in the early epoch of an ongoing outbreak. Characterization, in this context, refers to estimation of epidemiological parameters that can be used to provide short-term forecasts of the ongoing epidemic, as well as to provide gross information on the dynamics of the etiologic agent in the affected population e.g., the time-dependent infection rate. The characterization problem is formulated as a Bayesian inverse problem, and epidemiological parameters are estimated as distributions using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, thus quantifying the uncertainty in the estimates. In some cases, the inverse problem can be computationally expensive, primarily due to the epidemic simulator used inside the inversion algorithm. We present a method, based on replacing the epidemiological model with computationally inexpensive surrogates, that can reduce the computational time to minutes, without a significant loss of accuracy. The surrogates are created by projecting the output of an epidemiological model on a set of polynomial chaos bases; thereafter, computations involving the surrogate model reduce to evaluations of a polynomial. We find that the epidemic characterizations obtained with the surrogate models is very close to that obtained with the original model. We also find that the number of projections required to construct a surrogate model is O(10)-O(10{sup 2}) less than the number of samples required by the MCMC to construct a stationary posterior distribution; thus, depending upon the epidemiological models in question, it may be possible to omit the offline creation and caching of surrogate models, prior to their use in an inverse problem. The technique is demonstrated on synthetic data as well as observations from

  19. Modeling time to detection for observers searching for targets in cluttered backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruda, Harald; Snorrason, Magnus

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to provide a model for the average time to detection for observers searching for targets in photo-realistic images of cluttered scenes. The proposed model builds on previous work that constructs a fixation probability map (FPM) from the image. This FPM is constructed from bottom- up features, such as local contrast, but also includes top- down cognitive effects, such as the location of the horizon. The FPM is used to generate a set of conspicuous points that are likely to be fixation points, along with initial probabilities of fixation. These points are used to assemble fixation sequences. The order of these fixations is clearly crucial for determining the time to fixation. Recognizing that different observers (unconsciously) choose different orderings of the conspicuous points, the present model performs a Monte- Carlo simulation to find the probability of fixating each conspicuous point at each position in the sequence. The three main assumptions of this model are: the observer can only attend to the area of the image being fixated, each fixation has an approximately constant duration, and there is a short term memory for the locations of previous fixation points. This fixation point memory is an essential feature of the model, and the memory decay constant is a parameter of the model. Simulations show that the average time to fixation for a given conspicuous point in the image depends on the distribution of other conspicuous points. This is true even if the initial probability of fixation for a given point is the same across distributions, and only the initial probability of fixation of the other points is distributed differently.

  20. Observations of Time Variable Magnitude Events of Phoebe, Ariel, and Titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Charles; Chanover, N. J.; Holtzman, J. A.; Verbiscer, A. J.

    2007-10-01

    Visual observations of Saturn's moon Phoebe and Uranus' moons Ariel and Titania were made from the Apache Point Observatory (APO). Phoebe was observed with the APO 1 meter telescope over a two month period from 06 January to 04 March 2005, bracketing the zero-phase opposition on 13 January 2005. Phoebe was observed at Sun-Phoebe-Earth phase angles as low as 0.05 degrees on consecutive nights immediately before and after opposition in V, B, R, and I filters. Light curves of the opposition surge, the brightness increase that occurs as the phase angle drops below 0.10 degrees, are presented from this data. The data were processed using standard IRAF aperture photometry image processing techniques. The magnitude and duration of the opposition surge provide clues about the grain size of surface particles on Phoebe. Observations were also made of Uranian moons during mutual occultations in August 2007. Mutual satellite occultations are taking place throughout 2007 as Uranus passes through its equinox, which occurs once every 42 years. The timing and flux variation of satellite occultations provide a check on the accuracy of satellite orbital models. Light curves for Ariel and Titania in R and I filters as they are occulted by Umbriel are presented from data acquired with the APO 1 meter and 3.5 meter telescopes. Comparison is made to the predicted total flux reduction and event timing for each occultation as calculated by the Institut de Mecanique Celeste et de Calcul des Ephemerides (IMCCE) and implications of the results on determination of the relative orbital inclinations of Umbriel, Ariel, and Titania are discussed. This work was supported by an NMSU Space and Aerospace Research Cluster Graduate Fellowship .

  1. Real-time observation of interference between atomic one-electron and two-electron excitations.

    PubMed

    Geiseler, Henning; Rottke, Horst; Zhavoronkov, Nickolai; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2012-03-23

    We present results of real-time tracking of atomic two-electron dynamics in an autoionizing transient wave packet in krypton. A coherent superposition of two Fano resonances is excited with a femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulse. The evolution of the corresponding wave packet is subsequently probed with a delayed infrared pulse. In our specific case, we get access to the interference between one- and two-electron excitation channels in the launched wave packet, which is superimposed on its decay through autoionization. A simple model is able to account for the observed dynamical evolution of this wave packet.

  2. RXTE Observations of A1744-361: Correlated Spectral and Timing Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Swank, Jean H.; Markwardt, Craig B.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA) data of the transient low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) system A1744-361. We explore the X-ray intensity and spectral evolution of the source, perform timing analysis, and find that A1744-361 is a weak LMXB, that shows atoll behavior at high intensity states. The color-color diagram indicates that this LMXB was observed in a low intensity spectrally hard (low-hard) state and in a high intensity banana state. The low-hard state shows a horizontal pattern in the color-color diagram, and the previously reported dipper QPO appears only during this state. We also perform energy spectral analyses, and report the first detection of broad iron emission line and iron absorption edge from A1744-361.

  3. Avoidance tests with earthworms and springtails: defining the minimum exposure time to observe a significant response.

    PubMed

    Natal-da-Luz, Tiago; Amorim, Mónica J B; Römbke, Jörg; Sousa, José Paulo

    2008-10-01

    Based on the ability of organisms to avoid contaminated soils, avoidance tests have a great potential as early screening tools in lower tier levels of ERA schemes. Aiming at their standardization, the definition of the minimum exposure time necessary to observe an avoidance response to a contaminant is needed. To fill this gap, avoidance tests with earthworms (Eisenia andrei) and springtails (Folsomia candida), comparing distinct time periods (from 1-7 to 1-14 days, respectively), were performed using the artificial OECD soil and reference chemicals for each test organism. Results showed that for both organisms a clear response within 24 h of exposure can be obtained. This rapid response enhances the utility of the test for "on site" analysis to evaluate contaminated sites.

  4. POD experiments using real and simulated time-sharing observations for GEO satellites in C-band transfer ranging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fen, Cao; XuHai, Yang; ZhiGang, Li; ChuGang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    The normal consecutive observing model in Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS) can only supply observations of one GEO satellite in 1 day from one station. However, this can't satisfy the project need for observing many GEO satellites in 1 day. In order to obtain observations of several GEO satellites in 1 day like GPS/GLONASS/Galileo/BeiDou, the time-sharing observing model for GEO satellites in CAPS needs research. The principle of time-sharing observing model is illuminated with subsequent Precise Orbit Determination (POD) experiments using simulated time-sharing observations in 2005 and the real time-sharing observations in 2015. From time-sharing simulation experiments before 2014, the time-sharing observing 6 GEO satellites every 2 h has nearly the same orbit precision with the consecutive observing model. From POD experiments using the real time-sharing observations, POD precision for ZX12# and Yatai7# are about 3.234 m and 2.570 m, respectively, which indicates the time-sharing observing model is appropriate for CBTR system and can realize observing many GEO satellites in 1 day.

  5. Observational and numerical studies of extreme frontal scale contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven E.

    1995-01-01

    The general objective of this effort is to increase understanding of how frontal scale contraction processes may create and sustain intense mesoscale precipitation along intensifying cold fronts. The five-part project (an expansion of the originally proposed two-part project) employed conventional meteorological data, special mesoscale data, remote sensing measurements, and various numerical models. First an idealized hydrostatic modeling study of the scale contraction effects of differential cloud cover on low-level frontal structure and dynamics was completed and published in a peer-reviewed journal. The second objective was to complete and publish the results from a three dimensional numerical model simulation of a cold front in which differential sensible heating related to cloud coverage patterns was apparently crucial in the formation of a severe frontal squall line. The third objective was to use a nonhydrostatic model to examine the nonlinear interactions between the transverse circulation arising from inhomogeneous cloud cover, the adiabatic frontal circulation related to semi-geostrophic forcing, and diabatic effects related to precipitation processes, in the development of a density current-like microstructure at the leading edge of cold fronts. Although the development of a frontal model that could be used to initialize such a primitive equation model was begun, we decided to focus our efforts instead on a project that could be successfully completed in this short time, due to the lack of prospects for continued NASA funding beyond this first year (our proposal was not accepted for future funding). Thus, a fourth task was added, which was to use the nonhydrostatic model to test tentative hypotheses developed from the most detailed observations ever obtained on a density current (primarily sodar and wind profiler data). These simulations were successfully completed, the findings were reported at a scientific conference, and the results have recently been

  6. Real time observation and automated measurement of red blood cells agglutination inside a passive microfluidic biochip containing embedded reagents.

    PubMed

    Huet, Maxime; Cubizolles, Myriam; Buhot, Arnaud

    2016-09-20

    The process of agglutination is commonly used for the detection of biomarkers like proteins or viruses. The multiple bindings between micrometer sized particles, either latex beads or red blood cells (RBCs), create aggregates that are easily detectable and give qualitative information about the presence of the biomarkers. In most cases, the detection is made by simple naked-eye observation of agglutinates without any access to the kinetics of agglutination. In this study, we address the development of a real-time time observation of RBCs agglutination. Using ABO blood typing as a proof-of-concept, we developed i) an integrated biological protocol suitable for further use as point-of-care (POC) analysis and ii) two dedicated image processing algorithms for the real-time and quantitative measurement of agglutination. Anti-A or anti-B typing reagents were dried inside the microchannel of a passive microfluidic chip designed to enhance capillary flow. A blood drop deposit at the tip of the biochip established a simple biological protocol. In situ agglutination of autologous RBCs was achieved by means of embedded reagents and real time agglutination process was monitored by video recording. Using a training set of 24 experiments, two real-time indicators based on correlation and variance of gray levels were optimized and then further confirmed on a validation set. 100% correct discrimination between positive and negative agglutinations was performed within less than 2min by measuring real-time evolution of both correlation and variance indicators.

  7. Early-time observations of gamma-ray burst error boxes with the Livermore optical transient imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G G

    2000-08-01

    Despite the enormous wealth of gamma-ray burst (GRB) data collected over the past several years the physical mechanism which causes these extremely powerful phenomena is still unknown. Simultaneous and early time optical observations of GRBs will likely make an great contribution t o our understanding. LOTIS is a robotic wide field-of-view telescope dedicated to the search for prompt and early-time optical afterglows from gamma-ray bursts. LOTIS began routine operations in October 1996 and since that time has responded to over 145 gamma-ray burst triggers. Although LOTIS has not yet detected prompt optical emission from a GRB its upper limits have provided constraints on the theoretical emission mechanisms. Super-LOTIS, also a robotic wide field-of-view telescope, can detect emission 100 times fainter than LOTIS is capable of detecting. Routine observations from Steward Observatory's Kitt Peak Station will begin in the immediate future. During engineering test runs under bright skies from the grounds of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Super-LOTIS provided its first upper limits on the early-time optical afterglow of GRBs. This dissertation provides a summary of the results from LOTIS and Super-LOTIS through the time of writing. Plans for future studies with both systems are also presented.

