Science.gov

Sample records for observatory precipitable water

  1. Calculation of Precipitable Water for Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy Aircraft (SOFIA): Airplane in the Night Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Pey Chun; Busby, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, is the new generation airborne observatory station based at NASA s Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility, Palmdale, CA, to study the universe. Since the observatory detects infrared energy, water vapor is a concern in the atmosphere due to its known capacity to absorb infrared energy emitted by astronomical objects. Although SOFIA is hoping to fly above 99% of water vapor in the atmosphere it is still possible to affect astronomical observation. Water vapor is one of the toughest parameter to measure in the atmosphere, several atmosphere modeling are used to calculate water vapor loading. The water vapor loading, or Precipitable water, is being calculated by Matlab along the planned flight path. Over time, these results will help SOFIA to plan flights to regions of lower water vapor loading and hopefully improve the imagery collection of these astronomical features.

  2. Precipitable Water Vapour at the Canarian Observatories (Teide and Roque de los Muchachos) from routine GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Almazán, Julio A.; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; García-Lorenzo, Begoña.; Pérez-Jordán, Gabriel; Varela, Antonia M.; Romero, Ignacio

    2016-07-01

    We are presenting two years (2012 and 2013) of preliminary statistical results of calibrated PWV values from the GPS geodesic antennas (LPAL and IZAN) at Teide and Roque de los Muchachos Observatories (OT and ORM), Canary Islands. To calibrate the PWV from both GPS antennas we have selected a set of simultaneous high vertical resolution radio-sounding profiles from the closest operational balloon station, Güímar (GUI-WMO 60018; ≍15 km distant from OT and ≍150 km from ORM). The calibrations showed a correlation of 0.994 and 0.970 for OT and ORM, respectively, with rmse of 0.44 and 0.70 mm. The calibrated PWV series brought median values of 3.5 mm at OT and 4.0 mm at ORM. The difference is explained by the 200 m of difference in height of the antennas (LPAL antenna is below the telescopes altitude). Twenty five percent of the time, PWV is less than 1.7 mm.

  3. The Orbital Checkout Status of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Takeshi; Kojima, Masahiro; Furukawa, Kinji; Hyakusoku, Yasutoshi; Ishikiri, Takayuki; Kai, Hiroki; Iguchi, Toshio; Hanado, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro

    2014-05-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core observatory is developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) with National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). GPM objective is to observe global precipitation more frequently and accurately. GPM contributes to climate and water cycle change studies, flood prediction and numerical weather forecast. GPM consists of the GPM core observatory and constellation satellites carrying microwave radiometers (MWRs) and/or sounders (MWSs). The frequent measurement will be achieved by constellation satellites, and the accurate measurement will be achieved by the DPR with high sensitivity and dual frequency capability. The GPM core observatory is jointly developed by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and JAXA. NASA is developing the satellite bus and GPM microwave radiometer (GMI), and JAXA is developing the DPR. The DPR consists of Ku-band (13.6 GHz) radar suitable for heavy rainfall in the tropical region, and Ka-band (35.55 GHz) radar suitable for light rainfall in higher latitude region. Drop size distribution information will be derived which contributes to the improvement of rainfall estimate accuracy. DPR will also play a key role to improve rainfall estimation accuracy of constellation satellites. DPR proto-flight test at JAXA Tsukuba space center has been completed in February 2012. The DPR has handed over to NASA and integrated to the core observatory in May 2012. The system test of the core observatory has completed in November 2013 and DPR test results satisfied its system requirements. The core observatory was shipped to launch site of JAXA Tanegashima space center in Japan. Launch site activities have started on November 2013 and GPM core observatory will be launched in early 2014. DPR orbital check out will be started in March 2014 and it will be completed in April 2014. In this presentation, the orbital check out

  4. Total Precipitable Water

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

  5. HAWC: The high altitude water Cherenkov observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Jordan A.

    2013-02-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is currently being deployed at 4100m above sea level on the Vulcan Sierra Negra near Puebla, Mexico. The HAWC observatory will consist of 250-300 Water Cherenkov Detectors totaling approximately 22,000 m2 of instrumented area. The water Cherenkov technique allows HAWC to have a nearly 100% duty cycle and large field of view, making the HAWC observatory an ideal instrument for the study of transient phenomena. With its large effective area, excellent angular and energy resolutions, and efficient gamma-hadron separation, HAWC will survey the TeV gamma-ray sky, measure spectra of galactic sources from 1 TeV to beyond 100 TeV, and map galactic diffuse gamma ray emission. The science goals, instrument performance and status of the HAWC observatory will be presented.

  6. WEATHER_Layered-Precipitable-Water

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-23

    ... TOVS (HIRS) clear sky radiances Radiosonde GPS (after 1995) AIRS Level 2 TPW and Layered PW Spatial ... Parameters:  Precipitable Water Order Data:  Earthdata Search:  Earthdata Search SCAR-B ...

  7. WEATHER_Total-Precipitable-Water

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-23

    ... TOVS (HIRS) clear sky radiances Radiosonde GPS (after 1995) AIRS Level 2 TPW and Layered PW Spatial ... Parameters:  Precipitable Water Order Data:  Earthdata Search:  Earthdata Search SCAR-B ...

  8. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafá, Miguel A.

    2014-10-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV γ-ray experiment under construction at 4,100 m a.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow us to detect both the transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV γ-ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from γ-ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first 30 WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer 2012, and 100 WCDs will be taking data by May, 2013. We present in this paper the motivation for constructing the HAWC observatory, the status of the deployment, and the first results from the constantly growing array.

  9. Impacts of Light Precipitation Detection with Dual Frequency Radar on Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory (GPM/DPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayabu, Y. N.; Hamada, A.; Oki, R.; Kachi, M.; Kubota, T.; Iguchi, T.; Shige, S.; Nakamura, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on board the GPM Core Observatory consists of Ku-band (13.6 GHz) and Ka-band (35.5 GHz) radars, with an improved minimum detection sensitivity of precipitation compared to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR). We have studied impacts of improved detection sensitivity with the GPM DPR compared with the TRMM PR. One example of light precipitation is, a scattered rainfall around a trough over the subtropical South Pacific Ocean, which consists of weak but erect precipitation reaching over the melting level of ~2.5 km and trailing precipitation above, which reaches as high as 5km. Another example is a light anvil precipitation spreading from convective cores of a storm in the upper troposphere, overcasting shallow convective precipitation below. The ability of globally detecting such light precipitation will improve our knowledge of precipitation processes. Utilizing an early version of the DPR product, a quick evaluation on statistical impacts of increasing the detection sensitivity from 17dBZ to 12dBZ has been performed. Here, 17dBZ is the value which is mostly accepted as the performed detection sensitivity of the TRMM PR, and 12dBZ is the guaranteed sensitivity for GPM Ka-band radar. For the near surface precipitation, impacts are significant in terms of numbers, but limited to several regions in terms of the rainfall volume. Volume impacts are much larger at the upper troposphere, which is indicated by the detection of the anvil precipitation, for example. The upper level improvements are mostly found where the deep precipitation systems exist. Quantitative discussions utilizing the latest version of the DPR data, which is scheduled to be released to the public in September, will be presented at the session.

  10. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, Wayne

    2014-06-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a continuously operated, wide field of view detector based upon a water Cherenkov technology developed by the Milagro experiment. HAWC observes, at an elevation of 4100 m on Sierra Negra Mountain in Mexico, extensive air showers initiated by gamma and cosmic rays. The completed detector will consist of 300 closely spaced water tanks each instrumented with four photomultiplier tubes that provide timing and charge information used to reconstruct energy and arrival direction. HAWC has been optimized to observe transient and steady emission from point as well as diffuse sources of gamma rays in the energy range from several hundred GeV to several hundred TeV. Studies in solar physics as well as the properties of cosmic rays will also be performed. HAWC has been making observations at various stages of deployment since completion of 10% of the array in summer 2012. A discussion of the detector design, science capabilities, current construction/commissioning status, and first results will be presented...

  11. Layer Precipitable Water (LPW) Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, John; Kidder, Stan; Fuell, Kevin; LeRoy, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MIRS) provides soundings of specific humidity from a variety of instruments and is combined with AIRS infrared soundings to create a Layered Precipitable Water (LPW) composite product. The LPW provides vertical moisture information in the column instead of just upper levels via WV imagery, or a single column value via TPW products. LPW is created every 3 hours using the last 12 hours worth of data and has a delivery latency of 40 minutes. Weaknesses include discontinuities in the composite. Strengths include seeing through clouds, over land usage, and greater spatial coverage of vertical moisture profiles. Applications of LPW include analysis of horizontal and vertical moisture gradients, verification of NWP moisture, and analysis of atmospheric rivers and other moisture advection. Operational testbed is ongoing to determine viability of wider distribution.

  12. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Miguel; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a continuously operated, wide field of view experiment comprised of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs) to study transient and steady emission of TeV gamma and cosmic rays. Each 200000 l WCD is instrumented with 4 PMTs providing charge and timing information. The array covers ~22000 m2 at an altitude of 4100 m a.s.l. inside the Pico de Orizaba national park in Mexico. The high altitude, large active area, and optical isolation of the PMTs allows us to reliably estimate the energy and determine the arrival direction of gamma and cosmic rays with significant sensitivity over energies from several hundred GeV to a hundred TeV. Continuously observing 2 / 3 of the sky every 24 h, HAWC plays a significant role as a survey instrument for multi-wavelength studies. The performance of HAWC makes possible the detection of both transient and steady emissions, the study of diffuse emission and the measurement of the spectra of gamma-ray sources at TeV energies. HAWC is also sensitive to the emission from GRBs above 100 GeV. I will highlight the results from the first year of operation of the full HAWC array, and describe the ongoing site work to expand the array by a factor of 4 to explore the high energy range.

  13. Evaluating cloud precipitation efficiency with satellite retrievals of water isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, A.; Noone, D. C.; Wood, R.

    2015-12-01

    The efficiency with which clouds precipitate is believed to influence climate by modifying cloud lifetime and, ultimately, cloud amount. Aerosols can influence this linkage by reducing the effective radii of cloud droplets and suppressing precipitation. This relationship, however, is not unidirectional. Cloud precipitation efficiency can also regulate particle concentrations, since precipitation effectively scavenges aerosols from the atmosphere. One challenge in studying how aerosols, clouds, and precipitation processes interrelate is that observational constraints are difficult to attain. This work evaluates the ability of isotope ratios in water vapor to quantify cloud precipitation efficiency across the tropical and subtropical oceans. Theory suggests isotope ratios will record the precipitation efficiency of a convective plume, since heavier isotopologues precipitate preferentially; and a recent analysis of in situ measurements from the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO, Hawaii, USA) verifies this to be the case. The challenge now lies in understanding whether satellite retrievals of isotope ratios in water vapor are sensitive enough to track precipitation efficiency globally. To answer this question, vertical profiles of the D/H ratio derived from NASA's Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) are first compared with the MLO in situ measurements. A qualitative match indicates the satellite retrievals can distinguish high from low precipitation efficiency convection. To expand the analysis geographically, TES profiles between 40°S and 40°N are compared with estimates of precipitation efficiency derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and ECMWF's ERA-Interim. Retrievals are binned by lower-tropospheric humidity and by vertical velocity in order to minimize large-scale thermodynamical influences. Co-located cloud retrievals provide the context necessary to evaluate the utility of these new estimates in elucidating cloud feedbacks on climate.

  14. First scientific contributions from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León Vargas, H.; HAWC Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC), located at the slopes of the volcanoes Sierra Negra and Pico de Orizaba in Mexico, was inaugurated on March 20, 2015. However, data taking started in August 2013 with a partially deployed observatory and since then the instrument has collected data as it got closer to its final configuration. HAWC is a ground based TeV gamma-ray observatory with a large field of view that will be used to study the Northern sky with high sensitivity. In this contribution we present some of the results obtained with the partially built instrument and the expected capabilities to detect different phenomena with the complete observatory.

  15. Water Vapor Monitoring at the Roque de LOS Muchachos Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Espinosa, J. M.; Kidger, M.; del Rosario, J. C.; Trancho, G.

    1997-12-01

    We present the first results from a long-term campaign of water vapor monitoring at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Canary Islands, Spain). This observatory is situated on a volcanic peak, on the small island of La Palma. Although its altitude is relatively low (2400 meters), our initial site-testing, taken for site selection for the Spanish 10m telescope project, shows that a significant fraction of nights have water vapor column of 1mm, or lower, with values of 2mm and lower being relatively common, even in summer. The water vapor column can be stable at under 1mm for several nights, with only minimal variations. We contrast the results obtained using an infrared radiometer (on loan from Kitt Peak National Observatory), with those obtained using the 940nm water vapor line and comment briefly on plans for future automatic monitoring of water vapor at the observatory.

  16. In-Flight Performance of the Water Vapor Monitor Onboard the Sofia Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, Thomas L.; Yuen, Lunming; Sisson, David; Hang, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) airborne observatory flies in a modified B747-SP aircraft in the lower stratosphere above more than 99.9% of the Earth's water vapor. As low as this residual water vapor is, it will still affect SOFIA's infrared and sub-millimeter astronomical observations. As a result, a heterodyne instrument has been developed to observe the strength and shape of the 1830Hz rotational line of water, allowing measurements of the integrated water vapor overburden in flight. In order to be useful in correcting the astronomical signals, the required measured precipitable water vapor accuracy must be 2 microns or better, 3 sigma, and measured at least once a minute. The Water Vapor Monitor has flown 22 times during the SOFIA Early Science shared-risk period. The instrument water vapor overburden data obtained were then compared with concurrent data from GOES-V satellites to perform a preliminary calibration of the measurements. This presentation will cover the.results of these flights. The final flight calibration necessary to reach the required accuracy will await subsequent flights following the SOFIA observatory upgrade that is taking place during the spring and summer of 2012.

  17. CALCULATION: PRECIPITATION CHARACTERISITICS FOR STORM WATER MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    D. Ambos

    2000-08-14

    This Calculation is intended to satisfy engineering requirements for maximum 60-minute precipitation amounts for 50 and 100-year return periods at and near Yucca Mountain. This data requirement is documented in the ''Interface Control Document for Support Operations to Surface Facilities Operations Functional and Organizational Interfaces'' (CRWMS M&O 1998a). These developed data will supplement the information on 0.1 hour to 6-hour (in 0.1-hour increments) probable maximum precipitation (PMP) presented in the report, ''Precipitation Design Criteria for Storm Water Management'' (CRWMS M&O 1998b). The Reference Information Base (RIB) item, Precipitation ''Characteristics for Storm Water Management'' (M09902RIB00045 .OOO), was developed based on CRWMS M&O (1998b) and will be supplemented (via revision) with the information developed in this Calculation. The ''Development Plan for the Calculation: Precipitation Characteristics for Storm Water Management'' (CRWMS M&O 2000) was prepared in accordance with AP-2.l3Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning''. This calculation was developed in accordance with AP-3.12Q, Rev. O/ICN 2.

  18. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory: First Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisgarber, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction at Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla in Mexico. Operation began in September 2012, with the first 30 out of the final 300 water Cherenkov detectors deployed and in data acquisition. The HAWC Observatory is designed to record particle air showers from gamma rays and cosmic rays with TeV energies. Though the detector is only 10% complete, HAWC is already the world's largest water Cherenkov detector in the TeV band. In this presentation, I will summarize the performance of the detector to date and discuss preliminary observations of cosmic-ray and gamma-ray sources. I will also describe deployment plans for the remainder of the detector and outline prospects for TeV observations in the coming year.

  19. Mars water-ice clouds and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Whiteway, J A; Komguem, L; Dickinson, C; Cook, C; Illnicki, M; Seabrook, J; Popovici, V; Duck, T J; Davy, R; Taylor, P A; Pathak, J; Fisher, D; Carswell, A I; Daly, M; Hipkin, V; Zent, A P; Hecht, M H; Wood, S E; Tamppari, L K; Renno, N; Moores, J E; Lemmon, M T; Daerden, F; Smith, P H

    2009-07-03

    The light detection and ranging instrument on the Phoenix mission observed water-ice clouds in the atmosphere of Mars that were similar to cirrus clouds on Earth. Fall streaks in the cloud structure traced the precipitation of ice crystals toward the ground. Measurements of atmospheric dust indicated that the planetary boundary layer (PBL) on Mars was well mixed, up to heights of around 4 kilometers, by the summer daytime turbulence and convection. The water-ice clouds were detected at the top of the PBL and near the ground each night in late summer after the air temperature started decreasing. The interpretation is that water vapor mixed upward by daytime turbulence and convection forms ice crystal clouds at night that precipitate back toward the surface.

  20. The water Cherenkov detectors of the HAWC Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Megan; Mostafa, Miguel

    2012-10-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a very high-energy gamma-ray detector which is currently under construction at 4100 m in Sierra Negra, Mexico. The observatory will be composed of an array of 300 Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCDs). Each WCD consists of a 5 m tall by 7.3 m wide steel tank containing a hermetically sealed plastic bag, called a bladder, which is filled with 200,000 liters of purified water. The detectors are each equipped with four upward-facing photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), anchored to the bottom of the bladder. At Colorado State University (CSU) we have the only full-size prototype outside of the HAWC site. It serves as a testbed for installation and operation procedures for the HAWC observatory. The WCD at CSU has been fully operational since March 2011, and has several components not yet present at the HAWC site. In addition to the four HAWC position PMTs, our prototype has three additional PMTs, including one shrouded (dark) PMT. We also have five scintillator paddles, four buried underneath the HAWC position PMTs, and one freely moving paddle above the volume of water. These extra additions will allow us to work on muon reconstruction with a single WCD. We will describe the analysis being done with the data taken with the CSU prototype, its impact on the HAWC detector, and future plans for the prototype.

  1. Scientific verification of High Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, Antonio; Sparks, Kathryne; Alfaro, Ruben; González, María Magdalena; Patricelli, Barbara; Fraija, Nissim

    2014-04-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a TeV gamma-ray and cosmic-ray detector currently under construction at an altitude of 4100 m close to volcano Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla, Mexico. The HAWC [1] observatory is an extensive air-shower array composed of 300 optically isolated water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs). Each WCD contains ~200,000 l of filtered water and four upward-facing photomultiplier tubes. In Fall 2014, when the HAWC observatory will reach an area of 22,000 m2, the sensitivity will be 15 times higher than its predecessor Milagro [2]. Since September 2012, more than 30 WCDs have been instrumented and taking data. This first commissioning phase has been crucial for the verification of the data acquisition and event reconstruction algorithms. Moreover, with the increasing number of instrumented WCDs, it is important to verify the data taken with different configuration geometries. In this work we present a comparison between Monte Carlo simulation and data recorded by the experiment during 24 h of live time between 14 and 15 April of 2013 when 29 WCDs were active.

  2. First year results of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carramiñana, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) γ-ray observatory is a wide field of view (1.8 Sr) and high duty cycle (> 95% up-time) detector of unique capabilities for the study of TeV gamma-ray sources. Installed at an altitude of 4100m in the Northern slope of Volcan Sierra Negra, Puebla, by a collaboration of about thirty institutions of Mexico and the United States, HAWC has been in full operations since March 2015, surveying 2/3 of the sky every sidereal day, monitoring active galaxies and mapping sources in the Galactic Plane to a detection level of 1 Crab per day. This contribution summarizes the main results of the first year of observations of the HAWC γ-ray observatory.

  3. Precipitation Recycling and the Vertical Distribution of Local and Remote Sources of Water for Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Precipitation recycling is defined as the amount of water that evaporates from a region that precipitates within the same region. This is also interpreted as the local source of water for precipitation. In this study, the local and remote sources of water for precipitation have been diagnosed through the use of passive constituent tracers that represent regional evaporative sources along with their transport and precipitation. We will discuss the differences between this method and the simpler bulk diagnostic approach to precipitation recycling. A summer seasonal simulation has been analyzed for the regional sources of the United States Great Plains precipitation. While the tropical Atlantic Ocean (including the Gulf of Mexico) and the local continental sources of precipitation are most dominant, the vertically integrated column of water contains substantial water content originating from the Northern Pacific Ocean, which is not precipitated. The vertical profiles of regional water sources indicate that local Great Plains source of water dominates the lower troposphere, predominantly in the PBL. However, the Pacific Ocean source is dominant over a large portion of the middle to upper troposphere. The influence of the tropical Atlantic Ocean is reasonably uniform throughout the column. While the results are not unexpected given the formulation of the model's convective parameterization, the analysis provides a quantitative assessment of the impact of local evaporation on the occurrence of convective precipitation in the GCM. Further, these results suggest that local source of water is not well mixed throughout the vertical column.

  4. Draix multidisciplinary observatory for water and sediment processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bouteiller, C.; Mathys, N.; Liébault, F.; Klotz, S.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decades, much progress has been done in the modeling and conceptualizing of surface processes. Testing theories and models requires field data, and possibly long-term time series. Here we present a 30-year old field observatory dedicated to water and sediment fluxes in the French Alps. Draix observatory is located in a badland area of the French Alps (shale lithology), and includes several subcatchments which differ in size (0.001 to 1 km2) and vegetation coverage (bare soil or forest). Climate is mountainous and Mediterranean, characterized with summer storm-induced floods and winter frost. Data collected includes climatic data (rainfall, temperature) and water and sediment fluxes (discharge at the outlet of each subcatchment, suspended load and bedload fluxes). High frequency monitoring (minute/hour) is used to capture flood dynamics. Some soil hydraulic and geophysical properties, lidar scans and vegetation maps are also available. The combination of an erodible badland morphology and tough climatic conditions induces very high erosion rates and sediment yield (up to 70 tons/ha/yr). Observed erosion processes include landslides, small-scale debris flows, gully formation, weathering on the slopes and in the riverbeds, hyperconcentrated flows and in-transport sediment abrasion. The sediment response is highly non-linear with a strong seasonal pattern of storage and scour in the bed. Current research on Draix observatory is multidisciplinary and involves hydraulic engineers, hydrologists, geomorphologists, soil scientists and restoration ecologists. Fast rates of geomorphic changes, well-constrained sediment budgets and long data series are some of the advantages of this site for the study of earth surface processes. Our data is available for the community and we welcome everyone who is interested in collaborating on it.

  5. Precipitation Nonstationarity Effects on Water Infrastructure and Risk Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    The non-stationary precipitation regime, as increasingly recognized, affects the engineering basis and service functions of drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater infrastructures in urban centers. Small, yet significant rates of temporal precipitation change and diverse spat...

  6. Latest news from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Muñoz, A.; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory is an air shower detector designed to study very-high-energy gamma rays (˜ 100 GeV to ˜ 100 TeV). It is located in the Pico de Orizaba National Park, Mexico, at an elevation of 4100 m. HAWC started operations since August 2013 with 111 tanks and in April of 2015 the 300 tanks array was completed. HAWC's unique capabilities, with a field of view of ˜ 2 sr and a high duty cycle of 5%, allow it to survey 2/3 of the sky every day. These features makes HAWC an excellent instrument for searching new TeV sources and for the detection of transient events, like gamma-ray bursts. Moreover, HAWC provides almost continuous monitoring of already known sources with variable gamma-ray fluxes in most of the northern and part of the southern sky. These observations will bring new information about the acceleration processes that take place in astrophysical environments. In this contribution, some of the latest scientific results of the observatory will be presented.

  7. The integrated water balance and soil data set of the Rollesbroich hydrological observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Wei; Bogena, Heye R.; Huisman, Johan A.; Schmidt, Marius; Kunkel, Ralf; Weuthen, Ansgar; Schiedung, Henning; Schilling, Bernd; Sorg, Jürgen; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-10-01

    The Rollesbroich headwater catchment located in western Germany is a densely instrumented hydrological observatory and part of the TERENO (Terrestrial Environmental Observatories) initiative. The measurements acquired in this observatory present a comprehensive data set that contains key hydrological fluxes in addition to important hydrological states and properties. Meteorological data (i.e., precipitation, air temperature, air humidity, radiation components, and wind speed) are continuously recorded and actual evapotranspiration is measured using the eddy covariance technique. Runoff is measured at the catchment outlet with a gauging station. In addition, spatiotemporal variations in soil water content and temperature are measured at high resolution with a wireless sensor network (SoilNet). Soil physical properties were determined using standard laboratory procedures from samples taken at a large number of locations in the catchment. This comprehensive data set can be used to validate remote sensing retrievals and hydrological models, to improve the understanding of spatial temporal dynamics of soil water content, to optimize data assimilation and inverse techniques for hydrological models, and to develop upscaling and downscaling procedures of soil water content information. The complete data set is freely available online (http://www.tereno.net, doi:10.5880/TERENO.2016.001, doi:10.5880/TERENO.2016.004, doi:10.5880/TERENO.2016.003) and additionally referenced by three persistent identifiers securing the long-term data and metadata availability.

  8. Stochastic Models for Precipitable Water in Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Kimberly

    Atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) is the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere within a vertical column of unit cross-sectional area and is a critically important parameter of precipitation processes. However, accurate high-frequency and long-term observations of PWV in the sky were impossible until the availability of modern instruments such as radar. The United States Department of Energy (DOE)'s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program facility made the first systematic and high-resolution observations of PWV at Darwin, Australia since 2002. At a resolution of 20 seconds, this time series allowed us to examine the volatility of PWV, including fractal behavior with dimension equal to 1.9, higher than the Brownian motion dimension of 1.5. Such strong fractal behavior calls for stochastic differential equation modeling in an attempt to address some of the difficulties of convective parameterization in various kinds of climate models, ranging from general circulation models (GCM) to weather research forecasting (WRF) models. This important observed data at high resolution can capture the fractal behavior of PWV and enables stochastic exploration into the next generation of climate models which considers scales from micrometers to thousands of kilometers. As a first step, this thesis explores a simple stochastic differential equation model of water mass balance for PWV and assesses accuracy, robustness, and sensitivity of the stochastic model. A 1000-day simulation allows for the determination of the best-fitting 25-day period as compared to data from the TWP-ICE field campaign conducted out of Darwin, Australia in early 2006. The observed data and this portion of the simulation had a correlation coefficient of 0.6513 and followed similar statistics and low-resolution temporal trends. Building on the point model foundation, a similar algorithm was applied to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s existing single-column model as a test

  9. Stochastic Models for Precipitable Water in Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Kimberly

    Atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) is the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere within a vertical column of unit cross-sectional area and is a critically important parameter of precipitation processes. However, accurate high-frequency and long-term observations of PWV in the sky were impossible until the availability of modern instruments such as radar. The United States Department of Energy (DOE)'s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program facility made the first systematic and high-resolution observations of PWV at Darwin, Australia since 2002. At a resolution of 20 seconds, this time series allowed us to examine the volatility of PWV, including fractal behavior with dimension equal to 1.9, higher than the Brownian motion dimension of 1.5. Such strong fractal behavior calls for stochastic differential equation modeling in an attempt to address some of the difficulties of convective parameterization in various kinds of climate models, ranging from general circulation models (GCM) to weather research forecasting (WRF) models. This important observed data at high resolution can capture the fractal behavior of PWV and enables stochastic exploration into the next generation of climate models which considers scales from micrometers to thousands of kilometers. As a first step, this thesis explores a simple stochastic differential equation model of water mass balance for PWV and assesses accuracy, robustness, and sensitivity of the stochastic model. A 1000-day simulation allows for the determination of the best-fitting 25-day period as compared to data from the TWP-ICE field campaign conducted out of Darwin, Australia in early 2006. The observed data and this portion of the simulation had a correlation coefficient of 0.6513 and followed similar statistics and low-resolution temporal trends. Building on the point model foundation, a similar algorithm was applied to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s existing single-column model as a test

  10. Validation of Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's OMI Water Vapor Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.

    2015-12-01

    We perform a comprehensive validation of SAO's OMI water vapor product. The SAO OMI water vapor slant column is retrieved using the 430 - 480 nm wavelength range. In addition to water vapor, the retrieval considers O3, NO2, liquid water, O4, C2H2O2, the Ring effect, water ring, 3rd order polynomial, common mode and under-sampling. The slant column is converted to vertical column using AMF. AMF is calculated using GEOS-Chem water vapor profile shape, OMCLDO2 cloud information and OMLER surface albedo information. We validate our product using NCAR's GPS network data over the world and RSS's gridded microwave data over the ocean. We also compare our product with the total precipitable water derived from the AERONET ground-based sun photometer data, the GlobVapour gridded product, and other datasets. We investigate the influence of sub-grid scale variability and filtering criteria on the comparison. We study the influence of clouds, aerosols and a priori profiles on the retrieval. We also assess the long-term performance and stability of our product and seek ways to improve it.

  11. International Virtual Observatory System for Water Resources Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinenweber, Lewis; Bermudez, Luis

    2013-04-01

    Sharing, accessing, and integrating hydrologic and climatic data have been identified as a critical need for some time. The current state of data portals, standards, technologies, activities, and expertise can be leverage to develop an initial operational capability for a virtual observatory system. This system will allow to link observations data with stream networks and models, and to solve semantic inconsistencies among communities. Prototyping a virtual observatory system is an inter-disciplinary, inter-agency and international endeavor. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) within the OGC Interoperability Program provides the process and expertise to run such collaborative effort. The OGC serves as a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and to advance the development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The project coordinated by OGC that is advancing an international virtual observatory system for water resources information is called Climatology-Hydrology Information Sharing Pilot, Phase 1 (CHISP-1). It includes observations and forecasts in the U.S. and Canada levering current networks and capabilities. It is designed to support the following use cases: 1) Hydrologic modeling for historical and near-future stream flow and groundwater conditions. Requires the integration of trans-boundary stream flow and groundwater well data, as well as national river networks (US NHD and Canada NHN) from multiple agencies. Emphasis will be on time series data and real-time flood monitoring. 2) Modeling and assessment of nutrient load into the lakes. Requires accessing water-quality data from multiple agencies and integrating with stream flow information for calculating loads. Emphasis on discrete sampled water quality observations, linking those to specific NHD stream reaches and catchments, and additional metadata for sampled data. The key objectives of these use cases are: 1) To link

  12. Predicting abundance and variability of ice nucleating particles in precipitation at the high-altitude observatory Jungfraujoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Morris, Cindy E.; Herrmann, Erik; Henne, Stephan; Steinbacher, Martin; Alewell, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Nucleation of ice affects the properties of clouds and the formation of precipitation. Quantitative data on how ice nucleating particles (INPs) determine the distribution, occurrence and intensity of precipitation are still scarce. INPs active at -8 °C (INPs-8) were observed for 2 years in precipitation samples at the High-Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (Switzerland) at 3580 m a.s.l. Several environmental parameters were scanned for their capability to predict the observed abundance and variability of INPs-8. Those singularly presenting the best correlations with observed number of INPs-8 (residual fraction of water vapour, wind speed, air temperature, number of particles with diameter larger than 0.5 µm, season, and source region of particles) were implemented as potential predictor variables in statistical multiple linear regression models. These models were calibrated with 84 precipitation samples collected during the first year of observations; their predictive power was successively validated on the set of 15 precipitation samples collected during the second year. The model performing best in calibration and validation explains more than 75 % of the whole variability of INPs-8 in precipitation and indicates that a high abundance of INPs-8 is to be expected whenever high wind speed coincides with air masses having experienced little or no precipitation prior to sampling. Such conditions occur during frontal passages, often accompanied by precipitation. Therefore, the circumstances when INPs-8 could be sufficiently abundant to initiate the ice phase in clouds may frequently coincide with meteorological conditions favourable to the onset of precipitation events.

  13. Using total precipitable water anomaly as a forecast aid for heavy precipitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VandenBoogart, Lance M.

    Heavy precipitation events are of interest to weather forecasters, local government officials, and the Department of Defense. These events can cause flooding which endangers lives and property. Military concerns include decreased trafficability for military vehicles, which hinders both war- and peace-time missions. Even in data-rich areas such as the United States, it is difficult to determine when and where a heavy precipitation event will occur. The challenges are compounded in data-denied regions. The hypothesis that total precipitable water anomaly (TPWA) will be positive and increasing preceding heavy precipitation events is tested in order to establish an understanding of TPWA evolution. Results are then used to create a precipitation forecast aid. The operational, 16 km-gridded, 6-hourly TPWA product developed at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) compares a blended TPW product with a TPW climatology to give a percent of normal TPWA value. TPWA evolution is examined for 84 heavy precipitation events which occurred between August 2010 and November 2011. An algorithm which uses various TPWA thresholds derived from the 84 events is then developed and tested using dichotomous contingency table verification statistics to determine the extent to which satellite-based TPWA might be used to aid in forecasting precipitation over mesoscale domains. The hypothesis of positive and increasing TPWA preceding heavy precipitation events is supported by the analysis. Event-average TPWA rises for 36 hours and peaks at 154% of normal at the event time. The average precipitation event detected by the forecast algorithm is not of sufficient magnitude to be termed a "heavy" precipitation event; however, the algorithm adds skill to a climatological precipitation forecast. Probability of detection is low and false alarm ratios are large, thus qualifying the algorithm's current use as an aid rather than a deterministic forecast tool. The algorithm

  14. A New Method for Near Real Time Precipitation Estimates Using a Derived Statistical Relationship between Precipitable Water Vapor and Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, J.

    2015-12-01

    The IPCC 5th Assessment found that the predicted warming of 1oC would increase the risk of extreme events such as heat waves, droughts, and floods. Weather extremes, like floods, have shown the vulnerability and susceptibility society has to these extreme weather events, through impacts such as disruption of food production, water supply, health, and damage of infrastructure. This paper examines a new way of near-real time forecasting of precipitation. A 10-year statistical climatological relationship was derived between precipitable water vapor (PWV) and precipitation by using the NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder daily gridded PWV product and the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission daily gridded precipitation total. Forecasting precipitation estimates in real time is dire for flood monitoring and disaster management. Near real time PWV observations from AIRS on Aqua are available through the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Service Center. In addition, PWV observations are available through direct broadcast from the NASA Suomi-NPP ATMS/CrIS instrument, the operational follow on to AIRS. The derived climatological relationship can be applied to create precipitation estimates in near real time by utilizing the direct broadcasting capabilities currently available in the CONUS region. The application of this relationship will be characterized through case-studies by using near real-time NASA AIRS Science Team v6 PWV products and ground-based SuomiNet GPS to estimate the current precipitation potential; the max amount of precipitation that can occur based on the moisture availability. Furthermore, the potential contribution of using the direct broadcasting of the NUCAPS ATMS/CrIS PWV products will be demonstrated. The analysis will highlight the advantages of applying this relationship in near-real time for flash flood monitoring and risk management. Relevance to the NWS River Forecast Centers will be discussed.

  15. University of Oregon: GPS-based Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Vignola, F.; Andreas, A.

    2013-08-22

    A partnership with the University of Oregon and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) data to compliment existing resource assessment data collection by the university.

  16. Next-Generation Satellite Precipitation Products for Understanding Global and Regional Water Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in understanding the space-time variability of continental water fluxes is the lack of accurate precipitation estimates over complex terrains. While satellite precipitation observations can be used to complement ground-based data to obtain improved estimates, space-based and ground-based estimates come with their own sets of uncertainties, which must be understood and characterized. Quantitative estimation of uncertainties in these products also provides a necessary foundation for merging satellite and ground-based precipitation measurements within a rigorous statistical framework. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international satellite mission that will provide next-generation global precipitation data products for research and applications. It consists of a constellation of microwave sensors provided by NASA, JAXA, CNES, ISRO, EUMETSAT, DOD, NOAA, NPP, and JPSS. At the heart of the mission is the GPM Core Observatory provided by NASA and JAXA to be launched in 2013. The GPM Core, which will carry the first space-borne dual-frequency radar and a state-of-the-art multi-frequency radiometer, is designed to set new reference standards for precipitation measurements from space, which can then be used to unify and refine precipitation retrievals from all constellation sensors. The next-generation constellation-based satellite precipitation estimates will be characterized by intercalibrated radiometric measurements and physical-based retrievals using a common observation-derived hydrometeor database. For pre-launch algorithm development and post-launch product evaluation, NASA supports an extensive ground validation (GV) program in cooperation with domestic and international partners to improve (1) physics of remote-sensing algorithms through a series of focused field campaigns, (2) characterization of uncertainties in satellite and ground-based precipitation products over selected GV testbeds, and (3) modeling of atmospheric processes and

  17. Status and updates from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baughman, B. M.

    2013-06-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is currently being deployed on the slopes of Volcan Sierra Negra, Puebla, Mexico. The HAWC observatory will consist of 300 Water Cherenkov Detectors totaling approximately 22,000 m of instrumented area. The water Cherenkov technique allows HAWC to have a nearly 100% duty cycle and large field of view, making the HAWC observatory an ideal instrument for the study of transient phenomena. With its large effective area, excellent angular and energy resolutions, and efficient gamma-hadron separation, HAWC will survey the TeV gamma ray sky, measure spectra of galactic sources from 1 TeV to beyond 100 TeV, and map galactic diffuse gamma ray emission. The science goals and performance of the HAWC observatory as well as how it will complement contemporaneous space and ground-based detectors will be presented.

  18. Measurement of atmospheric precipitable water using a solar radiometer. [water vapor absorption effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, D. E.; Dillinger, A. E.; Mcallum, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described and tested that allows the determination of atmospheric precipitable water from two measurements of solar intensity: one in a water-vapor absorption band and another in a nearby spectral region unaffected by water vapor.

  19. Water And Carbon Fluxes Along An Elevation/Precipitation Gradient In A Sagebrush Steppe Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flerchinger, G. N.; Fellows, A.; Seyfried, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental gradients exert controls on water, carbon and energy fluxes across montane landscapes, impacting the magnitude and timing of evapotranspiration, carbon uptake, water stress, and water use efficiency. Four eddy covariance systems were situated along an elevation gradient in Idaho's Owyhee Mountains. The sites are part of the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory and contribute to an ongoing long-term environmental monitoring network in the USDA's Reynold's Creek Experimental Watershed. The sites include a Wyoming big sagebrush site, a low sagebrush site, a post-fire mountain big sagebrush site, and a mountain big sagebrush site located at elevations of 1425, 1680, 1808 and 2111 m. Variations in climate follow the montane elevation gradient; mean annual precipitation at the sites is 290, 337, 425, and 795 mm, respectively, and mean annual temperature is 8.9, 8.4, 6.1, 5.4°C. Transpiration peaked about a month earlier at the lower elevation sites, but with limited precipitation the vegetation also encountered water stress much earlier. The two higher elevation sites experienced relatively little water stress and transpired at near potential for most of the growing season. Implications on water use efficiency were investigated.

  20. Original isotopic composition of water in precipitation by different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.

    2016-11-01

    Stable isotopes of 2H and 18O in precipitation are different globally and carry all information about water molecules movement in hydrosphere cycles. Isotopic composition is a function of temperature, relative humidity, and speed of evaporation at different latitudes, longitudes, and altitudes. On the basis of this, we observe local meteoric water line measurements in the plot of δ2H versus δ18O. It will be interesting to know the original isotopic composition (without any modification) in a transition from cloud down to earth in different environmental conditions. This had been done by plotting of slope versus intercept of Local Meteoric Water Line (LMWL) at different altitudes in different years of observations. Intercept of LMWL with Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) data taken from the hydrology frame work of Corsica was plotted and it was found that the isotopic composition of water in precipitation by all these methods is same.

  1. Effect of antiscalants on precipitation of an RO concentrate: metals precipitated and particle characteristics for several water compositions.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Lauren F; Testa, Fabrice; Lawler, Desmond F; Freeman, Benny D; Moulin, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Inland brackish water reverse osmosis (RO) is economically and technically limited by the large volume of salty waste (concentrate) produced. The use of a controlled precipitation step, followed by solid/liquid separation (filtration), has emerged as a promising side-stream treatment process to treat reverse osmosis concentrate and increase overall system recovery. The addition of antiscalants to the RO feed prevents precipitation within the membrane system but might have a deleterious effect on a concentrate treatment process that uses precipitation to remove problematic precipitates. The effects of antiscalant type and concentration on salt precipitation and precipitate particle morphology were evaluated for several water compositions. The primary precipitate for the synthetic brackish waters tested was calcium carbonate; the presence of magnesium, sulfate, minor ions, and antiscalant compounds affected the amount of calcium precipitated, as well as the phases of calcium carbonate formed during precipitation. Addition of antiscalant decreased calcium precipitation but increased incorporation of magnesium and sulfate into precipitating calcium carbonate. Antiscalants prevented the growth of nucleated precipitates, resulting in the formation of small (100-200 nm diameter) particles, as well as larger (6-10 microm) particles. Elemental analysis revealed changes in composition and calcium carbonate polymorph with antiscalant addition and antiscalant type. Results indicate that the presence of antiscalants does reduce the extent of calcium precipitation and can worsen subsequent filtration performance.

  2. Process Control for Precipitation Prevention in Space Water Recovery Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam; Callahan, Michael R.; Muirhead, Dean

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recover and purify water through physiochemical processes is crucial for realizing long-term human space missions, including both planetary habitation and space travel. Because of their robust nature, rotary distillation systems have been actively pursued by NASA as one of the technologies for water recovery from wastewater primarily comprised of human urine. A specific area of interest is the prevention of the formation of solids that could clog fluid lines and damage rotating equipment. To mitigate the formation of solids, operational constraints are in place that limits such that the concentration of key precipitating ions in the wastewater brine are below the theoretical threshold. This control in effected by limiting the amount of water recovered such that the risk of reaching the precipitation threshold is within acceptable limits. The water recovery limit is based on an empirically derived worst case wastewater composition. During the batch process, water recovery is estimated by monitoring the throughput of the system. NASA Johnson Space Center is working on means of enhancing the process controls to increase water recovery. Options include more precise prediction of the precipitation threshold. To this end, JSC is developing a means of more accurately measuring the constituent of the brine and/or wastewater. Another means would be to more accurately monitor the throughput of the system. In spring of 2015, testing will be performed to test strategies for optimizing water recovery without increasing the risk of solids formation in the brine.

  3. Distribution of tritium in precipitation and surface water in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Patrick A.; Visser, Ate; Moran, Jean E.; Esser, Brad K.

    2016-03-01

    The tritium concentration in the surface hydrosphere throughout California was characterized to examine the reasons for spatial variability and to enhance the applicability of tritium in hydrological investigations. Eighteen precipitation samples were analyzed and 148 samples were collected from surface waters across California in the Summer and Fall of 2013, with repeat samples from some locations collected in Winter and Spring of 2014 to examine seasonal variation. The concentration of tritium in present day precipitation varied from 4.0 pCi/L near the California coast to 17.8 pCi/L in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Concentrations in precipitation increase in spring due to the 'Spring Leak' phenomenon. The average coastal concentration (6.3 ± 1.2 pCi/L) in precipitation matches estimated pre-nuclear levels. Surface water samples show a trend of increasing tritium with inland distance. Superimposed on that trend, elevated tritium concentrations are found in the San Francisco Bay area compared to other coastal areas, resulting from municipal water imported from inland mountain sources and local anthropogenic sources. Tritium concentrations in most surface waters decreased between Summer/Fall 2013 and Winter/Spring 2014 likely due to an increased groundwater signal as a result of drought conditions in 2014. A relationship between tritium and electrical conductivity in surface water was found to be indicative of water provenance and anthropogenic influences such as agricultural runoff. Despite low initial concentrations in precipitation, tritium continues to be a valuable tracer in a post nuclear bomb pulse world.

  4. Constraining Annual Water Balance Estimates with Basin-Scale Observations from the Airborne Snow Observatory during the Current Californian Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, K.; Painter, T. H.; Marks, D. G.; Hedrick, A. R.; Deems, J. S.; Patterson, V.; McGurk, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    One of the great unknowns in mountain hydrology is how much water is stored within a seasonal snowpack at the basin scale. Quantifying mountain water resources is critical for assisting with water resource management, but has proven elusive due to high spatial and temporal variability of mountain snow cover, complex terrain, accessibility constraints and limited in-situ networks. The Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO, aso.jpl.nasa.gov) uses coupled airborne LiDAR and spectrometer instruments for high resolution snow depth retrievals which are used to derive unprecedented basin-wide estimates of snow water mass (snow water equivalent, SWE). ASO has been operational over key basins in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California since 2013. Each operational year has been very dry, with precipitation in 2013 at 75% of average, 2014 at 50% of average and 2015 - the lowest snow year on record for the region. With vastly improved estimates of the snowpack water content from ASO, we can now for the first time conduct observation-based mass balance accounting of surface water in snow-dominated basins, and reconcile these estimates with observed reservoir inflows. In this study we use ASO SWE data to constrain mass balance accounting of basin annual water storages to quantify the water contained within the snowpack above the Hetch Hetchy water supply reservoir (Tuolumne River basin, California). The analysis compares and contrasts annual snow water volumes from observed reservoir inflows, snow water volume estimates from ASO, a physically based model that simulates the snowpack from meteorological inputs and a semi-distributed hydrological model. The study provides invaluable insight to the overall volume of water contained within a seasonal snowpack during a severe drought and how these quantities are simulated in our modelling systems. We envisage that this research will be of great interest to snowpack modellers, hydrologists, dam operators and water managers worldwide.

  5. Comparison Between Water Level and Precipitation in Rio Negro Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figliuolo, G. C.; Santos Da Silva, J.; Calmant, S.; Seyler, F.; Correia, F.; Oliveira, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Amazon Basin holds a lot of difficulties for providing data that enable regional researching works, because of its large extension and for having areas, whose access is very difficult. Remote sensing data presents an excellent way for monitoring the Amazon Basin and collecting data for researches. This current study aims matching radar altimetry data from the JASON-2, with the rainfall data from the TRMM satellite in order to analyze the relation between the water level and the precipitation in two different points along the Rio Negro Basin. After data analysis, it was possible noting a difference on the responding process for both regions. Whilst at the NEGRO_089_03 station (located in the city of São Gabriel da Cachoeira) the graphic of precipitation and water level were very similar, in NEGRO_063 station (located in the city of Manaus) the graphic showed a two month discrepancy due to the difference of the river's bottom size in both regions, at NEGRO_089_03's area for having a smaller river and the water level rises faster, whereas in NEGRO_063 the water level takes about two months to respond to precipitation.

  6. Study of de-watering from the gelatinous precipitate formed during co-precipitation of Nd-YAG powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Sanjib; Sharma, Rachna; Pathak, S. K.; Gupta, S. M.; Gupta, P. K.

    2013-02-01

    Neodymium doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG) ceramics have been synthesised using coprecipitation technique and high temperature vacuum sintering. Gelatinous like precipitates were obtained when precursors of Nd, Al and Yb-nitrate solutions are co-precipitated using ammonia co-precipitant. De-watering from the gelatinous like precipitates is a big challenge and it possesses difficulty in filtration. Evaporation of water by heating resulted in strong agglomerated powder. Different agents were used to ease the filtration process, which is correlated with the phase in the calcined powder.

  7. Study of de-watering from the gelatinous precipitate formed during co-precipitation of Nd-YAG powder

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, Sanjib; Sharma, Rachna; Pathak, S. K.; Gupta, S. M.; Gupta, P. K.

    2013-02-05

    Neodymium doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG) ceramics have been synthesised using coprecipitation technique and high temperature vacuum sintering. Gelatinous like precipitates were obtained when precursors of Nd, Al and Yb-nitrate solutions are co-precipitated using ammonia co-precipitant. De-watering from the gelatinous like precipitates is a big challenge and it possesses difficulty in filtration. Evaporation of water by heating resulted in strong agglomerated powder. Different agents were used to ease the filtration process, which is correlated with the phase in the calcined powder.

  8. Syndepositional shallow-water precipitation of glauconitic minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chafetz, H. S.; Reid, A.

    2000-10-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that glauconitic minerals predominantly form in water depths of mid-shelf to upper slope in modern oceans. These areas tend to have slow sedimentation rates, another commonly cited requisite for glauconitic mineral precipitation. Cambro-Ordovician strata from the southwestern US are rich in glauconitic minerals. Stratigraphic, sedimentological, and petrographic constraints indicate that the glauconitic minerals are autochthonous. In marked contrast to the modern environments of deposition, these Cambro-Ordovician strata formed under very shallow-water to tidal-flat conditions. The trough cross-stratified deposits of the most glauconitic mineral-rich accumulations (glaucarenites) indicate a high energy environment and probably a normal to high rate of sedimentation. The presence of fibroradiated rims of glauconitic minerals on glauconitic mineral pellets, echinoderm fragments, and quartz grains demonstrates that the Cambro-Ordovician glauconitic minerals precipitated on or in close proximity to the sea floor and prior to calcite precipitation. Consequently, glauconitic minerals must have formed under markedly different conditions in the lower Paleozoic than they do today. Thus, the occurrence of glauconitic minerals in the rock record cannot be used a priori as an environmental indicator of either mid-shelf and deeper water and/or a slow rate of sedimentation.

  9. Precipitation efficiency derived from isotope ratios in water vapor distinguishes dynamical and microphysical influences on subtropical atmospheric constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, A.; Nusbaumer, J.; Noone, D.

    2015-09-01

    With water vapor and clouds expected to effect significant feedbacks on climate, moisture transport through convective processes has important implications for future temperature change. The precipitation efficiency—the ratio of the rates at which precipitation and condensation form (e = P/C)—is useful for characterizing how much boundary layer moisture recycles through precipitation versus mixes into the free troposphere through cloud detrainment. Yet it is a difficult metric to constrain with traditional observational techniques. This analysis characterizes the precipitation efficiency of convection near the Big Island of Hawaii, USA, using a novel tracer: isotope ratios in water vapor. The synoptic circulation patterns associated with high and low precipitation efficiency are identified, and the importance of large-scale dynamics and local convective processes in regulating vertical distributions of atmospheric constituents important for climate is evaluated. The results suggest that high e days are correlated with plume-like transport originating from the relatively clean tropics, while low e days are associated with westerly transport, generated by a branching of the jet stream. Differences in transport pathway clearly modify background concentrations of water vapor and other trace gases measured at Mauna Loa Observatory; however, local convective processes appear to regulate aerosols there. Indeed, differences between observed and simulated diurnal cycles of particle number concentration indicate that precipitation scavenges aerosols and possibly facilitates new particle formation when e is high. As measurements of isotope ratios in water vapor expand across the subtropics, the techniques presented here can further our understanding of how synoptic weather, precipitation processes, and climate feedbacks interrelate.

  10. Precipitable water as a predictor of LCL height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugavel, P.; Malap, N.; Balaji, B.; Mehajan, R. K.; Prabha, T. V.

    2016-08-01

    Based on the precipitable water observations easily available from in situ and remote sensing sensors, a simple approach to define the lifting condensation level (LCL) is proposed in this study. High-resolution radiosonde and microwave radiometer observations over peninsular Indian region during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment Integrated Ground Observational Campaign (CAIPEEX-IGOC) during the monsoon season of 2011 are used to illustrate the unique relationship. The inferences illustrate a linear relationship between the precipitable water (PW) and the LCL temperature. This relationship is especially valuable because PW is easily available as a derived parameter from various remote sensing and ground-based observations. Thus, it could be used to estimate the LCL height and perhaps also the boundary layer height. LCL height and PW correlations are established from historical radiosonde data (1984-2012). This finding could be used to illustrate the boundary layer-cloud interactions during the monsoon and is important for parameterization of boundary layer clouds in numerical models. The relationships are illustrated to be robust and seem promising to get reasonable estimates of the LCL height over other locations as well using satellite observations of PW.

  11. Soil Moisture/ Tree Water Status Dynamics in a Mid-Latitude Montane Forest, Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartsough, P. C.; Malazian, A.; Kamai, T.; Roudneva, E.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    In the Mediterranean climate of the Sierra Nevada, snow pack persists well into the spring after precipitation has effectively stopped. With the onset of summer and continued dry conditions, snow quickly melts, and soil profiles dry out as shrubs and trees deplete the available soil moisture. A better understanding of surface and subsurface water budgets in remote landscapes warrants closer monitoring of moisture and temperature variability in near surfaces soils. As part of the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory (CZO), investigators from University of California deployed approximately 150 soil moisture, water potential and temperature sensors within the root structure of an individual white fir tree (Abies concolor) located in the Kings River Experimental Watershed (KREW). These sensors complement sap flow measurements in the trunk, stem water potential measurements in the canopy, and snow depth measurements, to enable the Southern Sierra CZO researchers to investigate how soil environmental stresses (water, temperature, and nutrients) impact forest ecosystems across the rain-to-snow-dominated transition zone. We captured the dynamics of the soil profile desiccation at various depths beneath the snow pack as soils went from wet to very dry conditions. Monitoring of sap flow and periodic leaf water potential measurements, we tracked the activity of the tree as it responded to changing available moisture in the root zone. All sensors were reactive to moisture and temperature variations and showed dynamic responses to precipitation, snow melt and changes in vegetative demand. We demonstrate here the initial phase of a multi-year deployment of soil moisture sensors as a critical integrator of hydrologic/ biotic interaction in a forested catchment as part of a wider effort to document changing ecosystem response to changing environmental inputs.

  12. Getting water right: A case study in water yield modelling based on precipitation data.

    PubMed

    Pessacg, Natalia; Flaherty, Silvia; Brandizi, Laura; Solman, Silvina; Pascual, Miguel

    2015-12-15

    Water yield is a key ecosystem service in river basins and especially in dry regions around the World. In this study we carry out a modelling analysis of water yields in the Chubut River basin, located in one of the driest districts of Patagonia, Argentina. We focus on the uncertainty around precipitation data, a driver of paramount importance for water yield. The objectives of this study are to: i) explore the spatial and numeric differences among six widely used global precipitation datasets for this region, ii) test them against data from independent ground stations, and iii) explore the effects of precipitation data uncertainty on simulations of water yield. The simulations were performed using the ecosystem services model InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs) with each of the six different precipitation datasets as input. Our results show marked differences among datasets for the Chubut watershed region, both in the magnitude of precipitations and their spatial arrangement. Five of the precipitation databases overestimate the precipitation over the basin by 50% or more, particularly over the more humid western range. Meanwhile, the remaining dataset (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission - TRMM), based on satellite measurements, adjusts well to the observed rainfall in different stations throughout the watershed and provides a better representation of the precipitation gradient characteristic of the rain shadow of the Andes. The observed differences among datasets in the representation of the rainfall gradient translate into large differences in water yield simulations. Errors in precipitation of +30% (-30%) amplify to water yield errors ranging from 50 to 150% (-45 to -60%) in some sub-basins. These results highlight the importance of assessing uncertainties in main input data when quantifying and mapping ecosystem services with biophysical models and cautions about the undisputed use of global environmental datasets.

  13. The Sierra Nevada-San Joaquin Hydrologic Observatory (SNSJHO): A WATERS Network Test Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J.; Meng, X.; Rice, R.; Butler, C.; Molotch, N.; Harmon, T. C.; Bales, R.

    2007-12-01

    A mountain-to-valley virtual hydrologic observatory in Central California provides a focus for data and information in support of hydrologic research, a testbed for prototype measurement systems, and guidance for development of measurement and cyber infrastructure in an actual observatory. The multiple rivers and watersheds making up the 60,000 km2 greater San Joaquin drainage are physically disconnected by mountain-front dams that provide flood control, hydropower, seasonal water delivery and recreation. However, the mountain and valley portions are institutionally connected in multiple ways. For example, each year the winter snowpack and watershed conditions determine the magnitude of annual runoff. Errors in snowpack measurements and runoff forecasts have huge economic implications for valley water users. Second, valley flood control, water quality, irrigation demand and hydropower operations have a very strong interest in influencing mountain watershed management. The broader aim of the Sierra Nevada-San Joaquin Hydrologic Observatory is to build research infrastructure and promote research for improving the knowledge base for sound hydrologic management in the Sierra Nevada, San Joaquin Valley and across the Western U.S. In the Sierra Nevada the current focus is on developing spatially distributed instrument clusters that, when blended with remotely sensed data, will improve water balance closure from hillslope to watershed scales. Five instrument clusters at or just above the rain-snow transition are in place and under development. In the San Joaquin Valley, the focus is on sensor systems for observing fertilizer application rates in agriculture, groundwater-surface water exchanges in rivers, and flow and mixing in the confluence zones between the main stem San Joaquin and tributary Merced Rivers. A common digital library and analysis framework further links the mountain and valley portions of the virtual observatory (see https://eng.ucmerced.edu/dev00/snsjno).

  14. Improving Reanalyses Using TRMM and SSM/I-Derived Precipitation and Total Precipitable Water Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Zhang, Sara Q.; daSilva, Arlindo M.

    1999-01-01

    Global reanalyses currently contain significant errors in the primary fields of the hydrological cycle such as precipitation, evaporation, moisture, and the related cloud fields, especially in the tropics. The Data Assimilation Office (DAO) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has been exploring the use of rainfall and total precipitable water (TPW) observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and the Special Sensor Microwave/ Imager (SSM/I) instruments to improve these fields in reanalyses. The DAO has developed a "1+1"D procedure to assimilate 6-hr averaged rainfall and TPW into the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System (DAS). The algorithm is based on a 6-hr time integration of a column version of the GEOS DAS. The "1+1" designation refers to one spatial dimension plus one temporal dimension. The scheme minimizes the least-square differences between the satellite-retrieved rain rates and those produced by the column model over the 6-hr analysis window. The control variables are analysis increments of moisture within the Incremental Analysis Update (IAU) framework of the GEOS DAS. This 1+1D scheme, in its generalization to four dimensions, is related to the standard 4D variational assimilation but differs in its choice of the control variable. Instead of estimating the initial condition at the beginning of the assimilation cycle, it estimates the constant IAU forcing applied over a 6-hr assimilation cycle. In doing so, it imposes the forecast model as a weak constraint in a manner similar to the variational continuous assimilation techniques. We present results from an experiment in which the observed rain rate and TPW are assumed to be "perfect". They show that assimilating the TMI and SSM/I-derived surface precipitation and TPW observations improves not only the precipitation and moisture fields but also key climate parameters directly linked to convective activities such as clouds, the

  15. 20-micron transparency and atmospheric water vapor at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasdalen, G. L.; Gehrz, R. D.; Hackwell, J. A.; Freedman, R.

    1985-01-01

    The atmospheric transparency at 19.5 and 23 microns from the Wyoming Infrared Observatory over the past six years has been examined. It is found that the transparency is largely controlled by the season. Four months: June, July, August, and September have very poor 20-micron transparency. During the rest of the year the transparency is usually quite good at 19.5 microns and moderately good at 23 microns. Using rawinsonde data and theoretical calculations for the expected infrared transparency, the measures of 20-micron transparency were calibrated in terms of atmospheric water-vapor content. The water vapor over the Wyoming Infrared Observatory is found to compare favorably with that above other proposed or developed sites: Mauna Kea, Mount Graham, and Wheeler Peak.

  16. Mobile and static sensors in a citizen-based observatory of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauchli, Tristan; Weijs, Steven V.; Lehning, Michael; Huwald, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    Understanding and forecasting water resources and components of the water cycle require spatially and temporally resolved observations of numerous water-related variables. Such observations are often obtained from wireless networks of automated weather stations. The "WeSenseIt" project develops a citizen- and community-based observatory of water to improve the water and risk management at the catchment scale and to support decision-making of stakeholders. It is implemented in three case studies addressing various questions related to flood, drought, water resource management, water quality and pollution. Citizens become potential observers and may transmit water-related measurements and information. Combining the use of recent technologies (wireless communication, internet, smartphone) with the development of innovative low cost sensors enables the implementation of heterogeneous observatories, which (a) empower citizens and (b) expand and complement traditional operational sensing networks. With the goal of increasing spatial coverage of observations and decreasing cost for sensors, this study presents the examples of measuring (a) flow velocity in streams using smartphones and (b) sensible heat flux using simple sensors at the nodes of wireless sensor networks.

  17. Studies of signal waveforms from the water-cherenkov detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, P.S.; Bui-Duc, H.; Chye, J.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dorofeev, A.; Matthews, J.; Nitz, D.F.; Ranchon, S.; Urban, M.; Veberic, D.; Watson, A.A.; Wileman, C.

    2005-08-01

    The ground array of the Pierre Auger Observatory will consist of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors. Such detectors give signals which can help differentiate between muons and electrons in extensive air showers. The relative numbers of muons and electrons is sensitive to the type of primary particle which initiated the shower. Results are presented using methods which describe the muon content and related information, such as the time structure of the shower front.

  18. An engineering array for the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Megan; Mostafa, Miguel

    2012-03-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) gamma-ray observatory is currently being deployed at 4100 m in Sierra Negra, Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have 300 Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCDs). Each WCD will be instrumented with 4 upward facing baffled photo multiplier tubes (PMTs) anchored to the bottom of a 5 m deep by 7.3 m diameter steel container with a multilayer hermetic plastic bag containing 200,000 liters of purified water. An engineering array of 6 WCDs was deployed in Summer 2011 at the HAWC site and has been operational since then. This array serves to validate the design and construction methods for the HAWC observatory. It has also been collecting data which allows for the development of data collection and analysis tools. Here we will describe the deployment of the engineering array, the lessons learned from this experience and the implications for HAWC, as well as give an introduction into data collection and initial analysis being done, which will be presented jointly.

  19. GPS Estimates of Integrated Precipitable Water Aid Weather Forecasters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Angelyn W.; Gutman, Seth I.; Holub, Kirk; Bock, Yehuda; Danielson, David; Laber, Jayme; Small, Ivory

    2013-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) meteorology provides enhanced density, low-latency (30-min resolution), integrated precipitable water (IPW) estimates to NOAA NWS (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminis tration Nat ional Weather Service) Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) to provide improved model and satellite data verification capability and more accurate forecasts of extreme weather such as flooding. An early activity of this project was to increase the number of stations contributing to the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) GPS meteorology observing network in Southern California by about 27 stations. Following this, the Los Angeles/Oxnard and San Diego WFOs began using the enhanced GPS-based IPW measurements provided by ESRL in the 2012 and 2013 monsoon seasons. Forecasters found GPS IPW to be an effective tool in evaluating model performance, and in monitoring monsoon development between weather model runs for improved flood forecasting. GPS stations are multi-purpose, and routine processing for position solutions also yields estimates of tropospheric zenith delays, which can be converted into mm-accuracy PWV (precipitable water vapor) using in situ pressure and temperature measurements, the basis for GPS meteorology. NOAA ESRL has implemented this concept with a nationwide distribution of more than 300 "GPSMet" stations providing IPW estimates at sub-hourly resolution currently used in operational weather models in the U.S.

  20. Response of the Pierre Auger Observatory water Cherenkov detectors to muons

    SciTech Connect

    Aglietta, M.; Allison, P.; Andres, E.C.; Arneodo, F.; Bertou, Xavier; Bonifazi, C.; Busca, N.; Creusot, A.; Deligny, O.; Dornic, D.; Genolini, B.; Ghia, P.L.; Grunfeld, C.M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Mazur, P.O.; Moreno, E.; Perez, G.; Salazar, H.; Suomijarvi, T.

    2005-07-01

    Two test detectors similar to the Pierre Auger Observatory Water Cherenkov Detectors have been installed at the Observatory site and at the Institut de Physique Nucleaire d'Orsay. The signals from the tanks are read out using three 9'' photomultipliers and analyzed by both a digital oscilloscope with high sampling frequency and the Auger surface detector electronics. Additionally, the detectors are equipped with plastic scintillators serving as muon telescopes. The trigger is provided either by the muon telescope or by the coincidence of the three PMTs. The scintillators are movable allowing the study of the detector response to atmospheric muons arriving with different incident angles. In this paper, the results of measurements for vertical and inclined background muons are presented. These results are compared to simulations and important calibration parameters are extracted. The influence of the direct light detected by the PMTs, particularly important for inclined showers, is discussed.

  1. Natural chlorine and fluorine in the atmosphere, water and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The geochemical cycles of chlorine and fluorine are surveyed and summarized as framework for the understanding of the global natural abundances of these species in the atmosphere, water, and precipitation. In the cycles the fluxes into and out of the atmosphere can be balanced within the limits of our knowledge of the natural sources and sinks. Sea salt from the ocean surfaces represent the predominant portion of the source of chlorine. It is also an important source of atmospheric fluorine, but volcanoes are likely to be more important fluorine sources. Dry deposition of sea salt returns about 85 percent of the salt released there. Precipitation removes the remainder. Most of the sea salt materials are considered to be cyclic, moving through sea spray over the oceans and either directly back to the oceans or deposited dry and in precipitation on land, whence it runs off into rivers and streams and returns to the oceans. Most of the natural chlorine in the atmosphere is in the form of particulate chloride ion with lesser amounts as gaseous inorganic chloride and methyl chloride vapor. Fluorine is emitted from volcanoes primarily as HF. It is possible that HF may be released directly form the ocean surface but this has not been confirmed by observation. HCl and most likely HF gases are released into the atmosphere by sea salt aerosols. The mechanism for the release is likely to be the provision of protons from the so-called excess sulfate and HNO3. Sea salt aerosol contains fluorine as F(-), MgF(+), CaF(+), and NaF. The concentrations of the various species of chlorine and fluorine that characterize primarily natural, unpolluted atmospheres are summarized in tables and are discussed in relation to their fluxes through the geochemical cycle.

  2. A Water Cherenkov Detector prototype for the HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Megan; Mostafa, Miguel; Salesa Greus, Francisco; Warner, David

    2011-10-01

    A full-size Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) prototype for the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) gamma-ray Observatory was deployed, and is currently being operated at Colorado State University (CSU). The HAWC Observatory will consist of 300 WCDs at the very high altitude (4100m) site in Sierra Negra, Mexico. Each WCD will have 4 baffled upward-facing Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) anchored to the bottom of a self made multilayer hermetic plastic bag containing 200,000 liters of purified water, inside a 5m deep by 7.3m diameter steel container. The full size WCD at CSU is the only full size prototype outside of the HAWC site. It is equipped with seven HAWC PMTs and has scintillators both under and above the volume of water. It has been in operation since March 1, 2011. This prototype also has the same laser calibration system that the detectors deployed at the HAWC site will have. The CSU WCD serves as a testbed for the different subsystems before deployment at high altitude, and for optimizing the location of the PMTs, the design of the light collectors, deployment procedures, etc. Simulations of the light inside the detectors and the expected signals in the PMTs can also be benchmarked with this prototype.

  3. NASA Airborne Snow Observatory: Measuring Spatial Distribution of Snow Water Equivalent and Snow Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, M.; Painter, T. H.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Laidlaw, R.; Bormann, K. J.; Skiles, M.; Richardson, M.; Berisford, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The two most critical properties for understanding snowmelt runoff and timing are the spatial and temporal distributions of snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow albedo. Despite their importance in controlling volume and timing of runoff, snowpack albedo and SWE are still largely unquantified in the US and not at all in most of the globe, leaving runoff models poorly constrained. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in partnership with the California Department of Water Resources, has developed the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and scanning LiDAR system, to quantify SWE and snow albedo, generate unprecedented knowledge of snow properties for cutting edge cryospheric science, and provide complete, robust inputs to water management models and systems of the future. This poster will describe the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory, its outputs and their uses and applications, along with recent advancements to the system and plans for the project's future. Specifically, we will look at how ASO uses its imaging spectrometer to quantify spectral albedo, broadband albedo, and radiative forcing by dust and black carbon in snow. Additionally, we'll see how the scanning LiDAR is used to determine snow depth against snow-free acquisitions and to quantify snow water equivalent when combined with in-situ constrained modeling of snow density.

  4. Relation of bulk precipitation and evapotranspiration to water quality and water resources, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jordan, Donald George; Fisher, Donald W.

