Science.gov

Sample records for observing field lrc1

  1. Observations of Interstellar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutcher, R.; Heiles, C.; Troland, T.

    This article describes how interstellar magnetic fields are detected, measured, and mapped, the results of such observations, and the role played by interstellar magnetic fields in the physics of the interstellar medium. A goal of the observations is the measurement of the morphology and strengths of the uniform (Bu) and random (Br) components of magnetic fields. Observational techniques probe either the component of B parallel to the line of sight (B_parallel) or in the plane of the sky (B_⊥). Tracers of B_parallel are Faraday rotation of the position angle of linearly polarized radiation and Zeeman splitting of spectral lines. Tracers of B_⊥ are the strength of synchrotron radiation and linear polarization of syn chrotron radiation and of emission or absorption from dust and spectral lines. Starlight polarization shows that on large spatial scales the Galactic magnetic field is not heavily tangled (B_u/B_r ≈ 0.7 - 1.0), that the field is generally parallel to the Galactic plane near the plane, that the local field points approximately along the local spiral arm (pitch angle 9.4(°) , center of curvature 7.8 kpc distant towards ℓ ≈ -15.4(°) ), and that off the Galactic plane there is considerable small-scale structure to the field. Galactic synchrotron emission shows magnetic spiral arms with a total strength B_t ≈ 6 #55G and B_u ≈ 4 #55G. Pulsar data show evidence for reversals of the field direction with Galactic radius and yield B_r ≈ 5 #55G and B_u ≈ 1.5 #55G; the morphology of the large-scale mean field is consistent with dynamo generation. H I Zeeman detections for diffuse clouds yield B_parallel char 126 5 - 20 #55G with many limits B_parallel #55G. A recent survey of Galactic H I in absorption against extragalactic sources confirms the result that the fields in diffuse clouds are often quite weak. The critical parameter for evaluating the importance of magnetic fields in star formation is the ratio of the mass to the magnetic flux, M

  2. Observations of Si field evaporation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Keith; Sebastian, Jason; Gerstl, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Field evaporation studies of crystalline <100> Si were performed in a three-dimensional atom-probe, which utilized a local electrode geometry. Several distinct phenomena were observed. Si field evaporation rates showed: (1) no measurable dependence on temperature below 110K, (2) an exponential dependence on evaporation rate as a function of temperature above 110K, and (3) no dependence on substrate doping (i.e., electrical conductivity) as high as 10 Omega cm in the temperature range of 40-150K. Two distinct evaporation modes were observed. The first was associated with approximately 1at% H+ in the mass spectrum. Negligible amounts of H were detected in the mass spectra of the second mode. When the pulse fraction (pf) was increased from 5% to 30%, the presence of H+ in the mass spectra, i.e. operation in the first mode, was associated with a degradation in mass resolution by as much as 80% for the 10 Omega cm Si samples. Conversely, no loss in mass resolution was detected for the approximately 0.001 Omega cm samples over the pf range studied.

  3. Observations of faint field galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Number counts, colors, and angular correlations of field galaxies fainter than 20th mag are summarized. Resulting conclusions regarding the presence and nature of luminosity, spectral, and clustering evolution remain contraversial. Preliminary analysis of two major spectroscopic surveys near completion suggests that by z approximately 0.5, larger numbers of very blue galaxies of moderate luminosities are found than today. The skewer-like surveys also provide new probes of galaxy clustering on scales previously unexplored (larger than 200 Mpc) and over lookback times of several billion years.

  4. Magnetic field observations in Comet Halley's coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Yeroshenko, Ye. G.; Styashkin, V. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-05-01

    During the encounter with Comet Halley, the magnetometer (MISCHA) aboard the Vega 1 spacecraft observed an increased level of magnetic field turbulence, resulting from an upstream bow wave. Both Vega spacecraft measured a peak field strength of 70-80 nT and observed draping of magnetic field lines around the cometary obstacle. An unexpected rotation of the magnetic field vector was observed, which may reflect either penetration of magnetic field lines into a diffuse layer related to the contact surface separating the solar-wind and cometary plasma, or the persistence of pre-existing interplanetary field structures.

  5. Cosmic Magnetic Fields: Observations and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    2011-09-01

    Synchrotron emission, its polarization and its Faraday rotation at radio frequencies of 0.2-10 GHz are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of cosmic magnetic fields. Unpolarized emission traces turbulent fields which are strongest in galactic spiral arms and bars (20-30 μG) and in central starburst regions (50-100 μG). Such fields are dynamically important, e.g. they can drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized emission traces ordered fields which can be regular (uni-directional) or anisotropic random (generated from isotropic random fields by compression or shear). Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies, and in central regions of starburst galaxies. The strongest ordered (mostly regular) fields of 10-15 μG strength are generally found in galactic interarm regions and follow the orientation of adjacent gas spiral arms. Faraday rotation measures (RM) of the diffuse polarized radio emission from the disks of several spiral galaxies reveal large-scale patterns, which are signatures of regular fields probably generated by a mean-field dynamo. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are an excellent tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the intergalactic medium. Ordered magnetic fields are also observed in radio halos around edge-on galaxies, out to large distances from the plane, with X-shaped patterns.--The strength of the total magnetic field in our Milky Way is about 6 μG near the solar radius, but several mG in dense clouds, pulsar wind nebulae, and filaments near the Galactic Center. Diffuse polarized radio emission and Faraday rotation data from pulsars and background sources show spiral fields with large-scale reversals, but the overall field structure in our Galaxy is still under debate.--Diffuse radio emission from the halos of galaxy clusters is mostly unpolarized because intracluster magnetic fields are turbulent, while cluster

  6. Fundamental implications of intergalactic magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2017-03-01

    Helical intergalactic magnetic fields at the ˜10-14 G level on ˜10 Mpc length scales are indicated by current gamma ray observations. The existence of magnetic fields in cosmic voids and their nontrivial helicity suggest that they must have originated in the early Universe and thus have implications for the fundamental interactions. We derive the spectrum of the cosmological magnetic field as implied by observations and MHD evolution, yielding order nano Gauss fields on kiloparsec scales and a "large helicity puzzle" that needs to be resolved by the fundamental interactions. The importance of C P violation and a possible crucial role for chiral effects or axions in the early Universe are pointed out.

  7. Precipitation properties observed during CHUVA Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, C.; Machado, L. A.; Angelis, C. F.; Silva Dias, M. A. F.; Fisch, G.; Carvalho, I. C.; Biscaro, T.; Sakuragi, J.; Neves, J. R.; Anselmo, E. M.; Lacerda, M.

    2012-04-01

    CHUVA is a Brazilian research program that seeks to depict the main precipitating systems observed in Brazil as a support for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. CHUVA is conducting a series of field campaigns in the time frame of 2010-2013 to sample raining systems that vary from maritime to continental regime and in polluted and clean environments. For this study, we will present initially the drop size distribution (DSD) variability observed in the field experiments of Alcantara (March/2010), Fortaleza (April/2011), Belém (June/2011) and Vale do Paraiba (November-December/2011). Secondly, with the help of the mobile X-Band and MRR-2, we will show the DSD differences observed on warm and cold phase clouds, and convective and stratiform precipitation. Finally, by employing the vertical electrical field and lightning measurements together with the weather radar, we will present the main vertical precipitation features observed in thunderstorms and non- thunderstorms, in addition to the different raining systems observed during the four field campaigns.

  8. CCD observations of old nova fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downes, Ronald A.; Szkody, Paula

    1989-01-01

    The discovery of CK Vulpeculae (Nova 1670) has prompted a major review of ideas concerning the long-term development of novae. Unfortunately, there are very few recovered novae old enough to provide confirmation (or rejection) of the new 'hibernation' scenario. CCD images of seven old nova fields, and R band photometry for four fields, have been obtained in an attempt to recover these objects in quiescence. A strong candidate for U Leonis, and a possible counterpart for T Bootis, are found. For three other fields, weak candidates have been found. Finding charts and colors are presented for the seven fields observed. The R light curves of U Leo, indicating an orbital period of 192.5 or 385.0 min, are shown.

  9. CCD observations of old nova fields

    SciTech Connect

    Downes, R.A.; Szkody, P.; Washington Uni., Seattle )

    1989-06-01

    The discovery of CK Vulpeculae (Nova 1670) has prompted a major review of ideas concerning the long-term development of novae. Unfortunately, there are very few recovered novae old enough to provide confirmation (or rejection) of the new hibernation scenario. CCD images of seven old nova fields, and R band photometry for four fields, have been obtained in an attempt to recover these objects in quiescence. A strong candidate for U Leonis, and a possible counterpart for T Bootis, are found. For three other fields, weak candidates have been found. Finding charts and colors are presented for the seven fields observed. The R light curves of U Leo, indicating an orbital period of 192.5 or 385.0 min, are shown. 14 refs.

  10. MESSENGER observations of Mercury's magnetic field structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Purucker, Michael E.; Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Winslow, Reka M.; Al Asad, Manar M. H.; Slavin, James A.; Alexeev, Igor. I.; Phillips, Roger J.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-12-01

    We present a baseline, time-averaged model for Mercury's magnetosphere, derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer data from 24 March to 12 December 2011, comprising the spacecraft's first three Mercury years in orbit around the innermost planet. The model, constructed under the approximation that the magnetospheric shape can be represented as a paraboloid of revolution, includes two external (magnetopause and magnetotail) current systems and an internal (dipole) field and allows for reconnection. We take advantage of the geometry of the orbital Magnetometer data to estimate all but one of the model parameters, and their ranges, directly from the observations. These parameters are then used as a priori constraints in the paraboloid magnetospheric model, and the sole remaining parameter, the dipole moment, is estimated as 190 nT RM3 from a grid search. We verify that the best fit dipole moment is insensitive to changes in the other parameters within their determined ranges. The model provides an excellent first-order fit to the MESSENGER observations, with a root-mean-square misfit of less than 20 nT globally. The results show that the magnetopause field strength ranges from 10% to 50% of the dipole field strength at observation locations on the dayside and at nightside latitudes north of 60°N. Globally, the residual signatures observed to date are dominated by the results of magnetospheric processes, confirming the dynamic nature of Mercury's magnetosphere.

  11. Dwarf Discoveries from Serendipitous Field Star Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    For the past two years, The University of Colorado, in collaboration with Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGTN) has been taking Sloans r' and i' images of approximately 200 galaxies during each new moon period to provide ground data in support of the approximately 1100 hours of warm Spitzer time awarded to Dr. Mansi Kasliwal's Caltech SPIRITS program. Currently there are over 6,000 images in this archive. Small telescope scientists routinely image the same fields, building similar archives brimming with science potential. This paper reports the technique to develop serendipitous observations of dwarf field stars. Answers to questions surrounding the dwarf's early life in proximity to non-hierarchal multiple star groups, about how dwarfs not only survive but are so numerous are well within the capabilities of small telescope scientists. The role of the small telescope scientist is of vital importance in these (re)discovery, confirmation, monitoring and reporting tasks.

  12. Observation of Magnetic Fields Generated by Tsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Maus, Stefan; Chulliat, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Tsunamis produce perturbations in the Earth's magnetic field by electromagnetic induction. Recent deployments of highly accurate magnetometers and the exceptionally deep solar minimum provided ideal conditions to observe these small signals from the tsunami resulting from the strong Chilean earthquake on 27 February 2010. Magnetic observatory measurements on Easter Island, 3500 kilometers west of the epicenter, show a periodic signal of 1 nanotesla, coincident in time with recordings from the local tide gauge. The detection of these magnetic signals represents a milestone in understanding tsunami-induced electromagnetic effects.

  13. Electric field observations of equatorial bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Maynard, N. C.; Hanson, W. B.; Saba, Jack L.

    1992-03-01

    Results from the double floating probe experiment performed on the San Marco D satellite are presented, with emphasis on the observation of large incremental changes in the convective electric field vector at the boundary of equatorial plasma bubbles. Attention is given to isolated bubble structures in the upper ionospheric F regions; these observed bubble encounters are divided into two types - type I (live bubbles) and type II (dead bubbles). Type I bubbles show varying degrees of plasma depletion and large upward velocities range up to 1000 km/s. The geometry of these bubbles is such that the spacecraft orbit may cut them where they are tilting either eastward or (more often) westward. Type II bubbles exhibit plasma density depletion but no appreciable upward convection. Both types of events are usually surrounded by a halo of plasma turbulence, which can extend considerably beyond the region of plasma depletion.

  14. Electric field observations of equatorial bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Maynard, N. C.; Hanson, W. B.; Saba, Jack L.

    1992-01-01

    Results from the double floating probe experiment performed on the San Marco D satellite are presented, with emphasis on the observation of large incremental changes in the convective electric field vector at the boundary of equatorial plasma bubbles. Attention is given to isolated bubble structures in the upper ionospheric F regions; these observed bubble encounters are divided into two types - type I (live bubbles) and type II (dead bubbles). Type I bubbles show varying degrees of plasma depletion and large upward velocities range up to 1000 km/s. The geometry of these bubbles is such that the spacecraft orbit may cut them where they are tilting either eastward or (more often) westward. Type II bubbles exhibit plasma density depletion but no appreciable upward convection. Both types of events are usually surrounded by a halo of plasma turbulence, which can extend considerably beyond the region of plasma depletion.

  15. Subduction dynamics: Constraints from gravity field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcadoo, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Satellite systems do the best job of resolving the long wavelength components of the Earth's gravity field. Over the oceans, satellite-borne radar altimeters such as SEASAT provide the best resolution observations of the intermediate wavelength components. Satellite observations of gravity contributed to the understanding of the dynamics of subduction. Large, long wavelength geoidal highs generally occur over subduction zones. These highs are attributed to the superposition of two effects of subduction: (1) the positive mass anomalies of subducting slabs themselves; and (2) the surface deformations such as the trenches convectively inducted by these slabs as they sink into the mantle. Models of this subduction process suggest that the mantle behaves as a nonNewtonian fluid, its effective viscosity increases significantly with depth, and that large positive mass anomalies may occur beneath the seismically defined Benioff zones.

  16. Observations of the diffuse UV radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra are presented for the diffuse UV radiation field between 1250 to 3100 A from eight different regions of the sky, which were obtained with the Johns Hopkins UVX experiment. UVX flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-61C) in January 1986 as part of the Get-Away Special project. The experiment consisted of two 1/4 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometers, covering the spectral range 1250 to 1700 A at 17 A resolution and 1600 to 3100 A at 27 A resolution, respectively, with a field of view of 4 x .25 deg, sufficiently small to pick out regions of the sky with no stars in the line of sight. Values were found for the diffuse cosmic background ranging in intensity from 300 to 900 photons/sq cm/sec/sr/A. The cosmic background is spectrally flat from 1250 to 3100 A, within the uncertainties of each spectrometer. The zodiacal light begins to play a significant role in the diffuse radiation field above 2000 A, and its brightness was determined relative to the solar emission. Observed brightnesses of the zodiacal light in the UV remain almost constant with ecliptic latitude, unlike the declining visible brightnesses, possibly indicating that those (smaller) grains responsible for the UV scattering have a much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering.

  17. Early Magnetic Field Observations from HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, Jon Todd; HMI Magnetic Field Team

    2010-05-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is beginning to produce a synoptic series of full-disk arc-second resolution magnetograms. Line-of-sight magnetograms are available every 45 seconds and the vector field will be routinely calculated every 12 minutes in automatically identified active region patches. Select quick-look products are available within minutes and definitive science data will be published within a day or two. The larger team has developed programs to routinely produce a comprehensive set of higher level products, including synoptic maps and frames, local surface-flow maps, a variety of local and global coronal field models, and time series of tracked active-region parameters - all useful in learning to forecast space weather events. Comparisons with AIA, EVE, MDI, SOLIS and other ground-based observations will ultimately help understand uncertainties in the observations. This work was supported by NASA through contract NAS5-02139 to Stanford University.

  18. Interpretation of Solar Magnetic Field Strength Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Bertello, L.; Boyden, J. E.; Webster, L.

    2009-03-01

    This study based on longitudinal Zeeman effect magnetograms and spectral line scans investigates the dependence of solar surface magnetic fields on the spectral line used and the way the line is sampled to estimate the magnetic flux emerging above the solar atmosphere and penetrating to the corona from magnetograms of the Mt. Wilson 150-foot tower synoptic program (MWO). We have compared the synoptic program λ5250 Å line of Fe i to the line of Fe i at λ5233 Å since this latter line has a broad shape with a profile that is nearly linear over a large portion of its wings. The present study uses five pairs of sampling points on the λ5233 Å line. Line profile observations show that the determination of the field strength from the Stokes V parameter or from line bisectors in the circularly polarized line profiles lead to similar dependencies on the spectral sampling of the lines, with the bisector method being the less sensitive. We recommend adoption of the field determined with the line bisector method as the best estimate of the emergent photospheric flux and further recommend the use of a sampling point as close to the line core as is practical. The combination of the line profile measurements and the cross-correlation of fields measured simultaneously with λ5250 Å and λ5233 Å yields a formula for the scale factor δ -1 that multiplies the MWO synoptic magnetic fields. By using ρ as the center-to-limb angle (CLA), a fit to this scale factor is δ -1=4.15-2.82sin 2( ρ). Previously δ -1=4.5-2.5sin 2( ρ) had been used. The new calibration shows that magnetic fields measured by the MDI system on the SOHO spacecraft are equal to 0.619±0.018 times the true value at a center-to-limb position 30°. Berger and Lites (2003, Solar Phys. 213, 213) found this factor to be 0.64±0.013 based on a comparison using the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter.

  19. Hazardous gas model evaluation with field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. R.; Chang, J. C.; Strimaitis, D. G.

    Fifteen hazardous gas models were evaluated using data from eight field experiments. The models include seven publicly available models (AFTOX, DEGADIS, HEGADAS, HGSYSTEM, INPUFF, OB/DG and SLAB), six proprietary models (AIRTOX, CHARM, FOCUS, GASTAR, PHAST and TRACE), and two "benchmark" analytical models (the Gaussian Plume Model and the analytical approximations to the Britter and McQuaid Workbook nomograms). The field data were divided into three groups—continuous dense gas releases (Burro LNG, Coyote LNG, Desert Tortoise NH 3-gas and aerosols, Goldfish HF-gas and aerosols, and Maplin Sands LNG), continuous passive gas releases (Prairie Grass and Hanford), and instantaneous dense gas releases (Thorney Island freon). The dense gas models that produced the most consistent predictions of plume centerline concentrations across the dense gas data sets are the Britter and McQuaid, CHARM, GASTAR, HEGADAS, HGSYSTEM, PHAST, SLAB and TRACE models, with relative mean biases of about ±30% or less and magnitudes of relative scatter that are about equal to the mean. The dense gas models tended to overpredict the plume widths and underpredict the plume depths by about a factor of two. All models except GASTAR, TRACE, and the area source version of DEGADIS perform fairly well with the continuous passive gas data sets. Some sensitivity studies were also carried out. It was found that three of the more widely used publicly-available dense gas models (DEGADIS, HGSYSTEM and SLAB) predicted increases in concentration of about 70% as roughness length decreased by an order of magnitude for the Desert Tortoise and Goldfish field studies. It was also found that none of the dense gas models that were considered came close to simulating the observed factor of two increase in peak concentrations as averaging time decreased from several minutes to 1 s. Because of their assumption that a concentrated dense gas core existed that was unaffected by variations in averaging time, the dense gas

  20. Theoretical and observational analysis of spacecraft fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, F. M.; Schatten, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    In order to investigate the nondipolar contributions of spacecraft magnetic fields a simple magnetic field model is proposed. This model consists of randomly oriented dipoles in a given volume. Two sets of formulas are presented which give the rms-multipole field components, for isotropic orientations of the dipoles at given positions and for isotropic orientations of the dipoles distributed uniformly throughout a cube or sphere. The statistical results for an 8 cu m cube together with individual examples computed numerically show the following features: Beyond about 2 to 3 m distance from the center of the cube, the field is dominated by an equivalent dipole. The magnitude of the magnetic moment of the dipolar part is approximated by an expression for equal magnetic moments or generally by the Pythagorean sum of the dipole moments. The radial component is generally greater than either of the transverse components for the dipole portion as well as for the nondipolar field contributions.

  1. Simultaneous particle and field observations of field-aligned currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berko, F. W.; Hoffman, R. A.; Burton, R. K.; Holzer, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of low energy precipitating electrons and magnetic fluctuations from the low altitude polar orbiting satellite OGO-4 have been compared. Analysis of the two sets of experimental data for isolated events led to the classification of high latitude field-aligned currents as purely temporal or purely spatial variations. Magnetic field disturbances calculated using these simple current models and the measured particle fluxes were in good agreement with measured field values. While fluxes of greater than 1 keV electrons are detected primarily on the nightside, magnetometer disturbances indicative of field-aligned currents were seen at all local times, both in the visual auroral regions and dayside polar cusp. Thus electrons with energies less than approximately 1 keV are the prime charge carriers in high latitude dayside field-aligned currents. The satellite measurements are in good agreement with previously measured field-aligned current values and with values predicted from several models involving magnetospheric field-aligned currents.

  2. Balloon-borne radiometer profiler: Field observations

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D.; Anderson, G.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Hubbe, J.M.; Scott, K.A.

    1995-03-01

    This project involves the development of the capability of making routine soundings of broadband radiative fluxes and radiative flux divergences to heights of 1500m AGL. Described in this document are radiometers carried on a stabilized platform in a harness inserted in the tetherline of a tethered balloon meteriological sounding system. Field test results are given.

  3. Annotated Observations: Field Notes and Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas-Fair, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this action research presentation is to invite discourse on the intersection of race, gender and instructional decisions in the classrooms of student teachers. The purpose of this study is to also examine the thoughts of a university supervisor during clinical observation with respect to her positionality as a woman of…

  4. POLAR FIELD REVERSAL OBSERVATIONS WITH HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, D.; Tsuneta, S.; Shimojo, M.; Orozco Suarez, D.; Ishikawa, R.; Sako, N.

    2012-07-10

    We have been monitoring yearly variation in the Sun's polar magnetic fields with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode to record their evolution and expected reversal near the solar maximum. All magnetic patches in the magnetic flux maps are automatically identified to obtain the number density and magnetic flux density as a function of the total magnetic flux per patch. The detected magnetic flux per patch ranges over four orders of magnitude (10{sup 15}-10{sup 20} Mx). The higher end of the magnetic flux in the polar regions is about one order of magnitude larger than that of the quiet Sun, and nearly that of pores. Almost all large patches ({>=}10{sup 18} Mx) have the same polarity, while smaller patches have a fair balance of both polarities. The polarity of the polar region as a whole is consequently determined only by the large magnetic concentrations. A clear decrease in the net flux of the polar region is detected in the slow rising phase of the current solar cycle. The decrease is more rapid in the north polar region than in the south. The decrease in the net flux is caused by a decrease in the number and size of the large flux concentrations as well as the appearance of patches with opposite polarity at lower latitudes. In contrast, we do not see temporal change in the magnetic flux associated with the smaller patches (<10{sup 18} Mx) and that of the horizontal magnetic fields during the years 2008-2012.

  5. Seismological Field Observation of Mesoscopic Nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Gassenmeier, Martina; Eulenfeld, Tom; Tilmann, Frederik; Korn, Michael; Niederleithinger, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Noise based observations of seismic velocity changes have been made in various environments. We know of seasonal changes of velocities related to ground water or temperature changes, co-seismic changes originating from shaking or stress redistribution and changes related to volcanic activity. Is is often argued that a decrease of velocity is related to the opening of cracks while the closure of cracks leads to a velocity increase if permanent stress changes are invoked. In contrast shaking induced changes are often related to "damage" and subsequent "healing" of the material. The co-seismic decrease and transient recovery of seismic velocities can thus be explained with both - static stress changes or damage/healing processes. This results in ambiguous interpretations of the observations. Here we present the analysis of one particular seismic station in northern Chile that shows very strong and clear velocity changes associated with several earthquakes ranging from Mw=5.3 to Mw=8.1. The fact that we can observe the response to several events of various magnitudes from different directions offers the unique possibility to discern the two possible causative processes. We test the hypothesis, that the velocity changes are related to shaking rather than stress changes by developing an empirical model that is based on the local ground acceleration at the sensor site. The eight year of almost continuous observations of velocity changes are well modeled by a daily drop of the velocity followed by an exponential recovery. Both, the amplitude of the drop as well as the recovery time are proportional to the integrated acceleration at the seismic station. Effects of consecutive days are independent and superimposed resulting in strong changes after earthquakes and constantly increasing velocities during quiet days thereafter. This model describes the continuous observations of the velocity changes solely based on the acceleration time series without individually defined dates

  6. Regional gravity field modelling from GOCE observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitoňák, Martin; Šprlák, Michal; Novák, Pavel; Tenzer, Robert

    2017-01-01

    In this article we discuss a regional recovery of gravity disturbances at the mean geocentric sphere approximating the Earth over the area of Central Europe from satellite gravitational gradients. For this purpose, we derive integral formulas which allow converting the gravity disturbances onto the disturbing gravitational gradients in the local north-oriented frame (LNOF). The derived formulas are free of singularities in case of r ≠ R . We then investigate three numerical approaches for solving their inverses. In the initial approach, the integral formulas are firstly modified for solving individually the near- and distant-zone contributions. While the effect of the near-zone gravitational gradients is solved as an inverse problem, the effect of the distant-zone gravitational gradients is computed by numerical integration from the global gravitational model (GGM) TIM-r4. In the second approach, we further elaborate the first scenario by reducing measured gravitational gradients for gravitational effects of topographic masses. In the third approach, we apply additional modification by reducing gravitational gradients for the reference GGM. In all approaches we determine the gravity disturbances from each of the four accurately measured gravitational gradients separately as well as from their combination. Our regional gravitational field solutions are based on the GOCE EGG_TRF_2 gravitational gradients collected within the period from November 1 2009 until January 11 2010. Obtained results are compared with EGM2008, DIR-r1, TIM-r1 and SPW-r1. The best fit, in terms of RMS (2.9 mGal), is achieved for EGM2008 while using the third approach which combine all four well-measured gravitational gradients. This is explained by the fact that a-priori information about the Earth's gravitational field up to the degree and order 180 was used.