  8. On the probability of violations of Fourier's law for heat flow in small systems observed for short times.

    PubMed

    Evans, Denis J; Searles, Debra J; Williams, Stephen R

    2010-01-14

    We study the statistical mechanics of thermal conduction in a classical many-body system that is in contact with two thermal reservoirs maintained at different temperatures. The ratio of the probabilities, that when observed for a finite time, the time averaged heat flux flows in and against the direction required by Fourier's Law for heat flow, is derived from first principles. This result is obtained using the transient fluctuation theorem. We show that the argument of that theorem, namely, the dissipation function is, close to equilibrium, equal to a microscopic expression for the entropy production. We also prove that if transient time correlation functions of smooth zero mean variables decay to zero at long times, the system will relax to a unique nonequilibrium steady state, and for this state, the thermal conductivity must be positive. Our expressions are tested using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat flow between thermostated walls.

  9. Observing molecular dynamics with time-resolved 3D momentum imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, F. P.; Wright, T.; Bocharova, I.; Ray, D.; Shivaram, N.; Cryan, J.; Belkacem, A.; Weber, T.; Dörner, R.

    2014-05-01

    Photo-excitation and ionization trigger rich dynamics in molecular systems which play a key role in many important processes in nature such as vision, photosynthesis or photoprotection. Observing those reactions in real-time without significantly disturbing the molecules by a strong electric field has been a great challenge. Recent experiments using Time-of-Flight and Velocity Map Imaging techniques have revealed important information on the dynamics of small molecular systems upon photo-excitation. We have developed an apparatus for time-resolved momentum imaging of electrons and ions in all three spatial dimensions that employs two-color femtosecond laser pulses in the vacuum and extreme ultraviolet (VUV, XUV) for probing molecular dynamics. Our COLTRIMS style reaction microscope can measure electrons and ions in coincidence and reconstruct the momenta of the reaction fragments in 3D. We use a high power 800 nm laser in a loose focusing geometry gas cell to efficinetly drive High Harmonic Generation. The resulting photon flux is sufficient to perform 2-photon pump-probe experiments using VUV and XUV pulses for both pump and probe. With this setup we investigate non-Born-Oppenheimer dynamics in small molecules such as C2H4 and CO2 on a femtosecond time scale. Supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences division of BES/DOE.

  10. Observations of near-inertial surface currents off Oregon: Decorrelation time and length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Yong; Kosro, P. Michael

    2013-07-01

    High-resolution (km in space and hourly in time) surface currents observed by an array of high-frequency radars off Oregon are analyzed to quantify the decorrelation time and length scales of their near-inertial motions. The near-inertial surface currents are dominantly clockwise with amplitudes of 9-12 cm s-1. However, they appear asymmetric and elliptical as a result of counterclockwise inertial motions with magnitudes in a range of 2-5 cm s-1. The decorrelation time and length scales are computed from the decay slope of the near-inertial peak and the spatial coherence in the near-inertial frequency band, respectively. Decorrelation time scales of clockwise near-inertial motions increase from 2 days nearshore (within 30 km from the coast) to 6 days offshore, and their length scales increase from 30 to 90 km seaward possibly due to coastal inhibition. The local spatial coherence has an exponentially decaying structure for both clockwise and counterclockwise rotations, and their phases propagate northwestward (offshore) for clockwise and northeastward (onshore) for counterclockwise rotations.

  11. Boson peak in supercooled liquids: Time domain observations and mode coupling theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cang, Hu; Li, Jie; Andersen, Hans C.; Fayer, M. D.

    2005-08-01

    Optical heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) experiments are presented for the supercooled liquid acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin - ASP). The ASP data and previously published OHD-OKE data on supercooled dibutylphthalate (DBP) display highly damped oscillations with a periods of ˜2ps as the temperature is reduced to and below the mode coupling theory (MCT) temperature TC. The oscillations become more pronounced below TC. The oscillations can be interpreted as the time domain signature of the boson peak. Recently a schematic MCT model, the Sjögren model, was used to describe the OHD-OKE data for a number of supercooled liquids by Götze and Sperl [W. Götze and M. Sperl, Phys. Rev. E 92, 105701 (2004)], but the short-time and low-temperature behaviors were not addressed. Franosch et al. [T. Franosch, W. Gotze, M. R. Mayr, and A. P. Singh, Phys. Rev. E 55, 3183 (1997)] found that the Sjögren model could describe the boson peak observed by depolarized light-scattering (DLS) experiments on glycerol. The OHD-OKE experiment measures a susceptibility that is a time domain equivalent of the spectrum measured in DLS. Here we present a detailed analysis of the ASP and DBP data over a broad range of times and temperatures using the Sjögren model. The MCT schematic model is able to describe the data very well at all temperatures and relevant time scales. The trajectory of MCT parameters that fit the high-temperature data (no short-time oscillations) when continued below TC results in calculations that reproduce the oscillations seen in the data. The results indicate that increasing translational-rotational coupling is responsible for the appearance of the boson peak as the temperature approaches and drops below TC.

  12. Real-Time Ada Problem Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-24

    define this set of problems. The authors were chosen because of their proven expertise in real-time development with Ada. They could enrich the results of...for Real-Time Embedded Systems". LabTek Corporation, the author , had proven expertise in embedded system design utilizing Motorola MC680XO- based...processors. The second report is entitledSoftware Enineering Problems Using Ada in Computers Integral to Weapons Systems. Its author , Sonicraft, had

  13. Observations of Real-Time Captioning in the Elementary English Language Learner Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingraham, Nissa

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study reviews the effects of real-time captioning on vocabulary acquisition of a novice elementary English language learner (ELL). Triangulation of data was completed through review of teacher journaling, captioning transcripts, and student pretest and posttest assessments. Results illuminate improved retention and usage of…

  14. National Positioning, Navigation, and Timing Architecture Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dyke, K.; Vicario, J.; Hothem, L.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of the National Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT) Architecture effort is to help guide future PNT system-of-systems investment and implementation decisions. The Assistant Secretary of Defense for Networks and Information Integration and the Under Secretary of Transportation for Policy sponsored a National PNT Architecture study to provide more effective and efficient PNT capabilities focused on the 2025 timeframe and an evolutionary path for government provided systems and services. U.S. Space-Based PNT Policy states that the U.S. must continue to improve and maintain GPS, augmentations to GPS, and back-up capabilities to meet growing national, homeland, and economic security needs. PNT touches almost every aspect of people´s lives today. PNT is essential for Defense and Civilian applications ranging from the Department of Defense´s Joint network centric and precision operations to the transportation and telecommunications sectors, improving efficiency, increasing safety, and being more productive. Absence of an approved PNT architecture results in uncoordinated research efforts, lack of clear developmental paths, potentially wasteful procurements and inefficient deployment of PNT resources. The national PNT architecture effort evaluated alternative future mixes of global (space and non space-based) and regional PNT solutions, PNT augmentations, and autonomous PNT capabilities to address priorities identified in the DoD PNT Joint Capabilities Document (JCD) and civil equivalents. The path to achieving the Should-Be architecture is described by the National PNT Architecture's Guiding Principles, representing an overarching Vision of the US' role in PNT, an architectural Strategy to fulfill that Vision, and four Vectors which support the Strategy. The National PNT Architecture effort has developed nineteen recommendations. Five foundational recommendations are tied directly to the Strategy while the remaining fourteen individually support one of

  15. Observation of Markarian 421 in TeV Gamma Rays Over a 14-Year Time Span

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acciari, V. A.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; McEnery, Julie E.

    2013-01-01

    The variability of the blazar Markarian 421 in TeV gamma rays over a 14-year time period has been explored with theWhipple 10 m telescope. It is shown that the dynamic range of its flux variations is large and similar to that in X-rays. A correlation between the X-ray and TeV energy bands is observed during some bright flares and when the complete data sets are binned on long timescales. The main database consists of 878.4 hours of observation with theWhipple telescope, spread over 783 nights. The peak energy response of the telescope was 400 GeV with 20% uncertainty. This is the largest database of any TeV-emitting active galactic nucleus (AGN) and hence was used to explore the variability profile of Markarian 421. The time-averaged flux from Markarian 421 over this period was 0.446+/-0.008 Crab flux units. The flux exceeded 10 Crab flux units on three separate occasions. For the 2000-2001 season the average flux reached 1.86 Crab units, while in the 1996-1997 season the average flux was only 0.23 Crab units.

  16. FUSE Observations of Jovian Aurora at the Time of the New Horizons Flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, P. D.; Weaver, H. A.; Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Strobel, D. F.; Stern, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    At the time of the New Horizons flyby of Jupiter on 28 February 2007, there was a five-day window of opportunity during which the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), despite the loss of three of its four reaction wheels, could be stably pointed at Jupiter's position on the sky. FUSE was an orbiting spectroscopic observatory capable of spectral resolution better than 0.4~Å for extended sources in the wavelength range 905--1187~Å, together with very high sensitivity to weak emissions. Three orbits of observations were obtained in a point-and-stare mode beginning at 16:50 UT on 02 March 2007 of which for the first two the FUSE 30" × 30" aperture was centered on the north polar aurora. During each orbit the count rate was constant with time indicating that the target remained fully in the aperture during the entire exposure. These spectra will be compared with those obtained by FUSE in October 2000, December 2000, and January 2001, in terms of FUV luminosity and derived H2 vibrational population. We will also place these data in the context of the ultraviolet images obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope one Jovian rotation before and one after the FUSE observations.

  17. DEMETER Observations of Ionospheric Heating Time Constants Above the NWC VLF Transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. F.; Graf, K. L.; Inan, U. S.; Parrot, M.

    2011-12-01

    As demonstrated by recent DEMETER observations, intense 19.8 kHz VLF signals from the powerful (1 MW) NWC transmitter in Australia significantly heat the overlying ionosphere and produce significant changes in local electron and ion density and temperature at 700 km altitude [Parrot et al., 2007]. These changes are accompanied by a unique VLF plasma wave structure covering a 5 to 10 kHz band below the NWC signals and by quasi-electrostatic ELF turbulence. In order to determine the heating and cooling time constants of this effect, a campaign was carried out in which the NWC transmitter was programed to transmit a single CW pulse of 2 second duration every 10 seconds during periods in which the DEMETER spacecraft passed over the transmitter location. The data from this campaign show that the time constant for production of the unique VLF plasma wave structure and the quasi-electrostatic ELF turbulence ranged from 100 to 300 msec. However significant changes in electron and ion density and temperature during the 2 second pulses occurred only sporadically. This result suggests that small scale ( 10-100 m) plasma density irregularities are produced quickly by the heating pulses, but larger scale irregularities take significantly longer than 2 seconds to develop. We discuss the observations obtained during the campaign and the physical mechanisms involved in the heating process.

  18. TEMPORAL SIGNATURES OF AIR QUALITY OBSERVATIONS AND MODEL OUTPUTS: DO TIME SERIES DECOMPOSITION METHODS CAPTURE RELEVANT TIME SCALES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time series decomposition methods were applied to meteorological and air quality data and their numerical model estimates. Decomposition techniques express a time series as the sum of a small number of independent modes which hypothetically represent identifiable forcings, thereb...