    1977-01-01

    St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, lies in what can be considered a true maritime regime, being 600 miles (1000 kilometers) from the nearest continental landmass. The island is composed almost entirely of volcanic rocks mantled by a thin soil seldom more than 2 feet (60 centimeters) thick. Rainfall, averaging about 40 inches (1020 millimeters) annually, has an orographic distribution related to the central ridge of the island, altitude 600 to 1500 feet (180 to 405 meters), and the easterly to northeasterly trade winds. The mineral content of bulk precipitation falling on the island is derived principally from the sea although soil dust contributes much of the calcium, sodium, and bicarbonate. Two-thirds of the sulfate in the precipitation is provided by sea salts; the remainder is derived from other sources. The concentration of the constituents of bulk precipitation fluctuates widely month to month, but the load of the constituents shows little monthly variation. Bulk precipitation is concentrated on the land surface and in the soil zone. From there it is carried into the ground water during recharge or is removed by storm-water runoff. It is the principal source of minerals in the waters of the island. Soil-moisture demand and evaporation limits recharge to 1 to 2 inches (25 to 50 millimeters) annually for the greater part of the island. Evapotranspiration also occurs directly from the aquifer. The salts left further increase the mineralization of the ground water. Water loss from the aquifer by evapotranspiration ranges from 40 to 80 percent of the recharge. Recharge to the aquifers and evapotranspiration of ground water determined by ratios of chloride concentrations in bulk precipitation, surface water, and subsurface water agree favorably with recharge and groundwater loss computed by other means.

  5. Estimation of precipitable water vapor at GPS sites in Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulali Idrissi, A.; Ouazar, D.; Bock, O.; Fadil, A.

    2009-12-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of water vapor in both time and space is essential for understanding weather and global climate change. This study presents the results of precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimates from GPS data for three continuously operating GPS stations in Morocco (Rabat, Tetouan, and Ifrane) for the period 2001 to 2007. The conversion of atmospheric delays to integrated water vapor was carried out using interpolated surface meteorological parameters derived from the global numerical weather model analysis from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The surface pressure extracted from the NCEP model was compared with observations provided from the synoptic network of the Moroccan Meteorological Agency (DMN). Good agreement was found between the two data sets with a bias of less than 1hPa. We compared the GPS derived PWV with the nearest radiosondes at the Rabat and Tetouan stations. The results show overall good agreement between the two data sets (mean difference < 2.5Kg/m2). The NCEP PWV compared well with GPS observations with a mean difference of less than 2.5 Kg/m2 and a standard deviation of less than 3.5 Kg/m2, confirming the potential of ground based GPS to provide an accurate and continuous description of water vapor field variations. The study showed by means of GPS, radiosondes and both NCEP model, a clear seasonal cycle of PWV with the highest values recorded during June, July, August, and September, peaking at 29 Kg/m2. The highest seasonal modulations seen at the 3 GPS stations were linked to large-scale atmospheric circulation.

  6. Spatial distribution of water in the stratosphere of Jupiter from observations with the Herschel space observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalié, T.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Lellouch, E.; de Val-Borro, M.; Jarchow, C.; Moreno, R.; Hartogh, P.; Orton, G.; Greathouse, T. K.; Billebaud, F.; Dobrijevic, M.; Lara, L. M.; Gonzalez, A.; Sagawa, H.

    2013-09-01

    Water in the atmospheres of the outer planets has both an internal and an external source (e.g., [1] and [2] for Jupiter). These sources are separated by a condensation layer, the tropopause cold trap, which acts as a transport barrier between the troposphere and the stratosphere. Thus, the water vapor observed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in the stratosphere of the giant planets has an external origin [3]. This external supply of water may have several sources: (i) a permanent flux from interplanetary dust particles produced from asteroid collisions and from comet activity [4], (ii) local sources from planetary environments (rings, satellites) [5], (iii) cometary "Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) type" impacts [6]. In the past 15 years, several studies suggested that water in the stratosphere of Jupiter originated from the SL9 comet impacts in July 1994, but a direct proof was missing. We will report the first high S/N spatially resolved mapping observations of water in Jupiter's stratosphere carried out with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) [7] and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) [8] instruments onboard the ESA Herschel Space Observatory [9]. These observations have been obtained in the framework of the Guaranteed Time Key Program "Water and related chemistry in the Solar System", also known as "Herschel Solar System Observations" (HssO) [10]. In parallel, we have monitored Jupiter's stratospheric temperature with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to separate temperature from water variability. We will present the results recently published by our team [11]. Water is found to be restricted to pressures lower than 2mbar. Its column density decreases by a factor of 2-3 between southern and northern latitudes (see Fig. 1), consistently between the HIFI and the PACS 66.4μm maps. Latitudinal temperature variability cannot explain the global north-south asymmetry in the water maps. From the latitudinal and vertical

  7. GPM Core Observatory Launch Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The launch is currently scheduled for Feb. 27, 2014....

  8. Monitoring water storage variations in the vadose zone with gravimeters - quantifying the influence of observatory buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Marvin; Güntner, Andreas; Mikolaj, Michal; Blume, Theresa

    2016-04-01

    Time-lapse ground-based measurements of gravity have been shown to be sensitive to water storage variations in the surroundings of the gravimeter. They thus have the potential to serve as an integrative observation of storage changes in the vadose zone. However, in almost all cases of continuous gravity measurements, the gravimeter is located within a building which seals the soil beneath it from natural hydrological processes like infiltration and evapotranspiration. As water storage changes in close vicinity of the gravimeter have the strongest influence on the measured signal, it is important to understand the hydrology in the unsaturated soil zone just beneath the impervious building. For this reason, TDR soil moisture sensors were installed in several vertical profiles up to a depth of 2 m underneath the planned new gravimeter building at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell (southeast Germany). In this study, we assess the influence of the observatory building on infiltration and subsurface flow patterns and thus the damping effect on gravimeter data in a two-way approach. Firstly, soil moisture time series of sensors outside of the building area are correlated with corresponding sensors of the same depth beneath the building. The resulting correlation coefficients, time lags and signal to noise relationships are used to find out how and where infiltrating water moves laterally beneath the building and towards its centre. Secondly, a physically based hydrological model (HYDRUS) with high discretization in space and time is set up for the 20 by 20 m area around and beneath the gravimeter building. The simulated spatial distribution of soil moisture in combination with the observed point data help to identify where and to what extent water storage changes and thus mass transport occurs beneath the building and how much this differs to the dynamics of the surroundings. This allows to define the umbrella space, i.e., the volume of the vadose zone where no mass

  9. The impact of extreme precipitation on plant growth and water relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeppel, M.; Lehmann, C.; Lewis, J. D.; Medlyn, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    Background The global hydrological cycle is predicted to become more intense, or extreme in future climates, with both larger precipitation events and longer times between events. The resulting wide fluctuations in soil water content (long droughts followed by flooding) may dramatically affect terrestrial ecosystems. Although effects of drought are well studied, tree responses to changed timing of precipitation are mostly unknown. Further, in future extreme precipitation is likely to occur in conjunction with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations [CO2]. We tested the impact of extreme precipitation and elevated [CO2] on plant growth and water relations. Methods/results Ten Acacia auriculiformis and Eucalyptus tetradonta saplings were grown in glasshouses, with ambient (380 p.p.m.) and elevated (600 p.p.m.) [CO2] and subject to ambient (1L weekly) and extreme (2L fortnightly) watering conditions (four treatments). We tested whether: (1) plants would show differential water stress and growth under extreme precipitation compared with ambient water treatments; and (2) plants would show differential water stress and growth responses under elevated compared with ambient [CO2] treatments. We found that the extreme precipitation, compared to ambient precipitation, lead to more water stressed plants, with more negative leaf water potential and lower stomatal conductance in both species. Further, plants experiencing extreme precipitation had a higher proportion of root volume at depth within the Eucalyptus. In contrast, the root depth of Acacia was similar across all treatments. Leaf area was smaller in extreme precipitation compared with ambient for Acacias, whereas leaf area was comparable across watering treatments in Eucalypts. Elevated CO2 had no impact on leaf water potential, stomatal conductance during the day or proportion of root depth. The Acacia, from tropical dry forest ecosystems, showed more signs of water stress (more negative leaf water potential and lower

  10. Validation of MODIS Total Precipitable Water Using Surface GPS Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Y. L.; Fears, A. J.; Moker, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this research we validate estimates of atmospheric total precipitable water (TPW) from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites using surface Global Positioning System (GPS) derived TPW collected at ten stations across northwest Mexico during the 2013 North American monsoon (NAM) season. The MODIS Level 2 products provide TPW estimated from both the infrared (IR) and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands and are available over the NAM region approximately twice per day. Our comparisons indicate that the correlations of Terra and Aqua IR TPW with the GPS observations are all significant at the 95% confidence level, while the NIR correlations show little or no significance. The analysis also finds that Terra and Aqua have significant seasonal biases with respect to the GPS for both the IR and NIR estimates at several locations, with the IR estimates showing better agreement than the NIR estimates. The dependence of the errors on elevation and time of overpass will be discussed to help identify contributing factors to the observed errors.

  11. Enhanced precipitation variability effects on water losses and ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change will result in increased precipitation variability with more extreme events reflected in more frequent droughts as well as more frequent extremely wet conditions. The increase in precipitation variability will occur at different temporal scales from intra to inter-annual and even long...

  12. Trends in precipitation and stream-water chemistry in the northeastern United States, water years 1984-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, D.W.; Mast, M. Alisa

    1999-01-01

    Trends in precipitation and stream-water chemistry during water years 1984-96 were examined at eight precipitation monitoring sites and five nearby streams operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in the northeastern United States. The statistical analyses indicate the following: 1)Stream-water sulfate (SO4) concentrations decreased at seven of eight precipitation monitoring sites and in each of five streams. 2)Calcium plus magnesium (Ca + Mg) concentrations decreased at seven of eight precipitation monitoring sites and in three of five streams. 3)Precipitation acidity decreased at five of eight precipitation monitoring sites, but alkalinity increased in only one stream. These results indicate that decreases in atmospheric deposition of SO4 have resulted in decreased precipitation acidity. The chemical response of stream water to changes in precipitation chemistry was complex. Decreases in stream-water SO4 concentrations generally matched decreases of precipitation SO4. In stream water, increases in alkalinity were uncommon because decreases in SO4 concentrations often were accompanied by decreases in Ca + Mg concentrations. The decreases in Ca + Mg concentrations might be related to depletion of base cations from soil caused by long-term exposure to acidic deposition. Increases in streamwater alkalinity might not occur until rates of acidic deposition are reduced to substantially less than the rate of cation resupply by weathering and atmospheric deposition. In areas where forests are aggrading, recovery of stream-water alkalinity will be delayed further because of the acidifying effect of biomass accumulation.

  13. Measuring TeV cosmic rays at the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenZvi, Segev

    2015-12-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, or HAWC, is an air shower array designed to observe cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. HAWC, located between the peaks Sierra Negra and Pico de Orizaba in central Mexico, will be completed in the spring of 2015. However, the observatory has been collecting data in a partial configuration since mid-2013. With only part of the final array in data acquisition, HAWC has already accumulated a data set of nearly 100 billion air showers. These events are used to calibrate the detector angular reconstruction using the shadow of the Moon, and to measure the anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays above 1 TeV. Using data recorded between June 2013 and July 2014, we have observed a significant 10-4 anisotropy consisting of three statistically significant "hotspots" in the cosmic ray flux. We will discuss these first results from HAWC and compare them to previous measurements of anisotropy in the northern and southern sky.

  14. High-Energy Astrophysics with the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretz, John; HAWC Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, under construction at Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla, Mexico, consists of a 22500 square meter area of water Cherenkov detectors: water tanks instrumented with light-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The experiment is used to detect energetic secondary particles reaching the ground when a 50 GeV to 100 TeV cosmic ray or gamma ray interacts in the atmosphere above the experiment. By timing the arrival of particles on the ground, the direction of the original primary particle may be resolved with an error of between 1.0 (50 GeV) and 0.1 (10 TeV) degrees. Gamma-ray primaries may be distinguished from cosmic ray background by identifying the penetrating particles characteristic of a hadronic particle shower. The instrument is 10% complete and is performing as expected, with 30% of the channels anticipated by the summer of 2013. HAWC will complement existing Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes and space-based gamma-ray telescopes with its extreme high-energy sensitivity and its large field-of-view. The observatory will be used to study particle acceleration in Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Supernova Remnants, Active Galactic Nuclei and Gamma-ray Bursts. Additionally, the instrument can be used to probe dark matter annihilation in halo and sub-halos of the galaxy. We will present the sensitivity of the HAWC instrument in the context of the main science objectives. We will also present the status of the deployment including first data from the instrument and prospects for the future.

  15. DIURNAL CYCLE OF PRECIPITABLE WATER VAPOR OVER SPAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz de Galisteo, J. P.; Cachorro, V. E.; Toledano, C.; Torres, B.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Bennouna, Yasmine; de Frutos, A. M.

    2011-05-20

    Despite the importance of the diurnal cycle of precipitable water vapor (PWV), its knowledge is very limited due to the lack of data with sufficient temporal resolution. Currently, from GPS receivers, PWV can be obtained with high temporal resolution in all weather conditions for all hours of the day. In this study we have calculated the diurnal cycle of PWV for ten GPS stations over Spain. The minimum value is reached approximately at the same time at all the stations, ~0400-0500 UTC, whereas the maximum is reached in the second half of the day, but with a larger dispersion of its occurrence between stations. The amplitude of the cycle ranges between 0.72 mm and 1.78 mm. The highest values are recorded at the stations on the Mediterranean coast, with a doubling of the values of the stations on the Atlantic coast or inland. The amplitude of the PWV cycle, relative to the annual mean value, ranges between 8.8 % on the Mediterranean coast and 3.6 % on the Atlantic coast. Two distinctly different seasonal diurnal cycles have been identified, one in winter and other in summer, with spring and autumn being only transition states. The winter cycle is quite similar at all locations, whereas in summer, local effects are felt strongly, making the diurnal cycle quite different between stations. The amplitude of the summer cycle is 1.69 mm, it is almost double the winter one (0.93 mm). Analogous to the annual cycles, the seasonal cycles of the different stations are more similar during the night and early morning hours than during the afternoon. The observed features of the PWV diurnal cycle are explained in a qualitative way on the basis of the air temperature, the transport of moisture by local winds, and the turbulent vertical mixing.

  16. On the Vertical Distribution of Local and Remote Sources of Water for Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.

    2001-01-01

    The vertical distribution of local and remote sources of water for precipitation and total column water over the United States are evaluated in a general circulation model simulation. The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) general circulation model (GCM) includes passive constituent tracers to determine the geographical sources of the water in the column. Results show that the local percentage of precipitable water and local percentage of precipitation can be very different. The transport of water vapor from remote oceanic sources at mid and upper levels is important to the total water in the column over the central United States, while the access of locally evaporated water in convective precipitation processes is important to the local precipitation ratio. This result resembles the conceptual formulation of the convective parameterization. However, the formulations of simple models of precipitation recycling include the assumption that the ratio of the local water in the column is equal to the ratio of the local precipitation. The present results demonstrate the uncertainty in that assumption, as locally evaporated water is more concentrated near the surface.

  17. The High Altitude Water Čerenkov (HAWC) TeV Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente, Eduardo; Oceguera-Becerra, Tomas; García-Torales, Guillermo; García-Luna, José Luis

    The High Altitude Water Čerenkov observatory is a second generation ground based very high-energy γ-ray detector under construction in Sierra Negra, Puebla, México at an altitude of 4,100m. Higher altitude, improved design and a larger physical size used to reject cosmic ray background, make HAWC 10-20 times more sensitive than its predecessor Milagro. HAWC's large field of view (˜2sr) and over 90% duty cycle make it ideal to search for several types of TeV astronomical γ-ray sources, diffuse emission, cosmic anisotropy, and transients. Details and status of HAWC at date, and a galactic star formation application are here presented.

  18. Using Airborne Snow Observatory distributed snow water equivalent to predict seasonal inflow volumes and inform management decisions at the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, C. B.; Painter, T. H.; Mazurkiewicz, A.

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, estimates of seasonal streamflow volumes have been determined using statistical relationships to precipitation and snow depth measurements taken at widely spaced while geographically clustered gauges. While strong statistical relationships have been identified in some locations, these relationships are susceptible to breaking down during extreme conditions such as droughts or extremely wet years. The Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) is a program where airplane mounted lidar is used to create snow-on and snow-off DEMs, yielding distributed estimates of snow water equivalent at the catchment scale. These estimates allow us, for the first time, to compare basin wide snow water equivalent to seasonal streamflow volumes. At the Tuolumne River basin in Yosemite National Park, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, the ASO estimates of basin wide SWE are shown to be tightly correlated to seasonal streamflow volumes. These estimates are further improved when combined with precipitation measurements. These estimates appear to be more robust than traditional statistical methods, and have been used to improve predictions of inflows at the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, the primary water source for the City and County of San Francisco and surrounding areas.

  19. A Pilot Study of Watershed Flow Using Stable Water Isotopes in Support of the Development of the Lamprey River Watershed (Southeast New Hampshire) as a Hydrologic Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frades, M.; Davis, J.; Bryce, J.; McDowell, W. H.

    2008-12-01

    The Lamprey River Watershed provides a suite of ecologic, geographic, geologic, and cultural characteristics that together provide an excellent opportunity to establish a convenient, unique, instructive, and informative natural laboratory. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire are establishing the Lamprey River Watershed, located in the seacoast region of New Hampshire, as a long term hydrologic observatory, where the instrumentation, data, and results from multi-disciplinary studies can be integrated to achieve greater understanding of the hydrologic system as a whole.One component of this proposed research is the establishment of a long term record of water isotope data. The results of a 1.5-year pilot study of stable water isotopes in the Headwaters of the Lamprey River Watershed (HLRW) are the focus of this presentation. In order to better understand groundwater flowpaths and residence times within the HLRW, we used stable water isotopes as natural tracers. For the period of June 2006 through October 2007, over 200 total water samples of groundwater, surface water, precipitation, and infiltration were collected and analyzed for stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. Based on analysis of isotopic and hydrometric data, the groundwater system is interpreted to be comprised of three distinct but interconnected reservoirs: a shallow groundwater reservoir which does not directly contribute to stream flow at the watershed outlet and has a mean residence time greater than 9 years; a near-surface groundwater reservoir, which is fed by the shallow system, flows through surface water bodies and wetlands with a mean residence time of approximately 1.5 months, and is the primary source of baseflow in the stream network; and a deep groundwater reservoir. The findings have significant implications for the interpretation of biogeochemical mass balance models of the Lamprey River Watershed and ongoing strontium isotope and trace element tracer studies. In a broader sense

  20. [Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of Precipitation and Its Water Vapor Sources in Eastern Qaidam Basin].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian-jia; Chen, Hui; Gong, Guo-li

    2015-08-01

    Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes can be used as a tracer to analyze water vapor sources of atmospheric precipitation. We choose Golmud and Delingha as our study areas, Golmud locates in the south of Qaidam basin, and Delingha locates in the northeast. Based on the analysis of monthly change of hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of precipitation during June to September of 2010, and the relationship between deltaD and delta18O in precipitation, we investigated the water vapor sources of precipitation in eastern Qaidam basin. The results show that: (1) meteoric water line between June to September in Golmud is: deltaD = 7.840 delta18O - 4.566 (R2 = 0.918, P < 0.001), and in Delingha is: deltaD = 7.833 delta18O + 8.606 (R2 = 0.986, P < 0.001). The slopes and intercepts of meteoric water line between June to September in both Golmud and Delingha are lower than the global average, and the intercept in Golmud is only -4.566, which indicates the extremely arid climate condition. (2) the delta18O content of precipitation is much higher in Golmud in early July, it shows the enrichment of some heavier isotopes. However, the delta18O content of precipitation becomes lower from late July to early September, especially for the late September. The 8180 content of precipitation in Delingha is higher in June to August than that in late September. (3) the water vapor sources of precipitation in Golmud and Delingha are different, Golmud area is the northern border of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau where the southwest monsoon can reach, and the southwest monsoon brings water vapors of precipitation, but the water vapors of precipitation in Delingha are mainly from local evaporation.

  1. High-accuracy measurements of total column water vapor from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert R.; Crisp, David; Ott, Lesley E.; O'Dell, Christopher W.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of the distribution of water vapor in Earth's atmosphere is of critical importance to both weather and climate studies. Here we report on measurements of total column water vapor (TCWV) from hyperspectral observations of near-infrared reflected sunlight over land and ocean surfaces from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2). These measurements are an ancillary product of the retrieval algorithm used to measure atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, with information coming from three highly resolved spectral bands. Comparisons to high-accuracy validation data, including ground-based GPS and microwave radiometer data, demonstrate that OCO-2 TCWV measurements have maximum root-mean-square deviations of 0.9-1.3mm. Our results indicate that OCO-2 is the first space-based sensor to accurately and precisely measure the two most important greenhouse gases, water vapor and carbon dioxide, at high spatial resolution (1.3 × 2.3 km2) and that OCO-2 TCWV measurements may be useful in improving numerical weather predictions and reanalysis products.

  2. Solvation agent for disulfide precipitates from inhibited glycol-water solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M. F.

    1971-01-01

    Small additions /0.01 percent or less/ of triethanoloamine sodium sulfite adduct to mercapto benzothiazole inhibited glycol water heat transfer solutions containing disulfide precipitate produce marked reduction in amount of precipitate. Adduct is useful as additive in glycol base antifreezes and coolants.

  3. Trends in the chemistry of precipitation and surface water in a national network of small watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aulenbach, Brent T.; Hooper, R.P.; Bricker, O.P.

    1996-01-01

    Trends in precipitation and surface water chemistry at a network of 15 small watersheds ( < 10 km2) in the USA were evaluated using a statistical test for monotonic trends (the seasonal Kendall test) and a graphical smoothing technique for the visual identification of trends. Composite precipitation samples were collected weekly and surface water samples were collected at least monthly. Concentrations were adjusted before trend analysis, by volume for precipitation samples and by flow for surface water samples. A relation between precipitation and surface water trends was not evident either for individual inorganic solutes or for solute combinations, such as ionic strength, at most sites. The only exception was chloride, for which there was a similar trend at 60% of the sites. The smoothing technique indicated that short-term patterns in precipitation chemistry were not reflected in surface waters. The magnitude of the short-term variations in surface water concentration was generally larger than the overall long-term trend, possibly because flow adjustment did not adequately correct for climatic variability. Detecting the relation between precipitation and surface water chemistry trends may be improved by using a more powerful sampling strategy and by developing better methods of concentration adjustment to remove the effects of natural variation in surface waters.

  4. Importance of Dry-Season Precipitation to the Water Resources of Monteverde, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guswa, A. J.; Rhodes, A. L.

    2005-12-01

    Monteverde, Costa Rica harbors montane forests that exemplify the delicate balances among climate, hydrology, habitat, and development. Most of the annual precipitation to this region arrives during the wet season, but the importance of orographic precipitation during the dry and transitional seasons should not be underestimated. Changes in regional land-cover and global climate may lead to reduced precipitation and cloud cover and a subsequent decline in endemic species, and a boom in ecotourism has put stress on water resources. A recent attempt to withdraw water from a local stream led to a standoff between conservationists and business developers, and there is a clear need for hydrologic data and understanding in support of policy. Through signals observed in the stable isotopic composition of precipitation and streamflow, we seek to understand how precipitation from the drier seasons propagates through the hydrologic cycle. In precipitation, δ18O and δ2H are heaviest during the dry and transitional seasons and light during the rainy season, consistent with the condensation mechanisms and degree of rainout typical of these periods. The signal in d-excess indicates a contribution of recycled water to precipitation in Monteverde from late in the rainy season through the dry season. Attenuated versions of these seasonal signals propagate through to the stream samples and provide a means of determining the importance of dry-season precipitation to water resources for the region. Results from six catchments on the leeward slope indicate that the Brillante Gap in the continental divide exerts strong control on the input of orographic precipitation to the region. Disparities in the temporal signals of precipitation and streamflow isotopes indicate non-linear behavior in the hydrologic processes that move water through these catchments.

  5. Exploring geophysical processes influencing U.S. West Coast precipitation and water supply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ralph, F.M.; Prather, K.; Cayan, D.

    2011-01-01

    CalWater Science Workshop; La Jolla, California, 8-10 June 2011 CalWater is a multiyear, multiagency research project with two primary research themes: the effects of changing climate on atmospheric rivers (ARs) and associated extreme events, and the potential role of aerosols in modulating cloud properties and precipitation, especially regarding orographic precipitation and water supply. Advances made in CalWater have implications for both water supply and flood control in California and other West Coast areas, both in the near term and in a changing climate.

  6. Exploring geophysical processes influencing U.S. West Coast precipitation and water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, F. Martin; Prather, Kim; Cayan, Dan

    2011-10-01

    CalWater Science Workshop; La Jolla, California, 8-10 June 2011 CalWater is a multiyear, multiagency research project with two primary research themes: the effects of changing climate on atmospheric rivers (ARs) and associated extreme events, and the potential role of aerosols in modulating cloud properties and precipitation, especially regarding orographic precipitation and water supply. Advances made in CalWater have implications for both water supply and flood control in California and other West Coast areas, both in the near term and in a changing climate.

  7. Chemical Signals of Critical Zone Processing: Quantification of Water and Sediment Sources During Individual Storm Events in the Christina River Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwan, D. L.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Aalto, R. E.; Lazareva, O.; Marquard, J.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Sawyer, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical signals of water and materials in catchment exports have long been studied as proxies for within-watershed processing. In the Christina River Critical Zone Observatory, we use the chemistry of water, in particular the oxygen-18 and chloride concentrations, and hydrograph separation to evaluate the contributions of different water sources to the stream discharge during a series of five storm events in 2011 and 2012. These events varied in magnitude, from 44 to 168 mm total precipitation, and precipitation chemistry, with δ18O values ranging from -5.38 to -11.06 ‰. The contribution of old water during the storm peak, determined by isotope hydrograph separation, varied from 0% in a spring storm of annual magnitude to 76% during Hurricane Sandy. Soil moisture data, available for all but one of our storms, indicates higher old water contribution at peak flow when the catchment has higher antecedent soil moisture. Understanding differences in water sourcing to the stream during different events provides a basis on which we analyze the movement of critical zone processing with regard to erosion and the source of exported sediment. For example, sediment fingerprinting with fallout radioisotopes indicated variation in sediment source between events. For example, suspended sediment samples taken during Hurricane Irene (28 August 2011) contained between 0 and 11.4 Bq/kg cesium-137 (137Cs) and 175 - 698 Bq/kg of beryllium-7 (7Be), indicating some level of recent surface erosion. Suspended sediment samples taken during Hurricane Sandy (29 October 2012) did not contain measureable activities of either 137Cs or 7Be.

  8. The removal of sulphate from mine water by precipitation as ettringite and the utilisation of the precipitate as a sorbent for arsenate removal.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Hu, Tao; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate sulphate removal from mine water by precipitation as ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12·26H2O) and the utilisation of the precipitate as a sorbent for arsenate removal. The mine water sulphate concentration was reduced by 85-90% from the initial 1400 mg/L during ettringite precipitation depending on the treatment method. The precipitation conditions were also simulated with MINEQL + software, and the computational results were compared with the experimental results. The precipitated solids were characterised with X-ray diffraction and a scanning electron microscope. The precipitated solids were tested as sorbents for arsenate removal from the model solution. The arsenic(V) model solution concentration reduced 86-96% from the initial 1.5 mg/L with a 1 g/L sorbent dosage. The effect of initial arsenate concentration on the sorption of arsenate on the precipitate was studied and Langmuir, Freundlich, and Langmuir-Freundlich sorption isotherm models were fitted to the experimental data. The maximum arsenate sorption capacity (qm = 11.2 ± 4.7 mg/g) of the precipitate was obtained from the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm. The results indicate that the precipitate produced during sulphate removal from mine water by precipitation as ettringite could be further used as a sorbent for arsenate removal.

  9. How Much Water is in That Snowpack? Improving Basin-wide Snow Water Equivalent Estimates from the Airborne Snow Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, K.; Painter, T. H.; Marks, D. G.; Kirchner, P. B.; Winstral, A. H.; Ramirez, P.; Goodale, C. E.; Richardson, M.; Berisford, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    In the western US, snowmelt from the mountains contribute the vast majority of fresh water supply, in an otherwise dry region. With much of California currently experiencing extreme drought, it is critical for water managers to have accurate basin-wide estimations of snow water content during the spring melt season. At the forefront of basin-scale snow monitoring is the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO). With combined LiDAR /spectrometer instruments and weekly flights over key basins throughout California, the ASO suite is capable of retrieving high-resolution basin-wide snow depth and albedo observations. To make best use of these high-resolution snow depths, spatially distributed snow density data are required to leverage snow water equivalent (SWE) from the measured depths. Snow density is a spatially and temporally variable property and is difficult to estimate at basin scales. Currently, ASO uses a physically based snow model (iSnobal) to resolve distributed snow density dynamics across the basin. However, there are issues with the density algorithms in iSnobal, particularly with snow depths below 0.50 m. This shortcoming limited the use of snow density fields from iSnobal during the poor snowfall year of 2014 in the Sierra Nevada, where snow depths were generally low. A deeper understanding of iSnobal model performance and uncertainty for snow density estimation is required. In this study, the model is compared to an existing climate-based statistical method for basin-wide snow density estimation in the Tuolumne basin in the Sierra Nevada and sparse field density measurements. The objective of this study is to improve the water resource information provided to water managers during ASO operation in the future by reducing the uncertainty introduced during the snow depth to SWE conversion.

  10. Distribution of tritium in water vapour and precipitation around Wolsung nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Chae, Jung-Seok; Lee, Sang-Kuk; Kim, Yongjae; Lee, Jung-Min; Cho, Heung-Joon; Cho, Yong-Woo; Yun, Ju-Yong

    2011-07-01

    The distribution of tritium in water vapour and precipitation with discharge of tritiated water vapour and meteorological factors was studied around the Wolsung nuclear power plant (NPP) site during the period 2004-2008. The tritium concentrations in atmospheric water vapour and precipitation had a temporal variation with relatively high values in the early summer. Spatial distribution of tritium concentrations was affected by various factors such as distance from the NPP site, wind direction, tritium discharge into the atmosphere and atmospheric dispersion factor. The annual mean concentrations of atmospheric HTO and precipitation were correlated with the amount of gaseous tritium released from the Wolsung NPP. The tritium concentrations in precipitation decrease exponentially with an increase of the distance from the Wolsung NPP site.

  11. Tritium and Stable Isotopes of Precipitation and Surface Water in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, P.; Moran, J. E.; Visser, A.; Esser, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Tritium (3H) and stable isotopes (2H and 18O) are effective natural tracers of water molecules through the hydrologic system. The strong topographic gradient in California results in distinct isotopic signatures that are particularly effective in watershed studies. Past studies of meteoric tritium distribution within the United States have focused on large-scale trends, at low spatial resolution. Globally, tritium in precipitation is monitored by the International Atomic Energy Agency contributing to the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) database. The two tritium monitoring stations in California contributing to the GNIP database were discontinued in 1976 (Santa Maria) and 1993 (Menlo Park). Surface water studies have focused on time series in major rivers nationwide or localized studies. Our study focuses on high spatial resolution water isotope data collection in California. Over 140 tritium and stable water isotope samples were collected from surface water and direct precipitation during the 2013 Summer/Fall and 2014 Winter/Spring flow regimes and analyzed by helium accumulation and noble gas mass spectrometry. Surface water samples are collected as a proxy for precipitation and to investigate trends related to water residence times. Tritium concentrations in precipitation show strong spatial trends, with higher concentrations at inland high elevation locations. Surface water tritium trends with spatial location (latitude and longitude) and elevation (reflecting the precipitation signal) and distance downstream (reflecting water residence times). A local meteoric water line (MWL) for California is developed from stable isotope data and analyzed in comparison to the global MWL. Results have implications for tritium tracer and water provenance studies.

  12. Water-mass dynamics of an Arctic cold-water coral reef: First results from a new ocean observatory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flögel, Sascha; Karstensen, Johannes; Linke, Peter; Pfannkuche, Olaf; Ashastina, Kseniia; Dullo, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Cold-water coral reefs occur at various sites along the European continental margin, like in the Mediterranean Sea, on carbonate mounds West off Ireland, or at shallower depths between 100 and 350 m on the Norwegian shelf. Their occurrence is related to different physical parameters like temperature, salinity, seawater density, dissolved oxygen, and to other environmental parameters such as internal wave activity, nutrient supply, strong currents, which keep sediment input low, etc. Here, we present first results from a long-term observation in one of the nortnermost cold-water coral reefs at 70.5°N - the Stjernsund in northern Norway. The Stjernsund is a 30 km long and up to 3.5 km wide sound connecting the open North Atlantic with a fjord system. A deep-seated SW-NE oriented morainic sill with varying depths (203-236 m) splits the more than 400 m deep sound into two troughs. Living Lophelia pertusa dominated reef complexes occur on the NW slope between 235 and 305 m water depths and on the SE slope between 245 and 280 m. To investigate the dominating physical and biogeochemical boundary conditions a new modular seafloor observatory, MoLab, consisting of five sea-floor observatories and two moorings was deployed for 100 days during the summer of 2012. The various lander systems and moorimgs were equipped with sensors to measure current velocities and directions, temperature, salinity, pressure, pH, turbidity, fluorescence, oxygen concentration and saturation. Results showed that near-bottom salinities, temperature and current velocities are dominated by a semi-diurnal tidal forcing (pronounced M2 constituent), which cause vertical water mass movements of up to 100 m. These influence large parts of the living reef. Closer examination revealed overturning cells on the south-eastern slope of the sill during high tide, when Atlantic Water flows over the sill. The appearance of living cold-water corals is limited to a density envelope of sigma-theta=27.25-27.50 kg/m-3

  13. Warming combined with more extreme precipitation regimes modifies the water sources used by trees.

    PubMed

    Grossiord, Charlotte; Sevanto, Sanna; Dawson, Todd E; Adams, Henry D; Collins, Adam D; Dickman, Lee T; Newman, Brent D; Stockton, Elizabeth A; McDowell, Nate G

    2017-01-01

    The persistence of vegetation under climate change will depend on a plant's capacity to exploit water resources. We analyzed water source dynamics in piñon pine and juniper trees subjected to precipitation reduction, atmospheric warming, and to both simultaneously. Piñon and juniper exhibited different and opposite shifts in water uptake depth in response to experimental stress and background climate over 3 yr. During a dry summer, juniper responded to warming with a shift to shallow water sources, whereas piñon pine responded to precipitation reduction with a shift to deeper sources in autumn. In normal and wet summers, both species responded to precipitation reduction, but juniper increased deep water uptake and piñon increased shallow water uptake. Shifts in the utilization of water sources were associated with reduced stomatal conductance and photosynthesis, suggesting that belowground compensation in response to warming and water reduction did not alleviate stress impacts for gas exchange. We have demonstrated that predicted climate change could modify water sources of trees. Warming impairs juniper uptake of deep sources during extended dry periods. Precipitation reduction alters the uptake of shallow sources following extended droughts for piñon. Shifts in water sources may not compensate for climate change impacts on tree physiology.

  14. Importance of orographic precipitation to the water resources of Monteverde, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guswa, Andrew J.; Rhodes, Amy L.; Newell, Silvia E.

    2007-10-01

    Monteverde, Costa Rica harbors montane forests that exemplify the delicate balances among climate, hydrology, habitat, and development. Most of the annual precipitation to this region arrives during the wet season, but the importance of orographic precipitation during the dry and transitional seasons should not be underestimated. Development associated with ecotourism has put significant stress on water resources, and recent work has shown evidence that changes in regional land-cover and global climate may lead to reduced precipitation and cloud cover and a subsequent decline in endemic species. Precipitation samples collected from 2003 to 2005 reveal a seasonal signal in stable isotope composition, as measured by δ 18O and δ 2H, that is heaviest during the dry and transitional seasons. Attenuated versions of this signal propagate through to stream samples and provide a means of determining the importance of precipitation delivered by the trade winds during the dry and transitional seasons to water resources for the region. Results from six catchments on the leeward slope indicate that topography exerts a strong control on the importance of orographic precipitation to stream baseflow. The contributions are greatest in those catchments that are close to the Brillante Gap in the Continental Divide. Differences in the temporal variation of precipitation and streamflow isotope compositions provide insight to the hydrologic pathways that move water to the streams.

  15. The Texas Water Observatory: Utilizing Advanced Observing System Design for Understanding Water Resources Sustainability Across Climatic and Geologic Gradients of Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, B.; Moore, G. W.; Miller, G. R.; Quiring, S. M.; Everett, M. E.; Morgan, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Texas Water Observatory (TWO) is a new distributed network of field observatories for better understanding of the hydrologic flow in the critical zone (encompassing groundwater, soil water, surface water, and atmospheric water) at various space and time scales. Core sites in the network will begin in Brazos River corridor and expand from there westward. Using many advanced observational platforms and real-time / near-real time sensors, this observatory will monitor high frequency data of water stores and fluxes, critical for understanding and modeling the in the state of Texas and Southern USA. Once implemented, TWO will be positioned to support high-impact water science that is highly relevant to societal needs and serve as a regional resource for better understanding and/or managing agriculture, water resources, ecosystems, biodiversity, disasters, health, energy, and weather/climate. TWO infrastructure will span land uses (cultivation agriculture, range/pasture, forest), landforms (low-relief erosional uplands to depositional lowlands), and across climatic and geologic gradients of Texas to investigate the sensitivity and resilience of fertile soils and the ecosystems they support. Besides developing a network of field water observatory infrastructure/capacity for accounting water flow and storage, TWO will facilitate developing a new generation interdisciplinary water professionals (from various TAMU Colleges) with better understanding and skills for attending to future water challenges of the region. This holistic growth will have great impact on TAMU research enterprise related to water resources, leading to higher federal and state level competitiveness for funding and establishing a center of excellence in the region

  16. Precipitation patterns and moisture fluxes in a sandy, tropical environment with a shallow water table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minihane, M. R.; Freyberg, D. L.

    2011-08-01

    Identifying the dominant mechanisms controlling recharge in shallow sandy soils in tropical climates has received relatively little attention. Given the expansion of coastal fill using marine sands and the growth of coastal populations throughout the tropics, there is a need to better understand the nature of water balances in these settings. We use time series of field observations at a coastal landfill in Singapore coupled with numerical modeling using the Richards' equation to examine the impact of precipitation patterns on soil moisture dynamics, including percolation past the root zone and recharge, in such an environment. A threshold in total precipitation event depth, much more so than peak precipitation intensity, is the strongest event control on recharge. However, shallow antecedent moisture, and therefore the timing between events along with the seasonal depth to water table, also play significant roles in determining recharge amounts. For example, at our field site, precipitation events of less than 3 mm per event yield little to no direct recharge, but for larger events, moisture content changes below the root zone are linearly correlated to the product of the average antecedent moisture content and the total event precipitation. Therefore, water resources planners need to consider identifying threshold precipitation volumes, along with the multiple time scales that capture variability in event antecedent conditions and storm frequency in assessing the role of recharge in coastal water balances in tropical settings.

  17. Remote sensing of precipitable water over the oceans from Nimbus-7 microwave measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Change, H. D.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1981-01-01

    Global maps of precipitable water over derived from scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) data reveal salient features associated with ocean currents and the large scale general circulation in the atmosphere. Nimbus-7 SMMR brightness temperature measurements in the 21 and 18 GHz channels are used to sense the precipitable water in the atmospheric over oceans. The difference in the brightness temperature (T sub 21 -T sub 18), both in the horizontal and vertical polarization, is found to be essentially a function of the precipitable water in the atmosphere. An equation, based on the physical consideration of the radiative transfer in the microwave region, is developed to relate the precipitable water to (T sub 21 - T sub 18). It shows that the signal (T sub 21- T sub 18) does not suffer severely from the noise introduced by variations in the sea surface temperature, surface winds, and liquid water content in non rain clouds. The rms deviation between the estimated precipitable water from SMMR data and that given by the closely coincident ship radiosondes is about 0.25 g/ sq cm

  18. Prediction of Water-level Changes and Water Use in the High Plains Aquifer from Radar Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittemore, D. O.; Butler, J. J., Jr.; Wilson, B. B.

    2015-12-01

    Meteorological conditions are the primary driver of variations in the annual volume of groundwater pumped for irrigation from the High Plains aquifer (HPA), one of the largest aquifers of the world. Correlations between climatic indices (such as the Standardized Precipitation Index [SPI]) and mean annual water-level changes and water use have been shown to be valuable tools for assessing the aquifer's response to various climatic scenarios in the semi-arid Kansas HPA (Whittemore et al., 2015). The correlations are generally better for a relatively large area (region) of the aquifer (such as that encompassed by a climatic division) because of the number of weather stations from which the climatic indices are computed. Correlations can be poor for county-sized and smaller areas (less than a few to several hundred km2) because of the low density of weather stations. Since 2005, radar precipitation data have been served online by the National Weather Service. The radar data are adjusted based on ground observations and are available at a spatial resolution of ~4x4 km. Correlations between radar precipitation and mean annual water-level changes and water use are comparable to those using SPI for the same region. Correlations using radar precipitation data are generally higher than with SPI computed for smaller areas, such as for counties and areas around individual monitoring wells. The optimum correlations for radar precipitation are determined using sums of different spans of monthly mean precipitation that include the irrigation season for the area of interest. Coefficients of determination, R2, for radar precipitation versus annual water-level change and water use can exceed 0.8 for counties and monitoring well areas in the Kansas HPA. These correlations are being used to assess the impact of drought and water-use management on HPA sustainability. These correlations can also be used to assess the quality of the reported water-use data.

  19. Selective recovery of copper and zinc from mine dump waters of mining enterprises in precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orekhova, N. N.; Tarybaeva, G. A.; Muravev, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    The acid mine dump waters at mining companies that mining the copper and copperzinc sulphide ore have the high concentrates of metals and classified in our view as the raw materials for selective recovery of metals in precipitates comparable in quality with concentrates of ores enrichment and suitable for further metallurgical processing. Authors have implemented three two-stage schemes for sequential extraction of copper and zinc: cementation-sulphide precipitation, galvanocoagulation-sulphide precipitation, precipitation-precipitation. Moreover, parameters of processes and quality of the obtained precipitates have described. The achieved copper recovery is 89% and 94% respectively with the application of cementation and galvanocoagulation, in sulphide precipitate exceeded 75%. Furthermore, the copper recovery from decoppering in precipitates amounted to more than 65%. Zinc-containing precipitates because of coprecipitation of iron, magnesium and calcium contain zinc from 14% to 28%, in two to three times less than the quality of conditioned zinc concentrates. The content of precipitates allows to apply them for additional charging to concentrates of enrichment or for the production of metals in metallurgical treatment. As a result of the studying the effect of reduced total salinity (S) on mass fraction of zinc in precipitate (β) with the constant concentration of zinc (SZn), the changes in concentration with constant salinity and reduction in total salinity (S) with constant ratio S/CZn, the following dependencies have obtained: ≤ft( {{S}} \\right):{≤ft( {{{\\partial β } \\over {\\partial {cZn}}}} \\right)_S} > 0,{≤ft( {{{\\partial β } \\over {\\partial S}}} \\right){C_{Zn}}} < 0, in the range of an index S from 4.5 to 90.0 g/L {≤ft( {{{\\partial β } \\over {\\partial S}}} \\right){{{C_{Zn}} \\over S}}} < 0, where {≤ft( {{{\\partial x} \\over {\\partial y}}} \\right)_Z} is a partial derivative of x to y, whereas the value z is fixed.

  20. Real-time QEXAFS spectroscopy measures rapid precipitate formation at the mineral-water interface.

    PubMed

    Siebecker, Matthew; Li, Wei; Khalid, Syed; Sparks, Donald

    2014-09-19

    Reactions at the mineral-water interface are central to numerous geochemical processes and have consequences at local, regional and global scales. They are also important in materials science research. Kinetics greatly influences mineral-water interface reactions; however, there are few kinetic data in real-time and at the molecular scale. Here we report real-time data illustrating the rapid formation of nickel aluminium-layered double hydroxide precipitates at the mineral-water interface in a flow environment in as little as 31-40 min. Layered double hydroxides have a variety of applications in environmental remediation and materials science. The real-time data shown here enhance our fundamental understanding of the kinetics of mineral-water interface processes, such as adsorption, dissolution and precipitation, by illustrating their rapid and simultaneous occurrence in a dynamic environment. Both precipitation and adsorption can occur on the same rapid timescale.

  1. Warming combined with more extreme precipitation regimes modifies the water sources used by trees

    SciTech Connect

    Grossiord, Charlotte; Sevanto, Sanna; Dawson, Todd E.; Adams, Henry D.; Collins, Adam D.; Dickman, Lee T.; Newman, Brent D.; Stockton, Elizabeth A.; McDowell, Nate G.

    2016-09-09

    The persistence of vegetation under climate change will depend on a plant's capacity to exploit water resources. In addition, we analyzed water source dynamics in piñon pine and juniper trees subjected to precipitation reduction, atmospheric warming, and to both simultaneously.

  2. CalWater 2 - Precipitation, Aerosols, and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.; Cayan, D. R.; DeMott, P. J.; Dettinger, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; Leung, L. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Rutledge, S. A.; Waliser, D. E.; White, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Emerging research has identified two phenomena that play key roles in the variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the West Coast of the United States. These phenomena include the role of (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major storms along the U.S. West Coast, and (2) aerosols—from local sources as well as those transported from remote continents—and their modulating effects on western U.S. precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of extreme precipitation and its effects, including the provision of beneficial water supply. This presentation summarizes the science objectives and strategies to address gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Observations are proposed for multiple winter seasons as part of a 5-year broad interagency vision referred to as CalWater 2 to address these science gaps (http://esrl.noaa.gov/psd/calwater). In January-February 2015, a field campaign has been planned consisting of a targeted set of aircraft and ship-based measurements and associated evaluation of data in near-shore regions of California and in the eastern Pacific. In close coordination with NOAA, DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is also contributing air and shipborne facilities for ACAPEX (ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment), a DOE-sponsored study complementing CalWater 2. Ground-based measurements from NOAA's HydroMeteorological Testbed (HMT) network in California and aerosol chemical instrumentation at Bodega Bay, California have been designed to add important near surface-level context for the

  3. Seasonal transfer of oxygen isotopes from precipitation and soil to the tree ring: source water versus needle water enrichment.

    PubMed

    Treydte, Kerstin; Boda, Sonja; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; Fonti, Patrick; Frank, David; Ullrich, Bastian; Saurer, Matthias; Siegwolf, Rolf; Battipaglia, Giovanna; Werner, Willy; Gessler, Arthur

    2014-05-01

    For accurate interpretation of oxygen isotopes in tree rings (δ(18) O), it is necessary to disentangle the mechanisms underlying the variations in the tree's internal water cycle and to understand the transfer of source versus leaf water δ(18) O to phloem sugars and stem wood. We studied the seasonal transfer of oxygen isotopes from precipitation and soil water through the xylem, needles and phloem to the tree rings of Larix decidua at two alpine sites in the Lötschental (Switzerland). Weekly resolved δ(18) O records of precipitation, soil water, xylem and needle water, phloem organic matter and tree rings were developed. Week-to-week variations in needle-water (18) O enrichment were strongly controlled by weather conditions during the growing season. These short-term variations were, however, not significantly fingerprinted in tree-ring δ(18) O. Instead, seasonal trends in tree-ring δ(18) O predominantly mirrored trends in the source water, including recent precipitation and soil water pools. Modelling results support these findings: seasonal tree-ring δ(18) O variations are captured best when the week-to-week variations of the leaf water signal are suppressed. Our results suggest that climate signals in tree-ring δ(18) O variations should be strongest at temperate sites with humid conditions and precipitation maxima during the growing season.

  4. Dynamic of the atmospheric boundary layer from the isotopic composition of surface water vapor at the Maïdo Observatory (La Réunion, Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilpart, Etienne; Vimeux, Francoise; Metzger, Jean-Marc; Evan, Stephanie; Brioude, Jerome; Cattani, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Projections of tropical and subtropical precipitation strongly differ from one climate model to another, both in sign and in amplitude. This is the case for example in some parts of the West Indian Ocean. The causes of those uncertainties are numerous and a better understanding of humid processes in the tropical atmosphere is needed. We propose to address this burning question by using water stables isotopes. We have been measuring the isotopic composition of surface water vapor at the atmospheric Observatory of Maïdo located at La Reunion Island (21°S, 55°E, 2200m a.s.l) since November 2014. Our results exhibit a strong diurnal cycle all over the year (except during cyclonic activity), with almost constant isotopic values during the day (around -13.5±0.6‰ for oxygen 18 from November 2014 to November 2015) and variable and very depleted isotopic values during the night (down to -35‰ for oxygen 18 over the same period) associated with low humidity levels. We will show in this presentation that the diurnal isotopic variations are associated to a strong air masses mixing. During the day, the isotopic composition of the vapor is typical of marine boundary layer (BL) moisture transported from the close Ocean and lifted up to the Maïdo station. During the night, the depleted values and the low humidity could trace free troposphere moisture, which is consistent with previous studies suggesting that the Maïdo Observatory is above the BL during the night. We will explore the influence of the daily BL development on our observations, using a set of atmospheric vertical profiles done on site in May 2015 during the BIOMAIDO campaign. At last, we will discuss the most isotopic depleted values recorded in our observations during the night as a possible consequence of regional strong subsidences.

  5. Water Column Sampling Capabilities of the NEPTUNE Canada Regional Cabled Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaly, S. F.; Neptune Canada Science

    2010-12-01

    The NEPTUNE Canada Regional Observatory affords a wide range of opportunities to conduct adaptive and high-temporal resolution water column property studies. Intensive sites are located in a shallow near-shore environment (Folger Passage), a shelf-slope-break region (Barkley Upper Slope) and a deep offshore mid-ocean spreading centre (Endeavour Ridge). The Folger Passage site has instrument platforms at 100 m and 23 m which are located near the mouth of Barkley Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island. Instruments include upward-looking surface-wave resolving Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs), multi-frequency echo-sounders to measure backscatter from zooplankton and bottom pressure recorders to assess long-wave variability (e.g. tsunami, shelf waves, tidal). The near-bottom water column is sampled for salinity, temperature, oxygen, chlorophyll, turbidity, photosynthetically active light and, in addition, there are fine scale measurements of the velocity structure of the bottom-boundary layer. Water column measurements at the 400 metre deep Barkley Upper Slope site are facilitated by a world leading Vertical Profiling System (VPS). This winch operated system will profile a suite of instruments through the water column at up to 4 cycles per day. Optical measurements consist of a pair of hyperspectral radiometers to characterise downwelling irradiation and upwelling radiance, backscatter fluorescence for chlorophyll, and an optode to determine oxygen levels. A pumped CTD will provide salinity, temperature, depth as well as plumbing for a nitrate sensor, a coloured dissolved organic matter sensor and a pCO2 sensor. Acoustic instruments on the profiler consist of a 400 kHz ADCP, 200 kHz echosounder and a broad band hydrophone. With these instruments we expect to be able to explore the covariation of physical and chemical parameters with impact at a range of trophic levels, up to and including marine mammals. At the base of the VPS there is a long range ADCP

  6. Evaporation tagging and atmospheric water budget analysis with WRF: A regional precipitation recycling study for West

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, Joel; Knoche, Richard; Wei, Jianhui; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Regional precipitation recycling is the measure of the contribution of local evaporation E to local precipitation. This study provides a set of two methods developed in the Weather Research and Forecasting WRF model system for investigating regional precipitation recycling mechanisms: (1) tracking of tagged atmospheric water species originating from evaporation in a source region, ie E-tagging, and (2) three-dimensional budgets of total and tagged atmospheric water species. These methods are used to quantify the effect of return flow and non-well vertical mixing neglected in the computation of the bulk precipitation recycling ratio. The developed algorithms are applied to a WRF simulation of the West African Monsoon 2003. The simulated region is characterized by vertical wind shear condition, i.e. southwesterlies in the low levels and easterlies in the mid-levels, which favours return flow and non-well vertical mixing. Regional precipitation recycling is investigated in 100x100 and 1000x1000 km2 areas. A prerequisite condition for evaporated water to contribute to the precipitation process in both areas is that it is lifted to the mid-levels where hydrometeors are produced. In the 100x100 (1000x1000) km2 area the bulk precipitation recycling ratio is 0.9 (7.3) %. Our budget analysis reveals that return flow and non-well vertically mixed outflow increase this value by about +0.2 (2.9) and +0.2 (1.6) %, respectively, thus strengthening the well-known scale-dependency of regional precipitation recycling.

  7. NASA Dual Precipitation Radar Arrives at Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) built by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory arrived on Friday, Marc...

  8. CCN and IN Effects on Cloud Properties and Precipitation - Case Studies from CalWater 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Leung, L.; Comstock, J. M.; Tomlinson, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) to modify cloud microphysical processes, which could potentially change the location, intensity, and type of precipitation. Dust aerosols are often observed over California in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in winter/spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia. Although anthropogenic pollution has been postulated to contribute to reduction of precipitation in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, the effects of dust aerosols on the winter clouds and precipitation has not been examined in detail particularly with model simulations. We incorporate recent progress in ice nucleation parameterizations to link dust with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with WRF, to exclusively look into how dust can possibly affect cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cases under different environmental conditions with atmospheric river (AR) and Sierra barrier jet (SBJ) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. It is shown that increasing IN concentrations or adding a dust layer at 4-6 km as IN enhances surface rain and snow due to enhanced production of ice and snow in clouds. However, increasing CCN suppresses surface rain and snow, and significantly redistributes surface precipitation upwind and downwind of the mountains, with important implication to improving our understanding of the impacts of aerosols on orographic precipitation and water supply in the region.

  9. Precipitation recycling in West Africa - regional modeling, evaporation tagging and atmospheric water budget analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, Joel; Kunstmann, Harald; Knoche, Hans-Richard

    2015-04-01

    Many numerical studies have shown that the West African monsoon is highly sensitive to the state of the land surface. It is however questionable to which extend a local change of land surface properties would affect the local climate, especially with respect to precipitation. This issue is traditionally addressed with the concept of precipitation recycling, defined as the contribution of local surface evaporation to local precipitation. For this study the West African monsoon has been simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using explicit convection, for the domain (1°S-21°N, 18°W-14°E) at a spatial resolution of 10 km, for the period January-October 2013, and using ERA-Interim reanalyses as driving data. This WRF configuration has been selected for its ability to simulate monthly precipitation amounts and daily histograms close to TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) data. In order to investigate precipitation recycling in this WRF simulation, surface evaporation tagging has been implemented in the WRF source code as well as the budget of total and tagged atmospheric water. Surface evaporation tagging consists in duplicating all water species and the respective prognostic equations in the source code. Then, tagged water species are set to zero at the lateral boundaries of the simulated domain (no inflow of tagged water vapor), and tagged surface evaporation is considered only in a specified region. All the source terms of the prognostic equations of total and tagged water species are finally saved in the outputs for the budget analysis. This allows quantifying the respective contribution of total and tagged atmospheric water to atmospheric precipitation processes. The WRF simulation with surface evaporation tagging and budgets has been conducted two times, first with a 100 km2 tagged region (11-12°N, 1-2°W), and second with a 1000 km2 tagged region (7-16°N, 6°W -3°E). In this presentation we will investigate hydro

  10. Controls on the stable isotopes in precipitation and surface waters across the southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Yao, Tandong; Xie, Shiyou; He, You

    2017-02-01

    Constraining temporal and spatial variability in water stable isotopes (δ18O and δD) is requested for interpreting proxy records of paleoclimate/paleoaltimetry. The southeastern Tibetan Plateau (TP) receives large amounts of precipitation in both summer (JJAS) and spring (MAM) and this makes it different from most other parts of the TP where annual precipitation concentrates only in summer. However, our knowledge of controls on precipitation and surface runoff generation in this region is still far from sufficient. In this study, the δ18O and δD of precipitation and stream waters across the southeastern TP were analyzed to investigate moisture sources and empirical isotope-elevation relationships. Herein, seasonal precipitation patterns, moisture trajectories and precipitation isotopes suggest this region is seasonally dominated by the monsoon in summer and the southerlies (from the Bay of Bengal) or a mix of southerlies and westerlies in spring. Spatially, vertical variations in precipitation seasonality exert profound influences on isotopic variability for stream waters. Larger contributions of spring precipitation (with higher δ18O and d-excess (d-excess = δD-8δ18O) compared to summer precipitation) vs. summer precipitation in the surface runoff generation at lower elevations account for the uncommon altitudinal decrease in streamwater d-excess. Such a cause also contributes to the slightly greater vertical lapse rates of streamwater δ18O (-0.28 to -0.48‰/100 m) relative to the Himalayan front. In addition, although a robust δ18O-elevation relationship is demonstrated based upon our measured and other published data on a broad spatial scale (over a 5200 m elevation range), this relationship is found to deviate from the empirical/theoretical pattern in the Himalayan front, which is also caused by the substantial spring precipitation in the southeastern TP. It is suggested that long-term changes in δ18O or δD of paleowater in this region actually

  11. Q Conversion Factor Models for Estimating Precipitable Water Vapor for Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz, Ilke; Mekik, Cetin; Gurbuz, Gokhan

    2015-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have recently proved to be one of the crucial tools for determining continuous and precise precipitable water vapor (GNSS-MET networks). GNSS, especially CORS networks such as CORS-TR (the Turkish Network-RTK), provide high temporal and spatial accuracy for the wet tropospheric zenith delays which are then converted to the precipitable water vapor due to the fact that they can operate in all weather conditions continuously and economically. The accuracy of wet tropospheric zenith delay highly depends on the accuracy of precipitable water vapor content in the troposphere. Therefore, the precipitable water vapor is an important element of the tropospheric zenith delay. A number of studies can be found in the literature on the determination of the precipitable water vapor from the tropospheric zenith delay. Studies of Hogg showed that when the precipitable water vapor is known, the tropospheric zenith delay can be computed. Askne and Nodius have developed fundamental equations between the wet tropospheric zenith delay and the precipitable water vapor from the equation of the index of refraction in the troposphere. Furthermore, Bevis have developed a linear regression model to determine the weighted mean temperature (Tm) depending on the surface temperature (Ts) in Askne and Nodius studies. For this reason, nearly 9000 radiosonde profiles in USA were analyzed and the coefficients calculated. Similarly, there are other studies on the calculation of those coefficients for different regions: Solbrig for Germany, Liou for Taiwan, Jihyun for South Korea, Dongseob for North Korea, Suresh Raju for India, Boutiouta and Lahcene for Algeria, Bokoye for Canada, Baltink for Netherlands and Baltic, Bock for Africa. It is stated that the weighted mean temperature can be found with a root mean square error of ±2-5 K. In addition, there are studies on the calculation of the coefficients globally. Another model for the determination of

  12. The CalWater 2 - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, L. Y.; Prather, K. A.; Ralph, F. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Spackman, J. R.; Fairall, C. W.; DeMott, P. J.; Fan, J.; Zhao, C.

    2014-12-01

    The western U.S. receives precipitation predominantly during the cold season when storms approach from the Pacific Ocean. The snowpack that accumulates during winter storms provides about 70-90% of water supply for the region. Two elements of significant importance in predicting precipitation variability in the western U.S. are atmospheric rivers and aerosols. Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow bands of enhanced water vapor associated with the warm sector of extratropical cyclones over the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. While ARs are responsible for a large fraction of heavy precipitation in the western U.S. during winter, much of the rest of the orographic precipitation occurs in post-frontal clouds, which are typically quite shallow, with tops just high enough to pass the mountain barrier. Such clouds are inherently quite susceptible to aerosol effects on both warm rain and ice precipitation-forming processes. In January - March 2015, the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign will take place in northern California. Joined with CalWater 2, the field campaign aims to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud and precipitation processes associated with ARs and aerosol-cloud interactions that influence precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. We will implement an observational strategy consisting of the use of land and offshore assets to monitor (1) the evolution and structure of ARs from near their regions of development, (2) long range transport of aerosols in eastern North Pacific and potential interactions with ARs, and (3) how aerosols from long-range transport and local sources influence cloud and precipitation in the U.S. West Coast where ARs make landfall and post-frontal clouds are frequent. This presentation will provide an overview of the science questions and hypotheses to be addressed by CalWater 2/ACAPEX, review key results from prior studies, and discuss recent findings from

  13. Measurements of total column ozone, precipitable water content and aerosol optical depth at Sofia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleyna, P.; Kolev, N.; Savov, P.; Evgenieva, Ts.; Danchovski, V.; Muhtarov, P.

    2016-03-01

    This article reports the results of a study related to variations in total ozone content, aerosol optical depth, water vapor content and Ångström coefficients from summer campaign carried out in June-July 2014, at two sites in the city of Sofia (Astronomical Observatory in the Borisova Gradina Park and National Institute of Geophysics, Geodesy and Geography (NIGGG)). The results of data analysis indicate the following: Spectral dependence of aerosol optical depth (AOD); Greater AOD values due to greater portion of aerosols; Inverse relationship between the time variations of AOD or water vapor and ozone.

  14. Reanalysis of water and carbon cycle models at a critical zone observatory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHCZO) is a forested, hill-slope catchment located in the temperate-climate of central Pennsylvania with an extensive network of ground-based instrumentation for model testing and development. In this paper we discuss the use of multi-state fi...

  15. An analysis of water in galactic infrared sources using the NASA Lear Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. L.; Hilgeman, T.

    1979-01-01

    The Michelson interferometer system on the NASA Lear Jet Airborne Observatory is described as well as the data reduction procedures. The objects observed (standard stars, M stars, a nebula, planets, and the moon) are discussed and the observing parameters are listed for each flight date. The spectra obtained from these data flights are presented, grouped by class of object.

  16. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Stream water pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southwast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site. 10 references, 2 tables.

  17. Comparison of time series of integrated water vapor measured using radiosonde, GPS and microwave radiometer at the CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Franceso; Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Information about the amount and spatial distribution of atmospheric water vapor is essential to improve our knowledge of weather forecasting and climate change. Water vapor is highly variable in space and time depending on the complex interplay of several phenomena like convection, precipitation, turbulence, etc. It remains one of the most poorly characterized meteorological parameters. Remarkable progress in using of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), in particular GPS, for the monitoring of atmospheric water vapor has been achieved during the last decades. Various studies have demonstrated that GPS could provide accurate water vapor estimates for the study of the atmosphere. Different GPS data processing provided within the scientific community made use of various tropospheric models that primarily differs for the assumptions on the vertical refractivity profiles and the mapping of the vertical delay with elevation angles. This works compares several models based on the use of surface meteorological data. In order to calculate the Integrated Water Vapour (IWV), an algorithm for calculating the zenith tropospheric delay was implemented. It is based upon different mapping functions (Niell, Saastamoinen, Chao and Herring Mapping Functions). Observations are performed at the Istituto di Metodologie per l'Analisi Ambientale (IMAA) GPS station located in Tito Scalo, Potenza (40.60N, 15.72E), from July to December 2014, in the framework of OSCAR project (Observation System for Climate Application at Regional scale). The retrieved values of the IWV using the GPS are systematically compared with the other estimation of IWV collected at CIAO (CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory) using the other available measurement techniques. In particular, in this work the compared IWV are retrieved from: 1. a Trimble GPS antenna (data processed by the GPS-Met network, see gpsmet.nooa.gov); 2. a Novatel GPS antenna (data locally processed using a software developed at CIAO); 3

  18. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbarzin, Ardeshir; Carlisle, Candace

    2010-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GP!v1) mission is an international cooperative effort to advance the understanding of the physics of the Earth's water and energy cycle. Accurate and timely knowledge of global precipitation is essential for understanding the weather/climate/ecological system, for improving our ability to manage freshwater resources, and for predicting high-impact natural hazard events including floods, droughts, extreme weather events, and landslides. The GPM Core Observatory will be a reference standard to uniformly calibrate data from a constellation of spacecraft with passive microwave sensors. GPM is being developed under a partnership between the United States (US) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Japanese Aerospace and Exploration Agency (JAXA). NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in Greenbelt, MD is developing the Core Observatory, two GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) instruments, Ground Validation System and Precipitation Processing System for the GPM mission. JAXA will provide a Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) for installation on the Core satellite and launch services for the Core Observatory. The second GMI instrument will be flown on a partner-provided spacecraft. Other US agencies and international partners contribute to the GPM mission by providing precipitation measurements obtained from their own spacecraft and/or providing ground-based precipitation measurements to support ground validation activities. The Precipitation Processing System will provide standard data products for the mission.

  19. Fusing enhanced radar precipitation, in-situ hydrometeorological measurements and airborne LIDAR snowpack estimates in a hyper-resolution hydrologic model to improve seasonal water supply forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gochis, D. J.; Busto, J.; Howard, K.; Mickey, J.; Deems, J. S.; Painter, T. H.; Richardson, M.; Dugger, A. L.; Karsten, L. R.; Tang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Scarcity of spatially- and temporally-continuous observations of precipitation and snowpack conditions in remote mountain watersheds results in fundamental limitations in water supply forecasting. These limitationsin observational capabilities can result in strong biases in total snowmelt-driven runoff amount, the elevational distribution of runoff, river basin tributary contributions to total basin runoff and, equally important for water management, the timing of runoff. The Upper Rio Grande River basin in Colorado and New Mexico is one basin where observational deficiencies are hypothesized to have significant adverse impacts on estimates of snowpack melt-out rates and on water supply forecasts. We present findings from a coordinated observational-modeling study within Upper Rio Grande River basin whose aim was to quanitfy the impact enhanced precipitation, meteorological and snowpack measurements on the simulation and prediction of snowmelt driven streamflow. The Rio Grande SNOwpack and streamFLOW (RIO-SNO-FLOW) Prediction Project conducted enhanced observing activities during the 2014-2015 water year. Measurements from a gap-filling, polarimetric radar (NOXP) and in-situ meteorological and snowpack measurement stations were assimilated into the WRF-Hydro modeling framework to provide continuous analyses of snowpack and streamflow conditions. Airborne lidar estimates of snowpack conditions from the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory during mid-April and mid-May were used as additional independent validations against the various model simulations and forecasts of snowpack conditions during the melt-out season. Uncalibrated WRF-Hydro model performance from simulations and forecasts driven by enhanced observational analyses were compared against results driven by currently operational data inputs. Precipitation estimates from the NOXP research radar validate significantly better against independent in situ observations of precipitation and snow-pack increases

  20. ASSESSING MINE DRAINAGE WATER QUALITY FROM THE COLOR AND SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE OF CHEMICAL PRECIPITATES

    EPA Science Inventory


    The pH and dissolved sulfate concentrations of mine impacted waters were estimated on the basis of the spectral reflectance of resident sediments composed mostly of chemical precipitates. Mine drainage sediments were collected from sites in the Anthracite Region of eastern Pe...

  1. Annual precipitation and effects of runoff-nutrient from agricultural watersheds on water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declining surface water quality from agricultural nonpoint sources is of great concern across the Platte river basin in Nebraska. Recent changes in the earth climate create abrupt changes in domestic weather (i.e., precipitation, temperature, etc.) which can alter the impact of these nonpoint source...

  2. Hydrologic response of catchments to precipitation: Quantification of mechanical carriers and origins of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.-J.; Sudicky, E. A.; Brookfield, A. E.; Jones, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Precipitation-induced overland and groundwater flow and mixing processes are quantified to analyze the temporal (event and pre-event water) and spatial (groundwater discharge and overland runoff) origins of water entering a stream. Using a distributed-parameter control volume finite-element simulator that can simultaneously solve the fully coupled partial differential equations describing 2-D Manning and 3-D Darcian flow and advective-dispersive transport, mechanical flow (driven by hydraulic potential) and tracer-based hydrograph separation (driven by dispersive mixing as well as mechanical flow) are simulated in response to precipitation events in two cross sections oriented parallel and perpendicular to a stream. The results indicate that as precipitation becomes more intense, the subsurface mechanical flow contributions tend to become less significant relative to the total pre-event stream discharge. Hydrodynamic mixing can play an important role in enhancing pre-event tracer signals in the stream. This implies that temporally tagged chemical signals introduced into surface-subsurface flow systems from precipitation may not be strong enough to detect the changes in the subsurface flow system. It is concluded that diffusive/dispersive mixing, capillary fringe groundwater ridging, and macropore flow can influence the temporal sources of water in the stream, but any sole mechanism may not fully explain the strong pre-event water discharge. Further investigations of the influence of heterogeneity, residence time, geomorphology, and root zone processes are required to confirm the conclusions of this study.