  7. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriss-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    With the use of a prediction technique it is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar geomagnetic field.

  8. Null fields in the outer Jovian magnetosphere: ULYSSES observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, P. L.; Balogh, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Fazakerley, A.

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports on a magnetic field phenomenon, hereafter referred to as null fields, which were discovered during the inbound pass of the recent flyby of Jupiter by the Ulysses spacecraft. These null fields which were observed in the outer dayside magnetosphere are characterised by brief but sharp decreases of the field magnitude to values less than 1 nT. The nulls are distinguished from the current sheet signatures characteristic of the middle magnetosphere by the fact that the field does not reverse across the event. A field configuration is suggested that accounts for the observed features of the events.

  9. Null fields in the outer Jovian magnetosphere: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, P. L.; Balogh, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Fazakerley, A.; Smith, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on a magnetic field phenomenon, hereafter referred to as null fields, which were discovered during the inbound pass of the recent flyby of Jupiter by the Ulysses spacecraft. These null fields which were observed in the outer dayside magnetosphere are characterised by brief but sharp decreases of the field magnitude to values less than 1 nT. The nulls are distinguished from the current sheet signatures characteristic of the middle magnetosphere by the fact that the field does not reverse across the event. A field configuration is suggested that accounts for the observed features of the events.

  10. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    In order to infer the interplanetary sector polarity from polar geomagnetic field diurnal variations, measurements were carried out at Godhavn and Thule (Denmark) Geomagnetic Observatories. The inferred interplanetary sector polarity was compared with the polarity observed at the same time by Explorer 33 and 35 magnetometers. It is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar cap geomagnetic fields.

  11. Intergalactic Magnetic Field Observations and their Fundamental Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2017-01-01

    I will review current observational evidence for helical intergalactic magnetic fields at the 10-14 G level on 10 Mpc length scales. The existence of magnetic fields in cosmic voids and their non-trivial helical structure suggest that they might have originated in the early universe due to CP violating fundamental interactions. The large helicity of the magnetic field suggests a possible crucial role for chiral MHD effects in the early universe. Supported by the DOE.

  12. Synthetic Observations of Magnetic Fields in Protostellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joyce W. Y.; Hull, Charles L. H.; Offner, Stella S. R.

    2017-01-01

    The role of magnetic fields in the early stages of star formation is not well constrained. In order to discriminate between different star formation models, we analyze 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low-mass cores and explore the correlation between magnetic field orientation and outflow orientation over time. We produce synthetic observations of dust polarization at resolutions comparable to millimeter-wave dust polarization maps observed by the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy and compare these with 2D visualizations of projected magnetic field and column density. Cumulative distribution functions of the projected angle between the magnetic field and outflow show different degrees of alignment in simulations with differing mass-to-flux ratios. The distribution function for the less magnetized core agrees with observations finding random alignment between outflow and field orientations, while the more magnetized core exhibits stronger alignment. We find that fractional polarization increases when the system is viewed such that the magnetic field is close to the plane of the sky, and the values of fractional polarization are consistent with observational measurements. The simulation outflow, which reflects the underlying angular momentum of the accreted gas, changes direction significantly over over the first ∼0.1 Myr of evolution. This movement could lead to the observed random alignment between outflows and the magnetic fields in protostellar cores.

  13. Observational testing of magnetospheric magnetic field models at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; McComas, D.J.

    1996-09-01

    Empirical mode which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions play an important role in space weather forecasting. We report here on a number of different studies aimed at quantitatively evaluating these models, and in particular the Tsyganenko T89a model. The models are evaluated in two basic ways: (1) by comparing the range of magnetic field tilt angles observed at geosynchronous orbit with the ranges predicted for the same locations by the models; and (2) by comparing the observed magnetic field mapping between the ionosphere and geosynchronous orbit (using two-satellite magnetic field conjunctions) with the model predictions at the same locations. We find that while the T89a model predicts reasonably well the basic variation in tilt angle with local time and permits a range of field inclinations adequate to encompass the majority of observed angles on the dawn, dusk, and night sides, it is unable to reproduce the range of inclinations on the dayside. The model also predicts a smaller magnetic latitude range of geosynchronous field line footpoints than the observed two-satellite mapping indicate. Together, these results suggest that the next generation of field models should allow a greater range of stretching, especially in local time sectors away from midnight. It is important to note, however, that any increased range should encompass less-stretched configurations: although there are certainly cases where the models are not sufficiently stretched, we find that on average all magnetic field models tested, including T89a, are too stretched. Finally, in investigating how well the observed degree of field stretch was ordered by various magnetospheric indices, we find that the tilt of the field at geosynchronous orbit is a promising candidate for the incorporation into future models.

  14. Inferring Lower Boundary Driving Conditions Using Vector Magnetic Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuck, Peter W.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James; MacNeice, Peter; Allred, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Low-beta coronal MHD simulations of realistic CME events require the detailed specification of the magnetic fields, velocities, densities, temperatures, etc., in the low corona. Presently, the most accurate estimates of solar vector magnetic fields are made in the high-beta photosphere. Several techniques have been developed that provide accurate estimates of the associated photospheric plasma velocities such as the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms and the Poloidal/Toroidal Decomposition. Nominally, these velocities are consistent with the evolution of the radial magnetic field. To evolve the tangential magnetic field radial gradients must be specified. In addition to estimating the photospheric vector magnetic and velocity fields, a further challenge involves incorporating these fields into an MHD simulation. The simulation boundary must be driven, consistent with the numerical boundary equations, with the goal of accurately reproducing the observed magnetic fields and estimated velocities at some height within the simulation. Even if this goal is achieved, many unanswered questions remain. How can the photospheric magnetic fields and velocities be propagated to the low corona through the transition region? At what cadence must we observe the photosphere to realistically simulate the corona? How do we model the magnetic fields and plasma velocities in the quiet Sun? How sensitive are the solutions to other unknowns that must be specified, such as the global solar magnetic field, and the photospheric temperature and density?

  15. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields at Venus. Venus Express observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Woch, J.; Zhang, T. L.; Wei, Y.; Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic field and plasma measurements carried out onboard Venus Express during solar minimum conditions suggest the existence of two kinds of magnetic field configuration in the Venusian ionosphere. We interpret these as the manifestation of two different types of generation mechanisms for the induced magnetosphere. A different magnetic field topology (toroidal and poloidal) arises if the induced currents are driven either by the solar wind motional electric field or by the Faraday electric field—a conducting ionosphere sees the magnetic field carried by solar wind as a time-varying field. At the dayside, both driving agents produce a similar draping pattern of the magnetic field. However, different magnetic field signatures inherent to both induction mechanisms appear at lower altitudes in the terminator region. The conditions at low solar EUV flux when the ionosphere of Venus becomes magnetized seem to be favorable to distinguish between two different types of the induced fields. We present cases of both types of the magnetic field topology. The cases when the effects of the Faraday induction become well noticeable are especially interesting since they provide us with an example of solar wind interaction with a tiny induced dipole field immersed into the ionosphere. Another interesting case when poloidal magnetic fields are evidently displayed is observed when the IMF vector is almost aligned with the solar wind velocity. In general case, both mechanisms of induction probably complement each other.

  16. Direct observations of field-induced assemblies in magnetite ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, N. S. Susan; Khapli, Sachin D.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-03-01

    Evolution of microstructures in magnetite-based ferrofluids with weak dipolar moments (particle size ≤ 10 nm) is studied with an emphasis on examining the effects of particle concentration (ϕ) and magnetic field strength (H) on the structures. Nanoparticles are dispersed in water at three different concentrations, ϕ = 0.15%, 0.48%, and 0.59% (w/v) [g/ml%] and exposed to uniform magnetic fields in the range of H = 0.05-0.42 T. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is employed to provide in-situ observations of the field-induced assemblies in such systems. As the magnetic field increases, the Brownian colloids are observed to form randomly distributed chains aligned in the field direction, followed by head-to-tail chain aggregation and then lateral aggregation of chains termed as zippering. By increasing the field in low concentration samples, the number of chains increases, though their length does not change dramatically. Increasing concentration increases the length of the linear particle assemblies in the presence of a fixed external magnetic field. Thickening of the chains due to zippering is observed at relatively high fields. Through a systematic variation of concentration and magnetic field strength, this study shows that both magnetic field strength and change in concentration can strongly influence formation of microstructures even in weak dipolar systems. Additionally, the results of two commonly used support films on electron microscopy grids, continuous carbon and holey carbon films, are compared. Holey carbon film allows us to create local regions of high concentrations that further assist the development of field-induced assemblies. The experimental observations provide a validation of the zippering effect and can be utilized in the development of models for thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity.

  17. Stellar magnetic fields from four Stokes parameter observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusomarov, N.; Kochukhov, O.; Piskunov, N.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Doppler imaging (MDI) from observations of four Stokes parameters can uncover new information that is of interest to the evolution and structure of magnetic fields of intermediate and high-mass stars. Our MDI study of the chemically peculiar star HD 24712 from four Stokes parameter observations, obtained with the HARPSpol instrument at the 3.6-m ESO telescope, revealed a magnetic field with strong dipolar component and weak small-scale contributions. This finding gives evidence for the hypothesis that old Ap stars have predominantly dipolar magnetic fields.

  18. Magnetospheric-field distortions observed by OGO 3 and 5.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Ledley, B. G.; Skillman, T. L.; Heppner, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The rubidium vapor magnetometer data of the scalar magnetic-field intensity obtained by the OGO 3 and 5 satellites are analyzed to study the magnetospheric-field distortions in terms of the observed field magnitude under quiet and slightly disturbed conditions minus the magnitude of the reference geomagnetic field (delta B). Average contours of equal delta Bs are shown in the geomagnetic noon-midnight and dawn-dusk meridian planes for magnetically quiet and slightly disturbed conditions. The equatorial distribution of observed delta Bs as a function of geocentric distance differs substantially from that expected from the well-known models of the quiet-time ring current. Other findings suggest that there must be a population of low-energy particles with substantial total energy near the equator at distances of 2 to 5 earth radii that has not been recognized as having sufficient energy to inflate the magnetic field.

  19. Validating an Environmental Education Field Day Observation Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Stephan P.; Heimlich, Joe E.; Storksdieck, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Environmental Field Days (EFD) are held throughout the country and provide a unique opportunity to involve students in real world science. A study to assess the validity of an observation tool for EFD programs was conducted at the Metro Water Festival with fifth grade students. Items from the observation tool were mapped to students' evaluation…

  20. Constructing the Coronal Magnetic Field: by Correlating Parameterized Magnetic Field Lines with Observed Coronal Plasma Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. A.

    1998-01-01

    The reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field is carried out using a perturbation procedure. A set of magnetic field lines generated from magnetogram data is parameterized and then deformed by varying the parameterized values. The coronal fluxtubes associated with this field are adjusted until the correlation between the field lines and the observed coronal loops is maximized. A mathematical formulation is described which ensures (1) that the normal component of the photospheric field remains unchanged, (2) that the field is given in the entire corona, (3) that the field remains divergence free, and (4) that electrical currents are introduced into the field. It is demonstrated that a simple radial parameterization of a potential field, comprising a radial stretching of the field, can provide a match for a simple bipolar active region, AR 7999, which crossed the central meridian on 1996 Nov 26. At a coronal height of 30 km, the resulting magnetic field is a non-force free magnetic field with the maximum Lorentz force being on the order of 2.6 x 10(exp -9) dyn resulting from an electric current density of $0.13 mu A/ sq m. This scheme is an important tool in generating a magnetic field solution consistent with the coronal flux tube observations and the observed photospheric magnetic field.

  1. Magnetic Fields Around the Heliosphere: Theory vs Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    Voyager in situ measurements of the magnetic field around the heliosphere are the source of invaluable information about the interface between the solar wind (SW) and local interstellar medium (LISM). On the other hand, they are quite challenging for theoretical analysis unless accompanied by remote observations of neutral atoms the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) and Ulysses missions. Of particular interest is the fine structure of the heliopause due to its instability and possible magnetic reconnection. Both phenomena may have contributed to the remarkable changes in the galactic and anomalous cosmic ray fluxes observed by Voyager 1 within a one-month period of 2012 after which the spacecraft penetrated into the LISM. Draping of the heliopause by the interstellar magnetic field affects the position of the bright ribbon of enhanced ENA flux observed by IBEX on the celestial sphere and 2-3 kHz radio emission caused by shock propagation through the outer heliosheath observed by Voyager 1. Interstellar magnetic field determines the structure of the bow wave in front of the heliopause. Moreover, magnetic fields define the orientation and shape of the heliotail, the features of which have been observed by IBEX. Recent numerical simulations show that the details of the large-scale interstellar magnetic field modification caused by the presence of the heliotail may be the source of the observed 1-10 TeV cosmic ray anisotropy studied in detail in numerous air shower measurements around the world. In this paper, an overview will be given of the recent theoretical and simulations results describing the magnetic field distribution around the heliosphere. The objective of the talk is to connect observational and theoretical results, and outline challenges that are going to inspire the heliospheric community in the coming years.

  2. Cosmic microwave background observables of small field models of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dayan, Ido; Brustein, Ram E-mail: ramyb@bgu.ac.il

    2010-09-01

    We construct a class of single small field models of inflation that can predict, contrary to popular wisdom, an observable gravitational wave signal in the cosmic microwave background anisotropies. The spectral index, its running, the tensor to scalar ratio and the number of e-folds can cover all the parameter space currently allowed by cosmological observations. A unique feature of models in this class is their ability to predict a negative spectral index running in accordance with recent cosmic microwave background observations. We discuss the new class of models from an effective field theory perspective and show that if the dimensionless trilinear coupling is small, as required for consistency, then the observed spectral index running implies a high scale of inflation and hence an observable gravitational wave signal. All the models share a distinct prediction of higher power at smaller scales, making them easy targets for detection.

  3. One kilometer tether observations of auroral electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shigeto; Whalen, Brian A.

    The OEDIPUS (Observations of Electric-field Distributions in the Ionospheric Plasma - a Unique Strategy) rocket was launched on January 30, 1989 from the Andoya range in Norway to an apogee of 512 km during an active auroral display. Two payloads, fully instrumented with plasma diagnostics but connected by a conducting tether were separated in flight along geomagnetic field lines to a distance of 1 km. Energetic electron, ion and thermal ion observations at the both ends of the payload were made in and near several auroral forms. Tether (interpayload) voltages and currents were monitored by using a high impedance voltmeter and a low impedance ammeter. Results of comparisons between charged particle observations and the tether voltage and current measurements indicate clearly the validity of electric field measurements made by this technique.

  4. On radial heliospheric magnetic fields: Voyager 2 observation and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Richardson, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2003-05-01

    The heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) direction, on average, conforms well to the Parker spiral. However, numerous examples of events where the HMF is oriented in near-radial directions for many hours have been reported on the basis of observations inside 5 AU from spacecraft such as ISEE-3 and Ulysses. The magnetic field data observed by Voyager 2 from launch in 1977 through the end of 1982 (i.e., between 1 and ˜10 AU) were searched for all instances of radial fields with durations of 6 hours or more. Radial fields of significant durations at large distances are unusual as the Parker spiral is very tightly wound. The radial HMF events in the inner heliosphere typically occur at times when the solar wind speed is declining gradually, while they tend to be associated with steady wind speeds at distances beyond ˜6 AU. The durations of these events appear to be independent of distance and solar cycle, with an average duration of ˜11 hours. They generally are not associated with interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). Possible generation mechanisms of the radial field events related to speed variations near the Sun are investigated by use of a MHD model. We find that a noticeable low-speed plateau of limited duration in solar wind speed near the Sun can produce radial field events having durations of the order of 10 hours in the heliosphere as observed by Voyager 2.

  5. Magnetic Field Observations near Mercury: Preliminary Results from Mariner 10.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Behannon, K W; Lepping, R P; Whang, Y C; Schatten, K H

    1974-07-12

    Results are presented from a preliminary analysis of data obtained near Mercury on 29 March 1974 by the NASA-GSFC magnetic field experiment on Mariner 10. Rather unexpectedly, a very well-developed, detached bow shock wave, which develops as the super-Alfvénic solar wind interacts with the planet, has been observed. In addition, a magnetosphere-like region, with maximum field strength of 98 gammas at closest approach (704 kilometers altitude), has been observed, contained within boundaries similar to the terrestrial magnetopause. The obstacle deflecting the solar wind flow is global in size, but the origin of the enhanced magnetic field has not yet been uniquely established. The field may be intrinsic to the planet and distorted by interaction with the solar wind. It may also be associated with a complex induction process whereby the planetary interior-atmosphere-ionosphere interacts with the solar wind flow to generate the observed field by a dynamo action. The complete body of data favors the preliminary conclusion that Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field. If this is correct, it represents a major scientific discovery in planetary magnetism and will have considerable impact on studies of the origin of the solar system.

  6. Inferring effective field observables from a discrete model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bény, Cédric

    2017-01-01

    A spin system on a lattice can usually be modeled at large scales by an effective quantum field theory. A key mathematical result relating the two descriptions is the quantum central limit theorem, which shows that certain spin observables satisfy an algebra of bosonic fields under certain conditions. Here, we show that these particular observables and conditions are the relevant ones for an observer with certain limited abilities to resolve spatial locations as well as spin values. This is shown by computing the asymptotic behaviour of a quantum Fisher information metric as function of the resolution parameters. The relevant observables characterise the state perturbations whose distinguishability does not decay too fast as a function of spatial or spin resolution.

  7. Polar Magnetic Fields Observed During the Last Four Solar Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    2008-12-01

    The Sun's polar fields during the current minimum are the weakest in at least four solar cycles. The field strengths are fairly symmetric, unlike at least the two previous minima. We compare data from the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) to follow the polar field changes since 1976. The polar field is never observed well from Earth because the ecliptic lies near the Sun's equator, and each year the view of the north (south) is completely hidden for several months around March 7 (September 7). Analysis of the most favorably oriented MDI synoptic maps each year allows us to derive the fairly slowly evolving large-scale polar magnetic field pattern from 1996 to the present. We account for differential rotation and other geometric effects. The analysis allows us to provide a useful interpolated or extrapolated correction that can be smoothly incorporated into the global synoptic or synchronic maps above about 70 degrees latitude. The polar field is important in modeling the large-scale coronal and heliospheric field, particularly at minimum. Even though there has been extremely little solar activity over the last several months, at the current solar minimum the structure of the corona is much less equatorial than usual, in part because the polar fields are relatively weak.

  8. Ulysses observations of latitude gradients in the heliospheric magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Balogh, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Neugebauer, M.; Phillips, J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1995-01-01

    Several parameters measured by Ulysses as it traveled southward to heliographic latitudes of -50 deg are presented and analyzed. The radial component of the magnetic field, averaged over 5 deg latitude increments and extrapolated back to 1 AU, is found to agree with baseline measurements provided by IMP-8. There is little, if any, evidence of a latitude gradient, a result consistent with the dominance of the magnetic field associated with the heliospheric current sheet and with recent models which include the effect of the current sheet as well as of source surface fields. Thus far, the spiral angle agrees with the Parker spiral assuming a rate of rotation of the field lines at the Sun equal to the equatorial value. No evidence is seen of either a change in rotation rate with latitude or an unwinding of the spiral as suggested by a recent analysis. Hourly variances in the field magnitude and in the sum of the variances in the components, normalized to the square of the observed field strenght, show the former to be independent of latitude while the latter shows a strong increase with latitude. These two observations are shown to be associated with Alfven waves that are continuously present at high latitudes. The waves have large amplitudes, extend to long periods, and have important implications for galactic cosmic rays and the solar wind.

  9. Polarimetric Radar and Electric Field Observations of a Multicell Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruning, E. C.; Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Schuur, T.; Straka, J.; Krehbiel, P.; Rison, W.

    2004-12-01

    Much prior thunderstorm electrification research uses one-dimensional analyses of vertical profiles of the thunderstorm electric field, often incorporating cloud-to-ground lighting strike data and radar reflectivity observations. New instrumentation has provided the opportunity to investigate thunderstorm electrification and lightning in greater spatial detail. We present data from the late stages of a multicellular storm occurring on 28-29 June 2004 during the Thunderstorm Electrification and Lightning Experiment (TELEX) field program in central Oklahoma. Three-dimensional (3-D) vector electric field (measured by balloon sounding), total lighting mapping, and polarimetric radar are utilized. The maximum measured electric field exceeded -150 kV m-1. Preliminary charge analysis using the electric field vectors indicates a positive layer below 0\\deg C, followed by a large negative layer just above the melting level. Another positive and negative layer follow this. Polarimetric radar signatures within the melting layer are examined in the context of the electric field observations. Mapped lightning flashes are used to clarify and support the inferred charge structure. An interactive 3-D display is used to combine these data sources. Temporal evolution of the storm is also considered.

  10. Constructing the Coronal Magnetic Field by Correlating Parameterized Magnetic Field Lines with Observed Coronal Plasma Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Gary G.; Alexander, David

    1999-01-01

    A method is presented for constructing the coronal magnetic field from photospheric magnetograms and observed coronal loops. A set of magnetic field lines generated from magnetogram data is parameterized and then deformed by varying the parameterized values. The coronal flux tubes associated with this field are adjusted until the correlation between the field lines and the observed coronal loops is maximized. A mathematical formulation is described which ensures that (1) the normal component of the photospheric field remains unchanged, (2) the field is given in the entire corona over an active region, (3) the field remains divergence-free, and 4electric currents are introduced into the field. It is demonstrated that a parameterization of a potential field, comprising a radial stretching of the field, can provide a match for a simple bipolar active region, AR 7999, which crossed the central meridian on 1996 November 26. The result is a non-force-free magnetic field with the Lorentz force being of the order of 10(exp -5.5) g per s(exp 2) resulting from an electric current density of 0.79 micro A per m(exp 2). Calculations show that the plasma beta becomes larger than unity at a strong non-radial currents requires low height of about 0.25 solar radii supporting the non-force-free conclusion. The presence of such strong non-radial currents requires large transverse pressure gradients fo maintain a magnetostatic atmosphere, required by the relatively persistent nature of the coronal structures observed in AR 7999. This scheme is an important tool in generating a magnetic field solution consistent with the coronal flux tube observations and the observed photospheric magnetic field.

  11. Observational constraints on gauge field production in axion inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Meerburg, P.D.; Pajer, E. E-mail: enrico.pajer@gmail.com

    2013-02-01

    Models of axion inflation are particularly interesting since they provide a natural justification for the flatness of the potential over a super-Planckian distance, namely the approximate shift-symmetry of the inflaton. In addition, most of the observational consequences are directly related to this symmetry and hence are correlated. Large tensor modes can be accompanied by the observable effects of a the shift-symmetric coupling φF F-tilde to a gauge field. During inflation this coupling leads to a copious production of gauge quanta and consequently a very distinct modification of the primordial curvature perturbations. In this work we compare these predictions with observations. We find that the leading constraint on the model comes from the CMB power spectrum when considering both WMAP 7-year and ACT data. The bispectrum generated by the non-Gaussian inverse-decay of the gauge field leads to a comparable but slightly weaker constraint. There is also a constraint from μ-distortion using TRIS plus COBE/FIRAS data, but it is much weaker. Finally we comment on a generalization of the model to massive gauge fields. When the mass is generated by some light Higgs field, observably large local non-Gaussianity can be produced.

  12. The Global Magnetic Field of Mercury from MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian J.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Korth, Haje; Purucker, Michael E.; Winslow, Reka M.; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Raines, Jim M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2011-09-01

    Magnetometer data acquired by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury permit the separation of internal and external magnetic field contributions. The global planetary field is represented as a southward-directed, spin-aligned, offset dipole centered on the spin axis. Positions where the cylindrical radial magnetic field component vanishes were used to map the magnetic equator and reveal an offset of 484 ± 11 kilometers northward of the geographic equator. The magnetic axis is tilted by less than 3° from the rotation axis. A magnetopause and tail-current model was defined by using 332 magnetopause crossing locations. Residuals of the net external and offset-dipole fields from observations north of 30°N yield a best-fit planetary moment of 195 ± 10 nanotesla-RM3, where RM is Mercury’s mean radius.