  19. Time-Variable Gravity from Space: Quarter Century of Observations, Mysteries, and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2003-01-01

    Any large mass transport in the Earth system produces changes in the gravity field. Via the space geodetic technique of satellite-laser ranging in the last quarter century, the Earth s dynamic oblateness J2 (the lowest-degree harmonic component of the gravity field) has been observed to undergo a slight decrease - until around 1998, when it switched quite suddenly to an increase trend which has continued to date. The secular decrease in J2 has long been attributed primarily to the post-glacial rebound in the mantle; the present increase signifies an even larger change in global mass distribution whose J2 effect overshadows that of the post-glacial rebound, at least over interannual timescales. Intriguing evidences have been found in the ocean water distribution, especially in the extratropical Pacific basins, that may be responsible for this 52 change. New techniques based on satellite-to-satellite tracking will yield greatly improved observations for time-variable gravity, with much higher precision and spatial resolution @e., much higher harmonic degrees). The most important example is the GRACE mission launched in March 2002, following the success of the CHAMP mission. Such observations are becoming a new and powerful tool for remote sensing of geophysical fluid processes that involve larger-scale mass transports.

  20. Three Dimensional Structure and Time Evolution of a Transition Region Explosive Event Observed in He II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, J. L.; Kankelborg, C. C.; Thomas, R. J.; Longcope, D.

    2007-12-01

    Transition Region Explosive Events (TREEs) have been observed with slit spectrographs since at least 1975, most commonly in lines of C IV (1548A,1550A) and Si IV (1393A, 1402A). We report what we believe to be the first observation of a TREE in He II 304A. With the MOSES sounding rocket, a novel type of imaging spectrograph, we are able to see the spatial and spectral structure of the event. It consists of a bright core expelling two jets, oppositely directed but not collinear, which curve away from the axis of the core. The jets have both line-of-sight and sky-plane motion. The core is a region of high non-thermal doppler broadening, characteristic of TREEs. It is possible to resolve the core broadening into red and blue line-of-sight components. MOSES captured approximately 150 sec of time evolution before the rocket flight ended. We see the beginning (core activation) and middle (jet ejection), but not the end. It is clear from our data-set that TREEs in He II 304A are much less common than observed in other wavelengths.

  1. Time-Variable Gravity from Space: Quarter Century of Observations, Mysteries, and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Boy, John-Paul

    2003-01-01

    Any large mass transport in the Earth system produces changes in the gravity field. Via the space geodetic technique of satellite-laser ranging in the last quarter century, the Earth's dynamic oblateness J2 (the lowest-degree harmonic component of the gravity field) has been observed to undergo a slight decrease -- until around 1998, when it switched quite suddenly to an increase trend which has continued to 2001 before sharply turning back to the value which it is "supposed to be"!. The secular decrease in J2 has long been attributed primarily to the post-glacial rebound in the mantle; the present increase signifies an even larger change in global mass distribution whose J2 effect overshadows that of the post-glacial rebound, at least over interannual timescales. Intriguing evidences have been found in the ocean water distribution, especially in the extratropical Pacific basins, that may be responsible for this J2 change. New techniques based on satellite-to-satellite tracking will yield greatly improved observations for time-variable gravity, with much higher precision and spatial resolution (i.e., much higher harmonic degrees). The most important example is the GRACE mission launched in March 2002, following the success of the CHAMP mission. Such observations are becoming a new and powerful tool for remote sensing of geophysical fluid processes that involve larger-scale mass transports.

  2. Undulations on the equatorward edge of the diffuse proton aurora: TIMED/GUVI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L. J.; Morrison, D.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Kil, H.; Wolven, B.; Meng, C.-I.; Christensen, A. B.

    2005-08-01

    Undulations on the equatorward edge of the diffuse proton aurora have been identified by using TIMED/GUVI auroral images in the far ultraviolet wavelengths. While undulations have been previously reported on the duskside (Lui et al., 1982), GUVI observations show the undulation also occurs in the dayside, nightside, and morningside. The GUVI proton auroral images provide direct optical evidence that the undulations occur in the proton aurora. It is also the first detection of the undulation in the dayside indicating strong convection shear in the region. The undulation in the nightside, a wavy structure in the whole diffuse proton aurora, is significantly different from those in the duskside and dayside. While almost all of the undulation events are observed during magnetic storms (Dst < -60 nT), one exceptional case shows undulation in the dayside with Dst = 30 nT. However, the case is associated with a large solar wind speed (650 km/s) and a high dynamic pressure (14 nPa). Coincident DMSP SSIES observations suggest that both large ion drift velocity (>1000 m/s) and strong velocity shear (>0.1 s-1) within the diffuse aurora oval are necessary conditions for the undulation to occur. The SSIES data also indicate the areas with large ion drift velocity and shear move to higher latitudes in the MLT sectors toward midnight. This may explain why the undulation is rarely detected in the nightside.

  3. Overland flow dynamics through visual observation using time-lapse photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silasari, Rasmiaditya; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Overland flow process on agricultural land is important to be investigated as it affects the stream discharge and water quality assessment. During rainfall events the formation of overland flow may happen through different processes (i.e. Hortonian or saturation excess overland flow) based on the governing soil hydraulic parameters (i.e. soil infiltration rate, soil water capacity). The dynamics of the soil water state and the processes will affect the surface runoff response which can be analyzed visually by observing the saturation patterns with a camera. Although visual observation was proven useful in laboratory experiments, the technique is not yet assessed for natural rainfall events. The aim of this work is to explore the use of time-lapse photographs of naturally occurring-saturation patterns in understanding the threshold processes of overland flow generation. The image processing produces orthographic projection of the saturation patterns which will be used to assess the dynamics of overland flow formation in relation with soil moisture state and rainfall magnitude. The camera observation was performed at Hydrological Open Air Laboratory (HOAL) catchment at Petzenkirchen, Lower Austria. The catchment covers an area of 66 ha dominated with agricultural land (87%). The mean annual precipitation and mean annual flow at catchment outlet are 750 mm and 4 l/s, respectively. The camera was set to observe the overland flow along a thalweg on an arable field which was drained in 1950s and has advantages of: (1) representing agricultural land as the dominant part of the catchment, (2) adjacent to the stream with clear visibility (no obstructing objects, such as trees), (3) drained area provides extra cases in understanding the response of tile drain outflow to overland flow formation and vice versa, and (4) in the vicinity of TDT soil moisture stations. The camera takes a picture with 1280 x 720 pixels resolution every minute and sends it directly in a PC via fiber

  4. Saving time and resources: observational research to support adoption of a hand hygiene promotion campaign.

    PubMed

    Mackert, Michael; Lazard, Allison; Liang, Ming-Ching; Mabry, Amanda; Champlin, Sara; Stroever, Stephanie

    2015-06-01

    Hand hygiene is the most effective way to prevent the spread of health care-associated infections, but many facilities may not have the resources or expertise to develop their own hand hygiene promotion campaign. This observational study demonstrated that a campaign developed for 1 facility could successfully contribute to behavior change at another, unrelated facility. It serves as a model and evidence that health care facilities can successfully adopt hand hygiene promotion campaigns developed and validated at other facilities.

  5. Lifetime socioeconomic position and mortality: prospective observational study.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G. D.; Hart, C.; Blane, D.; Gillis, C.; Hawthorne, V.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the influence of socioeconomic position over a lifetime on risk factors for cardiovascular disease, on morbidity, and on mortality from various causes. DESIGN: Prospective observational study with 21 years of follow up. Social class was determined as manual or non-manual at three stages of participants' lives: from the social class of their father's job, the social class of their first job, and the social class of their job at the time of screening. A cumulative social class indicator was constructed, ranging from non-manual social class at all three stages of life to manual social class at all three stages. SETTING: 27 workplaces in the west of Scotland. PARTICIPANTS: 5766 men aged 35-64 at the time of examination. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence and level of risk factors for cardiovascular disease; morbidity; and mortality from broad causes of death. RESULTS: From non-manual social class locations at all three life stages to manual at all stages there were strong positive trends for blood pressure, body mass index, current cigarette smoking, angina, and bronchitis. Inverse trends were seen for height, cholesterol concentration, lung function, and being an ex-smoker. 1580 men died during follow up. Age adjusted relative death rates in comparison with the men of non-manual social class locations at all three stages of life were 1.29 (95% confidence interval 1.08 to 1.56) in men of two non-manual and one manual social class; 1.45 (1.21 to 1.73) in men of two manual and one non-manual social class; and 1.71 (1.46 to 2.01) in men of manual social class at all three stages. Mortality from cardiovascular disease showed a similar graded association with cumulative social class. Mortality from cancer was mainly raised among men of manual social class at all three stages. Adjustment for a wide range of risk factors caused little attenuation in the association of cumulative social class with mortality from all causes and from cardiovascular disease

  6. SABRE observations of Pi2 pulsations: case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, E. G.; Lester, M.

    1997-01-01

    The characteristics of substorm-associated Pi2 pulsations observed by the SABRE coherent radar system during three separate case studies are presented. The SABRE field of view is well positioned to observe the differences between the auroral zone pulsation signature and that observed at mid-latitudes. During the first case study the SABRE field of view is initially in the eastward electrojet, equatorward and to the west of the substorm-enhanced electrojet current. As the interval progresses, the western, upward field-aligned current of the substorm current wedge moves westward across the longitudes of the radar field of view. The westward motion of the wedge is apparent in the spatial and temporal signatures of the associated Pi2 pulsation spectra and polarisation sense. During the second case study, the complex field-aligned and ionospheric currents associated with the pulsation generation region move equatorward into the SABRE field of view and then poleward out of it again after the third pulsation in the series. The spectral content of the four pulsations during the interval indicate different auroral zone and mid-latitude signatures. The final case study is from a period of low magnetic activity when SABRE observes a Pi2 pulsation signature from regions equatorward of the enhanced substorm currents. There is an apparent mode change between the signature observed by SABRE in the ionosphere and that on the ground by magnetometers at latitudes slightly equatorward of the radar field of view. The observations are discussed in terms of published theories of the generation mechanisms for this type of pulsation. Different signatures are observed by SABRE depending on the level of magnetic activity and the position of the SABRE field of view relative to the pulsation generation region. A twin source model for Pi2 pulsation generation provides the clearest explanation of the signatures observed Acknowledgements. The authors are grateful to Prof. D. J. Southwood

  7. The life cycles of Be viscous decretion discs: time-dependent modelling of infrared continuum observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, R. G.; Carciofi, A. C.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Rivinius, Th.; Baade, D.; Rímulo, L. R.

    2017-01-01

    We apply the viscous decretion disc (VDD) model to interpret the infrared disc continuum emission of 80 Be stars observed in different epochs. In this way, we determined 169 specific disc structures, namely their density scale, ρ0, and exponent, n. We found that the n values range mainly between 1.5 and 3.5, and ρ0 varies between 10-12 and 10-10 g cm-3, with a peak close to the lower value. Our large sample also allowed us to firmly establish that the discs around early-type stars are denser than in late-type stars. Additionally, we estimated the disc mass decretion rates and found that they range between 10-12 and 10-9 M⊙ yr-1. These values are compatible with recent stellar evolution models of fast-rotating stars. One of the main findings of this work is a correlation between the ρ0 and n values. In order to find out whether these relations can be traced back to the evolution of discs or have some other origin, we used the VDD model to calculate temporal sequences under different assumptions for the time profile of the disc mass injection. The results support the hypothesis that the observed distribution of disc properties is due to a common evolutionary path. In particular, our results suggest that the time-scale for disc growth, during which the disc is being actively fed by mass injection episodes, is shorter than the time-scale for disc dissipation, when the disc is no longer fed by the star and dissipates as a result of the viscous diffusion of the disc material.