  3. Hydrologic response of catchments to precipitation: Quantification of mechanical carriers and origins of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, Y.-J.; Sudicky, E.A.; Brookfield, A.E.; Jones, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Precipitation-induced overland and groundwater flow and mixing processes are quantified to analyze the temporal (event and pre-event water) and spatial (groundwater discharge and overland runoff) origins of water entering a stream. Using a distributed-parameter control volume finite-element simulator that can simultaneously solve the fully coupled partial differential equations describing 2-D Manning and 3-D Darcian flow and advective-dispersive transport, mechanical flow (driven by hydraulic potential) and tracer-based hydrograph separation (driven by dispersive mixing as well as mechanical flow) are simulated in response to precipitation events in two cross sections oriented parallel and perpendicular to a stream. The results indicate that as precipitation becomes more intense, the subsurface mechanical flow contributions tend to become less significant relative to the total pre-event stream discharge. Hydrodynamic mixing can play an important role in enhancing pre-event tracer signals in the stream. This implies that temporally tagged chemical signals introduced into surface-subsurface flow systems from precipitation may not be strong enough to detect the changes in the subsurface flow system. It is concluded that diffusive/dispersive mixing, capillary fringe groundwater ridging, and macropore flow can influence the temporal sources of water in the stream, but any sole mechanism may not fully explain the strong pre-event water discharge. Further investigations of the influence of heterogeneity, residence time, geomorphology, and root zone processes are required to confirm the conclusions of this study. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Intercomparison of CMIP5 simulations of summer precipitation, evaporation, and water vapor transport over Yellow and Yangtze River basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jiawei; Feng, Jinming

    2016-02-01

    Precipitation and other hydrologic variables play important roles in river basins. In this study, summer precipitation, evaporation, and water vapor transport from 16 models that have participated in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) for the Yellow River basin (a water-limited basin) and the Yangtze River basin (an energy-limited basin) over the period 1986-2005 are analyzed and evaluated. The results suggest that most models tend to overestimate precipitation in the Yellow River basin, whereas precipitation in the Yangtze River basin is generally well simulated. Models that overestimate precipitation in the Yellow River basin also simulate evaporation with large positive biases. For water vapor transport, models and reanalysis data concur that both basins are moisture sinks in summer. In addition, models that strongly overestimate precipitation in the Yellow River basin tend to produce strong water vapor convergence in that region, which is likely to be related to the situation that the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) simulated by these models strengthens and advances further westward and northward, resulting in stronger water vapor convergence in the Yellow River basin. Moreover, convective precipitation biases simulated by the models are also partially responsible for their total precipitation biases. Finally, summer precipitation and evaporation are negatively correlated in the Yangtze River basin, whereas the relation between these variables is weak in the Yellow River basin. In both basins, precipitation and water vapor convergence are positively correlated, which is well simulated by all models.

  5. Estimating the Risk of Domestic Water Source Contamination Following Precipitation Events.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, Ian F; Hoover, Christopher M; Remais, Justin V; Monaghan, Andrew; Celada, Marco; Carlton, Elizabeth J

    2016-06-01

    Climate change is expected to increase precipitation extremes, threatening water quality. In low resource settings, it is unclear which water sources are most vulnerable to contamination following rainfall events. We evaluated the relationship between rainfall and drinking water quality in southwest Guatemala where heavy rainfall is frequent and access to safe water is limited. We surveyed 59 shallow household wells, measured precipitation, and calculated simple hydrological variables. We compared Escherichia coli concentration at wells where recent rainfall had occurred versus had not occurred, and evaluated variability in the association between rainfall and E. coli concentration under different conditions using interaction models. Rainfall in the past 24 hours was associated with greater E. coli concentrations, with the strongest association between rainfall and fecal contamination at wells where pigs were nearby. Because of the small sample size, these findings should be considered preliminary, but provide a model to evaluate vulnerability to climate change.

  6. The new portfolio of global precipitation data products of the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre suitable to assess and quantify the global water cycle and resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Udo; Ziese, Markus; Meyer-Christoffer, Anja; Finger, Peter; Rustemeier, Elke; Becker, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Precipitation plays an important role in the global energy and water cycle. Accurate knowledge of precipitation amounts reaching the land surface is of special importance for fresh water assessment and management related to land use, agriculture and hydrology, incl. risk reduction of flood and drought. High interest in long-term precipitation analyses arises from the needs to assess climate change and its impacts on all spatial scales. In this framework, the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) has been established in 1989 on request of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). It is operated by Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD, National Meteorological Service of Germany) as a German contribution to the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). This paper provides information on the most recent update of GPCC's gridded data product portfolio including example use cases.

  7. Short-range precipitation forecasts using assimilation of simulated satellite water vapor profiles and column cloud liquid water amounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Diak, George R.; Hayden, Cristopher M.; Young, John A.

    1995-01-01

    These observing system simulation experiments investigate the assimilation of satellite-observed water vapor and cloud liquid water data in the initialization of a limited-area primitive equations model with the goal of improving short-range precipitation forecasts. The assimilation procedure presented includes two aspects: specification of an initial cloud liquid water vertical distribution and diabatic initialization. The satellite data is simulated for the next generation of polar-orbiting satellite instruments, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS), which are scheduled to be launched on the NOAA-K satellite in the mid-1990s. Based on cloud-top height and total column cloud liquid water amounts simulated for satellite data a diagnostic method is used to specify an initial cloud water vertical distribution and to modify the initial moisture distribution in cloudy areas. Using a diabatic initialization procedure, the associated latent heating profiles are directly assimilated into the numerical model. The initial heating is estimated by time averaging the latent heat release from convective and large-scale condensation during the early forecast stage after insertion of satellite-observed temperature, water vapor, and cloud water formation. The assimilation of satellite-observed moisture and cloud water, together withy three-mode diabatic initialization, significantly alleviates the model precipitation spinup problem, especially in the first 3 h of the forecast. Experimental forecasts indicate that the impact of satellite-observed temperature and water vapor profiles and cloud water alone in the initialization procedure shortens the spinup time for precipitation rates by 1-2 h and for regeneration of the areal coverage by 3 h. The diabatic initialization further reduces the precipitation spinup time (compared to adiabatic initialization) by 1 h.

  8. Numerical simulation of the geographical sources of water for Continental Scale Experiments (CSEs) Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Sud, Yogesh; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Walker, Gregory K.

    2003-01-01

    There are several important research questions that the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) is actively pursuing, namely: What is the intensity of the water cycle and how does it change? And what is the sustainability of water resources? Much of the research to address these questions is directed at understanding the atmospheric water cycle. In this paper, we have used a new diagnostic tool, called Water Vapor Tracers (WVTs), to quantify the how much precipitation originated as continental or oceanic evaporation. This shows how long water can remain in the atmosphere and how far it can travel. The model-simulated data are analyzed over regions of interest to the GEWEX community, specifically, their Continental Scale Experiments (CSEs) that are in place in the United States, Europe, Asia, Brazil, Africa and Canada. The paper presents quantitative data on how much each continent and ocean on Earth supplies water for each CSE. Furthermore, the analysis also shows the seasonal variation of the water sources. For example, in the United States, summertime precipitation is dominated by continental (land surface) sources of water, while wintertime precipitation is dominated by the Pacific Ocean sources of water. We also analyze the residence time of water in the atmosphere. The new diagnostic shows a longer residence time for water (9.2 days) than more traditional estimates (7.5 days). We emphasize that the results are based on model simulations and they depend on the model s veracity. However, there are many potential uses for the new diagnostic tool in understanding weather processes and large and small scales.

  9. Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Menzel, W. Paul; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Gao, Bo-Cai; Platnick, Steven; Ackerman, Steven A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Pincus, Robert; Hubanks, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is an earth-viewing sensor that flies on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites, launched in 1999 and 2002, respectively. MODIS scans a swath width of 2330 km that is sufficiently wide to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km. MODIS provides images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 pm with spatial resolutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to en- able advanced studies of land, ocean, and atmospheric properties. Twenty-six bands are used to derive atmospheric properties such as cloud mask, atmospheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties. In this paper we describe each of these atmospheric data products, including characteristics of each of these products such as file size, spatial resolution used in producing the product, and data availability.

  10. CalWater 2015 — Atmospheric Rivers and Aerosol Impacts on Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.; Cayan, D.; DeMott, P. J.; Dettinger, M. D.; Doyle, J. D.; Fairall, C. W.; Leung, L. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Rutledge, S. A.; Waliser, D. E.; White, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The CalWater 2015 field experiment was conducted between January and March and consisted of more than fifty science flights, a major research cruise, and continuous ground-based observations coordinated to study phenomena driving the incidence of extreme precipitation events and the variability of water supply along the West Coast of the United States. CalWater 2015 examined key processes linked to (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major winter storms, and (2) aerosols, originating from local sources as well as from remote continents, within and between storms and their modulating effects on precipitation on the U.S. West Coast. As part of a large interagency field effort including NOAA, DOE, NASA, NSF, and the Naval Research Laboratory, four research aircraft from three government agencies were deployed in coordination with the oceangoing NOAA Ronald H. Brown and were equipped with meteorological and chemical observing systems in near-shore regions of California and the eastern Pacific. At the same time, ground-based measurements from NOAA's HydroMeteorological Testbed (HMT) network on the U.S. West Coast and a major NSF-supported observing site for aerosols and microphysics at Bodega Bay, California provided continuous near surface-level meteorological and chemical observations, respectively, during CalWater 2015. The DOE-sponsored ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) was executed in close coordination with NOAA and NASA facilities and deployed airborne and ship-based observing systems. This presentation summarizes the objectives, implementation strategy, data acquisitions, and some preliminary results from CalWater 2015 addressing science gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic

  11. CalWater 2 - Precipitation, Aerosols, and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Ryan; Ralph, Marty; Prather, Kim; Cayan, Dan; DeMott, Paul; Dettinger, Mike; Fairall, Chris; Leung, Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rutledge, Steven; Waliser, Duane; White, Allen

    2014-05-01

    Emerging research has identified two phenomena that play key roles in the variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the West Coast of the United States. These phenomena include the role of (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major storms along the U.S. West Coast, and (2) aerosols—from local sources as well as those transported from remote continents—and their modulating effects on western U.S. precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of extreme precipitation and its effects, including the provision of beneficial water supply. This presentation summarizes science gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Observations are proposed for multiple winter seasons as part of a 5-year broad interagency vision referred to as CalWater 2 to address these science gaps (http://esrl.noaa.gov/psd/calwater). In the near term, a science investigation is being planned including a targeted set of aircraft and ship-based measurements and associated evaluation of data in near-shore regions of California and in the eastern Pacific for an intensive observing period between January 2015 and March 2015. DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and NOAA are coordinating on deployment of airborne and ship-borne facilities for this period in a DOE-sponsored study called ACAPEX (ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment) to complement CalWater 2. The motivation for this major study is based on findings that have emerged in the last few years from airborne and ground-based studies including CalWater and NOAA's HydroMeterology Testbed

  12. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream-flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid-forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Streamwater pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by calcium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southeast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site.

  13. METEOPOLE-FLUX: an observatory of terrestrial water, energy, and CO2 fluxes in Toulouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Roujean, Jean-Louis; Zhang, Sibo; Maurel, William; Piguet, Bruno; Barrié, Joël; Bouhours, Gilles; Couzinier, Jacques; Garrouste, Olivier; Girres, Sandrine; Suquia, David; Tzanos, Diane

    2016-04-01

    The METEOPOLE-FLUX project (http://www.cnrm.meteo.fr/spip.php?article874&lang=en) aims at monitoring a large suburban set-aside field in the city of Toulouse (43.572898 N, 1.374384 E). Since June 2012, these data contribute to the international effort to monitor terrestrial ecosystems (grasslands in particular), to the validation of land surface models, and to the near real time quality monitoring of operational weather forecast models. Various variables are monitored at a subhourly rate: wind speed, air temperature, air humidity, atmospheric pressure, precipitation, turbulent fluxes (H, LE, CO2), downwelling and upwelling solar and infrared radiation, downwelling and upwelling PAR, fraction of diffuse incoming PAR, presence of water intercepted by vegetation (rain, dew), soil moisture profile, soil temperature profile, surface albedo, transmissivity of PAR in vegetation canopy. Moreover, local observations are performed using remote sensing techniques: infrared radiometry, GNSS reflectometry, and multi-band surface reflectometry using an aerosol photometer from the AERONET network. Destructive measurements of LAI, green/brown above-ground biomass, and necromass are performed twice a year. This site is characterized by a large fraction of gravels and stones in the soil, ranging from 17% to 35% in the top soil layer (down to 0.6 m), and peaking at 81% at 0.7 m. The impact of gravels and stones on thermal and moisture fluxes in the soil has not been much addressed in the past and is not represented in most land surface models. Their impact on the available water content for plant transpiration and plant growth is not much documented so far. The long term monitoring of this site will therefore improve the knowledge on land processes. The data will be used together with urban meteorological data to characterize the urban heat island. Finally, this site will be used for the CAL/VAL of various satellite products in conjunction with the SMOSMANIA soil moisture network

  14. Seasonal predictions of precipitation in the Aksu-Tarim River basin for improved water resources management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Heike; Snow, Julie A.; Su, Buda; Jiang, Tong

    2016-12-01

    Since the 1950s, the population in the arid to hyperarid Tarim River basin has grown rapidly concurrent with an expansion of irrigated agriculture. This threatens the Tarim River basin's natural ecosystems and causes water shortages, even though increased discharges in the headwaters have been observed more recently. These increases have mainly been attributed to receding glaciers and are projected to cease when the glaciers are unable to provide sufficient amounts of meltwater. Under these circumstances water management will face a serious challenge in adapting its strategies to changes in river discharge, which to a greater extent will depend on changes in precipitation. In this paper, we aim to develop accurate seasonal predictions of precipitation to improve water resources management. Possible predictors of precipitation for the Tarim River basin were either downloaded directly or calculated using NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1 and NOAA Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (SST) V3b data in monthly resolution. To evaluate the significance of the predictors, they were then correlated with the monthly precipitation dataset GPCCv6 extracted for the Tarim River basin for the period 1961 to 2010. Prior to the Spearman rank correlation analyses, the precipitation data were averaged over the subbasins of the Tarim River. The strongest correlations were mainly detected with lead times of four and five months. Finally, an artificial neural network model, namely a multilayer perceptron (MLP), and a multiple linear regression (LR) model were developed each in two different configurations for the Aksu River subbasin, predicting precipitation five months in advance. Overall, the MLP using all predictors shows the best performance. The performance of both models drops only slightly when restricting the model input to the SST of the Black Sea and the Siberian High Intensity (SHI) pointing towards their importance as predictors.

  15. An approach to improve precipitation estimation to model the water budget in Alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, E.; Bertoldi, G.; Della Chiesa, S.; Niedrist, G.; Egarter Vigl, L.; Tappeiner, U.

    2012-04-01

    Accurate quantification of precipitation is still one of the major sources of uncertainty in quantifying the water budget of Alpine catchments. In fact, besides increasing data availability, usually most of the stations are located in the bottom of the valleys, while, at high elevations, rain gauge accuracy is limited by snow and wind, with strong underestimation of the total precipitation. Similar problems exist for snow measurement devices. In this contribution we present a novel empirical approach to improve precipitation estimation using rain gauge data, snow height and standard meteorological observations, and we evaluate the improvements in estimating the water budget of the Mazia Valley (100 km2 - Central Alps - South Tyrol, Italy). In fact, due to the screening effect of the surrounding mountains (mostly glaciated, maximum elevation: 3750 m a.s.l.) this valley has a relatively dry cold continental climate with strong precipitation gradients. In the framework of the projects "Klimawandel" and "HydroAlp", 17 monitoring stations were installed to measure standard micrometeorological variables, vegetation properties and soil moisture. For a correct climate analysis, a distinction between snow and rainfall is necessary. Due to energy limitations in remote alpine areas no heated rain gauges were installed. However, four stations are equipped with snow height sensors, from which snow data can be retrieved. For other stations the calculation of the snow water equivalent was more complicated because of the lack of snow height sensors. In the empirical approach, for every registered precipitation data record snow height change was reviewed and compared to air temperature and relative humidity, as well as to the calculated wet bulb temperature, in order to distinguish between rainfall and snowfall events. Also the global solar radiation was controlled to identify melt water production coming from accumulated snow on the top of the unheated rain gauges. With a formula

  16. Enrichment of 88Sr in continental waters due to calcium carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Netta; Gavrieli, Ittai; Halicz, Ludwik; Sandler, Amir; Stein, Mordechai; Lazar, Boaz

    2017-02-01

    δ88/86Sr data published over the last few years suggest that continental waters are enriched with 88Sr as compared to the rocks in their drainage basins. In an attempt to understand this phenomenon, this study established the fractionation in the 88Sr/86Sr ratio during precipitation of continental carbonates (i.e., carbonates precipitated on land from surface, pedogenic, or ground waters), and evaluated the contribution of this process to the 88Sr-enrichment in rivers. For this, stable and radiogenic Sr isotopes (88Sr, 87Sr and 86Sr) were measured in calcite samples and their precipitating waters collected in various continental environments, such as soil, cave, streams and groundwater. The results indicate that continental carbonates are 88Sr-depleted relative to their precipitating waters, placing them as one of the most 88Sr-depleted reservoirs on earth. The average difference in δ88/86Sr values between waters and solid CaCO3 (tufas or speleothems) that they precipitate is Δcarb-water = - 0.218 ± 0.014 ‰ (1SD). An even larger fractionation (εcarb-water = - 0.285 ± 0.02 ‰) was measured in groundwater with particularly high carbonate-alkalinity and high carbonate precipitation rate that depleted ∼65% of the Sr in the groundwater, resulting in substantial 88Sr-enrichment in the residual dissolved Sr (δ88/86Sr = 0.656 ‰). Results also suggest that pedogenic carbonate precipitation in soil profile removes 50-85% of the Sr from the recharging soil-water, thereby increasing the δ88/86Sr value of the soil-water from ∼ 0.18 ‰ to 0.3 ‰- 0.6 ‰. Similar 88Sr-enrichment was observed in drip water from a karst cave. A maximum removal flux of Sr into continental carbonates of about 20 Gmol(Sr)ṡy-1 is required to yield the reported 88Sr-enrichment in global rivers (δ88/86Sr = 0.32 ‰) relative to their rock sources when using the fractionation factor derived in this study, Δcarb-water = - 0.218 ‰, and the published δ88/86Sr composition of marine

  17. Silicon isotope fractionation during silica precipitation from hot-spring waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilert, Sonja; Vroon, Pieter; Keller, Nicole; Gudbrnadsson, Snorri; Stefánsson, Andri; van Bergen, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    Hot-spring systems in the Geysir geothermal area, Iceland, have been studied to explore silicon isotope fractionation in a natural setting where sinter deposits are actively formed over a temperature interval between 20° and 100° C. The SiO2(aq)concentrations in spring and stream waters range between 290 and 560ppm and stay relatively constant along downstream trajectories, irrespective of significant cooling gradients. The waters are predominantly oversaturated in amorphous silica at the temperatures measured in the field. Correlations between the saturation indices, temperature and amounts of evaporative water loss suggest that cooling and evaporation are the main causes of subaqueous silica precipitation. The δ30Si values of dissolved silica in spring water and outflowing streams average around +1o probably due to the small quantities of instantaneously precipitating silica relative to the dissolved amount. Siliceous sinters, in contrast, range between -0.1o to -4.0o consistent with a preferred incorporation of the light silicon isotope and with values for precipitated silica becoming more negative with downstream decreasing temperatures. Larger fractionation magnitudes are inversely correlated with the precipitation rate, which itself is dependent on temperature, saturation state and the extent of a system. The resulting magnitudes of solid-fluid isotopic fractionation generally decline from -3.5o at 10° C to -2.0o at 90° C. These values confirm a similar relationship between fractionation magnitude and temperature that we found in laboratory-controlled silica-precipitation experiments. However, a relatively constant offset of ca. -2.9o between field and experimental fractionation values indicates that temperature alone cannot be responsible for the observed shifts. We infer that precipitation kinetics are a prominent control of silicon isotope fractionation in aqueous environments, whereby the influence of the extent of the system on the precipitation

  18. Predicting the Effect of Changing Precipitation Extremes and Land Cover Change on Urban Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SUN, N.; Yearsley, J. R.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    Recent research shows that precipitation extremes in many of the largest U.S. urban areas have increased over the last 60 years. These changes have important implications for stormwater runoff and water quality, which in urban areas are dominated by the most extreme precipitation events. We assess the potential implications of changes in extreme precipitation and changing land cover in urban and urbanizing watersheds at the regional scale using a combination of hydrology and water quality models. Specifically, we describe the integration of a spatially distributed hydrological model - the Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM), the urban water quality model in EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM), the semi-Lagrangian stream temperature model RBM10, and dynamical and statistical downscaling methods applied to global climate predictions. Key output water quality parameters include total suspended solids (TSS), toal nitrogen, total phosphorous, fecal coliform bacteria and stream temperature. We have evaluated the performance of the modeling system in the highly urbanized Mercer Creek watershed in the rapidly growing Bellevue urban area in WA, USA. The results suggest that the model is able to (1) produce reasonable streamflow predictions at fine temporal and spatial scales; (2) provide spatially distributed water temperature predictions that mostly agree with observations throughout a complex stream network, and characterize impacts of climate, landscape, near-stream vegetation change on stream temperature at local and regional scales; and (3) capture plausibly the response of water quality constituents to varying magnitude of precipitation events in urban environments. Next we will extend the scope of the study from the Mercer Creek watershed to include the entire Puget Sound Basin, WA, USA.

  19. [Effects of ground cover and water-retaining agent on winter wheat growth and precipitation utilization].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji-Cheng; Guan, Xiu-Juan; Yang, Yong-Hui

    2011-01-01

    An investigation was made at a hilly upland in western Henan Province to understand the effects of water-retaining agent (0, 45, and 60 kg x hm(-2)), straw mulching (3000 and 6000 kg x hm(-2)), and plastic mulching (thickness < 0.005 mm) on winter wheat growth, soil moisture and nutrition conditions, and precipitation use. All the three measures promoted winter wheat growth, enhanced grain yield and precipitation use efficiency, and improved soil moisture and nutritional regimes. These positive effects were more obvious when the straw- or plastic mulching was combined with the use of water-retaining agent. Comparing with the control, all the measures increased the soil moisture content at different growth stages by 0.1%-6.5%. Plastic film mulching had the best water-retention effect before jointing stage, whereas water-retaining agent showed its best effect after jointing stage. Soil moisture content was the lowest at flowering and grain-filling stages. Land cover increased the grain yield by 2.6%-20.1%. The yield increment was the greatest (14.2%-20.1%) by the combined use of straw mulching and water-retaining agent, followed by plastic mulching combined with water-retaining agent (11.9% on average). Land cover also improved the precipitation use efficiency (0.4-3.2 kg x mm(-1) x hm(-2)) in a similar trend as the grain yield. This study showed that land cover and water-retaining agent improved soil moisture and nutrition conditions and precipitation utilization, which in turn, promoted the tillering of winter wheat, and increased the grain number per ear and the 1000-grain mass.

  20. Estimation of precipitable water over the Amazon Basin using GOES imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, John Andrew

    The Amazon Rainforest is the largest continuous rainforest on Earth. It holds a rich abundance of life containing approximately one-half of all existing plant and animal species and 20% of the world's fresh water. Climatologically, the Amazon Rainforest is a massive storehouse of carbon dioxide and water vapor and hosts hydrologic and energy cycles that influence regional and global patterns. However, this region has gone through vast land cover changes during the past several decades. Lack of conventional, in situ data sources prohibits detailed measurements to assess the climatological impact these changes may cause. This thesis applies a satellite-based, thermal infrared remote sensing algorithm to determine precipitable water in the Amazon Basin to test its applicability in the region and to measure the diurnal changes in water vapor. Imagery from the GOES geostationary satellite and estimated atmospheric conditions and radiance values derived from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis project were used as inputs to the Physical Split Window (PSW) technique. Retrievals of precipitable water were made every 3 hours throughout each day from 12Z to 24Z for the months of June and October, 1988 and 1995. These months correspond to when the atmosphere is not dominated by clouds during the rainy (wet) season or smoke and haze during the burning (dry) season. Monthly, daily, and diurnal aggregates of precipitable water Fields were analyzed spatially through seven zones located uniformly throughout the region. Monthly average precipitable water values were found to be 20mm to 25mm in the southeast and 45mm to 50mm in the northwest zones. Central and northwest zones showed little variation throughout the day with most areas peaking between 15Z and 21Z, representing early to late afternoon local time. Comparisons were made to nearby, coincident radiosonde observations with r ranging from 0.7 to 0.9 and MAE from 6mm to 12 mm.

  1. Tracer water transport and subgrid precipitation variation within atmospheric general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Eagleson, Peter S.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    1988-01-01

    A capability is developed for monitoring tracer water movement in the three-dimensional Goddard Institute for Space Science Atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM). A typical experiment with the tracer water model follows water evaporating from selected grid squares and determines where this water first returns to the Earth's surface as precipitation or condensate, thereby providing information on the lateral scales of hydrological transport in the GCM. Through a comparison of model results with observations in nature, inferences can be drawn concerning real world water transport. Tests of the tracer water model include a comparison of simulated and observed vertically-integrated vapor flux fields and simulations of atomic tritium transport from the stratosphere to the oceans. The inter-annual variability of the tracer water model results is also examined.

  2. Ikaite precipitation by mixing of shoreline springs and lake water, Mono Lake, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Stine, S.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Fitzpatrick, J.A.; Stafford, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    Metastable ikaite (CaCO3??6H2O) forms abundantly during winter months along the south shoreline of Mono Lake where shoreline springs mix with lake water. Ikaite precipitates because of its decreased solubility at low temperature and because of orthophosphate-ion inhibition of calcite and aragonite. During the spring some of the ikaite is transformed to anhydrous CaCO3 and is incorporated into tufa, but most is dispersed by wave action into the lake where it reacts to form gaylussite (Na2Ca(CO3)2?? 5H2O). Spring waters have low pH values, are dominantly Ca-Na-HCO3, have low radiocarbon activities, and are mixtures of deep-seated geothermal and cold groundwaters. Chemical modeling reveals that precipitation of CaCO3 can occur over a broad range of mixtures of spring and lake water with a maximum production occurring at 96% spring water and 4% lake water. Under these conditions all the Ca and a significant fraction of the CO3 of the precipitate is spring supplied. A radiocarbon age of 19,580 years obtained on a natural ikaite sample supports this conclusion. With the springs supplying a large and probably variable portion of the carbonate, and with apparent 14C age of the carbonate varying from spring to spring, tufa of similar actual antiquity may yield significantly different 14C dates, making tufa at this location unsuitable for absolute age dating by the radiocarbon method. ?? 1993.

  3. Evaluation of Technologies to Prevent Precipitation During Water Recovery from Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyan, James L., Jr.; Pickering, Karen D.; Adam, Niklas M.; Mitchell, Julie L.; Anderson, Molly S.; Carter, Layne; Muirhead, Dean; Gazda, Daniel B.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) experienced a hardware failure in the Distillation Assembly (DA) in October 2010. Initially the UPA was operated to recover 85% of the water from urine through distillation, concentrating the contaminants in the remaining urine. The DA failed due to precipitation of calcium sulfate (gypsum) which caused a loss of UPA function. The ISS UPA operations have been modified to only recover 70% of the water minimizing gypsum precipitation risk but substantially increasing water resupply needs. This paper describes the feasibility assessment of several technologies (ion exchange, chelating agents, threshold inhibitors, and Lorentz devices) to prevent gypsum precipitation. The feasibility assessment includes the development of assessment methods, chemical modeling, bench top testing, and validation testing in a flight-like ground UPA unit. Ion exchange technology has been successfully demonstrated and has been recommended for further development. The incorporation of the selected technology will enable water recovery to be increased from 70% back to the original 85% and improve the ISS water balance.

  4. Precipitation variability and future projections for water resources management in Tunisia Northern Coastal basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargaoui, Z.; Tramblay, Y.; Lawin, E.; Servat, E.

    2012-04-01

    Northern Tunisia is the rainiest part of the country. This is the reason why the surface water resources management scheme of Tunisia is principally focused on that area. The strategic situation of the study area, with respect to surface water resources, encourages the investigation of the climate change impacts as projected by climate models. The goal of this study is first to compare the observed precipitation with climate model outputs, and then to evaluate the future changes projected by the models. The study area is subdivided into three regions: the transboundary Medjerda basin, the northern coastal basins (Zouara, Sidi El Barrack, Lake Ichkeul basins) and the eastern coastal basins (Cap-Bon region and wadi Meliane basins). Rainfall data are collected in this area since the late 19th century. A data base provided by the Tunisian hydrological service (DGRE) is including 388 stations with monthly precipitation data over the period 1961-2000. Recent advances in downscaling have provided regional climate model (RCM) simulations at a coarser resolution than Global climate models (GCM). However there is a need to validate RCM outputs with respect to observed precipitation data before using them to make future projections. For that purpose, an ensemble of RCM simulations provided by the European Union-funded project ENSEMBLES (www. ensembles-eu.org) are used. Six RCM models runs (CNR_ARPEGE, DMI_ARPEGE, DMI_BCM, ICT_ECHAM, SMH_BCM, SMH_ECHAM) are tested for a control period (1961-2000) and two projection periods (2011-2050 and 2051-2090).The models efficiency in reproducing seasonal precipitation amounts and variability over the study domain is evaluated. A 1-km monthly precipitation grid is first obtained through the interpolation of rainfall observations during the period 1961-2000 with kriging techniques. Monthly precipitation series averaged over the three great regions are built for comparison for the control period. The RCM outputs are evaluated with respect

  5. Physicochemical characteristics of drip waters: Influence on mineralogy of recent cave carbonate precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechelmann, Sylvia; Schröder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Wassenburg, Jasper A.; Richter, Detlev K.; Riechelmann, Dana FC; Terente, Mihai; Constantin, Silviu; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Speleothems are one of the most intensively explored archives of palaeoclimate variability in continental settings. Considerable advances with respect to climatic and cave forcing of drip characteristics and related speleothem proxy data have been made during the last decades. The parameters, however, that control speleothem mineralogy and its changes with time and space are still poorly understood. In order to shed light on processes influencing speleothem mineralogy, precipitation experiments of recent carbonate crystals on watch glasses and glass plates were performed in seven selected caves. These include three caves in Germany as well as Morocco and one cave in Romania, which are situated in both limestone and dolostone. Drip water sites of these caves were analysed for their fluid Mg/Ca molar ratio, pH, degree of saturation for calcite and aragonite and drip rates. Corresponding precipitates were analysed with respect to their mineralogy using a high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM). The following results are found: High fluid Mg/Ca ratios are observed only for caves situated in dolostone, hence the hostrock lithology indirectly controls the carbonate mineralogy of speleothems. The precipitation of aragonite in place of calcite occurred only in dolostone caves and is bound to very specific conditions, which are: high fluid Mg/Ca ratios (≥ 0.5), high fluid pH (> 8.2) and low fluid saturation indices for calcite (< 0.8). These specific conditions are induced by slow drip rates of < 0.2 ml/min (often under more arid conditions), causing the precipitation of calcite / aragonite prior to reaching the stalagmite top. Due to this, fluid chemistry is altered, which in turn leads to changes in carbonate mineralogy and geochemistry on the stalagmite top. Interestingly, all of the above mentioned factors must act in a concerted manner. If this is not the case, calcite is the dominant phase. The threshold, where only aragonite precipitates is at fluid Mg

  6. Tropical convective onset statistics and establishing causality in the water vapor-precipitation relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelin, J. D.; Kuo, Y. H.; Schiro, K. A.; Langenbrunner, B.; Mechoso, C. R.; Sahany, S.; Bernstein, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    Previous work by various authors has pointed to the role of humidity in the lower free troposphere in affecting the onset of deep convection in the tropics. Empirical relations between column water vapor and the onset of precipitation have been inferred to be related to this. Evidence includes deep-convective conditional instability calculations for entraining plumes, in which the lower free-tropospheric environment affects the onset of deep convection due to the impact on buoyancy of turbulent entrainment of dry versus moist air. Tropical Western Pacific in situ observations, and tropical ocean basin satellite retrievals in comparison to climate model diagnostics each indicate that substantial entrainment is required to explain the observed relationship. In situ observations from the GoAmazon field campaign confirm that the basic relationship holds over tropical land much as it does over tropical ocean (although with greater additional sensitivity to boundary layer variations and to freezing processes). The relationship between deep convection and water vapor is, however, a two-way street, with convection moistening the free troposphere. One might thus argue that there has not yet been a smoking gun in terms of establishing the causality of the precipitation-water vapor relationship. Parameter perturbation experiments in the coupled Community Earth System Model show that when the deep convective scheme has low values of entrainment, the set of statistics associated with the transition to deep convection are radically altered, and the observed pickup of precipitation with column water vapor is no longer seen. In addition to cementing the dominant direction of causality in the fast timescale precipitation-column water vapor relationship, the results point to impacts of this mechanism on the climatology. Because at low entrainment the convection can fire before the lower troposphere is moistened, the climatology of water vapor remains lower than observed. These

  7. Study on the vertical distribution of precipitation amount within the water clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, K.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-12-01

    This work studied the behavior of radar reflectivity (Ze) of Cloud Profiling Radar on board CloudSat with variation in the properties of low-level water clouds, such as the effective droplet radius (re), geometrical thickness (Dcld), and liquid water path (LWP), over the northwest Pacific and China. The changes in the distribution of maxZe (the largest Ze within a cloud layer) were examined in terms of variation in the cloud parameters such as small, mid and large categories, while maxZe had monomodal distributions regarding variation in re and Dcld, that appeared bimodal in the small category of LWP. It was confirmed that the small category of LWP contained both non-precipitating clouds in the incipient stage and raining clouds in the dissipating stage. Next, optically measured particle size was combined with LWP derived from the microwave measurement to classify the precipitation type. Applying maxZe and Dcld to the analysis of classified precipitation types corroborated the importance of Dcld for examining the occurrence of precipitation. Finally, the position of maxZe relative to the cloud top was investigated using a measure of the probability of precipitation (POP) according to variation in re in order to get better understanding of the vertical distribution of precipitation amount. The results showed that the Pacific and China had 'bow' and 'funnel' shapes, respectively. The emergence of these shapes according to the variation in re was interpreted as the enhancement of Ze due to droplet collisional growth and the attenuation of Ze by the presence of large particles. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of smaller particles (nearly10 μm in radius) reinforced the idea of rapid, efficient particle growth in the lower part of the cloud. Detailed results will be given in the presentation.

  8. Liquid water content and precipitation characteristics of stratiform clouds as inferred from satellite microwave measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J.A. ); Ardell, C.D. ); Tian, Lin )

    1990-09-20

    In this paper the authors present an analysis of the integrated liquid water content and precipitation characteristics of stratiform clouds using data from the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) for January 1979, over the North Atlantic Ocean (40{degree}-60{degree}N). Concurrent analysis of the SMMR data with the US Air Force 3-Dimensional Nephanalysis (3DNEPH) allows the interpretation of the SMMR-derived liquid water paths and precipitation characteristics in terms of cloud type, cloud fraction, and cloud height. Combining the initialized analyses from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting with the 3DNEPH enables vertical temperature and humidity profiles to be incorporated into the retrievals. The interpretation and presentation of results are guided by their implications for the parameterization of liquid water content of layer clouds in large-scale atmospheric models. The average liquid water paths for middle and low clouds were determined to be 115 and 102 g m{sup {minus}2}, respectively, with a maximum value of 1,070 g m{sup {minus}2}. Analysis of the liquid water path as a function of temperature showed that clouds with average temperature below 246 K had little liquid water and were inferred to be predominantly crystalline. Liquid water paths of 350 g m{sup {minus}2} and 500 g m{sup {minus}2} for middle and low clouds, respectively, were determined to be average thresholds for the onset of precipitation. Maximum rain rates for these clouds were determined to be 7 mm h{sup {minus}1}. The autoconversion of cloud water to rain water was determined to occur at a rate of 0.001 s{sup {minus}1}.

  9. Advances in Global Water Cycle Science Made Possible by Global Precipitation Mission (GPM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Within this decade the internationally sponsored Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) will take an important step in creating a global precipitation observing system from space. One perspective for understanding the nature of GPM is that it will be a hierarchical system of datastreams from very high caliber combined dual frequency radar/passive microwave (PMW) rain-radiometer retrievals, to high caliber PMW rain-radiometer only retrievals, and on to blends of the former datastreams with other less-high caliber PMW-based and IR-based rain retrievals. Within the context of NASA's role in global water cycle science and its own Global Water & Energy Cycle (GWEC) program, GPM is the centerpiece mission for improving our understanding of the global water cycle from a space-based measurement perspective. One of the salient problems within our current understanding of the global water and energy cycle is determining whether a change in the rate of the water cycle is accompanying changes in global temperature. As there are a number of ways in which to define a rate-change of the global water cycle, it is not entirely clear as to what constitutes such a determination, This paper presents an overview of the Global Precipitation Mission and how its datasets can be used in a set of quantitative tests within the framework of the oceanic and continental water budget equations to determine comprehensively whether substantive rate changes do accompany perturbations in global temperatures and how such rate changes manifest themselves in both water storage and water flux transport processes.

  10. Advances in Understanding Global Water Cycle with Advent of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Within this decade the internationally organized Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission will take an important step in creating a global precipitation observing system from space. One perspective for understanding the nature of GPM is that it will be a hierarchical system of datastreams beginning with very high caliber combined dual frequency radar/passive microwave (PMW) rain-radiometer retrievals, to high caliber PMW rain-radiometer only retrievals, and then on to blends of the former datastreams with additional lower-caliber PMW-based and IR-based rain retrievals. Within the context of the now emerging global water & energy cycle (GWEC) programs of a number of research agencies throughout the world, GPM serves as a centerpiece space mission for improving our understanding of the global water cycle from a global measurement perspective. One of the salient problems within our current understanding of the global water and energy cycle is determining whether a change in the rate of the water cycle is accompanying changes in climate, e.g., climate warming. As there are a number of ways in which to define a rate-change of the global water cycle, it is not entirely clear as to what constitutes such a determination. This paper presents an overview of the GPM Mission and how its observations can be used within the framework of the oceanic and continental water budget equations to determine whether a given perturbation in precipitation is indicative of an actual rate change in the global water cycle, consistent with required responses in water storage and/or water flux transport processes, or whether it is the natural variability of a fixed rate cycle.

  11. Assessing surface water consumption using remotely-sensed groundwater, evapotranspiration, and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ray G.; Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S.

    2012-08-01

    Estimates of consumptive use of surface water by agriculture are vital for assessing food security, managing water rights, and evaluating anthropogenic impacts on regional hydrology. However, reliable, current, and public data on consumptive use can be difficult to obtain, particularly in international and less developed basins. We combine remotely-sensed precipitation and satellite observations of evapotranspiration and groundwater depletion to estimate surface water consumption by irrigated agriculture in California's Central Valley for the 2004-09 water years. We validated our technique against measured consumption data determined from streamflow observations and water export data in the Central Valley. Mean satellite-derived surface water consumption was 291.0 ± 32.4 mm/year while measured surface water consumption was 308.1 ± 6.5 mm/year. The results show the potential for remotely-sensed hydrologic data to independently observe irrigated agriculture's surface water consumption in contested or unmonitored basins. Improvements in the precision and spatial resolution of satellite precipitation, evapotranspiration and gravimetric groundwater observations are needed to reduce the uncertainty in this method and to allow its use on smaller basins and at shorter time scales.

  12. Detecting 1mm/Year Signals in Altimetric Global Sea Level: Effect of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlotnicki, Victor

    1999-01-01

    Several research efforts exist to use Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/ Projet d'Observatorie de Surveillance et d'Etudes Integrees de la Dynamique des Oceans (Poseidon) (T/P) to detect changes in global sea level possibly associated with climate change. This requires much better than 1 mm/yr accuracy, something that none of the instruments in T/P [or the European Remote Sensing (ERS-2) satellite, or the U.S. Navy's Geosat Follow-On (GFO) satellite] were designed for. This work focuses on the ability of the T/P microwave radiometer (TMR) to retrieve the path delay due to atmospheric water vapor along the altimeter's path with accuracy in the time changes below 1 mm/yr on global average. In collaboration with Stephen Keihm of JPL and Christopher Ruf of Pennsylvania State University, we compared TMR path delay (PD) estimates with atmospheric precipitable water (PW) from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) series of satellites for 1992-1998 to selected radiosondes, and we also looked at the brightness temperatures measured by TMR in the lowest 1% of the histogram. The conclusion is that TMR had a slow instrumental drift, associated with the 18-GHz channel, which causes an approximate underestimation of water vapor at a rate equivalent to 1.2 mm/yr in path delay between 1992 and 1996; this effect stopped and no drift is detected in 1997. The same study concluded that there is no detectable scale error (one which is proportional to measured vapor) in TMR. In related work, carried out with graduate student Damien Cailliau, we investigated the relative abilities of TMR, SSMI and the UP dual-frequency radar altimeter to detect rain, relative to a climatology of shipborne observations. Rain is a crucial but poorly measured variable in studies of the climate system, and a dedicated mission, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), was recently launched to measure it. However, the climatologies built over the

  13. Water Isotopes in Precipitation: Data/Model Comparison for Present-Day and Past Climates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jouzel, J.; Hoffmann, G.; Masson, V.

    1998-01-01

    Variations of HDO and H2O-18 concentrations are observed in precipitation both on a geographical and on a temporal basis. These variations, resulting from successive isotopic fractionation processes at each phase change of water during its atmospheric cycle, are well documented through the IAEA/WMO network and other sources. Isotope concentrations are, in middle and high latitudes, linearly related to the annual mean temperature at the precipitation site. Paleoclimatologists have used this relationship to infer paleotemperatures from isotope paleodata extractable from ice cores, deep groundwater and other such sources. For this application to be valid, however, the spatial relationship must also hold in time at a given location as the location undergoes a series of climatic changes. Progress in water isotope modeling aimed at examining and evaluating this assumption has been recently reviewed with a focus on polar regions and, more specifically, on Greenland. This article was largely based on the results obtained using the isotopic version of the NASA/GISS Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) fitted with isotope tracer diagnostics. We extend this review in comparing the results of two different isotopic AGCMs (NASA/GISS and ECHAM) and in examining, with a more global perspective, the validity of the above assumption, i.e. the equivalence of the spatial and temporal isotope-temperature relationship. We also examine recent progress made in modeling the relationship between the conditions prevailing in moisture source regions for precipitation and the deuterium-excess of that precipitation.

  14. Anticipated Improvements in Precipitation Physics and Understanding of Water Cycle from GPM Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.

    2003-01-01

    The GPM mission is currently planned for start in the late-2007 to early-2008 time frame. Its main scientific goal is to help answer pressing scientific problems arising within the context of global and regional water cycles. These problems cut across a hierarchy of scales and include climate-water cycle interactions, techniques for improving weather and climate predictions, and better methods for combining observed precipitation with hydrometeorological prediction models for applications to hazardous flood-producing storms, seasonal flood/draught conditions, and fresh water resource assessments. The GPM mission will expand the scope of precipitation measurement through the use of a constellation of some 9 satellites, one of which will be an advanced TRMM-like core satellite carrying a dual-frequency Ku-Ka band precipitation radar and an advanced, multifrequency passive microwave radiometer with vertical-horizontal polarization discrimination. The other constellation members will include new dedicated satellites and co-existing operational/research satellites carrying similar (but not identical) passive microwave radiometers. The goal of the constellation is to achieve approximately 3-hour sampling at any spot on the globe -- continuously. The constellation s orbit architecture will consist of a mix of sun-synchronous and non-sun-synchronous satellites with the core satellite providing measurements of cloud-precipitation microphysical processes plus calibration-quality rainrate retrievals to be used with the other retrieval information to ensure bias-free constellation coverage. GPM is organized internationally, involving existing, pending, projected, and under-study partnerships which will link NASA and NOAA in the US, NASDA in Japan, ESA in Europe, ISRO in India, CNES in France, and possibly AS1 in Italy, KARI in South Korea, CSA in Canada, and AEB in Brazil. Additionally, the program is actively pursuing agreements with other international collaborators and

  15. Specific lignin precipitation for oligosaccharides recovery from hot water wood extract.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqian; Wang, Zhaojiang; Fu, Yingjuan; Li, Zongquan; Qin, Menghua

    2014-01-01

    Hot water extraction is an important strategy of wood fractionation, by which the hemicelluloses can be separated for value-added products, while the residual solid can still be processed into traditional wood products. In this study, a combined process consisting of specific lignin precipitation and dialysis was proposed to recover hemicellulosic oligosaccharides (OS) from hot water extract (HWE). The results showed that polyaluminium chloride (PAC) precipitation was highly specific to large molecular lignin, leading to 25.1% lignin removal with negligible OS loss through charge neutralization mechanism. The separation was further enhanced by dialysis, reaching 37.6% OS recovery from HWE with remarkable purity of 94.1%. By the proposed process, 56.36 g OS, mainly xylooligosaccharides with two fractions of 5.2 and 0.51 kDa was recovered from one kg dried wood. This process can be envisaged as a great contribution to wood biorefinery.

  16. Carnegie Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Carnegie Observatories were founded in 1902 by George Ellery Hale. Their first facility was the MOUNT WILSON OBSERVATORY, located in the San Gabriel Mountains above Pasadena, California. Originally a solar observatory, it moved into stellar, galactic and extragalactic research with the construction of the 60 in (1.5 m), and 100 in (2.5 m) telescopes, each of which was the largest in the world...

  17. Latitudinal change in precipitation and water vapor isotopes over Southern ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahul, P.

    2015-12-01

    The evaporation process over ocean is primary source of water vapor in the hydrological cycle. The Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) dataset of rainwater and water vapor isotopes are predominantly based on continental observations, with very limited observation available from the oceanic area. Stable isotope ratios in precipitation provide valuable means to understand the process of evaporation and transport of water vapor. This is further extended in the study of past changes in climate from the isotopic composition of ice core. In this study we present latitudinal variability of water vapor and rainwater isotopic composition and compared it with factors like physical condition of sea surface water from near equator (1°S) to the polar front (56°S) during the summer time expedition of the year 2013. The water vapor and rainwater isotopes showed a sharp depletion in isotopes while progressively move southward from the tropical regions (i.e. >30°S), which follows the pattern recorded in the surface ocean water isotopic composition. From the tropics to the southern latitudes, the water vapor d18O varied between -11.8‰ to -14.7‰ while dD variation ranges between -77.7‰ to -122.2‰. Using the data we estimated the expected water vapor isotopic composition under kinetic as well as equilibrium process. Our observation suggests that the water vapor isotopic compositions are in equilibrium with the sea water in majority of cases. At one point of observation, where trajectory of air parcel originated from the continental region, we observed a large deviation from the existing trend of latitudinal variability. The deduced rainwater composition adopting equilibrium model showed a consistent pattern with observed values at the tropical region, while role of kinetic process become dominant on progressive shift towards the southern latitudes. We will draw comparison of our observation with other data available in the literature together with isotope

  18. Precipitation water stable isotope measurements and analyses in Middle and Polar Ural

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukova, Olga; Gribanov, Konstantin; Zakharov, Vyacheslav; Cattani, Olivier; Jouzel, Jean

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present results of precipitation (rain, snow) water stable isotope measurements, which were collected on two places. Measuring was made on laser spectroscopy analyzer PICARRO L2130-i equipped with liquid auto sampler. We describe method of sample collecting, preparing, measuring and continuing analysis of experimental data. Stored data include results of 177 samples measuring from Kourovka collected from November 2012 to March 2014 and 73 samples from Labytnangi collected from March 2013 to December 2013.

  19. Solute contributions from precipitation to the compositions of soil waters in a marine terrace chronosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivit, D. V.; White, A. F.; Bullen, T. D.; Fitzpatrick, J.

    2010-12-01

    Solute loading of soil waters by rainfall together with evapo-transpiration can increase the concentrations of various dissolved constituents. This process complicates the modeling of saturation states for the different mineral phases in the soil profile that are products of the weathering of primary minerals found in the original granitic source material. The estimation of true rates of regolith weathering due to CO2 drawdown at temperate hydrogeological sites requires having soil pore water solute concentration data which have been corrected for solute inputs from precipitation before proceeding with chemical weathering calculations. As part of a chemical weathering study of a coastal marine terrace chronosequence located in the vicinity of Wilder Ranch State Park, Santa Cruz County, CA, bulk samplers and automatic precipitation-event samplers installed at a range of sites enabled us to determine elemental concentrations and isotopic compositions of rainfall solutes which influence the overall compositions of the pore waters. Variations in rain sample chemistry (mole-ratio data using Na, Mg, Ca, Cl and SO4) correlated with precipitation intensity result from solute inputs contributed by marine and terrestrial aerosols. Higher strontium-isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr), which point to radiogenic dust sources, occur in rain water collected in the fall at the beginning of the rainy season while lower ratio values indicating marine aerosol sources appear in winter and spring samples. Use of the NOAA HYSPLIT particle-tracking program for computing the chronological progression of storm tracks during precipitation events could show the development of solute levels in rain. Subsequently, the installation of wind sensors along with the automatic rain collectors afforded the capability of correlating high resolution wind-speed and wind-direction data with changing compositions of rain samples collected at fixed-time intervals during storm events. Wind data show that wind

  20. Tropical intercontinental optical measurement network of aerosol, precipitable water and total column ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tanre, D.; Reagan, J. A.; Eck, T. F.; Setzer, A.; Kaufman, Y. A.; Vermote, E.; Vassiliou, G. D.; Lavenu, F.

    1992-01-01

    A new generation of automatic sunphotometers is used to systematically monitor clear sky total column aerosol concentration and optical properties, precipitable water and total column ozone diurnally and annually in West Africa and South America. The instruments are designed to measure direct beam sun, solar aureole and sky radiances in nine narrow spectral bands from the UV to the near infrared on an hourly basis. The instrumentation and the algorithms required to reduce the data for subsequent analysis are described.

  1. Stable isotope compositions of waters in the Great Basin, United States 2. Modern precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Smith, G.I.; Johnson, C.A.; Moscati, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Precipitation was collected between 1991 and 1997 at 41 locations within and adjacent to parts of the Great Basin lying in California, Oregon, Nevada, and Utah. These samples were analyzed for their deuterium (??D) and oxygen-18 (??18O) contents. Separate collections were made of summer and winter season precipitation at stations ranging in elevation from -65 m to 3246 m. The ??D per mil values of stations that were closely spaced but at different elevations showed an average ??D decrease of approximately 10???/km rise in elevation. Data for all samples representing winter precipitation, when plotted on a ??D versus ??18O plot, fall close to the Meteoric Water Line (??D = 8 ??18O + 10); samples representing summer precipitation define a line of slightly lower slope due to evaporation of the raindrops during their passage from cloud to ground. Comparison of our 1991-1997 ??D data with those from the same three stations reported by an earlier study in the southeastern California shows seasonal differences ranging from 0 per mil to 19??? (average: 15) and annual differences ranging from 0 to 13 per mil (average: 2), illustrating the degree of annual and seasonal variability in this region. When contoured, the ??D values display gradients indicating a north to northwest decrease in deuterium, with values ranging from -60 to -125??? in winter precipitation and from -40 to -110??? in summer precipitation. These gradient trends can be explained by the predominance of air mass trajectories originating in the tropical Pacific, the Gulf of California, and (in summer) the Gulf of Mexico.

  2. IMERG Global Precipitation Rates

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission has produced its first global map of rainfall and snowfall. The GPM Core Observatory launched one year ago on Feb. 27, 2014 as a collaboration betwee...

  3. Modeling Aerosol Effects on Clouds and Precipitation: Insights from CalWater 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, L. R.; Lim, K. S. S.; Fan, J.; Prather, K. A.; DeMott, P. J.; Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    The CalWater 2015 field campaign took place in northern California from mid January through early March of 2015. The field campaign, including collaborations between CalWater 2 and ACAPEX, aims to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud and precipitation processes associated with atmospheric rivers (ARs) and aerosol-cloud interactions that influence precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. An observational strategy was employed using land and offshore assets to monitor (1) the evolution and structure of ARs from near their regions of development, (2) long range transport of aerosols in eastern North Pacific and potential interactions with ARs, and (3) how aerosols from long-range transport and local sources influence cloud and precipitation in the U.S. During the field campaign, an AR developed in the Northeast Pacific Ocean in early February and made landfall in northern California. In-situ aerosol and cloud measurements from the G-1 aircraft; remote sensing data of clouds and aerosols; and meteorological measurements from aircraft, ship, and ground-based instruments collected from February 5 - 8, 2015 are analyzed to characterize the large-scale environment and cloud and precipitation forming processes. Modeling experiments are designed using a regional model for simulations with a cloud resolving limited area domain and quasi-global coarser resolution domain to evaluate the impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation, and to explore the relative contributions of long-range transported and regional aerosols that interacted with the clouds before, during, and after AR landfall. Preliminary results will be discussed in the context of the field data as well as a multi-year simulation of the climatological contributions of long-range transported dust during AR landfall in California.

  4. Alterations in 'water yield' associated with land use changes under different precipitation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohatyn, Shani; Ramati, Efrat; Tatarinov, Fyodor; Rotenberg, Eyal; Tas, Eran; Yakir, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Changes in rainfall regimes and land cover results in complex alterations in plant water use and in ecosystem water balance, which are not well quantified. This results in poor estimates of the 'water yield' (WY; the difference between precipitation, P, input and evapotranspiration, ET, losses), which provides the water available for runoff and re-charge, and ultimately also for human consumption. The objective of this study was to examine the interactions between the effects of land use change (from sparse shrubland to pine forest) on ecosystem WY, and changes in the precipitation regime (from humid Mediterranean to semi-arid conditions). We hypothesized that the forestation increased ET and reduced WY, but this impact diminishes with decreasing precipitation. We used a new approach centered on a custom-built mobile laboratory of eddy co-variance measurements deployed on a campaign basis (about two weeks per site repeated along the seasonal cycle), that allowed us to measure ecosystem-scale ET together with carbon and energy fluxes and meteorological parameters. Measurements were carried out between the years of 2012-2015 in three paired sites of Pinus halepensis forests and adjacent non-forest ecosystems along the rainfall gradient in Israel, from 755 to 290 mm in annual precipitation. Annual ET was estimated from the campaigns results based on multiple regression analyses with meteorological parameters (relative humidity, RH, temperature, T, and global radiation, Rg) from local meteorological stations that provided continuous data records. The results indicated that decrease in annual precipitation by a factor of ~2.5, resulted in decrease in ET by a factor of 2.4 from 685 mm, with WY=210 mm, in the humid forest, to 290 mm, with WY= 0 mm, in the dry forest. In the non-forest ecosystems ET showed relatively small decrease (by a factor of 1.3) from 285 mm, with WY=460 mm, to 220 mm, with WY=95 mm. The differences 'Forest-shrubland' in ET decreased from 400 mm to

  5. Retrieving moisture profiles from precipitable water measurements using a variational data assimilation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.R.; Zou, X.; Kuo, Y.H.

    1996-04-01

    Atmospheric moisture distribution is directly related to the formation of clouds and precipitation and affects the atmospheric radiation and climate. Currently, several remote sensing systems can measure precipitable water (PW) with fairly high accuracy. As part of the development of an Integrated Data Assimilation and Sounding System in support of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, retrieving the 3-D water vapor fields from PW measurements is an important problem. A new four dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system based on the Penn State/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) mesoscale model (MM5) has been developed by Zou et al. (1995) with the adjoint technique. In this study, we used this 4DVAR system to retrieve the moisture profiles. Because we do not have a set of real observed PW measurements now, the special soundings collected during the Severe Environmental Storm and Mesoscale Experiment (SESAME) in 1979 were used to simulate a set of PW measurements, which were then assimilated into the 4DVAR system. The accuracy of the derived water vapor fields was assessed by direct comparison with the detailed specific humidity soundings. The impact of PW assimilation on precipitation forecast was examined by conducting a series of model forecast experiments started from the different initial conditions with or without data assimilation.

  6. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gail

    2014-05-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core satellite, scheduled for launch at the end of February 2014, is well designed estimate precipitation from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect falling snow. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The design of the GPM Core Observatory is an advancement of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)'s highly successful rain-sensing package [3]. The cornerstone of the GPM mission is the deployment of a Core Observatory in a unique 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. The Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will provide measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improving retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The combined use of DPR and GMI measurements will place greater constraints on possible solutions to radiometer retrievals to improve the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. The GPM Core Observatory was developed and tested at NASA

  7. HAWC: The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory for TeV gamma-rays & cosmic-ray anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuVernois, Michael

    Currently, the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is being built at a site about a two hours drive east of Puebla, Mexico, on the Sierra Negra plateau (4100 m a.s.l.). HAWC is unique among TeV gamma-ray instruments since it can observe large portions of the sky in a 24 hour time period and therefore the detector is particularly well suited to measure extended and large-scale structures in the sky like galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, and both large and small-scale anisotropies. In addition, discoveries of other extended unidentified objects at TeV energies, for example collocated with the “Fermi Bubbles”, and the observation of transient phenomena such as GRBs are possible. The construction of HAWC funded through NSF, DoE, and CONACyT is expected to be complete by Fall 2014. Data are already being collected during construction with an increasingly sensitive detector allowing for synchronous observations with instruments at other wavebands such as the Fermi Space Telescopes. Analysis of the already recorded data reveal significant anisotropies in the arrival directions of cosmic rays at small and large scales. A number of gamma-ray hot spots are also observed along the Galactic plane and the data are searched for high-energy emission from GRBs detected at lower energies. I will present first results and some of the scientific potential of the observatory.

  8. Assimilation of Airborne Snow Observatory Snow Water Equivalent to Improve Runoff Forecasting Model Performance and Reservoir Management During Warm and Dry Winters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGurk, B. J.; Painter, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) NASA-JPL demonstration mission has collected detailed snow information for portions of the Tuolumne Basin in California for three years, 2013 - 2015. Both 2014 and 2015 were low snow years, and 2015 was exceptionally warm and analogous to future years after climate change. The ASO uses an imaging spectrometer and LiDAR sensors mounted in an aircraft to collect snow depth and extent data, and snow albedo. By combining ground and modeled density fields, the ~weekly flights over the Tuolumne produced both basin-wide and detailed sub-basin snow water equivalent (SWE) estimates that were provided to Hetch Hetchy Reservoir operators. The data were also assimilated into an hydrologic simulation model in an attempt to improve the accuracy and timing of a runoff forecasting tool that can be used to improve the management of Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, the source of 85% of the water supply for 2.6 million people on the San Francisco Peninsula. The USGS Precipitation Runoff Modeling System was calibrated to the 1181 square kilometer basin and simulation results compared to observed runoff with and without assimilation of ASO data. Simulated and observed were also compared with observed with both single updates associated with each flight, and with sequential updates from each flight. Sequential updating was found to improve correlation between observed and simulated reservoir inflows, and there by improve the ability of reservoir operators to more efficiently allocate the last half of the recession limb of snowmelt inflow and be assured of filling the reservoir and minimizing ecologically-damaging late season spills.

  9. Geochemical mass-balance relationships for selected ions in precipitation and stream water, Catoctin Mountains, Maryland.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.G.; Bricker, O.P.; Kennedy, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a study of input/output mass balances for major ions based on the chemical composition of precipitation and stream-water, geochemical reactions with different loading rates of hydrogen ion, and watershed processes influencing the chemical character of stream-waters in two small watershed areas are reported with a view to predicting the effect of additions of acidic rain to the watershed systems. Geochemical weathering processes account for the observed changes in the chemistry of stream flow. Although present in bedrock in extremely small quantities, calcite plays an important role in neutralization of the total hydrogen-ion input.-M.S.

  10. Water quality data for precipitation and storm runoff in Pennypack Creek Basin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Speight, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents data on the chemistry of precipitation and storm runoff that were collected during 29 storms from July 1979 through November 1980, in an urban environment in the Pennypack Creek basin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Daily mean and instantaneous stream discharge data were collected at two U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations. Water-quality data collected from these sites and from one storm-sewer sampling site included nutrients, chemical and biochemical oxygen demands, solids, metals, major anions, other constituents, and pH. Instantaneous loads of selected constituents were computed. Chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, sulfate, alkalinity, chloride, and dissolved solids generally were low in precipitation and runoff. During the November 5, 1980 storm at Pine Road, dissolved nitrate concentrations equaled or exceeded 10 milligrams per liter in 17 percent of the samples analyzed and dissolved ammonia nitrogen concentrations exceeded 2.5 milligrams per liter. Generally, a comparison of median concentration of copper, lead, or zinc in precipitation and runoff at the Tustin Street storm-sewer site showed that median concentrations in precipitation were greater than those in runoff.

  11. Instrumental and Reconstructed Water Year Precipitation for the Western United States: A 440-Year Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, H. F.; Wahl, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    We use a suite of reconstructed water year (WY; October through September) streamflow for 12 river basins in the western United States to reconstruct gridded water year precipitation over a similar western US domain. The streamflow values were reconstructed based on moisture sensitive tree ring records and we used values published in the peer-reviewed literature. A set of Principal Components (PC) of the streamflow reconstructions were calibrated against a complementary PC set from an ~120-year long instrumental record of WY precipitation west of ~90˚W to yield a 407 year reconstruction at each gridpoint. We were motivated to assess the rarity of the current extreme 3-year drought in the Southwest US—particularly in California. Hence, our analysis focuses largely on the moisture side of the water balance, although of course, streamflow is an integrator of both evapotranspiration and precipitation. Nevertheless, the strong calibration and validation statistics obtained in our study (and notably for California and Nevada) suggest that WY streamflow in much of the West is mainly driven by precipitation variability. The current WY drought (2013-14) and three year (2012-2014) extended drought is ranked in the instrumental record for California itself as the driest such period since 1895. In our longer reconstructed record of California and adjacent western Nevada, the current dry episode—exceeding one year's mean total in three years—is similar to only three other such occurrences over the past 440 years, centered on 1654, 1795, and 1930. Analyses of anomalous mid-tropospheric (700 hPa) circulation features over the instrumental period (since 1895) show the presence of persistent anticyclonic flow over, near, and to the west of the US Pacific coast during the driest WYs. Some differences in the location and spatial structure of the anomalous Northeast Pacific ridge are evident and these are discussed in the context of low-frequency climate variability and change.

  12. Solute contributions from precipitation to the compositions of soil waters in a marine terrace chronosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivit, D. V.; White, A. F.; Bullen, T. D.; Fitzpatrick, J.

    2009-12-01

    Solute loading of soil waters by rainfall together with evapo-transpiration can increase the concentrations of various dissolved constituents. This process complicates the modeling of saturation states for the different mineral phases in the soil profile that are products of the weathering of primary minerals in the original granitic source material. The estimation of true rates of regolith weathering due to CO2 drawdown at temperate hydrogeological sites requires having soil pore water solute concentration data which have been corrected for solute inputs from precipitation before proceeding with chemical weathering calculations. As part of a chemical weathering study of a coastal marine terrace chronosequence located in the vicinity of Wilder Ranch State Park, Santa Cruz County, CA, bulk samplers and automatic precipitation-event samplers were used at a range of sites to determine elemental concentrations as well as isotopic compositions of rainfall solutes which influence the overall compositions of the pore waters. Variations in rain sample chemistry correlated with precipitation intensity (see Fig. 1) are a result of solute inputs from aerosols of marine and terrestrial origins. Higher isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr), which point to radiogenic dust sources, were found in rain collected in the fall at the beginning of the rainy season while lower ratio values indicating marine aerosol effects were seen in winter and spring samples. To further understand the development of solute levels in rain, the NOAA HYSPLIT particle-tracking program was used to follow the chronological progression of storm tracks during precipitation events. Subsequently, wind sensors along with the automatic rain collectors were installed in an effort to correlate high resolution wind-speed and wind-direction data with changing compositions of rain samples collected at fixed-time intervals during storm events. Wind data show that wind directions during periods of rainfall generally deviate from

  13. Melting of the precipitated ice IV in LiCl aqueous solution and polyamorphism of water.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Osamu

    2011-12-08

    Melting of the precipitated ice IV in supercooled LiCl-H(2)O solution was studied in the range of 0-0.6 MPa and 160-270 K. Emulsified solution was used to detect this metastable transition. Ice IV was precipitated from the aqueous solution of 2.0 mol % LiCl (or 4.8 mol % LiCl) in each emulsion particle at low-temperature and high-pressure conditions, and the emulsion was decompressed at different temperatures. The melting of ice IV was detected from the temperature change of the emulsified sample during the decompression. There was an apparently sudden change in the slope of the ice IV melting curve (liquidus) in the pressure-temperature diagram. At the high-pressure and high-temperature side of the change, the solute-induced freezing point depression was observed. At the low-pressure and low-temperature side, ice IV transformed into ice Ih on the decompression, and the transition was almost unrelated to the concentration of LiCl. These experimental results were roughly explained by the presumed existence of two kinds of liquid water (low-density liquid water and high-density liquid water), or polyamorphism in water, and by the simple assumption that LiCl dissolved maily in high-density liquid water.

  14. Observatories: History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisciunas, K.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    An astronomical OBSERVATORY is a building, installation or institution dedicated to the systematic and regular observation of celestial objects for the purpose of understanding their physical nature, or for purposes of time reckoning and keeping the calendar. At a bona fide observatory such work constitutes a main activity, not just an incidental one. While the ancient Egyptians, Babylonians, Chi...

  15. Astronomical observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The layout and equipment of astronomical observatories, the oldest scientific institutions of human society are discussed. The example of leading observatories of the USSR allows the reader to familiarize himself with both their modern counterparts, as well as the goals and problems on which astronomers are presently working.

  16. Precipitation Trends and Water Consumption Related to Population in the Southwestern United States: A Reassessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Henry F.; Anderson, Craig A.

    1995-03-01

    Water consumption figures for the southwest United States are compared for the last four decades. Past trends in consumption are evaluated in the context of precipitation variability in the region and with regard to Colorado River streamflow changes. The study represents a follow-up look at a previous assessment of water consumption, regional precipitation, and demographic trends in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah, which account for much of the annual depletions of Colorado River water. The previous study was completed during a wet spell in the West, and trends in all major categories of water consumption were consistently upward. This study indicates that a decline or reversal has taken place in water use in many of the western states. The greater water efficiency (reduced per capita water use) is particularly noteworthy in California, which alone accounts for the lion's share of water depletions from the Colorado River Basin. The years since the mid-1980's have been predominantly dry in much of the West. At the same time, population in the six-state region has ncreased at about the same pace it had grown during prior decades. A shift from irrigation-related uses to civil consumption is evident in the 1980's. Taking into consideration a situation where multiyear dry spells are a normal part of the climate of the region, it appears that irrigation depletions may have peaked in the West. In the future, allocations for civil supply, recreation, and other in-stream uses as well as for hydropower generation may heighten the competition for available water supplies, put pressure on existing pricing policies, and force users toward greater conservation efforts and improved efficiencies.