  13. Implications of observing and writing field notes through different lenses

    PubMed Central

    Hellesø, Ragnhild; Melby, Line; Hauge, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Background From a philosophy of science perspective, the literature has posited that different research approaches influence field studies. Studies addressing interdisciplinary research have focused on the challenges of organizing and running interdisciplinary teams, cultural differences between and within disciplines, and constraints in conducting interdisciplinary research. Studies exploring and discussing the process and outcome of transferring observations to notes from an interdisciplinary point of view are not identified. The aim of this paper is to explore the characteristics of field notes created by researchers representing different disciplines and experiences. Methods A case study using a modified dynamic observation method was employed. The analyses were initiated by a researcher who had not been involved in the data collection. The field notes were analyzed using three main steps. Results The structures of both researchers’ field notes were characterized by similarities in their descriptions, but the notes’ foci and analytical levels differed. Conclusion The findings contribute new insights concerning the execution of interdisciplinary observational studies. Our findings demonstrate that entering the field with different lenses produced richer and more varied data, providing a broader platform from which to discuss and interpret a study’s findings. From a theoretical point of view, the findings enable a more nuanced discussion and a conceptual elaboration regarding how observational approaches should be pursued in future studies. On a practical level, the findings show that even if the researchers agree on what the overall focus in the observations should be, differences can occur in both their focus and analytical level throughout the study. PMID:25914543

  14. Near-field observation of light propagation in nanocoax waveguides.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Juan M; Ye, Fan; Rizal, Binod; Burns, Michael J; Naughton, Michael J

    2014-06-16

    We report the observation of propagating modes of visible and near infrared light in nanoscale coaxial (metal-dielectric-metal) structures, using near-field scanning optical microscopy. Together with numerical calculations, we show that the propagated modes have different nature depending on the excitation wavelength, i.e., plasmonic TE11 and TE21 modes in the near infrared and photonic TE31, TE41 and TM11 modes in the visible. Far field transmission out of the nanocoaxes is dominated by the superposition of Fabry-Perot cavity modes resonating in the structures, consistent with theory. Such coaxial optical waveguides may be useful for future nanoscale photonic systems.

  15. Possible observation of the isotope effect during field evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, O. L.; Blashenkov, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    The field evaporation of tungsten at high temperatures (T ~ 2000 K) has been studied using a magnetic mass spectrometer equipped with a field ion source. Only low-charge ions (W+2 and W+) have been observed in the course of evaporation for all tungsten isotopes. For singly charged ions only, the number of ions of the heaviest isotope, 186W+, was about one order of magnitude lower than that corresponding to the standard isotope ratio for natural tungsten. An explanation of this anomalous phenomenon is proposed.

  16. MESSENGER Observations of Induced Magnetic Fields at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Winslow, R. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Purucker, M. E.; Heyner, D.; Phillips, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Benna, M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    We use orbital data from the Magnetometer (MAG) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft to study induction signals from Mercury's core. The weak dipole moment (190 nT-RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius) yields a mean subsolar magnetopause distance,RSS, from the dipole origin of 1.45 RM. Time variations in Mercury's magnetopause position, and hence in the magnetopause fields, are driven by changes in solar wind dynamic pressure, Pram, and induce currents in Mercury's interior, in particular at the top of the large, highly conductive core. Mercury's eccentric orbit leads to periodic, annual variations in Pram with an amplitude of ˜50% of the mean Pram. Shorter-timescale, higher-amplitude variations in Pram also occur due to variability in the solar wind. We use a model of Mercury's magnetosphere derived from MESSENGER observations together with a two-layer, radial conductivity model to calculate the expected geometry and magnitude of induced field signatures. The inducing field geometry is obtained via a spherical harmonic expansion of the model magnetopause field at distinct RSS values corresponding to the range observed in MESSENGER MAG data. For the two-layer model and time variations in the field with periods longer than ~1 h, the transfer function between the inducing and induced fields depends only on the spherical harmonic degree and on the ratio of the core radius to the planetary radius. We observe two lines of evidence for an annual induced signature at Mercury. First, RSS varies with heliocentric distance, Rh, as Rhb where b < 1/3. Second, a stronger planetary dipole moment is observed at perihelion than at aphelion. The magnitudes of the observed signals are consistent with the recent estimate of Mercury's core radius (2020 × 30 km) derived from gravity and spin-state data, and independently rule out a core radius less than ˜1900 km. Larger amplitude induced signals are observed in association with

  17. Observations of magnetic fields on solar-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcy, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Magnetic-field observations were carried out for 29 G and K main-sequence stars. The area covering-factors of magnetic regions tends to be greater in the K dwarfs than in the G dwarfs. However, no spectral-type dependence is found for the field strengths, contrary to predictions that pressure equilibrium with the ambient photospheric gas pressure would determine the surface field strengths. Coronal soft X-ray fluxes from the G and K dwarfs correlate well with the fraction of the stellar surface covered by magnetic regions. The dependence of coronal soft X-ray fluxes on photospheric field strengths is consistent with Stein's predicted generation-rates for Alfven waves. These dependences are inconsistent with the one dynamo model for which a specific prediction is offered. Finally, time variability of magnetic fields is seen on the two active stars that have been extensively monitored. Significant changes in magnetic fields are seen to occur on timescales as short as one day.

  18. Estimating thermal performance curves from repeated field observations.

    PubMed

    Childress, Evan S; Letcher, Benjamin H

    2017-03-08

    Estimating thermal performance of organisms is critical for understanding population distributions and dynamics and predicting responses to climate change. Typically, performance curves are estimated using laboratory studies to isolate temperature effects, but other abiotic and biotic factors influence temperature-performance relationships in nature reducing these models' predictive ability. We present a model for estimating thermal performance curves from repeated field observations that includes environmental and individual variation. We fit the model in a Bayesian framework using MCMC sampling, which allowed for estimation of unobserved latent growth while propagating uncertainty. Fitting the model to simulated data varying in sampling design and parameter values demonstrated that the parameter estimates were accurate, precise, and unbiased. Fitting the model to individual growth data from wild trout revealed high out-of-sample predictive ability relative to laboratory-derived models, which produced more biased predictions for field performance. The field-based estimates of thermal maxima were lower than those based on laboratory studies. Under warming temperature scenarios, field-derived performance models predicted stronger declines in body size than laboratory-derived models, suggesting that laboratory-based models may underestimate climate change effects. The presented model estimates true, realized field performance, avoiding assumptions required for applying laboratory-based models to field performance, which should improve estimates of performance under climate change and advance thermal ecology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. An explanation for parallel electric field pulses observed over thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Barnum, B. H.

    2009-10-01

    Every electric field instrument flown on sounding rockets over a thunderstorm has detected pulses of electric fields parallel to the Earth's magnetic field associated with every strike. This paper describes the ionospheric signatures found during a flight from Wallops Island, Virginia, on 2 September 1995. The electric field results in a drifting Maxwellian corresponding to energies up to 1 eV. The distribution function relaxes because of elastic and inelastic collisions, resulting in electron heating up to 4000-5000 K and potentially observable red line emissions and enhanced ISR electron temperatures. The field strength scales with the current in cloud-to-ground strikes and falls off as r -1 with distance. Pulses of both polarities are found, although most electric fields are downward, parallel to the magnetic field. The pulse may be the reaction of ambient plasma to a current pulse carried at the whistler packet's highest group velocity. The charge source required to produce the electric field is very likely electrons of a few keV traveling at the packet velocity. We conjecture that the current source is the divergence of the current flowing at mesospheric heights, the phenomenon called an elve. The whistler packet's effective radiated power is as high as 25 mW at ionospheric heights, comparable to some ionospheric heater transmissions. Comparing the Poynting flux at the base of the ionosphere with flux an equal distance away along the ground, some 30 db are lost in the mesosphere. Another 10 db are lost in the transition from free space to the whistler mode.

  20. MESSENGER observations of induced magnetic fields in Mercury's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Philpott, Lydia C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Hauck, Steven A.; Heyner, Daniel; Phillips, Roger J.; Winslow, Reka M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-03-01

    Orbital data from the Magnetometer on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft allow investigation of magnetic fields induced at the top of Mercury's core by time-varying magnetospheric fields. We used 15 Mercury years of observations of the magnetopause position as well as the magnetic field inside the magnetosphere to establish the presence and magnitude of an annual induction signal. Our results indicate an annual change in the internal axial dipole term, g10, of 7.5 to 9.5 nT. For negligible mantle conductivity, the average annual induction signal provides an estimate of Mercury's core radius to within ±90 km, independent of geodetic results. Larger induction signals during extreme events are expected but are challenging to identify because of reconnection-driven erosion. Our results indicate that the magnetopause reaches the dayside planetary surface 1.5-4% of the time.

  1. Mapping the Frontier Fields with Chandra X-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Chandra has observed both the clusters and the parallel fields in four of the Frontier Fields. These observations allow us to dramatically improve our understanding of cluster mergers through the detailed mapping of the hot cluster gas compared with high resolution mass maps and, by mapping the gas temperature and pressure, identify merger shocks. A comparison of the lensing maps and the Chandra images allows us to identify subclusters and determine if these have been stripped of their hot gas. In addition the HST images show unusual galaxies (e.g. jellyfish) whose morphologies may have resulted from interactions with the hot intracluster medium. Finally, we will report on any close pairs of AGN, which are candidates for gravitationally lensed QSOs.

  2. Net field-aligned currents observed by Triad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Potemra, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    From the Triad magnetometer observation of a step-like level shift in the east-west component of the magnetic field at 800 km altitude, the existence of a net current flowing into or away from the ionosphere in a current layer was inferred. The current direction is toward the ionosphere on the morning side and away from it on the afternoon side. The field aligned currents observed by Triad are considered as being an important element in the electro-dynamical coupling between the distant magnetosphere and the ionosphere. The current density integrated over the thickness of the layer increases with increasing magnetic activity, but the relation between the current density and Kp in individual cases is not a simple linear relation. An extrapolation of the statistical relation to Kp = 0 indicates existence of a sheet current of order 0.1 amp/m even at extremely quiet times. During periods of higher magnetic activity an integrated current of approximately 1 amp/m and average current density of order 0.000001 amp/sq m are observed. The location and the latitudinal width of the field aligned current layer carrying the net current very roughly agree with those of the region of high electron intensities in the trapping boundary.

  3. Another Piece of the Elephant: Chromospheric Vector Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.; Metcalf, T. R.; Mickey, D. L.

    2005-05-01

    As with most solar observational questions, investigating the structure and role of the chromosphere is one of remote sensing: many investigations describing their "piece of the elephant". The goal is, of course, to form a coherent picture of the state of the magnetized plasma which resides there (or passes through). In this presentation, recent efforts to understand the chromospheric magnetic field structure via direct observation, i.e. chromospheric vector magnetograms, will be presented. Since late 2003, the U. Hawai`i/Mees Solar Observatory's Imaging Vector Magnetograph has routinely acquired spectropolarimetry measurements of active regions across the Na-I 589.6nm line; from the polarization at the line's near-wings approximately 0.007nm from line center we deduce the vector magnetic field. The data are specific to active regions, with the focus being the structure, free energy storage and evolution at that low-chromospheric layer. I will present salient aspects of the observed chromospheric magnetic field structure, to compare and contrast with the picture formed by the other methods in this session.

  4. Observation of Dirac monopoles in a synthetic magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ray, M W; Ruokokoski, E; Kandel, S; Möttönen, M; Hall, D S

    2014-01-30

    Magnetic monopoles--particles that behave as isolated north or south magnetic poles--have been the subject of speculation since the first detailed observations of magnetism several hundred years ago. Numerous theoretical investigations and hitherto unsuccessful experimental searches have followed Dirac's 1931 development of a theory of monopoles consistent with both quantum mechanics and the gauge invariance of the electromagnetic field. The existence of even a single Dirac magnetic monopole would have far-reaching physical consequences, most famously explaining the quantization of electric charge. Although analogues of magnetic monopoles have been found in exotic spin ices and other systems, there has been no direct experimental observation of Dirac monopoles within a medium described by a quantum field, such as superfluid helium-3 (refs 10-13). Here we demonstrate the controlled creation of Dirac monopoles in the synthetic magnetic field produced by a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Monopoles are identified, in both experiments and matching numerical simulations, at the termini of vortex lines within the condensate. By directly imaging such a vortex line, the presence of a monopole may be discerned from the experimental data alone. These real-space images provide conclusive and long-awaited experimental evidence of the existence of Dirac monopoles. Our result provides an unprecedented opportunity to observe and manipulate these quantum mechanical entities in a controlled environment.

  5. Observation of Dirac monopoles in a synthetic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, M. W.; Ruokokoski, E.; Kandel, S.; Möttönen, M.; Hall, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic monopoles--particles that behave as isolated north or south magnetic poles--have been the subject of speculation since the first detailed observations of magnetism several hundred years ago. Numerous theoretical investigations and hitherto unsuccessful experimental searches have followed Dirac's 1931 development of a theory of monopoles consistent with both quantum mechanics and the gauge invariance of the electromagnetic field. The existence of even a single Dirac magnetic monopole would have far-reaching physical consequences, most famously explaining the quantization of electric charge. Although analogues of magnetic monopoles have been found in exotic spin ices and other systems, there has been no direct experimental observation of Dirac monopoles within a medium described by a quantum field, such as superfluid helium-3 (refs 10, 11, 12, 13). Here we demonstrate the controlled creation of Dirac monopoles in the synthetic magnetic field produced by a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Monopoles are identified, in both experiments and matching numerical simulations, at the termini of vortex lines within the condensate. By directly imaging such a vortex line, the presence of a monopole may be discerned from the experimental data alone. These real-space images provide conclusive and long-awaited experimental evidence of the existence of Dirac monopoles. Our result provides an unprecedented opportunity to observe and manipulate these quantum mechanical entities in a controlled environment.

  6. Magnetic fields in star-forming regions - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiles, Carl; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1993-01-01

    We review the observational aspects of magnetic fields in dense, star-forming regions. First we discuss ways to observe the field. These include direct methods, which consist of the measurement of both linear and circular polarization of spectral line and continuum radiation; and indirect methods, consisting of the angular distribution of H2O masers on the sky and the measurement of ambipolar diffusion. Next we discuss selected observational results, focusing on detailed discussions of a small number of points rather than a generalized discussion that covers the waterfront. We discuss the Orion/BN-KL region in detail, both on the small and large scales. Next we discuss the derivation of the complete magnetic vector, including both the systematic and fluctuating component, from a large sample of Zeeman and linear polarization measurements for the L204 dark cloud. We examine the virial theorem as it applies to dark clouds in general and one dark cloud, Barnard 1, in particular. We critically discuss the numerous claims for alignment of cloud structural features with the plane-of-the-sky component of the magnetic field, and find that many of these have not been definitively established.

  7. MESSENGER Observations of Internal and External Magnetic Fields at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Purucker, M. E.; Alexeev, I. I.; Al Asad, M.; Korth, H.; Phillips, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.; Winslow, R. M.; Zuber, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    Orbital observations with the Magnetometer (MAG) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft allow global-scale modeling of Mercury's internal and external magnetic fields. We use a paraboloid model with a cross-tail current sheet to quantify the external magnetic fields and examine possible origins for any residual long-wavelength signals. Observations inside the magnetosphere extend from ~60°S to 86°N; those below 1000 km altitude are confined to the northern hemisphere, with global coverage in body-fixed longitude and in local time. We use MAG data to constrain the magnetopause sub-solar standoff distance, the dipole tilt and offset along the rotation axis, the tail field, and the distance to the inner edge of the tail current sheet. Additional parameters, including the dipole moment, are constrained by the goodness of fit of the model to the MAG data. Inbound and outbound magnetopause crossings are identified on each magnetosphere pass. The mean magnetopause shape for the first 120 days in orbit is modeled by a paraboloid of revolution having a subsolar standoff distance of 1.4 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius). Observations of Mercury's magnetic equator indicate a southward-directed dipole, offset northward along the rotation axis from the planetary center by 484 km, with a tilt of less than 2.5°. These observations constrain the dipole moment to be 195 ± 10 nT-RM3. The paraboloid model successfully matches the first-order global signature of the field, with residual amplitudes typically less than 50 nT. Residuals contain signatures from several different sources: (1) variations in the long-wavelength field that are slow relative to the magnetospheric transit time and which correspond to differences in the baseline magnetospheric currents; (2) multipolar contributions to the internal field of either core or crustal origin; (3) plasma and current systems within the magnetosphere that are not captured in the

  8. DMD-based programmable wide field spectrograph for Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamkotsian, Frédéric; Lanzoni, Patrick; Liotard, Arnaud; Viard, Thierry; Costes, Vincent; Hébert, Philippe-Jean

    2015-03-01

    In Earth Observation, Universe Observation and Planet Exploration, scientific return could be optimized in future missions using MOEMS devices. In Earth Observation, we propose an innovative reconfigurable instrument, a programmable wide-field spectrograph where both the FOV and the spectrum could be tailored thanks to a 2D micromirror array (MMA). For a linear 1D field of view (FOV), the principle is to use a MMA to select the wavelengths by acting on intensity. This component is placed in the focal plane of a first grating. On the MMA surface, the spatial dimension is along one side of the device and for each spatial point, its spectrum is displayed along the perpendicular direction: each spatial and spectral feature of the 1D FOV is then fully adjustable dynamically and/or programmable. A second stage with an identical grating recomposes the beam after wavelengths selection, leading to an output tailored 1D image. A mock-up has been designed, fabricated and tested. The micromirror array is the largest DMD in 2048 x 1080 mirrors format, with a pitch of 13.68μm. A synthetic linear FOV is generated and typical images have been recorded o at the output focal plane of the instrument. By tailoring the DMD, we could modify successfully each pixel of the input image: for example, it is possible to remove bright objects or, for each spatial pixel, modify the spectral signature. The very promising results obtained on the mock-up of the programmable wide-field spectrograph reveal the efficiency of this new instrument concept for Earth Observation.

  9. Swarm Observations of Field-Aligned Currents: Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Stolle, C.; Luhr, H.; Park, J.; Rauberg, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report the results of a few case studies of multi-point magnetic field measurements of field-aligned currents (FACs) from Swarm constellation mission to understand their temporal and spatial characteristics. During the commissioning phase, the three Swarm spacecraft were in an identical polar orbit with a string-of-pearl configuration with small separations. During the science operational phase (since April, 2014), the three spacecraft were placed in slightly different polar orbits: one spacecraft in a higher altitude orbit (507km x 512km) and two side-by-side in lower altitude orbits (459km x 462km). We analyze a few FAC events in both orbital phases and during periods of active geomagnetic conditions. The multi-point observations enable us to examine the FACs' temporal evolution and separate their temporal and spatial variations.

  10. Singularities in the Transverse Fields of Electromagnetic Waves. II. Observations on the Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajnal, J. V.

    1987-12-01

    Electromagnetic waves propagating in free space contain three kinds of singularities called C lines, S surfaces and disclinations. The paper describes observations of these singularities in two different monochromatic microwave fields. The observations confirm all the theoretically predicted properties of the singularities that could be tested. As expected, the singularities were found to be prominent structural features of the fields and in consequence to provide an economical means of characterizing their structure. A notable result is the observation of both right-hand and left-hand C lines in a field that is nominally uniformly left-hand circularly polarized. This is in agreement with the previous assertion that, in general, electromagnetic wavefields contain both right-hand and left-hand polarized regions.

  11. Field observations of dilution on the Ipanema Beach outfall.

    PubMed

    Roldão, J; Carvalho, J L; Roberts, P J

    2001-01-01

    Field observations of the Ipanema Beach, Rio de Janeiro, ocean sewage outfall are presented. Measurements of dilution and other wastefield characteristics were obtained by adding dye tracer to the effluent and measuring in-situ. Simultaneous measurements of oceanographic conditions were made by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers, thermistor strings, and profiling instruments. Four experiments were performed, two during unstratified conditions when the plume was surfacing, and two during conditions of strong stratification when the plume was submerged. The minimum dilution varied from 30 to 130. The measurements reflect the worst case conditions as the campaigns were all made for weak currents.

  12. Seismostatistical characterization of microseismicity observed at geothermal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, T.; Asanuma, H.; Adachi, M.; Saeki, K.; Aoyama, K.; Ozeki, H.; Häring, M. O.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, occurrence of felt earthquakes has been recognized as one of the most critical environmental burdens associated with geothermal development. We have taken seismostatistical approach to evaluate characteristics of the microseismicity at geothermal fields to establish realtime and automated monitoring techniques of the reservoir changes and risk assessment of the felt earthquakes. In this study, we have introduced the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model (Ogata, JASA, 1988) to statistically model the time series of occurrences and the magnitude of microseismic events from hydrothermal and EGS fields. Here maximum likelihood estimation has been employed to estimate optimum parameters of the ETAS model. We analyzed microseismic events observed at Yanaizu Nishiyama, one of the largest hydrothermal fields in Japan. In this field, four felt earthquakes with local magnitude larger than 3.0 occurred during production operation since 1996, although no clear correlation between the occurrence of the felt earthquakes and operation to the reservoir has been observed (Asanuma et al., Trans. GRC, 2011). We found that the occurrence rate of primary fluid signals, which are the events triggered by external forcing and have been interpreted to be independent from a series of aftershocks (Hainzl and Ogata, JGR, 2005), correlated to the reinjection rate (Fig. 1). However, no significant change in the other parameters in the ETAS model has been observed. We also analyzed microseismic events observed at Basel EGS site in Switzerland, where some felt earthquakes occurred during and after hydraulic stimulation. The estimated ETAS model demonstrated that there is a correlation between the occurrence rate of primary fluid signals and injection rate. We, however, found that there is limitation to fit the ETAS model to the induced seismic events and new seismostatistical model is required for microseismic reservoir monitoring.ig. 1 A relation among production

  13. {Interball-1 Plasma, Magnetic Field, and Energetic Particle Observations}

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Funding from NASA was received in two installments. The first installment supported research using Russian/Czech/Slovak/French Interball-1 plasma, magnetic field, and energetic particles observations in the vicinity of the magnetopause. The second installment provided salary support to review unsolicited proposals to NASA for data recovery and archiving, and also to survey ISTP data provision efforts. Two papers were published under the auspices of the grant. Sibeck et al. reported Interball-1 observations of a wave on the magnetopause with an amplitude in excess of 5 R(sub E), the largest ever reported to date. They attributed the wave to a hot flow anomaly striking the magnetopause and suggested that the hot flow anomaly itself formed during the interaction of an IMF discontinuity with the bow shock. Nemecek et al. used Interball-1's VDP Faraday cup to identify large transient increases in the magnetosheath density. They noted large variations in simultaneous Wind observations of the IMF cone angle, but were unable to establish any relationship between the cone angle variations at Wind and the density variations at Interball-1. Funds from the second installment were used to review over 20 proposals from various researchers in the scientific community who sought NASA support to restore or archive past observations. It also supported a survey of ISTP data provisions which was used as input to a Senior Review of ongoing NASA ISTP programs.

  14. A new approach to observe toroidal magnetic fields of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, H.; Makishima, K.; Enoto, T.; Nakano, T.; Furuta, Y.; Nakazawa, K.

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decade, observational evidence has amounted that magnetars harbor enormous surface dipole magnetic fields (MFs) of B_{d} = 10^{14-15} {G}. Theoretically, we expect even stronger toroidal MFs B_{t} (e.g., Takiwaki+2009), which is observationally supported by a discovery of low-B_{d} magnetars (e.g., SGR 0418+5729; Rea+2013). Here, we will present a new approach to access B_{t} more directly. Suzaku allows us to simultaneously observe a soft thermal component and a distinct hard X-ray tail of magnetars. Extensively analyzing two magnetars, 4U 0142+61 and 1E 1547.0-5408, we found that their hard X-ray pulses suffered from slow phase modulations (Makishima+2014, 2015). This can be interpreted as a manifestation of free precession, under an axial deformation by ˜0.01%. If this effect is attributed to the magnetic stress, B_{t}˜10^{16} G is inferred. We further found that, within 6 years observation of 4U 0142+61, the modulation periods remained constant, while the amplitude gradually increased from < 0.4 to ˜1.3 sec. These results suggest the shift of the hard X-ray emission region (or direction).

  15. Using Clocks and Atomic Interferometry for Gravity Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    New technology developed in the frame of fundamental physics may lead to enhanced capabilities for geodetic applications such as refined observations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, we will present new sensor measurement concepts that apply atomic interferometry for gravimetry and clock measurements for observing potential values. In the first case, gravity anomalies can be determined by observing free-falling atoms (quantum gravimetry). In the second case, highly precise optical clocks can be used to measure differences of the gravity potential over long distances (relativistic geodesy). Principally, also inter-satellite ranging between test masses in space with nanometer accuracy belongs to these novel developments. We will show, how the new measurement concepts are connected to classical geodetic concepts, e.g. geopotential numbers and clock readings. We will illustrate the application of these new methods and their benefit for geodesy, where local and global mass variations can be observed with unforeseen accuracy and resolution, mass variations that reflect processes in the Earth system. We will present a few examples where geodesy will potentially benefit from these developments. Thus, the novel technologies might be applied for defining and realizing height systems in a new way, but also for fast local gravimetric surveys and exploration.

  16. Electric earthquake precursors: from laboratory results to field observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallianatos, F.; Triantis, D.; Tzanis, A.; Anastasiadis, C.; Stavrakas, I.