  8. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. I. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST FOUR MONTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Li Jie; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Koch, David G.; Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; McCauliff, Sean

    2011-11-01

    The architectures of multiple planet systems can provide valuable constraints on models of planet formation, including orbital migration, and excitation of orbital eccentricities and inclinations. NASA's Kepler mission has identified 1235 transiting planet candidates. The method of transit timing variations (TTVs) has already confirmed seven planets in two planetary systems. We perform a transit timing analysis of the Kepler planet candidates. We find that at least {approx}11% of planet candidates currently suitable for TTV analysis show evidence suggestive of TTVs, representing at least {approx}65 TTV candidates. In all cases, the time span of observations must increase for TTVs to provide strong constraints on planet masses and/or orbits, as expected based on N-body integrations of multiple transiting planet candidate systems (assuming circular and coplanar orbits). We find the fraction of planet candidates showing TTVs in this data set does not vary significantly with the number of transiting planet candidates per star, suggesting significant mutual inclinations and that many stars with a single transiting planet should host additional non-transiting planets. We anticipate that Kepler could confirm (or reject) at least {approx}12 systems with multiple transiting planet candidates via TTVs. Thus, TTVs will provide a powerful tool for confirming transiting planets and characterizing the orbital dynamics of low-mass planets. If Kepler observations were extended to at least seven years, then TTVs would provide much more precise constraints on the dynamics of systems with multiple transiting planets and would become sensitive to planets with orbital periods extending into the habitable zone of solar-type stars.

  9. The Indiana Science Initiative: Lessons from a Classroom Observation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Nicole D.; Walker, William S.; Weaver, Gabriela C.; Sorge, Brandon H.

    2015-01-01

    The Indiana Science Initiative (ISI) is a systemic effort to reform K-8 science education. The program provides teachers with professional development, reform-oriented science modules, and materials support. To examine the impact of the initiative's professional development, a participant observation study was conducted in the program's pilot…

  10. Scientific and Ethical Approaches for Observational Exposure Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Researchers conduct observational human exposure studies to understand how and the extent to which people come into contact with chemicals and environmental stressors in their everyday lives, through the air they breathe, the food and liquids they consume, and the things they tou...

  11. An Observational Study of Early Heterosexual Interaction at Middle School Dances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrini, Anthony D.; Long, Jeffery D.

    2007-01-01

    In this longitudinal, observational study of heterosexual interaction at middle school dances we examined the degree to which boys' and girls' groups became more gender integrated over time. The results show groups became more integrated over time with the pattern differing by gender. Boys had a relatively low level of contact with girls over the…

  12. The status of blue straggler studies (II): observational properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Deng, Li-Cai; Liang, Yan-Chun

    2006-09-01

    The obervational features of blue stragglers (BSs) show great differences among the different stellar systems, such as Galactic halo, open clusters, globular clusters, and dwarf galaxies. These differences reveal the distinctive formation of BSs and the physical conditions of the systems and their stellar populations. Therefore, studying the observational properties of BSs could be an effective method for studying the formation mechanisms of BSs, the evolution of single stars and binary systems, and the dynamical evolution of stellar systems.

  13. Time-dependent MHD simulations of the solar wind outflow using interplanetary scintillation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae K.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Borovikov, Sergey N.; Clover, John M.; Jackson, Bernard V.; Yu, Hsiu-Shan

    2012-11-01

    Numerical modeling of the heliosphere is a critical component of space weather forecasting. The accuracy of heliospheric models can be improved by using realistic boundary conditions and confirming the results with in situ spacecraft measurements. To accurately reproduce the solar wind (SW) plasma flow near Earth, we need realistic, time-dependent boundary conditions at a fixed distance from the Sun. We may prepare such boundary conditions using SW speed and density determined from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations, magnetic field derived from photospheric magnetograms, and temperature estimated from its correlation with SW speed. Here, we present the time-dependent MHD simulation results obtained by using the 2011 IPS data from the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory as time-varying inner boundary conditions and compare the simulated data at Earth with OMNI data (spacecraft-interspersed, near-Earth solar wind data). At the request of the author, the PDF of the published article was replaced with a new file containing color figures. The scientific content is not affected by this change.

  14. Mapping rice in the USA with Earth Observations in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbick, N.; Salas, W.; Mueller, R.; Hanson, M.; Corbiere, M.; McKenzie, A.

    2014-12-01

    The USA is a major rice growing nation and one of the top rice exporters. Weather variability, water resources, and price volatility are current risks to rice production. To support risk management the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic Research Service are tasked with providing area statistics and production estimates. A Decision Support Tool (DST) is being developed to provide real-time estimates of rice extent and indicators of condition. The DST is largely driven by multi-scale Earth Observations including Landsat and MODIS that provide daily and 8-day indices that are sensitive to rice growth status and management practices. A multitemporal Classification And Regression Tree approach ingests multiscale imagery in real time to provide rice crop metrics. We hindcast the archives of Landsat (1984-2014) and MODIS (2002-2014) for California and achieve >80% accuracy by June and >95% accuracy by end of July as compared to the Crop Data Layer and county statistics. Outcomes are similar for the Midsouth rice region. The DST was utilized to assess the impact of current drought in California on rice. We predicted a 20% reduction in rice area based on our near time rice extent projections and assuming yields similar to 2013 and recent USDA average farm price estimates, 2014 production losses associated with the drought will amount to approximately $175 million. Additional results using Radarsat-2 in the Midsouth in preparation of ALOS-2 and Sentintel will be shared.

  15. Multifractal cross-correlation effects in two-variable time series of complex network vertex observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OświÈ©cimka, Paweł; Livi, Lorenzo; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the scaling of the cross-correlations calculated for two-variable time series containing vertex properties in the context of complex networks. Time series of such observables are obtained by means of stationary, unbiased random walks. We consider three vertex properties that provide, respectively, short-, medium-, and long-range information regarding the topological role of vertices in a given network. In order to reveal the relation between these quantities, we applied the multifractal cross-correlation analysis technique, which provides information about the nonlinear effects in coupling of time series. We show that the considered network models are characterized by unique multifractal properties of the cross-correlation. In particular, it is possible to distinguish between Erdös-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, and Watts-Strogatz networks on the basis of fractal cross-correlation. Moreover, the analysis of protein contact networks reveals characteristics shared with both scale-free and small-world models.

  16. November 2004 space weather events: Real-time observations and forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichtchenko, L.; Zhukov, A.; van der Linden, R.; Stankov, S. M.; Jakowski, N.; StanisłAwska, I.; Juchnikowski, G.; Wilkinson, P.; Patterson, G.; Thomson, A. W. P.

    2007-06-01

    Space weather events with their solar origin and their distribution through the heliosphere affect the whole magnetosphere-ionosphere-Earth system. Their real-time monitoring and forecasting are important for science and technology. Here we discuss one of the largest space weather events of Solar Cycle 23, in November 2004, which was also one of the most difficult periods to forecast. Nine halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interacting on their way through the interplanetary medium and forming two geoeffective interplanetary structures, exemplify the complexity of the event. Real-time and quasi-real-time observations of the ground geomagnetic field show rapid and extensive expansion of the auroral oval to 55° in geomagnetic latitude accompanied by great variability of the ionosphere. Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) seen in ground networks, such as power grids and pipelines, were significant during the event, although no problems were reported. Forecasts of the CME propagation, global and local ground geomagnetic activity, and ionospheric parameters, issued by several regional warning centers, revealed certain deficiencies in predictions of the interplanetary characteristics of the CME, size of the geomagnetic disturbances, and complexity of the ionospheric variations produced by this event. This paper is a collective report based on the materials presented at the splinter session on November 2004 events during the first European Space Weather Week.

  17. Constraint on the early Universe by relic gravitational waves: From pulsar timing observations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Wen

    2011-05-15

    Recent pulsar timing observations by the Parkers Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) and European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) teams obtained the constraint on the relic gravitational waves at the frequency f{sub *}=1/yr, which provides the opportunity to constrain H{sub *}, the Hubble parameter, when these waves crossed the horizon during inflation. In this paper, we investigate this constraint by considering the general scenario for the early Universe: we assume that the effective (average) equation-of-state w before the big bang nucleosynthesis stage is a free parameter. In the standard hot big-bang scenario with w=1/3, we find that the current PPTA result follows a bound H{sub *{<=}}1.15x10{sup -1}m{sub Pl}, and the EPTA result follows H{sub *{<=}}6.92x10{sup -2}m{sub Pl}. We also find that these bounds become much tighter in the nonstandard scenarios with w>1/3. When w=1, the bounds become H{sub *{<=}}5.89x10{sup -3}m{sub Pl} for the current PPTA and H{sub *{<=}}3.39x10{sup -3}m{sub Pl} for the current EPTA. In contrast, in the nonstandard scenario with w=0, the bound becomes H{sub *{<=}}7.76m{sub Pl} for the current PPTA.

  18. Observer study to evaluate the simulation of mammographic calcification clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Marcomini, Karem D.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Schiabel, Homero

    2016-03-01

    Numerous breast phantoms have been developed to be as realistic as possible to ensure the accuracy of image quality analysis, covering a greater range of applications. In this study, we simulated three different densities of the breast parenchyma using paraffin gel, acrylic plates and PVC films. Hydroxyapatite was used to simulate calcification clusters. From the images acquired with a GE Senographe DR 2000D mammography system, we selected 68 regions of interest (ROIs) with and 68 without a simulated calcification cluster. To validate the phantom simulation, we selected 136 ROIs from the University of South Florida's Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). Seven trained observers performed two observer experiments by using a high-resolution monitor Barco mod. E-3620. In the first experiment, the observers had to distinguish between real or phantom ROIs (with and without calcification). In the second one, the observers had to indicate the ROI with calcifications between a pair of ROIs. Results from our study show that the hydroxyapatite calcifications had poor contrast in the simulated breast parenchyma, thus observers had more difficulty in identifying the presence of calcification clusters in phantom images. Preliminary analysis of the power spectrum was conducted to investigate the radiographic density and the contrast thresholds for calcification detection. The values obtained for the power spectrum exponent (β) were comparable with those found in the literature.

  19. Inner magnetosphere variations after solar proton events. Observations on Mir space station in 1989-1994 time period.

    PubMed

    Dachev TsP; Semkova, J V; Matviichuk YuN; Tomov, B T; Koleva, R T; Baynov, P T; Petrov, V M; Shurshakov, V V; Ivanov, Y u

    1998-01-01

    Measurements on board the Mir space station have been used to study the dose rate and the particle flux distribution in the inner magnetosphere. The measurements have been performed with the Bulgarian-Russian dosimeter-radiometer Liulin. The paper concentrates on the dynamics of the observed "new" and "second" maxima which were created after Solar Proton Events (SPE) in the 1989-1994 time. The "second" belt was first observed after the SPE on October 20, 1989, and the last observation was after the SPE on February 20, 1994. The creation of the "new" belt is a unique phenomena seen in the Liulin data set after the SPE on March 23, 1991 and relates to the magnetic storm on March 24. The new belt fully disappears in the middle of 1993.

  20. Observer Interface Analysis for Standardization to a Cloud Based Real-Time Space Situational Awareness (SSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilers, J.