  17. Trace Perchlorate in Background Ground Water and Local Precipitation, Northern Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, M.; Longmire, P.; Granzow, K. P.; Englert, D.; Yanicak, S.; Larson, T.; Rearick, M.; Heikoop, J.; Perkins, G.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate occurs at detectable concentrations of 0.07 to 0.45 parts per billion (ppb) in ground water of background quality within the northern Rio Grande basin, New Mexico. Ground-water samples were collected from 47 wells and springs near Los Alamos, Santa Fe, and Taos, New Mexico. Analytical methods consisted of liquid and ion chromatography-mass spectrometry mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS and IC/MS/MS). An upper tolerance limit (mean plus two standard deviations) of 0.40 ppb was calculated from 184 analytical results for the background samples. Six distinguishable ground-water zones were sampled based on location, age, and hydrochemistry. In the Los Alamos area, ground water within the mountain-front and mountain-block region is mostly young or modern (less than 50 years). The regional aquifer including the White Rock Canyon springs are of sub-modern age (greater than 50 years). Tritium data from springs north of Taos indicate ground water of modern and sub-modern ages. Background perchlorate concentrations within the Los Alamos area were consistently higher than those measured in the Taos area. Ground water from the Taos area contains less perchlorate and has lower δ18O and δ2H values than ground water from the Los Alamos area. The elevation at which precipitation occurs with respect to recharge and/or the amount of evapotranspiration may play a role in perchlorate concentration in ground water. Natural variability, hydrogeology, and atmospheric inputs may also affect perchlorate concentration in ground water. A linear regression through perchlorate and chloride concentrations for all stations resulted in an r2 = 0. However, the r2 value of the Los Alamos regional aquifer for perchlorate versus chloride was 0.66. Thirteen precipitation samples were collected in the Los Alamos area. Results from eleven of these samples showed no perchlorate greater than 0.05 and 0.009 ppb, the method detection limit (MDL). Two precipitation samples analyzed using the IC

  18. Soil water and vegetation responses to precipitation and changes in depth to ground water in Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Stephen K.; Dileanis, Peter D.; Branson, Farrel A.

    1991-01-01

    Vegetation on the floor of Owens Valley, California, is composed predominantly of phreatophytic desert communities that are adapted to small quantities of precipitation and alkaline soils. These plant communities are believed to be dependent on the continuing presence of a shallow water table. Maintaining existing plant communities is important to preserve the environmental quality of the valley. Proposals to pump additional quantities of ground water from the valley for export to the city of Los Angeles caused concern about the effect of pumping on the existing vegetation and how the plants would adapt to short- or long-term declines of the shallow water table. To test the ability of selected major shrub species to adapt to water-table decline, four sites were selected, pump-equipped wells were installed, and water-table drawdown was monitored. Soil samples were collected with a hand auger and analyzed by using the filter-paper method to monitor changes in soil water content and soil matric potential at test sites. Plant reactions were determined by measurements of plant cover, shoot growth, and xylem pressure potential. Results of 3 years of monitoring show that growth and cover repetition of the shrubs studied are affected greatly by the quantity of annual precipitation, especially at sites with coarse-textured soils. Plants were not affected by drying soil in the root zone until the maximum matric potential exceeded 4.3 pF (-1,950 kilopascal) at depths greater than 0.5 meter. Rabbit-brush was most sensitive to dry soil and was the only shrub species that died as the result of water stress from water-table drawdown. The change in cover repetition correlated positively with the magnitude of water-table drawdown at one site and negatively at another site. Measurements of xylem pressure potential taken before dawn correlated well with water content in the upper 1.5 meters of soil. The magnitude of water-table drawdown achieved by the pump-equipped wells was less

  19. Precipitation Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1996-01-01

    The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

  20. The effect of antiscalant addition on calcium carbonate precipitation for a simplified synthetic brackish water reverse osmosis concentrate.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Lauren F; Testa, Fabrice; Lawler, Desmond F; Freeman, Benny D; Moulin, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    The primary limitations to inland brackish water reverse osmosis (RO) desalination are the cost and technical feasibility of concentrate disposal. To decrease concentrate volume, a side-stream process can be used to precipitate problematic scaling salts and remove the precipitate with a solid/liquid separation step. The treated concentrate can then be purified through a secondary reverse osmosis stage to increase overall recovery and decrease the volume of waste requiring disposal. Antiscalants are used in an RO system to prevent salt precipitation but might affect side-stream concentrate treatment. Precipitation experiments were performed on a synthetic RO concentrate with and without antiscalant; of particular interest was the precipitation of calcium carbonate. Particle size distributions, calcium precipitation, microfiltration flux, and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate the effects of antiscalant type, antiscalant concentration, and precipitation pH on calcium carbonate precipitation and filtration. Results show that antiscalants can decrease precipitate particle size and change the shape of the particles; smaller particles can cause an increase in microfiltration flux decline during the solid/liquid separation step. The presence of antiscalant during precipitation can also decrease the mass of precipitated calcium carbonate.

  1. Short-Term Effects of Changing Precipitation Patterns on Shrub-Steppe Grasslands: Seasonal Watering Is More Important than Frequency of Watering Events

    PubMed Central

    Densmore-McCulloch, Justine A.; Thompson, Donald L.; Fraser, Lauchlan H.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is expected to alter precipitation patterns. Droughts may become longer and more frequent, and the timing and intensity of precipitation may change. We tested how shifting precipitation patterns, both seasonally and by frequency of events, affects soil nitrogen availability, plant biomass and diversity in a shrub-steppe temperate grassland along a natural productivity gradient in Lac du Bois Grasslands Protected Area near Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada. We manipulated seasonal watering patterns by either exclusively watering in the spring or the fall. To simulate spring precipitation we restricted precipitation inputs in the fall, then added 50% more water than the long term average in the spring, and vice-versa for the fall precipitation treatment. Overall, the amount of precipitation remained roughly the same. We manipulated the frequency of rainfall events by either applying water weekly (frequent) or monthly (intensive). After 2 years, changes in the seasonality of watering had greater effects on plant biomass and diversity than changes in the frequency of watering. Fall watering reduced biomass and increased species diversity, while spring watering had little effect. The reduction in biomass in fall watered treatments was due to a decline in grasses, but not forbs. Plant available N, measured by Plant Root Simulator (PRS)-probes, increased from spring to summer to fall, and was higher in fall watered treatments compared to spring watered treatments when measured in the fall. The only effect observed due to frequency of watering events was greater extractable soil N in monthly applied treatments compared to weekly watering treatments. Understanding the effects of changing precipitation patterns on grasslands will allow improved grassland conservation and management in the face of global climatic change, and here we show that if precipitation is more abundant in the fall, compared to the spring, grassland primary productivity will likely be

  2. Short-Term Effects of Changing Precipitation Patterns on Shrub-Steppe Grasslands: Seasonal Watering Is More Important than Frequency of Watering Events.

    PubMed

    Densmore-McCulloch, Justine A; Thompson, Donald L; Fraser, Lauchlan H

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is expected to alter precipitation patterns. Droughts may become longer and more frequent, and the timing and intensity of precipitation may change. We tested how shifting precipitation patterns, both seasonally and by frequency of events, affects soil nitrogen availability, plant biomass and diversity in a shrub-steppe temperate grassland along a natural productivity gradient in Lac du Bois Grasslands Protected Area near Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada. We manipulated seasonal watering patterns by either exclusively watering in the spring or the fall. To simulate spring precipitation we restricted precipitation inputs in the fall, then added 50% more water than the long term average in the spring, and vice-versa for the fall precipitation treatment. Overall, the amount of precipitation remained roughly the same. We manipulated the frequency of rainfall events by either applying water weekly (frequent) or monthly (intensive). After 2 years, changes in the seasonality of watering had greater effects on plant biomass and diversity than changes in the frequency of watering. Fall watering reduced biomass and increased species diversity, while spring watering had little effect. The reduction in biomass in fall watered treatments was due to a decline in grasses, but not forbs. Plant available N, measured by Plant Root Simulator (PRS)-probes, increased from spring to summer to fall, and was higher in fall watered treatments compared to spring watered treatments when measured in the fall. The only effect observed due to frequency of watering events was greater extractable soil N in monthly applied treatments compared to weekly watering treatments. Understanding the effects of changing precipitation patterns on grasslands will allow improved grassland conservation and management in the face of global climatic change, and here we show that if precipitation is more abundant in the fall, compared to the spring, grassland primary productivity will likely be

  3. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: NASA Status and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Huffman, G.; Petersen, W.; Kidd, Chris

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission’s Core satellite, launched 27 February 2014, is well-designed to estimate precipitation from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect falling snow. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth’s water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. GPM is a joint NASA-JAXA mission. The design of the GPM Core Observatory is an advancement of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)’s highly successful rain-sensing package. The cornerstone of the GPM mission is the deployment of a Core Observatory in a unique 65 (°) non-Sun-synchronous orbit serving as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. The Core Observatory carries a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR provides measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improving retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The combined use of DPR and GMI measurements places greater constraints on possible solutions to radiometer retrievals to improve the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. The GPM mission science objectives and instrument

  4. Comparison of precipitable water over Ghana using GPS signals and reanalysis products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acheampong, A. A.; Fosu, C.; Amekudzi, L. K.; Kaas, E.

    2015-11-01

    Signals from Global Navigational Satellite Systems (GNSS) when integrated with surface meteorological parameters can be used to sense atmospheric water vapour. Using gLAB software and employing precise point positioning techniques, zenith troposphere delays (ZTD) for a GPS base station at KNUST, Kumasi have been computed and used to retrieve Precipitable Water (PW). The PW values obtained were compared with products from ERA-Interim and NCEP reanalysis data. The correlation coefficients, r, determined from these comparisons were 0.839 and 0.729 for ERA-interim and NCEP respectively. This study has demonstrated that water vapour can be retrieved with high precision from GNSS signal. Furthermore, a location map have been produced to serve as a guide in adopting and installing GNSS base stations in Ghana to achieve a country wide coverage of GNSS based water vapour monitoring.

  5. Impacts of precipitation variability on plant species and community water stress in a temperate deciduous forest in the central US

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Lianhong; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hosman, Kevin P.; Sun, Ying

    2015-12-11

    Variations in precipitation regimes can shift ecosystem structure and function by altering frequency, severity and timing of plant water stress. There is a need for predictively understanding impacts of precipitation regimes on plant water stress in relation to species water use strategies. Here we first formulated two complementary, physiologically-linked measures of precipitation variability (PV) - Precipitation Variability Index (PVI) and Average Recurrence Interval of Effective Precipitation (ARIEP). We then used nine-year continuous measurements of Predawn Leaf Water Potential Integral (PLWPI) in a central US forest to relate PVI and ARIEP to actual plant water availability and comparative water stress responses of six species with different capacities to regulate their internal water status. We found that PVI and ARIEP explained nearly all inter-annual variations in PLWPI for all species as well as for the community scaled from species measurements. The six species investigated showed differential sensitivities to variations in precipitation regimes. Their sensitivities were reflected more in the responses to PVI and ARIEP than to the mean precipitation rate. Further, they exhibited tradeoffs between responses to low and high PV. Finally, PVI and ARIEP were closely correlated with temporal integrals of positive temperature anomalies and vapor pressure deficit. We suggest that the comparative responses of plant species to PV are part of species-specific water use strategies in a plant community facing the uncertainty of fluctuating precipitation regimes. In conclusion, PVI and ARIEP should be adopted as key indices to quantify physiological drought and the ecological impacts of precipitation regimes in a changing climate.

  6. Impacts of precipitation variability on plant species and community water stress in a temperate deciduous forest in the central US

    DOE PAGES

    Gu, Lianhong; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hosman, Kevin P.; ...

    2015-12-11

    Variations in precipitation regimes can shift ecosystem structure and function by altering frequency, severity and timing of plant water stress. There is a need for predictively understanding impacts of precipitation regimes on plant water stress in relation to species water use strategies. Here we first formulated two complementary, physiologically-linked measures of precipitation variability (PV) - Precipitation Variability Index (PVI) and Average Recurrence Interval of Effective Precipitation (ARIEP). We then used nine-year continuous measurements of Predawn Leaf Water Potential Integral (PLWPI) in a central US forest to relate PVI and ARIEP to actual plant water availability and comparative water stress responsesmore » of six species with different capacities to regulate their internal water status. We found that PVI and ARIEP explained nearly all inter-annual variations in PLWPI for all species as well as for the community scaled from species measurements. The six species investigated showed differential sensitivities to variations in precipitation regimes. Their sensitivities were reflected more in the responses to PVI and ARIEP than to the mean precipitation rate. Further, they exhibited tradeoffs between responses to low and high PV. Finally, PVI and ARIEP were closely correlated with temporal integrals of positive temperature anomalies and vapor pressure deficit. We suggest that the comparative responses of plant species to PV are part of species-specific water use strategies in a plant community facing the uncertainty of fluctuating precipitation regimes. In conclusion, PVI and ARIEP should be adopted as key indices to quantify physiological drought and the ecological impacts of precipitation regimes in a changing climate.« less

  7. Preliminary Results on Simulations of Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) detected by The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enriquez Rivera, O.; Lara, A.

    2014-12-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is currently under construction at the Sierra Negra Volcano, Puebla in Mexico. Located 4100 m above sea level, this large array is mainly designed to observe high energy gamma rays (TeV). However, by recording scaler data that correspond to the rates of individual photomultiplier tubes, the detection and study of solar energetic particles (known as Ground Level Enhancements) as well as the decrease of the cosmic ray flux due to solar transients (known as Forbush decreases) will also be possible. In order to determine the response of the array to solar transients, we have performed simulations of the scaler output using different sub-array configurations. We present here our preliminary results of such simulations and their comparison with observed Forbush decreases.

  8. Long-term trends in stream water and precipitation chemistry at five headwater basins in the northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, David W.; Mast, M. Alisa

    1999-01-01

    Stream water data from five headwater basins in the northeastern United States covering water years 1968-1996 and precipitation data from eight nearby precipitation monitoring sites covering water years 1984-1996 were analyzed for temporal trends in chemistry using the nonparametric seasonal Kendall test. Concentrations of SO4 declined at three of five streams during 1968,1996 (p < 0.1), and all of the streams exhibited downward trends in SO4 over the second half of the period (1984-1996). Concentrations of SO4 in precipitation declined at seven of eight sites from 1984 to 1996, and the magnitudes of the declines (-0.7 to -2.0 ??eq L-1 yr-1) generally were similar to those of stream water SO4. These results indicate that changes in precipitation SO4 were of sufficient magnitude to account for changes in stream water SO4. Concentrations of Ca + Mg declined at three of five streams and five of eight precipitation sites from 1984 to 1996. Precipitation acidity decreased at five of eight sites during the same period, but alkalinity increased in only one stream. In most cases the decreases in stream water SO4 were similar in magnitude to declines in stream water Ca + Mg, which is consistent with the theory of leaching by mobile acid anions in soils. In precipitation the magnitudes of SO4 declines were similar to those of hydrogen, and declines in Ca + Mg were much smaller. This indicates that recent decreases in SO4 deposition are now being reflected in reduced precipitation acidity. The lack of widespread increases in stream water alkalinity, despite the prevalence of downward trends in Stream water SO4, suggests that at most sites, increases in stream water pH and acid-neutralizing capacity may be delayed until higher soil base-saturation levels are achieved.

  9. The Potential of Water Vapor & Precipitation Estimation with a Differential-frequency Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Liao, Liang; Tian, Lin

    2006-01-01

    In the presence of rain, the radar return powers from a three-frequency radar, with center frequency at 22.235 GHz and upper and lower frequencies chosen with equal water vapor absorption coefficients, can be used to estimate water vapor density and parameters of the precipitation. A linear combination of differential measurements between the center and lower frequencies on one hand and the upper and lower frequencies on the other provide an estimate of differential water vapor absorption. Conversely, the difference in radar reflectivity factors (in dB) between the upper and lower frequencies is independent of water vapor absorption and can be used to estimate the median mass diameter of the hydrometeors. For a down-looking radar, path-integrated estimates of water vapor absorption may be possible under rain-free as well as raining conditions by using the surface returns at the three frequencies. Cross-talk or interference between the precipitation and water vapor estimates depends on the frequency separation of the channels as well as on the phase state and the median mass diameter of the hydrometeors. Simulations of the retrieval of water vapor absorption show that the largest source of variability arises from the variance in the measured radar return powers while the largest biases occur in the mixed-phase region. Use of high pulse repetition frequencies and signal whitening methods may be needed to obtain the large number of independent samples required. Measurements over a fractional bandwidth, defined as the ratio of the difference between the upper and lower frequencies to the center frequency, up to about 0.2 should be passible in a differential frequency mode, where a single transceiver and antenna are used. Difficulties in frequency allocation may require alternative choices of frequency where the water vapor absorptions at the low and high frequencies are unequal. We consider the degradation in the retrieval accuracy when the frequencies are not optimum.

  10. Refining hot-water extracted silk sericin by ethanol-induced precipitation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hanjin; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Moo Kon; Um, In Chul; Lee, Ki Hoon

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve some inherent disadvantages in the mechanical properties of silk sericin (SS), we prepared ethanol-precipitated sericin (EpSS) by adding ethanol into hot-water extracted sericin (HS) solution. EpSS had higher viscosity compared to HS and it was due to the differences in their molecular weight distribution (MWD). The different MWD of EpSS was due to the different solubility of sericin molecules at various concentrations of ethanol, and the amino acid composition of EpSS showed that the more hydrophobic sericin is precipitated more readily in the presence of ethanol. The secondary structure of sericin is also changed from a random coil to β-sheet structure when the amount of ethanol added is high enough. The DSC analysis also revealed that EpSSs has a more compact structure. Finally, when beads were prepared from EpSS, they had enhanced compressive strength compared to those from HS.

  11. Aragonite precipitation induced by anaerobic oxidation of methane in shallow-water seeps, Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedling, Johanna; Kuhfuß, Hanna; Lott, Christian; Böttcher, Michael E.; Lichtschlag, Anna; Wegener, Gunter; Deusner, Christian; Bach, Wolfgang; Weber, Miriam

    2014-05-01

    In the shallow-water organic-poor silicate sands off the West coast of Elba, Italy, we found aragonite precipitates within a radius of 10 cm to methane seeps in 20 - 40 cm sediment depth. The shallow seep site was mapped by SCUBA diving and in an area of 100 m2 nine gas emission spots were observed. The gas emission, containing 73 Vol. % methane, was measured to be 0.72 L m-2 d-1. Findings of anaerobic methane oxidizing archea (ANME 1, 2, 2a, 2b) and sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) as well as in vitro rate measurements of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with a maximum of 67 ± 7 nmol CH4 cm-3 d-1 led to the hypothesis that carbonate precipitation is coupled to these microbial processes. Porewater analysis showed elevated concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (up to 15.5 mmol L-1) and hydrogen sulfide (up to 6.6 mmol L-1). The presence of bicarbonate and the ambient temperature (14 - 25 ° C) facilitate the precipitation of needle-shaped aragonite. Oxygen isotope compositions of the mineral are consistent with the ambient temperatures and may indicate a recent diagenetic formation of this mineral. Although precipitation should not be preserved in these sandy permeable sediments, influenced by seasonality, wave action, and fluid flow, we found up to 10-50 cm3 irregular pieces of cemented sand grains, very often encrusting dead seagrass rhizomes. Commonly known carbonate structures, especially from the deep sea, are chimneys, mounds, hardgrounds and nodules. These structures are well known from seep and vent sites, usually showing the same range of stable carbon isotope fractionation as the escaping methane. The permeable sediment at the Elba site possibly allows the gas to frequently change its pathway to the sediment surface and thus precipitation can occure at several spots and more irregular than in the reported sites. Preservation of precipitates, however, requires sufficient authigenic aragonite to be formed before fluid dynamics changed the

  12. Climate Change Impacts on US Precipitation Extremes and Consequences for Hydraulic Infrastructures and Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, S.; Kumar, D.; Mishra, V.; Ganguly, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Precipitation extremes in the conterminous United States are expected to intensify and grow more frequent with climate change. However, translating this climate insight to metrics relevant for hydraulic infrastructures or water resources remains a challenge. The primary issue is one of scale, which in turn may ultimately stem from the space-time variability in, and our lack of understanding of, fine-scale precipitation processes. Here we examine the hypothesis that credible metrics for civil engineers and hydrologists can be obtained through extreme value analysis of regional climate model simulations. Specifically, we develop intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) simulations, and characterize uncertainties by comparing with observations. We attempt to understand the nature of the insights, if any, that can be extracted despite the uncertainties.

  13. Simulating the effects of ground-water withdrawals on streamflow in a precipitation-runoff model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zarriello, P.J.; Barlow, P.M.; Duda, P.B.

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation-runoff models are used to assess the effects of water use and management alternatives on streamflow. Often, ground-water withdrawals are a major water-use component that affect streamflow, but the ability of surface-water models to simulate ground-water withdrawals is limited. As part of a Hydrologic Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) precipitation-runoff model developed to analyze the effect of ground-water and surface-water withdrawals on streamflow in the Ipswich River in northeastern Massachusetts, an analytical technique (STRMDEPL) was developed for calculating the effects of pumped wells on streamflow. STRMDEPL is a FORTRAN program based on two analytical solutions that solve equations for ground-water flow to a well completed in a semi-infinite, homogeneous, and isotropic aquifer in direct hydraulic connection to a fully penetrating stream. One analytical method calculates unimpeded flow at the stream-aquifer boundary and the other method calculates the resistance to flow caused by semipervious streambed and streambank material. The principle of superposition is used with these analytical equations to calculate time-varying streamflow depletions due to daily pumping. The HSPF model can readily incorporate streamflow depletions caused by a well or surface-water withdrawal, or by multiple wells or surface-water withdrawals, or both, as a combined time-varying outflow demand from affected channel reaches. These demands are stored as a time series in the Watershed Data Management (WDM) file. This time-series data is read into the model as an external source used to specify flow from the first outflow gate in the reach where these withdrawals are located. Although the STRMDEPL program can be run independently of the HSPF model, an extension was developed to run this program within GenScn, a scenario generator and graphical user interface developed for use with the HSPF model. This extension requires that actual pumping rates for each well be stored

  14. Predictability of horizontal water vapor transport relative to precipitation: Enhancing situational awareness for forecasting western U.S. extreme precipitation and flooding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavers, David A.; Waliser, Duane E.; Ralph, F. Martin; Dettinger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The western United States is vulnerable to socioeconomic disruption due to extreme winter precipitation and floods. Traditionally, forecasts of precipitation and river discharge provide the basis for preparations. Herein we show that earlier event awareness may be possible through use of horizontal water vapor transport (integrated vapor transport (IVT)) forecasts. Applying the potential predictability concept to the National Centers for Environmental Prediction global ensemble reforecasts, across 31 winters, IVT is found to be more predictable than precipitation. IVT ensemble forecasts with the smallest spreads (least forecast uncertainty) are associated with initiation states with anomalously high geopotential heights south of Alaska, a setup conducive for anticyclonic conditions and weak IVT into the western United States. IVT ensemble forecasts with the greatest spreads (most forecast uncertainty) have initiation states with anomalously low geopotential heights south of Alaska and correspond to atmospheric rivers. The greater IVT predictability could provide warnings of impending storminess with additional lead times for hydrometeorological applications.

  15. Determination of trifluoroacetic acid in 1996--1997 precipitation and surface waters in California and Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Wujcik, C.E.; Cahill, T.M.; Seiber, J.N.

    1999-05-15

    The atmospheric degradation of three chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) replacement compounds, namely HFC-134a, HCFC-123, and HCFC-124, results in the formation of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Concentrations of TFA were determined in precipitation and surface water samples collected in California and Nevada during 1996--1997. Terminal lake systems were found to have concentrations 4--13 times higher than their calculated yearly inputs, providing evidence for accumulation. The results support dry deposition as the primary contributor of TFA to surface waters in arid and semiarid environments. Precipitation samples obtained from three different locations contained 20.7--1530 ng/L with significantly higher concentrations in fogwater over rainwater. Elevated levels of TFA were observed for rainwater collected in Nevada over those collected in California, indicating continual uptake and concentration as clouds move from a semiarid to arid climate. Thus several mechanisms exist, including evaporative concentration, vapor-liquid phase partitioning, lowered washout volumes of atmospheric deposition water, and dry deposition, which may lead to elevated concentrations of TFA in atmospheric and surface waters above levels expected from usual rainfall washout.

  16. Annual precipitation regulates spatial and temporal drivers of lake water clarity.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kevin C; Greb, Steven R; Diebel, Matthew; Turner, Monica G

    2017-03-01

    Understanding how and why lakes vary and respond to different drivers through time and space is needed to understand, predict, and manage freshwater quality in an era of rapidly changing land use and climate. Water clarity regulates many characteristics of aquatic ecosystems and is responsive to watershed features, making it a sentinel of environmental change. However, whether precipitation alters the relative importance of features that influence lake water clarity or the spatial scales at which they operate is unknown. We used a data set of thousands of northern temperate lakes and asked (1) How does water clarity differ between a very wet vs. dry year? (2) Does the relative importance of different watershed features, or the spatial extent at which they are measured, vary between wet and dry years? (3) What lake and watershed characteristics regulate long-term water clarity trends? Among lakes, water clarity was reduced and less variable in the wet year than in the dry year; furthermore, water clarity was reduced much more in high-clarity lakes during the wet year than in low-clarity lakes. Climate, land use/land cover, and lake morphometry explained most variance in clarity among lakes in both years, but the spatial scales at which some features were important differed between the dry and wet years. Watershed percent agriculture was most important in the dry year, whereas riparian zone percent agriculture (around each lake and upstream features) was most important in the wet year. Between 1991 and 2012, water clarity declined in 23% of lakes and increased in only 6% of lakes. Conductance influenced the direction of temporal trend (clarity declined in lakes with low conductance), whereas the proportion of watershed wetlands, catchment-to-lake-area ratio, and lake maximum depth interacted with antecedent precipitation. Many predictors of water clarity, such as lake depth and landscape position, are features that cannot be readily managed. Given trends of

  17. Soil Water Balance and Water Use Efficiency of Dryland Wheat in Different Precipitation Years in Response to Green Manure Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dabin; Yao, Pengwei; Na, Zhao; Cao, Weidong; Zhang, Suiqi; Li, Yangyang; Gao, Yajun

    2016-05-01

    Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) monoculture is conventionally cultivated followed by two to three months of summer fallow in the Loess Plateau. To develop a sustainable cropping system, we conducted a six-year field experiment to investigate the effect of leguminous green manure (LGM) instead of bare fallow on the yield and water use efficiency (WUE) of winter wheat and the soil water balance (SWB) in different precipitation years in a semi-arid region of northwest China. Results confirmed that planting LGM crop consumes soil water in the fallow season can bring varied effects to the subsequent wheat. The effect is positive or neutral when the annual precipitation is adequate, so that there is no significant reduction in the soil water supplied to wheat. If this is not the case, the effect is negative. On average, the LGM crop increased wheat yield and WUE by 13% and 28%, respectively, and had considerable potential for maintaining the SWB (0–200 cm) compared with fallow management. In conclusion, cultivation of the LGM crop is a better option than fallow to improve the productivity and WUE of the next crop and maintain the soil water balance in the normal and wet years in the Loess Plateau.

  18. Soil Water Balance and Water Use Efficiency of Dryland Wheat in Different Precipitation Years in Response to Green Manure Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dabin; Yao, Pengwei; Na, Zhao; Cao, Weidong; Zhang, Suiqi; Li, Yangyang; Gao, Yajun

    2016-01-01

    Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) monoculture is conventionally cultivated followed by two to three months of summer fallow in the Loess Plateau. To develop a sustainable cropping system, we conducted a six-year field experiment to investigate the effect of leguminous green manure (LGM) instead of bare fallow on the yield and water use efficiency (WUE) of winter wheat and the soil water balance (SWB) in different precipitation years in a semi-arid region of northwest China. Results confirmed that planting LGM crop consumes soil water in the fallow season can bring varied effects to the subsequent wheat. The effect is positive or neutral when the annual precipitation is adequate, so that there is no significant reduction in the soil water supplied to wheat. If this is not the case, the effect is negative. On average, the LGM crop increased wheat yield and WUE by 13% and 28%, respectively, and had considerable potential for maintaining the SWB (0–200 cm) compared with fallow management. In conclusion, cultivation of the LGM crop is a better option than fallow to improve the productivity and WUE of the next crop and maintain the soil water balance in the normal and wet years in the Loess Plateau. PMID:27225842

  19. Precipitation and river water chemistry of the Piracicaba River basin, southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Williams, M R; Filoso, S; Martinelli, L A; Lara, L B; Camargo, P B

    2001-01-01

    Annual precipitation and river water volumes and chemistry were measured from 1995 to 1998 in a mesoscale agricultural area of southeast Brazil. Precipitation was mildly acidic and solute concentrations were higher in the west than in the east of the basin. Combustion products from biomass burning, automobile exhaust, and industry typically accumulate in the atmosphere from March until October and are responsible for seasonal differences observed in precipitation chemistry. In river waters, the volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentrations of major solutes at 10 sites across the basin were generally lower at upriver than at downriver sampling sites for most solutes. Mass balances for major solutes indicate that, as a regional entity, the Piracicaba River basin was a net sink of H+, PO4(3-), and NH4+, and a net source of other solutes. The main stem of the Piracicaba River had a general increase in solute concentrations from upriver to downriver sampling sites. In contrast, NO3- and NH4+ concentrations increased in the mid-reach sampling sites and decreased due to immobilization or utilization in the mid-reach reservoir, and there was denitrification immediately downriver of this reservoir. Compared with tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay estuary, the Piracicaba River is affected more by point-source inputs of raw sewage and industrial wastes than nonpoint agricultural runoff high in N and P. Inputs of N and C are responsible for a degradation of water quality at downriver sampling sites of the Piracicaba River drainage, and water quality could be considerably improved by augmenting sewage treatment.

  20. Contrasting precipitation seasonality influences evapotranspiration dynamics in water-limited shrublands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Samuel; Vargas, Rodrigo; Yepez, Enrico A.; Acosta, Jose S.; Castro, Angel; Escoto-Rodriguez, Martin; Lopez, Eulogio; Martínez-Osuna, Juan; Rodriguez, Julio C.; Smith, Stephen V.; Vivoni, Enrique R.; Watts, Christopher J.

    2016-02-01

    Water-limited ecosystems occupy nearly 30% of the Earth, but arguably, the controls on their ecosystem processes remain largely uncertain. We analyzed six site years of eddy covariance measurements of evapotranspiration (ET) from 2008 to 2010 at two water-limited shrublands: one dominated by winter precipitation (WP site) and another dominated by summer precipitation (SP site), but with similar solar radiation patterns in the Northern Hemisphere. We determined how physical forcing factors (i.e., net radiation (Rn), soil water content (SWC), air temperature (Ta), and vapor pressure deficit (VPD)) influence annual and seasonal variability of ET. Mean annual ET at SP site was 455 ± 91 mm yr-1, was mainly influenced by SWC during the dry season, by Rn during the wet season, and was highly sensitive to changes in annual precipitation (P). Mean annual ET at WP site was 363 ± 52 mm yr-1, had less interannual variability, but multiple variables (i.e., SWC, Ta, VPD, and Rn) were needed to explain ET among years and seasons. Wavelet coherence analysis showed that ET at SP site has a consistent temporal coherency with Ta and P, but this was not the case for ET at WP site. Our results support the paradigm that SWC is the main control of ET in water-limited ecosystems when radiation and temperature are not the limiting factors. In contrast, when P and SWC are decoupled from available energy (i.e., radiation and temperature), then ET is controlled by an interaction of multiple variables. Our results bring attention to the need for better understanding how climate and soil dynamics influence ET across these globally distributed ecosystems.

  1. PBO H2O: Monitoring the Terrestrial Water Cycle with reflected GPS signals recorded by the Plate Boundary Observatory Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, E. E.; Fairfax, E. J.; Chew, C. C.; Larson, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Data from NSF's EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), and similar GPS networks worldwide, can be used to monitor the terrestrial water cycle. GPS satellites transmit L-band microwave signals, which are strongly influenced by water at the surface of the Earth. GPS signals take two different paths: (1) the "direct" signal travels from the satellite to the antenna; (2) the "reflected" signal interacts with the Earth's surface before travelling to the antenna. The direct signal is used by geophysicists to measure the position of the antenna. By analyzing these GPS data over multiple years, the motion of the site can be estimated. The effects of reflected signals are generally ignored by geophysicists because they are small. This is not happenstance, as significant effort has been made to design and deploy a GPS antenna that suppresses ground reflections. Our group has developed a remote sensing technique to retrieve terrestrial water cycle variables from GPS data. We extract the water cycle products from signal strength data that measures the interference between the direct and reflected GPS signals. The sensing footprint is intermediate in scale between in situ observations and most remote sensing measurements. Snow depth, snow water equivalent (SWE), near surface soil moisture, and an index of vegetation water content are currently estimated from nearly 500 PBO sites. These PBO H2O products are updated daily and are available online (http://xenon.colorado.edu/portal/index.php). Validation studies show that retrieved products are of sufficient quality to be used in a variety of applications. The root mean square error (RMSE) of GPS-based SWE is 2 cm, based on a comparison to snow survey data at nearly 20 GPS sites. The RMSE of near surface volumetric soil moisture is < 0.04 cm3 cm-3, sufficient for validation of SMAP soil moisture and similar products.

  2. Evaporation tagging and atmospheric water budget analysis with WRF: A regional precipitation recycling study for West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, Joel; Knoche, Richard; Wei, Jianhui; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-03-01

    Regional precipitation recycling is the measure of the contribution of local evaporation E to local precipitation. This study provides a set of two methods developed in the Weather Research and Forecasting WRF model system for investigating regional precipitation recycling mechanisms: (1) tracking of tagged atmospheric water species originating from evaporation in a source region, ie E-tagging, and (2) three-dimensional budgets of total and tagged atmospheric water species. These methods are used to quantify the effect of return flow and nonwell vertical mixing neglected in the computation of the bulk precipitation recycling ratio. The developed algorithms are applied to a WRF simulation of the West African Monsoon 2003. The simulated region is characterized by vertical wind shear condition, i.e., southwesterlies in the low levels and easterlies in the mid-levels, which favors return flow and nonwell vertical mixing. Regional precipitation recycling is investigated in 100 × 100 and 1000 × 1000 km2 areas. A prerequisite condition for evaporated water to contribute to the precipitation process in both areas is that it is lifted to the mid-levels where hydrometeors are produced. In the 100 × 100 (1000 × 1000) km2 area the bulk precipitation recycling ratio is 0.9 (7.3) %. Our budget analysis reveals that return flow and nonwell vertically mixed outflow increase this value by about +0.2 (2.9) and +0.2 (1.6) %, respectively, thus strengthening the well-known scale-dependency of regional precipitation recycling.

  3. Estimating Ground-Water Recharge from Precipitation on Whidbey and Camano Islands, Island County, Washington, Water Years 1998 and 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumioka, S.S.; Bauer, H.H.

    2003-01-01

    Ground-water recharge from precipitation to unconsolidated deposits on Whidbey and Camano Islands, Washington, was estimated for water years 1998-99 using a near-surface water-balance method and a chloride mass-balance method. A daily near-surface water-balance method, the Deep Percolation Model (DPM), was used to simulate water budgets for October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1999 (water years 1998-99) for six small drainage basins?four on Whidbey Island and two on Camano Island. Adjusted parameters from the DPM for each small basin were then used in island-wide DPM simulations. A spatial distribution of annual recharge was simulated for each island, with island averages of 5.71 inches per year for Whidbey Island and 5.98 inches per year for Camano Island. The spatial distribution of simulated annual recharge for each island reflects variations in precipitation amounts and the distribution of surficial materials. DPM results indicate that recharge generally is higher in areas underlain by coarse-grained deposits (outwash) than in areas underlain by fine-grained deposits (till). A chloride mass-balance method was used to estimate combined recharge to unconsolidated deposits on Whidbey and Camano Islands. The average combined recharge for Whidbey and Camano Islands estimated by this method was 2.00 inches per year. The range of chloride concentrations in ground-water samples from selected wells indicates that the average recharge to unconsolidated deposits ranges from 0.78 to 7.81 inches per year. Sources of chloride in ground water other than from the atmosphere would cause recharge estimated by the chloride mass-balance method to be less than the actual recharge, therefore, these estimates may represent lower limits.

  4. Precipitation and Topography as Drivers of Tree Water Use and Productivity at Multiple Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. T.; Hu, J.; Looker, N. T.; Jencso, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Water is commonly the primary limiting factor for tree growth in semi-arid regions of the Western U.S. and tree productivity can vary drastically across landscapes as a function of water availability. The role of topography as a first order control on soil and ground water has been well studied; however, the strategies trees use to cope with water limitation in different landscape positions and across time remain unclear. As growing seasons progress, the availability of water changes temporally, as water inputs transition from snowmelt to rainfall, and spatially, as divergent positions dry more than convergent ones. We seek to understand how the interaction of these processes dictate where trees access water and which strategies most successfully avert water limitation of growth. We take advantage of clear differences in the isotopic signatures of snow and summer rain to track water utilized by Douglas fir, Ponderosa pine, Subalpine fir, Engelmann spruce, and Western larch in both convergent and divergent landscape positions and across time. We couple these data with evidence of growth limitation inferred from reductions in lateral growth rates observed by continuous dendrometer measurements to link tree water use and productivity. Xylem waters reflect both the precipitation type and soil profile distribution of water used by trees for growth and dendrometer measurements reflect the effects of water limitation through changes in the lateral growth curve as soil moistures decline. Isotope signatures from rain, snow and stream water fell predictably along the local meteoric water line with values from xylem samples falling between those of rain and snow. Trees on southern aspects exhibit more growth limitation in divergent than convergent positions while this effect appears muted or non-existent on northern aspects. Trees in convergent hollow positions rely more on snow water while trees on slopes utilize more rain water. Surprisingly, trees at lower elevation rely

  5. Precipitation of ikaite crystals in Antarctic marine sediments: implications from pore water geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Kennedy, H.; Rickaby, R. E.; Georg, B.; Shaw, S.; Lennie, A.; Pancost, R. D.

    2008-12-01

    Ikaite is a calcium carbonate hexahydrate (CaCO3•6H20) considered to be stable only at low temperatures. It has been found in form of tufa tower at locations where alkaline water mixes with water masses enriched in calcium (e.g. Ikka Fjord, Mono Lake). Large euhedral single crystals of ikaite were also recovered in marine sediments, associated with organic matter degradation, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and sulfate reduction. The hydration water in the ikaite crystals were demonstrated to record the oxygen isotope composition of the water from which they precipitated. Such a characteristic may allow using ikaite to reconstruct the ice volume in the past. For this purpose, the controls on its precipitation in the sediment column need to be investigated which is the main goal of this study. U.S. Antarctica Program cruise NBP0703 collected two cores with ikaite crystals at Antarctica Peninsula (Bransfield Strait and Firth of Tay). We determined major cation/anion concentrations, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and δ13C composition of DIC in the pore waters in these two cores. Strong organic matter degradation or AOM in both cores results in quick consumption of sulfate in shallow part of the cores (SMT at around 3m).Rapid build-up of DIC is accompanied by the sharp decrease of dissolved calcium in the top 5m. Large variations were observed in δ13CDIC values (-20‰ to +13‰). The δ13C of ikaite in two cores were distinctive from each other (-19‰ and +4‰) corresponding to the DIC pools at different depths. The down core saturation state of the ikaite was modeled in PHREEQC based on the pore water chemistry, and the results are consistent with carbon isotope data, suggesting that these large crystals very likely formed within a narrow depth interval and a short time period (given high sedimentation rates of 0.5-1 cm/yr in this area).

  6. Are the earthquakes of Central Virginia influenced by underground water fed by precipitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muco, B.

    2012-12-01

    Even though Central Virginia is far from the nearest plate boundaries, the zone is well-known for frequent small-to-moderate shocks that have occurred since at least 18th century. People in central Virginia have felt small earthquakes and suffered damage from infrequent larger ones. The largest damaging earthquake (magnitude 5.8) in this seismic zone occurred in August 2011. Smaller earthquakes that cause little or no damage are felt each year or two. It is difficult to link the earthquakes of this zone to known small faults which are numerous, deeply buried and which don't show up at the surface. The mean earthquake depth since 1960 is 6.7 km. On the other hand, Central Virginia is a big collector and transporter of the precipitation water which run for the Atlantic Ocean through James River and its tributaries. There are about 2,000 abandoned mine lands sites in Virginia which with their underground opening can facilitate the interception and conveying of surface water. Looking for a correlation between earthquake time series for Central Virginia and monthly precipitation series for some hydrometeorological stations of the zone, we got that the best cross-correlation is obtained for a time log of three months. This time period approximately three months, has been observed also in the case of some historical earthquakes which have occurred preceded by large amount of precipitation. A good cross-correlations results also matching earthquake time series with levels of James River and Rivanna River. These results support the hydroseismicity hypothesis which suggests the role of water in the generation of intraplate seismicity

  7. Application of pulsed spark discharge for calcium carbonate precipitation in hard water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Kim, Hyoungsup; Starikovskiy, Andrey; Fridman, Alexander; Cho, Young I

    2010-06-01

    The effect of underwater pulsed spark discharge on the precipitation of dissolved calcium ions was investigated in the present study. Water samples with different calcium hardness were prepared by continuous evaporation of tap water using a laboratory cooling tower. It was shown that the concentration of calcium ions dropped by 20-26% after 10-min plasma treatment, comparing with no drop for untreated cases. A laser particle counting method demonstrated that the total number of solid particles suspended in water increased by over 100% after the plasma treatment. The morphology and the crystal form of the particles were identified by both scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Calcite with rhombohedron morphology was observed for plasma treated cases, comparing with the round structure observed for no-treatment cases. It was hypothesized that the main mechanisms for the plasma-assisted calcium carbonate precipitation might include electrolysis, local heating in the vicinity of plasma channel and a high electric field at the tip of plasma streamers, inducing structural changes in the electric double layer of hydrated ions.

  8. Atmospheric water vapor transport: Estimation of continental precipitation recycling and parameterization of a simple climate model. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    The advective transport of atmospheric water vapor and its role in global hydrology and the water balance of continental regions are discussed and explored. The data set consists of ten years of global wind and humidity observations interpolated onto a regular grid by objective analysis. Atmospheric water vapor fluxes across the boundaries of selected continental regions are displayed graphically. The water vapor flux data are used to investigate the sources of continental precipitation. The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: (1) advection from surrounding areas external to the region; and (2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. In a separate, but related, study estimates of ocean to land water vapor transport are used to parameterize an existing simple climate model, containing both land and ocean surfaces, that is intended to mimic the dynamics of continental climates.

  9. The Alaska Water Isotope Network (AKWIN): Precipitation, lake, river and stream dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, M.; Welker, J. M.; Toohey, R.

    2011-12-01

    The hydrologic cycle is central to the structure and function of northern landscapes. The movement of water creates interactions between terrestrial, aquatic, marine and atmospheric processes. Understanding the processes and the spatial patterns that govern the isotopic (δ18O & δD) characteristics of the hydrologic cycle is especially important today as: a) modern climate/weather-isotope relations allow for more accurate interpretation of climate proxies and the calibration of atmospheric models, b) water isotopes facilitate understanding the role of storm tracks in regulating precipitation isotopic variability, c) water isotopes allow for estimates of glacial melt water inputs into aquatic systems, d) water isotopes allow for quantification of surface and groundwater interactions, e) water isotopes allow for quantification of permafrost meltwater use by plant communities, f) water isotopes aid in migratory bird forensics, g) water isotopes are critical to estimating field metabolic rates, h) water isotopes allow for crop and diet forensics and i) water isotopes can provide insight into evaporation and transpiration processes. As part of a new NSF MRI project at the Environment and Natural Resources Institute (ENRI) at the University of Alaska Anchorage and as an extension of the US Network for Isotopes in Precipitation (USNIP); we are forming AKWIN. The network will utilize long-term weekly sampling at Denali National Park and Caribou Poker Creek Watershed (USNIP sites-1989 to present), regular sampling across Alaska involving land management agencies (USGS, NPS, USFWS, EPA), educators, volunteers and citizen scientists, UA extended campuses, individual research projects, opportunistic sampling and published data to construct isoscapes and time series databases and information packages. We will be using a suite of spatial and temporal analysis methods to characterize water isotopes across Alaska and will provide web portals for data products. Our network is

  10. Fine-Scale Spatial Variability of Precipitation, Soil, and Plant Water Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, G. R.; Braun, S.; Romero, C.; Engbersen, N.; Gessler, A.; Siegwolf, R. T.; Schmid, L.

    2015-12-01

    Introduction: The measurement of stable isotope ratios of water has become fundamental in advancing our understanding of environmental patterns and processes, particularly with respect to understanding the movement of water within the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. While considerable research has explored the temporal variation in stable isotope ratios of water in the environment, our understanding of the spatial variability of these isotopes remains poorly understood. Methods: We collected spatially explicit samples of throughfall and soil water (n=150 locations) from a 1 ha plot delineated in a mixed deciduous forest in the northern Alps of Switzerland. We complemented this with fully sunlit branch and leaf samples (n = 60 individuals) collected from Picea abies and Fagus sylvatica between 14:00 and 16:00 on the same day by means of a helicopter. Soil and plant waters were extracted using cryogenic vacuum distillation and all samples were analyzed for δ18O using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Results: The mean δ18O of throughfall (-3.3 ± 0.8‰) indicated some evaporative enrichment associated with passage through the canopy, but this did not significantly differ from the precipitation collected in nearby open sites (-4.05‰). However, soil was depleted (-7.0 ± 1.8‰) compared to throughfall and there was no significant relationship between the two, suggesting that the sampling for precipitation inputs did not capture all the sources (e.g. stream water, which was -11.5‰) contributing to soil water δ18O ratios. Evaporative enrichment of δ18O was higher in leaves of Fagus (14.8 ± 1.8‰) than in leaves of Picea (11.8 ± 1.7‰). Sampling within crowns of each species (n = 5 branches each from 5 individuals) indicated that variability in a single individual is similar to that among individuals. Discussion: Stable isotopes of water are frequently engaged for studies of ecohydrology, plant ecophysiology, and paleoclimatology. Our results help

  11. Precipitable water vapor budget associated with MJO represented in newly-released JRA-55 reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) recently released a new reanalysis dataset JRA-55 with the use of a JMA operational prediction model and 4D-VAR data assimilation. To evaluate merit in utilizing the JRA-55 dataset to investigate dynamics of the tropical intraseasonal variability (ISV) including the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), this study examines ISV-scale precipitable water vapor (PWV) budget over the period 1989-2012. The ISV-scale PWV anomaly related to the boreal-winter MJO propagates eastward along with precipitation, consistent with the SSM/I PWV product. Decomposition of the PWV tendency into that simulated by the model and the analysis increment estimated by the data assimilation reveals that the model makes the PWV anomaly move eastward. On the other hand, the analysis increment exhibits positive values over the area where the PWV anomaly is positive, indicating that the model tends to damp the MJO signal. Note that the analysis increment over the Maritime Continent has comparable magnitude to the model tendency. The positive analysis increment may mainly be caused by an excess of precipitation anomaly with respect to the magnitude of PWV anomaly. In addition to the boreal-winter MJO, this study also examines the PWV budget associated with northward-propagating ISV during the boreal summer and find similar relationship between the PWV anomaly and analysis increment.

  12. Taosi Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    Taosi observatory is the remains of a structure discovered at the later Neolithic Taosi site located in Xiangfen County, Shanxi Province, in north-central China. The structure is a walled enclosure on a raised platform. Only rammed-earth foundations of the structure remained. Archaeoastronomical studies suggest that this structure functioned as an astronomical observatory. Historical circumstantial evidence suggests that it was probably related to the legendary kingdom of Yao from the twenty-first century BC.

  13. Precipitation projections under GCMs perspective and Turkish Water Foundation (TWF) statistical downscaling model procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabanlı, İsmail; Şen, Zekai

    2017-02-01

    The statistical climate downscaling model by the Turkish Water Foundation (TWF) is further developed and applied to a set of monthly precipitation records. The model is structured by two phases as spatial (regional) and temporal downscaling of global circulation model (GCM) scenarios. The TWF model takes into consideration the regional dependence function (RDF) for spatial structure and Markov whitening process (MWP) for temporal characteristics of the records to set projections. The impact of climate change on monthly precipitations is studied by downscaling Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change-Special Report on Emission Scenarios (IPCC-SRES) A2 and B2 emission scenarios from Max Plank Institute (EH40PYC) and Hadley Center (HadCM3). The main purposes are to explain the TWF statistical climate downscaling model procedures and to expose the validation tests, which are rewarded in same specifications as "very good" for all stations except one (Suhut) station in the Akarcay basin that is in the west central part of Turkey. Eventhough, the validation score is just a bit lower at the Suhut station, the results are "satisfactory." It is, therefore, possible to say that the TWF model has reasonably acceptable skill for highly accurate estimation regarding standard deviation ratio (SDR), Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), and percent bias (PBIAS) criteria. Based on the validated model, precipitation predictions are generated from 2011 to 2100 by using 30-year reference observation period (1981-2010). Precipitation arithmetic average and standard deviation have less than 5% error for EH40PYC and HadCM3 SRES (A2 and B2) scenarios.

  14. Inter-comparison of precipitable water among reanalyses and its effect on downscaling in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H. G.; Fujita, M.; Hara, M.

    2012-12-01

    This paper compared precipitable water (PW) among four major reanalyses. In addition, we also investigated the effect of the boundary conditions on downscaling in the tropics, using a regional climate model. The spatial pattern of PW in the reanalyses agreed closely with observations. However, the absolute amounts of PW in some reanalyses were very small compared to observations. The discrepancies of the 12-year mean PW in July over the Southeast Asian monsoon region exceeded the inter-annual standard deviation of the PW. There was also a discrepancy in tropical PWs throughout the year, an indication that the problem is not regional, but global. The downscaling experiments were conducted, which were forced by the different four reanalyses. The atmospheric circulation, including monsoon westerlies and various disturbances, was very small among the reanalyses. However, simulated precipitation was only 60 % of observed precipitation, although the dry bias in the boundary conditions was only 6 %. This result indicates that dry bias has large effects on precipitation in downscaling over the tropics. This suggests that a simulated regional climate downscaled from ensemble-mean boundary conditions is quite different from an ensemble-mean regional climate averaged over the several regional ones downscaled from boundary conditions of the ensemble members in the tropics. Downscaled models can provide realistic simulations of regional tropical climates only if the boundary conditions include realistic absolute amounts of PW. Use of boundary conditions that include realistic absolute amounts of PW in downscaling in the tropics is imperative at the present time. This work was partly supported by the Global Environment Research Fund (RFa-1101) of the Ministry of the Environment, Japan.

  15. Using Water Chemistry to Characterize Chemical Weathering in the Critical Zone Observatory: Shale Hills Catchment (Central Pennsylvania, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Brantley, S.

    2008-12-01

    Shales are important in determining global fluxes of C, P and Pt-group elements as they are widely exposed at the Earth's surfaces. A critical zone observatory (CZO) to study the hydrology, geochemistry, ecology, and geomorphology is established at the Shale Hills catchment in central Pennsylvania to complete such intensive investigations on the Rose Hill shale. The Shale Hills is V-shaped and forested catchment, with slopes around 16-18%. The parent shales are comprised of primarily illite, quartz, and chlorite. The dominant chemical reactions in the soil profiles are dissolution of chlorite and illite to more stable kaolinite, with vermiculite and hydroxy interlayered vermiculite as intermediate phases. Depth to the bedrock in the catchment depends mainly on the landscape positions, with thinner soils observed at the ridge tops, and much thicker soils at the valley floors and topographically depressional areas. Previous hydrologic studies have included monitoring the soil moisture contents and modeling the water flow dynamics in the soil zones. Study areas were selected to investigate the propagation rates of the weathering front (the interface between intact bedrock and weathered material) with increasing complexity: fluid flow above the bedrock interface is largely 1D and vertical at ridgetop, downslope and 2D along a planar transect, and convergent downslope and 3D along a swale transect. Weekly soil waters were collected at these sites. Chemistry of soil waters and first-order streams is controlled by chemical weathering reactions with only little contribution from rainfall. Soil waters become more concentrated from the ridge top to valley floor, as mineral dissolution progresses. The depth variation of water chemistry is distinctively different among the sites, which is closely related to soil- texture controlled water flowpaths. The stream reflects mixing among soil waters of different chemistry (shallow versus deep), and also mixing of soil waters and

  16. Chemical trends in background air quality and the ionic composition of precipitation for the period 1980-2004 from samples collected at Valentia Observatory, Co. Kerry, Ireland.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Wasim; McGovern, Frank; O'Brien, Phillip; Ryan, Margaret; Burke, Liam; Paull, Brett

    2008-06-01

    A major Irish study, based upon more than 8000 samples collected over the measurement period of 22 years, for sulfur dioxide (SO2-S), sulfate (SO4-S) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2-N) concentrations (microg m(-3)) within air, and the ionic composition of precipitation samples based on sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), magnesium (Mg2+), calcium (Ca2+), chloride (Cl-), sulfate (SO4-S), non-sea salt sulfate (nssSO4-S), ammonium (NH4-N), and nitrate (NO3-N) weighted mean concentrations (mg l(-1)), has been completed. For the air samples, the sulfur dioxide and sulfate concentrations decreased over the sampling period (1980-2004) by 75% and 45%, respectively, whereas no significant trend was observed for nitrogen dioxide. The highest concentrations for sulfur dioxide, sulfate and nitrogen dioxide were associated with wind originating from the easterly and northeasterly directions i.e. those influenced by Irish and European sources. The lowest concentrations were associated with the westerly directions i.e. for air masses originating in the North Atlantic region. This was further verified with the use of backward (back) trajectory analysis, which allowed tracing the movement of air parcels using the European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) ERA-40 re-analysis data. High non-sea salt sulfate levels were being associated with air masses originating from Europe (easterlies) with lower levels from the Atlantic (westerlies). With the precipitation data, analysis of the non-sea salt sulfate concentrations showed a decrease by 47% since the measurements commenced.

  17. Polyfluorinated telomers in precipitation and surface water in an urban area of Japan.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Manal A M; Kärrman, Anna; Oono, Sayoko; Harada, Kouji H; Koizumi, Akio

    2009-01-01

    Although fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) have been detected in various environmental matrices worldwide, no studies have been conducted to evaluate their concentrations in surface water or precipitation. Therefore, we developed a sensitive and reliable method to analyze various environmental aqueous samples for the presence of trace levels of 6:2 FTOH, 8:2 FTOH, 10:2 FTOH, 8:2 FTOAcr and 8:2 FTOMethacr FTOlefin using gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. The recoveries obtained using this method ranged from 57.8% to 78.2% and the detection limits were 0.5, 0.2, 0.2, 0.05 and 0.1 ng L(-1) for 6:2 FTOH, 8:2 FTOH, 10:2 FTOH, 8:2 FTOAcr and 8:2 FTOMethacr, respectively. Liquid and suspended phases of the examined samples were analyzed. The analysis revealed presence of telomer alcohols from the liquid phase only. Of the FTOHs evaluated, 6:2 FTOH and 8:2 FTOMethacr FTOlefin were not found in any of the environmental samples. The average concentrations of 8:2 FTOH, 10:2 FTOH and 8:2 FTOAcr of the precipitation samples were 1.97, 0.82 and 0.21 ng L(-1), respectively. In surface water samples, the highest concentrations of 8:2 FTOH, 10:2 FTOH and 8:2 FTOAcr were 3.38, 4.06 and 0.16 ng L(-1), which were observed in samples from the Daini-Neyagawa, Yamato and Kanzaki rivers, respectively. The total concentration of FTOHs in wastewater treatment plant effluents (23.2 ng L(-1)) was much higher than that of surface water (10.8 ng L(-1)). Taken together, the results of this study indicate that FTOHs released into the air contaminate rain and that those released from water disposal sites contaminate surface water.

  18. FerryMon: Using ferries as hydrochemical observatories in estuarine and coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paerl, H.; Guajardo, R.; Peierls, B.; Rossignol, K.; Braddy, J.

    2007-12-01

    Estuaries are among the most productive and resourceful aquatic ecosystems on Earth. They are strongly influenced by hydrochemical stressors, including nutrient enrichment and climatic factors such as droughts, storms and floods. Clarifying how estuaries respond to these stresses will provide an understanding of how hydrologic and chemical processes control ecological condition and change of these ecosystems. This understanding will greatly benefit from a spatially and temporally-intensive observational program, which, when coupled to modeling will help predict future responses to external anthropogenic (nutrient) and climatic (hydrologic) perturbations. North Carolina's Pamlico Sound System (PSS) is the Nation's second largest estuary. It exemplifies the impacts of human development (eutrophication) and large climatic perturbations (hurricanes). We are using 3 NC DOT ferries to conduct unattended hydrochemical monitoring of water quality, habitat and ecological condition of the PSS. This program, FerryMon (www.ferrymon.org), uses temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and chlorophyll a sensors coupled to discrete sampling of nutrients, organics, photopigment and molecular indicators to assess water quality in a near real-time manner over a range of relevant physical, chemical and biological time scales. An autonomous vertical profiler (AVP), equipped with sensors similar to those on the ferries, provides complementary vertical profile data. This capability is timely given unprecedented human development and a period of elevated tropical storm and hurricane activity affecting coastal water quality and habitat conditions and fisheries resources. FerryMon is used to calibrate remotely sensed indicators of water quality (photopigments, turbidity), facilitating scaling up to the ecosystem level. It is integrated with complementary observational programs (LTERs, NEON, ORION, WATERS, SEACOOS), and it supports interdisciplinary research aimed at

  19. Inter-annual precipitation fluctuations alter the responses of above- and belowground biomass to water and N enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. L.; Lü, X. T.; Jiang, L. L.; Wu, H. F.; Miao, Y.; Kardol, P.

    2013-08-01

    Water availability has profound effects on plant growth and productivity in temperate and semi-arid grasslands. However, it remains unclear how variation of inter-annual precipitation by extreme rainfall events will alter the aboveground and belowground responses of plants, and how these responses may be contingent on N availability. In this study, we examined the interactive effects of inter-annual precipitation variation and N addition on aboveground and live fine root biomass of a semi-arid grassland in northern China for two consecutive years (2007 and 2008). Inter-annual variation in precipitation resulting mainly from the occurrence of extreme rainfall events in 2008 significantly affected above- and belowground plant biomass responses to water addition. In addition, variation of inter-annual precipitation by this extreme rainfall event suppressed plant responses to nitrogen addition and reduced the interaction effects between water and nitrogen addition. These effects of inter-annual precipitation fluctuation could be attributed to the negative influence of the extreme rainfall event on soil N and water availability, ultimately reducing plant rainfall use efficiency and nitrogen use efficiency. In conclusion, our results suggest ecosystem responses to water and N enrichment could be altered by inter-annual variation of precipitation regime caused by the naturally occurring extreme rainfall events.

  20. The Precipitation Behavior of Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs with an Emphasis on the Digestion of Lipid Based Formulations.

    PubMed

    Khan, Jamal; Rades, Thomas; Boyd, Ben

    2016-03-01

    An increasing number of newly discovered drugs are poorly water-soluble and the use of natural and synthetic lipids to improve the oral bioavailability of these drugs by utilizing the digestion pathway in-vivo has proved an effective formulation strategy. The mechanisms responsible for lipid digestion and drug solubilisation during gastrointestinal transit have been explored in detail, but the implications of drug precipitation beyond the potential adverse effect on bioavailability have received attention only in recent years. Specifically, these implications are that different solid forms of drug on precipitation may affect the total amount of drug absorbed in-vivo through their different physico-chemical properties, and the possibility that the dynamic environment of the small intestine may afford re-dissolution of precipitated drug if present in a high-energy form. This review describes the events that lead to drug precipitation during the dispersion and digestion of lipid based formulations, common methods used to inhibit precipitation, as well as conventional and newly emerging characterization techniques for studying the solid state form of the precipitated drug. Moreover, selected case studies are discussed where drug precipitation has ensued from the digestion of lipid based formulations, as well as the apparent link between drug ionisability and altered solid forms on precipitation, culminating in a discussion about the importance of the solid form on precipitation with relevance to the total drug absorbed.

  1. Simulation of Water Sources and Precipitation Recycling for the MacKenzie, Mississippi and Amazon River Basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Chern, Jiun-Dar

    2005-01-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model simulation for 1948-1997 of the water budgets for the MacKenzie, Mississippi and Amazon River basins is presented. In addition to the water budget, we include passive tracers to identify the geographic sources of water for the basins, and the analysis focuses on the mechanisms contributing to precipitation recycling in each basin. While each basin s precipitation recycling has a strong dependency on evaporation during the mean annual cycle, the interannual variability of the recycling shows important relationships with the atmospheric circulation. The MacKenzie River basin has only a weak interannual dependency on evaporation, where the variations in zonal moisture transport from the Pacific Ocean can affect the basin water cycle. On the other hand, the Mississippi River basin has strong interannual dependencies on evaporation. While the precipitation recycling weakens with increased low level jet intensity, the evaporation variations exert stronger influence in providing water vapor for convective precipitation at the convective cloud base. High precipitation recycling is also found to be partly connected to warm SSTs in the tropical Pacific Ocean. The Amazon River basin evaporation exhibits small interannual variations, so that the interannual variations of precipitation recycling are related to atmospheric moisture transport from the tropical south Atlantic Ocean. Increasing SSTs over the 50-year period are causing increased easterly transport across the basin. As moisture transport increases, the Amazon precipitation recycling decreases (without real time varying vegetation changes). In addition, precipitation recycling from a bulk diagnostic method is compared to the passive tracer method used in the analysis. While the mean values are different, the interannual variations are comparable between each method. The methods also exhibit similar relationships to the terms of the basin scale water budgets.

  2. The role of precipitation type, intensity, and spatial distribution in source water quality after wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Sheila F.; Writer, Jeffrey H.; Blaine McCleskey, R.; Martin, Deborah A.

    2015-08-01

    Storms following wildfires are known to impair drinking water supplies in the southwestern United States, yet our understanding of the role of precipitation in post-wildfire water quality is far from complete. We quantitatively assessed water-quality impacts of different hydrologic events in the Colorado Front Range and found that for a three-year period, substantial hydrologic and geochemical responses downstream of a burned area were primarily driven by convective storms with a 30 min rainfall intensity >10 mm h-1. These storms, which typically occur several times each year in July-September, are often small in area, short-lived, and highly variable in intensity and geographic distribution. Thus, a rain gage network with high temporal resolution and spatial density, together with high-resolution stream sampling, are required to adequately characterize post-wildfire responses. We measured total suspended sediment, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrate, and manganese concentrations that were 10-156 times higher downstream of a burned area compared to upstream during relatively common (50% annual exceedance probability) rainstorms, and water quality was sufficiently impaired to pose water-treatment concerns. Short-term water-quality impairment was driven primarily by increased surface runoff during higher intensity convective storms that caused erosion in the burned area and transport of sediment and chemical constituents to streams. Annual sediment yields downstream of the burned area were controlled by storm events and subsequent remobilization, whereas DOC yields were closely linked to annual runoff and thus were more dependent on interannual variation in spring runoff. Nitrate yields were highest in the third year post-wildfire. Results from this study quantitatively demonstrate that water quality can be altered for several years after wildfire. Because the southwestern US is prone to wildfires and high-intensity rain storms, the role of storms in post

  3. The role of precipitation type, intensity, and spatial distribution in source water quality after wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Sheila F.; Writer, Jeffrey H.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Martin, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Storms following wildfires are known to impair drinking water supplies in the southwestern United States, yet our understanding of the role of precipitation in post-wildfire water quality is far from complete. We quantitatively assessed water-quality impacts of different hydrologic events in the Colorado Front Range and found that for a three-year period, substantial hydrologic and geochemical responses downstream of a burned area were primarily driven by convective storms with a 30 min rainfall intensity >10 mm h−1. These storms, which typically occur several times each year in July–September, are often small in area, short-lived, and highly variable in intensity and geographic distribution. Thus, a rain gage network with high temporal resolution and spatial density, together with high-resolution stream sampling, are required to adequately characterize post-wildfire responses. We measured total suspended sediment, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrate, and manganese concentrations that were 10–156 times higher downstream of a burned area compared to upstream during relatively common (50% annual exceedance probability) rainstorms, and water quality was sufficiently impaired to pose water-treatment concerns. Short-term water-quality impairment was driven primarily by increased surface runoff during higher intensity convective storms that caused erosion in the burned area and transport of sediment and chemical constituents to streams. Annual sediment yields downstream of the burned area were controlled by storm events and subsequent remobilization, whereas DOC yields were closely linked to annual runoff and thus were more dependent on interannual variation in spring runoff. Nitrate yields were highest in the third year post-wildfire. Results from this study quantitatively demonstrate that water quality can be altered for several years after wildfire. Because the southwestern US is prone to wildfires and high-intensity rain storms, the role of storms in post

  4. Precipitable water: Its linear retrieval using leaps and bounds procedure and its global distribution from SEASAT SMMR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    Eight subsets using two to five frequencies of the SEASAT scanning multichannel microwave radiometer are examined to determine their potential in the retrieval of atmospheric water vapor content. Analysis indicates that the information concerning the 18 and 21 GHz channels are optimum for water vapor retrieval. A comparison with radiosonde observations gave an rms accuracy of approximately 0.40 g sq cm. The rms accuracy of precipitable water using different subsets was within 10 percent. Global maps of precipitable water over oceans using two and five channel retrieval (average of two and five channel retrieval) are given. Study of these maps reveals the possibility of global moisture distribution associated with oceanic currents and large scale general circulation in the atmosphere. A stable feature of the large scale circulation is noticed. The precipitable water is maximum over the Bay of Bengal and in the North Pacific over the Kuroshio current and shows a general latitudinal pattern.

  5. Statistical relation between monthly mean precipitable water and surface-level humidity over global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    Monthly summaries of atmospheric soundings taken over 17 years from 49 midocean stations at small islands and weather ships distributed over major oceans are examined. Over tropical oceans, precipitable water is found to be a better predictor of surface-level humidity than surface-level air temperature. A statistical relation in the form of a polynomial is derived; from this relation, the monthly-mean, surface-level mixing ratio can be computed from monthly-mean precipitable water. The root-mean-square differences between the measured and derived values were found to be less than 8 x 10 to the -4th over most ocean areas. Such a relation is useful in deriving large-scale evaporation and latent heat flux data from the ocean, using spaceborne observations. The temporal and spatial variabilities of data deviations from this relation are examined. This relation is found to be applicable to all major ocean basins and can be used to monitor interannual variability. Boundary-layer thermodynamics of different air masses are suggested as an explanation of some characteristics of this relation.

  6. Attribution of the United States "warming hole": aerosol indirect effect and precipitable water vapor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaocai; Alapaty, Kiran; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Zhang, Yuanhang; Nolte, Chris; Eder, Brian; Foley, Kristen; Nagashima, Tatsuya

    2014-11-06

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and/or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. In contrast to the widespread global warming, the central and south central United States display a noteworthy overall cooling trend during the 20(th) century, with an especially striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) (termed the U.S. "warming hole"). Here we used observations of temperature, shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF), longwave cloud forcing (LWCF), aerosol optical depth and precipitable water vapor as well as global coupled climate models to explore the attribution of the "warming hole". We find that the observed cooling trend in summer Tmax can be attributed mainly to SWCF due to aerosols with offset from the greenhouse effect of precipitable water vapor. A global coupled climate model reveals that the observed "warming hole" can be produced only when the aerosol fields are simulated with a reasonable degree of accuracy as this is necessary for accurate simulation of SWCF over the region. These results provide compelling evidence of the role of the aerosol indirect effect in cooling regional climate on the Earth. Our results reaffirm that LWCF can warm both winter Tmax and Tmin.