    2003-04-01

    The possibility of electrical earthquake precursors (EEP) has long been appreciated, but it has proven difficult to construct a solid theory to describe their generation and expected characteristics, or proven techniques to identify and discriminate true precursors from noise. To this end, a large number of laboratory experiments have been conducted, which have demonstrated the generation of transient electric potential prior to rupture in both dry and wet rock specimens. The principal mechanisms proposed to explain these observations are the piezo-electric and electrokinetic effects. The often quoted in the literature piezoelectric effect, cannot explain why non-piezoelectric rock specimens can also generate precursory electric phenomena. Streaming potential can be generated in many kinds of saturated rocks, but the fracturing of dry rocks also produces transient electric effects. Therefore, these two mechanisms may not be the basic contributors to the precursory phenomena observed in the laboratory (and to possible EEP signals). Herein we present a series of laboratory experiments on the microfracturing electrification of dry marble samples under stress, and discuss their possible relationship to field observations of purported EEP. The marble samples were subjected to constant and variable stress-rate uniaxial compression, in both the elastic and the plastic region. During the experiment, pressure stimulated currents (PSC) were observed, which show a clear dependence on the stress rate and mechanical state of the material (the Young modulus), decreasing in frequency and intensity with increasing damage during repeated loading cycles. Explanation of these observations is attempted with a theoretical model involving microfracturing and the motion of charged edge dislocations (MCD) as the primary electrification mechanism, after Tzanis and Vallianatos (Seismo Electromagnetics: Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling, TERRAPUB, 2002). The PSC waveforms and mode

  17. Field observations using an AOTF polarimetric imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Hamilton, Mike; Mahoney, Colin; Reyes, George

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary results of recent field observations using a prototype acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) polarimetric imaging spectrometer. The data illustrate application potentials for geoscience. The operation principle of this instrument is different from that of current airborne multispectral imaging instruments, such as AVIRIS. The AOTF instrument takes two orthogonally polarized images at a desired wavelength at one time, whereas AVIRIS takes a spectrum over a predetermined wavelength range at one pixel at a time and the image is constructed later. AVIRIS does not have any polarization measuring capability. The AOTF instrument could be a complement tool to AVIRIS. Polarization measurement is a desired capability for many applications in remote sensing. It is well know that natural light is often polarized due to various scattering phenomena in the atmosphere. Also, scattered light from canopies is reported to have a polarized component. To characterize objects of interest correctly requires a remote sensing imaging spectrometer capable of measuring object signal and background radiation in both intensity and polarization so that the characteristics of the object can be determined. The AORF instrument has the capability to do so. The AOTF instrument has other unique properties. For example, it can provide spectral images immediately after the observation. The instrument can also allow observations to be tailored in real time to perform the desired experiments and to collect only required data. Consequently, the performance in each mission can be increased with minimal resources. The prototype instrument was completed in the beginning of this year. A number of outdoor field experiments were performed with the objective to evaluate the capability of this new technology for remote sensing applications and to determine issues for further improvements.

  18. Observations of field-aligned currents, waves, and electric fields at substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, D. P.; Hughes, W. J.; Cattell, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Substorm onsets, identified Pi 2 pulsations observed on the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory Magnetometer Network, are studied using magnetometer and electric field data from ISEE 1 as well as magnetometer data from the geosynchronous satellites GOES 2 and 3. The mid-latitude magnetometer data provides the means of both timing and locating the substorm onset so that the spacecraft locations with respect to the substorm current systems are known. During two intervals, each containing several onsets or intensifications, ISEE 1 observed field-aligned current signatures beginning simultaneously with the mid-latitude Pi 2 pulsation. Close to the earth broadband bursts of wave noise were observed in the electric field data whenever field-aligned currents were detected. One onset occurred when ISEE 1 and GOES 2 were on the same field line but in opposite hemispheres. During this onset ISEE 1 and GOES 2 saw magnetic signatures which appear to be due to conjugate field-aligned currents flowing out of the western end of the westward auroral electrojets. The ISEE 1 signature is of a line current moving westward past the spacecraft. During the other interval, ISEE 1 was in the near-tail region near the midnight meridian. Plasma data confirms that the plasma sheet thinned and subsequently expanded at onset. Electric field data shows that the plasma moved in the opposite direction to the plasma sheet boundary as the boundary expanded which implies that there must have been an abundant source of hot plasma present. The plasma motion was towards the center of the plasma sheet and earthwards and consisted of a series of pulses rather than a steady flow.

  19. Observation of synchronized atomic motions in the field ion microscope.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Fhm F; Notte, John A; Livengood, Richard H; Tan, Shida

    2013-03-01

    For over half a century, the field ion microscope (FIM) has been used to visualize atomic structures at the apex of a sharpened needle by way of the ion beams which are created at the most protruding atoms. In this paper we used a conventional FIM to study the emission characteristics of the neon ion beams produced within the FIM. The neon emission pattern is observed to be relatively short lived and subject to temporal and angular fluctuations. The nature of these fluctuations is complex, often with different parts of the emission pattern changing in a synchronized fashion over timescales spanning from milliseconds to a few tens of seconds. In this paper, we characterize the observed instability of the neon emission. We also offer a simple model of adsorbed atom mobility that explains much of these observations. And finally, we present a method by which the stability can be greatly improved so that the produced neon beam can be used effectively for nanomachining applications.

  20. Los Azufres geothermal field: Observed response after 12-year exploitation

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    Exploitation of the Los Azufres Geothermal field was initiated in August 1982, with the electric power generation of five 5-MW wellhead units. Since then another 70 MW have been installed. A large amount of information has been compiled, including geologic, geochemical, production, and reservoir characteristics. The data were evaluated to detect the extent of observable changes in the main reservoir parameters over the twelve-year production period. Pressure and temperature measurements in Los Azufres wells show that geothermal fluid distribution is strongly influenced by the presence of permeable structures. Wellhead production and chemical analysis of the separated brine show that we are dealing with a highly heterogeneous reservoir, were the drawdown and enthalpy changes depend on the position of the well being studied.

  1. Some field observations on OSI aerial photography scales

    SciTech Connect

    Geil, R.

    1981-03-16

    The US, UK and USSR are attempting to negotiate a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) in Geneva. One of the verification procedures presently proposed provides for the possibility of conducting an On-Site Inspection (OSI) if a violation is suspected. According to the terms of the draft treaty, the OSI team would be provided with either (1) stereoscopic aerial photographs with a scale of 1:2,500, or equivalent topographic maps (US version) or (2) a large scale aerial photograph (USSR version). In order to gain a better understanding of the aerial photograph issue, EG and G was asked to take stereoscopic aerial photographs of two areas at the NTS at four different scales, 1:2,500, 1:5,000, 1:10,000 and 1:25,000. The purpose of this paper is to present some field observations on the use for OSI type purposes of these different scale photos.

  2. Observations of the diffuse near-UV radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1990-01-01

    The diffuse radiation field from 1650-3100 A has been observed by spectrometer aboard the Space Shuttle, and the contributions of the zodiacal light an the diffuse cosmic background to the signal have been derived. Colors ranging from 0.65 to 1.2 are found for the zodiacal light with an almost linear increase in the color with ecliptic latitude. This rise in color is due to UV brightness remaining almost constant while the visible brightnesses drop by almost a factor of two. This is interpreted as evidence that the grains responsible for the UV scattering have much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering. Intensities for the cosmic diffuse background ranging from 300 units to 900 units are found which are not consistent with either a correlation with N(H I) or with spatial isotropy.

  3. Comparison of St. Lawrence blue whale vocalizations with field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchok, Catherine; Bradley, David; Gabrielson, Thomas; Sears, Richard

    2003-04-01

    During four field seasons from 1998-2001, vocalizations were recorded in the presence of St. Lawrence blue whales using a single omni-directional hydrophone. Both long duration infrasonic calls (~18 Hz, 5-20 s) as well as short duration higher frequency calls (85-25 Hz, ~2 s) were detected and compared with field observations. Two trends were noted. First, the long infrasonic call series were concentrated primarily in the deep (300 m) channel. These call series appear to compare well with blue whale vocalizations recorded by others in the deep open ocean. Second, the shorter audible calls were more evenly distributed over bathymetry and seem to be a form of short distance communication with at least one case occurring during an agonistic interaction. A comparison of these calls with biological parameters such as density of whales in the area, percentages of paired versus single whales, and numbers of males versus females will also be discussed. [Project supported by ARL/PSU, NSF, and the American Museum of Natural History.

  4. Review of lightning properties from electron field and TV observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakov, Vladimir A.; Uman, Martin A.; Thottappillil, Rajeev

    1994-05-01

    strokes are similar to or shorter than those preceding higher-order strokes. These observations indicate that channel conditions for the propagation of a subsequent leader are determined not just by the immediately preceding channel heating and cooling processes but rather by the entire channel history. In particular, the status of the channel apparently depends on the number of strokes that have participated in its cumulative conditioning. The overwhelming majority of long continuing currents, those with a duration longer than 40 ms, were initiated by subsequent strokes of multiple-stroke flashes as opposed to either the first stroke in a multiple-stroke flash or the only stroke in a single-stroke flash. Strokes that initiate such long continuing currents were (1) relatively small (in terms of both return-stroke field peak and, as determined from an independent study in New Mexico, stroke charge), (2) followed relatively short interstroke intervals, and (3) showed a tendency to be preceded by a relatively large stroke. Millisecond-scale K and M electric field changes appeared different in terms of both microsecond-scale pulse content and interevent time intervals. Often no microsecond-scale K and M field pulses were detected. When they were present, such pulses were highly variable and sometimes irregular in waveshape, as opposed to the alleged characteristic K-pulse waveform described by Arnold and Pierce (1964), which has been extensively used in atmospheric radio-noise studies. There is a remarkable similarity between many lightning characteristics in Florida and in New Mexico.

  5. Photometric Observations of 6000 Stars in the Cygnus Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W.; Caldwell, D.; Koch, D.; Jenkins, J.; Ninkov, Z.

    1999-01-01

    A small photometer to detect transits by extrasolar planets has been assembled and is being tested at Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton, California. The Vulcan photometer is constructed from a 30 cm focal length, F/2.5 AeroEktar reconnaissance lens and Photometrics PXL16800 CCD camera. A spectral filter is used to confine the pass band from 480 to 763 mn. It simultaneously monitors 6000 stars brighter than 12th magnitude within a single star field in the galactic plane. When the data are folded and phased to discover low amplitude transits, the relative precision of one-hour samples is about 1 part per thousand (10 x l0(exp -3)) for many of the brighter stars. This precision is sufficient to find jovian-size planets orbiting solar-like stars, which have signal amplitudes from 5 to 30 x l0(exp -3) depending on the inflation of the planet and the size of the star. Based on the frequency of giant inner-planets discovered by Doppler-velocity method, one or two planets should be detectable in a rich star field. The goal of the observations is to obtain the sizes of giant extrasolar planets in short-period orbits and to combine these with masses determined from Doppler velocity measurements to determine the densities of these planets. A further goal is to compare the measured planetary diameters with those predicted from theoretical models. From August 10 through September 30 of 1998, a forty nine square degree field in the Cygnus constellation centered at RA and DEC of 19 hr 47 min, +36 deg 55 min was observed. Useful data were obtained on twenty-nine nights. Nearly fifty stars showed some evidence of transits with periods between 0.3 and 8 days. Most had amplitudes too large to be associated with planetary transits. However, several stars showed low amplitude transits. The data for several transits of each of these two stars have been folded and been folded into 30 minute periods. Only Cygl433 shows any evidence of a flattened bottom that is expected when a small object

  6. Geopotential Field Anomaly Continuation with Multi-Altitude Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Kim, Hyung Rae; von Frese, Ralph; Taylor, Patrick; Rangelova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Conventional gravity and magnetic anomaly continuation invokes the standard Poisson boundary condition of a zero anomaly at an infinite vertical distance from the observation surface. This simple continuation is limited, however, where multiple altitude slices of the anomaly field have been observed. Increasingly, areas are becoming available constrained by multiple boundary conditions from surface, airborne, and satellite surveys. This paper describes the implementation of continuation with multi-altitude boundary conditions in Cartesian and spherical coordinates and investigates the advantages and limitations of these applications. Continuations by EPS (Equivalent Point Source) inversion and the FT (Fourier Transform), as well as by SCHA (Spherical Cap Harmonic Analysis) are considered. These methods were selected because they are especially well suited for analyzing multi-altitude data over finite patches of the earth such as covered by the ADMAP database. In general, continuations constrained by multi-altitude data surfaces are invariably superior to those constrained by a single altitude data surface due to anomaly measurement errors and the non-uniqueness of continuation.

  7. Geopotential Field Anomaly Continuation with Multi-Altitude Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Kim, Hyung Rae; vonFrese, Ralph; Taylor, Patrick; Rangelova, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Conventional gravity and magnetic anomaly continuation invokes the standard Poisson boundary condition of a zero anomaly at an infinite vertical distance from the observation surface. This simple continuation is limited, however, where multiple altitude slices of the anomaly field have been observed. Increasingly, areas are becoming available constrained by multiple boundary conditions from surface, airborne, and satellite surveys. This paper describes the implementation of continuation with multi-altitude boundary conditions in Cartesian and spherical coordinates and investigates the advantages and limitations of these applications. Continuations by EPS (Equivalent Point Source) inversion and the FT (Fourier Transform), as well as by SCHA (Spherical Cap Harmonic Analysis) are considered. These methods were selected because they are especially well suited for analyzing multi-altitude data over finite patches of the earth such as covered by the ADMAP database. In general, continuations constrained by multi-altitude data surfaces are invariably superior to those constrained by a single altitude data surface due to anomaly measurement errors and the non-uniqueness of continuation.

  8. Anomalous foreshock field-aligned beams observed by Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, K.; Hamza, A. M.; Wilber, M.; Mazelle, C.; Lee, M. A.

    2011-10-01

    We report occasional observations of two simultaneously distinct ion foreshock components recorded by the Cluster spacecraft upstream of the Earth's bow shock. In most occurrences, the lower-energy population originates as a field-aligned beam (FAB) associated with quasi-perpendicular regions, which loses energy as the IMF rotates into oblique geometries. A second beam, with energies in excess of ~10 keV, appears sometimes in association with the onset of ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves, and sometimes ahead of the appearance of the latter. Measurements from the mass spectrometer indicate that both beams consist of protons. While the lower-speed beam is well-accounted for by a known reflection mechanism, the non-radial IMF orientations as well as other arguments seem to rule out magnetosheath or magnetospheric sources for the higher energy component. The wave characteristics are typical of the oblique foreshock and we have found that they are in cyclotron-resonance with the low speed beam (FAB). These observations constitute a theoretical challenge since conventional mechanisms described in the literature cannot account for the production of beams at two different energies.

  9. H-band observations of the Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, E.; Barmby, P.; Rigopoulou, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.

    2003-05-01

    We report results of our H-band survey of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS). The observations, made with SofI on the NTT, cover 0.027 square degrees to H< 20.5 and 0.17 square degrees to H< 19.8 (50% completeness limits). In total, 4819 objects were detected, of which 80% are galaxies based on the SExtractor parameter ``stellarity index'' having a value less than 0.5. Our astrometric solutions are in good agreement with those of the Las Campanas Infrared Survey (LCIRS), the COMBO-17, and the ESO-EIS surveys. Our photometry compares satisfactorily with the LCIRS results as well as with GOODS data. Galaxy number counts are ~ 50 000 galaxies per square degree at H< 20.75, in good agreement with those of LCIRS. The object catalog is published electronically at the CDS. The whole catalog is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/403/493}. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile under programs 66.A-0451 and 68.A-0375.

  10. Determining degree-day thresholds from field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, R. L.; Spano, Donatella; Cesaraccio, Carla; Duce, Pierpaolo

    This paper compares several methods for determining degree-day (°D) threshold temperatures from field observations. Three of the methods use the mean developmental period temperature and simple equations to estimate: (1) the smallest standard deviation in °D, (2) the least standard deviation in days, and (3) a linear regression intercept. Two additional methods use iterations of cumulative °D and threshold temperatures to determine the smallest root mean square error (RMSE). One of the iteration methods uses a linear model and the other uses a single triangle °D calculation method. The method giving the best results was verified by comparing observed and predicted phenological periods using 7 years of kiwifruit data and 10 years of cherry tree data. In general, the iteration method using the single triangle method to calculate °D provided threshold temperatures with the smallest RMSE values. However, the iteration method using a linear °D model also worked well. Simply using a threshold of zero gave predictions that were nearly as good as those obtained using the other two methods. The smallest standard deviation in °D performed the worst. The least standard deviation in days and the regression methods did well sometimes; however, the threshold temperatures were sometimes negative, which does not support the idea that development rates are related to heat units.

  11. Field aligned current observations in the polar cusp ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledley, B. G.; Farthing, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Vector magnetic field measurements made during a sounding rocket flight in the polar cusp ionosphere show field fluctuations in the lower F-region which are interpreted as being caused by the payload's passage through a structured field aligned current system. The field aligned currents have a characteristic horizontal scale size of one kilometer. Analysis of one large field fluctuation gives a current density of 0.0001 amp/m sq.

  12. Earthquake Rupture Complexity Evidence from Field Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudnut, K. W.; Fletcher, J. M.; Rockwell, T. K.; Gonzalez-Garcia, J. J.; Teran, O.; Akciz, S. O.

    2010-12-01

    Field observations provide strong evidence for four intriguing aspects of rupture process complexity for the 4 April 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah - Indiviso earthquake. First, the southern “fork” of the rupture exhibits two splays just to the northwest of the event epicenter, both with nearly pure right-lateral faulting. Teleseismic source modeling by others indicates normal slip on deep fault surface preceded the shallow strike-slip faulting, and our field observations from the fork area indicate that the earliest phase of strike-slip faulting did not involve a significant normal faulting component. Second, as rupture propagated to the northwest along the Pescadores fault, slip ended abruptly on this fault and transferred across a complex zone to the Borrego fault (although the Pescadores fault continues farther and would have seemed an easier route to follow). This stepover is called the Puerta Accommodation Zone (PAZ) which extends 11 km along-strike within an elevated portion of the Cucapah massif and accommodates a left step (transpressional) that measures less than 2 km across-strike. Though partly obscured by rockfalls in the steep terrain here, only discontinuous faulting of up to one meter reached the ground surface, yet imagery differencing by others indicates several meters of continuous subsurface slip throughout this section. This 11 km region of reduced and discontinuous slip is one of the longest surface rupture jumps ever observed, with lengthy and continuous surface faulting on either side. The SE end of the stepover coincides spatially with the Canon Rojo embayment where the M7.2 1892 surface rupture propagated onto a second fault forming an abrupt corner in its surface trace. Hence, the surface rupture and slip distribution pattern in 2010 appears to have been influenced by stress changes induced by the 1892 event. Thirdly, from the NW end of the transition section, the Borrego fault continues to the NNW with strong east-down slip obliquity. Along

  13. Experimental evidence for seismoelectric observations at field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzhauer, Julia; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2010-05-01

    In the past decades, seismoelectric has concentrated a growing interest as a promising tool for hydrogeophysical studies. Resulting from an electrokinetic coupling in porous saturated media traversed by an acoustic wave, this method could ultimately offer a direct access to various hydraulic parameters ranging from porosity to permeability or fluids conductivity. In some other aspects it also occasionally showed some ability to thin-layer resolution. Within the development of the new test-site Schillerslage with typical north-German geology, consisting of two shallow quaternary aquifers separated by a till layer over cretaceous marl, we tested the observability of the seismoelectric signal along with various conventional (seismic, georadar, geoelectric) and unconventional (magnetic resonance sounding -MRS, spectral induced polarisation -SIP) geophysical methods as well as boreholes analysis. The special focus was on the converted seismoelectric signal, an electromagnetic wave acting as a vertical dipole which should theoretically display on the seismoelectrogram as a horizontal arrival. This converted wave appears when the incident acoustic wave meets a hydraulic discontinuity affecting the pore space in any geometrical or chemical manner. This electromagnetic signal fades out rapidly, due to its dipole nature and its weakness, so that its relevance is restricted to the near surface characterisation. In the given setting, such a wave could either initiate at the water table or originate from an abrupt transition from sand to till. Decision was made to record both seismic and seismoelectric signal concomitantly. To allow the detection of the later signal, the field layout was gradually adjusted. Considering the source, hammer-seismic was chosen for its precision in near surface application and automatic trigger-techniques producing major disturbances in the first 10 ms of the seismoelectrogram were abandoned in favour of manual triggering. To avoid any further noise

  14. Unifying inflation and dark matter with the Peccei-Quinn field: Observable axions and observable tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbairn, Malcolm; Hogan, Robert; Marsh, David J. E.

    2015-01-01

    A model of high scale inflation is presented where the radial part of the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) field with a non-minimal coupling to gravity plays the role of the inflaton, and the QCD axion is the dark matter. A quantum fluctuation of O (H /2 π ) in the axion field will result in a smaller angular fluctuation if the PQ field is sitting at a larger radius during inflation than in the vacuum. This changes the effective axion decay constant, fa, during inflation and dramatically reduces the production of isocurvature modes. This mechanism opens up a new window in parameter space where an axion decay constant in the range 1 012 GeV ≲fa≲1 015 GeV is compatible with observably large r . The exact range allowed for fa depends on the efficiency of reheating. This model also predicts a minimum possible value of r =1 0-3. The new window can be explored by a measurement of r possible with SPIDER and the proposed CASPEr experiment search for high fa axions.

  15. Field Observations of the Effects of Explosives on Snow Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, R.; Hendrikx, J.; Miller, D. A.; Birkeland, K.

    2012-12-01

    Explosives are a critically important component of avalanche control programs. They are used to both initiate avalanches and to test snowpack instability by ski areas, highway departments and other avalanche programs around the world. Current understanding of the effects of explosives on snow is mainly limited to shock wave behavior demonstrated through stress wave velocities, pressures and attenuation. This study seeks to enhance current knowledge of how explosives physically alter snow by providing practical, field-based observations and analyses that quantify the effect of explosives on snow density, snow hardness and snow stability test results. Density, hardness and stability test results were evaluated both before and after the application of 0.9 kg cast pentolite boosters as air blasts. Changes in these properties were evaluated at specified distances up to 4 meters (m) from the blast center using a density gauge, hand hardness, Compression Tests (CTs), and Extended Column Tests (ECTs). Statistically significant density increases occurred out to a distance of 1.5 m from the blast center and down to a depth of 60 centimeters (cm). Statistically significant density increases were also observed at the surface (down to 20 cm) out to a distance of 4 m. Hardness increased slightly at the surface and at the bottom of the snowpack (depths of 80-100 cm), while decreasing slightly in the middle of the snowpack (depths of 30-60 cm). Results from CTs showed a decrease in the number of taps needed for column failure in the post explosive tests, while a smaller data set of ECT results showed no overall change in ECT score. The findings of this study provide a better understanding of the physical changes in snow following explosives, which may lead to more effective and efficient avalanche risk mitigation.

  16. In situ magnetic field observations of the AMPTE artificial comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehr, H.; Kloecker, N.; Southwood, D. J.; Dunlop, M. W.; Mier-Jedrzejowicz, W. A. C.; Rijnbeek, R. P.; Six, M.; Haeusler, B.; Acuna, M.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetometers aboard the IRM and UKS spacecraft monitored the magnetic field during the AMPTE artificial comet experiment of Dec. 27, 1984. Rapid photoionization of the released barium vapor resulted in the formation of a magnetic cavity, shielded from the ambient magnetic field.The presence of this highly conductive obstacle caused draping and compression of the solar wind magnetic field.

  17. The linear model and experimentally observed resonant field amplification in tokamaks and reversed field pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2011-01-15

    A review is given of the experimentally observed effects related to the resonant field amplification (RFA) and the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) instability in tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFPs). This includes the feedback rotation of RWM in RFX-mod RFP, dependence of the RWM growth rate on the plasma-wall separation observed in JT-60U, appearance of the slowly growing RWM precursors in JT-60U and similar phenomena in other devices. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions based on the model comprising the Maxwell equations, Ohm's law for the conducting wall, the boundary conditions and assumption of linear plasma response to the external magnetic perturbations. The model describes the plasma reaction to the error field as essentially depending on two factors: the plasma proximity to the RWM stability threshold and the natural rotation frequency of the plasma mode. The linear response means that these characteristics are determined by the plasma equilibrium parameters only. It is shown that the mentioned effects in different devices under different conditions can be described on a common basis with only assumption that the plasma behaves as a linear system. To extend the range of the model validation, some predictions are derived with proposals for experimental studies of the RFA dynamics.

  18. CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS DERIVED FROM SIMULTANEOUS MICROWAVE AND EUV OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH THE POTENTIAL FIELD MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Miyawaki, Shun; Nozawa, Satoshi; Iwai, Kazumasa; Shibasaki, Kiyoto; Shiota, Daikou

    2016-02-10

    We estimated the accuracy of coronal magnetic fields derived from radio observations by comparing them to potential field calculations and the differential emission measure measurements using EUV observations. We derived line-of-sight components of the coronal magnetic field from polarization observations of the thermal bremsstrahlung in the NOAA active region 11150, observed around 3:00 UT on 2011 February 3 using the Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 GHz. Because the thermal bremsstrahlung intensity at 17 GHz includes both chromospheric and coronal components, we extracted only the coronal component by measuring the coronal emission measure in EUV observations. In addition, we derived only the radio polarization component of the corona by selecting the region of coronal loops and weak magnetic field strength in the chromosphere along the line of sight. The upper limits of the coronal longitudinal magnetic fields were determined as 100–210 G. We also calculated the coronal longitudinal magnetic fields from the potential field extrapolation using the photospheric magnetic field obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. However, the calculated potential fields were certainly smaller than the observed coronal longitudinal magnetic field. This discrepancy between the potential and the observed magnetic field strengths can be explained consistently by two reasons: (1) the underestimation of the coronal emission measure resulting from the limitation of the temperature range of the EUV observations, and (2) the underestimation of the coronal magnetic field resulting from the potential field assumption.