    2013-09-01

    The interface analysis from an observer of space objects makes a standard necessary. This standardized dataset serves as input for a cloud based service, which aimed for a near real-time Space Situational Awareness (SSA) system. The system contains all advantages of a cloud based solution, like redundancy, scalability and an easy way to distribute information. For the standard based on the interface analysis of the observer, the information can be separated in three parts. One part is the information about the observer e.g. a ground station. The next part is the information about the sensors that are used by the observer. And the last part is the data from the detected object. Backbone of the SSA System is the cloud based service which includes the consistency check for the observed objects, a database for the objects, the algorithms and analysis as well as the visualization of the results. This paper also provides an approximation of the needed computational power, data storage and a financial approach to deliver this service to a broad community. In this context cloud means, neither the user nor the observer has to think about the infrastructure of the calculation environment. The decision if the IT-infrastructure will be built by a conglomerate of different nations or rented on the marked should be based on an efficiency analysis. Also combinations are possible like starting on a rented cloud and then go to a private cloud owned by the government. One of the advantages of a cloud solution is the scalability. There are about 3000 satellites in space, 900 of them are active, and in total there are about ~17.000 detected space objects orbiting earth. But for the computation it is not a N(active) to N problem it is more N(active) to N(apo peri) quantity of N(all). Instead of 15.3 million possible collisions to calculate a computation of only approx. 2.3 million possible collisions must be done. In general, this Space Situational Awareness System can be used as a

  1. Time Is of the Essence: Factors Encouraging Out-of-Class Study Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuda, Steve T.; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Out-of-class study time is essential in students' language learning, but few studies in ELT measure out-of-class study time or investigate how teachers can encourage, rather than demand it. In Japan, out-of-class study time is lower than might be expected, ranging from zero to an hour per week. This study therefore sets out to establish those…

  2. Real-time Observation of Vo ordering dynamics in LaCoO3 /STO superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jae Hyuck; Mishra, Rohan; Kim, Young-Min; He, Qian; Qiao, Liang; Biegalski, Michael D.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Oak Ridge National Lab. Collaboration; Vanderbilt University Collaboration; Korea Basic Science Institute Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Properties of solid oxide fuel cell, catalysts etc. is dependent on the distribution and transport behavior of oxygen ions. In this study, we observe the dynamics of vacancy ordering in LaCoO3/SrTiO3 (LCO/STO) superlattice and LCO films using high angle annular dark field and annular bright field (ABF) STEM. Vo ordering was directly observed by tracking interatomic spacings, withs nucleation, propagation and interaction of different Vo nuclei demonstrated. Moreover, ABF images show that on 1-D (110) vacancy channels form in the depleted layers.In the case for superlattice, very small contribution of vacancy injection was observed. When this approach is applied to 15 u.c. LCO film, however, a sequence of different phases is observed, starting from disordered perovskite LaCoO3-x to a brownmillerite La3Co3O8-x to eventually brownmillerite La2Co2O5-x. Kinetics of the ordering and vacancy injection, as well as implications for beam-driven phase-transformation at an atomic scale, will be discussed. Research at ORNL supported by the MSE division, BES U.S. DOE, and through a user project supported by ORNL's CMMS, which is also sponsored by BES U.S. DOE.

  3. Justifying Study Abroad in Financially Difficult Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlum, Marty; Ice, Randal; Sheetz-Nguyen, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we will develop the justification for study abroad. We will discuss the current economic climate and its impact on budgets. Next, we will explain the many benefits of the study abroad programs. Then we will propose some less expensive alternatives to the traditional study abroad programs. We will conclude with expectations for the…

  4. Global TIE Observatories: Real Time Observational Astronomy Through a Robotic Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.; Mayo, L. A.

    2001-12-01

    Astronomy in grades K-12 is traditionally taught (if at all) using textbooks and a few simple hands-on activities. Teachers are generally not trained in observational astronomy techniques and are unfamiliar with the most basic astronomical concepts. In addition, most students, by High School graduation, will never have even looked through the eyepiece of a telescope. The problem becomes even more challenging in inner cities, remote rural areas and low socioeconomic communities where educational emphasis on topics in astronomy as well as access to observing facilities is limited or non existent. Access to most optical telescope facilities is limited to monthly observing nights that cater to a small percentage of the general public living near the observatory. Even here, the observing experience is a one-time event detached from the process of scientific enquiry and sustained educational application. Additionally, a number of large, "research grade" observatory facilities are largely unused, partially due to the slow creep of light pollution around the facilities as well as the development of newer, more capable telescopes. Though cutting edge science is often no longer possible at these sights, real research opportunities in astronomy remain numerous for these facilities as educational tools. The possibility now exists to establish a network of research grade telescopes, no longer useful to the professional astronomical community, that can be made accessible through classrooms, after school, and community based programs all across the country through existing IT technologies and applications. These telescopes could provide unparalleled research and educational opportunities for a broad spectrum of students and turns underutilized observatory facilities into valuable, state-of-the-art teaching centers. The NASA sponsored Telescopes In Education project has been wildly successful in engaging the K-12 education community in real-time, hands-on, interactive astronomy

  5. Mercury's Time-Averaged and Induced Magnetic Fields from MESSENGER Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Winslow, R. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Purucker, M. E.; Korth, H.; Al Asad, M. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Baker, D. N.; Hauck, S. A.; Phillips, R. J.; Zuber, M. T.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Observations from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) have allowed the construction of a baseline, time-averaged model for Mercury's magnetosphere. The model, constructed with the approximation that the magnetospheric shape can be represented as a paraboloid, includes two external (magnetopause and magnetotail) current systems and an internal (dipole) field. We take advantage of the geometry of the orbital MAG data to constrain all but one of the model parameters, and their ranges, directly from the observations. These parameters are then used as a priori constraints in the magnetospheric model, and the remaining parameter, the dipole moment, is estimated from a grid search. The model provides an excellent fit to the MAG observations, with a root-mean-square misfit of less than 20 nT globally. The mean distance from the planetary dipole origin to the magnetopause subsolar point, RSS, is 1.45 RM (where RM = 2440 km) and the mean planetary dipole moment is 190 nT- RM3. Temporal variations in the global-scale magnetic fields result from changes in solar wind ram pressure, Pram, at Mercury that arise from the planet's 88-day eccentric orbit around the Sun and from transient, rapid changes in solar wind conditions. For a constant planetary dipole moment, RSS varies as Pram-1/6. However, magnetopause crossings obtained from several Mercury years of MESSENGER observations indicate that RSS is proportional to Pram-1/a where a is greater than 6, suggesting induction in Mercury's highly conducting metallic interior. We obtain an effective dipole moment that varies by up to ˜15% about its mean value. We further investigate the periodic 88-day induction signature and use the paraboloid model to describe the spatial structure in the inducing magnetopause field, together with estimates for the outer radius of Mercury's liquid core and possible overlying solid iron sulfide layer, to calculate induced core fields. The baseline magnetospheric model is adapted to include the 88-day

  6. Use of real-time tools to support field operations of NSF's Lower Atmosphere Observing Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M.; Stossmeister, G.; Johnson, E.; Martin, C.; Webster, C.; Dixon, M.; Maclean, G.

    2012-12-01

    NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) operates Lower Atmosphere Observing Facilities (LAOF) for the scientific community, under sponsorship of the National Science Foundation. In order to obtain the highest quality dataset during field campaigns, real-time decision-making critically depends on the availability of timely data and reliable communications between field operations staff and instrument operators. EOL incorporates the latest technologies to monitor the health of instrumentation, facilitate remote operations of instrumentation and keep project participants abreast of changing conditions in the field. As the availability of bandwidth on mobile communication networks and the capabilities of their associated devices (smart phone, tablets, etc.) improved, so has the ability of researchers to respond to rapidly changing conditions and coordinate ever more detailed measurements from multiple remote fixed, portable and airborne platforms. This presentation will describe several new tools that EOL is making available to project investigators and how these tools are being used in a mobile computing environment to support enhanced data collection during field campaigns. LAOF platforms such as radars, aircraft, sondes, balloons and surface stations all rely on displays of real-time data for their operations. Data from sondes are ingested into the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) for assimilation into regional forecasting models that help guide project operations. Since many of EOL's projects occur around the globe and at the same time instrument complexity has increased, automated monitoring of instrumentation platforms and systems has become essential. Tools are being developed to allow remote instrument control of our suite of observing systems where feasible. The Computing, Data and Software (CDS) Facility of EOL develops and supports a Field Catalog used in field campaigns for nearly two decades. Today, the Field Catalog serves as a hub for the

  7. [Intravaginal ejaculatory latency time: Advances in studies].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-rong; Xie, Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Although premature ejaculation (PE) is a common type of male sexual dysfunction, to date we lack a unified definition of PE. The multidimensional definition of PE has been accepted by more and more clinicians. Intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) is one of the three important dimensions (time to ejaculation, inability to control or delay ejaculation, and negative consequences) for defining PE. Rapid ejaculation is one of the core symptoms of PE and IELT is an objective measurement as well as an important tool for the evaluation of PE. This article reviews estimated IELT, stopwatch-measured IELT, the correlation between estimated and stopwatch-measured IELT, and the factors affecting IELT in the general male population, PE patients, and those complaining of PE.

  8. Observational evidence of seasonality in the timing of loop current eddy separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Cody A.; Leben, Robert R.

    2016-12-01

    Observational datasets, reports and analyses over the time period from 1978 through 1992 are reviewed to derive pre-altimetry Loop Current (LC) eddy separation dates. The reanalysis identified 20 separation events in the 15-year record. Separation dates are estimated to be accurate to approximately ± 1.5 months and sufficient to detect statistically significant LC eddy separation seasonality, which was not the case for previously published records because of the misidentification of separation events and their timing. The reanalysis indicates that previously reported LC eddy separation dates, determined for the time period before the advent of continuous altimetric monitoring in the early 1990s, are inaccurate because of extensive reliance on satellite sea surface temperature (SST) imagery. Automated LC tracking techniques are used to derive LC eddy separation dates in three different altimetry-based sea surface height (SSH) datasets over the time period from 1993 through 2012. A total of 28-30 LC eddy separation events were identified in the 20-year record. Variations in the number and dates of eddy separation events are attributed to the different mean sea surfaces and objective-analysis smoothing procedures used to produce the SSH datasets. Significance tests on various altimetry and pre-altimetry/altimetry combined date lists consistently show that the seasonal distribution of separation events is not uniform at the 95% confidence level. Randomization tests further show that the seasonal peak in LC eddy separation events in August and September is highly unlikely to have occurred by chance. The other seasonal peak in February and March is less significant, but possibly indicates two seasons of enhanced probability of eddy separation centered near the spring and fall equinoxes. This is further quantified by objectively dividing the seasonal distribution into two seasons using circular statistical techniques and a k-means clustering algorithm. The estimated

  9. Observation of increases in emission from modern vehicles over time in Hong Kong using remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jason; Hung, W T; Cheung, C S

    2012-04-01

    In this study on-road gaseous emissions of vehicles are investigated using remote sensing measurements collected over three different periods. The results show that a high percentage of gaseous pollutants were emitted from a small percentage of vehicles. Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) vehicles generally have higher gaseous emissions compared to other vehicles, particularly among higher-emitting vehicles. Vehicles with high vehicle specific power (VSP) tend to have lower CO and HC emissions while petrol and LPG vehicles tend to have higher NO emissions when engine load is high. It can be observed that gaseous emission factors of petrol and LPG vehicles increase greatly within 2 years of being introduced to the vehicle fleet, suggesting that engine and catalyst performance deteriorate rapidly. It can be observed that LPG vehicles have higher levels of gaseous emissions than petrol vehicles, suggesting that proper maintenance of LPG vehicles is essential in reducing gaseous emissions from vehicles.

  10. LATE-TIME SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS OF THE STRONGLY INTERACTING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PTF11kx

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Nugent, Peter E.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D. Andrew; Pan, Yen-Chen; Hook, Isobel M.