  7. Attribution of the United States “warming hole”: Aerosol indirect effect and precipitable water vapor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shaocai; Alapaty, Kiran; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Zhang, Yuanhang; Nolte, Chris; Eder, Brian; Foley, Kristen; Nagashima, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and/or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. In contrast to the widespread global warming, the central and south central United States display a noteworthy overall cooling trend during the 20th century, with an especially striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) (termed the U.S. “warming hole”). Here we used observations of temperature, shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF), longwave cloud forcing (LWCF), aerosol optical depth and precipitable water vapor as well as global coupled climate models to explore the attribution of the “warming hole”. We find that the observed cooling trend in summer Tmax can be attributed mainly to SWCF due to aerosols with offset from the greenhouse effect of precipitable water vapor. A global coupled climate model reveals that the observed “warming hole” can be produced only when the aerosol fields are simulated with a reasonable degree of accuracy as this is necessary for accurate simulation of SWCF over the region. These results provide compelling evidence of the role of the aerosol indirect effect in cooling regional climate on the Earth. Our results reaffirm that LWCF can warm both winter Tmax and Tmin. PMID:25373416

  8. Evaluation of AERONET precipitable water vapor versus microwave radiometry, GPS, and radiosondes at ARM sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Ramírez, Daniel; Whiteman, David N.; Smirnov, Alexander; Lyamani, Hassan; Holben, Brent N.; Pinker, Rachel; Andrade, Marcos; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we present comparisons of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) precipitable water vapor (W) retrievals from Sun photometers versus radiosonde observations and other ground-based retrieval techniques such as microwave radiometry (MWR) and GPS. The comparisons make use of the extensive measurements made within the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM), mainly at their permanent sites located at the Southern Great Plains (Oklahoma, U.S.), Nauru Islands, and Barrow (Alaska, U.S.). These places experience different types of weather which allows the comparison of W under different conditions. Radiosonde and microwave radiometry data were provided by the ARM program while the GPS data were obtained from the SOUMINET network. In general, W obtained by AERONET is lower than those obtained by MWR and GPS by ~6.0-9.0% and ~6.0-8.0%, respectively. The AERONET values are also lower by approximately 5% than those obtained from the numerous balloon-borne radiosondes launched at the Southern Great Plains. These results point toward a consistent dry bias in the retrievals of W by AERONET of approximately 5-6% and a total estimated uncertainty of 12-15%. Differences with respect to MWR retrievals are a function of solar zenith angle pointing toward a possible bias in the MWR retrievals. Finally, the ability of AERONET precipitable water vapor retrievals to provide long-term records of W in diverse climate regimes is demonstrated.

  9. Physicochemical characteristics of drip waters: Influence on mineralogy and crystal morphology of recent cave carbonate precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechelmann, Sylvia; Schröder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Wassenburg, Jasper A.; Schreuer, Jürgen; Richter, Detlev K.; Riechelmann, Dana F. C.; Terente, Mihai; Constantin, Silviu; Mangini, Augusto; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Speleothems are one of the most intensively explored continental archives for palaeoclimate variability. The parameters, however, that control speleothem petrography and its changes with time and space, specifically calcite crystal morphology and carbonate mineralogy, are still poorly understood. In order to shed light on processes and their products, precipitation experiments of recent carbonate crystals on watch glasses and glass plates were performed in seven selected caves. Drip water sites were analysed for their fluid Mg/Ca molar ratio, pH, degree of saturation for calcite and aragonite and drip rates. Corresponding precipitates were analysed with respect to their mineralogy, calcite crystal morphology and Mg/Ca molar ratio of calcite. The following results are found: High fluid Mg/Ca ratios are found only for caves situated in dolostone, thus the hostrock lithology indirectly controls the carbonate mineralogy and calcite crystal morphology of speleothems. The precipitation of aragonite in place of calcite occurred only in dolostone caves and is bound to very specific conditions. These are: high fluid Mg/Ca ratios (⩾0.5), high fluid pH (>8.2) and low fluid saturation indices for calcite (<0.8). These specific conditions are induced by slow drip rates of <0.2 ml/min as often under more arid conditions, causing the precipitation of calcite/aragonite prior to reaching the stalagmite top. Due to this, fluid chemistry is altered, which in turn leads to changes in carbonate mineralogy and geochemistry on the stalagmite top. Calcite growth is inhibited at high fluid Mg/Ca ratios and hence, aragonite precipitation is kinetically stabilised. An increase of the drip water Mg/Ca ratio leads to an increased incorporation of Mg2+ into the calcite crystal lattice and thus, to a change in calcite crystal morphology. Four distinctive changes occur with increasing Mg2+ incorporation: (i) development of new forms (steeper rhombohedra and base pinacoid) at the edges and

  10. The Synthesis of Calcium Salt from Brine Water by Partial Evaporation and Chemical Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalasari, L. H.; Widowati, M. K.; Natasha, N. C.; Sulistiyono, E.; Prasetyo, A. B.

    2017-02-01

    In this study would be investigated the effects of partial evaporation and chemical precipitation in the formation of calcium salt from brine water resources. The chemical reagents used in the study was oxalate acid (C2H2O4), ammonium carbonate (NH4)2CO3) and ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) with reagent concentration of 2 N, respectively. The procedure was 10 liters brine water evaporated until 20% volume and continued with filtration process to separate brine water filtrate from residue (salt). Salt resulted from evaporation process was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. Filtrate then was reacted with C2H2O4, (NH4)2CO3 and NH4OH reagents to get salt products in atmospheric condition and variation ratio volume brine water/chemicals (v/v) [10/1; 10/5; 10/10; 10/20; 10/30; 10:50; 20/1; 20/5; 20/10; 20/20; 20/30; 20:50]. The salt product than were filtered, dried, measured weights and finally characterized by SEM/EDS and XRD techniques. The result of experiment showed the chemical composition of brine water from Tirta Sanita, Bogor was 28.87% Na, 9.17% Mg, 2.94% Ca, 22.33% O, 0.71% Sr, 30.02% Cl, 1.51% Si, 1.23% K, 0.55% S, 1.31% Al. The chemical composition of salt resulted by partial evaporation was 53.02% Ca, 28.93%O, 9.50% Na, 2.10% Mg, 1.53% Sr, 1.20% Cl, 1.10% Si, 0.63% K, 0.40% S, 0.39% Al. The salt resulted by total evaporation was indicated namely as NaCl. Whereas salt resulted by partial evaporation was CaCO3 with a purity of 90 % from High Score Plus analysis. In the experiment by chemical precipitation was reported that the reagents of ammonium carbonate were more reactive for synthesizing calcium salt from brine water compared to reagents of oxalate acid and ammonium hydroxide. The salts precipitated by NH4OH, (NH4)2CO3, and H2C2O4 reagents were indicated as NaCl, CaCO3 and CaC2O4.H2O, respectively. The techniques of partial evaporation until 20% volume sample of brine water and

  11. Desalination of brackish ground waters and produced waters using in-situ precipitation.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Pless, Jason; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Voigt, James A.; Phillips, Mark L. F.; Axness, Marlene; Moore, Diana Lynn; Sattler, Allan Richard

    2004-08-01

    The need for fresh water has increased exponentially during the last several decades due to the continuous growth of human population and industrial and agricultural activities. Yet existing resources are limited often because of their high salinity. This unfavorable situation requires the development of new, long-term strategies and alternative technologies for desalination of saline waters presently not being used to supply the population growth occurring in arid regions. We have developed a novel environmentally friendly method for desalinating inland brackish waters. This process can be applied to either brackish ground water or produced waters (i.e., coal-bed methane or oil and gas produced waters). Using a set of ion exchange and sorption materials, our process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps. The ion exchange materials were chosen because of their specific selectivity for ions of interest, and for their ability to work in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. For anion exchange, we have focused on hydrotalcite (HTC), a layered hydroxide similar to clay in structure. For cation exchange, we have developed an amorphous silica material that has enhanced cation (in particular Na{sup +}) selectivity. In the case of produced waters with high concentrations of Ca{sup 2+}, a lime softening step is included.

  12. Application of the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System to evaluate water budgets after forest fuel management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, A. M.; Micheletty, P. D.; Kinoshita, A. M.; Hogue, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Sagehen Experimental Forest is being used as a prototype for forest fuel management to mitigate severe wildfires and improve ecosystem function and habitat. Sagehen is located at the headwaters of Sagehen Creek and contributes to the Truckee River, which is the main water supply for Reno, Nevada. Sagehen is a snow-dominated basin that receives an average annual rainfall of 892 mm and streamflow of 392 mm. A standardized precipitation index (SPI) indicates eight wet years and three dry years occurred since 1978. The Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) is utilized to run scenarios of fuel treatments and to analyze corresponding water budget changes in Sagehen. PRMS is calibrated to observed streamflow using the systematic multi-objective, step-wise calibration software Let Us Calibrate (LUCA). The basin is divided into 128 hydrologic response units (HRUs) based on similar hydrologic and physical characteristics. Fuel management will include multiple thinning and burning treatments based on topography and ecosystem characteristics and coincides with approximately 41 percent of the defined HRUs. Three treatment scenarios were run for relevant HRUs for water years 1981-2000. Scenarios reflect a 25, 50, and 75 percent vegetation reduction by altering sensitive parameters such as summer and winter cover density, summer and winter rain-interception storage capacity, and snow-interception storage capacity. Preliminary analysis shows changes in the water budget exemplified by simulated streamflow compared to baseline simulations. Ongoing work includes investigating PRMS outputs such as evapotranspiration, snow, and recharge to fully understand the scope of proposed fuel management in Sagehen. Individual assessment of impacted HRUs will also provide insight on specific treatment types and ultimately provide insight for future regional treatments in the Sierra Nevada.

  13. Trend Analysis of GPS Precipitable Water Vapor Above South Korea Over the Last 10 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Dong-Hyo; Cho, Jungho

    2010-09-01

    We analyzed global positioning system (GPS)-derived precipitable water vapor (PWV) trends of the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute 5 stations (Seoul, Daejeon, Mokpo, Milyang, Sokcho) where Korea Meteorological Administration meteorological data can be obtained at the same place. In the least squares analysis, the GPS PWV time series showed consistent positive trends (0.11 mm/year) over South Korea from 2000 to 2009. The annual increase of GPS PWV was comparable with the 0.17 mm/year and 0.02 mm/year from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Earth Observing Laboratory and Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder, respectively. For seasonal analysis, the increasing tendency was found by 0.05 mm/year, 0.16 mm/year, 0.04 mm/year in spring (March-May), summer (June-August) and winter (December-February), respectively. However, a negative trend (-0.14 mm/year) was seen in autumn (September-November). We examined the relationship between GPS PWV and temperature which is the one of the climatic elements. Two elements trends increased during the same period and the correlation coefficient was about 0.8. Also, we found the temperature rise has increased more GPS PWV and observed a stronger positive trend in summer than in winter. This is characterized by hot humid summer and cold dry winter of Korea climate and depending on the amount of water vapor the air contains at a certain temperature. In addition, it is assumed that GPS PWV positive trend is caused by increasing amount of saturated water vapor due to temperature rise in the Korean Peninsula. In the future, we plan to verify GPS PWV effectiveness as a tool to monitor changes in precipitable water through cause analysis of seasonal trends and indepth/ long-term comparative analysis between GPS PWV and other climatic elements.

  14. Enhancements to the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System for simulating in-stream water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markstrom, S. L.; Hay, L.

    2010-12-01

    A stream temperature module has been developed for the U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) for simulating maximum- and mean-daily stream temperature. This module provides additional simulation capabilities by coupling PRMS with the U.S. Geological Survey Stream Network Temperature (SNTEMP) model. PRMS is a modular, deterministic, distributed-parameter, physical-process watershed model that simulates watershed response to various combinations of climate and land use. Normal and extreme rainfall and snowmelt can be simulated to evaluate changes in water-balance relations, streamflow regimes, soil-water relations, and ground-water recharge. SNTEMP was developed to help aquatic biologists and engineers predict the effects of flow regime changes on water temperatures. This coupling of PRMS with SNTEMP will allow scientists and watershed managers to evaluate the effects of historical climate and projected climate change, landscape evolution, and resource management scenarios on watershed hydrology and in-stream water temperature. The prototype of this coupled model was developed for the U.S. Geological Survey Southeast Regional Assessment Project (SERAP) and tested in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin in the southeastern United States. Preliminary results from the prototype are presented.

  15. Controls on Synoptic Scale Variability in Atmospheric Water Vapor Stable Isotopologues from Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, J. V.; Galewsky, J.; Noone, D. C.; Worden, J.; Johnson, L. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Havaiki campaign, 9 October to 6 November, 2008, included continuous (6 seconds) in-situ measurement of water vapor stable isotopic ratios at the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), Hawaii. δD correlates with water vapor mixing ratios, and is characterized by both diurnal fluctuations and synoptic scale variability. Daily fluctuations are related to day-time lifting and night-time compression of the trade inversion. We focus on the synoptic variability of night-time δD values, which is more representative of the free troposphere. To do so, we determined last saturation conditions for air at MLO using both Lagrangian back-trajectory and Eulerian GCM-based techniques. Last saturation of air at MLO occurs primarily in the extra-tropical middle-upper troposphere, along mid-latitude baroclinic zones, and secondarily near Hawaii within mesoscale convective systems. Synoptic-scale periods of lower (elevated) δD values at MLO correspond to extra-tropical (near-Hawaii) last saturation. To assess the influence of mixing on water vapor δD at MLO, we reconstructed Havaiki humidity and δD values from both our Lagrangian and Eulerian last saturation model results. The Eulerian based reconstructions, which account for mixing, better represent the observed Havaiki δD values. The Lagrangian approach does not account for mixing and overestimates the observed variability. These results suggest that mixing plays a critical role in setting the water vapor δD of sub-saturated air in the subtropical free tropopshere. To weigh the influences that large-scale circulation or the pre-saturation water vapor δD values have on the observed synoptic variability of δD at MLO, we conducted δD reconstruction experiments. First, we held constant the pre-saturation water vapor δD, varied the last saturation distributions, and were able to reproduce the observed synoptic variability. In the second experiment, we held last saturation distributions constant, varied the pre-saturation

  16. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) L-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2013-10-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will advance the measurement of global precipitation, making possible high spatial resolution precipitation measurements. GPM will provide the first opportunity to calibrate measurements of global precipitation across tropical, mid-latitude, and polar regions. The GPM mission has the following scientific objectives: (1) Advance precipitation measurement capability from space through combined use of active and passive remote-sensing techniques; (2) Advance understanding of global water/energy cycle variability and fresh water availability; (3) Improve climate prediction by providing the foundation for better understanding of surface water fluxes, soil moisture storage, cloud/precipitation microphysics and latent heat release in the Earth's atmosphere; (4) Advance Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) skills through more accurate and frequent measurements of instantaneous rain rates; and (5) Improve high impact natural hazard (flood/drought, landslide, and hurricane hazard) prediction capabilities. The GPM mission centers on the deployment of a Core Observatory carrying an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites. GPM, jointly led with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), involves a partnership with other international space agencies including the French Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), and others. The GPM Core Observatory is currently being prepared for shipment to Japan for launch. Launch is scheduled for February 2014 from JAXA's Tanegashima Space Center on an H-IIA 202 launch vehicle.

  17. ECMWF Extreme Forecast Index for water vapor transport: A forecast tool for atmospheric rivers and extreme precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavers, David A.; Pappenberger, Florian; Richardson, David S.; Zsoter, Ervin

    2016-11-01

    In winter, heavy precipitation and floods along the west coasts of midlatitude continents are largely caused by intense water vapor transport (integrated vapor transport (IVT)) within the atmospheric river of extratropical cyclones. This study builds on previous findings that showed that forecasts of IVT have higher predictability than precipitation, by applying and evaluating the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Extreme Forecast Index (EFI) for IVT in ensemble forecasts during three winters across Europe. We show that the IVT EFI is more able (than the precipitation EFI) to capture extreme precipitation in forecast week 2 during forecasts initialized in a positive North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) phase; conversely, the precipitation EFI is better during the negative NAO phase and at shorter leads. An IVT EFI example for storm Desmond in December 2015 highlights its potential to identify upcoming hydrometeorological extremes, which may prove useful to the user and forecasting communities.

  18. Keele Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorus van Loon, Jacco; Albinson, James; Bagnall, Alan; Bryant, Lian; Caisley, Dave; Doody, Stephen; Johnson, Ian; Klimczak, Paul; Maddison, Ron; Robinson, StJohn; Stretch, Matthew; Webb, John

    2015-08-01

    Keele Observatory was founded by Dr. Ron Maddison in 1962, on the hill-top campus of Keele University in central England, hosting the 1876 Grubb 31cm refractor from Oxford Observatory. It since acquired a 61cm research reflector, a 15cm Halpha solar telescope and a range of other telescopes. Run by a group of volunteering engineers and students under directorship of a Keele astrophysicist, it is used for public outreach as well as research. About 4,000 people visit the observatory every year, including a large number of children. We present the facility, its history - including involvement in the 1919 Eddington solar eclipse expedition which proved Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity - and its ambitions to erect a radio telescope on its site.

  19. Precipitation variability in High Mountain Asia from multiple datasets and implication for water balance analysis in large lake basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chunqiao; Huang, Bo; Ke, Linghong; Ye, Qinghua

    2016-10-01

    For the period 1979-2011, eight gridded monthly precipitation datasets, including GPCP, CMAP-1/2, TRMM, PREC/L, APHRODITE, NCEP-2 and ERA-Interim, are inter-compared with each other and station observations over High Mountain Asia (HMA). The precipitation variability from the first six gauge-based or merged analysis datasets agree better with each other than with the two reanalysis data. The long-term trend analysis of GPCP, CMAP-1, PREC/L and APHRODITE precipitation datasets consistently reveals moderate increases in the inner and northeastern Tibetan Plateau (TP) and northwest Xinjiang, and obvious decreases in the southeast TP. However, in the Himalayas and Karakorum, there are large discrepancies among different datasets, where GPCP and APHRODITE precipitation datasets show significant decreases along the Himalayas while other datasets show strong spatial heterogeneity or slight variations. The larger uncertainties in the rugged area may be largely attributed to scarce station observations, as well as the stronger snow-induced scattering by microwave measurement. To assess which precipitation datasets tend to be more suitable for hydrologic analysis in HMA, we further investigate the accuracy of precipitation estimates at basin scale by comparing with gauge-based observations, and examine the coherences of annual lake water budgets and precipitation variability over four large closed lake catchments. The results indicate that two reanalysis precipitation datasets show evidently weaker correlations with station observations; the other six datasets perform better in indicating inter-annual variations of lake water budgets. It suggests that these merged analysis precipitation datasets, especially for GPCP, CMAP-1/2 and PREC/L, have the potential in examining regional water balances of the inner basins in HMA.

  20. Global analyses of water vapor, cloud and precipitation derived from a diagnostic assimilation of SSM/I geophysical retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Cohen, Charles

    1990-01-01

    An analytical approach is described for diagnostically assimilating moisture data from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) into a global analysis of water vapor, cloud content, and precipitation. In this method, 3D fields of wind and temperature values taken from ECMWF gridded analysis are used to drive moisture conservation equations with parameterized microphysical treatment of vapor, liquid, and ice; the evolving field of water vapor is periodically updated or constrained by SSM/I retrievals of precipitable water. Initial results indicate that this diagnostic model can produce realistic large-scale fields of cloud and precipitation. The resulting water vapor analyses agree well with SSM/I and have an additional advantage of being synoptic.

  1. [Impact of precipitation and underground water level in the edge of oases on growth and decline of Nitraria tangugtorum community].

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Gao, Z

    2000-12-01

    Based on the data from underground water monitoring, meterological measuring and fixed sample square investigating in successive years at the edge of the oasis in Minqin, Gansu, the impact of precipitation and underground water on the growth and decline of Nitraria tangutorum community was studied. The result showed that the desiccated environment in oases driven by the decline of underground water level was favorable for the growth and develoment of N. tangutorum community, and made this species more xerophilous. This declining underground water level was not a limiting factor for N. tangutorum growth in late years. These N. tangutorum-dominated communities were predicted to survive comparatively longer, and to function as sand fixer and wind breaker at oasis edge in Minqin. When average annual precipitation was about 110 mm, N. tangutorum would maintain its normal growth, but the community couldn't spread freely. Only when the annual precipitation was up 140 mm in two years running, could its growth be improved.

  2. Trans-African Hydro-Meteorological Observatory (TAHMO): A network to monitor weather, water, and climate in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Giesen, N.; Hut, R.; Andreini, M.; Selker, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Trans-African Hydro-Meteorological Observatory (TAHMO) has a goal to design, build, install and operate a dense network of hydro-meteorological monitoring stations in sub-Saharan Africa; one every 35 km. This corresponds to a total of 20,000 stations. By applying ICT and innovative sensors, each station should cost not more than $500. The stations would be placed at schools and integrated in the environmental curriculum. Data will be combined with models and satellite observations to obtain a very complete insight into the distribution of water and energy stocks and fluxes. Within this project, we have built a prototype of an acoustic disdrometer (rain gauge) that can be produced for much less than the cost of a commercial equivalent with the same specifications. The disdrometer was developed in The Netherlands and tested in Tanzania for a total project cost of Euro 5000. First tests have been run at junior high schools in Ghana to incorporate hydro-meteorological measurements in the science curriculum. The latest activity concerns the organization of a crowdsourcing competitions across Africa to address business development and the design and building of new robust sensors. This has resulted in a wide network throughout the continent to bring this program forward.

  3. GPS sensing of precipitable water vapour during the March 2010 Melbourne storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, S.; Wang, C.; Zhang, K.; Kuleshov, Y.

    2013-11-01

    The March 2010 Melbourne storm is used as a case study to examine the potential of using Global Positioning System (GPS) observations for studying the precipitable water vapour (PWV) field. The Victorian statewide GPS infrastructure network, i.e. GPSnet, was used in this study. GPSnet is currently the only statewide and densest GPS infrastructure network in Australia, which provides an excellent opportunity to examine the distribution of water vapour as the severe weather system passed over the state. Data from 15 GPSnet stations were processed over a one-week period, i.e. a few days prior to and after the storm passage, during which the course of the storm extended from the west to the southeast corner of the state. In addition, data from two radiosonde sites of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology Upper Air Network were used to compare and validate the GPS derived PWV measurements. The findings demonstrate that there is strong spatial and temporal correlation between variations of the ground-based GPS-PWV estimates and the passage of the storm over the state. This is encouraging as the ground-based GPS water vapour sensing technique can be considered as a supplemental meteorological sensor in studying severe weather events. The advantage of using ground-based GPS-PWV technique is that it is capable of providing continuous observation of the storm passage with high temporal resolution. The spatial resolution of the distribution of water vapour is dependent on the geographical location and density of the GPS stations.

  4. Comparison of precipitable water observations in the near tropics by GPS, microwave radiometer and radiosondes.

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, Y. A.; Teng, Y. T.; VanHove, T.; Liljegren, J. C.; Environmental Research; National Central Univ.; UCAR

    2001-01-01

    The sensing of precipitable water (PW) using the Global Positioning System (GPS) in the near Tropics is investigated. GPS data acquired from the Central Weather Bureau's Taipei weather station in Banchao (Taipei), Taiwan, and each of nine International GPS Service (IGS) stations were utilized to determine independently the PW at the Taipei site from 18 to 24 March 1998. Baselines between Taipei and the other nine stations range from 676 to 3009 km. The PW determined from GPS observations for the nine baseline cases are compared with measurements by a dual-channel water vapor radiometer (WVR) and radiosondes at the Taipei site. Although previous results from other locations show that the variability in the rms difference between GPS- and WVR-observed PW ranges from 1 to 2 mm, a variability of 2.2 mm is found. The increase is consistent with scaling of the variability with the total water vapor burden (PW). In addition, accurate absolute PW estimates from GPS data for baseline lengths between 1500 and 3000 km were obtained. Previously, 500 and 2000 km have been recommended in the literature as the minimum baseline length needed for accurate absolute PW estimation. An exception occurs when GPS data acquired in Guam, one of the nine IGS stations, were utilized. This result is a possible further indication that the rms difference between GPS- and WVR-measured PW is dependent on the total water vapor burden, because both Taipei and Guam are located in more humid regions than the other stations.

  5. Seasonal change in precipitation, snowpack, snowmelt, soil water and streamwater chemistry, northern Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stottlemyer, R.; Toczydlowski, D.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied weekly precipitation, snowpack, snowmelt, soil water and streamwater chemistry throughout winter for over a decade in a small (176 ha) northern Michigan watershed with high snowfall and vegetated by 60 to 80 year-old northern hardwoods. In this paper, we examine physical, chemical, and biological processes responsible for observed seasonal change in streamwater chemistry based upon intensive study during winter 1996-1997. The objective was to define the contributions made to winter and spring streamwater chemical concentration and flux by processes as snowmelt, over-winter forest floor and surface soil mineralization, immobilization, and exchange, and subsurface flowpath. The forest floor and soil were unfrozen beneath the snowpack which permitted most snowmelt to enter. Over-winter soil mineralization and other biological processes maintain shallow subsurface ion and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoirs. Small, but steady, snowmelt throughout winter removed readily mobilized soil NO3- which resulted in high over-winter streamwater concentrations but little flux. Winter soil water levels and flowpaths were generally deep which increased soil water and streamwater base cation (C(B)), HCO3-, and Si concentrations. Spring snowmelt increased soil water levels and removal of ions and DOC from the biologically active forest floor and shallow soils. The snowpack solute content was a minor component in determining streamwater ion concentration or flux during and following peak snowmelt. Exchangeable ions, weakly adsorbed anions, and DOC in the forest floor and surface soils dominated the chemical concentration and flux in soil water and streamwater. Following peak snowmelt, soil microbial immobilization and rapidly increased plant uptake of limiting nutrients removed nearly all available nitrogen from soil water and streamwater. During the growing season high evapotranspiration increased subsurface flowpath depth which in turn removed weathering

  6. Precipitation; ground-water age; ground-water nitrate concentrations, 1995-2002; and ground-water levels, 2002-03 in Eastern Bernalillo County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Paul J.

    2004-01-01

    The eastern Bernalillo County study area consists of about 150 square miles and includes all of Bernalillo County east of the crests of the Sandia and Manzanita Mountains. Soil and unconsolidated alluvial deposits overlie fractured and solution-channeled limestone in most of the study area. North of Interstate Highway 40 and east of New Mexico Highway 14, the uppermost consolidated geologic units are fractured sandstones and shales. Average annual precipitation at three long-term National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration precipitation and snowfall data-collection sites was 14.94 inches at approximately 6,300 feet (Sandia Ranger Station), 19.06 inches at about 7,020 feet (Sandia Park), and 23.07 inches at approximately 10,680 feet (Sandia Crest). The periods of record at these sites are 1933-74, 1939-2001, and 1953-79, respectively. Average annual snowfall during these same periods of record was 27.7 inches at Sandia Ranger Station, 60.8 inches at Sandia Park, and 115.5 inches at Sandia Crest. Seven precipitation data-collection sites were established during December 2000-March 2001. Precipitation during 2001-03 at three U.S. Geological Survey sites ranged from 66 to 94 percent of period-of-record average annual precipitation at corresponding National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration long-term sites in 2001, from 51 to 75 percent in 2002, and from 34 to 81 percent during January through September 2003. Missing precipitation records for one site resulted in the 34-percent value in 2003. Analyses of concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113 in ground-water samples from nine wells and one spring were used to estimate when the sampled water entered the ground-water system. Apparent ages of ground water ranged from as young as about 10 to 16 years to as old as about 20 to 26 years. Concentrations of dissolved nitrates in samples collected from 24 wells during 2001-02 were similar to concentrations in samples collected from the same

  7. Soil Water Retention as Indicator for Soil Physical Quality - Examples from Two SoilTrEC European Critical Zone Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseva, Svetla; Kercheva, Milena; Shishkov, Toma; Dimitrov, Emil; Nenov, Martin; Lair, Georg J.; Moraetis, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Soil water retention is of primary importance for majority of soil functions. The characteristics derived from Soil Water Retention Curve (SWRC) are directly related to soil structure and soil water regime and can be used as indicators for soil physical quality. The aim of this study is to present some parameters and relationships based on the SWRC data from the soil profiles characterising the European SoilTrEC Critical Zone Observatories Fuchsenbigl and Koiliaris. The studied soils are representative for highly productive soils managed as arable land in the frame of soil formation chronosequence at "Marchfeld" (Fuchsenbigl CZO), Austria and heavily impacted soils during centuries through intensive grazing and farming, under severe risk of desertification in context of climatic and lithological gradient at Koiliaris, Crete, Greece. Soil water retention at pF ≤ 2.52 was determined using the undisturbed soil cores (100 cm3 and 50 cm3) by a suction plate method. Water retention at pF = 4.2 was determined by a membrane press method and at pF ≥ 5.6 - by adsorption of water vapour at controlled relative humidity, both using ground soil samples. The soil physical quality parameter (S-parameter) was defined as the slope of the water retention curve at its inflection point (Dexter, 2006), determined with the obtained parameters of van Genuhten (1980) water retention equation. The S-parameter values were categorised to assess soil physical quality as follows: S < 0.020 very poor, 0.020 ≤ S < 0.035 poor, 0.035 ≤ S < 0.050 good, S ≥ 0.050 very good (Dexter, 2004). The results showed that most of the studied topsoil horizons have good physical quality according to both the S-parameter and the Plant-Available Water content (PAW), with the exception of the soils from croplands at CZO Fuxenbigl (F4, F5) which are with poor soil structure. The link between the S-parameter and the indicator of soil structure stability (water stable soil aggregates with size 1-3 mm) is not

  8. The European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and Water-column Observatory Consortium (EMSO-ERIC): Impact, Progress, and Plans.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Mairi

    2016-04-01

    EMSO is forging ahead through the next challenge in Earth-Ocean Science: How to co-ordinate ocean data acquisition, analysis and response across provincial, national, regional, and global scales. EMSO provides power, communications, sensors, and data infrastructure for continuous, high resolution, (near)-real-time, interactive ocean observations across a truly multi- and interdisciplinary range of research areas including biology, geology, chemistry, physics, engineering, and computer science; from polar to tropical environments, through the water column down to the abyss. 11 deep sea and 4 shallow nodes span from Arctic through the Atlantic and Mediterranean, to the Black Sea. The EMSO Preparatory Phase (FP7) project led to the Interim phase (involving 13 countries) of forming the legal entity: the EMSO European Research Infrastructure Consortium (EMSO-ERIC). The open user community is through ESONET-Vi (European Seafloor Observatory NETwork - The Vision), following on the extensive scientific community planning contributions of the ESONET-NoE (FP6) project. The further progress made through the FixO3 project (FP7) will also benefit the development of this shared infrastructure. Coordination among nodes is being strengthened through the EMSOdev project (H2020) which will produce the EMSO Generic Instrument Module (EGIM) - standardised observations of temperature, pressure, salinity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll fluorescence, currents, passive acoustics, pH, pCO2, and nutrients. Early installations are now being upgraded; for example in October 2015 EMSO-France deployed a second cable and junction box serving the Ligurian Sea Node in order to monitor slope stability offshore Nice; in 2016 the EMSO Azores Node will receive a major upgrade that will double its observing capacity; for the Ionian Sea Node the Capo Passero site will be installed and the Catania site will be upgraded. Significant findings are already coming in; for example high frequency

  9. Dudley Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Dudley Observatory, in Schenectady, New York, is a private foundation supporting research and education in astronomy, astrophysics and the history of astronomy. Chartered in 1852, it is the oldest organization in the US, outside academia and government, dedicated to the support of astronomical research. For more than a century it was a world leader in astrometry, with such achievements as pub...

  10. Validating reconstruction of snow water equivalent in California's Sierra Nevada using measurements from the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bair, Edward H.; Rittger, Karl; Davis, Robert E.; Painter, Thomas H.; Dozier, Jeff

    2016-11-01

    Accurately estimating basin-wide snow water equivalent (SWE) is the most important unsolved problem in mountain hydrology. Models that rely on remotely sensed inputs are especially needed in ranges with few surface measurements. The NASA Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) provides estimates of SWE at 50 m spatial resolution in several basins across the Western U.S. during the melt season. Primarily, water managers use this information to forecast snowmelt runoff into reservoirs; another impactful use of ASO measurements lies in validating and improving satellite-based snow estimates or models that can scale to whole mountain ranges, even those without ground-based measurements. We compare ASO measurements from 2013 to 2015 to four methods that estimate spatially distributed SWE: two versions of a SWE reconstruction method, spatial interpolation from snow pillows and courses, and NOAA's Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS). SWE reconstruction downscales energy forcings to compute potential melt, then multiplies those values by satellite-derived estimates of fractional snow-covered area to calculate snowmelt. The snowpack is then built in reverse from the date the snow is observed to disappear. The two SWE reconstruction models tested include one that employs an energy balance calculation of snowmelt, and one that combines net radiation and degree-day approaches to estimate melt. Our full energy balance model, without ground observations, performed slightly better than spatial interpolation from snow pillows, having no systematic bias and 26% mean absolute error when compared to SWE from ASO. Both reconstruction models and interpolation were more accurate than SNODAS.

  11. Measurement of Low Amounts of Precipitable Water Vapor Using Ground-Based Millimeterwave Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, Paul E.; Westwater, Ed R.; Han, Yong; Gasiewski, Albin J.; Klein, Marian; Cimini, Domenico; Jones, David C.; Manning, WIll; Kim, Edward J.; Wang, James R.

    2003-01-01

    Extremely dry conditions characterized by amounts of precipitable water vapor (PWV) as as 1-2 mm commonly occur in high-latitude regions during the winter months. While such atmospheres carry only a few percent of the latent heat energy compared to tropical atmospheres, the effects of low vapor amounts on the polar radiation budget - both directly through modulation of longwave radiation and indirectly through the formation of clouds - are considerable. Accurate measurements of precipitable water vapor (PWV) during such dry conditions are needed to improve polar radiation models for use in understanding and predicting change in the climatically sensitive polar regions. To this end, the strong water vapor absorption at 183.310 GHz provides a unique means of measuring low amounts of PWV. Weighting function analysis, forward model calculations based upon a 7-year radiosonde dataset, and retrieval simulations consistently predict that radiometric measurements made using several millimeter-wavelength (MMW) channels near the 183 GHz line, together with established microwave (MW) measurements at the 22.235 GHz water vapor line and -3 1 GHz atmospheric absorption window can be used to determine within 5% uncertainty the full range of PWV expected in the Arctic. This unique collective capability stands in spite of accuracy limitations stemming from uncertainties due to the sensitivity of the vertical distribution of temperature and water vapor at MMW channels. In this study the potential of MMW radiometry using the 183 GHz line for measuring low amounts of PWV is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. The study uses data obtained during March 1999 as part of an experiment conducted at the Department of Energy s Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) near Barrow, Alaska. Several radiometers from both NOAA and NASA were deployed during the experiment to provide the first combined MMW and MW ground-based data set during dry arctic conditions. Single-channel retrievals

  12. Isotopic (18O) characteristics of weekly precipitation collected across the USA: an initial analysis with application to water source studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welker, J. M.

    2000-06-01

    A portion of the precipitation samples collected and stored by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) are shown to be useful for analysis of isotopes in precipitation. The potential problems with evaporation are small based on deuterium excess analyses and comparisons with the Global Meteroic Water Line. Presented here are the 18O values of precipitation collected from nine NADP sites during 1989, 1990 and 1991. The trends in the isotopic (18O) characteristics of recent precipitation are in agreement with findings from previous International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) sites in the USA. The findings are also in agreement with several major isotope-environment relationships, further supporting the use of these samples for a modern global data base on the isotopes in precipitation being developed by IAEA, called GNIP (Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation) and for use by research groups in the hydrological modelling, palaeoclimate and ecological communities.As expected, the average 18O values of precipitation that is derived from the Gulf of Mexico (-3) and from the Pacific North-west are isotopically distinct (-7). In addition, using the NADP network, isotopic depletion in the 18O values of precipitation in the range of 8 was observed from coastal to inland locations either in the Pacific North-west or along the east side of the Rocky Mountains, from Texas to Eastern Montana. In central USA, especially at high elevation, there is a strong seasonal variation in the 18O values of precipitation, differing by almost 25 between January and August, whereas at coastal locations the seasonal variation in the 18O values of precipitation was minimal. Comparisons between the average 18precipitation from several NADP sites and those of the IAEA collected in the 1960s and 1970s are exceptionally comparable, differing in some cases by only 01, further substantiating the quality and utility of precipitation from this network. The

  13. Comparison of Daily Total Precipitable Water From Satellite and Model Reanalysis Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Suggs, R. J.; Haines, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that there is fairly good agreement between the monthly values of total precipitable water (TPW) from the NVAP data set, a multi satellite and radiosonde merged data product, and the NCEP reanalysis TPW data. However, there are regions and time periods where significant differences between the data sets are found in the monthly mean TPW time series and period of record trends. To better understand these differences seen in the monthly data values, the daily mean TPW data are examined. Possible contributions to the TPW differences such as data quality of the individual NVAP data set components associated with missing or irregular daily values are addressed. Also, effects associated with the weighting of the individual NVAP data set components to form a merged product are considered. The daily variations in TPW exhibited by each data set are also quantified and compared between the data sets.

  14. Analysis of the distribution of precipitable water vapor in the Chajnantor area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, Fernando; Reeves, Rodrigo; Bustos, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present results from a long-term precipitable water vapor (PWV) study in the Chajnantor area, in northern Chile. Data from several instruments located at relevant sites for submillimeter and midinfrared astronomy were processed to obtain relations between the atmospheric conditions among the sites. The data used for this study can be considered the richest data set to date, because of the geographical sampling of the region, including sites at different altitudes, a time span from 2005 to 2014, and the different techniques and instruments used for the measurements. We validate a method to convert atmospheric opacity from 350 μm tipper radiometers to PWV. An average of 0.68 PWV ratio between Cerro Chajnantor and Llano of Chajnantor was found.

  15. Simultaneous measurements of stable water isotopes in near-surface vapor and precipitation to constrain below-cloud processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Pascal; Sodemann, Harald; Pfahl, Stephan; Schneebeli, Marc; Ventura, Jordi Figueras i.; Leuenberger, Andreas; Grazioli, Jacopo; Raupach, Tim; Berne, Alexis; Wernli, Heini

    2016-04-01

    Present-day observations of stable water isotopes (SWI) in precipitation on monthly time scales are abundant and the processes governing the variation of SWI on these time scales have been investigated by many studies. However, also on much shorter time scales of hours mesoscale meteorological processes lead to significant variations of SWIs, which are important to understand. There are only few studies investigating the variations of SWI on this short time scale, for which, e.g., frontal dynamics, convection and cloud microphysics play an essential role. In particular, the isotopic composition of both near-surface vapor and precipitation is significantly influenced by below-cloud processes that include precipitation evaporation and isotopic exchange between falling precipitation and surrounding vapor. In this study, simultaneous measurements of SWI in near-surface vapor and precipitation with high (sub-hourly) temporal resolution in combination with observational data from radars, disdrometers, radiosondes and standard meteorological instruments are used for a detailed analysis of the relative importance of below-cloud and in-cloud (i.e., precipitation formation) processes during the course of three rain events in Switzerland in spring 2014. Periods are identified when the isotopic composition of near-surface vapor and equilibrium vapor above liquid rain drops agree and when they differ due to either evaporation of precipitation or incomplete equilibration of precipitation with surrounding vapor. These findings are verified by the supporting observational data. In addition, calculations with a simple rain-shaft model fed with observational data are compared to the actual isotopic composition of precipitation. This combination of isotope measurements and model calculations allows us to test the sensitivity of the precipitation isotope signal to rain intensity, drop-size distribution and temperature and humidity profiles.

  16. Monitoring the variability of precipitable water vapor over the Klang Valley, Malaysia during flash flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suparta, W.; Rahman, R.; Singh, M. S. J.

    2014-06-01

    Klang Valley is a focal area of Malaysian economic and business activities where the local weather condition is very important to maintain its reputation. Heavy rainfalls for more than an hour were reported up to 40 mm in September 2013 and 35 mm in October 2013. Both events are monitored as the first and second cases of flash flood, respectively. Based on these cases, we investigate the water vapor, rainfall, surface meteorological data (surface pressure, relative humidity, and temperature) and river water level. The precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from Global Positioning System (GPS) is used to indicate the impact of flash flood on the rainfall. We found that PWV was dropped 4 mm in 2 hours before rainfall reached to 40 mm and dropped 3 mm in 3 hours before 35 mm of rainfall in respective cases. Variation of PWV was higher in September case compared to October case of about 2 mm. We suggest the rainfall phenomena can disturb the GPS propagation and therefore, the impact of PWV before, during and after the flash flood event at three selected GPS stations in Klang Valley is investigated for possible mitigation in the future.

  17. Determination of the sources and impacts of aerosols on clouds and orographic precipitation during CalWater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.; Suski, K.; Cazorla, A.; Cahill, J. F.; Creamean, J.; Collins, D. B.; Ralph, F. M.; Cayan, D. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; DeMott, P. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; Comstock, J. M.; Leung, L.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Roberts, G. C.; Nenes, A.; Lin, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Climate projections for the remainder of this century for the U.S. Southwest, including parts of California, suggest a drying trend (reductions ~ 10 -15 %). Thus, understanding factors which could potentially influence the amount and type of precipitation is critical to future water resources in California. Previous studies suggest aerosols transported from the Central Valley into the mountains may be reducing the amount of orographic precipitation in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, the key region for water storage in the snowpack. CalWater, which commenced in the Winter of 2009, is an ongoing multi-year, multi-agency field campaign to investigate the primary sources of aerosols influencing clouds and precipitation in this region. Single particle measurements, used in both ground as well as PNNL G1 aircraft measurements, in the recent campaign provide insight into the sources of aerosols impacting the clouds and precipitation. Biomass burning, Central Valley pollution, long range transported Asian dust and pollution, locally generated newly formed particles, and marine aerosols all show strong impacts on the cloud microphysical properties. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the objective and key findings from CalWater measurements of aerosols, precipitation, clouds, and meteorology conducted from 2009-2011 in this region.

  18. A CloudSat Perspective of the Atmospheric Water Cycle and Precipitation: Recent Progress and Grand Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Im, Eastwood; Vane, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Summary Global - mean precipitation - is controlled by Earth's energy balance and is a quantifiable consequence of the water vapor feedback. Predictability rests on the degree to which the water vapor feedback is predictable. Regional scale - to a significant extent, changes are shaped by atmospheric circulation changes but we do not know the extent to which regional scale changes are predictable. The impacts of changes to atmospheric circulation on regional scale water cycle changes can be dramatic. Process - scale - significant biases to the CHARACTER of precipitation (frequency and intensity) is related to how the precipitation process is parameterized in models. Aerosol - We still do not know the extent to which the water cycle is influenced by aerosol but anecdotal evidence is building. The character of precipitation is affected by the way aerosol influence clouds and thus affects the forcing of the climate system through the albedo effect. Observations - we still have a way to go and need to approach the problem in a more integrated way (tie clouds, aerosol and precipitation together and then link to soil moisture, etc). Globally our capabilities seriously lag behind the science and model development.

  19. Toward a green observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilenmann, Ueli; Ramírez, Christian; Vanderheyden, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    Many of the modern observatories are located at remote sites, far from larger cities and away from infrastructure like power grids, water supplies and roads. On-site power generation in island mode is often the only choice to provide electricity to an observatory. During the 2008 petrol price rally, conventional power generation has received special attention and alternatives are being studied now in many organisations to keep energy prices at bay. This paper shall outline the power generation at the ESO VLT/VLTI observatory at Paranal as it is now and a plan for a possible way out of the dependency on fossil fuels in the near future. A discussion of several alternatives including wind energy, solar energy and heat recovery from a conventional power plant shall be analysed and compared. Finally, a project is being proposed to equip the VLT/VLTI with a modern alternative energy supply, based on a novel concept: Solar cooling.

  20. Successes with the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Huffman, George; Stocker, Erich; Petersen, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Water is essential to our planet Earth. Knowing when, where and how precipitation falls is crucial for understanding the linkages between the Earth's water and energy cycles and is extraordinarily important for sustaining life on our planet during climate change. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory spacecraft launched February 27, 2014, is the anchor to the GPM international satellite mission to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational sensors to provide "next-generation" precipitation products. GPM is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Status and successes in terms of spacecraft, instruments, retrieval products, validation, and impacts for science and society will be presented. Precipitation, microwave, satellite

  1. NASA-modified precipitation products to improve USEPA nonpoint source water quality modeling for the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Joseph; Toll, David; Partington, Ed; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Lee, Shihyan; Gutierrez-Magness, Angelica; Engman, Ted; Arsenault, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    The USEPA has estimated that over 20,000 water bodies within the United States do not meet water quality standards. One of the regulations in the Clean Water Act of 1972 requires states to monitor the total maximum daily load, or the amount of pollution that can be carried by a water body before it is determined to be "polluted," for any watershed in the United States (Copeland, 2005). In response to this mandate, the USEPA developed Better Assessment Science Integrating Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) as a decision support tool for assessing pollution and to guide the decision-making process for improving water quality. One of the models in BASINS, the Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF), computes continuous streamflow rates and pollutant concentration at each basin outlet. By design, precipitation and other meteorological data from weather stations serve as standard model input. In practice, these stations may be unable to capture the spatial heterogeneity of precipitation events, especially if they are few and far between. An attempt was made to resolve this issue by substituting station data with NASA-modified/NOAA precipitation data. Using these data within HSPF, streamflow was calculated for seven watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Basin during low flow periods, convective storm periods, and annual flows. In almost every case, the modeling performance of HSPF increased when using the NASA-modified precipitation data, resulting in better streamflow statistics and, potentially, in improved water quality assessment.

  2. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Johanna

    2016-08-17

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory is expanding its current array of 300 water tanks to include 350 outrigger tanks to increase sensitivity to gamma rays above 10 TeV. This involves creating and testing hardware with which to build the new tanks, including photomultiplier tubes, high voltage supply units, and flash analog to digital converters. My responsibilities this summer included preparing, testing and calibrating that equipment.

  3. Association between Precipitation Upstream of a Drinking Water Utility and Nurse Advice Calls Relating to Acute Gastrointestinal Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Tornevi, Andreas; Axelsson, Gösta; Forsberg, Bertil

    2013-01-01

    Background The River Göta Älv is a source of fresh-water for the City of Gothenburg (Sweden). We recently identified a clear association between upstream precipitation and indicator bacteria concentrations in the river water outside the intake to the drinking water utility. This study aimed to determine if variation in the incidence of acute gastrointestinal illnesses is associated with upstream precipitation. Methods We acquired data, covering 1494 days, on the daily number of telephone calls to the nurse advice line from citizens in Gothenburg living in areas with Göta Älv as a fresh-water supply. We separated calls relating to gastrointestinal illnesses from other medical concerns, and analyzed their association with precipitation using a distributed lag non-linear Poisson regression model, adjusting for seasonal patterns and covariates. We used a 0–21-day lag period for precipitation to account for drinking water delivery times and incubation periods of waterborne pathogens. Results The study period contained 25,659 nurse advice calls relating to gastrointestinal illnesses. Heavy rainfall was associated with increased calls the same day and around 5–6 days later. Consecutive days of wet weather were also found to be associated with an increase in the daily number of gastrointestinal concerns. No associations were identified between precipitation and nurse advice calls relating to other medical concerns. Conclusion An increase in nurse advice calls relating to gastrointestinal illnesses around 5–6 days after heavy rainfall is consistent with a hypothesis that the cause could be related to drinking water due to insufficient barriers in the drinking water production, suggesting the need for improved drinking water treatment. PMID:23875009

  4. Changing Precipitation Patterns or Waning Glaciers? Identifying Water Supply Vulnerabilities to Climate Change in the Bolivian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guido, Z. S.; McIntosh, J. C.; Papuga, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Bolivian Andes have become an iconic example for the impacts of climate change. Glaciers are rapidly melting and some have already completely disappeared. More than 75 percent of the water consumed by 2 million people living on the flanks of the Bolivian Andes comes from mountains and it is often cited that the dwindling ice threatens the water supply of the expanding and destitute population living in the twin cities of La Paz and El Alto. However, the wet and the warm seasons and the cold and dry seasons coincide, causing high precipitation and ice melt—and therefore high streamflows—to occur only in the austral summer (October-March); during the austral winter, cold conditions limit glacier melt. This suggests that reductions in the water supply could be influenced more by changing precipitation amounts than continued glacial mass-wasting. We hypothesize that precipitation is the principal component of groundwater recharge for the aquifers at the base of the central Cordillera Real. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes from rivers partially fed by glaciers, groundwater, and glacial melt water can help determine the relative contribution of precipitation and glacial melt to important water supplies. During the dry season in August 2010, we sampled 23 sites that follow the flow path of water in the Condiriri watershed, beginning in the glacial headwaters and ending several kilometers upriver from Lake Titicaca. We collected five samples at the toe of the Pequeño Alpamayo glacier and four samples from three tributary rivers that drain glaciated headwaters, which include meltwater from the Pequeño Alpamayo glacier. W also collected 14 water samples from shallow and deep wells in rural communities within 40 kilometers of the glaciers. If the isotopic values of groundwater are similar to rain values, as we suspect, precipitation is likely the largest contributor to groundwater resources in the region and will suggest that changing precipitation patterns present the

  5. Precipitation Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Although weather, including its role in the water cycle, is included in most elementary science programs, any further examination of raindrops and snowflakes is rare. Together rain and snow make up most of the precipitation that replenishes Earth's life-sustaining fresh water supply. When viewed individually, raindrops and snowflakes are quite…

  6. Grand Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eric W.

    2002-01-01

    Various concepts have been recently presented for a 100 m class astronomical observatory. The science virtues of such an observatory are many: resolving planets orbiting around other stars, resolving the surface features of other stars, extending our temporal reach back toward the beginning (at and before stellar and galactic development), improving on the Next Generation Space Telescope, and other (perhaps as yet) undiscovered purposes. This observatory would be a general facility instrument with wide spectral range from at least the near ultraviolet to the mid infrared. The concept espoused here is based on a practical, modular design located in a place where temperatures remain (and instruments could operate) within several degrees of absolute zero with no shielding or cooling. This location is the bottom of a crater located near the north or south pole of the moon, most probably the South Polar Depression. In such a location the telescope would never see the sun or the earth, hence the profound cold and absence of stray light. The ideal nature of this location is elaborated herein. It is envisioned that this observatory would be assembled and maintained remotely through the use of expert robotic systems. A base station would be located above the crater rim with (at least occasional) direct line-of-sight access to the earth. Certainly it would be advantageous, but not absolutely essential, to have humans travel to the site to deal with unexpected contingencies. Further, observers and their teams could eventually travel there for extended observational campaigns. Educational activities, in general, could be furthered thru extended human presence. Even recreational visitors and long term habitation might follow.

  7. NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission for Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gail

    2016-04-01

    Water is fundamental to life on Earth. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, launched February 27, 2014, is an international satellite mission to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational sensors to provide "next-generation" precipitation products. The joint NASA-JAXA GPM Core Observatory serves as the cornerstone and anchor to unite the constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory carries a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. As a science mission with integrated application goals, GPM is designed to (1) advance precipitation measurement capability from space through combined use of active and passive microwave sensors, (2) advance the knowledge of the global water/energy cycle and freshwater availability through better description of the space-time variability of global precipitation, and (3) improve weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of instantaneous precipitation rates and time-integrated rainfall accumulation. Since launch, the instruments have been collecting outstanding precipitation data. New scientific insights resulting from GPM data, an overview of the GPM mission concept and science activities in the United States

  8. The Use of Water Vapor for Detecting Environments that Lead to Convectively Produced Heavy Precipitation and Flash Floods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scofield, Rod; Vicente, Gilberto; Hodges, Mike

    2000-01-01

    This Tech Report summarizes years of study and experiences on using GOES Water vapor (6.7 micron and precipitable water) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/1) from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) derived Precipitable Water (PNAI) for detecting environments favorable for convectively produced flash floods. An emphasis is on the moisture. upper air flow, and equivalent potential temperature (Theta(sub e)) patterns that lead to devastating flood events. The 15 minute 6.7 micron water vapor imagery is essential for tracking middle to upper tropospheric disturbances that produce upward vertical motion and initiate flash flood producing systems. Water vapor imagery at 6.7 micron is also used to detect surges of upper level moisture (called tropical water vapor plumes) that have been associated with extremely heavy rainfall. Since the water vapor readily depicts lifting mechanisms and upper level moisture, water vapor imagery is often an excellent source of data for recognizing patterns of heavy precipitation and flash floods. In order to analyze the depth of the moisture, the PW aspects of the troposphere must be measured. The collocation (or nearby location) of high values ofP\\V and instability are antecedent conditions prior to the flash flood or heavy rainfall events. Knowledge of PW magnitudes have been used as thresholds for impending flash flood events, PW trends are essential in flash flood prediction. Conceptual models and water vapor products are used to study some of the characteristics of convective systems that occurred over the United States of America (USA) during the summer of 1997 and the 1997-1998 El Nino. P\\V plumes were associated with most of the \\vest coast heavy precipitation events examined during the winter season of 1997 - 1998, In another study, conducted during the summer season of 1997. results showed that the collocation of water vapor (6.7 micron) and P\\N' plumes possessed higher correlations with predicted

  9. Methodology to assess water presence on speleothems during periods of low precipitation, with implications for recharge sources - Kartchner Caverns, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blasch, Kyle W.

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in January 2005, recharge processes and the presence of water on speleothems were monitored in Kartchner Caverns during a 44-month period when annual rainfall rates were 6 to 18 percent below the long-term mean. Electrical-resistance sensors designed to detect the presence of water were used to identify ephemeral streamflow in the channels overlying the cave as well as the movement of water within the cave system. Direct infiltration of precipitation through overhead rocks provided consistent inflow to the cave, but precipitation rates and subsequent infiltration rates were reduced during the comparatively dry years. Ephemeral stream-channel recharge through autogenic and allogenic processes, the predominant recharge mechanism during wetter periods, was limited to two low-volume events. From visual observations, it appeared that recharge from channel infiltration was equal to or less than recharge from overhead infiltration. Electrical-resistance sensors were able to detect thin films of water on speleothems, including stalactites, ribbons, and stalagmites. These films of water were directly attributed to overhead infiltration of precipitation. Periods of low precipitation resulted in decreased speleothem wetness.

  10. Influence of the vertical structure of the atmosphere on the seasonal variation of precipitable water and greenhouse effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bony, S.; Duvel, J.P.

    1994-06-01

    By using satellite observations and European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses, we study the seasonal variations of the precipitable water and the greenhouse effect, defined as the normalized difference between the longwave flux emitted at the surface and that emergent at the top of the atmosphere. Results show a strong systematic influence of the vertical structure of the atmosphere on geographical and seasonal variations of both precipitable water and greenhouse effect. Over ocean, in middle and high latitudes, the seasonal variation of the mean temperature lapse rate in the troposphere leads to large seasonal phase lags between greenhouse effect and precipitable water. By contrast, the seasonal variation of the clear-sky greenhouse effect over tropical oceans is mainly driven by the total atmospheric transmittance and thus by precipitable water variations. Over land, the seasonal variations of the tropospheric lapse rate acts to amplify the radiative impact of water vapor changes, giving a strong seasonal variation of the greenhouse effect. Over tropical land regions, monsoon activity generates a seasonal phase lag between surface temperature and relative humidity variations that gives a seasonal lag of about 2 months between the surface temperature and the clear-sky greenhouse effect. Generally, the cloudiness amplifies clear-sky tendencies. Finally, as an illustration, obtained results are used to evaluate the general circulation model of the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique.

  11. The comparison of IR and MW ground-based measurements of total precipitable water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, I. A.; Virolainen, Ya. A.; Timofeyev, Yu. M.; Poberovskii, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Water vapor is one of the basic climate gases playing a key role in various processes at different altitudes of the Earth's atmosphere. An intercomparison and validation of different total precipitable water (TPW) measurement methods are important for determining the true accuracy of these methods, the shared use of data from multiple sources, the creation of data archives of different measurements, etc. In this paper, the TPW values obtained from measurements of solar IR spectral radiation (~8-9 μm absorption band) and thermal MW radiation of the atmosphere (1.35 cm absorption line) for 138 days of observation are compared. Measurements have been carried out from March 2013 to June 2014 at Peterhof station of the St. Petersburg State University in (59.88° N, 29.82° E). It is shown that MW measurements usually give higher TPW values than IR measurements. The bias between the two methods varies from 1 to 8% for small and large TPW values, respectively. With increasing TPW values, the bias reduces and for TPW > 1 cm it is ~1%. Standard deviation (SD) between the two methods reaches 7% for TPW < 0.4 cm and 3-5% for TPW > 1 cm. These data show the high quality of both remote sensing methods. Moreover, the IR measurements have a higher accuracy than MW measurements for small TPW values.

  12. Assessment of spill flow emissions on the basis of measured precipitation and waste water data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochedlinger, Martin; Gruber, Günter; Kainz, Harald

    2005-09-01

    Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are substantial contributors to the total emissions into surface water bodies. The emitted pollution results from dry-weather waste water loads, surface runoff pollution and from the remobilisation of sewer deposits and sewer slime during storm events. One possibility to estimate overflow loads is a calculation with load quantification models. Input data for these models are pollution concentrations, e.g. Total Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD tot), Total Suspended Solids (TSS) or Soluble Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD sol), rainfall series and flow measurements for model calibration and validation. It is important for the result of overflow loads to model with reliable input data, otherwise this inevitably leads to bad results. In this paper the correction of precipitation measurements and the sewer online-measurements are presented to satisfy the load quantification model requirements already described. The main focus is on tipping bucket gauge measurements and their corrections. The results evidence the importance of their corrections due the effects on load quantification modelling and show the difference between corrected and not corrected data of storm events with high rain intensities.

  13. A comparison of total precipitable water measurements from radiosonde and sunphotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campmany, Elies; Bech, Joan; Rodríguez-Marcos, Javier; Sola, Yolanda; Lorente, Jerónimo

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric water vapour is an essential component of the terrestrial atmosphere and must be known precisely in a wide range of applications such as radiative transfer modelling or weather forecasting to mention just a few examples. Vertically integrated measurements, or total precipitable water (TPW) equivalent amounts traditionally derived from radiosonde measurements, are needed in many of these applications and can also be obtained from other methodologies such as sunphotometers or GPS-based techniques. This paper presents a study comparing different measurements of TPW from radiosonde and sunphotometer data recorded from 2001 to 2004 in Barcelona, Spain. Three collocated instruments were employed in this study: RS-80A Vaisala sondes and two types of commonly used sunphotometers (Cimel 318N-VBS7 and Microtops II). A cloud screening filter was applied to photometer data based on the quality control procedure of the AERONET database. A systematic comparison among the measurements indicates that bivariate correlations between different instruments were high, with correlation factors ( r2) above 0.8 in all cases. Measurements covered all seasons allowing examining intra-annual variability, which generally did not exhibit statistically significant differences. Examination of 57 concurrent measurements of the three instruments indicated that radiosonde TPW measurements were the highest (15 mm on average) and Cimel and Microtops presented similar values (12 mm and 11 mm respectively).

  14. MM-Wave Radiometric Measurements of Low Amounts of Precipitable Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, P.; Westwater, Ed; Han, Yong; Manning, Will; Jones, David; Gasiewski, Al

    2000-01-01

    An experiment was conducted during March, 1999 to study ways in which to improve techniques for measuring low amounts of total-column precipitable water vapor (PWV). The experiment was conducted at the DOE's ARM program's North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed site (DoE ARM NSA/AAO CaRT) located just outside Barrow, Alaska. NASA and NOAA deployed a suite of radiometers covering 25 channels in the frequency range of 20 GHz up to 340 GHz including 8 channels around the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line. In addition to the usual CaRT site instrumentation the NOAA Depolarization and Backscatter Unattended Lidar (DABUL), the SUNY Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) and other surface based meteorological instrumentation were deployed during the intensive observation period. Vaisala RS80 radiosondes were launched daily as well as nearby National Weather Service VIZ sondes. Atmospheric conditions ranged from clear calm skies to blowing snow and heavy multi-layer cloud coverage. Measurements made by the radiosondes indicate the PWV varied from approx. 1 to approx. 5 mm during the experiment. The near-surface temperature varied between about -40 C to - 15 C. In this presentation, an overview of the experiment with examples of data collected will be presented. Application of the data for assessing the potential and limitations of millimeter-wave radiometry for retrieving very low amounts of PWV will be discussed.

  15. The Impact of Urbanization on the Precipitation Component of the Water Cycle: A New Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, J. Marshal

    2002-01-01

    It is estimated that by the year 2025, 60% of the world s population will live in cities (UNFP, 1999). As cities continue to grow, urban sprawl (e.g., the expansion of urban surfaces outward into rural surroundings) creates unique problems related to land use, transportation, agriculture, housing, pollution, and development. Urban expansion also has measurable impacts on environmental processes. Urban areas modify boundary layer processes through the creation of an urban heat island (UHI). The literature indicates that the signature of the urban heat island effect may be resolvable in rainfall patterns over and downwind of metropolitan areas. However, a recent U.S. Weather Research Program panel concluded that more observational and modeling research is needed in this area (Dabberdt et al. 2000). NASA and other agencies initiated programs such as the Atlanta Land-use Analysis: Temperature and Air Quality Project (ATLANTA) (Quattrochi et al. 1998) which aimed to identify and understand how urban heat islands impact the environment. However, a comprehensive assessment of the role of urban-induced rainfall in the global water and energy cycle (GWEC) and cycling of freshwater was not a primary focus of these efforts. NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) seeks to develop a scientific understanding of the Earth system and its response to natural or human-induced changes to enable improved prediction capability for climate, weather, and natural hazards (NASA, 2000). Within this mission, the ESE has three basic thrusts: science research to increase Earth system knowledge; an applications program to transfer science knowledge to practical use in society; and a technology program to enable new, better, and cheaper capabilities for observing the earth. Within this framework, a research program is underway to further address the co-relationship between land cover use and change (e.g. urban development) and its impact on key components of the GWEC (e.g., precipitation). This

  16. Precipitation, Ground-water Hydrology, and Recharge Along the Eastern Slopes of the Sandia Mountains, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, Kurt J.; Blanchard, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of recharge to carbonate and clastic aquifers along the eastern slopes of the Sandia Mountains was investigated by using precipitation, water-level, dissolved chloride, and specific-conductance data. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Bernalillo County Public Works Division, conducted a study to assess ground-water conditions and provide technical data that could be used as a basis for management and future planning of eastern Bernalillo County water resources. The intent of the investigation was to improve the current understanding of subsurface mechanisms controlling recharge dynamics in a geologically complex aquifer system. In the Sandia Mountains, precipitation events are generally limited to snowfalls in winter months and monsoon rainfall in late summer. Monthly meteorological data from weather stations in the study area indicate that monsoon rainfall during July and August constitutes close to one-third of annual precipitation totals. Following precipitation and snowmelt events, daily ground-water level data show low-amplitude, long-duration peaks in hydrographs of wells north and west of the Tijeras Fault. Hydrographs of monthly and biannual water-level data from across the study area show seasonal variation and water-level fluctuations in excess of 30 ft during a period of below-average precipitation. Water level observations in 67 percent of wells showing drought-induced water-level declines rebounded to at or near predrought conditions within 6 months of return to normal climate conditions. Cross-correlation of annual hydrologic data shows aquifer response to periods of monsoon recharge to persist from 1 to 6 months following events. The lag time between precipitation input and response of water levels or solute concentrations was largest near the Tijeras and Gutierrez Faults. These results indicate regional faults hydrologically isolate the Tijeras Graben from groundwater recharge originating

  17. Preparation of nanoparticles of poorly water-soluble antioxidant curcumin by antisolvent precipitation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakran, Mitali; Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Tan, I.-Lin; Li, Lin

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance the solubility and dissolution rate of a poorly water-soluble antioxidant, curcumin, by fabricating its nanoparticles with two methods: antisolvent precipitation with a syringe pump (APSP) and evaporative precipitation of nanosuspension (EPN). For APSP, process parameters like flow rate, stirring speed, solvent to antisolvent (SAS) ratio, and drug concentration were investigated to obtain the smallest particle size. For EPN, factors like drug concentration and the SAS ratio were examined. The effects of these process parameters on the supersaturation, nucleation, and growth rate were studied and optimized to obtain the smallest particle size of curcumin by both the methods. The average particle size of the original drug was about 10-12 μm and it was decreased to a mean diameter of 330 nm for the APSP method and to 150 nm for the EPN method. Overall, decreasing the drug concentration or increasing the flow rate, stirring rate, and antisolvent amount resulted in smaller particle sizes. Differential scanning calorimetry studies suggested lower crystallinity of curcumin particles fabricated. The solubility and dissolution rates of the prepared curcumin particles were significantly higher than those the original curcumin. The antioxidant activity, studied by the DPPH free radical-scavenging assay, was greater for the curcumin nanoparticles than the original curcumin. This study demonstrated that both the methods can successfully prepare curcumin into submicro to nanoparticles. However, drug particles prepared by EPN were smaller than those by APSP and hence, showed the slightly better solubility, dissolution rate, and antioxidant activity than the latter.

  18. Simulation of the Diurnal Cycle of Integrated Precipitable Water in the North American Monsoon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, C. A.; Quintanar, A.; Adams, D. K.; Martinez-lopez, B.

    2015-12-01

    Organized deep convection over the North American monsoon region (NAM) is a salient climatic feature that has been the subject of several experimental campaigns and modeling efforts. Recently, however, in Mexico and the Caribbean, there has been mounting interest towards implementing low-cost, low-maintenance GPS-meteorological networks (TLALOCNet and COCOnet) that provide near real-time Integrated Precipitable Water data (IPW) into the assimilation cycle of regional models. A wealth of interesting new observational results concerning the link between the diurnal cycle of deep convection and the processes that could alter it at the surface and aloft has open up opportunities of model verification and improvements to the physics that are specific to subtropical deep convection. In this work, the diurnal cycle of IPW is studied using observational data collected during the North American Monsoon GPS Transect Experiment 2013 experiment and numerical simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF). WRF was run in climate mode to generate a simulation for the entire experiment using ECMWF ERA-Interim analysis data for initial and boundary conditions and spectral nudging. We classified the days during the experiment, according to type of mesoscale phenomena present each day and averaged days with same weather types in both data sets (observed and simulated). Preliminary results show that the simulated diurnal cycle of IPW is very sensitive to Land Use/Land Cover data and to initial and the boundary conditions. Preliminary results show that the simulated amplitude and phase of the diurnal cycle of IPW is well represented only when a more up-to-date LULC is used (MODIS v.s. 99 USGS LULC) and the Thompson mycrophysics scheme is used. In agreement with the previous results, modeled precipitation time series agree better with observed GPS-meterological station reports during the NAM 2013 experiment.