  19. Neotectonic stresses in Fennoscandia: field observations and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    The present-day stress state of Fennoscandia is traditionally viewed as the combination of far field sources and residual glacial loading stresses. Investigations were conducted in different regions of Norway with the purpose of detecting and measuring stress-relief features and to derive from them valuable information on the crustal stress state. Stress-relief features are induced by blasting and sudden rock unloading in road construction and quarrying operations and are common in Norway and very likely in other regions of Fennoscandia. Stress relief at the Earth's surface is diagnostic of anomalously high stress levels at shallow depths in the crust and appears to be a characteristic of the formerly glaciated Baltic and Canadian Precambrian shields. The studied stress-relief features are, in general, indicative of NW-SE compression, suggesting ridge-push as the main source of stress. Our derived stress directions are also in excellent agreement with the ones derived from other kinds of stress indicators, including focal mechanisms from deep earthquakes, demonstrating that stress-relief features are valuable for neotectonic research. As a second step we applied numerical modelling techniques to simulate the neotectonic stress field in Fennoscandia with particular emphasis to southern Norway. A numerical method was used to reconstruct the structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere. The numerical method involves classical steady-state heat equations to derive lithosphere thickness, geotherm and density distribution and, in addition, requires the studied lithosphere to be isostatically compensated at its base. The a priori crustal structure was derived from previous geophysical studies. Undulations of the geoid were used to calibrate the models. Once the density structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere is reconstructed it is straightforward to quantify its stress state and compare modelling results with existing stress indicators. The modelling suggests that

  20. Clustered or regular cumulus cloud fields - The statistical character of observed and simulated cloud fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Jorge A.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1990-01-01

    The spatial distribution of cumulus clouds is assumed to be the result of the effects of convective activity on the thermodynamic environment. The effects can be parameterized in terms of a stabilization function representing the time rate of change of convective available potential energy. Using these results, a new inhibition hypothesis explaining the expected characteristics of the spatial distribution of cumulus clouds is postulated. This paper performs a verification of the inhibition hypothesis on real and simulated cloud fields. In order to do so, an objective measure of the spatial characteristics of cumulus clouds is introduced. Multiple cloud experiments are performed with a three-dimensional numerical cloud model. Skylab pictures of real cumuli are also used in the verification. Results of applying this measure to simulated and observed cumulus cloud fields confirm the inhibition hypothesis.

  1. Extended field observations of cirrus clouds using a ground-based cloud observing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of synoptic-scale dynamics associated with a middle and upper tropospheric cloud event that occurred on 26 November 1991 is examined. The case under consideration occurred during the FIRE CIRRUS-II Intensive Field Observing Period held in Coffeyville, KS during Nov. and Dec., 1991. Using data from the wind profiler demonstration network and a temporally and spatially augmented radiosonde array, emphasis is given to explaining the evolution of the kinematically-derived ageostrophic vertical circulations and correlating the circulation with the forcing of an extensively sampled cloud field. This is facilitated by decomposing the horizontal divergence into its component parts through a natural coordinate representation of the flow. Ageostrophic vertical circulations are inferred and compared to the circulation forcing arising from geostrophic confluence and shearing deformation derived from the Sawyer-Eliassen Equation. It is found that a thermodynamically indirect vertical circulation existed in association with a jet streak exit region. The circulation was displaced to the cyclonic side of the jet axis due to the orientation of the jet exit between a deepening diffluent trough and building ridge. The cloud line formed in the ascending branch of the vertical circulation with the most concentrated cloud development occurring in conjunction with the maximum large-scale vertical motion. The relationship between the large scale dynamics and the parameterization of middle and upper tropospheric clouds in large-scale models is discussed and an example of ice water contents derived from a parameterization forced by the diagnosed vertical motions and observed water vapor contents is presented.

  2. Kinetics of droplet growth observed in recent field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Wang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols can indirectly influence global climate budget by changing the microphysical structure, lifetime, and coverage of clouds. While it is generally agreed that aerosol indirect effects act to cool the Earth-atmosphere system by increasing cloud reflectivity and coverage, the magnitudes of the indirect effects are poorly understood. The formation of cloud droplets from aerosol particles is kinetically controlled by the availability of water vapor, equilibrium water vapor pressure above the growing droplet surface, and both the gas phase and aerosol phase mass transfer resistances. It has been hypothesized that the formation of surface organic films or the delay in dissolution of solute could significantly delay the growth of cloud droplets. Such delay could lead to a higher maximum supersaturation within a rising cloud parcel, therefore higher droplet number concentration and smaller droplet size at constant liquid water content. When only a subset of the droplets experiences significant growth delay, the overall droplet size spectrum will be broadened, which facilitates the formation of precipitation. During three recent field campaigns (CalNex-LA, CARES, and Aerosol Intensive Observation Period at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the CCN activity and droplet growth of size selected particles ranging from 25 to 320 nm were characterized by a CCN counter under supersaturations from 0.1% to 0.8%. The three campaigns allow us to examine the droplet growth for many representative organic aerosol types, including biogenic SOA, anthropogenic SOA, and organic aerosols from biomass burning. The droplet growth of size-selected ambient particles inside the CCN counter was found to be influenced by a number of parameters, including particle critical supersaturation, heterogeneity in particle composition, and particle concentration. For example, reduced droplet growth due to water vapor depletion was observed when particle concentration was higher than 200 cm

  3. Observing earthquakes triggered in the near field by dynamic deformations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Bodin, P.; Reasenberg, P.A.

    2003-01-01

    We examine the hypothesis that dynamic deformations associated with seismic waves trigger earthquakes in many tectonic environments. Our analysis focuses on seismicity at close range (within the aftershock zone), complementing published studies of long-range triggering. Our results suggest that dynamic triggering is not confined to remote distances or to geothermal and volcanic regions. Long unilaterally propagating ruptures may focus radiated dynamic deformations in the propagation direction. Therefore, we expect seismicity triggered dynamically by a directive rupture to occur asymmetrically, with a majority of triggered earthquakes in the direction of rupture propagation. Bilaterally propagating ruptures also may be directive, and we propose simple criteria for assessing their directivity. We compare the inferred rupture direction and observed seismicity rate change following 15 earthquakes (M 5.7 to M 8.1) that occured in California and Idaho in the United States, the Gulf of Aqaba, Syria, Guatemala, China, New Guinea, Turkey, Japan, Mexico, and Antarctica. Nine of these mainshocks had clearly directive, unilateral ruptures. Of these nine, seven apparently induced an asymmetric increase in seismicity rate that correlates with the rupture direction. The two exceptions include an earthquake preceded by a comparable-magnitude event on a conjugate fault and another for which data limitations prohibited conclusive results. Similar (but weaker) correlations were found for the bilaterally rupturing earthquakes we studied. Although the static stress change also may trigger seismicity, it and the seismicity it triggers are expected to be similarly asymmetric only if the final slip is skewed toward the rupture terminus. For several of the directive earthquakes, we suggest that the seismicity rate change correlates better with the dynamic stress field than the static stress change.

  4. Application of relativistic mean field and effective field theory densities to scattering observables for Ca isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuyan, M.; Panda, R. N.; Routray, T. R.; Patra, S. K.

    2010-12-15

    In the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) theory, we have calculated the density distribution of protons and neutrons for {sup 40,42,44,48}Ca with NL3 and G2 parameter sets. The microscopic proton-nucleus optical potentials for p+{sup 40,42,44,48}Ca systems are evaluated from the Dirac nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude and the density of the target nucleus using relativistic-Love-Franey and McNeil-Ray-Wallace parametrizations. We have estimated the scattering observables, such as the elastic differential scattering cross section, analyzing power and the spin observables with the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA). The results have been compared with the experimental data for a few selective cases and we find that the use of density as well as the scattering matrix parametrizations are crucial for the theoretical prediction.

  5. Field Science Ethnography: Methods For Systematic Observation on an Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Haughton-Mars expedition is a multidisciplinary project, exploring an impact crater in an extreme environment to determine how people might live and work on Mars. The expedition seeks to understand and field test Mars facilities, crew roles, operations, and computer tools. I combine an ethnographic approach to establish a baseline understanding of how scientists prefer to live and work when relatively unemcumbered, with a participatory design approach of experimenting with procedures and tools in the context of use. This paper focuses on field methods for systematically recording and analyzing the expedition's activities. Systematic photography and time-lapse video are combined with concept mapping to organize and present information. This hybrid approach is generally applicable to the study of modern field expeditions having a dozen or more multidisciplinary participants, spread over a large terrain during multiple field seasons.

  6. Mariner 10 magnetic field observations of the Venus wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetic field measurements made over a 21-hour interval during the Mariner 10 encounter with Venus were used to study the down-stream region of the solar wind-Venus interaction over a distance of approximately 100 R sub v. For most of the day before closest approach the spacecraft was located in a sheath-like region which was apparently bounded by planetary bow shock on the outer side and either a planetary wake boundary or transient boundary-like feature on the inner side. The spacecraft made multiple encounters with the wake-like boundary during the 21-hour interval with an increasing frequency as it approached the planet. Each pass into the wake boundary from the sheath region was consistently characterized by a slight decrease in magnetic field magnitude, a marked increase in the frequency and amplitude of field fluctuations, and a systematic clockwise rotation of the field direction when viewed from above the plane of the planet orbit.

  7. Laboratory Observation Of Magnetic Field Growth Driven By Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Dorf, L.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Lapenta, G.

    2012-12-01

    We have measured in the laboratory profiles of magnetic flux ropes, that include ion flow, magnetic field, current density, and plasma pressure. These data allow a complete screw pinch equilibrium with guide magnetic field to be reconstructed, and the electron flows to be inferred. We use this information to evaluate the Hall JxB term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohms Law. The difference between ion and electron flows allows us to show experimentally and theoretically that the sheared electron flows can account for the generation of magnetic field. For example we show a measured quadrupole out of plane magnetic field B_z structure that occurs even in the absence of magnetic reconnection. This out of plane quadrupole pattern has historically been used as a signature of magnetic reconnection, especially with small to vanishing guide field. Recent theoretical analyses have pointed out that this presumption need not be true. *Supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369, NASA Geospace NNHIOA044I, Basic

  8. Results from HST Observations of Six LMC Globular Cluster Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, K. A. G.; Hodge, P. W.; Mateo, M.; Olszewski, E. W.; Schommer, R. A.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Walker, A. R.

    We present deep HST color-magnitude diagrams of fields centered on the six old LMC globular clusters NGC 1754, NGC 1835, NGC 1898, NGC 1916, NGC 2005, and NGC 2019. Separate cluster and field star CMDs are shown. The time of formation of the LMC is studied from an analysis of the cluster CMDs. Based on a comparison of the CMDs with sequences of the Milky Way clusters M3, M5, and M55, we suggest that the LMC formed its first stars at the same time as the Milky Way to within 1 Gyr. We derive abundances and reddenings of the clusters that agree roughly with published values. Adopting our measured abundances, we find additional evidence that these LMC globular clusters are as old as the oldest Milky Way clusters through a comparison of our data with the horizontal branch evolutionary models of Lee, Demarque, and Zinn (1994). The evolution of the LMC following its formation is studied through an analysis of the field star CMDs. Through an automated comparison with stellar evolution models, we extract the star formation histories implied by the CMDs and luminosity functions. We explore the effects of varying the reddening, distance modulus, and IMF of the field stars on the derived star formation histories. We discuss the evidence for different star formation histories among the six fields.

  9. Convective Systems Observed and Simulated During TRMM Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently completed TRMM field campaigns (TEFLUN1998, SCSMEX-1998, TRMM.LBA-1999, and KWAJEX 1999) have obtained direct measurements of microphysical data associated with convective systems from various geographical locations. These TRMM field experiments were designed to contribute to fundamental understanding of cloud dynamics and microphysics, as well as for validation,, testing assumptions and error estimates of cloud-resolving models, forward radiative transfer models, algorithms used to estimate rainfall statistics and vertical structure of precipitation and latent heating from both surface-based radar and satellites.

  10. Reactivity to Systematic Observation with Film: A Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The reluctance to use film and video equipment for systematic observation and recording can be partially attributed to an assumption of reactivity and internal invalidity. The results of the study discuss placement of the observer and the use of film in data collection. (Author/DEP)

  11. Multi-point Magnetic Field Observations of Field-Aligned Currents from Swarm Constellation Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Guan; Chi, Peter; Lühr, Hermann; Gjerloev, Jesper; Stolle, Claudia; Park, Jaeheung; Rauberg, Jan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we report the results of case studies of multi-point magnetic field measurements of field-aligned currents (FACs) from Swarm constellation mission to understand their temporal characteristics and hemispheric asymmetry. For science operations (since April, 2014), the three spacecraft were placed in slightly different polar orbits: Swarm B spacecraft in a higher altitude orbit (507km x 512km) and Swarm A and C side-by-side in lower altitude orbits (459km x 462km). In the beginning of the science operational phase, the longitudinal separations of the orbital planes were small, and Swarm A/C pair and Swarm B were nearly out of phase in the orbit. This unique orbit configuration provides opportunities to study some new features of FACs. Specifically, the Swarm satellites make multiple crossings of a FAC region within a few hours. Such data enable us to study temporal variations in several time scales, from 1 minute up to about 3 hours. Furthermore, the three satellites make nearly simultaneous observations of FACs in northern and southern hemispheres, which provide us an opportunity to study the hemispheric asymmetry.

  12. Magnetic Field and Plasma Diagnostics from Coordinated Prominence Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Levens, P.; Dalmasse, K.; Mein, N.; Mein, P.; Lopez-Ariste, A.; Labrosse, N.; Heinzel, P.

    2016-04-01

    We study the magnetic field in prominences from a statistical point of view, by using THEMIS in the MTR mode, performing spectropolarimetry of the He I D3 line. Combining these measurements with spectroscopic data from IRIS, Hinode/EIS as well as ground-based telescopes, such as the Meudon Solar Tower, we infer the temperature, density, and flow velocities of the plasma. There are a number of open questions that we aim to answer: - What is the general direction of the magnetic field in prominences? Is the model using a single orientation of magnetic field always valid for atypical prominences? %- Does this depend on the location of the filament on the disk (visible in Hα, in He II 304 Å) over an inversion line between weak or strong network ? - Are prominences in a weak environment field dominated by gas pressure? - Measuring the Doppler shifts in Mg II lines (with IRIS) and in Hα can tell us if there are substantial velocities to maintain vertical rotating structures, as has been suggested for tornado-like prominences. We present here some results obtained with different ground-based and space-based instruments in this framework.

  13. An improved Overhauser magnetometer for Earth's magnetic field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shifang; Chen, Shudong; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Cao, Qiong

    2016-09-01

    Overhauser magnetometer is a kind of high-precision devices for magnetostatic field measurement. It is widely used in geological survey, earth field variations, UXO detection etc. However, the original Overhauser magnetometer JOM-2 shows great shortcomings of low signal to noise ratio (SNR) and high power consumption, which directly affect the performance of the device. In order to increase the sensitivity and reduce power consumption, we present an improved Overhauser magnetometer. Firstly, compared with the original power board which suffers from heavy noise for improper EMC design, an improved power broad with 20mV peak to peak noise is presented in this paper. Then, the junction field effect transistor (JFET) is used as pre-amplifier in our new design, to overcome the higher current noise produced by the original instrumentation amplifier. By adjusting the parameters carefully low noise factor down to 0.5 dB can be obtained. Finally, the new architecture of ARM + CPLD is adopted to replace the original one with DSP+CPLD. So lower power consumption and greater flash memory can be realized. With these measures, an improved Overhauser magnetometer with higher sensitivity and lower power consumption is design here. The experimental results indicate that the sensitivity of the improved Overhauser magnetometer is 0.071nT, which confirms that the new magnetometer is sensitive to earth field measurement.

  14. Space Technology 5 observations of auroral field-aligned currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, James

    During its three month long technology validation mission, Space Technology 5 (ST-5) returned high quality multi-point measurements of the near-Earth magnetic field. Its three micro-satellites were launched into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn - dusk, sun synchronous orbit (inclination = 105.6o) orbit with a period of 138 min by a Pegasus launch vehicle on March 22, 2006. The spacecraft were maintained in a "pearls on a sting" constellation with controlled spacings ranging from just over 5000 km down to under 50 km. The individual micro-satellites were 48 cm tall octagons with diameters of 50 cm. They were spin-stabilized at approximately 20 rpm at deployment and slowly spun-down to about 15 rpm by the end of the mission. Each spacecraft carried a miniature tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) provided by the University of California at Los Angeles mounted at the end of a ultra-low mass 72 cm boom. These data allow, for the first time, the separation of temporal and spatial variations in field-aligned current (FAC) perturbations measured in low-Earth orbit on time scales of 10 sec to 10 min. The constellation measurements are used to directly determine field-aligned current sheet motion, thickness, and current density. Two multi-point methods for the inference of FAC current density that have not previously been possible in low-Earth orbit are demonstrated: 1) the "standard method," based upon s/c velocity, but corrected for FAC current sheet motion, and 2) the "gradiometer method" which uses simultaneous magnetic field measurements at two points with known separation. Future studies will apply these methods to the entire ST-5 data set and expand to include horizontal ionospheric currents, ULF waves and geomagnetic field gradient analyses.

  15. Space Technology 5 Observations of Auroral Field-Aligned Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James

    2008-01-01

    During its three month long technology validation mission, Space Technology 5 (ST-5) returned high quality multi-point measurements of the near-Earth magnetic field. Its three micro-satellites were launched into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn - dusk, sun synchronous orbit (inclination = 105.60) orbit with a period of 138 min by a Pegasus launch vehicle on March 22, 2006. The spacecraft were maintained in a "pearls on a sting" constellation with controlled spacings ranging from just over 5000 km down to under 50 km. The individual micro-satellites were 48 cm tall octagons with diameters of 50 cm. They were spin-stabilized at approximately 20 rpm at deployment and slowly spun-down to about 15 rpm by the end of the mission. Each spacecraft carried a miniature tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) provided by the University of California at Los Angeles mounted at the end of a ultra-low mass 72 cm boom. These data allow, for the first time, the separation of temporal and spatial variations in field-aligned current (FAC) perturbations measured in low-Earth orbit on time scales of 10 sec to 10 min. The constellation measurements are used to directly determine field-aligned current sheet motion, thickness. and current density. Two multi-point methods for the inference of FAC current density that have not previously been possible in low-Earth orbit are demonstrated: 1) the -standard method." based upon s/c velocity, but corrected for FAC current sheet motion. and 2) the "gradiometer method" which uses simultaneous magnetic field measurements at two points with known separation. Future studies will apply these methods to the entire ST-5 data sct and expand to include horizontal ionospheric currents. ULF waves and geomagnetic field gradient analyses.

  16. Sensor Technology Performance Characteristics- Field and Laboratory Observations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Observed Intangible Performance Characteristics RH and temperature impacts may be significant for some devices Internal battery lifetimes range from 4 to 24 hoursSensor packaging can interfere with accurate measurements (reactivity)Wireless communication protocols are not foolpr...

  17. Microspacecraft and Earth observation: Electrical field (ELF) measurement project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Tanya; Elkington, Scot; Parker, Scott; Smith, Grover; Shumway, Andrew; Christensen, Craig; Parsa, Mehrdad; Larsen, Layne; Martinez, Ranae; Powell, George

    1990-01-01

    The Utah State University space system design project for 1989 to 1990 focuses on the design of a global electrical field sensing system to be deployed in a constellation of microspacecraft. The design includes the selection of the sensor and the design of the spacecraft, the sensor support subsystems, the launch vehicle interface structure, on board data storage and communications subsystems, and associated ground receiving stations. Optimization of satellite orbits and spacecraft attitude are critical to the overall mapping of the electrical field and, thus, are also included in the project. The spacecraft design incorporates a deployable sensor array (5 m booms) into a spinning oblate platform. Data is taken every 0.1 seconds by the electrical field sensors and stored on-board. An omni-directional antenna communicates with a ground station twice per day to down link the stored data. Wrap-around solar cells cover the exterior of the spacecraft to generate power. Nine Pegasus launches may be used to deploy fifty such satellites to orbits with inclinations greater than 45 deg. Piggyback deployment from other launch vehicles such as the DELTA 2 is also examined.

  18. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, T. P.; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.; Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.

    2014-04-01

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow vi, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow ve can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J ×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×ve×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δBz. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  19. Laboratory Observation of Magnetic Field Growth Driven by Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, Thomas; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Feng, Y.

    2013-04-01

    We have measured in the laboratory profiles of magnetic flux ropes, that include ion flow, magnetic field, current density, and plasma pressure. The electron flows v_e can therefore be inferred, and we use this information to evaluate the Hall J × B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm’s Law. Mutually attracted and compressed flux ropes break the cylindrical symmetry. This simple and coherent example of shear flow supports magnetic field growth corresponding to non vanishing curl × v_e × B. In the absence of magnetic reconnection we measure and predict a quadrupole out of plane magnetic field δBz, even though this has historically been invoked to be the signature of Hall magnetic reconnection. This provides a natural and general mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence. *Supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369, NASA Geospace NNHIOA044I, Basic

  20. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, T. P. Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.

    2014-04-15

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow v{sub i}, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow v{sub e} can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×v{sub e}×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δB{sub z}. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  1. VOYAGER OBSERVATIONS OF THE DIFFUSE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, Richard Conn; Holberg, Jay B.

    2012-03-01

    The two Voyager spacecraft have completed their planetary exploration mission and are now probing the outer realms of the heliosphere. The Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers continued to operate well after the Voyager 2 Neptune encounter in 1989. We present a complete database of diffuse radiation observations made by both Voyagers: a total of 1943 spectra (500-1600 A) scattered throughout the sky. These include observations of dust-scattered starlight, emission lines from the hot interstellar medium, and a number of locations where no diffuse radiation was detected, with the very low upper limit of about 25 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} A{sup -1}. Many of these observations were from late in the mission when there was significantly less contribution from interplanetary emission lines and thus less contamination of the interstellar signal.

  2. A cumulus cloud field observed by Landsat Thematic Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Ross N.; Isaacs, Ronald G.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a spatial coherence scene model which is to be utilized to determine cloud properties from TM data is described. The observed radiances are modeled in terms of ocean and cloud spectra, the cloud fraction, and a geometric factor. Consideration is given to saturation effects and the need to constrain the model. The conjugate gradient algorithm is utilized to fit the model. A one-dimensional simulation was performed in order to evaluate the model; it is observed that the model provides good fit.

  3. Relationships between field-aligned currents, electric fields, and particle precipitation as observed by Dynamics Explorer-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Hoffman, R. A.; Maynard, N. C.; Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The relationships between field-aligned currents, electric fields, and particle fluxes are determined using observations from the polar orbiting low-altitude satellite Dynamics Explorer-2. It is shown that the north-south electric field and the east-west magnetic field components are usually highly correlated in the field-aligned current regions. This proportionality observationally proves that the field-aligned current equals the divergence of the height-integrated ionospheric Pedersen current in the meridional plane to a high degree of approximation. As a general rule, in the evening sector the upward field-aligned currents flow in the boundary plasma sheet region and the downward currents flow in the central plasma sheet region. The current densities determined independently from the plasma and magnetic field measurements are compared. Although the current densities deduced from the two methods are in general agreement, the degree and extent of the agreement vary in individual cases.

  4. Relationships between field-aligned currents, electric fields and particle precipitation as observed by dynamics Explorer-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Hoffman, R. A.; Maynard, N. C.; Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The relationships between field-aligned currents, electric fields, and particle fluxes are determined using observations from the polar orbiting low-altitude satellite Dynamics Explorer-2. It is shown that the north-south electric field and the east-west magnetic field components are usually highly correlated in the field-aligned current regions. This proportionality observationally proves that the field-aligned current equals the divergence of the height-integrated ionospheric Pedersen current in the meridional plane to a high degree of approximation. As a general rule, in the evening sector the upward field-aligned currents flow in the boundary plasma sheet region and the downward currents flow in the central plasma sheet region. The current densities determined independently from the plasma and magnetic field measurements are compared. Although the current densities deduced from the two methods are in general agreement, the degree and extent of the agreement vary in individual cases.

  5. Field observations of artificial sand and oil agglomerates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, Patricia (Soupy); Long, Joseph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; McLaughlin, Molly R.; Mickey, Rangley C.

    2015-01-01

    Oil that comes into the surf zone following spills, such as occurred during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout, can mix with local sediment to form heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs), at times in the form of mats a few centimeters thick and tens of meters long. Smaller agglomerates that form in situ or pieces that break off of larger mats, sometimes referred to as surface residual balls (SRBs), range in size from sand-sized grains to patty-shaped pieces several centimeters (cm) in diameter. These mobile SOAs can cause beach oiling for extended periods following the spill, on the scale of years as in the case of DWH. Limited research, including a prior effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigating SOA mobility, alongshore transport, and seafloor interaction using numerical model output, focused on the physical dynamics of SOAs. To address this data gap, we constructed artificial sand and oil agglomerates (aSOAs) with sand and paraffin wax to mimic the size and density of genuine SOAs. These aSOAs were deployed in the nearshore off the coast of St. Petersburg, Florida, during a field experiment to investigate their movement and seafloor interaction. This report presents the methodology for constructing aSOAs and describes the field experiment. Data acquired during the field campaign, including videos and images of aSOA movement in the nearshore (1.5-meter and 0.5-meter water depth) and in the swash zone, are also presented in this report.