    2013-08-01

    PTF11kx was a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) that showed time-variable absorption features, including saturated Ca II H and K lines that weakened and eventually went into emission. The strength of the emission component of H{alpha} gradually increased, implying that the SN was undergoing significant interaction with its circumstellar medium (CSM). These features, and many others, were blueshifted slightly and showed a P-Cygni profile, likely indicating that the CSM was directly related to, and probably previously ejected by, the progenitor system itself. These and other observations led Dilday et al. to conclude that PTF11kx came from a symbiotic nova progenitor like RS Oph. In this work we extend the spectral coverage of PTF11kx to 124-680 rest-frame days past maximum brightness. The late-time spectra of PTF11kx are dominated by H{alpha} emission (with widths of full width at half-maximum intensity Almost-Equal-To 2000 km s{sup -1}), strong Ca II emission features ({approx}10,000 km s{sup -1} wide), and a blue 'quasi-continuum' due to many overlapping narrow lines of Fe II. Emission from oxygen, He I, and Balmer lines higher than H{alpha} is weak or completely absent at all epochs, leading to large observed H{alpha}/H{beta} intensity ratios. The H{alpha} emission appears to increase in strength with time for {approx}1 yr, but it subsequently decreases significantly along with the Ca II emission. Our latest spectrum also indicates the possibility of newly formed dust in the system as evidenced by a slight decrease in the red wing of H{alpha}. During the same epochs, multiple narrow emission features from the CSM temporally vary in strength. The weakening of the H{alpha} and Ca II emission at late times is possible evidence that the SN ejecta have overtaken the majority of the CSM and agrees with models of other strongly interacting SNe Ia. The varying narrow emission features, on the other hand, may indicate that the CSM is clumpy or consists of multiple thin shells.

  11. Using action observation to study superior motor performance: a pilot fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Carl-Johan; Lundström, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The most efficient way to acquire motor skills may be through physical practice. Nevertheless, it has also been shown that action observation may improve motor performance. The aim of the present pilot study was to examine a potential action observation paradigm used to (1) capture the superior performance of expert athletes and (2) capture the underlying neural mechanisms of successful action observation in relation to task experience. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure regional blood flow while presenting videos of a hockey player shooting a puck toward a hockey goal. The videos (a total of 120) where stopped at different time frames with different amount of information provided, creating a paradigm with three different levels of difficulty to decide the fate of a shot. Since this was only a pilot study, we first tested the paradigm behaviorally on six elite expert hockey players, five intermediate players, and six non-hockey playing controls. The results showed that expert hockey players were significantly (p < 0.05) more accurate on deciding the fate of the action compared to the others. Thus, it appears as if the paradigm can capture superior performance of expert athletes (aim 1). We then tested three of the hockey players and three of the controls on the same paradigm in the MRI scanner to investigate the underlying neural mechanisms of successful action anticipation. The imaging results showed that when expert hockey players observed and correctly anticipated situations, they recruited motor and temporal regions of the brain. Novices, on the other hand, relied on visual regions during observation and prefrontal regions during action decision. Thus, the results from the imaging data suggest that different networks of the brain are recruited depending on task experience (aim 2). In conclusion, depending on the level of motor skill of the observer, when correctly anticipating actions different neural systems will be recruited. PMID

  12. Carbon Dioxide Observational Platform System (CO-OPS), feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, D. L.; Hall, D. W.; Mcelveen, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Observational Platform System (CO-OPS) is a near-space, geostationary, multi-user, unmanned microwave powered monitoring platform system. This systems engineering feasibility study addressed identified existing requirements such as: carbon dioxide observational data requirements, communications requirements, and eye-in-the-sky requirements of other groups like the Defense Department, the Forestry Service, and the Coast Guard. In addition, potential applications in: earth system science, space system sciences, and test and verification (satellite sensors and data management techniques) were considered. The eleven month effort is summarized. Past work and methods of gathering the required observational data were assessed and rough-order-of magnitude cost estimates have shown the CO-OPS system to be most cost effective (less than $30 million within a 10 year lifetime). It was also concluded that there are no technical, schedule, or obstacles that would prevent achieving the objectives of the total 5-year CO-OPS program.

  13. Non-stationarity of solute travel time distribution observed in a controlled hydrologic transport volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queloz, P.; Bertuzzo, E.; Carraro, L.; Botter, G.; Miglietta, F.; Rao, P. S.; Rinaldo, A.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental data were collected over a year-long period in a transport experiment carried out within a controlled transport volume (represented by a 2m-deep, 1m-diameter lysimeter fitted with bottom drainage). The soil surface was shielded from natural rainfall, replaced by an artificial injection (Poisson process) at the daily timescale. Bottom drainage out-flows were continuously monitored with leakage tipping bucket and evapotranspiration (prompted by a willow tree growing within the system) was measured trough precision load cells, which also allow an accurate and continuous reading of the total water storage. Five artificial soluble tracers (species of fluorobenzoic acid, FBAs, mutually passive) were selected based on low-reactivity and low-retardation in our specific soil and used to individually mark five rainfall inputs of different amplitudes and occurring at various initial soil moisture conditions. Tracer discharge concentration and hydrologic fluxes measurements provide a direct method for the assessment of the bulk effects of transport on the (backward and forward) travel time distributions in the hydrological setting. The large discrepancies observed in terms of mass recovery in the discharge (supported by ex post FBAs quantification in the soil and in the vegetation) and tracer out-fluxes dynamics emphasized the dependence of the forward travel time on the various injection times and the stages experienced by the system during the migration of the pulse. Rescaling the measured travel time distribution by using the cumulative drainage volume as an independent variable instead of the time elapsed since the injection also fails to yield to stationary distributions, as it was argued by Niemi (1997). Our experimental results support earlier theoretical speculations centered on the key role of non-stationarity on the characterization of the properties of hydrologic flow and transport phenomena. A travel time based model, with all in- and out- hydrological

  14. Real-time observations of lithium battery reactions—operando neutron diffraction analysis during practical operation

    PubMed Central

    Taminato, Sou; Yonemura, Masao; Shiotani, Shinya; Kamiyama, Takashi; Torii, Shuki; Nagao, Miki; Ishikawa, Yoshihisa; Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Onodera, Yohei; Naka, Takahiro; Morishima, Makoto; Ukyo, Yoshio; Adipranoto, Dyah Sulistyanintyas; Arai, Hajime; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ogumi, Zempachi; Suzuki, Kota; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Among the energy storage devices for applications in electric vehicles and stationary uses, lithium batteries typically deliver high performance. However, there is still a missing link between the engineering developments for large-scale batteries and the fundamental science of each battery component. Elucidating reaction mechanisms under practical operation is crucial for future battery technology. Here, we report an operando diffraction technique that uses high-intensity neutrons to detect reactions in non-equilibrium states driven by high-current operation in commercial 18650 cells. The experimental system comprising a time-of-flight diffractometer with automated Rietveld analysis was developed to collect and analyse diffraction data produced by sequential charge and discharge processes. Furthermore, observations under high current drain revealed inhomogeneous reactions, a structural relaxation after discharge, and a shift in the lithium concentration ranges with cycling in the electrode matrix. The technique provides valuable information required for the development of advanced batteries. PMID:27357605

  15. Follow-Up Discovery Channel Telescope Observations of Transients and Variables from Optical Time Domain Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, Suvi; Liu, Tingting; Hung, Tiara

    2017-01-01

    We highlight the capabilities of the Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) for follow-up observations of transients and variables discovered by optical time-domain surveys. We present two DCT programs: 1) extended-baseline imaging with the Large Monolithic Imager of periodically variable quasars from the Pan-STARRS1 survey to identify binary supermassive black hole candidates, and 2) spectroscopic classification with the DeVeny spectrograph of nuclear transients from the iPTF survey to identify tidal disruption event candidates. We demonstrate that DCT is well-matched to the magnitude ranges of the transients and variables discovered by these surveys, and has played an important role in their classification and characterization.

  16. JPL's Real-Time Weather Processor project (RWP) metrics and observations at system completion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loesh, Robert E.; Conover, Robert A.; Malhotra, Shan

    1990-01-01

    As an integral part of the overall upgraded National Airspace System (NAS), the objective of the Real-Time Weather Processor (RWP) project is to improve the quality of weather information and the timeliness of its dissemination to system users. To accomplish this, an RWP will be installed in each of the Center Weather Service Units (CWSUs), located in 21 of the 23 Air Route Traffic Control Centers (ARTCCs). The RWP System is a prototype system. It is planned that the software will be GFE and that production hardware will be acquired via industry competitive procurement. The ARTCC is a facility established to provide air traffic control service to aircraft operating on Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) flight plans within controlled airspace, principally during the en route phase of the flight. Covered here are requirement metrics, Software Problem Failure Reports (SPFRs), and Ada portability metrics and observations.

  17. The Upper Limit of Sunspot Activity as Observed over a Long Time Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagovitsyn, Yu. A.; Obridko, V. N.; Kuleshova, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    After analyzing the observational manifestations of the α- and ω-effects of the dynamo theory and using the modified Waldmeier rule, we show that the annual mean Wolf numbers at the maximum of the 11-year cycle that are likely to occur a time interval of 104 years have an upper limit amounting approximately to W EXTR˜230 - 240. Similar values were also obtained using the results by Usoskin et al. (2014, Astron. Astrophys. 562, L10), who considered the probability of various activity levels by reconstructing the variations of solar activity over three thousand years. As an additional result, the predicted maximum of Cycle 24 is refined and is shown to be W M=72 - 132 with a 95 % confidence.

  18. Real time simulation of nonlinear generalized predictive control for wind energy conversion system with nonlinear observer.

    PubMed

    Ouari, Kamel; Rekioua, Toufik; Ouhrouche, Mohand

    2014-01-01

    In order to make a wind power generation truly cost-effective and reliable, an advanced control techniques must be used. In this paper, we develop a new control strategy, using nonlinear generalized predictive control (NGPC) approach, for DFIG-based wind turbine. The proposed control law is based on two points: NGPC-based torque-current control loop generating the rotor reference voltage and NGPC-based speed control loop that provides the torque reference. In order to enhance the robustness of the controller, a disturbance observer is designed to estimate the aerodynamic torque which is considered as an unknown perturbation. Finally, a real-time simulation is carried out to illustrate the performance of the proposed controller.

  19. Real-time observations of lithium battery reactions—operando neutron diffraction analysis during practical operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taminato, Sou; Yonemura, Masao; Shiotani, Shinya; Kamiyama, Takashi; Torii, Shuki; Nagao, Miki; Ishikawa, Yoshihisa; Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Onodera, Yohei; Naka, Takahiro; Morishima, Makoto; Ukyo, Yoshio; Adipranoto, Dyah Sulistyanintyas; Arai, Hajime; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ogumi, Zempachi; Suzuki, Kota; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Ryoji

    2016-06-01

    Among the energy storage devices for applications in electric vehicles and stationary uses, lithium batteries typically deliver high performance. However, there is still a missing link between the engineering developments for large-scale batteries and the fundamental science of each battery component. Elucidating reaction mechanisms under practical operation is crucial for future battery technology. Here, we report an operando diffraction technique that uses high-intensity neutrons to detect reactions in non-equilibrium states driven by high-current operation in commercial 18650 cells. The experimental system comprising a time-of-flight diffractometer with automated Rietveld analysis was developed to collect and analyse diffraction data produced by sequential charge and discharge processes. Furthermore, observations under high current drain revealed inhomogeneous reactions, a structural relaxation after discharge, and a shift in the lithium concentration ranges with cycling in the electrode matrix. The technique provides valuable information required for the development of advanced batteries.

  20. Quantum beats observed in time resolved X-ray interference experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, G.; Jex, H.