  19. Weathering, Fractures and Water in the deep Critical Zone: Geophysical investigations in the U.S. Critical Zone Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, W. S.; Carr, B.; Moon, S.; Perron, J. T.; Hayes, J. L.; Flinchum, B. A.; St Clair, J. T.; Riebe, C. S.; Richter, D., Jr.; Leone, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Critical Zone (CZ) is Earth's breathing skin: the thin layer from treetop to bedrock that supports most terrestrial life. Key hydrological, biogeochemical, and physical processes occur in the CZ, including physical and chemical weathering, soil production, erosion, nutrient cycling, and surface/groundwater exchange. These processes in turn influence subsurface water storage capacity, landscape evolution, ecological stability, aquifer recharge and stream flow. Because the deep CZ is hidden from direct observation, it can only be studied by drilling and/or geophysical measurements. Given the relative scarcity of such data, we lack a complete understanding of the architecture of the CZ, how it varies across landscapes, and what controls that variation. We present geophysical data that address these questions at six Critical Zone Observatories (CZO): Calhoun, Boulder Creek, Eel River, Reynolds Creek, Catalina-Jemez, and Southern Sierra. Conclusions include: (1) Regolith depth is influenced by the opening of fractures due to the release of regional and topographic stress as rocks are exhumed toward the surface. Stress models at Calhoun and Boulder Creek show remarkable agreement with seismic velocities in the shallow subsurface, suggesting that stress release controls the development of fracture porosity in the CZ. (2) Chemical weathering (plagioclase dissolution) begins at depths where fractures open (~40 m at Calhoun), implying that fracturing and chemical weathering are intimately paired in the deep CZ. (3) Volumetric strain is an underappreciated contributor to porosity in the CZ. In the Southern Sierra, strain dominates over chemical weathering in the upper 10 m, consistent with the stress-release model. (4) Geological structure and lithology can trump environmental controls (e.g., aspect and climate) on regolith development. At Catalina, strongly contrasting regolith thickness on north- and south-facing slopes, is not due to "northness", but rather to

  20. Spatial Heterogeneity of Stream Water Chemistry in the Elder Creek Catchment at the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurnhoffer, B. M.; Lovill, S. M.; Nghiem, A.; Kim, H.; Bishop, J. K. B.

    2014-12-01

    How does stream chemistry vary with respect to discharge, flow distance, elevation, hill slope orientation, lithology, and vegetation on catchment scale? Is it possible to discern fast flowing seasonally recharged subsurface waters from long residence time waters contributing to base flow? To answer these questions, water samples were collected at ~80 locations distributed over the channel network of the (17 km2) Elder Creek catchment during surveys in May and August/September 2014. The site, located at the Angelo Coast Range Reserve near the headwaters of the South Fork of the Eel River in northern California, experiences a Mediterranean climate with warm dry summers and cold wet winters; this year (2014), our area has received less than 50% of expected precipitation and is experiencing an extreme drought. Our survey times correspond to the beginning of the dry season and late dry season, respectively. The subsurface lithology of the region almost uniform, being largely composed of argillite mudstone with intermittent areas underlain with sandstone. It is forested with Douglas fir, live and tan oaks, madrone and California bay laurel, which vary in abundance with hill-slope orientation. Due to drought, the Elder Catchment has recently experienced the effects of the nearby Lodge Lightening Complex Fire (first detection July 31 2014) and its effects may be differentiated through the continuous 1 - 3 day frequency sampling of Elder Creek water using the ISCO Gravity Filtration System (GFS; Kim et al. 2012, EST). All water samples are analyzed for dissolved major, minor, and trace solutes by Inductively Couple Plasma Mass Spectrometry and this report focuses on major solutes such as Na, K, Ca, Mg and Si; redox sensitive metals Fe and Mn; and Ba and Sr. Preliminary analysis of May 2014 data shows interesting patterns between tributaries, particularly differences between streams on north vs. south facing slopes. Concentrations of Ca, Mg, and Na decrease down slope in

  1. Biases in Total Precipitable Water Vapor Climatologies from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Eldering, Annmarie; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2006-01-01

    We examine differences in total precipitable water vapor (PWV) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) experiments sharing the Aqua spacecraft platform. Both systems provide estimates of PWV over water surfaces. We compare AIRS and AMSR-E PWV to constrain AIRS retrieval uncertainties as functions of AIRS retrieved infrared cloud fraction. PWV differences between the two instruments vary only weakly with infrared cloud fraction up to about 70%. Maps of AIRS-AMSR-E PWV differences vary with location and season. Observational biases, when both instruments observe identical scenes, are generally less than 5%. Exceptions are in cold air outbreaks where AIRS is biased moist by 10-20% or 10-60% (depending on retrieval processing) and at high latitudes in winter where AIRS is dry by 5-10%. Sampling biases, from different sampling characteristics of AIRS and AMSR-E, vary in sign and magnitude. AIRS sampling is dry by up to 30% in most high-latitude regions but moist by 5-15% in subtropical stratus cloud belts. Over the northwest Pacific, AIRS samples conditions more moist than AMSR-E by a much as 60%. We hypothesize that both wet and dry sampling biases are due to the effects of clouds on the AIRS retrieval methodology. The sign and magnitude of these biases depend upon the types of cloud present and on the relationship between clouds and PWV. These results for PWV imply that climatologies of height-resolved water vapor from AIRS must take into consideration local meteorological processes affecting AIRS sampling.

  2. Global Positioning System (GPS) Precipitable Water in Forecasting Lightning at Spaceport Canaveral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehrer, Kristen C.; Graf, Brian; Roeder, William

    2006-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of precipitable water (PW) from Global Positioning System (GPS) in lightning prediction. Additional independent verification of an earlier model is performed. This earlier model used binary logistic regression with the following four predictor variables optimally selected from a candidate list of 23 candidate predictors: the current precipitable water value for a given time of the day, the change in GPS-PW over the past 9 hours, the KIndex, and the electric field mill value. This earlier model was not optimized for any specific forecast interval, but showed promise for 6 hour and 1.5 hour forecasts. Two new models were developed and verified. These new models were optimized for two operationally significant forecast intervals. The first model was optimized for the 0.5 hour lightning advisories issued by the 45th Weather Squadron. An additional 1.5 hours was allowed for sensor dwell, communication, calculation, analysis, and advisory decision by the forecaster. Therefore the 0.5 hour advisory model became a 2 hour forecast model for lightning within the 45th Weather Squadron advisory areas. The second model was optimized for major ground processing operations supported by the 45th Weather Squadron, which can require lightning forecasts with a lead-time of up to 7.5 hours. Using the same 1.5 lag as in the other new model, this became a 9 hour forecast model for lightning within 37 km (20 NM)) of the 45th Weather Squadron advisory areas. The two new models were built using binary logistic regression from a list of 26 candidate predictor variables: the current GPS-PW value, the change of GPS-PW over 0.5 hour increments from 0.5 to 12 hours, and the K-index. The new 2 hour model found the following for predictors to be statistically significant, listed in decreasing order of contribution to the forecast: the 0.5 hour change in GPS-PW, the 7.5 hour change in GPS-PW, the current GPS-PW value, and the KIndex. The new 9 hour forecast model found

  3. Global Positioning System (GPS) Precipitable Water in Forecasting Lightning at Spaceport Canaveral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehrer, Kristen; Graf, Brian G.; Roeder, William

    2005-01-01

    Using meteorology data, focusing on precipitable water (PW), obtained during the 2000-2003 thunderstorm seasons in Central Florida, this paper will, one, assess the skill and accuracy measurements of the current Mazany forecasting tool and, two, provide additional forecasting tools that can be used in predicting lightning. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) are located in east Central Florida. KSC and CCAFS process and launch manned (NASA Space Shuttle) and unmanned (NASA and Air Force Expendable Launch Vehicles) space vehicles. One of the biggest cost impacts is unplanned launch scrubs due to inclement weather conditions such as thunderstorms. Each launch delay/scrub costs over a quarter million dollars, and the need to land the Shuttle at another landing site and return to KSC costs approximately $ 1M. Given the amount of time lost and costs incurred, the ability to accurately forecast (predict) when lightning will occur can result in significant cost and time savings. All lightning prediction models were developed using binary logistic regression. Lightning is the dependent variable and is binary. The independent variables are the Precipitable Water (PW) value for a given time of the day, the change in PW up to 12 hours, the electric field mill value, and the K-index value. In comparing the Mazany model results for the 1999 period B against actual observations for the 2000-2003 thunderstorm seasons, differences were found in the False Alarm Rate (FAR), Probability of Detection (POD) and Hit Rate (H). On average, the False Alarm Rate (FAR) increased by 58%, the Probability of Detection (POD) decreased by 31% and the Hit Rate decreased by 20%. In comparing the performance of the 6 hour forecast period to the performance of the 1.5 hour forecast period for the Mazany model, the FAR was lower by 15% and the Hit Rate was higher by 7%. However, the POD for the 6 hour forecast period was lower by 16% as compared to the POD of the 1

  4. Where Does the Irrigation Water Go? An Estimate of the Contribution of Irrigation to Precipitation Using MERRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Jiangfeng; Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Wisser, Dominik; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Mocko, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Irrigation is an important human activity that may impact local and regional climate, but current climate model simulations and data assimilation systems generally do not explicitly include it. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim) shows more irrigation signal in surface evapotranspiration (ET) than the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) because ERA-Interim adjusts soil moisture according to the observed surface temperature and humidity while MERRA has no explicit consideration of irrigation at the surface. But, when compared with the results from a hydrological model with detailed considerations of agriculture, the ET from both reanalyses show large deficiencies in capturing the impact of irrigation. Here, a back-trajectory method is used to estimate the contribution of irrigation to precipitation over local and surrounding regions, using MERRA with observation-based corrections and added irrigation-caused ET increase from the hydrological model. Results show substantial contributions of irrigation to precipitation over heavily irrigated regions in Asia, but the precipitation increase is much less than the ET increase over most areas, indicating that irrigation could lead to water deficits over these regions. For the same increase in ET, precipitation increases are larger over wetter areas where convection is more easily triggered, but the percentage increase in precipitation is similar for different areas. There are substantial regional differences in the patterns of irrigation impact, but, for all the studied regions, the highest percentage contribution to precipitation is over local land.

  5. A continuous and highly effective static mixing process for antisolvent precipitation of nanoparticles of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuancai; Ng, Wai Kiong; Hu, Jun; Shen, Shoucang; Tan, Reginald B H

    2010-02-15

    Rapid and homogeneous mixing of the solvent and antisolvent is critical to achieve submicron drug particles by antisolvent precipitation technique. This work aims to develop a continuous and highly effective static mixing process for antisolvent precipitation of nanoparticles of poorly water-soluble drugs with spironolactone as a model drug. Continuous antisolvent production of drug nanoparticles was carried out with a SMV DN25 static mixer comprising 6-18 mixing elements. The total flow rate ranged from 1.0 to 3.0 L/min while the flow rate ratio of solvent to antisolvent was maintained at 1:9. It is found that only 6 mixing elements were sufficient to precipitate the particles in the submicron range. Increasing the number of elements would further reduce the precipitated particle size. Increasing flow rate from 1.0 to 3.0 L/min did not further reduce the particle size, while higher drug concentrations led to particle size increase. XRD and SEM results demonstrated that the freshly precipitated drug nanoparticles are in the amorphous state, which would, in presence of the mixture of solvent and antisolvent, change to crystalline form in short time. The lyophilized spironolactone nanoparticles with lactose as lyoprotectant possessed good redispersibility and showed 6.6 and 3.3 times faster dissolution rate than that of lyophilized raw drug formulation in 5 and 10 min, respectively. The developed static mixing process exhibits high potential for continuous and large-scale antisolvent precipitation of submicron drug particles.

  6. Relations Between Grace-Derived Water Storage Change with Precipitation and Temperature Over Kaidu River Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Zhou, Q.

    2016-06-01

    Water is essential for human survival and well-being, and important to virtually all sectors of the economy. In the aridzone of China's west, water resource is the controlling factor on the distribution of human settlements. Water cycle variation is sensitive to temperature and precipitation, which are influenced by human activity and climate change. Satellite observations of Earth's time-variable gravity field from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission, which enable direct measurement of changes of total terrestrial water storage, could be useful to aid this modelling. In this pilot study, TWS change from 2002 to 2013 obtained from GRACE satellite mission over the Kaidu River Basin in Xinjiang, China is presented. Precipitation and temperature data from in-situ station and National Satellite Meteorological Centre of China (NSMC) are analysed to examine whether there is a statistically significant correlation between them.

  7. Estimation of total precipitable water and snow cover in Alaska using radiometric measurements near 90 and 183 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Chang, A. T. C.; Sharma, A. K.

    1991-01-01

    Radiometric measurements at 90 GHz and three sideband frequencies near the peak water-vapor absorption line of 183.3 GHz were made with the Advanced Microwave Moisture Sounder (AMMS) aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft over Alaska on November 28, 1989. These measurements show that when the atmosphere is relatively dry the total precipitable water and snow cover could be estimated with high sensitivity. The estimated total precipitable water correlates positively with the aircraft radar altitude. This positive correlation is expected because aircraft radar altitude provides a measure of atmospheric burden above the surface. The surface reflectivities at both 90 and 183 GHz are also estimated which can be used to estimate snow water equivalent.

  8. Precipitation and temperature variations affecting glacierised Himalayan headwaters and water resources in the upper Indus and Sutlej basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. N.; Eaton, D.; Entwistle, N. S.

    2013-12-01

    Both the main stem upper Indus and Sutlej rivers feed major reservoirs for hydropower plants and supply water for irrigated agriculture in the Punjab plains. Flows in both rivers have shown significant decreases since the mid-20th century. Monsoon precipitation, which dominates flow in lower Himalayan section of the Sutlej as the upper basin on the Tibetan plateau is fairly dry, has declined by about 30% since the 1950s maximum. Air temperatures decreased from the 1960s to 1980s before recovering in the early 2000s to previous levels. Any enhanced glacier melt in the late twentieth century failed to offset declining precipitation and river flow continued to fall. In the upper Indus basin, precipitation derived in winter from the westerlies was enhanced but temperatures remained flat at stations in valleys at which measurements were undertaken. Runoff from tributary basins of the Indus, which have variable percentages of ice-cover, appears to be subdued as precipitation gently increased. Temperature was more stable than in mountain basins farther east. Valley bottoms in the Karakoram are arid, so that precipitation on glaciers reduces flow but there is little seasonal slow to melt to contribute to runoff in the ice-free areas. Changes in glacierised area seem to have limited impact on flow in these two significant rivers. Precipitation in Himalayan sub-catchments dominates flow, but has contrasting effects on runoff downstream. Temporal variations in both winter and summer precipitation along the Himalayan arc therefore have strong influences on the sustainability of water resources in the adjacent plains.

  9. Analytical studies assessing the association between extreme precipitation or temperature and drinking water-related waterborne infections: a review.

    PubMed

    Guzman Herrador, Bernardo R; de Blasio, Birgitte Freiesleben; MacDonald, Emily; Nichols, Gordon; Sudre, Bertrand; Vold, Line; Semenza, Jan C; Nygård, Karin

    2015-03-27

    Determining the role of weather in waterborne infections is a priority public health research issue as climate change is predicted to increase the frequency of extreme precipitation and temperature events. To document the current knowledge on this topic, we performed a literature review of analytical research studies that have combined epidemiological and meteorological data in order to analyze associations between extreme precipitation or temperature and waterborne disease.A search of the databases Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS and Web of Science was conducted, using search terms related to waterborne infections and precipitation or temperature. Results were limited to studies published in English between January 2001 and December 2013.Twenty-four articles were included in this review, predominantly from Asia and North-America. Four articles used waterborne outbreaks as study units, while the remaining articles used number of cases of waterborne infections. Results presented in the different articles were heterogeneous. Although most of the studies identified a positive association between increased precipitation or temperature and infection, there were several in which this association was not evidenced. A number of articles also identified an association between decreased precipitation and infections. This highlights the complex relationship between precipitation or temperature driven transmission and waterborne disease. We encourage researchers to conduct studies examining potential effect modifiers, such as the specific type of microorganism, geographical region, season, type of water supply, water source or water treatment, in order to assess how they modulate the relationship between heavy rain events or temperature and waterborne disease. Addressing these gaps is of primary importance in order to identify the areas where action is needed to minimize negative impact of climate change on health in the future.

  10. The effects of precipitation, river discharge, land use and coastal circulation on water quality in coastal Maine

    PubMed Central

    Tilburg, Charles E.; Jordan, Linda M.; Carlson, Amy E.; Zeeman, Stephan I.; Yund, Philip O.

    2015-01-01

    Faecal pollution in stormwater, wastewater and direct run-off can carry zoonotic pathogens to streams, rivers and the ocean, reduce water quality, and affect both recreational and commercial fishing areas of the coastal ocean. Typically, the closure of beaches and commercial fishing areas is governed by the testing for the presence of faecal bacteria, which requires an 18–24 h period for sample incubation. As water quality can change during this testing period, the need for accurate and timely predictions of coastal water quality has become acute. In this study, we: (i) examine the relationship between water quality, precipitation and river discharge at several locations within the Gulf of Maine, and (ii) use multiple linear regression models based on readily obtainable hydrometeorological measurements to predict water quality events at five coastal locations. Analysis of a 12 year dataset revealed that high river discharge and/or precipitation events can lead to reduced water quality; however, the use of only these two parameters to predict water quality can result in a number of errors. Analysis of a higher frequency, 2 year study using multiple linear regression models revealed that precipitation, salinity, river discharge, winds, seasonality and coastal circulation correlate with variations in water quality. Although there has been extensive development of regression models for freshwater, this is one of the first attempts to create a mechanistic model to predict water quality in coastal marine waters. Model performance is similar to that of efforts in other regions, which have incorporated models into water resource managers' decisions, indicating that the use of a mechanistic model in coastal Maine is feasible. PMID:26587258

  11. The effects of precipitation, river discharge, land use and coastal circulation on water quality in coastal Maine.

    PubMed

    Tilburg, Charles E; Jordan, Linda M; Carlson, Amy E; Zeeman, Stephan I; Yund, Philip O

    2015-07-01

    Faecal pollution in stormwater, wastewater and direct run-off can carry zoonotic pathogens to streams, rivers and the ocean, reduce water quality, and affect both recreational and commercial fishing areas of the coastal ocean. Typically, the closure of beaches and commercial fishing areas is governed by the testing for the presence of faecal bacteria, which requires an 18-24 h period for sample incubation. As water quality can change during this testing period, the need for accurate and timely predictions of coastal water quality has become acute. In this study, we: (i) examine the relationship between water quality, precipitation and river discharge at several locations within the Gulf of Maine, and (ii) use multiple linear regression models based on readily obtainable hydrometeorological measurements to predict water quality events at five coastal locations. Analysis of a 12 year dataset revealed that high river discharge and/or precipitation events can lead to reduced water quality; however, the use of only these two parameters to predict water quality can result in a number of errors. Analysis of a higher frequency, 2 year study using multiple linear regression models revealed that precipitation, salinity, river discharge, winds, seasonality and coastal circulation correlate with variations in water quality. Although there has been extensive development of regression models for freshwater, this is one of the first attempts to create a mechanistic model to predict water quality in coastal marine waters. Model performance is similar to that of efforts in other regions, which have incorporated models into water resource managers' decisions, indicating that the use of a mechanistic model in coastal Maine is feasible.

  12. Monitoring and Prediction of Precipitable Water Vapor using GPS data in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Kutubuddin; Althuwaynee, Omar F.; Corumluoglu, Ozsen

    2016-12-01

    Although Global Positioning System (GPS) primarily provide accurate estimates of position, velocity and time of the receiver, as the signals pass through the atmoshphere carrying its signatures, thus offers opportunities for atmoshpheric applications. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) is a vital component of the atmosphere and significantly influences atmospheric processes like rainfall and atmospheric temperature. The developing networks of continuously operating GPS can be used to efficiently estimate PWV. The Turkish Permanent GPS Network (TPGN) is employed to monitor PWV information in Turkey. This work primarily aims to derive long-term data of PWV by using atmospheric path delays observed through continuously operating TPGN from November 2014 to October 2015. A least square mathematical approach was then applied to establish the relation of the observed PWV to rainfall and temperature. The modeled PWV was correlated with PWV estimated from GPS data, with an average correlation of 67.10 %-88.60 %. The estimated root mean square error (RMSE) varied from 2.840 to 6.380, with an average of 4.697. Finally, data of TPGN, rainfall, and temperature were obtained for less than 2 months (November 2015 to December 2015) and assessed to validate the mathematical model. This study provides a basis for determining PWV by using rainfall and temperature data.

  13. Comparison of Precipitable Water Vapor Observations by GPS, Radiosonde and NWP Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-Geun; Baek, Jeongho; Cho, Jungho

    2009-12-01

    Precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model were compared to observations derived from ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers. The model data compared were from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model short-range forecasts on nested grids. The numerical experiments were performed by selecting the cloud microphysics schemes and for the comparisons, the Changma period of 2008 was selected. The observational data were derived from GPS measurements at 9-sites in South Korea over a 1-month period, in the middle of June-July 2008. In general, the WRF model demonstrated considerable skill in reproducing the temporal and spatial evolution of the PWV as depicted by the GPS estimations. The correlation between forecasts and GPS estimates of PWV depreciated slowly with increasing forecast times. Comparing simulations with a resolution of 18 km and 6 km showed no obvious PWV dependence on resolution. Besides, GPS and the model PWV data were found to be in quite good agreement with data derived from radiosondes. These results indicated that the GPS-derived PWV data, with high temporal and spatial resolution, are very useful for meteorological applications.

  14. Long Series of GNSS Integrated Precipitable Water as a Climate Change Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruczyk, Michał

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates information potential contained in tropospheric delay product for selected International GNSS Service (IGS) stations in climatologic research. Long time series of daily averaged Integrated Precipitable Water (IPW) can serve as climate indicator. The seasonal model of IPW change has been adjusted to the multi-year series (by the least square method). Author applied two modes: sinusoidal and composite (two or more oscillations). Even simple sinusoidal seasonal model (of daily IPW values series) clearly represents diversity of world climates. Residuals in periods from 10 up to 17 years are searched for some long-term IPW trend - self-evident climate change indicator. Results are ambiguous: for some stations or periods IPW trends are quite clear, the following years (or the other station) not visible. Method of fitting linear trend to IPW series does not influence considerably the value of linear trend. The results are mostly influenced by series length, completeness and data (e.g. meteorological) quality. The longer and more homogenous IPW series, the better chance to estimate the magnitude of climatologic IPW changes.

  15. Real-time retrieval of precipitable water vapor from GPS and BeiDou observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixian; Li, Xingxing; Nilsson, Tobias; Ning, Tong; Heinkelmann, Robert; Ge, Maorong; Glaser, Susanne; Schuh, Harald

    2015-09-01

    The rapid development of the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) brings a promising prospect for the real-time retrieval of zenith tropospheric delays (ZTD) and precipitable water vapor (PWV), which is of great benefit for supporting the time-critical meteorological applications such as nowcasting or severe weather event monitoring. In this study, we develop a real-time ZTD/PWV processing method based on Global Positioning System (GPS) and BDS observations. The performance of ZTD and PWV derived from BDS observations using real-time precise point positioning (PPP) technique is carefully investigated. The contribution of combining BDS and GPS for ZTD/PWV retrieving is evaluated as well. GPS and BDS observations of a half-year period for 40 globally distributed stations from the International GNSS Service Multi-GNSS Experiment and BeiDou Experiment Tracking Network are processed. The results show that the real-time BDS-only ZTD series agree well with the GPS-only ZTD series in general: the RMS values are about 11-16 mm (about 2-3 mm in PWV). Furthermore, the real-time ZTD derived from GPS-only, BDS-only, and GPS/BDS combined solutions are compared with those derived from the Very Long Baseline Interferometry. The comparisons show that the BDS can contribute to real-time meteorological applications, slightly less accurately than GPS. More accurate and reliable water vapor estimates, about 1.3-1.8 mm in PWV, can be obtained if the BDS observations are combined with the GPS observations in the real-time PPP data processing. The PWV comparisons with radiosondes further confirm the performance of BDS-derived real-time PWV and the benefit of adding BDS to standard GPS processing.

  16. GPS-derived Precipitable Water Vapour in Antarctica and validation with radiosoundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.; Tomasi, C.; Petkov, B.

    2012-12-01

    The capability of the GPS in retrieving the precipitable water vapour (PWV) content at low- and mid-latitudes has been amply investigated by several studies. In Polar Regions, beyond the classical positioning application, the use of GPS observations for sensing the atmosphere is of particular interest due to its easy and unmanned operability. It is well known that, in those areas, the atmospheric water vapour content is approximately one third or less than that present at mid latitudes and that on the Antarctic Plateau the PWV drops down to less than a few mm. As a consequence, the use of GPS data in sensing the atmosphere can be reliably applied only on coastal areas, were the PWV is large enough to exceed the sensitivity of the method. Radio-soundings are periodically performed at several coastal Antarctic stations, where permanent GPS equipments are also installed. The co-location of GPS and radio-soundings allows a validation of the PWV derived from the geodetic data. In this investigation we present the results of the analysis of continuous long time series of GPS data acquired at Mawson (MAW1), Casey (CAS1), Davis (DAV1), McMurdo (MCM4) and Mario Zucchelli (TNB1) stations during twelve years spanning 1999-2010. Particularly, at each site, the PWV is determined with GPS data and the same parameter derived from the analysis of the radio-sounding is used for validation. The GPS analysis is optimized for Antarctic data, using specific atmospheric models (e.g. the Vienna Mapping Function) and particular care in the data screening and elimination. The sites to be analyzed were selected according to the radiosonde equipment: the Vaisala sensors' readings were corrected specifically with ad hoc models.

  17. Measurement of Low Amounts of Precipitable Water Vapor Using Ground-Based Millimeterwave Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racette, Paul E.; Westwater, Ed R.; Han, Yong; Gasiewski, Albin J.; Klein, Marian; Cimini, Domenico; Jones, David C.; Manning, Will; Kim, Edward J.; Wang, James R.; Leuski, Vladimir; Kiedron, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Extremely dry conditions characterized by amounts of precipitable water vapor (PWV) as low as 1-2 mm commonly occur in high-latitude regions during the winter months. While such dry atmospheres carry only a few percent of the latent heat energy compared to tropical atmospheres, the effects of low vapor amounts on the polar radiation budget - both directly through modulation of longwave radiation and indirectly through the formation of clouds - are considerable. Accurate measurements of PWV during such dry conditions are needed to improve polar radiation models for use in understanding and predicting change in the climatically sensitive polar regions. To this end, the strong water-vapor absorption line at 183.310 GHz provides a unique means of measuring low amounts of PWV. Weighting function analysis, forward model calculations based upon a 7-yr radiosonde dataset, and retrieval simulations consistently predict that radiometric measurements made using several millimeter-wavelength (MMW) channels near the 183-GHz line, together with established microwave (MW) measurements near the 22.235-GHz water-vapor line and ∼31-GHz atmospheric absorption window can be used to determine within 5% uncertainty the full range of PWV expected in the Arctic. This combined capability stands in spite of accuracy limitations stemming from uncertainties due to the sensitivity of the vertical distribution of temperature and water vapor at MMW channels. In this study the potential of MMW radiometry using the 183-GHz line for measuring low amounts of PWV is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. The study uses data obtained during March 1999 as part of an experiment conducted at the Department of Energy's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site near Barrow, Alaska. Several radiometers from both NOAA and NASA were deployed during the experiment to provide the first combined MMW and MW ground-based dataset during dry Arctic conditions. Single-channel retrievals of PWV were

  18. Instrumenting Wildlife Water Developments to Measure Precipitation and Estimate Runoff in Remote Catchments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Nevada, available data on precipitation and runoff in remote catchments are extremely limited. The National Weather Service’s Cooperative Observer Network (COOP) includes 178 weather stations, most of which collect precipitation data and qualitative weather observations. Most of these stations ar...

  19. Using Wildlife Water Developments to Measure Precipitation and Estimate Runoff in Remote Catchments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Nevada, available data on precipitation and runoff in remote catchments is extremely limited. The National Weather Service’s Cooperative Observer Network (COOP) includes 178 weather stations, most of which collect precipitation data and qualitative weather observations. Most of these stations a...

  20. Water and sediment yield response to multi-year precipitation variations in a central Oklahoma watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Persistent, multi-year departures of annual precipitation from long term mean have been observed in various parts of the United States. The Dust Bowl years in the central plains and the recent drought in the West are examples of such persistent departures. Departures in annual precipitation that las...

  1. Summary and statistical analysis of precipitation and groundwater data for Brunswick County, North Carolina, Water Year 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Strickland, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater conditions in Brunswick County, North Carolina, have been monitored continuously since 2000 through the operation and maintenance of groundwater-level observation wells in the surficial, Castle Hayne, and Peedee aquifers of the North Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer system. Groundwater-resource conditions for the Brunswick County area were evaluated by relating the normal range (25th to 75th percentile) monthly mean groundwater-level and precipitation data for water years 2001 to 2008 to median monthly mean groundwater levels and monthly sum of daily precipitation for water year 2008. Summaries of precipitation and groundwater conditions for the Brunswick County area and hydrographs and statistics of continuous groundwater levels collected during the 2008 water year are presented in this report. Groundwater levels varied by aquifer and geographic location within Brunswick County, but were influenced by drought conditions and groundwater withdrawals. Water levels were normal in two of the eight observation wells and below normal in the remaining six wells. Seasonal Kendall trend analysis performed on more than 9 years of monthly mean groundwater-level data collected in an observation well located within the Brunswick County well field indicated there is a strong downward trend, with water levels declining at a rate of about 2.2 feet per year.

  2. Effect of precipitation change on water balance and WUE of the winter wheat-summer maize rotation in the North China Plain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited precipitation restricts crops yield in the North China Plain, where high levels of production depend largely on irrigation. Establishing the optimal irrigation scheduling according to the crop water requirements (CWR) and precipitation is the key factor to achieve rational water use. Precipi...

  3. NASA-Modified Precipitation Products to Improve EPA Nonpoint Source Water Quality Modeling for the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nigro, Joseph; Toll, David; Partington, Ed; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Lee, Shihyan; Gutierrez-Magness, Angelica; Engman, Ted; Arsenault, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that over 20,000 water bodies within the United States do not meet water quality standards. Ninety percent of the impairments are typically caused by nonpoint sources. One of the regulations in the Clean Water Act of 1972 requires States to monitor the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), or the amount of pollution that can be carried by a water body before it is determined to be "polluted", for any watershed in the U.S.. In response to this mandate, the EPA developed Better Assessment Science Integrating Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) as a Decision Support Tool (DST) for assessing pollution and to guide the decision making process for improving water quality. One of the models in BASINS, the Hydrological Simulation Program -- Fortran (HSPF), computes daily stream flow rates and pollutant concentration at each basin outlet. By design, precipitation and other meteorological data from weather stations serve as standard model input. In practice, these stations may be unable to capture the spatial heterogeneity of precipitation events especially if they are few and far between. An attempt was made to resolve this issue by substituting station data with NASA modified/NOAA precipitation data. Using these data within HSPF, stream flow was calculated for seven watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Basin during low flow periods, convective storm periods, and annual flows. In almost every case, the modeling performance of HSPF increased when using the NASA-modified precipitation data, resulting in better stream flow statistics and, ultimately, in improved water quality assessment.

  4. Infiltration/ground water linkage in the southwest: Response of shallow ground water to interannual variations of precipitation, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Groffman, A. R.

    2002-01-01

    Hydraulic gradients, residence times and the hydrochemistry of shallow ground water are linked to the episodic precipitation and recharge events characteristic of the arid southwest. In this region, the amount of precipitation, and corresponding biomass, is dependant upon altitude with greater frequency and duration in the montane highlands and less in the desert lowlands. Results from a four-year study at the Rio Calaveras research site in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico show a strong correlation between the physical and hydrochemical properties of shallow ground water and variations of seasonal precipitation and infiltration. For example, the water table shows a dramatic response to snowmelt infiltration during years of abundant snow pack (El Nifio) and diminished response during years of reduced snow pack (La Niiia). The chemical structure of shallow ground water is also affected by the precipitation regime, primarily by variations in the flux of reductants (organic carbon) and oxidants (dissolved oxygen) from the vadose zone to the water table. Generally, oxic conditions persist during spring snowmelt infiltration shifting to anoxic conditions as biotic and abiotic processes transform dissolved oxygen. Other redox-sensitive constituents (ferrous iron, manganese, sulfate, nitrate, and nitrite) show increasing and decreasing concentrations as redox fluctuates seasonally and year-to-year. The cycling of these redox sensitive solutes in the subsurface depends upon the character of the aquifer materials, the biomass at the surface, moisture and temperature regime of the vadose zone, and frequency of infiltration events.

  5. Analyses of extreme precipitation and runoff events including uncertainties and reliability in design and management of urban water infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailegeorgis, Teklu T.; Alfredsen, Knut

    2017-01-01

    There is a need for assessment of uncertainties and hence effects on reliability of design and management of stormwater pipes due to the prevalence of urban floods trigged by modification of land cover and high precipitation intensities respectively due to increasing urbanization and changing climate. Observed annual maximum series (AMS) of extreme precipitation intensities of 17 durations (1-min to 1440-min) and runoff records of 27 years from a 21.255 ha (23% impervious, 35% built-up and 41% open areas) Risvollan catchment in Trondheim City were used. Using a balanced bootstrap resampling (BBRS) with frequency analysis, we quantified considerable uncertainty in precipitation and runoff quantiles due to the sampling variability of systematic observations (e.g., -43% to +49% relative differences from the quantile estimates for the original sample). These differences are higher than suggested increase in design rainfall and floods by many countries for climate change adjustment. The uncertainties in IDF curves and derived design storm hyetographs are found to have large effects on the reliability of sizing of stormwater pipes. The study also indicated low validity of the assumptions on extreme precipitation and runoff relationships in the return period-based method for the partially paved urban catchment: (i) maximum of only 46% of the AMS of extreme precipitation and runoff events occurred concurrently and (ii) T-year return period extreme precipitation events do not necessarily result in T-year flood events. These indicate that there are effects of snowmelt seasonality, and probably catchment moisture states and interactions between the flows in subsurface media and pipes. The results substantiate the need for better understanding of relationships between precipitation and runoff extremes and urban runoff generation process, and importance of uncertainty assessment and application of reliability-based methods for design and management of water infrastructure.

  6. Investigation of the Potential for 90Sr Immobilization in INTEC Perched Water via Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiko Fujita; Karen E. Wright; William A. Smith

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this work is to evaluate the applicability of a biogeochemical sequestration approach for remediation of 90Sr contamination in perched water zones underlying the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The approach is based on the accelerated co-precipitation of the contaminant in calcite, where the acceleration is catalyzed by the microbial urea hydrolysis. We have previously demonstrated the potential for this remediation mechanism to immobilize strontium. Urea hydrolysis promotes calcite precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing groundwater pH and alkalinity. Ureolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many environmental microorganisms. In the Snake River Plain Aquifer, which is saturated with respect to calcite, any co-precipitated 90Sr should be effectively sequestered over the long-term, even after return to pre-manipulation conditions. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the NH4+ ions produced by the reaction can exchange with cations sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for re-capture via a more stable mechanism (co-precipitation rather than adsorption).

  7. Isotopic equilibrium between precipitation and water vapor: evidence from continental rains in central Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, K.; Gerlein, C.; Kemeny, P. C.; Caylor, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    An accurate understanding of the relationships between the isotopic composition of liquid water and that of water vapor in the environment can help describe hydrologic processes across many scales. One such relationship is the isotopic equilibrium between falling raindrops and the surrounding vapor. The degree of equilibration is used to model the isotopic composition of precipitation in isotope-enable general circulation models and land-atmosphere exchange models. Although this equilibrium has been a topic of isotope hydrology research for more than four decades, few studies have included vapor measurements to validate modeling efforts. Recent advances in laser technology have allowed for in situ vapor measurements at high temporal resolution (e.g., >1 Hz). Here we present concomitant rain and vapor measurements for a series of 17 rain events during the 'Continental' rainy season (June through August) at Mpala Research Center in central Kenya. Rain samples (n=218) were collected at intervals of 2 to 35 minutes (median of 3 minutes) depending on the rain rate (0.4 to 10.5 mm/hr). The volume-weighted mean rain values for δ18O, δ2H and D-excess (δ2H - 8* δ18O) were 0.1 ‰, 10.7 ‰, and 10.1 ‰. These values are more enriched than the annual weighted means reported for the area (-2.2 ‰, -7.6 ‰, and 11.0 ‰, respectively). Vapor was measured continuously at ~2Hz (DLT-100, Los Gatos Research), with an inverted funnel intake 4m above the ground surface. The mean vapor isotopic composition during the rain events was -10.0 +/- 1.2 ‰ (1 σ) for δ18O and -73.9 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. The difference between the rain sample isotopic composition and that of liquid in isotopic equilibrium with the corresponding vapor at the ambient temperature was 0.8 +/- 2.2 ‰ for δ18O and 6.2 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. This disequilibrium was found to correlate with the natural log of rain rate (R2 of 0.26 for δ18O and 0.46 for δ2H), with lower rain rates having larger

  8. GPS-derived Precipitable Water Vapour in Antarctica and validation with radiosoundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negusini, Monia; Sarti, Pierguido; Tomasi, Claudio; Petkov, Boyan; Capra, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    In Polar regions, the atmospheric precipitable water vapour (PWV) content is approximately one third or less than that present at mid latitudes. On the Antarctic Plateau, it drops down to less than a few mm. As a consequence, the use of GPS data in sensing the atmosphere can be reliably applied only on coastal areas, were the PWV is large enough to exceed the sensitivity of the method. Radio-soundings (RS) are periodically performed at several coastal Antarctic stations, where permanent GPS equipments are also installed. The sites to be analyzed were selected according to the radiosonde equipment: the Vaisala sensors' readings were corrected specifically with ad hoc models. The co-location of GPS and radio-soundings allows us to validate the PWV content with totally independent techniques. In this investigation we present the results of the analysis of continuous long time series of GPS data acquired at Mawson (MAW1), Casey (CAS1), Davis (DAV1), McMurdo (MCM4) and Mario Zucchelli (TNB1) stations over twelve years (1999-2010). Particularly, at each site, the PWV is determined with GPS data and the same parameter derived from the analysis of the radio-sounding is used for validation. The GPS analysis is optimized for Antarctic data, using specific atmospheric models (e.g. the Vienna Mapping Function) and particular care in the data screening and elimination. The ZHD values are extracted from a grid model provided by the TU Wien (http://ggosatm.hg.tuwien.ac.at/DELAY/GRID) and bilienarly interpolated at the site location. At MZS, surface met parameters are available and used to compute the ZHD which is compared with the corresponding grid-derived ZHD series. We find discrepancies and a seasonal signal that straightforwardly impact the PW time series.

  9. Stable isotope compositions of waters in the Great Basin, United States 3. Comparison of groundwaters with modern precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.I.; Friedman, I.; Veronda, G.; Johnson, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Groundwater samples from wells and springs, scattered over most of the Great Basin province, were collected and analyzed for their isotopic makeup. They were augmented by previously published isotopic data on groundwaters from southeast California and by several hundred unpublished isotopic analyses. The ratio of 2H (deuterium, D) to 1H, in water samples from valleys in parts of California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Utah, are here compared with the winter, summer, and annual isotopic compositions of precipitation falling in or near the sampled areas. The main goal of this study was to identify basins where the groundwaters have isotopic compositions that are "lighter" (depleted in the heavier isotope, D) relative to modern winter precipitation. Where these basins do not adjoin substantially higher terrain, we consider those light groundwaters to be of Pleistocene age and thus more than 10,000 years old. Where the groundwater is 10 to 19??? lighter than local winter precipitation, we consider it to be possibly an indication of Pleistocene water; where the ??D makeup is >20??? lighter, we consider it to be probably Pleistocene water. More than 80 sites underlain by waters of possible or probable Pleistocene age were identified.

  10. Concentration of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus from water samples by tangential flow filtration and polyethylene glycol precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, W.N.; Winton, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was concentrated from water samples by polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation, tangential flow filtration (TFF), and by a combination of TFF followed by PEG precipitation of the retentate. Used alone, PEG increased virus titers more than 200-fold, and the efficiency of recovery was as great as 100%. Used alone, TFF concentrated IHNV more than 20-fold, and average recovery was 70%. When the two techniques were combined, 10-L water samples were reduced to about 300 mL by TFF and the virus was precipitated with PEG into a 1 to 2 g pellet; total recovery was as great as 100%. The combined techniques were used to isolate IHNV from water samples taken from a river containing adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and from a hatchery pond containing adult spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha). The combination of these methods was effective in concentrating and detecting IHNV from water containing only three infectious particles per 10-L sample.

  11. Precipitation isotopes link regional climate patterns to water supply in a tropical mountain forest, eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, Martha A.; Murphy, Sheila F.

    2014-01-01

    Like many mountainous areas in the tropics, watersheds in the Luquillo Mountains of eastern Puerto Rico have abundant rainfall and stream discharge and provide much of the water supply for the densely populated metropolitan areas nearby. Projected changes in regional temperature and atmospheric dynamics as a result of global warming suggest that water availability will be affected by changes in rainfall patterns. It is essential to understand the relative importance of different weather systems to water supply to determine how changes in rainfall patterns, interacting with geology and vegetation, will affect the water balance. To help determine the links between climate and water availability, stable isotope signatures of precipitation from different weather systems were established to identify those that are most important in maintaining streamflow and groundwater recharge. Precipitation stable isotope values in the Luquillo Mountains had a large range, from fog/cloud water with δ2H, δ18O values as high as +12 ‰, −0.73 ‰ to tropical storm rain with values as low as −127 ‰, −16.8 ‰. Temporal isotope values exhibit a reverse seasonality from those observed in higher latitude continental watersheds, with higher isotopic values in the winter and lower values in the summer. Despite the higher volume of convective and low-pressure system rainfall, stable isotope analyses indicated that under the current rainfall regime, frequent trade -wind orographic showers contribute much of the groundwater recharge and stream base flow. Analysis of rain events using 20 years of 15 -minute resolution data at a mountain station (643 m) showed an increasing trend in rainfall amount, in agreement with increased precipitable water in the atmosphere, but differing from climate model projections of drying in the region. The mean intensity of rain events also showed an increasing trend. The determination of recharge sources from stable isotope tracers indicates that water

  12. A Feasibility Study for Simultaneous Measurements of Water Vapor and Precipitation Parameters using a Three-frequency Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, R.; Liao, L.; Tian, L.

    2005-01-01

    The radar return powers from a three-frequency radar, with center frequency at 22.235 GHz and upper and lower frequencies chosen with equal water vapor absorption coefficients, can be used to estimate water vapor density and parameters of the precipitation. A linear combination of differential measurements between the center and lower frequencies on one hand and the upper and lower frequencies on the other provide an estimate of differential water vapor absorption. The coupling between the precipitation and water vapor estimates is generally weak but increases with bandwidth and the amount of non-Rayleigh scattering of the hydrometeors. The coupling leads to biases in the estimates of water vapor absorption that are related primarily to the phase state and the median mass diameter of the hydrometeors. For a down-looking radar, path-averaged estimates of water vapor absorption are possible under rain-free as well as raining conditions by using the surface returns at the three frequencies. Simulations of the water vapor attenuation retrieval show that the largest source of error typically arises from the variance in the measured radar return powers. Although the error can be mitigated by a combination of a high pulse repetition frequency, pulse compression, and averaging in range and time, the radar receiver must be stable over the averaging period. For fractional bandwidths of 20% or less, the potential exists for simultaneous measurements at the three frequencies with a single antenna and transceiver, thereby significantly reducing the cost and mass of the system.

  13. Chemistry and isotopic composition of precipitation and surface waters in Khumbu valley (Nepal Himalaya): N dynamics of high elevation basins.

    PubMed

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Polesello, Stefano; Sacchi, Elisa

    2014-07-01

    We monitored the chemical and isotopic compositions of wet depositions, at the Pyramid International Laboratory (5050 ma.s.l.), and surrounding surface waters, in the Khumbu basin, to understand precipitation chemistry and to obtain insights regarding ecosystem responses to atmospheric inputs. The major cations in the precipitation were NH4(+) and Ca(2+), whereas the main anion was HCO3(-), which constituted approximately 69% of the anions, followed by NO3(-), SO4(2-) and Cl(-). Data analysis suggested that Na(+), Cl(-) and K(+) were derived from the long-range transport of marine aerosols. Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and HCO3(-) were related to rock and soil dust contributions and the NO3(-) and SO4(2-) concentrations were derived from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, NH4(+) was derived from gaseous NH3 scavenging. The isotopic composition of weekly precipitation ranged from -1.9 to -23.2‰ in δ(18)O, and from -0.8 to -174‰ in δ(2)H, with depleted values characterizing the central part of the monsoon period. The chemical composition of the stream water was dominated by calcite and/or gypsum dissolution. However, the isotopic composition of the stream water did not fully reflect the composition of the monsoon precipitation, which suggested that other water sources contributed to the stream flow. Precipitation contents for all ions were the lowest ones among those measured in high elevation sites around the world. During the monsoon periods the depositions were not substantially influenced by anthropogenic inputs, while in pre- and post-monsoon seasons the Himalayas could not represent an effective barrier for airborne pollution. In the late monsoon phase, the increase of ionic contents in precipitation could also be due to a change in the moisture source. The calculated atmospheric N load (0.30 kg ha(-1) y(-1)) was considerably lower than the levels that were measured in other high-altitude environments. Nevertheless, the NO3(-) concentrations in the surface waters

  14. The HAWC observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYoung, Tyce; HAWC Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a new very high energy water Cherenkov gamma ray telescope, now under construction at 4100 m altitude at Sierra Negra, Mexico. Due to its increased altitude, larger surface area and improved design, HAWC will be about 15 times more sensitive than its predecessor, Milagro. With its wide field of view and high duty factor, HAWC will be an excellent instrument for the studies of diffuse gamma ray emission, the high energy spectra of Galactic gamma ray sources, and transient emission from extragalactic objects such as GRBs and AGN, as well as surveying a large fraction of the VHE sky.

  15. The annual and interannual variabilities of precipitable water, surface wind speed, and sea surface temperature over the tropical Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy

    1989-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SSMR) provided simultaneous measurements of three geophysical parameters, each of which describing a certain aspect of the evolution of the 1982-1983 ENSO: the sea-surface temperature (T), precipitable water (W), and surface-wind speed (U). In this paper, values derived from the SSMR were compared with in situ measurements from ships, research buoys, and operational island stations in the tropical Pacific between January 1980 and October 1983, demonstrating the temporal and spatial coherence of the SSMR measurements. The results show that the variabilities of the surface convergence, sea surface temperature, and precipitable water are related. It was found that W anomalies were not always colocated with T anomalies, and that W anomalies were often associated with negative U anomalies, interpreted as surface convergence.

  16. Streamflow and selected precipitation data for Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada, water years 1983-85

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pabst, M.E.; Beck, D.A.; Glancy, P.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Streamflow and precipitation data collected at and near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, during water years 1983-85, are presented. The data were collected and compiled as part of the studies the U.S. Geological Survey is making, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, to characterize surface water hydrology in the Yucca Mountain area. Streamflow data include daily mean discharges and peak discharges at 4 complete-record gaging stations and peak discharges at 10 crest-stage, partial-record stations and 12 miscellaneous sites. Precipitation data include cumulative totals at 12 stations maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey and daily totals at 17 stations maintained by the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

  17. Streamflow and Selected Precipitation Data for Yucca Mountain Region, Southern Nevada and Eastern California, Water Years 1986-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, Thomas G.; Bauer, David J.; Martinez, Clair M.

    1994-01-01

    Streamflow and precipitation data collected at and near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, during water years 1986-90 are presented in this report. The data were collected and compiled as part of the studies by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, to characterize surface-water hydrology in the Yucca Mountain area. Streamflow data include daily-mean discharges and peak discharges at 5 continuous-record gaging stations, and peak discharges at 10 crest-stage, partial-record stations and 2 miscellaneous sites. Precipitation data include cumulative totals at 20 stations maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey and daily totals at 15 stations maintained by the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

  18. Acid precipitation and drinking water quality in the eastern United States. Final report, November 1981-January 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, F.; Taylor, J.A.; Symons, G.E.; Collins, J.J.; Schock, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Research was conducted to provide accurate modern and historical data on drinking water quality and the possible effect of acid precipitation on water samples. Samples of source raw and finished water were collected from more than 300 surface and groundwater supplies in the New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia, and North Carolina. The samples were analyzed at EPA laboratories. Historical records were obtained dating back to 1886. Acid rain may dissolve harmful elements from soils and from water supply distribution systems. Because soils can alter the character of acid rain through buffering, causal relationships are difficult to identify. A helpful approach to this problem is the use of indices of water supply sensitiviy and corrosiveness. With these indices, drinking water standards, and reliable chemical data, an assessment of water supply characteristics has been accomplished. Though solution products of acid rain in the water supply sources studied do not exceed EPA Primary Drinking Water Regulations, a large number of tests for aluminum showed levels that could be of concern to kidney dialysis patients. Because of the present water quality conditions (low alkalinity and pH) at numerous water sources, future acid deposition could be expected to have a detrimental effect on water quality. 42 references, 15 figures, 42 tables.

  19. An assessment of two automated snow water equivalent instruments during the WMO Solid Precipitation Intercomparison Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Craig D.; Kontu, Anna; Laffin, Richard; Pomeroy, John W.

    2017-01-01

    During the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Solid Precipitation Intercomparison Experiment (SPICE), automated measurements of snow water equivalent (SWE) were made at the Sodankylä (Finland), Weissfluhjoch (Switzerland) and Caribou Creek (Canada) SPICE sites during the northern hemispheric winters of 2013/14 and 2014/15. Supplementary intercomparison measurements were made at Fortress Mountain (Kananaskis, Canada) during the 2013/14 winter. The objectives of this analysis are to compare automated SWE measurements with a reference, comment on their performance and, where possible, to make recommendations on how to best use the instruments and interpret their measurements. Sodankylä, Caribou Creek and Fortress Mountain hosted a Campbell Scientific CS725 passive gamma radiation SWE sensor. Sodankylä and Weissfluhjoch hosted a Sommer Messtechnik SSG1000 snow scale. The CS725 operating principle is based on measuring the attenuation of soil emitted gamma radiation by the snowpack and relating the attenuation to SWE. The SSG1000 measures the mass of the overlying snowpack directly by using a weighing platform and load cell. Manual SWE measurements were obtained at the intercomparison sites on a bi-weekly basis over the accumulation-ablation periods using bulk density samplers. These manual measurements are considered to be the reference for the intercomparison. Results from Sodankylä and Caribou Creek showed that the CS725 generally overestimates SWE as compared to manual measurements by roughly 30-35 % with correlations (r2) as high as 0.99 for Sodankylä and 0.90 for Caribou Creek. The RMSE varied from 30 to 43 mm water equivalent (mm w.e.) and from 18 to 25 mm w.e. at Sodankylä and Caribou Creek, which had respective SWE maximums of approximately 200 and 120 mm w.e. The correlation at Fortress Mountain was 0.94 (RMSE of 48 mm w.e. with a maximum SWE of approximately 650 mm w.e.) with no systematic overestimation. The SSG1000 snow scale, having a different

  20. Exploring the influence of precipitation extremes and human water use on total water storage (TWS) changes in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandu; Forootan, Ehsan; Schumacher, Maike; Awange, Joseph L.; Müller Schmied, Hannes

    2016-03-01

    Climate extremes such as droughts and intense rainfall events are expected to strongly influence global/regional water resources in addition to the growing demands for freshwater. This study examines the impacts of precipitation extremes and human water usage on total water storage (TWS) over the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) River Basin in South Asia. Monthly TWS changes derived from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) (2002-2014) and soil moisture from three reanalyses (1979-2014) are used to estimate new extreme indices. These indices are applied in conjunction with standardized precipitation indices (SPI) to explore the impacts of precipitation extremes on TWS in the region. The results indicate that although long-term precipitation do not indicate any significant trends over the two subbasins (Ganges and Brahmaputra-Meghna), there is significant decline in rainfall (9.0 ± 4.0 mm/decade) over the Brahmaputra-Meghna River Basin from 1998 to 2014. Both river basins exhibit a rapid decline of TWS from 2002 to 2014 (Ganges: 12.2 ± 3.4 km3/yr and Brahmaputra-Meghna: 9.1 ± 2.7 km3/yr). While the Ganges River Basin has been regaining TWS (5.4 ± 2.2 km3/yr) from 2010 onward, the Brahmaputra-Meghna River Basin exhibits a further decline (13.0 ± 3.2 km3/yr) in TWS from 2011 onward. The impact of human water consumption on TWS appears to be considerably higher in Ganges compared to Brahmaputra-Meghna, where it is mainly concentrated over Bangladesh. The interannual water storage dynamics are found to be strongly associated with meteorological forcing data such as precipitation. In particular, extreme drought conditions, such as those of 2006 and 2009, had profound negative impacts on the TWS, where groundwater resources are already being unsustainably exploited.

  1. Stable isotopes in monsoon precipitation and water vapour in Nagqu, Tibet, and their implications for monsoon moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Siyuan; Richards, Keith

    2016-09-01

    Understanding climate variations over the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau has become essential because the high plateau sustains various ecosystems and water sources, and impacts on the Asian monsoon system. This paper provides new information from isotopic signals in meteoric water and atmospheric water vapour on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau using high frequency observation data over a relatively short period. The aim is to explore temporal moisture changes and annual variations at the onset and during the summer monsoon season at a transitional site with respect to the monsoon influence. Data show that high frequency and short period observations can reveal typical moisture changes from the pre-monsoon to the monsoon seasons (2010), and the large variation in isotopic signals in different years with respect to active/inactive periods during a mature phase of the monsoon (2011), especially inferring from the temporal changes in the d-excess of precipitation and its relationship with δ18O values, when higher d-excess is found in the pre-monsoon precipitation. In this transition zone on a daily basis, δ18O values in precipitation are controlled mainly by the amount of rainfall during the monsoon season, while temperature seems more important before the onset of monsoon. Furthermore, the ;amount effect; is significant for night-time rain events. From comparison of signals in both the precipitation and water vapour, an inconsistent relationship between d-excess values suggests various moisture fluxes are active in a short period. The temporal pattern of isotopic signal change from the onset of the monsoon to the mature monsoon phase provides information about the larger circulation dynamics of the Asian monsoon.

  2. Modeling of Soil and Tree Water Status Dynamics in a Mixed-Conifer Forest of the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmans, J. W.; Rings, J.; Kamai, T.; Mollaei Kandelous, M.; Hartsough, P. C.; Vrugt, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Trees play a key role in controlling the water and energy balance at the land-air surface. By changing water content of soil and atmosphere, trees influence meteorological, climatological and hydrological cycles. Numerical models allow simulating the relevant hydrological processes; most importantly the movement of water as it is transported through the soil, taken up by roots into the tree and ultimately transpired into the atmosphere along water potential gradients across the soil-root-tree-atmosphere continuum (SPAC). The results of a multi-year deployment of soil moisture sensors to study the hydrologic/biotic interactions in a mixed-conifer forest in the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) will be presented. To better understand root-soil water interactions, a mature white fir (Abies concolor) and the surrounding root zone was continuously monitored (sap flow, canopy stem water potential, soil moisture, soil water potential and temperature), to characterize the hydraulics SPAC. In addition, we present a hydrodynamic model, simulating unsaturated flow in the soil and tree with stress functions controlling spatially distributed root uptake and canopy transpiration. To parameterize the in-situ tree water relationships, we combine the numerical model with observational data in an optimization framework, minimizing residuals between modeled and measured observational data.

  3. Precipitation-runoff processes in the Feather River basin, northeastern California, and streamflow predictability, water years 1971-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koczot, Kathryn M.; Jeton, Anne E.; McGurk, Bruce; Dettinger, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Precipitation-runoff processes in the Feather River Basin of northern California determine short- and long-term streamflow variations that are of considerable local, State, and Federal concern. The river is an important source of water and power for the region. The basin forms the headwaters of the California State Water Project. Lake Oroville, at the outlet of the basin, plays an important role in flood management, water quality, and the health of fisheries as far downstream as the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Existing models of the river simulate streamflow in hourly, daily, weekly, and seasonal time steps, but cannot adequately describe responses to climate and land-use variations in the basin. New spatially detailed precipitation-runoff models of the basin have been developed to simulate responses to climate and land-use variations at a higher spatial resolution than was available previously. This report characterizes daily rainfall, snowpack evolution, runoff, water and energy balances, and streamflow variations from, and within, the basin above Lake Oroville. The new model's ability to predict streamflow is assessed. The Feather River Basin sits astride geologic, topographic, and climatic divides that establish a hydrologic character that is relatively unusual among the basins of the Sierra Nevada. It straddles a north-south geologic transition in the Sierra Nevada between the granitic bedrock that underlies and forms most of the central and southern Sierra Nevada and volcanic bedrock that underlies the northernmost parts of the range (and basin). Because volcanic bedrock generally is more permeable than granitic, the northern, volcanic parts of the basin contribute larger fractions of ground-water flow to streams than do the southern, granitic parts of the basin. The Sierra Nevada topographic divide forms a high altitude ridgeline running northwest to southeast through the middle of the basin. The topography east of this ridgeline is more like the rain

  4. Effect of some organic solvent-water mixtures composition on precipitated calcium carbonate in carbonation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopacka-Łyskawa, Donata; Kościelska, Barbara; Karczewski, Jakub

    2015-05-01

    Precipitated calcium carbonate particles were obtained during carbonation of calcium hydroxide slurry with carbon dioxide. Aqueous solutions of isopropyl alcohol, n-butanol and glycerol were used as solvents. Concentration of organic additives in the reactive mixture was from 0% to 20% (vol). Precipitation process were performed in a stirred tank reactor equipped with gas distributor. Multimodal courses of particles size distribution were determined for produced CaCO3 particles. Calcium carbonate as calcite was precipitated in all experiments. The mean Sauter diameter of CaCO3 particles decreased when the concentration of all used organic additives increased. The amount of small particle fraction in the product increased with the increasing concentration of organic solvents. Similar physical properties of used liquid phase resulted in the similar characteristics of obtained particles.

  5. Temporal trends in the acidity of precipitation and surface waters of New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Norman E.; Schroeder, Roy A.; Troutman, David E.

    1982-01-01

    Statistical analyses of precipitation data from a nine-station monitoring network indicate little change in pH from 1965-78 within New York State as a whole but suggest that pH of bulk precipitation has decreased in the western part of the State by approximately 0.2 pH units since 1965 and increased in the eastern part by a similar amount. This trend is equivalent to an annual change in hydrogen-ion concentration of 0.2 microequivalents per liter. An average annual increase in precipitation quantity of 2 to 3 percent since 1965 has resulted in an increased acid load in the western and central parts of the State. During 1965-78, sulfate concentration in precipitation decreased an average of 1-4 percent annually. In general, no trend in nitrate was detected. Calculated trends in hydrogen-ion concentration do not correlate with measured trends of sulfate and nitrate, which suggests variable neutralization of hydrogen ion, possibly by particles from dry deposition. Neutralization has produced an increase of about 0.3 pH units in nonurban areas and 0.7 pH units in urban areas. Statistical analyses of chemical data from several streams throughout New York suggest that sulfate concentrations decreased an average of 1 to 4 percent per year. This decrease is comparable to the sulfate decrease in precipitation during the same period. In most areas of the State, chemical contributions from urbanization and farming, as well as the neutralizing effect of carbonate soils, conceal whatever effects acid precipitation may have on pH of streams.

  6. Effects of landuse and precipitation on pesticides and water quality in playa lakes of the southern high plains.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Todd A; Salice, Christopher J; Erickson, Richard A; McMurry, Scott T; Cox, Stephen B; Smith, Loren M

    2013-06-01

    The 25000 playa wetlands within the Southern High Plains (SHP) of the United States of America (USA) are the dominant hydrogeomorphic feature in the region, providing habitat for numerous plants and wildlife. The SHP are among the most intensively cultivated regions; there are concerns over the degradation and/or loss of playa wetland habitat. We examined water quality in playa wetlands surrounded by both grassland and agriculture and measured water concentrations of pesticides used on cotton (acephate, trifluralin, malathion, pendimethalin, tribufos, bifenthrin, λ-cyhalothrin, acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam), the dominant crop in the SHP. Pesticides used on cotton were detected in water samples collected from all playas. Precipitation events and the amount of cultivation were related to pesticide concentrations in sediment and water. Our results show that pesticide concentrations were related in some circumstances to time, precipitation, and tilled-index for some but not all pesticides. We further compared measured pesticide concentrations in playas to toxicity benchmarks used by the US EPA in pesticide ecological risk assessments to obtain some insight into the potential for ecological effects. For all pesticides in water, the maximum measured concentrations exceeded at least one toxicity benchmark, while median concentrations did not exceed any benchmarks. This analysis indicates that there is a potential for adverse effects of pesticides to aquatic organisms.

  7. Water chemistry impacts on arsenic mobilization from arsenopyrite dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation: implications for managed aquifer recharge.

    PubMed

    Neil, Chelsea W; Yang, Y Jeffrey; Schupp, Don; Jun, Young-Shin

    2014-04-15

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is a water reuse technique with the potential to meet growing water demands. However, MAR sites have encountered arsenic mobilization resulting from recharge operations. To combat this challenge, it is imperative to identify the mechanisms of arsenic mobilization during MAR. In this bench-scale study, arsenic mobilization from arsenopyrite (FeAsS) was characterized for conditions relevant to MAR operations. Experimentally determined activation energies for arsenic mobilization from FeAsS under aerobic conditions were 36.9 ± 2.3 kJ/mol for 10 mM sodium chloride, 40.8 ± 3.5 kJ/mol for 10 mM sodium nitrate, and 43.6 ± 5.0 kJ/mol for secondary effluent from a wastewater treatment plant. Interestingly, the sodium chloride system showed higher arsenic mobilization under aerobic conditions. In addition, secondary mineral precipitation varied among systems and further affected arsenic mobilization. For example, the wastewater system inhibited precipitation, while in the sodium chloride system, faster phase transformation of iron(III) (hydr)oxide precipitates was observed, resulting in hematite formation after 7 days. The phase transformation to hematite will result in less available surface area for arsenic attenuation. These new observations and activation energies can be useful to develop improved reactive transport models for the fate of arsenic during MAR, and develop strategies to minimize arsenic release.

  8. Intraspecific variation in precipitation responses of a widespread C4 grass depends on site water limitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Changes in precipitation expected with climate change have important implications for plant growth and fitness, as well as species genetic diversity and ecological distributions. Intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity – the ability of a genotype to alter its phenotype in response to e...

  9. Characterization of iron and manganese precipitates from an in situ ground water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Mettler, S; Abdelmoula, M; Hoehn, E; Schoenenberger, R; Weidler, P; von Gunten, U

    2001-01-01

    Aquifer samples from the precipitation zone of an in situ iron and manganese removal plant that was operated for 10 years were analyzed for iron and manganese minerals. Measurements were performed by various chemical extraction techniques (5 M HCI, 0.008 M Ti(III)-EDTA, 0.114 M ascorbic acid), X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Chemical extractions showed that iron was precipitated as ferric oxides, whereas manganese was not oxidized but deposited as Mn(II) probably within carbonates. The ferric oxides in particular accumulate preferentially in the smaller grain- size fractions. This tendency was observed to a lesser extent for manganese. X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the ferric oxides were mainly crystalline (goethite, 50% to 100% of the iron). Ferrihydrite was found as well, but only as a minor fraction (< or = 12%). Pure manganese minerals were not found by X-ray diffraction. The precipitated amounts of iron (5 to 27 micromol/g Fe as ferric oxide) and manganese (1 to 4 micromol/g Mn) during 10 years operation of the treatment plant agree with values that were estimated from operational parameters (9 to 31 micromol/g Fe and 3 to 6 micromol/g Mn). Considering the small amounts of precipitated iron and manganese, no long-term risks of clogging of the aquifer are expected.

  10. Influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation on water resources in central Iberia: Precipitation, streamflow anomalies, and reservoir management strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Moreno, Juan I.; BegueríA, Santiago; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; GarcíA-Ruiz, José M.

    2007-09-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of the extreme phases of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on water resources in the Spanish region of the Tagus River basin. By analyzing a winter NAO index based on station sea level pressure, the years between 1957 and 2003 were classified as normal, positive, and negative NAO years. A statistical test was then applied to monthly data series of precipitation, river discharge, reservoir storage, and reservoir release to analyze the variations in these variables. For all four variables, significant differences were found between positive and negative NAO years, the former resulting in reduced water availability (negative anomalies) and the latter resulting in increased water availability (positive anomalies). The influence of extreme NAO winters was found to act with different time lags on different variables: The effect of extreme NAO winters on precipitation was found to be quite immediate (and significant for December to March), but this effect was observed later in the year and lasted longer for river discharge, reservoir storage, and water release. Positive and negative NAO years were also found to have different effects on these variables, in that the effects of positive years were more sustained and those of negative years were more rapid and less prolonged. In spite of the high variability of the availability of water resources, the strategies for management of the reservoir system of the basin were found in most cases to provide a regular supply that meets water demands. However, our results also indicate that these water management practices are not adequate for the expected scenarios of climate change and increasing water demand.

  11. Flow patterns of precipitation and soil water beneath forest canopies: An experimental approach to assessing water flow heterogeneity with high resolution measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Johanna Clara; Dalla Valle, Nicolas; Wutzler, Thomas; Filipzik, Janett; Grauer, Christoph; Schelhorn, Danny; Weckmüller, Josef; Hildebrandt, Anke

    2015-04-01

    Due to the mechanisms of interception, stemflow and canopy throughfall, precipitation reaches a forest soil surface in an altered temporal and spatial distribution. It is characterized by a strong heterogeneity. The retention of water by canopies is contrasted by the formation of dynamic hotspots, which channel rain water down to the soil: canopy dripping points and stemflow. This poster introduces a new experimental site established within the collaborative research center of AquaDiva, where we aim to investigate the flow paths of water from the top of the canopy through the soil below the main rooting zone in an intensive field study. The study site, sized one hectare, is located in Thuringia in an unmanaged Central European beech forest on limestone, and complemented by measurements in an adjacent grassland site. A soil moisture sensor network (SoilNet) has been established for monitoring soil water content at high temporal (3 min interval) and spatial (420 sensors per ha) resolution. During field campaigns in spring and early summer, the spatial distribution of net precipitation is measured. Vegetation properties and soil physical and scientific characteristics have been surveyed. Using this setup, we plan to determine, whether and during which conditions spatial patterns of net precipitation persist in soil moisture and fluxes. Using the high-resolution soil water content data we aim to discover flow dynamics and thus identify preferential flow paths in the soil. Geostatistical analysis will yield information about spatial distribution and the relationship of above- and subsurface flow patterns and impact factors. In this poster we will present first results of net precipitation composition and statistical characteristics of throughfall and soil moisture data.

  12. Controls on oxygen isotope variability in precipitation and drip water at eight caves in the monsoon regions of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wuhui; Ruan, Jiaoyang; Luo, Weijun; Li, Tingyong; Tian, Lijun; Zeng, Guangneng; Zhang, Dezhong; Bai, Yijun; Li, Jilong; Tao, Tao; Zhang, Pingzhong; Tan, Ming

    2015-04-01

    Cave monitoring is important to fully understand the climatic significance of stalagmite δ18O records. Most previous studies focus on one cave, or several caves in one area. A large regional-scale investigation on the isotopic composition of precipitation and drip water is scarce. To investigate the regional-scale climate forcing on the oxygen isotopic composition of precipitation in the monsoon regions of China (MRC) and how the isotopic signals are transmitted to various drip sites, a three-year-long (2011-2014) on-site rainfall and drip water monitoring program has been carried out with approximately monthly sampling at 37 drip sites in eight caves in the MRC. Neither rainfall amount nor air temperature are the predominant controls on the oxygen isotopic composition of monthly precipitation. The rain in the wet season (May to October), with relatively low δ18O values, is sourced from tropical air masses, whereas the rainfall in the dry season (November to April), with relatively high δ18O values, is mostly sourced from continental air masses. Additionally, the weighted summer rainwater δ18O values decrease from coastal southwest China to inland northeast China, which suggests that the moisture of monsoon rainfall in China originates mainly from Indian Ocean, and transports to the north along the southwest-northeast path. 28 of the 37 drip sites are constant drips with little discernable variation in drip water δ18O through the whole study period. For most of the constant drips, the mean value of each drip water δ18O is nearly identical to or slightly higher than the three-year weighted mean value of the corresponding local rainwater δ18O, indicating these drips may be mainly recharged by none-evaporated or slightly evaporated, well-mixed older water stored in the vadose zone. 7 of all the 37 drip sites are seasonal drips, for which, although the amplitude of drip water δ18O is narrower than that of rainfall, the monthly response of drip water δ18O to

  13. Combining snow, streamflow, and precipitation gauge observations to infer basin-mean precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henn, Brian; Clark, Martyn P.; Kavetski, Dmitri; McGurk, Bruce; Painter, Thomas H.; Lundquist, Jessica D.