  6. Observability of atomic line features in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunner, G.; Ruder, H.; Herold, H.; Truemper, J.

    1981-01-01

    The physical properties of atoms in superstrong magnetic fields, characteristic of neutron stars, and the possibility of detecting magnetically strongly shifted atomic lines in the spectra of magnetized X-ray pulsars are discussed. It is suggested that it is recommendable to look for magnetically strongly shifted Fe 26 Lyman lines in rotating neutron stars of not too high luminosity using spectrometers working in the energy range 10 - 20 keV, with sensitivities to minus 4 power photons per sq cm and second, and resolution E/delta E approx. 10-100.

  7. Neptune's polar cusp region - Observations and magnetic field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lazarus, A. J.; Vasyliunas, V. M.; Szabo, A.; Steinberg, J.; Ness, N. F.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper confirms and extends the results of Szabo et al. (1991) (which demonstrated some similarities of the Neptune's polar cusp region to the earth's cusp), but uses a different approach requiring plasma and vector magnetic field quantities. In addition, various MHD properties of the cusp-magnetopause boundary, which separates the cusp from the magnetosheath allowing thermal anisotropy, are obtained, including the magnetopause (MP) normal, mass, and normal momentum flux, the boundary speed (and thickness), and their relationships. Results demonstrate that the MP velocity is composed of two components: a propagation speed and the other component consistent with the rotational motion of the magnetosphere.

  8. Observations and Opinions of Student Teachers while in the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masztal, Nancy; Singleton, Dorothy

    This study surveyed teacher education students during their student teaching assignments in order to determine their perspectives on their preparedness for the classroom and their observations or use of effective teaching strategies during their student teaching experiences. Responses were obtained from 31 preservice teachers, 26 elementary and 6…

  9. Time Series Vegetation Aerodynamic Roughness Fields Estimated from MODIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borak, Jordan S.; Jasinski, Michael F.; Crago, Richard D.

    2005-01-01

    Most land surface models used today require estimates of aerodynamic roughness length in order to characterize momentum transfer between the surface and atmosphere. The most common method of prescribing roughness is through the use of empirical look-up tables based solely on land cover class. Theoretical approaches that employ satellite-based estimates of canopy density present an attractive alternative to current look-up table approaches based on vegetation cover type that do not account for within-class variability and are oftentimes simplistic with respect to temporal variability. The current research applies Raupach s formulation of momentum aerodynamic roughness to MODIS data on a regional scale in order to estimate seasonally variable roughness and zero-plane displacement height fields using bulk land cover parameters estimated by [Jasinski, M.F., Borak, J., Crago, R., 2005. Bulk surface momentum parameters for satellite-derived vegetation fields. Agric. For. Meteorol. 133, 55-68]. Results indicate promising advances over look-up approaches with respect to characterization of vegetation roughness variability in land surface and atmospheric circulation models.

  10. Overhauser magnetometer sensor design for magnetic field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zan; Chen, Shudong; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Cao, Qiong

    2016-10-01

    The Overhauser magnetometer, with its unique set of advantages, such as low power consumption, high precision and fast recording ability has been widely used in geophysical mineral and oil exploration, archeology, environmental survey, ordnance and weapons detection (UXO) and other earth science applications. Compared with the traditional proton magnetometer, which suffers from high power consumption and low precision, the Overhauser magnetometer excite the free radical solution in a cavity with RF signal to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Thus, RF resonator plays a crucial role in reducing power consumption and improving the accuracy of Overhauser magnetometer. There are a wide variety of resonators, but only two of them are chosen for Overhauser magnetometer: birdcage coil and coaxial resonator. In order to get the best RF cavity for Overhauser magnetometer sensor, both resonators are investigated here. Firstly, parameters of two RF resonators are calculated theoretically and simulated with Ansoft HFSS. The results indicate that birdcage coil is characterized by linear polarization while coaxial resonator is characterized by circular polarization. Besides, all RF fields are limited inside of the coaxial resonator while distributed both inside and outside of the birdcage coil. Then, the two resonators are practically manufactured based on the theoretical design. And the S-parameter and Smith chart of these resonators are measured with Agilent 8712ES RF network analyzer. The measured results indicate that the coaxial resonator has a much higher Q value(875) than the birdcage coil(70). All these results reveal a better performance for coaxial resonator. Finally, field experimental shows 0.074nT sensitivity for Overhauser magnetometer with coaxial resonator.

  11. LAMOST Observations of Flaring M Dwarfs in the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H.-Y.; Song, Y.-H.; Luo, A.-L.; Huang, L.-C.; Ip, W.-H.; Fu, J.-N.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.-H.; Cao, Z.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.

    2017-01-01

    A sample of the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope spectra of early-type M0–M3 dwarfs is compared with Kepler observations. It is found that M dwarfs with strong chromospheric emission in {{{H}}}α have large flare activity in general. The rotational periods derived from the Kepler measurements have close correlations with the sizes of the flares, the power-law distribution index, and the equivalent widths of the {{{H}}}α emission. A clear trend exists for higher magnetic activities being detected in faster-rotating M dwarfs (rotation periods < 20 days).

  12. Observations of polarization electric fields and plasma drifts associated with low-latitude TIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Ionospheric plasma structures and TIDs are often observed in the conjugate hemispheres. It is widely believed that the polarization electric field is responsible for the conjugacy. However, observed conjugate disturbances so far are mostly in plasma density and TEC, and there is almost no report of observations of polarization electric fields associated with TIDs. We present the C/NOFS measurements of TID-like disturbances in the plasma density and drift velocity. The plasma drift perpendicular to the geomagnetic field is manifestation of the polarization electric field. Plasma flow parallel to the geomagnetic field is highly correlated with the polarization electric field and is consistent with the prediction of TID theories, confirming that the polarization electric field is caused by TIDs. Surprisingly, the polarization electric field is observed not only at night but also during daytime, implying that the polarization electric field is not shorted out by the dayside E layers. The satellite data are compared with the Jicamarca radar data when C/NOFS is 20 degrees away from the radar but nearly at the same magnetic latitude (along the same field lines). This may be the first observation of polarization electric field associated with TIDs and verifies that the polarization electric field can be indeed transmitted thousands of kilometers along the geomagnetic field lines. The observations provide direct evidence for justifying the mechanism for the generation of similar ionospheric disturbances in the conjugate hemispheres.

  13. Applicability of sniffing team observations: experience of field measurements.

    PubMed

    Van Langenhove, H; Van Broeck, G

    2001-01-01

    Sniffing measurement campaigns are a commonly used technique in Flanders to estimate the impact of an odour emission source. The Department of Organic Chemistry at Ghent University has developed its own sniffing strategy throughout the last ten years. The method uses, in essence, the technique of plotting odour perception areas and calculation of total odour emission rates based on maximum odour perception distance. 566 sniffing measurements, executed from 1990 until 1999 around industrial and agricultural odour sources were collected in a database for statistical analysis. Short-term dispersion modelling was executed using four different models, two of them based on Bultynck-Malet dispersion parameters, and two based on Pasquill dispersion parameters. Results from this analysis demonstrate some causes of variance in calculated emissions and show the fitness of each model. From the results of the sniffing teams, which are expressed as sniffing units (SU) instead of odour units (OU, OUE) to underline the difference in methodological approach, the overall odorous emission can be calculated, using short-term atmospheric dispersion models. In a second step, long-term dispersion models can be used to calculate isopercentile contour plots. According to our experience the short-term atmospheric model is a source of "noise" in the method since calculated standard deviations on calculated emissions are larger than standard deviations in the observed maximum distance for odour perception. This will be illustrated by presenting results from the evaluation of composting plants and animal farm houses.

  14. An observation planning algorithm applied to multi-objective astronomical observations and its simulation in COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yi; Gu, Yonggang; Zhai, Chao

    2012-09-01

    Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic sky surveys are now booming, such as LAMOST already built by China, BIGBOSS project put forward by the U.S. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and GTC (Gran Telescopio Canarias) telescope developed by the United States, Mexico and Spain. They all use or will use this approach and each fiber can be moved within a certain area for one astrology target, so observation planning is particularly important for this Sky Surveys. One observation planning algorithm used in multi-objective astronomical observations is developed. It can avoid the collision and interference between the fiber positioning units in the focal plane during the observation in one field of view, and the interested objects can be ovserved in a limited round with the maximize efficiency. Also, the observation simulation can be made for wide field of view through multi-FOV observation. After the observation planning is built ,the simulation is made in COSMOS field using GTC telescope. Interested galaxies, stars and high-redshift LBG galaxies are selected after the removal of the mask area, which may be bright stars. Then 9 FOV simulation is completed and observation efficiency and fiber utilization ratio for every round are given. Otherwise,allocating a certain number of fibers for background sky, giving different weights for different objects and how to move the FOV to improve the overall observation efficiency are discussed.

  15. Snapshots from deep magma chambers: decoding field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Campos, Cristina P.

    2014-05-01

    mingling, between contrasting magmas generated from different sources and depths. When flow patterns from these plutonic structures are compared to those obtained from experiments and numerical modeling, vortex-like systems may be locally recognized with chaotic regions among concentric regular flow cells, separated by major flow shearing zones. These patterns may be in remarkable good agreement with less complex flow patterns obtained for simpler dynamic systems. Differences in the magma supply and flow regimes between distinct plutons, in time and space, depict frozen moments in their evolution and therefore may explain some of the discrepancies in the different hybridization degrees for different complexes. The combination of detailed mapping of flow patterns in the field, numerical modeling and experimental results using natural magmatic products as end-members may provide new insights into the dynamics of magma chambers, specially for shallow chambers in a volcanic environment. Due to high viscosities and non-Newtonian behavior during a long time-interval, the application of fluid dynamics to understanding magmatic processes, especially those taking place in the deep crust, is still a major challenge to Geosciences. Extrapolation for plutonic environments remains therefore a great defiance. This discussion aims to show that it is nevertheless worthwhile.

  16. MMS Multipoint electric field observations of small-scale magnetic holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Katherine A.; Ergun, Robert E.; Wilder, Frederick D.; Burch, James; Torbert, Roy; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Russell, Christopher; Strangeway, Robert; Magnes, Werner; Gershman, Daniel; Giles, Barbara; Nakamura, Rumi; Stawarz, Julia; Holmes, Justin; Sturner, Andrew; Malaspina, David M.

    2016-06-01

    Small-scale magnetic holes (MHs), local depletions in magnetic field strength, have been observed multiple times in the Earth's magnetosphere in the bursty bulk flow (BBF) braking region. This particular subset of MHs has observed scale sizes perpendicular to the background magnetic field (B) less than the ambient ion Larmor radius (ρi). Previous observations by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) indicate that this subset of MHs can be supported by a current driven by the E × B drift of electrons. Ions do not participate in the E × B drift due to the small-scale size of the electric field. While in the BBF braking region, during its commissioning phase, the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft observed a small-scale MH. The electric field observations taken during this event suggest the presence of electron currents perpendicular to the magnetic field. These observations also suggest that these currents can evolve to smaller spatial scales.

  17. Observations of improved confinement in field reversed configurations sustained by antisymmetric rotating magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H.Y.; Hoffman, A.L.; Steinhauer, L.C.

    2005-06-15

    Rotating magnetic fields (RMF) have been employed to both form and sustain currents in field reversed configurations (FRC). A major concern about this method has been the fear of opening up magnetic field lines with even small ratios of vacuum RMF B{sub {omega}} to external confinement field B{sub e}. A recently proposed innovation was to use an antisymmetric arrangement of RMF, but vacuum calculations with full RMF penetration showed that very low values of B{sub {omega}}/B{sub e} would still be required to provide field-line closure. Recent comparisons of symmetric and antisymmetric RMF drive on the translation, confinement, and sustainment (TCS) facility [A. L. Hoffman, H. Y. Guo, J. T. Slough et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 41, 92 (2002)] have shown strong improvements in the basic confinement properties of the FRCs when using antisymmetric drive, even with ratios of B{sub {omega}}/B{sub e} as high as 0.3. This is due to normal standard operation with only partial penetration of the RMF beyond the FRC separatrix. The uniform transverse RMF in vacuum is shielded by the conducting plasma, resulting in a mostly azimuthal field near the FRC separatrix with a very small radial component. Simple numerical calculations using analytical solutions for the partially penetrated antisymmetric RMF, superimposed on Grad-Shafranov solutions for the poloidal FRC fields, show good field-line closure for the TCS experimental conditions. The antisymmetric arrangement also leads to more efficient current drive and improved stabilization of rotational modes.

  18. Correlation between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the field-aligned current regions deduced from DE 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, M.; Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Slavin, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The satellite-observed high correlations between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the high-latitude field-aligned current regions are investigated by examining the dependence of the relationship between Delta-B and E on spatial scale, using the electric and magnetic field data obtained by DE 2 in the polar regions. The results are compared with the Pedersen conductivity inferred from the international reference ionosphere model and the Alfven wave velocity calculated from the in situ ion density and magnetic field measurements.

  19. Observations of broad-band circular polarization in sunspots - Magnetic field correspondence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illing, R. M. E.; Landman, D. A.; Mickey, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The present work proposes a general rule relating the polarity of broad-band (spectral range: 5250 A to 5350 A) circular polarization fields observed in sunspots to that of the corresponding magnetic fields. The rule is illustrated with observations of particular spots.

  20. Guided Field Observations: Variables Related to Preservice Teachers' Knowledge about Effective Primary Reading Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roehrig, Alysia D.; Guidry, Lisa O.; Bodur, Yasar; Guan, Qun; Guo, Ying; Pop, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    Relations between preservice teachers' guided field observations of primary literacy instruction and knowledge about effective beginning reading practices were explored. Preservice teachers (n = 48) participated in a Directed Field Experience course including instruction on and observations of exemplary teaching practices promoting student…

  1. The energy budget of stellar magnetic fields: comparing non-potential simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, L. T.; Jardine, M. M.; Vidotto, A. A.; Mackay, D. H.; See, V.; Donati, J.-F.; Folsom, C. P.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.; Petit, P.

    2017-03-01

    The magnetic geometry of the surface magnetic fields of more than 55 cool stars have now been mapped using spectropolarimetry. In order to better understand these observations, we compare the magnetic field topology at different surface scale sizes of observed and simulated cool stars. For ease of comparison between the high-resolution non-potential magnetofrictional simulations and the relatively low-resolution observations, we filter out the small-scale field in the simulations using a spherical harmonics decomposition. We show that the large-scale field topologies of the solar-based simulations produce values of poloidal/toroidal fields and fractions of energy in axisymmetric modes which are similar to the observations. These global non-potential evolution model simulations capture key magnetic features of the observed solar-like stars through the processes of surface flux transport and magnetic flux emergence. They do not, however, reproduce the magnetic field of M-dwarfs or stars with dominantly toroidal field. Furthermore, we analyse the magnetic field topologies of individual spherical harmonics for the simulations and discover that the dipole is predominately poloidal, while the quadrupole shows the highest fraction of toroidal fields. Magnetic field structures smaller than a quadrupole display a fixed ratio between the poloidal and toroidal magnetic energies.

  2. Observations of the Ion Signatures of Double Merging and the Formation of Newly Closed Field Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Michael O.; Avanov, Levon A.; Craven, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    Observations from the Polar spacecraft, taken during a period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) show magnetosheath ions within the magnetosphere with velocity distributions resulting from multiple merging sites along the same field line. The observations from the TIDE instrument show two separate ion energy-time dispersions that are attributed to two widely separated (-20Re) merging sites. Estimates of the initial merging times show that they occurred nearly simultaneously (within 5 minutes.) Along with these populations, cold, ionospheric ions were observed counterstreaming along the field lines. The presence of such ions is evidence that these field lines are connected to the ionosphere on both ends. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that double merging can produce closed field lines populated by solar wind plasma. While the merging sites cannot be unambiguously located, the observations and analyses favor one site poleward of the northern cusp and a second site at low latitudes.

  3. B fields in OB stars (BOB): Concluding the FORS 2 observing campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöller, M.; Hubrig, S.; Fossati, L.; Carroll, T. A.; Briquet, M.; Oskinova, L. M.; Järvinen, S.; Ilyin, I.; Castro, N.; Morel, T.; Langer, N.; Przybilla, N.; Nieva, M.-F.; Kholtygin, A. F.; Sana, H.; Herrero, A.; Barbá, R. H.; de Koter, A.; BOB Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    Aims: The B fields in OB stars (BOB) Collaboration is based on an ESO Large Programme to study the occurrence rate, properties, and ultimately the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars. Methods: In the framework of this program, we carried out low-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of a large sample of massive stars using FORS 2 installed at the ESO VLT 8 m telescope. Results: We determined the magnetic field values with two completely independent reduction and analysis pipelines. Our in-depth study of the magnetic field measurements shows that differences between our two pipelines are usually well within 3σ errors. From the 32 observations of 28 OB stars, we were able to monitor the magnetic fields in CPD -57° 3509 and HD 164492C, confirm the magnetic field in HD 54879, and detect a magnetic field in CPD -62° 2124. We obtain a magnetic field detection rate of 6 ± 3% for the full sample of 69 OB stars observed with FORS 2 within the BOB program. For the preselected objects with a v sin i below 60 km s-1, we obtain a magnetic field detection rate of 5 ± 5%. We also discuss X-ray properties and multiplicity of the objects in our FORS 2 sample with respect to the magnetic field detections. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 191.D-0255(E,G).

  4. Synergies between spectroscopic and time-series photometric surveys - LAMOST observations for the Kepler field and K2 fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jianning; De Cat, Peter; Smith, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Synergies between spectroscopic and time-series photometric surveys can provide valuable information for studies in Galactic archaeology. The Kepler satellite has provided unprecedented high duty-cycle, high-precision time-series photometric observations for a large number of stars. After a continuous monitoring of the Kepler field for 4 years, it started to observe K2 fields, which include multiple stellar populations, for about 80 days each. These observed fields are all good targets for Galactic archaeology, provided that spectroscopic observations can be made for hundreds of thousands of stars within these fields in a homogeneous way.In 2010, we initiated the LAMOST-Kepler project with the aim to collect low-resolution spectra for as many objects from the KIC10 catalogue as possible with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST). This is a 4-m telescope equipped with 4,000 optical fibers covering a circular field of view with a diameter of 5 degrees on the sky. The observations since 2012 have resulted in 150,567 low-resolution spectra with the Signal-Noise-Ratio in r larger than 20. The stellar atmospheric parameters were derived and calibrated with the values determined from either high-resolution spectroscopy or asteroseismology. Since the end of 2015, five K2 fields have been observed with LAMOST and the qualified spectra were used to derive the stellar atmospheric parameters for 59,213 stars.In this presentation we introduce the LAMOST-Kepler project, whose data have a great potential for Galactic archaeology. It includes an update on the progress and a summary of the existing scientific works based on the data provided by this project.

  5. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Rajnak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Ivankov, Olexandr I.; Feoktystov, Artem; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj

    2015-08-17

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  6. Predicting observational consequences of magnetic field effects in the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov1, D. D.; Kane1, J. O.; Mizuta2, A.; Pound3, M. W.; Remington1, B. A.

    2003-10-01

    Magnetic fields are thought to play a substantial role in photoevaporated molecular clouds, an example of which is the famous Eagle Nebula. On the other hand, any direct measurements of the magnetic fields in the Eagle Nebula are still absent. To help in developing the observational strategies, we consider two models of the magnetic field and discuss their general compatibility with the observed structures. We also consider other factors that can be used to derive the structure and the strength of the magnetic field. The two models are those of an initially quasi-homogeneous magnetic field permeating the cloud prior to the onset of hydrodynamic motion, and of a pre-existing "magnetostatic turbulence" [1]. We evaluate possible magnetic field strength in the ablated flow, magnetic field effects on the velocity distribution inside the cloud, and on the star formation. [1] D.D. Ryutov, B.A. Remington. PPCF, 44, B407, 2002.

  7. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajnak, Michal; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Ivankov, Olexandr I.; Feoktystov, Artem; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan

    2015-08-01

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  8. Observation of the Faraday effect via beam deflection in a longitudinal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Ambarish; Hill, Winfield; Fischer, Peer

    2007-11-15

    We show that magnetic-field-induced circular differential deflection of light can be observed in reflection or refraction at a single interface. The difference in the reflection or refraction angles between the two circular polarization components is a function of the magnetic-field strength and the Verdet constant, and permits the observation of the Faraday effect not via polarization rotation in transmission, but via changes in the propagation direction. Deflection measurements do not suffer from n-{pi} ambiguities and are shown to be another means to map magnetic fields with high axial resolution, or to determine the sign and magnitude of magnetic-field pulses in a single measurement.

  9. Forcing a Global, Offline Land Surface Modeling System with Observation-Based Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Houser, Paul R.; Jambor, U.; Gottschalck, J.; Radakovich, J.; Arsenault, K.; Meng, C.-J.; Mitchell, K. E.

    2002-01-01

    The Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) drives multiple uncoupled land surface models in order to produce optimal output fields of surface states in near-real time, globally, at 1/4 degree spatial resolution. These fields are then made available for coupled atmospheric model initialization and further research. One of the unique aspects of GLDAS is its ability to ingest both modeled and observation-derived forcing for running global scale land surface models. This paper compares results of runs forced by modeled and observed precipitation and shortwave radiation fields. Differences are examined and the impact of the observations on model skill is assessed.

  10. Magnetic and Electric Field Diagnostics of Chromospheric Jets by Spectropolarimetric Observations of the HI Paschen Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan, T.; Casini, R.; Ichimoto, K.

    2014-10-01

    In order to study the magnetic and electric fields of chromospheric jets, we observed the full Stokes spectra of the Paschen series of neutral hydrogen in active region jets that took place at the solar limb on May 5, 2012. For the observations, we used the spectropolarimeter of the Domeless Solar Telescope at Hida observatory, Japan. Inversion of the Stokes spectra taking into account the effect of magnetic field on the energy structure and polarization of the hydrogen levels (including the Hanle effect and level-crossing effects) elucidates the magnetic field approximately aligned with the visible structure of the jets. In addition to the magnetic field, the energy structure and the polarization of the hydrogen levels is sensitive to electric field through the Stark effect, electric Hanle effect (analogous effect with the Hanle effect by magnetic field), and the level-crossing effects. Since, we found no definitive evidence of the polarization produced by the effect of electric field in the observed Stokes profiles, we derived upper limits of electric field felt by neutral atom moving across the magnetic field, and conclude that the velocity of the neutral atom perpendicular to the magnetic field was below several percents of the velocity bulk plasma motion.

  11. Magnetic fields in protoplanetary discs: from MHD simulations to ALMA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrang, G. H.-M.; Flock, M.; Wolf, S.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields significantly influence the evolution of protoplanetary discs and the formation of planets, following the predictions of numerous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. However, these predictions are yet observationally unconstrained. To validate the predictions on the influence of magnetic fields on protoplanetary discs, we apply 3D radiative transfer simulations of the polarized emission of aligned aspherical dust grains that directly link 3D global non-ideal MHD simulations to Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations. Our simulations show that it is feasible to observe the predicted toroidal large-scale magnetic field structures, not only in the ideal observations but also with high-angular resolution ALMA observations. Our results show further that high-angular resolution observations by ALMA are able to identify vortices embedded in outer magnetized disc regions.

  12. In-situ Observation and Differential Thermal Analysis of MnBi in High Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Daiki; Mitsui, Yoshifuru; Abematsu, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Kohki; Watanabe, Kazuo; Uda, Satoshi; Koyama, Keiichi

    For investigating in-field process of melting and solidification visually and quantitatively, in-situ observation system with differential thermal analysis (DTA) utilized in high temperature and in high magnetic field was developed. Decomposition processes of the bulk sample of ferromagnetic MnBi were directly observed with collecting DTA data under high magnetic field of 10 T for the 290-770 K temperature range. When the temperature was over decomposition point (ferromagnetic MnBi → paramagnetic Mn1.08Bi + liquid), liquid phase appeared on the sample surface. Furthermore, when the temperature was over peritectic temperature (∼ 700 K: paramagnetic Mn1.08Bi → Mn + liquid), the sample surface was broken and a large quantity of the liquid phase appeared from the sample. The in-situ observation also suggested that the decomposition temperature increased from 620 K for a zero field to 638 K for a magnetic field of 10 T.

  13. Determination of magnetic fields in broad line region of active galactic nuclei from polarimetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrovich, Mikhail; Silant'ev, Nikolai; Gnedin, Yuri; Natsvlishvili, Tinatin; Buliga, Stanislava

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in confining gas clouds in the broad line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and in maintaining the stability of these clouds. Without magnetic fields the clouds would not be stable, and soon after their formation they would expand and disperse. We show that the strength of the magnetic field can be derived from the polarimetric observations. Estimates of magnetic fields for a number of AGNs are based on the observed polarization degrees of broad Hα lines and nearby continuum. The difference between their values allows us to estimate the magnetic field strength in the BLR using the method developed by Silant'ev et al. (2013). Values of magnetic fields in BLR for a number of AGNs have been derived.