    1999-01-01

    We have employed an LLL-type X-ray interferometer with a mirror crystal divided into two parts and X-cut quartz crystals attached aside each mirror. Ultrasound waves of slightly different frequencies around f = 10 MHz (phonon energies around hf = 41 neV) are fed into the mirrors. The interaction with the coherent photon beams in the interferometer causes quantum beats in the interference intensity. In time resolved interference experiments beat frequencies of Δf = 96 mHz (in energy scale ΔE = hΔf = 397 atto-eV = 3.97 × 10 -16 eV) were observed. The energy sensitivity of our experiments achieved values δE = 15.6 zepto-eV = 1.56 × 10 -20 eV.

  1. Real-time observations of lithium battery reactions-operando neutron diffraction analysis during practical operation.

    PubMed

    Taminato, Sou; Yonemura, Masao; Shiotani, Shinya; Kamiyama, Takashi; Torii, Shuki; Nagao, Miki; Ishikawa, Yoshihisa; Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Onodera, Yohei; Naka, Takahiro; Morishima, Makoto; Ukyo, Yoshio; Adipranoto, Dyah Sulistyanintyas; Arai, Hajime; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ogumi, Zempachi; Suzuki, Kota; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Ryoji

    2016-06-30

    Among the energy storage devices for applications in electric vehicles and stationary uses, lithium batteries typically deliver high performance. However, there is still a missing link between the engineering developments for large-scale batteries and the fundamental science of each battery component. Elucidating reaction mechanisms under practical operation is crucial for future battery technology. Here, we report an operando diffraction technique that uses high-intensity neutrons to detect reactions in non-equilibrium states driven by high-current operation in commercial 18650 cells. The experimental system comprising a time-of-flight diffractometer with automated Rietveld analysis was developed to collect and analyse diffraction data produced by sequential charge and discharge processes. Furthermore, observations under high current drain revealed inhomogeneous reactions, a structural relaxation after discharge, and a shift in the lithium concentration ranges with cycling in the electrode matrix. The technique provides valuable information required for the development of advanced batteries.

  2. Time-series observations of phytoplankton productivity in the western North Pacific by an underwater profiling buoy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, T.; Honda, M. C.; Matsumoto, K.; Kawakami, H.; Wakita, M.; Saino, T.; Marine Biogeochemical Cycle Research Team

    2010-12-01

    An understanding of the variability in phytoplankton primary productivity provides a basic knowledge of the ecosystem structure and carbon cycle in the ocean. Primary productivity in the world’s oceans has been measured mostly by the radiocarbon tracer or oxygen evolution methods. These methods require bottle incubations for periods ranging from hours to 1 day. This methodological limitation makes it difficult to measure primary productivity in situ with high temporal and spatial resolution. In particular, ship-based studies of the open ocean have been limited in their ability to conduct time-series observations for understanding variability in primary productivity. To overcome these problems, we developed an underwater profiling buoy system incorporating a fast repetition rate fluorometer which enables real-time high-frequency measurements of primary productivity, and started time-series observations in the western North Pacific as part of the environmental biogeochemical cycle research program in JAMSTEC. Here, we show the results of observations in the western North Pacific by the underwater profiling buoy system.

  3. First real-time observation of transverse division in azooxanthellate scleractinian corals

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Yuki; Haraguchi, Hiroko; Ezaki, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Asexual reproduction is one of the most important traits in the evolutionary history of corals. No real-time observations of asexual reproduction in azooxanthellate solitary scleractinian corals have been conducted to date. Here, we describe previously unknown aspects of asexual reproduction by using Truncatoflabellum spheniscus (Family Flabellidae) based on observations of transverse division conducted over 1200 days. The findings revealed that (1) transverse division was caused by decalcification; (2) compared to the anthocyathus (upper part of the divided corallum), the soft parts of the anthocaulus (lower part of the divided corallum) were severely damaged and injured during division; (3) these injuries were repaired rapidly; and (4) the anthocaulus regrew and repeatedly produced anthocyathi by means of transverse division. Differences in the patterns of soft-part regeneration and repair, as well as differences in skeletal growth rates between the anthocaulus and the anthocyathus imply that the ecological requirements and reproductive success are different from each other immediately after division. The findings provide important clues for unravelling why asexual reproduction appeared frequently in free-living corals, and the extent to which those modes of reproduction has affected the adaptive and evolutionary success of scleractinian corals throughout the Phanerozoic. PMID:28150745

  4. Astrometric reduction of the Mars Exploration Rover night-time observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, J.; Lainey, V.; Bell, J.; Dehant, V.

    2006-06-01

    In 2003 NASA launched toward Mars two robots, Spirit and Opportunity, in search of answers about the history of water on Mars. They landed on Mars on January 4 and January 24, 2004. Since this date, they have traversed around their landing site to search for and characterize a wide range of rocks and soils that hold clues to past water activity on Mars. Among the science instruments carried by the rovers, the Panoramic Camera (Pancam) is used to determine the mineralogy, the texture, and the structure of the local terrain. The Pancam has also been used to take images of the Martian sky during the night. In particular, the Spirit rover has taken more than 500 night-time images showing Mars' moons Phobos and Deimos. We are performing the astrometric reduction of those images, with the goal of refining further the ephemerides of both satellites. Ephemeris improvements may help future targeting of high resolution images of the satellites from orbiters or other future missions. In addition, we hope to provide new constraints on the orbital evolution of the satellites through these observations and through other recent observations.

  5. Observations of stable boundary layers over a seasonal time scale in south-east England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horlacher, V.; Price, J.

    2009-04-01

    First results from the Stable Boundary Layer Experiment (SABLE) are presented. The campaign took place at the Met Office Meteorological Research Unit at Cardington Airfield between December 2006 and October 2008. The aim is to understand seasonal changes of stable boundary layers. In most operational models the boundary layer parametrisation uses stability functions based on Monin-Obukhov theory which predicts that turbulence is suppressed when the Richardson number exceeds a critical value. Depending on the form of the stability function, for instance, the surface temperature is colder than the observations suggest. By analysing different times of the year it is possible to identify different types of development during stable nights and perhaps move away from one parametrisation for all seasons. However the main emphasis here is to highlight seasonal variation of the stably stratified boundary layer. This unique data set is compiled of routine turbulence measurement at 10m, 25m and 50m. During 18 IOPs (Intensive Observation Period) the Met Office tethered balloon based turbulence probe was also flown and radiosondes released. In addition surface based turbulence measurements are also available from a site around 10km away and differences between the two sites will be presented.

  6. First real-time observation of transverse division in azooxanthellate scleractinian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Yuki; Haraguchi, Hiroko; Ezaki, Yoichi

    2017-02-01

    Asexual reproduction is one of the most important traits in the evolutionary history of corals. No real-time observations of asexual reproduction in azooxanthellate solitary scleractinian corals have been conducted to date. Here, we describe previously unknown aspects of asexual reproduction by using Truncatoflabellum spheniscus (Family Flabellidae) based on observations of transverse division conducted over 1200 days. The findings revealed that (1) transverse division was caused by decalcification; (2) compared to the anthocyathus (upper part of the divided corallum), the soft parts of the anthocaulus (lower part of the divided corallum) were severely damaged and injured during division; (3) these injuries were repaired rapidly; and (4) the anthocaulus regrew and repeatedly produced anthocyathi by means of transverse division. Differences in the patterns of soft-part regeneration and repair, as well as differences in skeletal growth rates between the anthocaulus and the anthocyathus imply that the ecological requirements and reproductive success are different from each other immediately after division. The findings provide important clues for unravelling why asexual reproduction appeared frequently in free-living corals, and the extent to which those modes of reproduction has affected the adaptive and evolutionary success of scleractinian corals throughout the Phanerozoic.

  7. Folic Acid Supplementation and Preterm Birth: Results from Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Franchi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Folic acid (FA) supplementation is recommended worldwide in the periconceptional period for the prevention of neural tube defects. Due to its involvement in a number of cellular processes, its role in other pregnancy outcomes such as miscarriage, recurrent miscarriage, low birth weight, preterm birth (PTB), preeclampsia, abruptio placentae, and stillbirth has been investigated. PTB is a leading cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity; therefore its association with FA supplementation is of major interest. The analysis of a small number of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) has not found a beneficial role of FA in reducing the rate of PTBs. Aim of the Study. The aim of this review was to examine the results from recent observational studies about the effect of FA supplementation on PTB. Materials and Methods. We carried out a search on Medline and by manual search of the observational studies from 2009 onwards that analyzed the rate of PTB in patients who received supplementation with FA before and/or throughout pregnancy. Results. The results from recent observational studies suggest a slight reduction of PTBs that is not consistent with the results from RCTs. Further research is needed to better understand the role of FA supplementation before and during pregnancy in PTB. PMID:24724083

  8. Observational Results of Diurnal Variation in Quiet Time Inner Plasmasphere Equatorial Noise Leading to Post-Midnight Ion Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno-Smith, L. K.; Liemohn, M. W.; Skoug, R. M.; Morley, S.; Breneman, A. W.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Moldwin, M.; Katus, R. M.; Zou, S.

    2015-12-01

    After the discovery of the plasmaspheric post-midnight 1-10 eV ion loss between L =2 and L =3, we have expanded upon these results and connected the observed ion loss with changes in plasma wave activity. Using the Van Allen Probes Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) and the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instruments, we observed that diurnal variation in EMFISIS equatorial noise measurements was consistent with HOPE H+ thermal ion measurement variations. Through statistical studies and case studies, we present how enhanced dayside equatorial noise heats via cyclotron resonance to form the 1-10 eV ion population of the inner plasmasphere during quiet time.

  9. Statistical study of seismo-electromagnetic effects observed by DEMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, F.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.; Berthelier, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present results of a statistical study of VLF electromagnetic waves observed in the vicinity of earthquakes. Survey mode data obtained by the French micro-satellite DEMETER (launched in June, 2004, inclination ~98 degrees, altitude ~700 km, designed specifically to analyze seismo-electromagnetic emissions) are used. Altogether, more than 5000 hours of data and more than 4500 earthquakes that occurred in the satellite zone are analyzed. A robust two-step data processing method has been developed and applied in order to distinguish very weak phenomena connected with the seismic activity from the natural background. In the first step, a map in the form of a histogram expressing the expected values of intensity of electromagnetic emissions at a given point of the satellite orbit under given conditions is constructed. In the second step, the intensity of emissions measured close to the earthquakes is compared with the distribution of intensities that could be expected from the previous step. Statistical consequences of the described data processing are thoroughly discussed and it is concluded that the observed fluctuations of wave intensity are most probably connected to the earthquakes. The frequency spectrum of the observed emissions, shape and dimensions of the affected area, as well as the most favorable natural conditions and earthquake properties to observe the phenomenon are studied.

  10. The potential role of real-time geodetic observations in tsunami early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Stefano; Armigliato, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    experimental or testing stage and haven't been implemented yet in any standard TWS operations. Nonetheless, this is seen to be the future and the natural TWS evolving enhancement. In this context, improvement of the real-time estimates of tsunamigenic earthquake focal mechanism is of fundamental importance to trigger the appropriate computational chain. Quick discrimination between strike-slip and thrust-fault earthquakes, and equally relevant, quick assessment of co-seismic on-fault slip distribution, are exemplary cases to which a real-time geodetic monitoring system can contribute significantly. Robust inversion of geodetic data can help to reconstruct the sea floor deformation pattern especially if two conditions are met: the source is not too far from network stations and is well covered azimuthally. These two conditions are sometimes hard to satisfy fully, but in certain regions, like the Mediterranean and the Caribbean sea, this is quite possible due to the limited size of the ocean basins. Close cooperation between the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) community, seismologists, tsunami scientists and TWS operators is highly recommended to obtain significant progresses in the quick determination of the earthquake source, which can trigger a timely estimation of the ensuing tsunami and a more reliable and detailed assessment of the tsunami size at the coast.