    2016-11-01

    Precipitation data in mountain basins are typically sparse and subject to uncertainty due to difficulties in measurement and capturing spatial variability. Streamflow provides indirect information about basin-mean precipitation, but inferring precipitation from streamflow requires assumptions about hydrologic model structure that influence precipitation amounts. In this study, we test the extent to which using both snow and streamflow observations reduces differences in inferred annual total precipitation, compared to inference from streamflow alone. The case study area is the upper Tuolumne River basin in the Sierra Nevada of California, where distributed and basin-mean snow water equivalent (SWE) estimates have been made using LiDAR as part of the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO). To reconstruct basin-mean SWE for years prior to the ASO campaign, we test for a robust relationship between SWE estimates from ASO and from snow courses and pillows, which have a longer record. Relative to ASO's distributed SWE observations, point SWE measurements in this part of the Sierra Nevada tend to overestimate SWE at a given elevation, but undersample high-elevation areas. We then infer precipitation from snow and streamflow, obtained from multiple hydrologic model structures. When included in precipitation inference, snow data reduce by up to one third the standard deviations of the water year total precipitation between model structures and improve the consistency between structures in terms of the yearly variability in precipitation. We reiterate previous findings that multiple types of hydrologic data improve the consistency of modeled physical processes and help identify the most appropriate model structures.

  14. Time series study of concentrations of SO4(2-) and H+ in precipitation and soil waters in Norway.

    PubMed

    Kvaalen, H; Solberg, S; Clarke, N; Torp, T; Aamlid, D

    2002-01-01

    Along with a steady reduction of acid inputs during 14 years of intensive forest monitoring in Norway, the influence of acid deposition upon soil water acidity is gradually reduced in favour of other and internal sources of H+ and sulphate, in particular from processes in the upper soil layer. We used statistical analyses in two steps for precipitation, throughfall and soil water at 5, 15 and 40 cm depths. Firstly, we employed time series analyses to model the temporal variation as a long-term linear trend and a monthly variation, and by this filtered out residual, weekly variation. Secondly, we used the parameter estimates and the residuals from this to show that the long term, the monthly and the weekly variation in one layer were correlated to similar temporal variation in the above, adjacent layer. This was strongly evident for throughfall correlated to precipitation, but much weaker for soil water. Continued acidification in soil water on many plots suggests that the combined effects of anthropogenic and natural acid inputs exceed in places the buffering capacity of the soil.

  15. Runoff water quality from broiler litter-amended tall fescue in response to natural precipitation in the Ozark Highlands.

    PubMed

    Menjoulet, B C; Brye, K R; Pirani, A L; Haggard, B E; Gbur, E E

    2009-01-01

    The Arkansas poultry industry produced more than 1.2 billion broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and generated approximately 1.3 million Mg of broiler litter in 2002. High transportation costs of relocating broiler litter have led to annual land applications near poultry houses, increasing concern for potential surface water contamination from runoff. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of broiler litter application rate on runoff water quality in response to natural precipitation. Six plots (1.5 by 6.0 m), located on a Captina silt loam (finesilty, siliceous, active, mesic Typic Fragiudult), were amended with fresh broiler litter at 0, 5.6, and 11.2 Mg ha(-1) (control, low, and high litter treatments, respectively) once annually for 4 yr (May 2003 through April 2007). Runoff collected after each runoff-producing event was analyzed for soluble nutrients and metals. Cumulative runoff did not differ among litter treatments over the 4-yr study. At times, flow-weighted mean (FWM) concentrations of As from all litter treatments exceeded the maximum contaminant level for drinking water (0.01 mg As L(-1)). Four-year FWM Fe concentrations and runoff losses were greater (P < 0.05) from the high than from the low litter treatment and unamended control, and the 4-yr FWM P concentration from the low litter treatment (3.0 mg L(-1)) was greater than that from the unamended control (1.8 mg L(-1)). Since precipitation is temporally variable, evaluating runoff water quality in response to natural precipitation over several years is key to ascertaining the long-term impacts of surface-applied soil amendments like broiler litter.

  16. The Platte River Hydrologic Observatory (PRIVHO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, F.; Ramirez, J. A.; Thurow, T. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Platte River Hydrologic Observatory (PRIVHO), located within the Platte River Basin, of the U.S. central Great Plains, affords excellent interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary research opportunities for scientists to examine the impacts of scaling, to investigate forcing feedbacks and coupling of various interconnected hydrological, geological, climatological and biological systems, and to test the applicability and limits of prediction in keeping with all five of CUAHSI's priority science criteria; linking hydrologic and biogeochemical cycles, sustainability of water resources, hydrologic and ecosystem interactions, hydrologic extremes, and fate and transport of contaminants. In addition, PRIVHO is uniquely positioned to investigate many human dimension questions such as those related to interstate and intrastate conflicts over water use, evolution of water policy and law in the wake of advancing science, societal and economic changes that are driven by water use, availability and management, and human impacts on climate and land use changes. The Platte River traverses several important environmental gradients, including temperature and precipitation-to-evaporation ratio, is underlain by the High Plains Aquifer under much of its reach, crosses a number of terrestrial ecoregions, and in central Nebraska, serves as a vital link in the Central Flyway, providing habitat for 300 species of migratory birds and many threatened or endangered species. The Platte River flows through metropolitan, urban and agricultural settings and is impacted by both point and non-point pollution. The Platte River is one of the most over-appropriated rivers in the country with 15 major dams, hundreds of small reservoirs, and thousands of irrigation wells. The river provides municipal and industrial water supplies for about 3.5 million people, irrigation water for millions of acres of farmland, and generates millions of dollars of hydroelectric power. PRIVHO will allow researchers to

  17. Precipitation Climate Data Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. R.; Prat, O.; Vasquez, L.

    2015-12-01

    Five precipitation CDRs are now or soon will be transitioned to NOAA's CDR program. These include the PERSIANN data set, which is a 30-year record of daily adjusted global precipitation based on retrievals from satellite microwave data using artificial neural networks. The AMSU-A/B/Hydrobundle is an 11-year record of precipitable water, cloud water, ice water, and other variables. CMORPH (the NOAA Climate Prediction Center Morphing Technique) is a 17-year record of daily and sub-daily adjusted global precipitation measured from passive microwave and infrared data at high spatial and temporal resolution. GPCP (the Global Precipitation Climatology Project) is an approximately 30-year record of monthly and pentad adjusted global precipitation and a 17-year record of daily adjusted global precipitation. The NEXRAD Reanalysis is a 10-year record of high resolution NEXRAD radar based adjusted CONUS-wide hourly and daily precipitation. This study provides an assessment of the existing and transitioned long term precipitation CDRs and includes the verification of the five precipitation CDRs using various methods including comparison with in-situ data sets and trend analysis. As all of the precipitation related CDRs are transitioned, long term analyses can be performed. Comparisons at varying scales (hourly, daily and longer) of the precipitation CDRs with in-situ data sets are provided as well as a first look at what could be an ensemble long term precipitation data record.

  18. An assessment of the isotopic (2H/18O) integrity of water samples collected and stored by unattended precipitation totalizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzer, Stefan; Wassenaar, Leonard I.; Douence, Cedric; Araguas-Araguas, Luis

    2016-04-01

    The IAEA-WMO Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) provides worldwide δ18O and δ2H data for numerous hydrological and climatological studies. The traditional GNIP sample collection method relies on weather station operators to accumulate precipitation obtained from manual rain gauges. Over the past decades, widespread weather station automatization resulted in the increased use of unattended precipitation totalizers that accumulate and store the rainwater in the field for up to one month. Several low-tech measures were adopted to prevent in situ secondary evaporative isotopic enrichment (SEE) of totalized water samples (i.e. disequilibrium isotopic fractionation after precipitation is stored in the collection device). These include: (a) adding a 0.5-1 cm floating layer of paraffin oil to the totalizer bottle, (b) using an intake tube leading from the collection funnel and submerged to the bottom of the totalizer bottle, or (c) placing a table tennis ball in the funnel aiming to reduce evaporation of the collected water from the receiving bottle to the atmosphere. We assessed the isotopic integrity of stored rainwater samples for three totalizers under controlled settings: each aforementioned totalizer was filled with a 100 or 500 mL of isotopically known water and installed in the field with the intake funnels sheltered to prevent rainwater collection. Potential evapotranspiration (PET) was obtained from on-site meteorological recordings. Stored evaporative loss from each totalizer was evaluated on a monthly basis; gravimetrically and by analysing δ18O and δ2H of the stored water, for a period of 6 months and a cumulative PET of ˜500 mm. The gravimetric and isotope results revealed that for smaller water volumes (100 ml, corresponding to ca. 5 mm of monthly precipitation), negligible isotope enrichment (δ18O) was observed in the paraffin-oil based totalizer, whereas unacceptable evaporative isotope effects were observed for the ball

  19. Citizen observatory of water as a data engine supporting the people-hydrology nexus: experience of the WeSenseIt project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, Michele; Baruffi, Francesco; Norbiato, Daniele; Monego, Martina; Tomei, Giovanni; Solomatine, Dimitri; Alfonso, Leonardo; Mazzoleni, Maurizio; Chacon, Juan Carlos; Wehn, Uta; Ciravegna, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Citizen observatories (COs) present an interesting case of strong multi-facet feedback between the physical (water) system and humans. CO is a form of crowdsourcing ensuring a data flow from citizens observing environment (e.g. water level in a river) to a central data processing unit which is typically part of a more complex social arrangement (e.g. water authorities responsible for flood forecasting). The EU-funded project WeSenseIt (www.wesenseit.eu) aims at developing technologies and tools supporting creation of such COs [1,2,3,4]. Citizens which form a CO play the role of "social sensors" which however are very specific. The data streams from such sensors have varying temporal and spatial coverage and information value (uncertainty). The crowdsourced data can be of course simply visualized and presented to public, but it is much more interesting to consider cases when such data are assimilated into the existing forecasting systems, e.g. flood early warning systems based on hydrological and hydraulic models. COs may also affect water management and governance [4], and in fact can be seen as data engines supporting the people-hydrology nexus. In the framework of WeSenseIt project several approaches were developed allowing for optimal assimilation of intermittent data streams with varying spatial coverage into distributed hydrological models [1, 2]. The mentioned specific features of CO data required updates of the existing data assimilation algorithms (Ensemble Kalman Filter was used as the basic algorithm). The developed algorithms have been implemented in the operational flood forecasting systems of the Alto Adriatico Water Authority (AAWA), Venice. In this paper we analyse various scenarios of employing citizens data (COs) for flood forecasting. This study is partly supported by the FP7 European Project WeSenseIt Citizen Water Observatory (www.http://wesenseit.eu/). References [1] Mazzoleni, M., Alfonso, L., Chacon-Hurtado, J., Solomatine, D. (2015

  20. Stable isotope study of precipitation and cave drip water in Florida (USA): implications for speleothem-based paleoclimate studies.

    PubMed

    Onac, Bogdan P; Pace-Graczyk, Kali; Atudirei, Viorel

    2008-06-01

    Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen were used to examine how the isotopic signal of meteoric water is modified as it travels through soil and epikarst into two caves in Florida. Surface and cave water samples were collected every week from February 2006 until March 2007. The isotopic composition of precipitation at the investigated sites is highly variable and shows little seasonal control. The delta18O vs. delta2H plot shows a mixing line having a slope of 5.63, suggesting evaporation effects dominate the isotopic composition of most rainfall events of less than 8 cm/day, as indicated by their low d-excess values. The delta18O values of the drip water show little variability (<0.6 per thousand), which is loosely tied to local variations in the seasonal amount of precipitation. This is only seen during wintertime at the Florida Caverns site. The lag time of over two months and the lack of any relationship between rainfall amount and the increase in drip rate indicate a dominance of matrix flow relative to fracture/conduit flow at each site. The long residence time of the vadose seepage waters allows for an effective isotopic homogenisation of individual and seasonal rainfall events. We find no correlation between rainfall and drip water delta18O at any site. The isotopic composition of drip water in both caves consistently tends to resemble the amount-weighted monthly mean rainfall input. This implies that the delta18O of speleothems from these two caves in Florida cannot record seasonal cycle in rainfall delta18O, but are suitable for paleoclimate reconstructions at inter-annual time scales.dagger.

  1. Measurement of the Muon Atmospheric Production Depth with the Water Cherenkov Detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Bueno, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR) are particles of uncertain origin and composition, with energies above 1 EeV (1018 eV or 0.16 J). The measured flux of UHECR is a steeply decreasing function of energy. The largest and most sensitive apparatus built to date to record and study cosmic ray Extensive Air Showers (EAS) is the Pierre Auger Observatory. The Pierre Auger Observatory has produced the largest and finest amount of data ever collected for UHECR. A broad physics program is being carried out covering all relevant topics of the field. Among them, one of the most interesting is the problem related to the estimation of the mass composition of cosmic rays in this energy range. Currently the best measurements of mass are those obtained by studying the longitudinal development of the electromagnetic part of the EAS with the Fluorescence Detector. However, the collected statistics is small, specially at energies above several tens of EeV. Although less precise, the volume of data gathered with the Surface Detector is nearly a factor ten larger than the fluorescence data. So new ways to study composition with data collected at the ground are under investigation. The subject of this thesis follows one of those new lines of research. Using preferentially the time information associated with the muons that reach the ground, we try to build observables related to the composition of the primaries that initiated the EAS. A simple phenomenological model relates the arrival times with the depths in the atmosphere where muons are produced. The experimental confirmation that the distributions of muon production depths (MPD) correlate with the mass of the primary particle has opened the way to a variety of studies, of which this thesis is a continuation, with the aim of enlarging and improving its range of applicability. We revisit the phenomenological model which is at the root of the analysis and discuss a new way to improve some aspects of the model. We carry

  2. MWRRET Value-Added Product: The Retrieval of Liquid Water Path and Precipitable Water Vapor from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Data Sets (Revision 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Gaustad, KL; Turner, DD; McFarlane, SA

    2011-07-25

    This report provides a short description of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility microwave radiometer (MWR) Retrieval (MWRRET) value-added product (VAP) algorithm. This algorithm utilizes a complementary physical retrieval method and applies brightness temperature offsets to reduce spurious liquid water path (LWP) bias in clear skies resulting in significantly improved precipitable water vapor (PWV) and LWP retrievals. We present a general overview of the technique, input parameters, output products, and describe data quality checks. A more complete discussion of the theory and results is given in Turner et al. (2007b).

  3. Effects of nitrate and water on the oxygen isotopic analysis of barium sulfate precipitated from solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hannon, Janet E.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Mroczkowski, Stanley J.

    2008-01-01

    BaSO4 precipitated from mixed salt solutions by common techniques for SO isotopic analysis may contain quantities of H2O and NOthat introduce errors in O isotope measurements. Experiments with synthetic solutions indicate that δ18O values of CO produced by decomposition of precipitated BaSO4 in a carbon reactor may be either too low or too high, depending on the relative concentrations of SO and NO and the δ18O values of the H2O, NO, and SO. Typical δ18O errors are of the order of 0.5 to 1‰ in many sample types, and can be larger in samples containing atmospheric NO, which can cause similar errors in δ17O and Δ17O. These errors can be reduced by (1) ion chromatographic separation of SO from NO, (2) increasing the salinity of the solutions before precipitating BaSO4 to minimize incorporation of H2O, (3) heating BaSO4 under vacuum to remove H2O, (4) preparing isotopic reference materials as aqueous samples to mimic the conditions of the samples, and (5) adjusting measured δ18O values based on amounts and isotopic compositions of coexisting H2O and NO. These procedures are demonstrated for SO isotopic reference materials, synthetic solutions with isotopically known reagents, atmospheric deposition from Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA, and sulfate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert, Chile, and Mojave Desert, California, USA. These results have implications for the calibration and use of O isotope data in studies of SOsources and reaction mechanisms.

  4. Origin and Migration of the Pollutants in Precipitation and Surface Water in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I.; Lim, C.; Yu, J.

    2002-12-01

    Variations in abundance of stable isotopes of sulfur, hydrogen, and oxygen are studied on snow and rainwater samples from Seoul area. Their suitability as a tool for characterizing the seasonality and source of regions near Korea, which contribute to the pollution in Seoul Area was investigated. Also stable isotopic and chemical evidence has been used to trace the sources of sulfate in precipitation at study area and to distinguish sulfate between natural and anthropogenic origins. The contribution of different sources to a specific receptor site depends on emission patterns and meteorological conditions. Measured isotope ratios reflect the actual superposition of the distinct source types based on the assumption that no major isotope fractionation occurs during the transportation process between source region and sampling site. The sulfur isotopic composition of sulfate (δ34S) in precipitation decreased during spring and summer. The δ34S values ranged from +4.4 to +6.5› (mean +5.9›) in winter and from +3.7 to 4.8› (mean +4.3›) in summer. Furthermore, the isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen in the snow and rainwater samples were used to support the meteorological information. The δ34S value of the sulfate in precipitation shows characteristic patterns of seasonal variation in the present research. Seasonal variations of the δ34S values and their relation to chemical composition of the atmospheric pollutants are discussed taking into account the δ34S values of sulfur originating from sea salt, oil and coal combustion, and biogenic activity. Also, the δ34S values of sulfate in the atmospheric pollutants show a remarkable seasonal variation depending on the wind directions. The relationship between wind direction and seasonal variation can be explained by contribution of sulfur from coal combustion in northern China and southern China.

  5. HAWC observatory catches first gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frías Villegas, Gabriela

    2013-06-01

    The world's largest and most modern gamma-ray observatory has carried out its first successful observations. Located inside the Pico de Orizaba national park in the Mexican state of Puebla, the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is a collaboration between 26 Mexican and US institutions.

  6. GPM Core Observatory Views Feb. 21, 2015, Storm

    NASA Video Gallery

    At 10:05 a.m. EST on Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory flew over a snow storm that covered most of the Washington, D.C., metro area leav...

  7. GPM Core Observatory Views Feb. 17, 2015, Storm

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory captured a 3-D image of a winter storm on Feb. 17, 2015, that left 6 to 12 inches of snow over much of Kentucky, southwestern West Virgin...

  8. The effects of acid precipitation runoff episodes on reservoir and tapwater quality in an Appalachian Mountain water supply.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, W E; DeWalle, D R

    1990-01-01

    The aluminum concentration and Ryznar Index increased and the pH decreased in a small Appalachian water supply reservoir following acid precipitation runoff episodes. Concomitant increases in tapwater aluminum and decreases in tapwater pH were also observed at two homes in the water distribution system. Lead concentrations in the tapwater of one home frequently exceeded recommended levels, although spatial and temporal variation in tapwater copper and lead concentrations was considerable. Since source water and reservoir water copper and lead concentrations were much lower, the increased copper and lead concentrations in tapwater were attributed to corrosion of household plumbing. Tapwater copper concentration correlated well with tapwater pH and tapwater temperature. Asbestos fibers were not detected in tapwater. The asbestos-cement pipe in the water distribution system was protected by a spontaneous metallic coating that inhibited fiber release from the pipe. Several simultaneous reactions were hypothesized to be taking place in the distribution system that involved corrosion of metallic components and coating of asbestos-cement pipe components in part with corrosion products and in part by cations of watershed origin. Greater water quality changes might be expected in areas of higher atmospheric deposition. Images FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. PMID:2088742

  9. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) launch, commissioning, and early operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2014-10-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international partnership co-led by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The mission centers on the GPM Core Observatory and consists of an international network, or constellation, of additional satellites that together will provide next-generation global observations of precipitation from space. The GPM constellation will provide measurements of the intensity and variability of precipitation, three-dimensional structure of cloud and storm systems, the microphysics of ice and liquid particles within clouds, and the amount of water falling to Earth's surface. Observations from the GPM constellation, combined with land surface data, will improve weather forecast models; climate models; integrated hydrologic models of watersheds; and forecasts of hurricanes/typhoons/cylcones, landslides, floods and droughts. The GPM Core Observatory carries an advanced radar/radiometer system and serves as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from all satellites that fly within the constellation. The GPM Core Observatory improves upon the capabilities of its predecessor, the NASA-JAXA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), with advanced science instruments and expanded coverage of Earth's surface. The GPM Core Observatory carries two instruments, the NASA-supplied GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the JAXA-supplied Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The GMI measures the amount, size, intensity and type of precipitation, from heavy-tomoderate rain to light rain and snowfall. The DPR provides three-dimensional profiles and intensities of liquid and solid precipitation. The French Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), and the U.S. Department of Defense are partners with NASA and

  10. A Rapid Protoyping Approach for the Evaluation of Potential GPM-Era Precipitation Products for Water Resources Management Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantharaj, V. G.; Houser, P. R.; Turk, F. J.; Peterson, C. A.; Hossain, F.; Moorhead, R. J.; Toll, D. L.; Mostovoy, G.

    2009-04-01

    societal benefits related to human health (soil moisture, climate and disease outbreak), homeland security (removal of chemical/biological/nuclear agents), flooding potential and warning, water availability, water quality, and agriculture and food security. In 2006, the NASA ASP sponsored two RPC experiments to evaluate potential GPM-era high resolution satellite precipitation products for water management applications. One of the current uncertainties involved in the GPM missions is the nature of the exact configuration of the constellations of satellites and hence the potential for the dynamic error characteristics over time of the precipitation estimates. For the RPC evaluations, we needed a satellite precipitation product that would be analogous to the GPM-era products. Our solution was to develop a suite of high resolution precipitation products, based on the NRL-Blend algorithm. We created a set of 10 different satellite precipitation estimates (hereafter referred to as the "GPM-proxy data"), using the currently available IR and microwave sensors. However, in each product we systematically left out sets of observations and/or sensors, such as AM orbits. The geographical focus of our study was the operational domain of the Arkansas Basin River Forecast Center (ABRFC) of the U.S. National Weather Service. We have evaluated the GPM-proxy data against the operational product (radar and gauge based) used by ABRFC. Further, we also performed a set of soil water content (SWC) sensitivity experiments using the Noah and Mosaic Land Surface Models (LSM) to quantify the impacts on water management applications involving land surface hydrology. Both the LSMs were forced with the same set of GPM-proxy data. Though the overall spatial patterns for both the models were similar, there were subtle differences in the respective model sensitivities to the different precipitation forcings. These experimental results illustrate the need for comprehensive pre-evaluations of applications

  11. Chemical Data for Rock, Sediment, Biological, Precipitate, and Water Samples from Abandoned Copper Mines in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, Randolph A.; Munk, LeeAnn

    2007-01-01

    In the early 20th century, approximately 6 million metric tons of copper ore were mined from numerous deposits located along the shorelines of fjords and islands in Prince William Sound, Alaska. At the Beatson, Ellamar, and Threeman mine sites (fig. 1), rocks containing Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb sulfide minerals are exposed to chemical weathering in abandoned mine workings and remnant waste piles that extend into the littoral zone. Field investigations in 2003 and 2005 as well as analytical data for rock, sediment, precipitate, water, and biological samples reveal that the oxidation of sulfides at these sites is resulting in the generation of acid mine drainage and the transport of metals into the marine environment (Koski and others, 2008; Stillings and others, 2008). At the Ellamar and Threeman sites, plumes of acidic and metal-enriched water are flowing through beach gravels into the shallow offshore environment. Interstitial water samples collected from beach sediment at Ellamar have low pH levels (to ~3) and high concentrations of metals including iron, copper, zinc, cobalt, lead, and mercury. The abundant precipitation of the iron sulfate mineral jarosite in the Ellamar gravels also signifies a low-pH environment. At the Beatson mine site (the largest copper mine in the region) seeps containing iron-rich microbial precipitates drain into the intertidal zone below mine dumps (Foster and others, 2008). A stream flowing down to the shoreline from underground mine workings at Beatson has near-neutral pH, but elevated levels of zinc, copper, and lead (Stillings and others, 2008). Offshore sediment samples at Beatson are enriched in these metals. Preliminary chemical data for tissue from marine mussels collected near the Ellamar, Threeman, and Beatson sites reveal elevated levels of copper, zinc, and lead compared to tissue in mussels from other locations in Prince William Sound (Koski and others, 2008). Three papers presenting results of this ongoing investigation of

  12. Chemical Data for Rock, Sediment, Biological, Precipitate, and Water Samples from Abandoned Copper Mines in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, Randolph A.; Munk, LeeAnn

    2007-01-01

    Introduction In the early 20th century, approximately 6 million metric tons of copper ore were mined from numerous deposits located along the shorelines of fjords and islands in Prince William Sound, Alaska. At the Beatson, Ellamar, and Threeman mine sites (fig. 1), rocks containing Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb sulfide minerals are exposed to chemical weathering in abandoned mine workings and remnant waste piles that extend into the littoral zone. Field investigations in 2003 and 2005 as well as analytical data for rock, sediment, precipitate, water, and biological samples reveal that the oxidation of sulfides at these sites is resulting in the generation of acid mine drainage and the transport of metals into the marine environment (Koski and others, 2008; Stillings and others, 2008). At the Ellamar and Threeman sites, plumes of acidic and metal-enriched water are flowing through beach gravels into the shallow offshore environment. Interstitial water samples collected from beach sediment at Ellamar have low pH levels (to ~3) and high concentrations of metals including iron, copper, zinc, cobalt, lead, and mercury. The abundant precipitation of the iron sulfate mineral jarosite in the Ellamar gravels also signifies a low-pH environment. At the Beatson mine site (the largest copper mine in the region) seeps containing iron-rich microbial precipitates drain into the intertidal zone below mine dumps (Foster and others, 2008). A stream flowing down to the shoreline from underground mine workings at Beatson has near-neutral pH, but elevated levels of zinc, copper, and lead (Stillings and others, 2008). Offshore sediment samples at Beatson are enriched in these metals. Preliminary chemical data for tissue from marine mussels collected near the Ellamar, Threeman, and Beatson sites reveal elevated levels of copper, zinc, and lead compared to tissue in mussels from other locations in Prince William Sound (Koski and others, 2008). Three papers presenting results of this ongoing

  13. Hydrogen isotope correction for laser instrument measurement bias at low water vapor concentration using conventional isotope analyses: application to measurements from Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L R; Sharp, Z D; Galewsky, J; Strong, M; Van Pelt, A D; Dong, F; Noone, D

    2011-03-15

    The hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of water vapor can be measured with commercially available laser spectroscopy analyzers in real time. Operation of the laser systems in relatively dry air is difficult because measurements are non-linear as a function of humidity at low water concentrations. Here we use field-based sampling coupled with traditional mass spectrometry techniques for assessing linearity and calibrating laser spectroscopy systems at low water vapor concentrations. Air samples are collected in an evacuated 2 L glass flask and the water is separated from the non-condensable gases cryogenically. Approximately 2 µL of water are reduced to H(2) gas and measured on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. In a field experiment at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), we ran Picarro and Los Gatos Research (LGR) laser analyzers for a period of 25 days in addition to periodic sample collection in evacuated flasks. When the two laser systems are corrected to the flask data, they are strongly coincident over the entire 25 days. The δ(2)H values were found to change by over 200‰ over 2.5 min as the boundary layer elevation changed relative to MLO. The δ(2)H values ranged from -106 to -332‰, and the δ(18)O values (uncorrected) ranged from -12 to -50‰. Raw data from laser analyzers in environments with low water vapor concentrations can be normalized to the international V-SMOW scale by calibration to the flask data measured conventionally. Bias correction is especially critical for the accurate determination of deuterium excess in dry air.

  14. Retrieval of precipitable water vapor using MFRSR and comparison with other multisensors over the semi-arid area of northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia; Zhang, Lei; Cao, Xianjie; Quan, Jiannong; Wang, Tianhe; Liang, Jiening; Shi, Jinsen

    2016-05-01

    Precipitable water vapor (PWV) was retrieved using direct solar irradiance at 938 nm measured by a multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) at the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL) located in the semi-arid area of northwest China from August 2007 to June 2010. Measurement also occurred at Zhangye, China, at the Atmosphere Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program's Ancillary Facility during the dust period from April to June 2008. The line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) code combined with the HITRAN 2004 spectral database is used to model the water vapor spectral transmittance throughout the 938-nm spectral response of MFRSR in the retrieval algorithm. Gaussian fitting is proposed to determine the daily calibration constant at the top of atmosphere for a long-term series under an obvious annual change in solar radiation. PWV retrieved by MFRSR over SACOL shows that 90% of PWV values are smaller than 1.52 cm, and PWV distribution has a seasonal variation, with maximum in summer and minimum in winter. The comparisons between MFRSR and other measurements show a better agreement between MFRSR and sunphotometer (AERONET's Cimel) PWV retrievals with relative bias of 2.9% and RMS difference of 9.1% than between MFRSR and microwave radiometer (MWR) with relative bias of 10% and RMS difference of 23% over SACOL, and an excellent agreement between MFRSR and sunphotometer with relative bias of 0.56% and RMS difference of 6.1% over Zhangye. To verify satellite PWV products over the semi-arid area of northwest China, the comparisons of PWV from MODIS and AIRS with MFRSR suggest that the agreement between satellite and MFRSR PWV retrievals is not as good as that between MFRSR and other ground-based instruments. MODIS appears to slightly underestimate PWV in a dry atmosphere but overestimate PWV in a moist atmosphere against MFRSR. A method is proposed to correct MODIS PWV products. AIRS PWV products relative to MFRSR show

  15. Effects of water addition on soil arthropods and soil characteristics in a precipitation-limited environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikoski, Jennifer M.; Ferguson, Steven H.; Meyer, Lense

    2006-09-01

    We investigated the effect of water addition and season on soil arthropod abundance and soil characteristics (%C, %N, C:N, moisture, pH). The experimental design consisted of 24 groups of five boxes distributed within a small aspen stand in Saskatchewan, Canada. The boxes depressed the soil to create a habitat with suitable microclimate for soil arthropods, and by overturning boxes we counted soil arthropods during weekly surveys from April to September 1999. Soil samples were collected at two-month intervals and water was added once per week to half of the plots. Of the eleven recognizable taxonomic units identified, only mites (Acari) and springtails (Collembola) responded to water addition by increasing abundance, whereas ants decreased in abundance with water addition. During summer, springtail numbers increased with water addition, whereas pH was a stronger determinant of mite abundance. In autumn, springtails were positively correlated with water and negatively correlated with mites, whereas mite abundance was negatively correlated with increasing C:N ratio, positively correlated to water addition, and negatively correlated with springtail abundance. Although both mite and springtail numbers decreased in autumn with a decrease in soil moisture, mites became more abundant than springtails suggesting a predator-prey (mite-springtail) relationship. Water had a significant effect on both springtails and mites in summer and autumn supporting the assertion that prairie soil communities are water limited.

  16. Infrared Space Observatory Observations of Far-Infrared Rotational Emission Lines of Water Vapor Toward the Supergiant Star VY Canis Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Feuchtgruber, Helmut; Harwit, Martin; Melnick, Gary J.

    1999-01-01

    We report the detection of numerous far-infrared emission lines of water vapor toward the supergiant star VY Canis Majoris. A 29.5-45 micron grating scan of VY CMa, obtained using the Short-Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) of the Infrared Space Observatory at a spectral resolving power lambda/delat.lambda of approximately 2000, reveals at least 41 spectral features due to water vapor that together radiate a total luminosity of approximately 25 solar luminosity . In addition to pure rotational transitions within the ground vibrational state, these features include rotational transitions within the (010) excited vibrational state. The spectrum also shows the (sup 2)product(sub 1/2) (J = 5/2) left arrow (sup 2)product(sub 3/2) (J = 3/2) OH feature near 34.6 micron in absorption. Additional SWS observations of VY CMa were carried out in the instrument's Fabry-Perot mode for three water transitions: the 7(sub 25)-6(sub 16) line at 29.8367 micron, the 4(sub 41)-3(sub 12) line at 31.7721 micron, and the 4(sub 32)-3(sub 03) line at 40.6909 micron. The higher spectral resolving power lambda/delta.lambda of approximately 30,000 thereby obtained permits the line profiles to be resolved spectrally for the first time and reveals the "P Cygni" profiles that are characteristic of emission from an outflowing envelope.

  17. Silicon isotope fractionation during silica precipitation from hot-spring waters: Evidence from the Geysir geothermal field, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilert, Sonja; Vroon, Pieter Z.; Keller, Nicole S.; Gudbrandsson, Snorri; Stefánsson, Andri; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to explore the extent and controls of silicon isotope fractionation in hot spring systems of the Geysir geothermal area (Iceland), a setting where sinter deposits are actively formed. The δ30Si values of dissolved silica measured in the spring water and sampling sites along outflowing streams, covering a temperature range between 20 and 100 °C, were relatively constant around +0.2‰, whereas the δ30Si signatures of associated opaline sinters from the streambeds were between -0.1‰ and -4.0‰, becoming progressively more negative in the downstream parts of the aprons. Here, the deposited sinters represent some of the most 30Si depleted abiotically produced terrestrial materials documented to date. Compared to the data reported for Icelandic basalts, considered to be the source of the silicon, the δ30Si values of the fluids and sinter deposits are higher and lower, respectively. The resulting values for apparent solid-water isotope fractionation (Δ30Sisolid-water) decreased with decreasing temperature from ca. -0.7‰ at ∼80 °C to -3.7‰ at ∼20 °C, locally down to -4.4‰. This temperature relationship was reproducible in each of the investigated hot spring systems and is qualitatively consistent with recent findings in laboratory experiments on kinetic fractionation for a flowing fluid. However, the apparent fractionation magnitudes observed in the field are ca. -2‰ more negative and thus significantly larger. We infer that solid-water silicon isotope fractionation during deposition of amorphous silica from a flowing fluid correlates inversely with temperature, but is essentially a function of the precipitation rate, such that the fractionation factor decreases with increasing rate. As an important corollary, the effective fractionation behavior during precipitation of silica from saturated solutions is a system-dependent feature, which should be taken into account when using silicon isotopes for paleo-environmental reconstructions.

  18. High-spatial-resolution mapping of precipitable water vapour using SAR interferograms, GPS observations and ERA-Interim reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei; Liao, Mingsheng; Zhang, Lu; Li, Wei; Yu, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    A high spatial and temporal resolution of the precipitable water vapour (PWV) in the atmosphere is a key requirement for the short-scale weather forecasting and climate research. The aim of this work is to derive temporally differenced maps of the spatial distribution of PWV by analysing the tropospheric delay "noise" in interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Time series maps of differential PWV were obtained by processing a set of ENVISAT ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar) images covering the area of southern California, USA from 6 October 2007 to 29 November 2008. To get a more accurate PWV, the component of hydrostatic delay was calculated and subtracted by using ERA-Interim reanalysis products. In addition, the ERA-Interim was used to compute the conversion factors required to convert the zenith wet delay to water vapour. The InSAR-derived differential PWV maps were calibrated by means of the GPS PWV measurements over the study area. We validated our results against the measurements of PWV derived from the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) which was located together with the ASAR sensor on board the ENVISAT satellite. Our comparative results show strong spatial correlations between the two data sets. The difference maps have Gaussian distributions with mean values close to zero and standard deviations below 2 mm. The advantage of the InSAR technique is that it provides water vapour distribution with a spatial resolution as fine as 20 m and an accuracy of ˜ 2 mm. Such high-spatial-resolution maps of PWV could lead to much greater accuracy in meteorological understanding and quantitative precipitation forecasts. With the launch of Sentinel-1A and Sentinel-1B satellites, every few days (6 days) new SAR images can be acquired with a wide swath up to 250 km, enabling a unique operational service for InSAR-based water vapour maps with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution.

  19. Electrostatic precipitation of particulate emissions from the combustion of coal-oil-water and coal-water-slurry in an industrial packaged boiler. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, C.G.; Dooher, J.R.

    1984-12-01

    The report discusses the results of a research project designed to determine electrostatic-precipitation performance in collecting particulate emissions from coal-oil-water or coal-water slurry fuels. Measurements made on a mobile electrostatic precipitator (ESP) showed that New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) could be met by appropriate design and operation. Coal-oil-water fuels required a specific collection area (SCA) of 340 sq ft/1,000 ACFM flue gas, while coal-water slurry fuel needed 500 sq ft/ACFM flue gas to comply with NSPS. Specific electrode power densities were 200 watts/1,000 ACFM flue gas. The mobile ESP accepted flue gas from a packaged fire-tube boiler converted to coal-slurry firing. The fully instrumented boiler produced a fly-ash high-in carbon content, especially when burning CWS fuel. The high carbon content influenced fly-ash resistivity vs. temperature curves and must be taken into account in designing an ESP for this kind of service.

  20. Private Observatories in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijsdijk, C.

    2016-12-01

    Descriptions of private observatories in South Africa, written by their owners. Positions, equipment descriptions and observing programmes are given. Included are: Klein Karoo Observatory (B. Monard), Cederberg Observatory (various), Centurion Planetary and Lunar Observatory (C. Foster), Le Marischel Observatory (L. Ferreira), Sterkastaaing Observatory (M. Streicher), Henley on Klip (B. Fraser), Archer Observatory (B. Dumas), Overbeek Observatory (A. Overbeek), Overberg Observatory (A. van Staden), St Cyprian's School Observatory, Fisherhaven Small Telescope Observatory (J. Retief), COSPAR 0433 (G. Roberts), COSPAR 0434 (I. Roberts), Weltevreden Karoo Observatory (D. Bullis), Winobs (M. Shafer)

  1. Three-dimensional electrical conductivity structure beneath Australia from inversion of geomagnetic observatory data: evidence for lateral variations in transition-zone temperature, water content and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Takao; Khan, Amir; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we report the 3-D electrical conductivity distribution beneath the Australian continent in the depth range 410-1600 km, which we have imaged by inverting C-response estimates from a regional network of geomagnetic observatories. The inversion scheme is based on a quasi-Newton optimization method while the forward algorithm relies on an integral-equation approach. To properly account for the ocean effect in responses at coastal observatories we included a high-resolution (1° × 1°) fixed thin laterally varying surface conductance layer. As starting model in the inversion we considered a laboratory-based 3-D conductivity model of the region obtained from seismic surface wave data and thermodynamic modelling. This model provides a good fit to observed C-response estimates supporting its choice as initial model. The most striking feature of the obtained 3-D model is a high-conductivity anomaly in the lower part of the mantle transition zone (MTZ; 520-660 km depth) beneath southeastern Australia implying considerable lateral as radial heterogeneity in the conductivity structure. The high-conductivity region appears to be 0.5-1 log units more conductive than previous global and other regionalized 1-D models. Further analysis using laboratory-based conductivity models combined with thermochemical phase equilibrium computations shows that the strong conductivity anomaly implies water contents of around 0.1 wt per cent in the upper part and >0.4 wt per cent in the lower part of the MTZ. This implies a large MTZ water reservoir that likely totals one to three times that which currently resides in the oceans. The amount of water in the lower MTZ appears to exceed the experimentally determined water storage capacity of the main lower MTZ mineral ringwoodite, which, as a result, undergoes dehydration-induced partial melting. Including contributions to conductivity from a thin melt layer (20 km thick) located in the mid-MTZ increases conductivity locally in the

  2. Effects of nitrate and water on the oxygen isotopic analysis of barium sulfate precipitated from water samples.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Janet E; Böhlke, John Karl; Mroczkowski, Stanley J

    2008-12-01

    BaSO(4) precipitated from mixed salt solutions by common techniques for SO(4) (2-) isotopic analysis may contain quantities of H(2)O and NO(3) (-) that introduce errors in O isotope measurements. Experiments with synthetic solutions indicate that delta(18)O values of CO produced by decomposition of precipitated BaSO(4) in a carbon reactor may be either too low or too high, depending on the relative concentrations of SO(4) (2-) and NO(3) (-) and the delta(18)O values of the H(2)O, NO(3) (-), and SO(4) (2-). Typical delta(18)O errors are of the order of 0.5 to 1 per thousand in many sample types, and can be larger in samples containing atmospheric NO(3) (-), which can cause similar errors in delta(17)O and Delta(17)O. These errors can be reduced by (1) ion chromatographic separation of SO(4) (2-) from NO(3) (-), (2) increasing the salinity of the solutions before precipitating BaSO(4) to minimize incorporation of H(2)O, (3) heating BaSO(4) under vacuum to remove H(2)O, (4) preparing isotopic reference materials as aqueous samples to mimic the conditions of the samples, and (5) adjusting measured delta(18)O values based on amounts and isotopic compositions of coexisting H(2)O and NO(3) (-). These procedures are demonstrated for SO(4) (2-) isotopic reference materials, synthetic solutions with isotopically known reagents, atmospheric deposition from Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA, and sulfate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert, Chile, and Mojave Desert, California, USA. These results have implications for the calibration and use of O isotope data in studies of SO(4) (2-) sources and reaction mechanisms.

  3. Effects of nitrate and water on the oxygen isotopic analysis of barium sulfate precipitated from water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hannon, J.E.; Böhlke, J.K.; Mroczkowski, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    BaSO4 precipitated from mixed salt solutions by common techniques for SO42- isotopic analysis may contain quantities of H2O and NO3- that introduce errors in O isotope measurements. Experiments with synthetic solutions indicate that ??18O values of CO produced by decomposition of precipitated BaSO4 in a carbon reactor may be either too low or too high, depending on the relative concentrations of SO42- and NO3- and the ??18O values of the H2O, NO3-, and SO42-. Typical ??18O errors are of the order of 0.5 to 1??? in many sample types, and can be larger in samples containing atmospheric NO 3-, which can cause similar errors in ?? 17O and ??17O. These errors can be reduced by (1) ion chromatographic separation of SO42- from NO 3-, (2) increasing the salinity of the solutions before precipitating BaSO4 to minimize incorporation of H2O, (3) heating BaSO4 under vacuum to remove H2O, (4) preparing isotopic reference materials as aqueous samples to mimic the conditions of the samples, and (5) adjusting measured ??18O values based on amounts and isotopic compositions of coexisting H2O and NO 3-. These procedures are demonstrated for SO 42- isotopic reference materials, synthetic solutions with isotopically known reagents, atmospheric deposition from Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA, and sulfate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert, Chile, and Mojave Desert, California, USA. These results have implications for the calibration and use of O isotope data in studies of SO42- sources and reaction mechanisms.

  4. Controls on the isotopic composition of surface water and precipitation in the Northern Andes, Colombian Eastern Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, Joel E.; Mora, Andrés; Horton, Brian K.; Nie, Junsheng

    2009-12-01

    Empirical datasets provide the constraints on the variability and causes of variability in stable isotope compositions (δD or δ 18O) of surface water and precipitation that are essential not only for models of modern and past climate but also for investigations of paleoelevation. This study presents stable isotope data for 76 samples from four elevation transects and three IAEA GNIP stations in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and the northern Andean foreland. These data are largely consistent with theories of stable isotope variability developed based on a global dataset. On a monthly basis, the precipitation-amount effect exerts the dominant control on δD p and δ 18O p values at the IAEA GNIP stations. At the Bogotá station (2547 m), the δD p and δ 18O p values vary seasonally, with isotopic minima correlating with maxima in precipitation-amount. Although surface water samples from Eastern Cordilleran streams and rivers fall on the Global Meteoric Water Line, samples from three of four lakes (2842-3459 m) have evaporatively elevated δD sw and δ 18O sw values. The IAEA GNIP station data averaged over multiple years, combined with stream and river water data, define vertical lapse rates of -1.8‰ km -1 for Δδ 18O and -14.6‰ km -1 for ΔδD, and are a close fit to a common thermodynamically based Rayleigh distillation model. Elevation uncertainties for these relationships are also evaluated. Comparison of this Colombian dataset with the elevation uncertainties generated by the thermodynamically based model shows that the model underestimates uncertainty at high Δδ 18O and ΔδD values while overestimating it for low Δδ 18O and ΔδD values. This study presents an independent, empirical assessment of stable isotope-based elevation uncertainties for the northern Andes based on a dataset of sufficient size to ensure statistical integrity. These vertical lapse rates and associated uncertainties form the basis for stable isotope paleoelevation studies

  5. Landscape controls on pore water chemistry and chemical weathering rates in the Critical Zone Observatory: Shale Hills Catchment (Central Pennsylvania, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Brantley, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate controls, mechanisms and rates of shale weathering and soil formation at the Susquehanna/Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory of central Pennsylvania. The Shale Hills is forested and V-shaped catchment, with slopes around 16-18%. The parent shales, of Silurian Rose Hill Formation, are comprised of primarily illite, quartz, and chlorite. The dominant chemical reactions in the soil profiles are dissolution of chlorite and illite to form more stable kaolinite, through intermediate phases vermiculite and hydroxy interlayered vermiculite. Previous hydrologic studies have included monitoring the soil moisture contents and modeling the water flow dynamics in the unsaturated zones. Depth to the bedrock in the catchment depends mainly on the landscape positions, with thinner soils observed at the ridge tops, and much thicker soils at the valley floors and topographically depressional areas. Study sites were selected to investigate the propagation rates of the weathering front (the interface between intact bedrock and weathered material) with increasing complexity: fluid flow above the bedrock interface is largely vertical at ridgetop (1D site), downslope along a planar transect (2D site), and convergent downslope along a swale transect (3D site). Weekly soil waters were collected at these sites and the soil water chemistry and mineral dissolution kinetics are integrated at these characteristic landscapes, to investigate weathering scenario for the whole catchment. Soil at the 1D site is only 20 cm thick, with soils slightly depleted relative to parent composition. Here, porewater chemistry is controlled by chemical weathering reactions with some contribution from rainfall. At the 2D planar transect, soil thickness increases from the ridge top to valley floor, and soil waters become more concentrated downslope as mineral dissolution progresses. The depth variation of water chemistry is distinctively different among the sites, which is closely related to soil

  6. Evaluation of the effects of precipitation on ground-water levels from wells in selected alluvial aquifers in Utah and Arizona, 1936-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, Philip M.; Heilweil, Victor M.

    2009-01-01

    Increased withdrawals from alluvial aquifers of the southwestern United States during the last half-century have intensified the effects of drought on ground-water levels in valleys where withdrawal for irrigation is greatest. Furthermore, during wet periods, reduced withdrawals coupled with increased natural recharge cause rising ground-water levels. In order to manage water resources more effectively, analysis of ground-water levels under the influence of natural and anthropogenic stresses is useful. This report evaluates the effects of precipitation patterns on ground-water levels in areas of Utah and Arizona that have experienced different amounts of ground-water withdrawal. This includes a comparison of water-level records from basins that are hydrogeologically and climatologically similar but have contrasting levels of ground-water development. Hydrologic data, including records of ground-water levels, basin-wide annual ground-water withdrawals, and precipitation were examined from two basins in Utah (Milford and central Sevier) and three in Arizona (Aravaipa Canyon, Willcox, and Douglas). Most water-level records examined in this study from basins experiencing substantial ground-water development (Milford, Douglas, and Willcox) showed strong trends of declining water levels. Other water-level records, generally from the less-developed basins (central Sevier and Aravaipa Canyon) exhibited trends of increasing water levels. These trends are likely the result of accumulating infiltration of unconsumed irrigation water. Water-level records that had significant trends were detrended by subtraction of a low-order polynomial in an attempt to eliminate the variation in the water-level records that resulted from ground-water withdrawal or the application of water for irrigation. After detrending, water-level residuals were correlated with 2- to 10-year moving averages of annual precipitation from representative stations for the individual basins. The water

  7. Relative humidity patterns and fog water precipitation in the Atacama Desert and biological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CáCeres, Luis; Gómez-Silva, Benito; Garró, Ximena; RodríGuez, Violeta; Monardes, Vinka; McKay, Christopher P.

    2007-12-01

    Fog is the most important source of water for native plants and biological soil crusts in the Atacama Desert. Since fog depends upon available moisture, an understanding of climatic patterns is essential to interpret its present-day occurrence and distribution. In this work, temperature and humidity of ambient air and collected fog water in selected sites were studied across a transect from the coast to inland of the Atacama Desert, by using automated outdoor sensors for temperature and relative humidity, and also fog collectors equipped with automated rain gauges to measure collected fog water flow rates. Field measurements were organized to determine fog and collected fog water patterns at three selected sites, namely, Coloso, Inacesa and Yungay in addition to the relative humidity and temperature variation with altitude at Coloso Mountain located within Coloso site. The results show a decreasing trend in the collected fog water flow rates from the coast toward inland locations. Daily thermal oscillations at each site are closely related to fog water collection. At Coloso Mountain, an adiabatic cooling-like effect of the wind ascending its slope was observed preferentially during nighttime. At daytime, occasional distortions observed in the temperature profiles are probably produced by a thermal driven-air convection process along the Coloso Mountain slope heated by solar radiation. The reduction in available water from fog from the coast to the inland site is consistent with the reduction in colonization rate for hypolithic cyanobacteria along this same transect.

  8. The Boulder magnetic observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Finn, Carol A.; Pedrie, Kolby L.; Blum, Cletus C.

    2015-08-14

    The Boulder magnetic observatory has, since 1963, been operated by the Geomagnetism Program of the U.S. Geological Survey in accordance with Bureau and national priorities. Data from the observatory are used for a wide variety of scientific purposes, both pure and applied. The observatory also supports developmental projects within the Geomagnetism Program and collaborative projects with allied geophysical agencies.

  9. Unit operation optimization for the manufacturing of botanical injections using a design space approach: a case study of water precipitation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xingchu; Chen, Huali; Chen, Teng; Qu, Haibin

    2014-01-01

    Quality by design (QbD) concept is a paradigm for the improvement of botanical injection quality control. In this work, water precipitation process for the manufacturing of Xueshuantong injection, a botanical injection made from Notoginseng Radix et Rhizoma, was optimized using a design space approach as a sample. Saponin recovery and total saponin purity (TSP) in supernatant were identified as the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of water precipitation using a risk assessment for all the processes of Xueshuantong injection. An Ishikawa diagram and experiments of fractional factorial design were applied to determine critical process parameters (CPPs). Dry matter content of concentrated extract (DMCC), amount of water added (AWA), and stirring speed (SS) were identified as CPPs. Box-Behnken designed experiments were carried out to develop models between CPPs and process CQAs. Determination coefficients were higher than 0.86 for all the models. High TSP in supernatant can be obtained when DMCC is low and SS is high. Saponin recoveries decreased as DMCC increased. Incomplete collection of supernatant was the main reason for the loss of saponins. Design space was calculated using a Monte-Carlo simulation method with acceptable probability of 0.90. Recommended normal operation region are located in DMCC of 0.38-0.41 g/g, AWA of 3.7-4.9 g/g, and SS of 280-350 rpm, with a probability more than 0.919 to attain CQA criteria. Verification experiment results showed that operating DMCC, SS, and AWA within design space can attain CQA criteria with high probability.

  10. Unit Operation Optimization for the Manufacturing of Botanical Injections Using a Design Space Approach: A Case Study of Water Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xingchu; Chen, Huali; Chen, Teng; Qu, Haibin

    2014-01-01

    Quality by design (QbD) concept is a paradigm for the improvement of botanical injection quality control. In this work, water precipitation process for the manufacturing of Xueshuantong injection, a botanical injection made from Notoginseng Radix et Rhizoma, was optimized using a design space approach as a sample. Saponin recovery and total saponin purity (TSP) in supernatant were identified as the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of water precipitation using a risk assessment for all the processes of Xueshuantong injection. An Ishikawa diagram and experiments of fractional factorial design were applied to determine critical process parameters (CPPs). Dry matter content of concentrated extract (DMCC), amount of water added (AWA), and stirring speed (SS) were identified as CPPs. Box-Behnken designed experiments were carried out to develop models between CPPs and process CQAs. Determination coefficients were higher than 0.86 for all the models. High TSP in supernatant can be obtained when DMCC is low and SS is high. Saponin recoveries decreased as DMCC increased. Incomplete collection of supernatant was the main reason for the loss of saponins. Design space was calculated using a Monte-Carlo simulation method with acceptable probability of 0.90. Recommended normal operation region are located in DMCC of 0.38–0.41 g/g, AWA of 3.7–4.9 g/g, and SS of 280–350 rpm, with a probability more than 0.919 to attain CQA criteria. Verification experiment results showed that operating DMCC, SS, and AWA within design space can attain CQA criteria with high probability. PMID:25101624

  11. The Status of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission 26 Months After Launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gail; Huffman, George

    2016-04-01

    Water is essential to our planet Earth. Knowing when, where and how precipitation falls is crucial for understanding the linkages between the Earth's water and energy cycles and is extraordinarily important for sustaining life on our planet during climate change. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory spacecraft launched February 27, 2014, is the anchor to the GPM international satellite mission to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational sensors to provide "next-generation" precipitation products [1-2]. GPM is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The unique 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 407 km for the GPM Core Observatory allows for highly sophisticated observations of precipitation in the mid-latitudes where a majority of the population lives. Indeed, the GOM Core Observatory serves as the cornerstone, as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. GPM's requirements are to measure rain rates from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect and estimate falling snow. GPM has several retrieval product levels ranging from raw instrument data to Core and partner swath precipitation estimates to gridded and accumulated products and finally to multi-satellite merged products. The latter merged product, called IMERG, is available with a 5-hour latency with temporal resolution of 30 minutes and spatial resolution of 0.1o x 0.1o (~10km x 10km) grid box. Some products have a 1-hour latency for societal applications such as floods, landslides, hurricanes, blizzards, and typhoons and all have late-latency high-quality science products. The GPM mission is well on its way to providing essential data on precipitation (rain and snow) from micro to local to global scales via providing precipitation

  12. Synthesis by precipitation polymerization of molecularly imprinted polymer for the selective extraction of diclofenac from water samples.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chao-meng; Zhou, Xue-fei; Zhang, Ya-lei; Liu, Shu-guang; Zhang, Juan

    2011-12-30

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized by precipitation polymerization using diclofenac (DFC) as a template, 2-vinylpyridine (2-VP) as functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross-linker, and toluene as porogen. The MIP showed outstanding affinity toward DFC in aqueous solution with a binding site capacity (Q(max)) of 324.8 mg/g (1.09 mmol/g) and was used as solid-phase extraction (SPE) material for the quantitative enrichment of DFC in environmental water samples and off-line coupled to a reversed-phase HPLC/DAD. Various parameters including washing solvent, elution solvent and breakthrough volume affecting the extraction efficiency of the polymers have been evaluated to achieve the selective preconcentration of DFC from water samples and to reduce non-specific interactions. Recoveries of DFC extracted from tap water, river water and wastewater samples were higher than 95%, and no significant DFC recovery difference was obtained among the different water matrix. The stability of MIP was tested by consecutive percolation of water sample, and it was shown that the performance of the MIP did not vary even after 30 adsorption and desorption cycles. Furthermore, the MISPE was used for the analysis of DFC in river water and wastewater samples and revealed DFC concentrations of 0.69±0.002 μg/L (n=3) and 0.31±0.004μg/L (n=3), respectively. The results were in good agreement with corresponding LC-MS/MS data.

  13. [Seasonal characteristics of δD and δ18O in precipitation and its water vapor sources in the Xiaolangdi Reservoir area of Yellow River, China].

    PubMed

    Tian, Chao; Meng, Ping; Zhang, Jin-song; Sun, Shou-jia; He, Chun-xia; Jia, Chang-rong; Li, Jian-zhong

    2015-12-01

    The seasonal characteristics of δD and δ¹⁸O in precipitation and the influence factors were studied in the Xiaolangdi Reservoir area at the eastern monsoon region of China. The precipitation samples and the corresponding meteorological data were collected between April and October from the year 2011 to 2014. The local meteoric water lines (LMWL) of different seasons were established, and the water vapor sources in different seasons were investigated. The results showed that the δD and δ¹⁸O in precipitation exhibited an extremely wide range and a distinct seasonal variation, and they were enriched in the spring, and depleted in the fall. The δD and δ¹⁸O values showed negative correlations with the amount of precipitation from April to October and the fall, respectively. The δD values and the mean air temperature showed a negative correlation from April to October, but showed no correlation in seasonal precipitation. Both the slopes of LMWL and excess deuterium (d values) of precipitation were the smallest in the summer, and the largest in the fall. The results of air mass back trajectories of seasonal precipitation using the HYSPLIT model indicated a dominant effect of southeast and southwest maritime monsoon air masses in the summer and the co-influence of continental and oceanic monsoons air masses in the spring and fall in the study area.

  14. Polar Sunrise 2008 Comparison of Lidar Water Vapor Measurements from the IASOA PEARL Observatory in Eureka, Canada and ACE Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, A. L.; Sica, R. J.; Strawbridge, K. B.; Walker, K. A.; Manney, G. L.; Drummond, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Water vapor is an important part of the atmosphere due to its roles in the hydrological cycle, greenhouse heating and ozone chemistry. The stratospheric ozone lidar located at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in Eureka, Nunavut (80.2° N, 86.4° W) is jointly operated by the Canadian Network for Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) and Environment Canada. It has recently been upgraded to measure water vapor at 150 m vertical resolution in the polar troposphere up to about six kilometers, with measurements extending above this at lower vertical resolution. Successful validation of these measurements will allow scientific studies to begin with the coincident measurements from the lidar and suite of CANDAC instruments at PEARL. In concert with the lidar's well-established ozone and temperature profiles these new water vapor measurements will allow incidents of stratosphere-troposphere exchange to be monitored as well as, when combined with other measurements from PEARL instrumentation, detailed studies of ozone chemistry to be performed. With the motion of the polar vortex bringing it overhead and away from PEARL during the course of a campaign, it is possible to look at interactions between upper tropospheric jets and the vortex. Water vapor measurements have been taken and analyzed for eleven nights during the Canadian Arctic ACE Validation Campaign in February and March 2008. Calibration of the lidar has been obtained by comparing lidar measurements from seven clear nights to water vapor measurements from the regular radiosonde launches at the Eureka Weather Station. A consistent altitude dependent bias between the two instruments is found, giving us confidence in the calibration. Calibrated lidar measurements are currently being compared to water vapour measurements from overpasses by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite, as well as compared to the ozone measurements obtained during the campaign.

  15. Impact of extreme precipitation and water table change on N2O fluxes in a bio-energy poplar plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zona, D.; Janssens, I. A.; Verlinden, M. S.; Broeckx, L. S.; Cools, J.; Gioli, B.; Zaldei, A.; Ceulemans, R.

    2011-03-01

    A large fraction of the West European landscape is used for intensive agriculture. Several of these countries have very high nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, because of substantial use of fertilizers and high rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. N2O production in soils is controlled by water-filled pore space (WFPS) and substrate availability (NO3). Here we show that extreme precipitation (80 mm rainfall in 48 h) after a long dry period, led to a week-long peak in N2O emissions (up to about 2200 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1). In the first four of these peak emission days, N2O fluxes showed a pronounced diurnal pattern correlated to daytime increase in temperature and wind speed. It is possible that N2O was transported through the transpiration stream of the poplar trees and emitted through the stomates. However, during the following three high emission days, N2O emission was fairly stable with no pronounced diurnal trend, and was correlated with wind speed and WFPS (at 20 and 40 cm depth) but no longer with soil temperature. We hypothesized that wind speed facilitated N2O emission from the soil to the atmosphere through a significant pressure-pumping. Successive rainfall events and similar WFPS after this first intense precipitation did not lead to N2O emissions of the same magnitude. These findings suggest that climate change-induced modification in precipitation patterns may lead to high N2O emission pulses from soil, such that sparser and more extreme rainfall events after longer dry periods could lead to peak N2O emissions. The cumulative effects of more variable climate on annual N2O emission are still largely uncertain and need further investigation.

  16. Modeled Interactive Effects of Precipitation, temperature, and [CO2] on Ecosystem Carbon and Water Dynamics in Different Climatic Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yiqi; Gerten, Dieter; Le Maire, Guerric; Parton, William; Weng, Ensheng; Zhou, Xuhuui; Keough, Cindy; Beier, Claus; Ciais, Philippe; Cramer, Wolfgang; Dukes, Jeff; Emmett, Bridget; Hanson, Paul J; Knapp, Alan; Linder, Sune; Nepstad, Daniel; Rustad, Lindsey

    2008-01-01

    Interactive effects of multiple global change factors on ecosystem processes are complex. It is relatively expensive to explore those interactions in manipulative experiments. We conducted a modeling analysis to identify potentially important interactions and to stimulate hypothesis formulation for experimental research. Four models were used to quantify interactive effects of climate warming (T), altered precipitation amounts [doubled (DP) and halved (HP)] and seasonality (SP, moving precipitation in July and August to January and February to create summer drought), and elevated [CO2] (C) on net primary production (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), net ecosystem production (NEP), transpiration, and runoff.We examined those responses in seven ecosystems, including forests, grasslands, and heathlands in different climate zones. The modeling analysis showed that none of the threeway interactions among T, C, and altered precipitation was substantial for either carbon or water processes, nor consistent among the seven ecosystems. However, two-way interactive effects on NPP, Rh, and NEP were generally positive (i.e. amplification of one factor s effect by the other factor) between T and C or between T and DP. A negative interaction (i.e. depression of one factor s effect by the other factor) occurred for simulated NPP between T and HP. The interactive effects on runoff were positive between T and HP. Four pairs of two-way interactive effects on plant transpiration were positive and two pairs negative. In addition, wet sites generally had smaller relative changes in NPP, Rh, runoff, and transpiration but larger absolute changes in NEP than dry sites in response to the treatments. The modeling results suggest new hypotheses to be tested in multifactor global change experiments. Likewise, more experimental evidence is needed for the further improvement of ecosystem models in order to adequately simulate complex interactive processes.

  17. A universal salt model based on under-ground precipitation of solid salts due to supercritical water `out-salting'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueslåtten, H.; Hovland, M. T.

    2010-12-01

    One of the common characteristics of planets Earth and Mars is that both host water (H2O) and large accumulations of salt. Whereas Earth’s surface-environment can be regarded as ‘water-friendly’ and ‘salt hostile’, the reverse can be said for the surface of Mars. This is because liquid water is stable on Earth, and the atmosphere transports humidity around the globe, whereas on planet Mars, liquid water is unstable, rendering the atmosphere dry and, therefore, ‘salt-friendly’. The riddle as to how the salt accumulated in various locations on those two planets, is one of long-lasting and great debate. The salt accumulations on Earth are traditionally termed ‘evaporites’, meaning that they formed as a consequence of the evaporation of large masses of seawater. How the accumulations on Mars formed is much harder to explain, as an ocean only existed briefly. Although water molecules and OH-groups may exist in abundance in bound form (crystal water, adsorbed water, etc.), the only place where free water is expected to be stable on Mars is within underground faults, fractures, and crevices. Here it likely occurs as brine or in the form of ice. Based on these conditions, a key to understanding the accumulation of large deposits of salt on both planets is linked to how brines behave in the subsurface when pressurized and heated beyond their supercritical point. At depths greater than about 3 km (P>300 bars) water will no longer boil in a steam phase. Rather, it becomes supercritical and will attain the phase of supercritical water vapor (SCRIW) with a specific gravity of typically 0.3 g/cm3. An important characteristic of SCRIW is its inability to dissolve the common sea salts. The salt dissolved in the brines will therefore precipitate as solid particles when brines (seawater on the Earth) move into the supercritical P&T-domain (T>400°C, P>300 bars). Numerical modeling of a hydrothermal system in the Atlantis II Deep of the Red Sea indicates that a

  18. Impacts of Wildfire on Throughfall and Stemflow Precipitation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. M.; McIntosh, J. C.; Meixner, T.; Brooks, P. D.; Chorover, J.

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of large, stand replacing wildfires is more frequent in the western United States now than ever before. The loss of canopy cover due to wildfire drastically modifies landscapes and alters ecosystems as high intensity burns replace canopies with charred branches and trunks, change soil composition and erosion processes, and affect hydrologic flow paths and water chemistry. Precipitation that is not intercepted by the forest canopy makes its way to the forest floor as throughfall or stemflow. Tracking variations in the amount and chemistry of precipitation that interacts with burned versus unburned forest stands, as well as open precipitation, will help to quantify changes in hydrologic routing and catchment water chemistry caused by wildfire. This study investigates the effects of fire on the volume and chemical composition of precipitation diverted to the forest floor as stemflow and throughfall by observing the impact of the June 2013 Thompson Ridge wildfire in the Jemez River Basin Critical Zone Observatory field site in the Valles Caldera National Preserve of New Mexico. Throughfall and stemflow collectors were installed beneath both burned and unburned canopies and open areas in two catchments impacted by the Thompson Ridge fire. Initial results of field parameters, including electrical conductivity, pH and volume of precipitation collected from both burned and unburned sites, show variations across collector type (stemflow, throughfall and open precipitation), site location as the two catchments differ in aspect and gradient, and burn severity. Throughfall, stemflow and open precipitation samples were analyzed for trace metals, major cations, anions, nutrients and organic matter to determine how fire affects the chemical composition of the precipitation that interacts with burned canopies. This study is one of the first to quantify the relationship between wildfire and the chemistry and flux of stemflow and throughfall in conjunction with a full

  19. Impact of shallow water bodies on the permafrost temperature and estimation of risk of thermokarst development at the Barrow Environmental Observatory area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodov, A. L.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Chamberlain, A. J.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Cable, W.

    2015-12-01

    Extension of the thermokarst features such as lakes and ponds had been noticed in many regions of the Arctic affected by the modern climate warming. Thermokarst is a process of permafrost thawing under the water bodies with depths larger than maximal thickness of seasonal ice in the area, i.e. with permanent positive temperature at the bottom. This process is most probable in the areas where massive ice bodies (wedges, lenses, layers etc) or ice rich deposits exist close to ground surface and even insignificant increasing of thaw depth can lead to its melting and surface subsidence. Local depressions such as low-centered polygonal ponds or interpolygonal troughs can potentially become triggers of thermokarst development. Current research was aimed on determination of warming impact of small water bodies on the permafrost temperature and seasonal thawing and estimation of risk of thermokarst development at Barrow Environmental Observatory area. Comparison of temperature measurements under shallow (10 - 40 cm deep) with relatively dry spots and active layer thickness survey show that warming impact of small water bodies (mean annual temperature at the permafrost table here is up to 2oC higher then under "dry" geomorphological features) is not realized in increasing of the thawing depth. Active layer thickness does not exceed values of 45 cm under polygonal ponds and 35 cm under troughs that is less then thickness of protective layer above ice wedges in the area. For estimation of risk of thermokarst development we used analytical equations developed by V.Kudryavtsev (1974). Results of calculations show that in this area crucial depth of water bodies required for mean annual temperature at the bottom of the pond became higher then freezing point consists of 0.95 cm. Current research was supported by US DOE as a part of research project Next Generation of Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE).

  20. Precipitate deposition around CMC and vesicle-to-micelle transition of monopotassium monododecyl phosphate in water.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takaya; Miyaki, Masahiro; Tajima, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Masaki

    2012-09-13

    Monoalkyl phosphate (MAP) salts are a kind of bivalent anionic surfactants. The difference of properties between half-neutralized monosalt and completely neutralized disalt is very interesting. In this study, the aggregation behavior of monopotassium monododecyl phosphate (MAP-12K) in aqueous solution with an increase in concentration was investigated by surface tension (γ), elemental analysis, gas chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, steady-state fluorescence, and negative strained transmission electron microscopy techniques. MAP-12K aqueous solution showed some characteristics: (I) Vesicle aggregates were formed at very dilute concentration (1.2 mM). (II) The precipitate of a highly hydrophobic dimer of MAP, which was quaternary neutralized by potassium, was generated only in a certain dilute concentration region (2.7-200 mM) around the critical micelle concentration (cmc = 20 mM). (III) Vesicles spontaneously translate into micelles at the cmc. (IV) In the higher concentration above 200 mM, the solution becomes homogeneous micellar solution. All of these uncommon characteristics are thought to be caused by the generation of the dimer, which is much more hydrophobic than dissolved MAP derivatives, in the complicated chemical equilibria based on the weakly acidic character of MAP. MAP-12K aqueous solution behaves as if it is a binary mixed surfactant solution of hydrophobic dialkyl surfactant and hydrophilic monoalkyl surfactant in spite of a single component solution.