  14. Nonoptically probing near-field microscopy for the observation of biological living specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Yoshimasa; Murakami, Manabu; Egami, Chikara; Sugihara, Okihiro; Okamoto, Naomichi; Tsuchimori, Masaaki; Watanabe, Osamu; Nakamura, Osamu

    2001-04-01

    We present the observation of living specimens with subwavelength resolution by using the nonoptically probing near-field microscopy we have developed recently. In the near-field microscope, the optical field distributions near the specimens are recorded as the surface topography of a photosensitive film, and the topographical distributions are readout with an atomic-force microscopy. Since the near-field microscope does not require the scanning of a probe tip for illumination or detection or scattering of light, it is possible to observe moving biological specimens and fast phenomena. We demonstrate the observation of a moving paramecium and euglena gracilis with subwavelength resolution. The observation of the nucleus inside a euglena cell was also demonstrated.

  15. Observations of two-dimensional magnetic field evolution in a plasma opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpitalnik, R.; Weingarten, A.; Gomberoff, K.; Krasik, Ya.; Maron, Y.

    1998-03-01

    The time dependent magnetic field distribution was studied in a coaxial 100-ns positive-polarity Plasma Opening Switch (POS) by observing the Zeeman effect in ionic line emission. Measurements local in three dimensions are obtained by doping the plasma using laser evaporation techniques. Fast magnetic field penetration with a relatively sharp magnetic field front (⩽1 cm) is observed at the early stages of the pulse (t≲25). Later in the pulse, the magnetic field is observed at the load-side edge of the plasma, leaving "islands" of low magnetic field at the plasma center that last for about 10 ns. The two-dimensional (2-D) structure of the magnetic field in the r,z plane is compared to the results of an analytical model based on electron-magneto-hydrodynamics, that utilizes the measured 2-D plasma density distribution and assumes fast magnetic field penetration along both POS electrodes. The model results provide quantitative explanation for the magnetic field evolution observed.

  16. Radio observations in the fields of COS-B gamma ray sources. IV - First quadrant sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozel, M. E.; Schlickeiser, R.; Sieber, W.; Younis, S.

    1988-01-01

    The field of five COS-B gamma-ray sources in the first galactic quadrant have been mapped using the Effelsberg radio telescope at several frequencies. Candidate objects as potential radio counterparts of gamma-ray sources are discussed in the light of current observations; however, mostly being due to the crowded nature of the radio fields, no clear identification has been possible.

  17. Larmor electric field observed at the Earth's magnetopause by Polar satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, D. Gonzalez, W. D.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Mozer, F. S.; Cardoso, F. R.

    2014-10-15

    We present, for the first time, observational evidence of a kinetic electric field near the X-line associated with asymmetric reconnection at the Earth's dayside magnetopause using Polar observations. On March 29, 2003, Polar satellite detected an asymmetric collisionless reconnection event. This event shows a unipolar Hall electric field signature and a simple deviation from the guide field during the magnetopause crossing, with the absence of an ion plasma jet outflow indicating that the magnetopause crossing was near the X-line. As expected from particle-in-cell simulations by Malakit et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 135001 (2013)), an earthward pointing normal electric field appears in the magnetospheric side of the ion diffusion region. The electric field satisfies two necessary conditions for the existence of the finite ion Larmor radius effect: (1) the ion Larmor radius (r{sub g2}) is larger than the distance between the stagnation point and the edge of the ion diffusion region in the strong magnetic field side (δ{sub S2}) and (2) the spatial extent of the kinetic electric field (δ{sub EL}) is of the order of the ion Larmor radius. Furthermore, it is shown that the peak value of the Larmor electric field is comparable to the predicted value. The observation of the Larmor electric field can be valuable in other analyses to show that the crossing occurred near the X-line.

  18. Quantitative comparison of lunar magnetic field observed by Kaguya and Lunar Prospector missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, A.; Shibuya, H.; Tsunakawa, H.; Takahashi, F.; Shimizu, H.; Matsushima, M.

    2009-12-01

    The magnetometer on board Kaguya (Kaguya-LMAG) has been almost continuously observed the magnetic field at about 100km altitude since October 29, 2007. The magnetic field observations are beautiful because of the very low solar activity, the crustal field is well observed at 100km altitude from the record in the lunar wake and the tail-lobe environments. As the lunar crustal magnetic field does not vary, those results are comparable with the Lunar Prospector magnetometer (LP-MAG). Such a comparison has been made between Apollo sub-satellite data and LP-MAG, but only qualitative similarity has been discussed, since the altitude effect to the intensity and shape of the magnetic field was not quantitatively evaluated. We have developed a method to recover the 3-d magnetic field from satellite field observations (EPR method which stands for Equivalent Pole Reduction; Toyoshima et al. 2008). Applying EPR to the LP-MAG data, we presented, at AGU 2008 meeting, the global magnetic anomaly map. As the EPR reduce the field observation to the magnetic monopole distribution, the magnetic field at the Kaguya track is also calculated, so that the quantitative comparison between the observations of the two missions becomes possible. The comparison in several strong magnetic anomaly regions, Abel, Descartes, Reiner Gamma, Rima Sirsalis, Crisium Antipode, Orientale Antipode and South Pole-Aitken regions, the EPR field and observation agree very well, considerably better than the previous mapping models. In some passes the discrepancy is less than 0.1nT though out the 20 span in latitude. This agreement indicates that the calibrations of both Kaguya and LP are very precisely consistent, and the EPR works very well to restore the magnetic field in three dimensions. It is also found in most of the areas that the radial component is more consistent than the other components. It might be due to the moon surface current generated by the varying interplanetary field. They are also

  19. DC Electric Fields and Associated Plasma Drifts Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Rowland, D.

    2009-01-01

    Initial DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. We present statistical averages of the vector fields for the first year of operations that include both the zonal and radial components of the resulting E x B plasma flows at low latitudes. Magnetic field data from the VEFI science magnetometer are used to compute the plasma flows. The DC electric field detector reveals zonal and radial electric fields that undergo strong diurnal variations, typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night. There is considerable variation in the large scale DC electric field data, in both the daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures typically observed at night. In general, the measured zonal DC electric field amplitudes include excursions that extend within the 0.4 - 2 m V/m range, corresponding to E x B drifts of the order of 30-150 m/s. The average vertical or radial electric fields may exceed the zonal fields in amplitude by a factor of 1.5 to 2. Although the data compare well, in a general sense, with previous satellite observations and statistical patterns of vertical ion drifts, the E x B drifts we report from C/NOFS rarely show a pronounced pre-reversal enhancement after sunset. We attribute this to a combination of extreme solar minimum conditions and the fact that the C/NOFS orbit of 401 by 867 km carries the probes essentially above the lower altitude regions where the wind-driven dynamo might be expected to create enhanced upwards drifts in the early evening. Evidence for wavenumber 4 tidal effects and other longitudinal signatures have been detected and will be presented. We also discuss off-equatorial electric fields and their relation to the ambient plasma density.

  20. Pioneer Venus observations of plasma and field structure in the near wake of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Brace, L. H.; Knudsen, W. C.; Taylor, H. A.; Scarf, F. L.; Colburn, D. S.; Barnes, A.

    1982-01-01

    Ionospheric plasma density depletions or 'holes' are observed by the Pioneer Venus orbiter in association with radial magnetic fields in the near wake of Venus. This report presents examples of the collected observations of these unexpected features of the Venus nightside ionosphere obtained by the Langmuir probe, magnetometer, ion mass spectrometer, retarding potential analyzer, plasma analyzer, and electric field experiments. The connection between plasma density depletions and temperature changes, changes in ion composition, plasma wave emissions, and magnetic fields with a substantial radial component is illustrated. Mechanisms that may be responsible for the formation and maintenance of holes are suggested.

  1. Relationship of the interplanetary electric field to the high-latitude ionospheric electric field and currents Observations and model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Banks, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    The electrical coupling between the solar wind, magnetosphere, and ionosphere is studied. The coupling is analyzed using observations of high-latitude ion convection measured by the Sondre Stromfjord radar in Greenland and a computer simulation. The computer simulation calculates the ionospheric electric potential distribution for a given configuration of field-aligned currents and conductivity distribution. The technique for measuring F-region in velocities at high time resolution over a large range of latitudes is described. Variations in the currents on ionospheric plasma convection are examined using a model of field-aligned currents linking the solar wind with the dayside, high-latitude ionosphere. The data reveal that high-latitude ionospheric convection patterns, electric fields, and field-aligned currents are dependent on IMF orientation; it is observed that the electric field, which drives the F-region plasma curve, responds within about 14 minutes to IMF variations in the magnetopause. Comparisons of the simulated plasma convection with the ion velocity measurements reveal good correlation between the data.

  2. Field-aligned currents observed in the vicinity of a moving auroral arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Bruening, K.

    1984-09-01

    The sounding rocket Porcupine F4 was launched into an auroral arc and the field aligned currents were independently deduced from magnetic field measurements; the horizontal current deduced from the electric field measurements and height integrated conductivity calculations; and measurements of electron fluxes. Above the arc the different methods agree. The magnetosphere acts as generator and the ionosphere as load. North of the arc, the first two methods disagree, possibly due to an Alfven wave carrying the observed magnetic field perturbation. The energy flow is out of the ionosphere. Here the ionosphere acts as generator and the magnetosphere as load.

  3. Field-aligned currents observed in the vicinity of a moving auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Bruening, K.

    1984-01-01

    The sounding rocket Porcupine F4 was launched into an auroral arc and the field aligned currents were independently deduced from magnetic field measurements; the horizontal current deduced from the electric field measurements and height integrated conductivity calculations; and measurements of electron fluxes. Above the arc the different methods agree. The magnetosphere acts as generator and the ionosphere as load. North of the arc, the first two methods disagree, possibly due to an Alfven wave carrying the observed magnetic field perturbation. The energy flow is out of the ionosphere. Here the ionosphere acts as generator and the magnetosphere as load.

  4. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malaspina, David; Horanyi, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kersten, K.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of hypervelocity dust particles impacting the Wind spacecraft are reported here for the first time using data from the WindWAVES electric field instrument. A unique combination of rotating spacecraft, amplitude-triggered high-cadence waveform collection, and electric field antenna configuration allow the first direct determination of dust impact direction by any spacecraft using electric field data. Dust flux and impact direction data indicate that the observed dust is approximately micron-sized with both interplanetary and interstellar populations. Nanometer radius dust is not detected by Wind during times when nanometer dust is observed on the STEREO spacecraft and both spacecraft are in close proximity. Determined impact directions suggest that interplanetary dust detected by electric field instruments at 1 AU is dominated by particles on bound trajectories crossing Earths orbit, rather than dust with hyperbolic orbits.

  5. Comparison of inferred and observed interplanetary magnetic field polarities, 1970-1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.; Svalgaard, L.; Hedgecock, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    The inferred polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field at earth using polar observations of the geomagnetic field has been compared with spacecraft observations. A list published by Svalgaard (1974) of the inferred field polarities in the period from 1970 to 1972 is found to be correct on 82% of the days. A near real-time (same day) method of inferring the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field using geomagnetic observations at Vostok and Thule is in use at the NOAA Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado. During 1972, this method is found to be correct on 87% of the days. A list of 'well-defined' sector boundaries at earth from 1970 to 1972 is given.

  6. Micropulsations in the electric field near the plasmapause, observed by ISEE-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, T. E.; Maynard, N. C.; Heppner, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The occurrence of micropulsations near and inside the plasmapause was surveyed. The observed pulsations, classified as Pc3 and Pi2, are discussed. In addition one single event of Pc1 was observed. The frequencies in the Pc3 and Pi2 bands, the amplitude ranges, and the direction of rotation for the electric field vector are reported.

  7. Bridging the terahertz near-field and far-field observations of liquid crystal based metamaterial absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Ge, Shijun; Chen, Zhaoxian; Hu, Wei; Lu, Yanqing

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterial-based absorbers play a significant role in applications ranging from energy harvesting and thermal emitters to sensors and imaging devices. The middle dielectric layer of conventional metamaterial absorbers has always been solid. Researchers could not detect the near field distribution in this layer or utilize it effectively. Here, we use anisotropic liquid crystal as the dielectric layer to realize electrically fast tunable terahertz metamaterial absorbers. We demonstrate strong, position-dependent terahertz near-field enhancement with sub-wavelength resolution inside the metamaterial absorber. We measure the terahertz far-field absorption as the driving voltage increases. By combining experimental results with liquid crystal simulations, we verify the near-field distribution in the middle layer indirectly and bridge the near-field and far-field observations. Our work opens new opportunities for creating high-performance, fast, tunable, terahertz metamaterial devices that can be applied in biological imaging and sensing. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921803), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 61225026, 61490714, 11304151, and 61435008), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant Nos. BK20150845 and 15KJB140004), the Open Foundation Project of National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, China (Grant No. M28003), and the Research Center of Optical Communications Engineering & Technology, Jiangsu Province, China.

  8. Magnetic fields around evolved stars: further observations of H2O maser polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M. L.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Kemball, A.; Amiri, N.

    2013-06-01

    Context. A low- or intermediate-mass star is believed to maintain a spherical shape throughout the evolution from the main sequence to the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. However, many post-AGB objects and planetary nebulae exhibit non-spherical symmetry. Several candidates have been suggested as factors that can play a role in this change of morphology, but the problem is still not well understood. Magnetic fields are one of these possible agents. Aims: We aim to detect the magnetic field and infer its properties around four AGB stars using H2O maser observations. The sample we observed consists of the following sources: the semi-regular variable RT Vir, and the Mira variables AP Lyn, IK Tau, and IRC+60370. Methods: We observed the 61,6 -52,3 H2O maser rotational transition in full-polarization mode to determine its linear and circular polarization. Based on the Zeeman effect, one can infer the properties of the magnetic field from the maser polarization analysis. Results: We detected a total of 238 maser features in three of the four observed sources. No masers were found toward AP Lyn. The observed masers are all located between 2.4 and 53.0 AU from the stars. Linear and circular polarization was found in 18 and 11 maser features, respectively. Conclusions: We more than doubled the number of AGB stars in which a magnetic field has been detected from H2O maser polarization. Our results confirm the presence of fields around IK Tau, RT Vir, and IRC+60370. The strength of the field along the line of sight is found to be between 47 and 331 mG in the H2O maser region. Extrapolating this result to the surface of the stars, assuming a toroidal field (∝ r-1), we find magnetic fields of 0.3-6.9 G on the stellar surfaces. If, instead of a toroidal field, we assume a poloidal field (∝ r-2), then the extrapolated magnetic field strength on the stellar surfaces are in the range between 2.2 and ~115 G. Finally, if a dipole field (∝ r-3) is assumed, the field

  9. Airborne observations of electric fields around growing and decaying cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giori, K. L.; Nanevicz, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne electric field data were gathered in an atmospheric electrification study near Cape Canaveral, FL. A Learjet 36A was instrumented with eight electric field meters (mills) and five different particle probes. The local electric field enhancements at each field mill site were determined under lab conditions and verified using in-flight data. The overdetermined system of eight equations (one for each field mill) was solved using a weighted least squares algorithm to compute the magnitude and direction of the ambient electric field. The signal processing system allowed the measured data to be expressed in terms of earth coordinates, regardless of the attitude of the aircraft. Thus, it was possible to take maximum advantage of the Learjet's speed and maneuverability in studying the electric field structure in the vicinity of the clouds. Data gathered while circling just outside the boundary of a growing cumulus cloud show a nonsymmetric pattern of electric field strength. Field intensity grew rapidly over a period of less than 10 minutes. The observed direction of the ambient electric field vector can be explained by an ascending motion of the charge centers of a classic tripole model of a thunderstorm.

  10. Magnetic field inversions at 1 AU: Comparisons between mapping predictions and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Owens, M. J.; Neudegg, D.; Lobzin, V. V.; Steward, G.

    2016-11-01

    Large-scale magnetic field configurations are important for the transport of solar wind strahl electrons, which are suprathermal and directed along the field outward from the Sun. Strahl electrons are routinely used to infer not only the field configurations between the Sun and Earth but also local field structures, i.e., field inversions, where the magnetic field is locally folded back or inverted. Using solar wind data from ACE observations and a 2-D data-driven solar wind model with nonzero azimuthal magnetic field at the solar wind source surface, magnetic field lines are mapped between the Sun and Earth and beyond, in the solar equatorial plane. Standard verification metrics are used to assess, for five solar rotations at different phases of solar cycle 23, the performance of the mapping predictions for observed inversions, which are inferred from solar wind suprathermal electrons and magnetic fields measured by ACE. The probability of detection is consistently ≈0.70 across the different phases. The success ratio, the Hanssen-Kuipers skill score, and the Heidke skill score are ≈0.55-0.70 for the four rotations in the rising, solar maximum, and declining phases, but ≈0.35-0.60 for the rotation near solar minimum, during which almost half of the samples have undetermined field configurations. Our analyses confirm the persistence of inversions throughout solar cycle 23, suggest for most observed inversions a solar/coronal origin at the wind's source surface or below, and predict that inversions should be less common for larger heliocentric distance r ˜> 3 AU than for smaller r.

  11. Solar coronal and magnetic field observations near the time of the 1988 March 18 solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    Sime, D.G.; Fisher, R.R.; Mickey, D.L.

    1988-10-01

    Observations made during the interval March 1-31, 1988, are presented which were designed to provide a synoptic context in which data from the March 18, 1988, total solar eclipse can be interpreted. Daily observations made with the Mark III K-coronameter and the H-alpha prominence monitor at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, along with photographic records of the Sun in H-alpha from the flare patrol at Mees Solar Observatory on Haleakala, Maui, are included. Observations of the longitudinal component of the photospheric magnetic field made at Mees Solar Observatory were also gathered around the period of the eclipse. Together with the white-light image of the corona at the eclipse, these coronal and magnetic field observations assembled into synoptic maps for this epoch, are presented. On the basis of these observations, an interpretation of the global density distribution of the corona at the time of the eclipse is constructed. 11 references.

  12. Electric and magnetic field observations during a substorm of 24 February 1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Akasofu, S. I.

    1974-01-01

    A series of electric field measurements is reported which was obtained from the Injun 5 satellite along with a simultaneous magnetic disturbance observed in the interplanetary medium and on the ground during a magnetic substorm. The substorm analyzed took place on February 24, 1970. Prior to the onset of the substorm a greatly enhanced anti-sunward plasma flow was observed over the polar cap. The enhanced plasma flow occurred about 30 minutes after a switch in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field from northward to southward. The electric fields across the polar cap immediately before and during the substorm were essentially unchanged indicating that an enhancement in the ionospheric conductivity rather than the electric field must be responsible for the large increase in the auroral electrojet current during the substorm.

  13. MAVEN Observations of Energy-Time Dispersed Electron Signatures in Martian Crustal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Y.; Mitchell, D. L.; Halekas, J. S.; McFadden, J. P.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Brain, D. A.; Larson, D. E.; Lillis, R. J.; Hara, T.; Livi, R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    Energy-time dispersed electron signatures are observed by the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission in the vicinity of strong Martian crustal magnetic fields. Analysis of pitch angle distributions indicates that these dispersed electrons are typically trapped on closed field lines formed above strong crustal magnetic sources. Most of the dispersed electron signatures are characterized by peak energies decreasing with time rather than increasing peak energies. These properties can be explained by impulsive and local injection of hot electrons into closed field lines and subsequent dispersion by magnetic drift of the trapped electrons. In addition, the dispersed flux enhancements are often bursty and sometimes exhibit clear periodicity, suggesting that the injection and trapping processes are intrinsically time dependent and dynamic. These MAVEN observations demonstrate that common physical processes can operate in both global intrinsic magnetospheres and local crustal magnetic fields.

  14. A biophysical observation model for field potentials of networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons.

    PubMed

    Beim Graben, Peter; Rodrigues, Serafim

    2012-01-01

    We present a biophysical approach for the coupling of neural network activity as resulting from proper dipole currents of cortical pyramidal neurons to the electric field in extracellular fluid. Starting from a reduced three-compartment model of a single pyramidal neuron, we derive an observation model for dendritic dipole currents in extracellular space and thereby for the dendritic field potential (DFP) that contributes to the local field potential (LFP) of a neural population. This work aligns and satisfies the widespread dipole assumption that is motivated by the "open-field" configuration of the DFP around cortical pyramidal cells. Our reduced three-compartment scheme allows to derive networks of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) models, which facilitates comparison with existing neural network and observation models. In particular, by means of numerical simulations we compare our approach with an ad hoc model by Mazzoni et al. (2008), and conclude that our biophysically motivated approach yields substantial improvement.

  15. Dynamics of Tachyon Fields and Inflation - Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results with Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, M.; Dimitrijević, D. D.; Djordjević, G. S.; Stojanović, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    The role tachyon fields may play in evolution of early universe is discussed in this paper. We consider the evolution of a flat and homogeneous universe governed by a tachyon scalar field with the DBI-type action and calculate the slow-roll parameters of inflation, scalar spectral index (n), and tensor-scalar ratio (r) for the given potentials. We pay special attention to the inverse power potential, first of all to V(x)˜ x^{-4}, and compare the available results obtained by analytical and numerical methods with those obtained by observation. It is shown that the computed values of the observational parameters and the observed ones are in a good agreement for the high values of the constant X_0. The possibility that influence of the radion field can extend a range of the acceptable values of the constant X_0 to the string theory motivated sector of its values is briefly considered.

  16. Cosmological backreaction for a test field observer in a chaotic inflationary model

    SciTech Connect

    Marozzi, Giovanni; Vacca, Gian Paolo; Brandenberger, Robert H. E-mail: vacca@bo.infn.it

    2013-02-01

    In an inhomogeneous universe, an observer associated with a particular matter field does not necessarily measure the same cosmological evolution as an observer in a homogeneous and isotropic universe. Here we consider, in the context of a chaotic inflationary background model, a class of observers associated with a ''clock field'' for which we use a light test field. We compute the effective expansion rate and fluid equation of state in a gauge invariant way, taking into account the quantum fluctuations of the long wavelength modes, and working up to second order in perturbation theory and in the slow-roll approximation. We find that the effective expansion rate is smaller than what would be measured in the absence of fluctuations. Within the stochastic approach we study the bounds for which the approximations we make are consistent.

  17. Ionospheric magnetic fields and currents at Mars and Venus. Perspectives from MEX and VEX observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Zhang, T.-L.; Wei, Y.; Woch, J.; Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.; Duru, F.

    2012-09-01

    Mars Express and Venus Express spacecrafts have provided us a wealth of in-situ observations of characteristics of induced magnetospheres of Mars and Venus at low altitudes during solar minimum conditions. At such conditions large-scale magnetic fields are observed deeply in the ionospheres (magnetized ionospheres). The observations again raise a long-standing question about the origin of these fields. The problem is intimately related to issue of electric current system and their closure. Analysis of ASPERA-3, ASPERA-4, MARSIS and MAG data reveals a lot of features which require a more sophisticated view at the origin and topology of the ionospheric magnetic fields. Differing perspectives at this problem are widely discussed.

  18. Near-field observation of subwavelength confinement of photoluminescence by a photonic crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Louvion, Nicolas; Rahmani, Adel; Seassal, Christian; Callard, Ségolène; Gérard, Davy; de Fornel, Frédérique

    2006-07-15

    We present a direct, room-temperature near-field optical study of light confinement by a subwavelength defect microcavity in a photonic crystal slab containing quantum-well sources. The observations are compared with three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain calculations, and excellent agreement is found. Moreover, we use a subwavelength cavity to study the influence of a near-field probe on the imaging of localized optical modes.

  19. Particle and field characteristics of broadband electrons observed by the FAST satellite during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, A.; Shiokawa, K.; Seki, K.; Strangeway, R. J.; McFadden, J. P.; Carlson, C. W.

    2007-06-01

    Broadband electrons (BBEs) are remarkable flux enhancements (>1013 eV cm-2 s-1) of precipitating electrons over a broad energy range (0.03-30 keV) near the equatorward edge of the auroral oval during geomagnetic storms. We show characteristics of particles (energy spectra and pitch angle distribution) and fields (electric field, magnetic field, and wave spectra) during a BBE event observed by the Fast Auroral SnapshoT (FAST) satellite. The BBEs were observed at an altitude of ˜2000 km at 59°-61° invariant latitudes (ILATs) and 21 h magnetic local time (MLT). The event was observed at ˜7 min after the onset of a substorm during the main phase of the Bastille Day geomagnetic storm (minimum Dst = -301 nT) on 15 July 2000. The precipitation region of the BBEs corresponded to a localized intensification of auroral emission, lasting ˜14 min, observed by the Polar UVI images at 50°-60° geomagnetic latitudes (MLATs) and 20-21 MLTs. These results suggest that rapid particle acceleration was occurring in the inner magnetosphere associated with a storm-time substorm. The pitch angle distribution of BBEs was isotropic except for a loss cone feature around the field-aligned upward direction at a higher energy range above ˜1 keV, while field-aligned electron fluxes were larger than the perpendicular fluxes below ˜1 keV. These results imply that a higher energy part of the BBEs originated from higher altitudes in the inner magnetosphere and that a lower energy part was accelerated parallel to the local magnetic field at lower altitudes near the satellite. Intense fluctuations of electric and magnetic fields were observed during this BBE event. From these results, we discuss possible acceleration of the lower energy part of BBEs through wave-particle interaction.