  11. Single-shot observation of optical rogue waves in integrable turbulence using time microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Suret, Pierre; Koussaifi, Rebecca El; Tikan, Alexey; Evain, Clément; Randoux, Stéphane; Szwaj, Christophe; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Optical fibres are favourable tabletop laboratories to investigate both coherent and incoherent nonlinear waves. In particular, exact solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation such as fundamental solitons or solitons on finite background can be generated by launching periodic, specifically designed coherent waves in optical fibres. It is an open fundamental question to know whether these coherent structures can emerge from the nonlinear propagation of random waves. However the typical sub-picosecond timescale prevented—up to now—time-resolved observations of the awaited dynamics. Here, we report temporal ‘snapshots' of random light using a specially designed ‘time-microscope'. Ultrafast structures having peak powers much larger than the average optical power are generated from the propagation of partially coherent waves in optical fibre and are recorded with 250 femtoseconds resolution. Our experiment demonstrates the central role played by ‘breather-like' structures such as the Peregrine soliton in the emergence of heavy-tailed statistics in integrable turbulence. PMID:27713416

  12. Dust Signatures from Late-time Infrared and Optical Observations of SN 1998S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzo, M.; Meikle, W. P. S.; Fassia, A.; Geballe, T.; Lundqvist, P.; Chugai, N. N.; Sollerman, J.

    2005-12-01

    We present late-time IR (1-5 µm) and optical observations of the type IIn SN 1998S up to about 1200 days post-explosion. The shape and evolution of the Hα and He I 1.083 µm line profiles indicate a powerful interaction with a massive progenitor wind and provide evidence of dust condensation within the ejecta. 1.5-2.5 µm spectra and HKL'M' photometry reveal strong IR emission due to hot dust in the ejecta and/or circumstellar medium (CSM). For the origin of the IR emission we favour dust condensation (at least 10^{-3} M_{sun}) in a cool dense shell (CDS) as the main IR source but do not rule out a contribution from the CSM. The late-time evolution of the intrinsic (K-L') colour of type II supernovae (SNe) may be a potentially useful tool for determining the presence or absence of a massive CSM around their progenitors.

  13. Space-Time Variations in Water Vapor as Observed by the UARS Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elson, Lee S.; Read, William G.; Waters, Joe W.; Mote, Philip W.; Kinnersley, Jonathan S.; Harwood, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor in the upper troposphere has a significant impact on the climate system. Difficulties in making accurate global measurements have led to uncertainty in understanding water vapor's coupling to the hydrologic cycle in the lower troposphere and its role in radiative energy balance. The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite is able to retrieve water vapor concentration in the upper troposphere with good sensitivity and nearly global coverage. An analysis of these preliminary retrievals based on 3 years of observations shows the water vapor distribution to be similar to that measured by other techniques and to model results. The primary MLS water vapor measurements were made in the stratosphere, where this species acts as a conserved tracer under certain conditions. As is the case for the upper troposphere, most of the stratospheric discussion focuses on the time evolution of the zonal mean and zonally varying water vapor. Stratospheric results span a 19-month period and tropospheric results a 36-month period, both beginning in October of 1991. Comparisons with stratospheric model calculations show general agreement, with some differences in the amplitude and phase of long-term variations. At certain times and places, the evolution of water vapor distributions in the lower stratosphere suggests the presence of meridional transport.

  14. Real-time observation of the isothermal crystallization kinetics in a deeply supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanatta, M.; Cormier, L.; Hennet, L.; Petrillo, C.; Sacchetti, F.

    2017-03-01

    Below the melting temperature Tm, crystals are the stable phase of typical elemental or molecular systems. However, cooling down a liquid below Tm, crystallization is anything but inevitable. The liquid can be supercooled, eventually forming a glass below the glass transition temperature Tg. Despite their long lifetimes and the presence of strong barriers that produces an apparent stability, supercooled liquids and glasses remain intrinsically a metastable state and thermodynamically unstable towards the crystal. Here we investigated the isothermal crystallization kinetics of the prototypical strong glassformer GeO2 in the deep supercooled liquid at 1100 K, about half-way between Tm and Tg. The crystallization process has been observed through time-resolved neutron diffraction for about three days. Data show a continuous reorganization of the amorphous structure towards the alpha-quartz phase with the final material composed by crystalline domains plunged into a low-density, residual amorphous matrix. A quantitative analysis of the diffraction patterns allows determining the time evolution of the relative fractions of crystal and amorphous, that was interpreted through an empirical model for the crystallization kinetics. This approach provides a very good description of the experimental data and identifies a predator-prey-like mechanism between crystal and amorphous, where the density variation acts as a blocking barrier.

  15. Comparisons Between TIME-GCM/MERRA Simulations and LEO Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, M. E.; Haeusler, K.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Doornbos, E.; Bruinsma, S.; Lu, G.

    2014-12-01

    We report on yearlong National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) simulations where we utilize the recently developed lower boundary condition based on 3-hourly MERRA (Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application) reanalysis data to account for tropospheric waves and tides propagating upward into the model domain. The solar and geomagnetic forcing is based on prevailing geophysical conditions. The simulations show a strong day-to-day variability in the upper thermospheric neutral temperature tidal fields, which is smoothed out quickly when averaging is applied over several days, e.g. up to 50% DE3 amplitude reduction for a 10-day average. This is an important result with respect to tidal diagnostics from satellite observations where averaging over multiple days is inevitable. In order to assess TIME-GCM performance we compare the simulations with measurements from the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE), Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites.

  16. Real-time observation of the isothermal crystallization kinetics in a deeply supercooled liquid

    PubMed Central

    Zanatta, M.; Cormier, L.; Hennet, L.; Petrillo, C.; Sacchetti, F.

    2017-01-01

    Below the melting temperature Tm, crystals are the stable phase of typical elemental or molecular systems. However, cooling down a liquid below Tm, crystallization is anything but inevitable. The liquid can be supercooled, eventually forming a glass below the glass transition temperature Tg. Despite their long lifetimes and the presence of strong barriers that produces an apparent stability, supercooled liquids and glasses remain intrinsically a metastable state and thermodynamically unstable towards the crystal. Here we investigated the isothermal crystallization kinetics of the prototypical strong glassformer GeO2 in the deep supercooled liquid at 1100 K, about half-way between Tm and Tg. The crystallization process has been observed through time-resolved neutron diffraction for about three days. Data show a continuous reorganization of the amorphous structure towards the alpha-quartz phase with the final material composed by crystalline domains plunged into a low-density, residual amorphous matrix. A quantitative analysis of the diffraction patterns allows determining the time evolution of the relative fractions of crystal and amorphous, that was interpreted through an empirical model for the crystallization kinetics. This approach provides a very good description of the experimental data and identifies a predator-prey-like mechanism between crystal and amorphous, where the density variation acts as a blocking barrier. PMID:28255173

  17. Recurrence times and periodicities in 4U 1608-52 as observed by Vela 5B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lochner, James C.; Roussel-Dupre, Diane

    1994-01-01

    We report on the Vela 5B 10 year history of the soft X-ray transient 4U 1608-52, and on the characteristics of its soft X-ray outbursts. The Vela 5B satellite observed the four known outbursts in 1975, 1977, and 1979, and four new outbursts in 1970 and 1971, altering the recurrence pattern of outbursts from this source. One of the 1970 outbursts is symmetric in its intensity profile, while the two outbursts in 1971 have short exponential profiles separated by 80 days. Despite suggestive recurrence periods of approximately 85 and approximately 150 days evident in the time intervals between the outbursts, there is no single statistically significant recurrence time on which the outbursts recur consistently. In the 1970 symmetric event, there is evidence for a period of either 4.10 or 5.19 days. Drawing upon the analogy with SU Ursa Majoris dwarf novae, we suggest that the short period is orbital and any longer period would be associated with a precession period of the accretion disk.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler transit timing observations. VIII. (Mazeh+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazeh, T.; Nachmani, G.; Holczer, T.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Ford, E. B.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Sokol, G.; Rowe, J. F.; Zucker, S.; Agol, E.; Carter, J. A.; Lissauer, J. J.; Quintana, E. V.; Ragozzine, D.; Steffen, J. H.; Welsh, W.

    2013-10-01

    Following the works of Ford et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJS/197/2; 2012ApJ...756..185F) and Steffen et al. (2012ApJ...756..186S) we derived the transit timing of 1960 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) using the pre-search data conditioning light curves of the first twelve quarters of the Kepler data. For 721 KOIs with large enough signal-to-noise ratios, we obtained also the duration and depth of each transit. The results are presented as a catalog for the community to use. We derived a few statistics of our results that could be used to indicate significant variations. Including systems found by previous works, we have found 130 KOIs that showed highly significant times of transit variations (TTVs) and 13 that had short-period TTV modulations with small amplitudes. We consider two effects that could cause apparent periodic TTV -- the finite sampling of the observations and the interference with the stellar activity, stellar spots in particular. We briefly discuss some statistical aspects of our detected TTVs. We show that the TTV period is correlated with the orbital period of the planet and with the TTV amplitude. (7 data files).

  19. Real-time observation of the isothermal crystallization kinetics in a deeply supercooled liquid.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, M; Cormier, L; Hennet, L; Petrillo, C; Sacchetti, F

    2017-03-03

    Below the melting temperature Tm, crystals are the stable phase of typical elemental or molecular systems. However, cooling down a liquid below Tm, crystallization is anything but inevitable. The liquid can be supercooled, eventually forming a glass below the glass transition temperature Tg. Despite their long lifetimes and the presence of strong barriers that produces an apparent stability, supercooled liquids and glasses remain intrinsically a metastable state and thermodynamically unstable towards the crystal. Here we investigated the isothermal crystallization kinetics of the prototypical strong glassformer GeO2 in the deep supercooled liquid at 1100 K, about half-way between Tm and Tg. The crystallization process has been observed through time-resolved neutron diffraction for about three days. Data show a continuous reorganization of the amorphous structure towards the alpha-quartz phase with the final material composed by crystalline domains plunged into a low-density, residual amorphous matrix. A quantitative analysis of the diffraction patterns allows determining the time evolution of the relative fractions of crystal and amorphous, that was interpreted through an empirical model for the crystallization kinetics. This approach provides a very good description of the experimental data and identifies a predator-prey-like mechanism between crystal and amorphous, where the density variation acts as a blocking barrier.

  20. Single-shot observation of optical rogue waves in integrable turbulence using time microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suret, Pierre; Koussaifi, Rebecca El; Tikan, Alexey; Evain, Clément; Randoux, Stéphane; Szwaj, Christophe; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-10-01

    Optical fibres are favourable tabletop laboratories to investigate both coherent and incoherent nonlinear waves. In particular, exact solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation such as fundamental solitons or solitons on finite background can be generated by launching periodic, specifically designed coherent waves in optical fibres. It is an open fundamental question to know whether these coherent structures can emerge from the nonlinear propagation of random waves. However the typical sub-picosecond timescale prevented--up to now--time-resolved observations of the awaited dynamics. Here, we report temporal `snapshots' of random light using a specially designed `time-microscope'. Ultrafast structures having peak powers much larger than the average optical power are generated from the propagation of partially coherent waves in optical fibre and are recorded with 250 femtoseconds resolution. Our experiment demonstrates the central role pl