  1. Annual Variations in Water Storage and Precipitation in the Amazon Basin: Bounding Sink Terms in the Terrestrial Hydrological Balance using GRACE Satellite Gravity Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, John W.; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Bailey, Richard C.; Tamisiea, Mark E.; Davis, James L.

    2007-01-01

    We combine satellite gravity data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and precipitation measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center's (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), over the period from mid-2002 to mid-2006, to investigate the relative importance of sink (runoff and evaporation) and source (precipitation) terms in the hydrological balance of the Amazon Basin. When linear and quadratic terms are removed, the time series of land water storage variations estimated from GRACE exhibits a dominant annual signal of 250 mm peak-to-peak, which is equivalent to a water volume change of approximately 1800 cubic kilometers. A comparison of this trend with accumulated (i.e., integrated) precipitation shows excellent agreement and no evidence of basin saturation. The agreement indicates that the net runoff and evaporation contributes significantly less than precipitation to the annual hydrological mass balance. Indeed, raw residuals between the detrended water storage and precipitation anomalies range from plus or minus 40 mm. This range is consistent with streamflow measurements from the region, although the latter are characterized by a stronger annual signal than ow residuals, suggesting that runoff and evaporation may act to partially cancel each other.

  2. Research and operational products from the combination of a monthly hydrographic station and an oceanic buoy: The Biscay AGL fixed-point water column observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavin, Alicia; Cano, Daniel; González-Pola, Cesar; Tel, Elena; Rodriguez, Carmen; Ruiz, Manuel; Somavilla, Raquel

    2015-04-01

    , but Dissolved Oxygen sensor is also problematic. Periods of realistic smooth variations present strong offset that is corrected based on the Winkler analysis of water samples. The incorporation of these observatories on larger scale research programs, as done in 2003 in the framework of the VACLAN and COVACLAN projects, is important in order to provide them with a larger spatial dimension and maximize its utility for process-oriented studies. In 2003, the Santander section was extended 90 miles offshore in the framework of a large-scale hydrographic and circulation monitoring program. Partnerships in a large EU project as FixO3 has provided tools for coordination, homogenization and data validation as well as improve the use of chemical-biological data.

  3. Application of quantitative XRD on the precipitation of struvite from Brine Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heraldy, E.; Rahmawati, F.; Heryanto; Putra, D. P.

    2017-02-01

    The present studies have been conducted to quantify the varied phases in struvite formation from brine water as the magnesium source. The quantitative X-ray Diffraction (QXRD) method was performed to quantitatively determine the crystal phases and amorphous content of struvite samples. Substantial phase samples were employed quantitative analysis to calibrate against known phase composition information by Rietveld refinement on powder XRD data. The results showed that brine water could be considered as magnesium source the formation of struvite products. The study demonstrated that in general, the high N:P molar ratio (both pH 9 and 10) might lead to the significant formation of struvite.

  4. Use of NADP archive samples to determine the isotope composition of precipitation: characterizing the meteoric input function for use in ground water studies.

    PubMed

    Harvey, F E

    2001-01-01

    Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes have been used in ground water studies to investigate recharge, mixing, ground water/surface water interaction, advective-diffusive transport, paleohydrogeologic interactions and to estimate ground water ages. Such studies require that the isotopic composition of precipitation be known, as precipitation is a major input to ground water and surface water systems. As oxygen-18 and deuterium data for precipitation are lacking across much of the United States, there is need to establish additional local meteoric water lines as isotope input functions across the region, as well as to develop better understanding of the isotopic climate linkages that control oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios in precipitation. In the absence of long-term monitoring stations, one possible solution to this problem is to determine the delta 18O and delta 2H values of precipitation using archive samples collected at monitoring stations managed by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP). This study describes and interprets the seasonal delta 18O and delta 2H composition of archived precipitation samples collected in eastern Nebraska near the town of Mead during the years 1992-1994. Values for delta 18O range from -23.6 to -0.7@1000. Values for delta 2H range from -172 to 0@1000. Yearly arithmetic mean delta 18O and delta 2H values for the Mead station are -8.1@1000 and -53@1000, respectively. Weighted yearly means for delta 18O and delta 2H were -7.4@1000 and -48@1000, respectively. Mead values show a strong isotopic enrichment between winter and summer precipitation, and a strong delta 18O-T correlation (r2 = 0.91) for mean monthly values of about 0.5@1000 per degree Celsius. The local meteoric water line for the Mead site is delta 2H = 7.40 delta 18O + 7.32. Deuterium excess values suggest that most of the moisture across the region is derived primarily from a Gulf of Mexico source. The results of this study demonstrate that in the absence of

  5. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2012-01-01

    (SAPHIR) on the French-Indian MeghaTropiques satellite, (4) the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-19, (5) MHS instruments on MetOp satellites launched by the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), (6) the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP), and (7) ATMS instruments on the NOAA-NASA Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) satellites. Data from Chinese and Russian microwave radiometers may also become available through international collaboration under the auspices of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). The current generation of global rainfall products combines observations from a network of uncoordinated satellite missions using a variety of merging techniques. GPM will provide "next-generation" precipitation products characterized by: (1) more accurate instantaneous precipitation estimate (especially for light rain and cold-season solid precipitation), (2) intercalibrated microwave brightness temperatures from constellation radiometers within a consistent framework, and (3) unified precipitation retrievals from constellation radiometers using a common a priori hydrometeor database constrained by combined radar/radiometer measurements provided by the GPM Core Observatory. GPM is a science mission with integrated applications goals. GPM will provide a key measurement to improve understanding of global water cycle variability and freshwater availability in a changing climate. The DPR and GMI measurements will offer insights into 3-dimensional structures of hurricanes and midlatitude storms, microphysical properties of precipitating particles, and latent heat associated with precipitation processes. The GPM mission will also make data available in near realtime (within 3 hours of observations

  6. Factors Affecting P Loads to Surface Waters: Comparing the Roles of Precipitation and Land Management Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motew, M.; Booth, E.; Carpenter, S. R.; Kucharik, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Surface water quality is a major concern in the Yahara watershed (YW) of southern Wisconsin, home to a thriving dairy industry, the city of Madison, and five highly valued lakes that are eutrophic. Despite management interventions to mitigate runoff, there has been no significant trend in P loading to the lakes since 1975. Increases in manure production and heavy rainfall events over this time period may have offset any effects of management. We developed a comprehensive, integrated modeling framework that can simulate the effects of multiple drivers on ecosystem services, including surface water quality. The framework includes process-based representation of terrestrial ecosystems (Agro-IBIS) and groundwater flow (MODFLOW), hydrologic routing of water and nutrients across the landscape (THMB), and assessment of lake water quality (YWQM). Biogeochemical cycling and hydrologic transport of P have been added to the framework to enable detailed simulation of P dynamics within the watershed, including interactions with climate and management. The P module features in-soil cycling of organic, inorganic, and labile forms of P; manure application, decomposition, and subsequent loss of dissolved P in runoff; loss of particulate-bound P with erosion; and transport of dissolved and particulate P within waterways. Model results will compare the effects of increased heavy rainfall events, increased manure production, and implementation of best management practices on P loads to the Yahara lakes.

  7. The bovine immune response to Brucella abortus I. A water soluble antigen precipitated by sera of some naturally infected cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Stemshorn, B; Nielsen, K

    1977-01-01

    Selected sera from cattle naturally infected with Brucella abortus precipitate water soluble antigens extracted by sonication from B. abortus. One of these antigens resembles antigen E (Baughn and Freeman) as it is excluded from Sephadex G-200 gels, migrates anodally when electrophoresed at pH 8.6, resists heating at 100 degrees C for ten minutes and appears to be susceptible to papain digestion. Precipitins specific for this antigen remained in sera from which all detectable Brucella agglutinating antibody had been removed by adsorption with live or heat killed B. abortus. The antigen has been extracted from smooth and rough strains of B abortus. Precipitins specific for this antigen have been detected in antisera produced against Brucella canis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:405088

  8. WetNet: Using SSM/I data interactively for global distribution of tropical rainfall and precipitable water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipser, Edward J.; Mcguirk, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The research objectives were the following: (1) to use SSM/I to categorize, measure, and parameterize effects of rainfall systems around the globe, especially mesoscale convective systems; (2) to use SSM/I to monitor key components of the global hydrologic cycle, including tropical rainfall and precipitable water, and links to increasing sea surface temperatures; and (3) to assist in the development of efficient methods of exchange of massive satellite data bases and of analysis techniques, especially their use at a university. Numerous tasks have been initiated. First and foremost has been the integration and startup of the WetNet computer system into the TAMU computer network. Scientific activity was infeasible before completion of this activity. Final hardware delivery was not completed until October 1991, after which followed a period of identification and solution of several hardware and software and software problems. Accomplishments representing approximately four months work with the WetNEt system are presented.

  9. Overland flow computations in urban and industrial catchments from direct precipitation data using a two-dimensional shallow water model.

    PubMed

    Cea, L; Garrido, M; Puertas, J; Jácome, A; Del Río, H; Suárez, J

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental validation and the application to a real industrial catchment of a two-dimensional depth-averaged shallow water model used for the computation of rainfall-runoff transformation from direct precipitation data. Instead of using the common approach in flood inundation modelling, which consists in computing the water depth and velocity fields given the water discharge, in this study the rainfall intensity is imposed directly in the model, the surface runoff being generated automatically. The model considers infiltration losses simultaneously with flow simulation. Gullies are also included in the model, although the coupling between the surface runoff and the sewer network is not considered. Experimental validation of the model is presented in several simplified laboratory configurations of urban catchments, in which the surface runoff has been measured for different hyetographs. The application to a real industrial catchment includes a sewer network flow component, which is solved with the SWMM model. The numerical predictions of the discharge hydrograph generated by a 12 hours storm event are compared with field measurements, providing encouraging results.

  10. Time distribution of the precipitable water vapor in central Saudi Arabia and its relationship to solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrabi, A. H.; Al Dajani, H. M.

    2014-04-01

    Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas. It plays a major role in the dynamics of atmospheric circulation, radiation exchange within the atmosphere, and climate variability. Knowledge of the distribution of water vapor is important for understanding climate change and global warming. In this study, radiosonde data from 1985 to 2012 were used to examine the monthly, interannual, and annual variations and trends of precipitable water vapor (PWV) in central Saudi Arabia in the city of Riyadh (24° 43‧N; 46° 40‧E, 764 m a.s.l.). The results revealed a clear seasonal cycle of PWV with a maximum during the summer months (June-August) and a minimum during the winter (December-February). This variation follows the mean monthly variation of air temperature. The PWV displays considerable variability at the interannual scale. We could not attribute the variations to the air temperature because no relationship was found between the two variables when the interannual variations were examined. Study of the annual variations of the PWV showed cyclic variations with a period of approximately 10-11 years. The two maximums and minimums were in 1996 and 2007 and 1989 and 2000, respectively. The results showed that the annual PWV values are anticorrelated with solar activity, represented by sunspot number, during solar cycles 22 and 23. The physical mechanism underlying this relationship remains unclear. This finding is preliminary, and future investigations are recommended.

  11. Data Assimilation of AIRS Water Vapor Profiles: Impact on Precipitation Forecasts for Atmospheric River Cases Affecting the Western of the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary; Wick, Gary; Neiman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric rivers are transient, narrow regions in the atmosphere responsible for the transport of large amounts of water vapor. These phenomena can have a large impact on precipitation. In particular, they can be responsible for intense rain events on the western coast of North America during the winter season. This paper focuses on attempts to improve forecasts of heavy precipitation events in the Western US due to atmospheric rivers. Profiles of water vapor derived from from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations are combined with GFS forecasts by a three-dimensional variational data assimilation in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI). Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) forecasts initialized from the combined field are compared to forecasts initialized from the GFS forecast only for 3 test cases in the winter of 2011. Results will be presented showing the impact of the AIRS profile data on water vapor and temperature fields, and on the resultant precipitation forecasts.

  12. Precipitation chemistry - Atmospheric loadings to the surface waters of the Indian River lagoon basin by rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.; Madsen, Brooks C.; Maull, Lee A.; Hinkle, C. R.; Knott, William M., III

    1990-01-01

    Rain volume and chemistry monitoring as part of the Kennedy Space Center Long Term Environmental Monitoring Program included the years 1984-1987 as part of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. Atmospheric deposition in rainfall consisted primarily of sea salt and hydrogen ion, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ions. The deposition of nitrogen (a principal plant nutrient) was on the order of 200-300 metric tons per year to the surface waters.

  13. Sustained Water Changes in California during Drought and Heavy Precipitation Inferred from GPS, InSAR, and GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argus, D. F.; Fu, Y.; Landerer, F. W.; Wiese, D. N.; Farr, T. G.; Liu, Z.; Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    About 1200 GPS sites in the westernmost United States are used to weigh changes in surface water as a function of location from 2006 to 2015. The effect of known changes in water in artificial reservoirs is removed, allowing changes in the total of snow, soil moisture, and mountain fracture groundwater to be inferred from GPS. In this study water changes inferred from GPS are placed into the context of complementary InSAR and GRACE data. The southern Central Valley (the San Joaquin Valley and Tulare Basin) is subsiding at spectacular rates of 0.01 m/yr to 0.2 m/yr in response to groundwater management. We construct an elastic model of groundwater change of the southern Central Valley, using GRACE as the basis of total groundwater loss and InSAR to infer the lateral distribution of that groundwater loss. This elastic model of Central Valley groundwater loss is removed from the GPS displacements. Because snow in California is insignificant in October, and because changes in soil moisture between successive autumns are small, we can infer changes in Sierra Nevada mountain fracture groundwater to be: -19 km3 during drought from 2006 to 2009, +35 km3 during heavy precipitation from 2009 to 2011, and -38 km3 during drought from 2011 to 2014 (start and end times are all in October). We infer changes in Sierra Nevada mountain groundwater to be playing an important role in modulating Central Valley groundwater loss. Total water in the Sierra Nevada recovered by 16 km3 from October 2014 to April 2015, but water is being lost again in summer 2015.

  14. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission contributions to terrestrial hydrology and societal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, D.; Skofronick Jackson, G.; Huffman, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Too much or too little rain can serve as a tipping point for triggering catastrophic flooding and landslides or widespread drought. Knowing when, where and how much rain is falling globally is vital to understanding how vulnerable areas may be more or less impacted by these disasters. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international constellation of satellites coordinated through a partnership with NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to provide next-generation global observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission centers on the deployment of a Core Observatory satellite that serves as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites. This satellite launched from Tanegashima Space Complex in Japan on January 28th, 2014 and carries advanced instruments setting a new standard for precipitation measurements from space. The GPM Core Observatory satellite measures rain and snow using two science instruments: the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The GMI captures precipitation intensities and horizontal patterns, while the DPR provides insights into the three dimensional structure of precipitating particles. Together these two instruments provide a database of measurements against which other partner satellites' microwave observations can be meaningfully compared and combined to make a global precipitation dataset. GPM has already provided unprecedented views of typhoons, extratropical systems, light rain, snow storms and extreme precipitation. Through improved measurements of precipitation globally, the GPM mission provides new insights into measuring the fluxes of Earth's water cycle. This presentation will outline new findings and advancements of GPM in understanding and modeling of Earth's water and energy cycles, improving forecasting of extreme events that cause natural hazards and disasters, and extending current

  15. Limitations of Snow-Water Equivalent and Precipitation Data in Seasonal Flow Forecasting in the Upper Klamath River Basin of Oregon and California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risley, J. C.; Roehl, E. A.

    2005-12-01

    Water managers in the upper Klamath Basin, located in south-central Oregon and northeastern California, rely on accurate forecasts of spring and summer streamflow to optimally allocate increasingly limited water supplies for various demands that include irrigation for agriculture, habitat for endangered fishes, and hydropower production. Federal agencies make forecasts on the 1st of each month, from January through May, of the total volume of water expected to pass a stream gage or flow into a reservoir during an entire summer irrigation season. Often the forecasts are based on output from flow forecast models that use real-time snow-water equivalent (SWE) and precipitation data as input. Because the January and February forecasts are significantly less accurate than those made in the spring, we were interested in quantifying the limitations of real-time SWE and precipitation data in forecasting future flows. Using over 20 years of daily SWE, precipitation, and flow time-series from five sites in the upper Klamath Basin, we first decomposed the flow records into annual periodic, long-term climatic, and chaotic traces. Being the component of the original flow records with their seasonality and long-term trends removed, the chaotic traces were then lag correlated with SWE and precipitation records. After a 120 day lag (approximately 4 months), all of the correlation coefficients between the chaotic flow traces and the SWE and precipitation records were less than 0.4. From this, we could infer that SWE and precipitation data older than 120 days provide forecast models only with information regarding the annual seasonal and long-term climate patterns and do not provide information that is unique and specific for the upcoming irrigation season. These results also support the need to find new climate variables, such as mid-oceanic indicators, to improve forecast model accuracy rather than using just real-time SWE and precipitation conditions.

  16. Comparison of broad band time series recorded parallel by FGI type interferometric water level and Lippmann type pendulum tilt meters at Conrad observatory, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruotsalainen, Hannu; Papp, Gabor; Leonhardt, Roman; Ban, Dora; Szücs, Eszter; Benedek, Judith

    2016-04-01

    The Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) the progenitor of Finnish Geospatial Research Institute of NLS designed and built a 5.5m long prototype of interferometric water level tiltmeter (iWT) in early 2014. Geodetic and Geophysical Institute (GGI), Sopron, Hungary bought the instrument and started tilt measurement in August 2014 at the Conrad observatory (COBS), Austria to monitor geodynamical phenomena like microseisms, free oscillations of the Earth, earth tides, mass loading effects and crustal deformations in cooperation with Austrian Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) and the FGI. On the July 16 2015 a Lippmann-type 2D tilt sensor (LTS) was also installed by GGI on the 6 m long pier where iWT was set up previously. This situation opens a possibility to do broad band (from secular to seismic variations up to 15 Hz) geophysical signal analysis comparing the responses of long (several meters) and short (a few decimeters) base instruments implementing different physical principles (relative height change of a level surface and inclination change of the plumb line). The characteristics of the sensors are studied by the evaluation of the spectra of recorded signals dominated by microseisms. The iWT has internal interferometric calibration and it can be compared to Lippmanns tilt meter one. Both instruments show good long term ( > 1 day) stability when earth tides and ocean and air mass loading tilts are modelled.

  17. Sensor networks for cabled ocean observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, B. M.; McGinnis, T.; Kirkham, H.

    2003-04-01

    This paper considers the development of a support infrastructure for subsea observatory sensors and networks. Some sensors will be self-contained individual items, others will be part of a sensor network using, for example, secondary cables and junction boxes to extend the horizontal reach 10s to 100s of km from backbone nodes, or using moorings to distribute observatory capabilities throughout the water column and (equivalently) down boreholes into the crust. Included in the support infrastructure could be acoustic navigation and communications systems, free-swimming AUVs, and bottom rovers that could carry sensors and could provide data and energy "tanker" service. Because of the likely long term observatory application of sensors, and the high cost of access, methods of self-calibration of sensors will also be useful. The sensor infrastructure would supplement the observatory infrastructure that is part of the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI). This Initiative plans to provide junction box nodes on the seafloor that furnish power and communications, and distribute time. There are three elements of the OOI: a regional scale cabled observatory (such as NEPTUNE) with dozens of nodes; a sparse global array of buoys with seafloor nodes; and an expanded system of coastal observatories. Each of these observatories will depend on suites of sensors from a number of investigators, and it is likely that once the observatory infrastructure itself has been installed and commissioned, most of the physical interaction with an observatory will be for installing, operating, servicing, and recovering sensors. These activities will be supported by the proposed infrastructure, enabling the full potential of the observatory to be reached.

  18. A heat and water transfer model for seasonally frozen soils with application to a precipitation-runoff model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emerson, Douglas G.

    1994-01-01

    A model that simulates heat and water transfer in soils during freezing and thawing periods was developed and incorporated into the U.S. Geological Survey's Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System. The model's transfer of heat is based on an equation developed from Fourier's equation for heat flux. The model's transfer of water within the soil profile is based on the concept of capillary forces. Field capacity and infiltration rate can vary throughout the freezing and thawing period, depending on soil conditions and rate and timing of snowmelt. The model can be used to determine the effects of seasonally frozen soils on ground-water recharge and surface-water runoff. Data collected for two winters, 1985-86 and 1986-87, on three runoff plots were used to calibrate and verify the model. The winter of 1985-86 was colder than normal, and snow cover was continuous throughout the winter. The winter of 1986-87 was warmer than normal, and snow accumulated for only short periods of several days. Runoff, snowmelt, and frost depths were used as the criteria for determining the degree of agreement between simulated and measured data. The model was calibrated using the 1985-86 data for plot 2. The calibration simulation agreed closely with the measured data. The verification simulations for plots 1 and 3 using the 1985-86 data and for plots 1 and 2 using the 1986-87 data agreed closely with the measured data. The verification simulation for plot 3 using the 1986-87 data did not agree closely. The recalibration simulations for plots 1 and 3 using the 1985-86 data indicated little improvement because the verification simulations for plots 1 and 3 already agreed closely with the measured data.

  19. Response of surface water chemistry to reduced levels of acid precipitation: Comparison of trends in two regions of New York, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; McHale, M.R.; Driscoll, C.T.; Roy, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    In light of recent reductions in sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) emissions mandated by Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, temporal trends and trend coherence in precipitation (1984-2001 and 1992-2001) and surface water chemistry (1992-2001) were determined in two of the most acid-sensitive regions of North America, i.e. the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains of New York. Precipitation chemistry data from six sites located near these regions showed decreasing sulphate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-), and base cation (CB) concentrations and increasing pH during 1984-2001, but few significant trends during 1992-2001. Data from five Catskill streams and 12 Adirondack lakes showed decreasing trends in SO42- concentrations at all sites, and decreasing trends in NO3-, CB, and H+ concentrations and increasing trends in dissolved organic carbon at most sites. In contrast, acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC increased significantly at only about half the Adirondack lakes and in one of the Catskill streams. Flow correction prior to trend analysis did not change any trend directions and had little effect on SO42- trends, but it caused several significant non-flow-corrected trends in NO3- and ANC to become non-significant, suggesting that trend results for flow-sensitive constituents are affected by flow-related climate variation. SO42- concentrations showed high temporal coherence in precipitation, surface waters, and in precipitation-surface water comparisons, reflecting a strong link between S emissions, precipitation SO42- concentrations, and the processes that affect S cycling within these regions. NO3- and H+ concentrations and ANC generally showed weak coherence, especially in surface waters and in precipitation-surface water comparisons, indicating that variation in local-scale processes driven by factors such as climate are affecting trends in acid-base chemistry in these two regions. Copyright ?? 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Jarosite Precipitation from Acidic Saline Waters in Kachchh, Gujarat, India: an Appropriate Martian Analogue?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Gupta, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Banerjee, S.; Chauhan, P.; Parthasarathy, G.

    2014-12-01

    The origin of jarosite [KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6] on the Martian surface has been an intriguing problem since the Mars Exploration Rover 'Opportunity' first revealed its presence at the Meridiani Planum on Mars. To explain its origin, several terrestrial analogue sites have been studied in different geographical zones. Although several models have been suggested, there is a consensus that only the prevalence of acidic and oxidizing aqueous environmental conditions are conducive to form jarosite. In the Kachchh region of Gujarat, western India, jarosite has been recently discovered from gorges dissecting the Paleocene Matanumadh Formation sediments, that overlie basalts of the Deccan Volcanic Province. This formation comprises pebble conglomerates, carbonaceous shales and purple sandstones capped by a laterite on top. Jarosite, in association with gypsum and goethite, has been detected through FTIR and VNIR spectrometry in almost all litho-units of the succession, albeit in different modes and concentrations. The occurrence of jarosite within black shale in other parts of the world, has been attributed to the oxidation of pyrites within the shale layers. However, in shales of the Matanumadh Formation, jarosite is restricted to fractures that cut across the bedding, while the overlying purple sandstone unit only preserves jarosite in shale clasts within the sandstone. Since the sandstone overlies the black shale layer, downward percolation of sulfate-bearing water from the oxidation of pyrite within the shale layer cannot explain jarosite formation in this unit. In addition, no jarosite is observed below or within pyrite-rich lignite bearing sections in other parts of Kachchh. Alternative suggestions, that jarosite developed in the immediate aftermath of Deccan volcanism as surface waters were rendered acidic by interaction with the final phase of volcanic effusives, are also unlikely as on-going studies suggest that jarosite is not restricted to the Matanumadh Formation. The

  1. Aerosol Impacts on California Winter Clouds and Precipitation during CalWater 2011: Local Pollution versus Long-Range Transported Dust

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, Allen B.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

    2014-01-03

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter and spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust and biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust and biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet, and cloud dynamics. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental conditions for

  2. Aerosol impacts on California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011: local pollution vs. long-range transported dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Leung, L. R.; DeMott, P. J.; Comstock, J. M.; Singh, B.; Rosenfeld, D.; Tomlinson, J. M.; White, A.; Prather, K. A.; Minnis, P.; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Q.

    2013-07-01

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter/spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on 16 February (FEB16) and 2 March (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust or dust/biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust/biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a 40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet, and cloud dynamics. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental conditions for

  3. Aerosol impacts on California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011: local pollution versus long-range transported dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Leung, L. R.; DeMott, P. J.; Comstock, J. M.; Singh, B.; Rosenfeld, D.; Tomlinson, J. M.; White, A.; Prather, K. A.; Minnis, P.; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter and spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and the Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in order to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases (from the CalWater 2011 field campaign) with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on 16 February (FEB16) and 2 March (MAR02). In both cases, observations show the presence of dust and biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust and biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by a few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present, but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology, including cloud dynamics and the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental

  4. Nanoparticles with photoinduced precipitation for the extraction of pollutants from water and soil

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Ferdinand; Bertrand, Nicolas; Lima, Eliana Martins; Langer, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology may offer fast and effective solutions for environmental clean-up. Herein, amphiphilic diblock copolymers are used to develop a platform of photosensitive core-shell nanoparticles. Irradiation with ultraviolet light removes the protective layer responsible for colloidal stability; as a result, the nanoparticles are rapidly and irreversibly converted to macroscopic aggregates. The associated phase separation allows measuring the partitioning of small molecules between the aqueous phase and nanoparticles; data suggests that interactions are enhanced by decreasing the particle size. Adsorption onto nanoparticles can be exploited to efficiently remove hydrophobic pollutants from water and contaminated soil. Preliminary in vivo experiments suggest that treatment with photocleavable nanoparticles can significantly reduce the teratogenicity of bisphenol A, triclosan and 17α-ethinyl estradiol without generating obviously toxic byproducts. Small-scale pilot experiments on wastewater, thermal printing paper and contaminated soil demonstrate the applicability of the approach. PMID:26196119

  5. Nanoparticles with photoinduced precipitation for the extraction of pollutants from water and soil.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Ferdinand; Bertrand, Nicolas; Lima, Eliana Martins; Langer, Robert

    2015-07-21

    Nanotechnology may offer fast and effective solutions for environmental clean-up. Herein, amphiphilic diblock copolymers are used to develop a platform of photosensitive core-shell nanoparticles. Irradiation with ultraviolet light removes the protective layer responsible for colloidal stability; as a result, the nanoparticles are rapidly and irreversibly converted to macroscopic aggregates. The associated phase separation allows measuring the partitioning of small molecules between the aqueous phase and nanoparticles; data suggests that interactions are enhanced by decreasing the particle size. Adsorption onto nanoparticles can be exploited to efficiently remove hydrophobic pollutants from water and contaminated soil. Preliminary in vivo experiments suggest that treatment with photocleavable nanoparticles can significantly reduce the teratogenicity of bisphenol A, triclosan and 17α-ethinyl estradiol without generating obviously toxic byproducts. Small-scale pilot experiments on wastewater, thermal printing paper and contaminated soil demonstrate the applicability of the approach.

  6. Nanoparticles with photoinduced precipitation for the extraction of pollutants from water and soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, Ferdinand; Bertrand, Nicolas; Lima, Eliana Martins; Langer, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Nanotechnology may offer fast and effective solutions for environmental clean-up. Herein, amphiphilic diblock copolymers are used to develop a platform of photosensitive core-shell nanoparticles. Irradiation with ultraviolet light removes the protective layer responsible for colloidal stability; as a result, the nanoparticles are rapidly and irreversibly converted to macroscopic aggregates. The associated phase separation allows measuring the partitioning of small molecules between the aqueous phase and nanoparticles; data suggests that interactions are enhanced by decreasing the particle size. Adsorption onto nanoparticles can be exploited to efficiently remove hydrophobic pollutants from water and contaminated soil. Preliminary in vivo experiments suggest that treatment with photocleavable nanoparticles can significantly reduce the teratogenicity of bisphenol A, triclosan and 17α-ethinyl estradiol without generating obviously toxic byproducts. Small-scale pilot experiments on wastewater, thermal printing paper and contaminated soil demonstrate the applicability of the approach.

  7. Water-regolith-energy Interaction in Landscape Evolution and Its Influence on Forming Asymmetric Landscape: An Example from the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory of Central Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Slingerland, R. L.; Shi, Y.; Duffy, C.; West, N.

    2015-12-01

    Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHCZO) is a 0.08 km2 first order experimental research catchment with relatively homogeneous bedrock, regolith and tectonic uplift, but with an asymmetric slope and thickness of regolith on the north- and south-facing hillslopes. In this paper, we use a hydrological-morphodynamic model (LE-PIHM), which links bedrock, soil, surface and subsurface water flow, plant, energy, and seasonal climate, to address the influence of water-regolith-energy interaction on soil creep process, the possible factors causing slope asymmetry and the spatial distribution of regolith transport at the SSHCZO. Two non-dimensional parameters were used to explore the competitive relationship between regolith diffusion and advection forming self-organized channel spacing, relief and slope length at steady state. Model simulation under seasonal meteorological forcing shows spatial variations of hillslope sediment fluxes. An experimental study using Beryllium 10 at the SSHCZO (West et al 2013) showed that a south-facing planar slope had a greater diffusion flux rate than a planar on north-facing slope. The model confirms this relationship in general although there are significant local variations. The largest regolith transport rate by overland flow (advection) occurs at the junctions of main channel and swales. The model simulation further suggests that north-south differences in diffusive flux may be a result of asymmetric solar insolation which affects freeze-thaw frequency and sediment transport through the process of soil creep. This study demonstrates the value of physically-based distributed landscape evolution model on estimating spatial distribution of regolith transport and highlights the critical transition zone.

  8. The Little Thompson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A.; Melsheimer, T.; Rideout, C.; Vanlew, K.

    1998-12-01

    The Little Thompson Observatory is believed to be the first observatory built as part of a high school and accessible to other schools remotely, via the Internet. This observatory is the second member of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project. Construction is nearly completed and first light is planned for fall 1998. The observatory is located on the grounds of Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. Local schools and youth organizations will have prioritized access to the telescope, and there will also be opportunities for public viewing. After midnight, the telescope will be open to world-wide use by schools via the Internet following the model of the first TIE observatory, the 24" telescope on Mt. Wilson. That telescope has been in use for the past four years by up to 50 schools per month. Students remotely connect to the observatory over the Internet, and then receive the images on their local computers. The observatory grew out of grassroots support from the local community surrounding Berthoud, Colorado, a town of 3,500 residents. TIE has provided the observatory with a Tinsley 18" Cassegrain telescope on a 10-year loan. The facility has been built with tremendous support from volunteers and the local school district. We have applied for an IDEAS grant to provide teacher training workshops which will allow K-12 schools in northern Colorado to make use of the Little Thompson Observatory, including remote observing from classrooms.

  9. The Little Thompson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A.; Melsheimer, T.; Sackett, C.

    1999-05-01

    The Little Thompson Observatory is believed to be the first observatory built as part of a high school and accessible to other schools remotely, via the Internet. This observatory is the second member of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project. Construction of the building and dome has been completed, and first light is planned for spring 1999. The observatory is located on the grounds of Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. Local schools and youth organizations will have prioritized access to the telescope, and there will also be opportunities for public viewing. After midnight, the telescope will be open to world-wide use by schools via the Internet following the model of the first TIE observatory, the 24" telescope on Mt. Wilson. Students remotely connect to the observatory over the Internet, and then receive the images on their local computers. The observatory grew out of grassroots support from the local community surrounding Berthoud, Colorado, a town of 3,500 residents. TIE has provided the observatory with a Tinsley 18" Cassegrain telescope on a 10-year loan. The facility has been built with tremendous support from volunteers and the local school district. We have received an IDEAS grant to provide teacher training workshops which will allow K-12 schools in northern Colorado to make use of the Little Thompson Observatory, including remote observing from classrooms.

  10. Royal Observatory, Edinburgh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (ROE) comprises the UK Astronomy Technology Centre (ATC) of the PARTICLE PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY RESEARCH COUNCIL, and the University of Edinburgh's Institute for Astronomy....

  11. Precipitation, streamflow and water quality data from selected sites in the City of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, 1995-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, J.B.; Hazell, W.F.; Garrett, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    Precipitation data were collected at 46 precipitation sites and 3 atmospheric deposition sites, and hydrologic data were collected at 9 stream sites in the vicinity of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, from July 1995 through June 1997. Data were collected to identify the type, concentration, and amount of nonpoint-source stormwater runoff within the area. The data collected include measurements of precipitation; streamflow; physical characteristics, such as water temperature, pH, specific conductance, biochemical oxygen demand, oil and grease, and suspended sediment concentrations; and concentrations of nutrients, metals and minor constituents, and organic compounds. These data should provide valuable information needed for (1) planned watershed simulation models, (2) estimates of nonpoint-source constituent loadings to the Catawba River, and (3) characterization of water quality in relation to basin conditions. Streamflow and rainfall data have been used to provide early warning of possible flooding.

  12. Physical retrieval of precipitation water contents from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. Part 2: Retrieval method and applications (report version)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.

    1990-01-01

    A physical retrieval method for estimating precipitating water distributions and other geophysical parameters based upon measurements from the DMSP-F8 SSM/I is developed. Three unique features of the retrieval method are (1) sensor antenna patterns are explicitly included to accommodate varying channel resolution; (2) precipitation-brightness temperature relationships are quantified using the cloud ensemble/radiative parameterization; and (3) spatial constraints are imposed for certain background parameters, such as humidity, which vary more slowly in the horizontal than the cloud and precipitation water contents. The general framework of the method will facilitate the incorporation of measurements from the SSMJT, SSM/T-2 and geostationary infrared measurements, as well as information from conventional sources (e.g., radiosondes) or numerical forecast model fields.

  13. Precipitation, atmospheric deposition, streamflow, and water-quality data from selected sites in the city of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarver, Kathleen M.; Hazell, W.F.; Robinson, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Precipitation data were collected at 46 precipitation sites and 3 atmospheric deposition sites, and hydrologic data were collected at 6 stream sites in the vicinity of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, from July 1997 through September 1998. Data were collected to identify the type, concentration, and amount of nonpoint- source stormwater runoff in the study area. The data collected include measurements of precipitation; streamflow; physical characteristics, such as water temperature, pH, specific conductance, biochemical oxygen demand, oil and grease, and suspended-sediment concentrations; and concentrations of nutrients, metals and minor constituents, and organic compounds. These data will provide information needed for (1) planned watershed simulation models, (2) estimates of nonpoint-source constituent loadings to the Catawba River, and (3) characterization of water quality in relation to basin conditions. Streamflow and rainfall data have been used to provide early warnings of possible flooding.

  14. Intercomparisons of Total Precipitable Water from Satellite and Other Long Term Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Fong-Chiau; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Suggs, Ronnie J.; Guillory, Anthony R.

    1998-01-01

    Global water vapor data sets from satellite (NVAP) and reanalysis (NCEP and DAO) are intercompared for a 5 year period (1988-1992). Global average indicates that the NCEP and DAO reanalyses are dryer than NVAP over much of the period. Spatial patterns of the NCEP/NVAP and DAO/NVAP differences show regional variations in the 60 month climatogical fields. For example, in the Eastern Pacific just south of the equator NVAP is much dryer than the NCEP and more moist than DAO. Rather large discrepancies exist in other regions as well. North Africa, Saudi Arabia, India, and Australia show that NVAP TPW values are more moist than the NCEP and DAO model analyses by 4-8 mm. In general, the NCEP and DAO exhibits a tendency to be dryer than NVAP over the tropical ocean region. Over the Americas little differences exist except over the west coast. The shapes of the differences fields over the Eastern Pacific region are significantly different between NCEP/NVAP and DAO/NVAP differences. Over South America and Central Africa, DAO TPW values are significantly higher than those of NVAP. These difference fields show monthly and seasonal variability as well. These results will be highlighted in the paper and on the poster.

  15. Enhanced bioavailability of a poorly water-soluble weakly basic compound using a combination approach of solubilization agents and precipitation inhibitors: a case study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Pollock-Dove, Crystal; Dong, Liang C; Chen, Jing; Creasey, Abla A; Dai, Wei-Guo

    2012-05-07

    Poorly water-soluble weakly basic compounds which are solubilized in gastric fluid are likely to precipitate after the solution empties from the stomach into the small intestine, leading to a low oral bioavailability. In this study, we reported an approach of combining solubilization agents and precipitation inhibitors to produce a supersaturated drug concentration and to prolong such a drug concentration for an extended period of time for an optimal absorption, thereby improving oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. A weakly basic compound from Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development was used as a model compound. A parallel microscreening precipitation method using 96-well plates and a TECAN robot was used to assess the precipitation of the tested compound in the simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and the simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), respectively, for lead solubilizing agents and precipitation inhibitors. The precipitation screening results showed vitamin E TPGS was an effective solubilizing agent and Pluronic F127 was a potent precipitation inhibitor for the tested compound. Interestingly, the combination of Pluronic F127 with vitamin E TPGS resulted in a synergistic effect in prolonging compound concentration upon dilution in SIF. In addition, HPMC E5 and Eudragit L100-55 were found to be effective precipitation inhibitors for the tested compounds in SGF. Furthermore, optimization DOE study results suggested a formulation sweet spot comprising HPMC, Eudragit L 100-55, vitamin E TPGS, and Pluronic F127. The lead formulation maintained the tested compound concentration at 300 μg/mL upon dilution in SIF, and more than 70% of the compound remained solubilized compared with the compound alone at <1 μg/mL of its concentration. Dosing of the solid dosage form predissolved in SGF in dogs resulted in 52% of oral bioavailability compared to 26% for the suspension control, a statistically significant increase (p = 0.002). The enhanced

  16. Long-term, High Frequency, High Precision pH Measurements on the MBARI deep-water FOCE Experiment at the MARS Cabled Observatory in Monterey Bay, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Maughan, T.; Barry, J. P.; Brewer, P. G.; Headley, K. L.; Herlien, R.; Kirkwood, W. J.; Matsumoto, G. I.; O'Reilly, T. C.; Salamy, K. A.; Scholfield, J.; Shane, F. F.; Walz, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    The MBARI deep-water FOCE experiment was deployed on the MARS cabled observatory in Monterey Bay on May 4th, 2011. It has been in continuous operation (excluding a few minor shore based power outages) ever since. During the fifteen months of deployment, we have been able to observe both the daily variation in pH in response to water mass movements associated with the semi-diurnal tides, internal waves and longer-term trends as a function of the seasonal variations in the water masses within the Monterey Bay Canyon. Our experimental site is located at 890 meters, just below the oxygen minimum for Monterey Bay, and we clearly see the anticipated inverse correlation between seawater temperature and pH. Daily variation in pH is on the order of 0.020-0.030 pH units with longer term trends adding an additional variation of similar magnitude. Instrumentation on this experiment included two CTDs with oxygen sensors (Sea-Bird 52). One CTD is mounted on the external FOCE framework to measure the background conditions, and one CTD is installed within the FOCE pH control area to monitor the experimentally manipulated conditions. In addition, 6 MBARI modified Sea-Bird 18 pH sensors were mounted on the FOCE apparatus. Four of these pH sensors monitored pH inside the experimental chamber and two monitored the external background seawater conditions. Although we originally intended to conduct several in situ CO2 enrichment experiments to study the impact of ocean acidification on the benthic biology and then recover the apparatus after one year, unanticipated changes in the ship schedule have left the FOCE experiment in place for nearly fifteen months at the time of this writing. Throughout this time period, all sensor data has been logged by the MBARI Shore-Side Data System (SSDS) resulting in the longest continuous record of high precision pH measurements in the intermediate water column. We present an analysis of the data obtained from this unique data set, and discuss our in

  17. Modifying the 'pulse-reserve' paradigm for deserts of North America: precipitation pulses, soil water, and plant responses.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, James F; Kemp, Paul R; Ogle, Kiona; Fernández, Roberto J

    2004-10-01

    The 'pulse-reserve' conceptual model--arguably one of the most-cited paradigms in aridland ecology--depicts a simple, direct relationship between rainfall, which triggers pulses of plant growth, and reserves of carbon and energy. While the heuristics of 'pulses', 'triggers' and 'reserves' are intuitive and thus appealing, the value of the paradigm is limited, both as a conceptual model of how pulsed water inputs are translated into primary production and as a framework for developing quantitative models. To overcome these limitations, we propose a revision of the pulse-reserve model that emphasizes the following: (1) what explicitly constitutes a biologically significant 'rainfall pulse', (2) how do rainfall pulses translate into usable 'soil moisture pulses', and (3) how are soil moisture pulses differentially utilized by various plant functional types (FTs) in terms of growth? We explore these questions using the patch arid lands simulation (PALS) model for sites in the Mojave, Sonoran, and Chihuahuan deserts of North America. Our analyses indicate that rainfall variability is best understood in terms of sequences of rainfall events that produce biologically-significant 'pulses' of soil moisture recharge, as opposed to individual rain events. In the desert regions investigated, biologically significant pulses of soil moisture occur in either winter (October-March) or summer (July-September), as determined by the period of activity of the plant FTs. Nevertheless, it is difficult to make generalizations regarding specific growth responses to moisture pulses, because of the strong effects of and interactions between precipitation, antecedent soil moisture, and plant FT responses, all of which vary among deserts and seasons. Our results further suggest that, in most soil types and in most seasons, there is little separation of soil water with depth. Thus, coexistence of plant FTs in a single patch as examined in this PALS study is likely to be fostered by factors

  18. NASA’s Sense of Snow: the Airborne Snow Observatory

    NASA Video Gallery

    Water is a critical resource in the western U.S. NASA’s Airborne Snow Observatory is giving California water agencies the first complete measurements of the water available in the Sierra snowpack ...

  19. Comparing the relationship between precipitation and river geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epp, A.; Luymes, R.; Bennett, M.; DaSilva, J.; Marsh, S. J.; Gillies, S. L.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Voss, B.

    2013-12-01

    The geochemistry of precipitation affects the geochemistry of river water. Ideally, studies of river biogeochemistry should therefore include collection and analyses of dry and wet deposition. The Global Rivers Observatory has studied the Fraser River near Vancouver since the summer of 2009 at roughly bi-weekly resolution. The interpretation of this temporal record of river biogeochemistry, particularly the various sources of solutes, could be improved with a better understanding of atmospheric contributions. In this study precipitation and river water will be analysed from the Fraser River basin for nutrients as well as major and select trace ion concentrations. The nutrients analyzed will include ammonium (NH4), nitrate and nitrate (NO3-NO2), phosphate (PO4) and silicate (SiO4). Major ions include sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), chloride (Cl), and sulfate (SO4). Trace elements may include molybdenum, strontium, barium, uranium, rubidium, manganese and iron. Samples will be collected using the bulk method which collects both wet and dry deposition . Correlating precipitation chemistry with data on wind direction may help elucidate sources of nutrients and major ions. For instance, westerly sources may transport pollution from the City of Vancouver and agricultural lands in the Fraser delta. Such pollutants may increase the acidity of precipitation and imprint the water chemistry with a unique chemical signature . The results of this study will be helpful in correcting Fraser River water data for contributions from atmospheric deposition.

  20. My NASA Data Precipitation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lesson has two activities that help students develop a basic understanding of the relationship between cloud type and the form of precipitation and the relationship between the amount of water...

  1. Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Rahimov, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about the Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year, a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to their required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  2. Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Dyakov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to the required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  3. INTERMAGNET and magnetic observatories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Chulliat, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    A magnetic observatory is a specially designed ground-based facility that supports time-series measurement of the Earth’s magnetic field. Observatory data record a superposition of time-dependent signals related to a fantastic diversity of physical processes in the Earth’s core, mantle, lithosphere, ocean, ionosphere, magnetosphere, and, even, the Sun and solar wind.

  4. The Norwegian Naval Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Bjørn Ragnvald

    2007-07-01

    Archival material has revealed milestones and new details in the history of the Norwegian Naval Observatories. We have identified several of the instrument types used at different epochs. Observational results have been extracted from handwritten sources and an extensive literature search. These allow determination of an approximate location of the first naval observatory building (1842) at Fredriksvern. No physical remains exist today. A second observatory was established in 1854 at the new main naval base at Horten. Its location is evident on military maps and photographs. We describe its development until the Naval Observatory buildings, including archives and instruments, were completely demolished during an allied air bomb raid on 23 February 1945. The first director, C.T.H. Geelmuyden, maintained scientific standards at the the Observatory between 1842 and 1870, and collaborated with university astronomers to investigate, develop, and employ time-transfer by telegraphy. Their purpose was accurate longitude determination between observatories in Norway and abroad. The Naval Observatory issued telegraphic time signals twice weekly to a national network of sites, and as such served as the first national time-service in Norway. Later the Naval Observatory focused on the particular needs of the Navy and developed into an internal navigational service.

  5. Carter National Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Carter National Observatory is situated in the Botanic Gardens in Wellington, New Zealand. Opened in 1941, the observatory is equipped with a 41 cm Boller and Chivens, an historic 23 cm Cooke photo-visual refractor and a 36 seat Zeiss planetarium. The staff are involved in research, school and tertiary education programs....

  6. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewan, G. T.

    1992-04-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) detector is a 1000 ton heavy water (D2O) Cherenkov detector designed to study neutrinos from the sun and other astrophysical sources. The use of heavy water allows both electron neutrinos and all other types of neutrinos to be observed by three complementary reactions. The detector will be sensitive to the electron neutrino flux and energy spectrum shape and to the total neutrino flux irrespective of neutrino type. These measurements will provide information on both vacuum neutrino oscillations and matter-enhanced oscillations, the MSW effect. In the event of a supernova it will be very sensitive to muon and tau neutrinos as well as the electron neutrinos emitted in the initial burst, enabling sensitive mass measurements as well as providing details of the physics of stellar collapse. On behalf of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Collaboration : H.C . Evans, G.T . Ewan, H.W. Lee, J .R . Leslie, J .D. MacArthur, H .-B . Mak, A.B . McDonald, W. McLatchie, B.C . Robertson, B. Sur, P. Skensved (Queen's University) ; C.K . Hargrove, H. Mes, W.F. Davidson, D. Sinclair, 1 . Blevis, M. Shatkay (Centre for Research in Particle Physics) ; E.D. Earle, G.M. Milton, E. Bonvin, (Chalk River Laboratories); J .J . Simpson, P. Jagam, J . Law, J .-X . Wang (University of Guelph); E.D . Hallman, R.U. Haq (Laurentian University); A.L. Carter, D. Kessler, B.R . Hollebone (Carleton University); R. Schubank . C.E . Waltha m (University of British Columbia); R.T. Kouzes, M.M. Lowry, R.M. Key (Princeton University); E.W. Beier, W. Frati, M. Newcomer, R. Van Berg (University of Penn-sylvania), T.J . Bowles, P.J . Doe, S.R . Elliott, M.M. Fowler, R.G.H. Robertson, D.J . Vieira, J .B . Wilhelmy, J .F. Wilker-son, J .M. Wouters (Los Alamos National Laboratory) ; E. Norman, K. Lesko, A. Smith, R. Fulton, R. Stokstad (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), N.W. Tanner, N. JCIILY, P. Trent, J . Barton, D.L . Wark (University of Oxford).

  7. Dynamic interactions of dissolution, surface adsorption, and precipitation in an aging cobalt(II)-clay-water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Hillary A.; Parks, George A.; Brown, Gordon E.

    1999-06-01

    We have studied the dynamic interactions of mineral dissolution, cation surface adsorption, and precipitation in aqueous slurries initially containing kaolinite and millimolar quantities of cobalt(II) in 0.1 molar NaNO 3 solution. Batch slurries spent an initial 24 hours at pH 4.2, then NaOH was added to increase pH to 7.8, where pH was maintained for several months. Dissolved Co, Al, and Si concentrations were monitored by ICP-MS; solid-phase products were characterized using EXAFS and TEM. At low pH, kaolinite dissolved, releasing Al and Si to solution. Aluminum hydroxide and aluminosilicate phases precipitated rapidly as pH increased. Cobalt uptake from solution began as pH increased and continued throughout the remainder of the experiment. Rapid surface adsorption and precipitation accounted for early Co uptake; much slower precipitation caused continued Co uptake. Cobalt adsorbed on kaolinite in the form of hydroxy-bridged polymers or multimers and precipitated as a hydrotalcite-like solid that contained aluminum ions derived from kaolinite and aluminum hydroxide dissolution. The cobalt hydrotalcite precipitate had the approximate stoichiometry [Co 6Al 2(OH) 16(A n-) 2/n], with nitrate or silicate anions occupying A sites. Precipitate particles were several nanometers in diameter and some probably precipitated homogeneously. Some of the Co originally adsorbed was later incorporated into precipitate. Slow kaolinite dissolution near neutral pH limited the rate of Co uptake by precipitation, thereby accounting for the slow second stage of Co uptake. Continued changes in solution composition indicate that even this relatively simple system did not reach equilibrium under fixed solution conditions after several months. For this set of conditions, cobalt hydrotalcite appears to be the stable Co-containing phase, and its precipitation can reduce dissolved metal ion concentrations below levels achievable by simple adsorption on kaolinite.

  8. Dynamic interactions of dissolution, surface adsorption, and precipitation in an aging cobalt(II)-clay-water system

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, H.A.; Parks, G.A.; Brown, G.E. Jr. |

    1999-06-01

    The authors have studied the dynamic interactions of mineral dissolution, cation surface adsorption, and precipitation in aqueous slurries initially containing kaolinite and millimolar quantities of cobalt(II) in 0.1 molar NaNO{sub 3} solution. Batch slurries spent an initial 24 hours at pH 4.2, then NaOH was added to increase pH to 7.8, where pH was maintained for several months. Dissolved Co, Al, and Si concentrations were monitored by ICP-MS; solid-phase products were characterized using EXAFS and TEM. At low pH, kaolinite dissolved, releasing Al and Si to solution. Aluminum hydroxide and aluminosilicate phases precipitated rapidly as pH increased. Cobalt uptake from solution began as pH increased and continued throughout the remainder of the experiment. Rapid surface adsorption and precipitation accounted for early Co uptake; much slower precipitation caused continued Co uptake. Cobalt adsorbed on kaolinite in the form of hydroxy-bridged polymers or multimers and precipitated as a hydrotalcite-like solid that contained aluminum ions derived from kaolinite and aluminum hydroxide dissolution. The cobalt hydrotalcite precipitate had the approximate stoichiometry [Co{sub 6}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 16}(N{sup n{minus}}){sub 2/n}], with nitrate or silicate anions occupying A sites. Precipitate particles were several nanometers in diameter and some probably precipitated homogeneously. Some of the Co originally adsorbed was later incorporated into precipitate. Slow kaolinite dissolution near neutral pH limited the rate of Co uptake by precipitation, thereby accounting for the slow second stage of Co uptake. Continued changes in solution composition indicate that even this relatively simple system did not reach equilibrium under fixed solution conditions after several months. For this set of conditions, cobalt hydrotalcite appears to be the stable Co-containing phase, and its precipitation can reduce dissolved metal ion concentrations below levels achievable by simple

  9. Characterization and interaction of precipitation, river water and groundwater in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta - A case study in the Plain of Reeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duy Nguyen, Le; Heidbüchel, Ingo; Merz, Bruno; Apel, Heiko

    2016-04-01

    An understanding of the interactions between surface water and groundwater systems in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (VMD) is important not only for water resources planning and management, but also for the livelihood of the majority of the population in the delta. Precipitation and ground water, but also river water is used as drinking water in the communes of the Delta. Particularly the ground water is increasingly exploited, but the important processes like river - aquifer interaction and ground water recharge rates are largely unknown. This study thus aims at the characterization of processes between the different water resources. For this the different water sources were sampled over longer time periods and analysed for isotopic composition (2H, 18O). Additionally surface and ground water levels were recorded, as well as the temperature profile at and under the river bed in order to identify the river-ground water interaction. First results indicate that the isotopic composition and the local meteoric water line of the precipitation is very similar to the GNIP data for Bangkok, indicating similar isotopic sequestration and origin of the rainfall in the region (near ocean areas of SE-Asia). The isotopic composition of precipitation and river water exhibits a strong seasonal signal indicating the monsoonal influence. During the monsoon season both precipitation and river water is depleted in stable isotopes, while the dry season shows an enriched composition. This also indicates the different composition of the river water over the seasons. During the rainy season the portion of rain water, i.e. surface runoff stemming from the Mekong basin but also direct rainfall contribution in the Mekong Delta is considerably larger, as expected. The enriched composition during the dry season indicates a larger ground water, i.e. base flow portion, but also a generally higher evaporation due to the lower atmospheric moisture. The isotopic composition of the ground water differs

  10. Total ozone column, aerosol optical depth and precipitable water effects on solar erythemal ultraviolet radiation recorded in Malta.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Julia; Román, Roberto; Yousif, Charles; Mateos, David; Miguel, Argimiro

    2013-04-01

    The Universities of Malta and Valladolid (Spain) developed a measurement campaign, which took place in the Institute for Energy Technology in Marsaxlokk (Southern Malta) between May and October 2012, and it was supported by the Spanish government through the Project titled "Measurement campaign about Solar Radiation, Ozone, and Aerosol in the Mediterranean area" (with reference CGL2010-12140-E). This campaign provided the first ground-based measurements in Malta of erythemal radiation and UV index, which indicate the effectiveness of the sun exposure to produce sunburn on human skin. A wide variety of instruments was involved in the campaign, providing a complete atmospheric characterization. Data of erythemal radiation and UV index (from UVB-1 pyranometer), total shortwave radiaton (global and diffuse components from CM-6B pyranometers), and total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness, and precitable water column (from a Microtops-II sunphotometer) were available in the campaign. Ground-based and satellite instruments were used in the analysis, and several intercomparisons were carried out to validate remote sensing data. OMI, GOME, GOME-2, and MODIS instruments, which provide data of ozone, aerosol load and optical properties, were used to this end. The effects on solar radiation, ultraviolet and total shortwave ranges, of total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water column were obtained using radiation measurements at different fixed solar zenith angles. The empirical results shown a determinant role of the solar position, a negligible effect of ozone on total shortwave radiation, and a stronger attenuation provided by aerosol particles in the erythemal radiation. A variety of aerosol types from different sources (desert dust, biomass burning, continental, and maritime) reach Malta, in this campaign several dust events from the Sahara desert occurred and were analyzed establishing the air mass back-trajectories ending at Malta at

  11. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: U.S. Program and Science Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Arthur; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir; Kakar, Ramesh; Neeck, Steven

    2010-05-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. NASA and JAXA will deploy the GPM Core Observatory carrying an advanced radar-radiometer system to serve as a physics observatory and a transfer standard for inter-calibration of constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled for launch in July 2013. In addition, NASA will provide a second radiometer to be flown on a partner-provided GPM Low-Inclination Observatory to enhance the near real-time monitoring of hurricanes and mid-latitude storms. JAXA will also contribute data from the Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) satellite. Additional partnerships are under development to include conical-scanning microwave imagers on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite and U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, as well as cross-track scanning humidity sounders on operational satellites such as the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP), POES, NPOESS, and European MetOp satellites, which are used to improve the precipitation sampling over land. Currently, Brazil has in its national space plan for a GPM low-inclination radiometer, and data from Chinese and Russian microwave radiometers could potentially become available through international collaboration under the auspices of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). The current generation of global rainfall products combines observations from a network of uncoordinated satellite missions using a variety of merging techniques. GPM will provide "next-generation" precipitation data products characterized by: (1) more accurate instantaneous precipitation measurement (especially for light rain and cold-season solid precipitation), (2) more

  12. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and U.S. Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2010-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. NASA and JAXA will deploy the GPM Core Observatory carrying an advanced radar-radiometer system to serve as a physics observatory and a transfer standard for inter-calibration of constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled for launch in July 2013. NASA will provide a second radiometer to be flown on a partner-provided GPM Low-Inclination Observatory to enhance the near real-time monitoring of hurricanes and mid-latitude storms. JAXA will also contribute data from the Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) satellite. Additional partnerships are under development to include microwave radiometers on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite and U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, as well as cross-track scanning humidity sounders on operational satellites such as the NPP, POES, JPSS, and MetOp satellites, which are used to improve the precipitation sampling over land. Brazil has in its national space plan for a GPM low-inclination radiometer, and data from Chinese and Russian microwave radiometers could potentially become available through international collaboration under the auspices of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). The current generation of global rainfall products combines observations from a network of uncoordinated satellite missions using a variety of merging techniques. GPM will provide "next-generation" precipitation data products characterized by: (1) more accurate instantaneous precipitation measurement (especially for light rain and cold-season solid precipitation), (2) more frequent sampling by an expanded constellation of microwave radiometers including operational humidity sounders over land, (3) intercalibrated microwave

  13. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: U.S. Program and Science Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, A.; Azarbarzin, A.; Kakar, R.; Neeck, S.

    2009-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors to provide next-generation precipitation data products for scientific research and societal applications. NASA and JAXA will deploy the GPM Core Observatory carrying an advanced radar-radiometer system to serve as a physics observatory and calibration reference for constellation radiometers. NASA will deploy the GPM Low-Inclination Observatory to enhance the near real-time monitoring of hurricanes and mid-latitude storms, and JAXA will contribute data from the Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) satellite. Partnerships are under development to include additional conical-scanning microwave imagers on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite and U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, as well as cross-track scanning humidity sounders on operational satellites such as the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP), POES, NPOESS, and European MetOp satellites, which are used to improve the precipitation sampling over land. In addition, Brazil has in its national space plan for a GPM low-inclination radiometer, and data from Chinese and Russian microwave radiometers could potentially become available through international collaboration under the auspices of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). As a science mission with integrated application goals, GPM is expected to (1) provide new measurement standards for precipitation estimation from space, (2) improve understanding of precipitation physics, the global water cycle variability, and freshwater availability, and (3) advance weather/climate/hydrological prediction capabilities to directly benefit the society. An overview of the GPM mission concept, program

  14. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Johanna; HAWC Collaboration; College of Idaho; HAWC Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    To increase the effective area and sensitivity of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory to gamma-ray photons with energies higher than 10 TeV, we are building 350 smaller outrigger tanks around the main array of 300 existing tanks. HAWC detects cascades of charged particles (``extensive air showers'') created by TeV gamma rays hitting the atmosphere. Increasing the size of the array will improve the sensitivity of the array by a factor of 2 to 4 above 10 TeV, allowing for more accurate gamma-ray origin reconstruction and energy estimation. Building the outrigger array requires carefully calibrated equipment, including PMTs and high voltage signal cables of the correct length. Origin reconstruction relies on precise signal timing, so the signal cables' lengths were standardized so that the signal transit time varied by less than 5 ns. Energy estimation depends on accurate photon counts from each tank, so the PMTs were calibrated with a laser and filter wheels to give the PMTs a known amount of light.

  15. The Little Thompson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A. E.; VanLew, K.; Melsheimer, T.; Sackett, C.

    1999-12-01

    The Little Thompson Observatory is the second member of the Telescopes in Education (TIE) project. Construction of the dome and the remote control system has been completed, and the telescope is now on-line and operational over the Internet. The observatory is located on the grounds of Berthoud High School in northern Colorado. Local schools and youth organizations have prioritized access to the telescope, and there are monthly opportunities for public viewing. In the future, the telescope will be open after midnight to world-wide use by schools following the model of the first TIE observatory, the 24" telescope on Mt. Wilson. Students remotely connect to the observatory over the Internet, and then receive the images on their local computers. The observatory grew out of grassroots support from the local community surrounding Berthoud, Colorado, a town of 3,500 residents. TIE has provided the observatory with a Tinsley 18" Cassegrain telescope on a 10-year loan. The facility has been built with tremendous support from volunteers and the local school district. With funding from an IDEAS grant, we have begun teacher training workshops which will allow K-12 schools in northern Colorado to make use of the Little Thompson Observatory, including remote observing from classrooms.

  16. The Virtual Observatory: I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, R. J.

    2014-11-01

    The concept of the Virtual Observatory arose more-or-less simultaneously in the United States and Europe circa 2000. Ten pages of Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium: Panel Reports (National Academy Press, Washington, 2001), that is, the detailed recommendations of the Panel on Theory, Computation, and Data Exploration of the 2000 Decadal Survey in Astronomy, are dedicated to describing the motivation for, scientific value of, and major components required in implementing the National Virtual Observatory. European initiatives included the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory at the European Southern Observatory, the AstroGrid project in the United Kingdom, and the Euro-VO (sponsored by the European Union). Organizational/conceptual meetings were held in the US at the California Institute of Technology (Virtual Observatories of the Future, June 13-16, 2000) and at ESO Headquarters in Garching, Germany (Mining the Sky, July 31-August 4, 2000; Toward an International Virtual Observatory, June 10-14, 2002). The nascent US, UK, and European VO projects formed the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) at the June 2002 meeting in Garching, with yours truly as the first chair. The IVOA has grown to a membership of twenty-one national projects and programs on six continents, and has developed a broad suite of data access protocols and standards that have been widely implemented. Astronomers can now discover, access, and compare data from hundreds of telescopes and facilities, hosted at hundreds of organizations worldwide, stored in thousands of databases, all with a single query.

  17. Study on the properties of the Integrated Precipitable Water (IPW) maps derived by GPS, SAR interferometry and numerical forecasting models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateus, Pedro; Nico, Giovanni; Tomé, Ricardo; Catalão, João.; Miranda, Pedro

    2010-05-01

    The knowledge of spatial distribution of relative changes in atmospheric Integrated Precipitable Water (IPW) density is important for climate studies and numerical weather forecasting. An increase (or decrease) of the IPW density affects the phase of electromagnetic waves. For this reason, this quantity can be measured by techniques such as GPS and space-borne SAR interferometry (InSAR). The aim of this work is to study the isotropic properties of the IPW maps obtained by GPS and SAR InSAR measurements and derived by a Numerical Weather Forecasting Model. The existence of a power law in their phase spectrum is verified. The relationship between the interferometric phase delay and the topographic height of the observed area is also investigated. The Lisbon region, Portugal, was chosen as a study area. This region is monitored by a network of GPS permanent stations covering an area of about squared kilometers. The network consists of 12 GPS stations of which 4 belonging to the Instituto Geográfico Português (IGP) and 8 to Instituto Geográfico do Exercito (IGEOE). All stations were installed between 1997 and the beginning of 2009. The GAMIT package was used to process GPS data and to estimate the total zenith delay with a temporal sampling of 15 minutes. A set of 25 SAR interferograms with a 35-day temporal baseline were processed using ASAR-ENVISAT data acquired over the Lisbon region during the period from 2003 to 2005 and from 2008 to 2009. These interferograms give an estimate of the variation of the global atmospheric delay. Terrain deformations related to known geological phenomena in the Lisbon area are negligible at this time scale of 35 days. Furthermore, two interferometric SAR images acquired by ERS-1/2 over the Lisbon region on 20/07/1995 and 21/07/1995, respectively, and so with a temporal baseline of just 1 day, were also processed. The Weather Research & Forecasting Model (WRF) was used to generate the three-dimensional fields of temperature

  18. Aerosol Impacts on California Winter Clouds and Precipitation during CalWater 2011: Local Pollution versus Long-Range Transported Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Leung, L.; DeMott, P. J.; Comstock, J. M.; Singh, B.; Rosenfeld, D.; Tomlinson, J. M.; White, A. B.; Prather, K. A.; Minnis, P.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter/spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust or dust/biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust/biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB06 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including

  19. Hydrological Modeling of Storm Water Drainage System due to Frequent and Intense Precipitation of Dhaka city using Storm Water Management Model (SWMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, S., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall induced flooding during rainy season is a regular phenomenon in Dhaka City. Almost every year a significant part of the city suffers badly with drainage congestion. There are some highly dense areas with lower ground elevation which submerge under water even with an intense precipitation of few hours. The higher areas also suffer with the drainage problem due to inadequate maintenance of the system and encroachment or illegal filling up of the drainage canals and lakes. Most part of the city suffered from long term urban flooding during historical extreme rainfall events in September 2004, 2007 and July 2009. The situation is likely to worsen in the future due to Climate Change, which may lead to more frequent and intense precipitation. To assess the major and minor drainage systems and elements of the urban basins using the hydrodynamic modelling and, through this, identifying the flooding events and areas, taking into account the current situation and future flood or drainage scenarios. Stormwater modeling has a major role in preventing issues such as flash floods and urban water-quality problems. Stormwater models of a lowered spatial resolution would thus appear valuable if only their ability to provide realistic results could be proved. The present scenario of urban morphology of Dhaka city and existing drainage system is complex for hydrological and hydrodynamic modeling. Furthermore limitations of background data and uncertain future urban scenarios may confine the potential outputs of a model. Although several studies were carried out including modeling for drainage master planning, a detail model for whole DAP (Detaile Area Plan) of Dhaka city area is not available. The model developed under this study is covering the existing drainage system in the study area as well as natural flows in the fringe area. A good number of models are available for hydrological and hydraulic analysis of urban areas. These are MIKE 11, MOUSE, HEC-RAS, HEC HMS and EPA

  20. The Effect of Contrasting Wet and Dry Extreme Precipitation on Ecosystem Carbon Fluxes and Water Use Efficiency in the Southern Great Plains, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Felzer, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Climate extremes, such as heat waves and heavy precipitation, are more likely to occur with increased warming and simultaneously have profound influences on ecosystem fluxes. Existing studies have already investigated how a single extreme event affects ecosystem dynamics. However, how ecosystems respond to consecutive climate extremes is rarely examined. More heat waves are expected to cause more droughts, while more heavy precipitation could cause more floods. Both may have a negative effect on vegetation growth, although wetter conditions may alternatively stimulate growth. In the southern Great Plains the hydrological year of 2006 was the second-driest year on record, with only 61% of long-term annual precipitation. In contrast, the summer of 2007 was the second-wettest summer, with 121% of the normal annual precipitation. This "pair" provides a unique example to study alternatively contrasting climate extremes and their impacts on ecosystem dynamics. In this study, we aim to assess whether or not this consecutive drought and flood has altered the sensitivity of ecosystem carbon fluxes and water use efficiency. To investigate this question, we parameterized a newly developed process-based terrestrial ecosystem model (TEM-Hydro daily version) and applied the Maurer's 1/8 degree daily climate datasets. The modeled results are compared against the MODIS datasets and Ameriflux Eddy Covariance observations to determine the mechanism responsible for understanding how extremes in precipitation affect ecosystem functions. The significance of the consecutive climate extremes on ecosystem structures and processes in the southern Great Plains will be discussed.