  20. High performance field emission and Nottingham effect observed from carbon nanotube yarn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young Chul; Kang, Jun-Tae; Park, Sora; Go, Eunsol; Jeon, Hyojin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Park, Kyung-Ho; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2017-02-01

    Vertically aligned CNTs were synthesized on a four inch wafer, followed by the preparation of a CNT yarn. The yarn emitter was found to have an extremely high field enhancement factor, which was confirmed to have originated from multi-stage effect. In addition to superb field emission characteristics, the energy exchange during field emission, called Nottingham effect, was observed from the CNT yarn emitter. A CNT yarn was attached to the thermistor whose resistance depends on temperature. Then, the change of resistance was monitored during the field emission, which enabled us to calculate the energy exchange. It was found that the observed heating originated from both Nottingham and Joule heating. Nottingham heating was dominant at low current region while Joule heating became larger contribution at high current region. Very large Nottingham region of up to 33.35 mA was obtained, which is due presumably to the high performance field emission characteristics of a CNT yarn. This is believed to be an important observation for developing reliable field emission devices with suppressed Joule heating effect.

  1. Latitudinal variation of perturbation electric fields during magnetically disturbed periods - 1986 Sundial observations and model results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, B. G.; Spiro, R. W.; Wolf, R. A.; Foster, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    F-region incoherent scatter radar drift observations from Millstone Hill and Jicamarca, h-prime F observations from Huancayo, and high latitude ground-magnetometer measurements taken during the Sundial 1986 campaign are used to study the relationship between plasmaspheric electric field perturbations and high latitude currents during disturbed periods. The observations are in good agreement with numerical results from a Rice Covection Model run that involved a sharp increase in the polar cap potential drop followed by a subsequent decrease. The zonal disturbance electric field pattern is latitude independent, and the corresponding amplitudes change approximately as L exp n (where n is about 1.5). The meridional electric field patterns and amplitudes have larger latitudinal variations. The mid-, low, and equatorial electric fields from the Rice Convection Model are in good agreement with previous results from the semianalytic, Senior-Blanc (1987) model. Also discussed are three physical mechanisms (over-shielding, fossil winds, and magnetic reconfiguration) that contribute to the long lasting (1-2 h) equatorial zonal electric field perturbations associated with a sudden northward turning of the IMF. It is predicted that the penetration of high latitude electric fields to low latitudes should, in general, be closely related to the rate of motion of the shielding layer and the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora.

  2. Interpolation of observed rainfall fields for flood forecasting in data poor areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogelis Prada, M. C.; Werner, M. G. F.

    2010-09-01

    Observed rainfall fields constitute a crucial input for operational flood forecasting, providing boundary conditions to hydrological models for prediction of flows and levels in relevant forecast points. Such observed fields are derived through interpolation from available observed data from rain gauges. The reliability of the derived rainfall field depends on the density of the gauge network within the basin, as well as on the variability of the rainfall itself, and the interpolation method. In this paper interpolation methods to estimate rainfall fields under data- poor environments are researched, with the derived rainfall fields being used in operational flood warnings. Methods are applied in a small catchment in Bogotá, Colombia. This catchment has a complex climatology, which is strongly influenced by the inter-tropical convergence zone and orographic enhancement. As is common in such catchments in developing countries, the rainfall gauging network is sparse, while the need for reliable rainfall in flood forecasting is high. The extensive high flood risk zones in the lower areas of the catchment, where urbanization processes are characterized by unplanned occupation of areas close to rivers, is common in developing countries. Results show the sensitivity of interpolated rainfall fields to the interpolation methods chosen, and the importance of the use of indicator variables for improving the spatial distribution of interpolated rainfall. The value of these methods in establishing optimal new gauging sites for augmenting the sparse gauge network is demonstrated.

  3. Observations of the dust radial velocity field in the F-corona on March 29, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakova, L. I.; Demchenko, B. I.; Rspaev, F. K.; Chalabaev, A.

    2011-12-01

    The results of interferometer observations of the dust radial velocity field in the F-corona during the total solar eclipse of March 29, 2006, are presented. The observations were performed in the Mugalzhar settlement, Aqtobe region, Kazakhstan. The observation results indicated that the dust orbital motion is opposite to the planetary motion and is inclined at an angle of about 105° with respect to the ecliptic plane. It is assumed that the observed dust is genetically related to Kreutz comets falling on the Sun and registered with the SOHO spacecraft on March 28 and 31, 2006.

  4. The magnetic field of the earth - Performance considerations for space-based observing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, W. J., Jr.; Taylor, P. T.; Schnetzler, C. C.; Langel, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Basic problems inherent in carrying out observations of the earth magnetic field from space are reviewed. It is shown that while useful observations of the core and crustal fields are possible at the peak of the solar cycle, the greatest useful data volume is obtained during solar minimum. During the last three solar cycles, the proportion of data with a planetary disturbance index of less than 2 at solar maximum was in the range 0.4-0.8 in comparison with solar minimum. It is found that current state of the art orbit determination techniques should eliminate orbit error as a problem in gravitational field measurements from space. The spatial resolution obtained for crustal field anomalies during the major satellite observation programs of the last 30 years are compared in a table. The relationship between observing altitude and the spatial resolution of magnetic field structures is discussed. Reference is made to data obtained using the Magsat, the Polar Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (POGO), and instruments on board the Space Shuttle.

  5. Future Observations of Cosmic Magnetic Fields with LOFAR, SKA and Its Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Polarization observations with the forthcoming large radio telescopes will open a new era in the observation of magnetic fields and should help to understand their origin. Low-frequency radio synchrotron emission from the Milky Way, galaxies and galaxy clusters, observed with the new Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) and the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA), traces low-energy cosmic ray electrons and allows us to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies, in halos and relics of clusters and in the Milky Way. Polarization at higher frequencies (1-10 GHz), to be observed with the SKA and its precursors Australia SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) and the South African MeerKAT telescopes, will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of galaxies and in cluster relics in unprecedented detail. All-sky surveys of Faraday rotation measures towards a dense grid of polarized background sources with ASKAP (project POSSUM) and the SKA are dedicated to measure magnetic fields in intervening galaxies, clusters and intergalactic filaments, and will be used to model the overall structure and strength of magnetic fields in the Milky Way. Cosmic magnetism is "key science" for LOFAR, ASKAP and the SKA.

  6. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, L; Lummen, T.T.A.; Quiñonez, E; Murooka, Y; Reed, B.W.; Barwick, B; Carbone, F

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinduced near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. This methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits. PMID:25728197

  7. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    SciTech Connect

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; Murooka, Y.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2015-03-02

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinduced near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. In conclusion, this methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.

  8. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    DOE PAGES

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; ...

    2015-03-02

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinducedmore » near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. In conclusion, this methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.« less

  9. Observations of the magnetic field and plasma flow in Jupiter's magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L. W.; Jessen, J. M.; Goodrich, G. C.

    1980-01-01

    Large scale (many minutes to 10 hours) magnetic field structures consisting predominantly of nearly north-south field direction were discovered in Jupiter's magnetosheath from the data of Voyagers 1 and 2 and Pioneer 10 during their outbound encounter trajectories. The Voyager 2 data, and that of Voyager 1 to a lesser extent, show evidence of a quasi-period of 10 hours (and occasionally 5 hours) for these structures. The north-south components of the field and plasma velocity were strongly correlated in the outbound magnetosheath as observed by Voyagers 1 and 2, and the components orthogonal to the north-south direction showed weak correlations. For both Voyager encounters the sense (positive and negative) of the north-south correlations were directly related to the direction of the ecliptic plane component of the interplanetary magnetic field using the field and plasma measurements of the non-encountering spacecraft.

  10. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; Murooka, Y.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave-particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinduced near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. This methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.

  11. Field trip report: Observations made at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Special report No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.A.

    1993-03-01

    A field trip was made to the Yucca Mountain area on December 5-9, 1992 by Jerry Frazier, Don Livingston, Christine Schluter, Russell Harmon, and Carol Hill. Forty-three separate stops were made and 275 lbs. of rocks were collected during the five days of the field trip. Key localities visited were the Bare Mountains, Yucca Mountain, Calico Hills, Busted Butte, Harper Valley, Red Cliff Gulch, Wahmonie Hills, Crater Flat, and Lathrop Wells Cone. This report only describes field observations made by Carol Hill. Drawings are used rather than photographs because cameras were not permitted on the Nevada Test Site during this trip.

  12. Interaction of solar wind with Mercury and its magnetic field. [as observed by Mariner 10 space probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review is presented of magnetic field and solar wind electron observations by Mariner 10 spacecraft. The intrinsic magnetic field of the planet Mercury and the implications of such a field for the planetary interior are also discussed.

  13. Voyager 1 and 2 Observations of the Local Interstellar Magnetic Field and Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2015-12-01

    Voyager 1 (V1) observed compressive interstellar turbulence in the local interstellar medium (LISM) with a Kolmogorov spectrum from 2013.36 to 2014.64. Observations of the magnetic field by V1 during 2015 will be presented. Preliminary heliosheath observations by Voyager 2 (V2) indicate that the magnetic field strength (B) began to increase in mid-2011, possibly reaching 0.3 nT during mid-2012. A similar increase in B was observed by V1 shortly before it crossed the heliopause. However, it is possible that the strong magnetic fields observed by V2, if confirmed, were associated with increasing solar activity. The plasma speed was lowest during the middle of 2012, but there was no clear relationship between V and B. The magnetic flux continued to be conserved by V2 during 2011 and 2012, whereas the magnetic flux at V1 decreased in the heliosheath with increasing distance. At least 30 magnetic holes, magnetic humps and other microscale features were observed in the heliosheath by V2 during 2012. Such features were not observed by V1 in the LISM.

  14. FM 22. Mapping the Frontier Fields with Chandra X-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C.; van Weeren, R.; Ogrean, G.; Forman, W.

    Chandra has deeply observed the clusters and parallel fields in four Frontier Fields. These observations allow us to dramatically improve our understanding of cluster mergers by comparing the detailed mapping of the hot cluster gas with high resolution mass maps and by identifying merger shocks and cold fronts. In merging clusters, relativistic particles can be re-accelerated to produce radio relics. A comparison of lensing maps and Chandra images allows us to determine the cluster morphology and dynamical state and if there are offsets between the dark matter and the hot gas.

  15. A quantitative study relating observed shear in photospheric magnetic fields to repeated flaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Smith, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper a quantitative evaluation of the shear in the magnetic field along the neutral line in an active region during an epoch of flare activity is presented. Shear is defined as the angular difference in the photosphere between the potential magnetic field, which fits the boundary conditions imposed by the observed line-of-sight field, and the observed magnetic field. For the active region studied, this angular difference (shear) is non-uniform along the neutral line with maxima occurring at the locations of repeated flare onsets. It is suggested that continued magnetic evolution causes the field's maximum shear to exceed a critical value of shear, resulting in a flare around the site of maximum shear. Evidently, the field at the site of the flare must relax to a state of shear somewhat below the critical value (but still far from potential), with subsequent evolution returning the field to the critical threshold. This inference is drawn because several flares occured at sites of maximum photospheric shear which were persistent in location.

  16. Modular model for Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within the average observed magnetopause

    PubMed Central

    Tsyganenko, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Philpott, Lydia C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Al Asad, Manar M.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to understand the sources of the planet's internal field. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft. The field of internal origin is approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT RM 3, where RM is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis. External field sources include currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross‐tail current sheet. The cross‐tail current is described by a disk‐shaped current near the planet and a sheet current at larger (≳ 5 RM) antisunward distances. The tail currents are constrained by minimizing the root‐mean‐square (RMS) residual between the model and the magnetic field observed within the magnetosphere. The magnetopause current contributions are derived by shielding the field of each module external to the magnetopause by minimizing the RMS normal component of the magnetic field at the magnetopause. The new model yields improvements over the previously developed paraboloid model in regions that are close to the magnetopause and the nightside magnetic equatorial plane. Magnetic field residuals remain that are distributed systematically over large areas and vary monotonically with magnetic activity. Further advances in empirical descriptions of Mercury's magnetospheric external field will need to account for the dependence of the tail and magnetopause currents on magnetic activity and additional sources within the magnetosphere associated with Birkeland currents and plasma distributions near the dayside magnetopause. PMID:27656335

  17. Modular model for Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within the average observed magnetopause.

    PubMed

    Korth, Haje; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A; Johnson, Catherine L; Philpott, Lydia C; Anderson, Brian J; Al Asad, Manar M; Solomon, Sean C; McNutt, Ralph L

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to understand the sources of the planet's internal field. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft. The field of internal origin is approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT RM(3), where RM is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis. External field sources include currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross-tail current sheet. The cross-tail current is described by a disk-shaped current near the planet and a sheet current at larger (≳ 5 RM ) antisunward distances. The tail currents are constrained by minimizing the root-mean-square (RMS) residual between the model and the magnetic field observed within the magnetosphere. The magnetopause current contributions are derived by shielding the field of each module external to the magnetopause by minimizing the RMS normal component of the magnetic field at the magnetopause. The new model yields improvements over the previously developed paraboloid model in regions that are close to the magnetopause and the nightside magnetic equatorial plane. Magnetic field residuals remain that are distributed systematically over large areas and vary monotonically with magnetic activity. Further advances in empirical descriptions of Mercury's magnetospheric external field will need to account for the dependence of the tail and magnetopause currents on magnetic activity and additional sources within the magnetosphere associated with Birkeland currents and plasma distributions near the dayside magnetopause.

  18. OBSERVATIONS AND MAGNETIC FIELD MODELING OF A SOLAR POLAR CROWN PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yingna; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan

    2012-10-01

    We present observations and magnetic field modeling of the large polar crown prominence that erupted on 2010 December 6. Combination of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and STEREO{sub B}ehind/EUVI allows us to see the fine structures of this prominence both at the limb and on the disk. We focus on the structures and dynamics of this prominence before the eruption. This prominence contains two parts: an active region part containing mainly horizontal threads and a quiet-Sun part containing mainly vertical threads. On the northern side of the prominence channel, both AIA and EUVI observe bright features which appear to be the lower legs of loops that go above then join in the filament. Filament materials are observed to frequently eject horizontally from the active region part to the quiet-Sun part. This ejection results in the formation of a dense-column structure (concentration of dark vertical threads) near the border between the active region and the quiet Sun. Using the flux rope insertion method, we create nonlinear force-free field models based on SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager line-of-sight magnetograms. A key feature of these models is that the flux rope has connections with the surroundings photosphere, so its axial flux varies along the filament path. The height and location of the dips of field lines in our models roughly replicate those of the observed prominence. Comparison between model and observations suggests that the bright features on the northern side of the channel are the lower legs of the field lines that turn into the flux rope. We suggest that plasma may be injected into the prominence along these field lines. Although the models fit the observations quiet well, there are also some interesting differences. For example, the models do not reproduce the observed vertical threads and cannot explain the formation of the dense-column structure.

  19. Geology Structure Identification based on Polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) Data and Field Based Observation at Ciwidey Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, R. A.; Saepuloh, A.; Suryantini

    2016-09-01

    Geological structure observation is difficult to be conducted at Quaternary volcanic field due to the classical problem at tropical region such as intensive erosion, dense vegetation covers, and rough terrain. The problem hampers the field observation especially for geological structures mapping. In order to overcome the problems, an active remote sensing technology based on Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) data was used in this study. The longer wavelength of microwave than optical region caused the SAR layer penetration higher than optics. The Ciwidey Geothermal Field, Indonesia was selected as study area because of the existence of surface manifestations with lack information about the control of geological structures to the geothermal system. Visual interpretation based on composite polarization modes was applied to identify geological structures at study area. The color composite Red-Green-Blue for HV-HH-VV polarizations provided highest texture and structural features among the other composite combination. The Linear Features Density (LFD) map was also used to interpret the fractures zones. The calculated LFD showed high anomaly about 3.6 km/km2 with two strike directions NW-SE and NE-SW. Interestingly, the surface geothermal manifestation agreed with the low anomaly of LFD. The geological structures consisted of ten faults were successfully detected and mapped. The faults type mainly are oblique-slip with strike directions NE-SW and NW-SE.

  20. OBSERVATION OF A NON-RADIAL PENUMBRA IN A FLUX EMERGING REGION UNDER CHROMOSPHERIC CANOPY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Goode, Philip; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-05-20

    The presence of a penumbra is one of the main properties of a mature sunspot, but its formation mechanism has been elusive due to a lack of observations that fully cover the formation process. Utilizing the New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory, we observed the formation of a partial penumbra for about 7 hr simultaneously at the photospheric (TiO; 7057 A) and the chromospheric (H{alpha} - 1 A) spectral lines with high spatial and temporal resolution. From this uninterrupted, long observing sequence, we found that the formation of the observed penumbra was closely associated with flux emergence under the pre-existing chromospheric canopy fields. Based on this finding, we suggest a possible scenario for penumbra formation in which a penumbra forms when the emerging flux is constrained from continuing to emerge, but rather is trapped at the photospheric level by the overlying chromospheric canopy fields.

  1. Observation of low field microwave absorption in co-doped ZnO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahule, Tebogo S.; Srinivasu, Vijaya V.; Das, Jayashree

    2016-10-01

    Room temperature low field microwave absorption (LFMA) in magnetic materials find application in microwave absorbers and low field sensors. However not all the magnetic materials show LFMA and the phenomenon is not fully understood. We report on the observation of low field microwave absorption (LFMA) or the non-resonant microwave absorption (NRMA) in the transition metal (TM) co-doped ZnO samples of the composition Zn1-x(TM:TM)xO synthesized by solid state reaction technique. LFMA peaks and hysteresis matches very well with that of the magnetization hysteresis loop and the anisotropy fields at room temperature similar to the reports in the literature for other magnetic systems. However we show through our careful experiments that such a correlation between LFMA and the magnetization does not survive at low temperatures and particularly at 10 K the LFMA hysteresis collapses in our TM co-doped ZnO system; whereas the magnetization hysteresis loop becomes very big and anisotropy field becomes bigger in the range of kOe. We interpret the LFMA as field dependent surface impedance or eddy current losses, in terms of a possible role of anomalous hall resistivity that follows magnetization and the ordinary hall resistivity that only follows the applied field. We then argue that LFMA accordingly follows magnetization or applied field when AHE or OHE dominates respectively. Also we confirm the absence of LFMA signals in the rare earth co-doped ZnO system.

  2. Modeling electron density, temperature distribution in the solar corona based on solar surface magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, A.; Rodríguez, J. M.; Vieira, L.; Coelho Stekel, T. R.; Costa, J. E. R.; Pinto, T. S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic fields constitute a natural link between the Sun, the Earth and the Heliosphere in general. The solar dynamo action maintains and strengthens the magnetic field in the solar interior. The structure of the solar corona is mostly determined by the configuration and evolution of the magnetic field. While open magnetic field lines carry plasma into the heliosphere, closed field lines confine plasma. Additionally, key physical processes that impact the evolution of Earth's atmosphere on time-scale from days to millennia, such as the soft X-ray and EUV emission, are also determined by the solar magnetic field. However, observations of the solar spectral irradiance are restricted to the last few solar cycles and are subject to large uncertainties. Here we present a physics-based model to reconstruct in near-real time the evolution of the solar EUV emission based on the configuration of the magnetic field imprinted on the solar surface and assuming that the emission lines are optically thin. The structure of the coronal magnetic field is estimated employing a potential field source surface extrapolation based on the synoptic charts. The coronal plasma temperature and density are described by a hydrostatic model. The emission is estimated to employ the CHIANTI database. The performance of the model is compared to the emission observed by EVE instrument on board SDO spacecraft. The preliminary results and uncertainties are discussed in details. Furthermore, we examine the possibility of delivery the reconstruction of the solar spectral irradiance in near-real time using the infrastructure provided by the Brazilian Space weather program (EMBRACE/INPE). This work is partially supported by CNPq/Brazil under the grant agreement no. 140779/2015-9.

  3. High-resolution observations of the polar magnetic fields of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H.; Varsik, J.; Zirin, H.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution magnetograms of the solar polar region were used for the study of the polar magnetic field. In contrast to low-resolution magnetograph observations which measure the polar magnetic field averaged over a large area, we focused our efforts on the properties of the small magnetic elements in the polar region. Evolution of the filling factor (the ratio of the area occupied by the magnetic elements to the total area) of these magnetic elements, as well as the average magnetic field strength, were studied during the maximum and declining phase of solar cycle 22, from early 1991 to mid-1993. We found that during the sunspot maximum period, the polar regions were occupied by about equal numbers of positive and negative magnetic elements, with equal average field strength. As the solar cycle progresses toward sunspot minimum, the magnetic field elements in the polar region become predominantly of one polarity. The average magnetic field of the dominant polarity elements also increases with the filling factor. In the meanwhile, both the filling factor and the average field strength of the non-dominant polarity elements decrease. The combined effects of the changing filling factors and average field strength produce the observed evolution of the integrated polar flux over the solar cycle. We compared the evolutionary histories of both filling factor and average field strength, for regions of high (70-80 deg) and low (60-70 deg) latitudes. For the south pole, we found no significant evidence of difference in the time of reversal. However, the low-latitude region of the north pole did reverse polarity much earlier than the high-latitude region. It later showed an oscillatory behavior. We suggest this may be caused by the poleward migration of flux from a large active region in 1989 with highly imbalanced flux.

  4. Horizontal flow fields observed in Hinode G-band images. II. Flow fields in the final stages of sunspot decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Balthasar, H.; Deng, N.; Liu, C.; Shimizu, T.; Wang, H.; Denker, C.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Generation and dissipation of magnetic fields is a fundamental physical process on the Sun. In comparison to flux emergence and the initial stages of sunspot formation, the demise of sunspots still lacks a comprehensive description. Aims: The evolution of sunspots is most commonly discussed in terms of their intensity and magnetic field. Here, we present additional information about the three-dimensional flow field in the vicinity of sunspots towards the end of their existence. Methods: We present a subset of multi-wavelengths observations obtained with the Japanese Hinode mission, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain during the time period 2010 November 18-23. Horizontal proper motions were derived from G-band and Ca ii H images, whereas line-of-sight velocities were extracted from VTT echelle Hα λ656.28 nm spectra and Fe i λ630.25 nm spectral data of the Hinode/Spectro-Polarimeter, which also provided three-dimensional magnetic field information. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board SDO provided continuum images and line-of-sight magnetograms, in addition to the high-resolution observations for the entire disk passage of the active region. Results: We perform a quantitative study of photospheric and chromospheric flow fields in and around decaying sunspots. In one of the trailing sunspots of active region NOAA 11126, we observe moat flow and moving magnetic features (MMFs), even after its penumbra had decayed. We also detect a superpenumbral structure around this pore. We find that MMFs follow well-defined, radial paths from the spot all the way to the border of a supergranular cell surrounding the spot. In contrast, flux emergence near the other sunspot prevents the establishment of similar well ordered flow patterns, which could be discerned around a tiny pore of merely 2 Mm diameter. After the disappearance of the sunspots/pores, a coherent patch of abnormal

  5. Radial profile of the inner heliospheric magnetic field as deduced from Faraday rotation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Garzelli, M. V.

    2013-05-01

    Faraday rotation measures (RMs) of the polarized emission from extragalactic radio sources occulted by the coronal plasma were used to infer the radial profile of the inner heliospheric magnetic field near the solar minimum. By inverting LASCO/SOHO polarized brightness (pB) data taken during the observations in May 1997, we retrieved the electron density distribution along the lines of sight to the sources, which allowed us to separate the two plasma properties that contribute to the observed RMs. By comparing the observed RM values with those theoretically predicted by a power law model of the radial component of the coronal magnetic field using a best-fitting procedure, we found that the radial component of the inner heliospheric magnetic field can be nicely approximated by a power law of the form Br = 3.76 r-2.29 G in a range of heights from about 5 to 14 R⊙. Finally, our analysis suggests that the radial computation of the potential field source surface model from the Wilcox Solar Observatory is the preferred choice near solar minimum assuming a radial field in the photosphere and a source surface located at Rss = 2.5 R⊙.

  6. Making global map of the solar surface Br from the HMI vector magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.; Liu, Y.; Sun, X.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Centeno, R.; Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.

    2013-06-01

    The Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) has made full-disk vector magnetic field measurements of the Sun with cadence of 12 minutes. The three-component solar surface magnetic field vector data are from the HMI observations with the data process pipeline modules, VFISV (Very Fast Inversion of the Stokes Vector, Borrero et al., 2011) for Milne-Eddington inversion and the minimum-energy disambiguation algorithm (Metcalf 1994, Leka et al, 2009). The models of the global corona and solar wind, such as the PFSS (potential-field source-surface) model and the MHD simulations, often use the maps of solar surface magnetic field, especially the radial component (Br) as the boundary condition. The HMI observation can provide new Br data for these model. Because of weak magnetic signals at the quiet regions of the Sun, the limb darkening, and geometric effects near solar poles, we need to apply an assumption to make a whole-surface map. In this paper, we tested two assumptions for determining Br at weak-field regions. The coronal structures calculated by the PFSS model with the vector-based Br are compared with those with the magnetogram-based Br and the corona observed by the SDO/AIA (Atmospheric Imaging Assembly). In the tested period, CR 2098, the vector-based Br map gives better agreements than the line-of-sight magnetogram data, though we need further investigation for evaluation.

  7. Constraining magnetic fields morphologies using mid-IR polarization: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han; Li, Dan; Pantin, Eric; Telesco, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Polarization arises from aligned dust grains in magnetic fields, and thus the direction of polarization can trace the direction of B fields. We present the mid-IR imaging and spectropolarimetry observations made with the GTC's CanariCam of the Herbig Ae star WL 16. WL 16 is embedded in/behind the ρ Ophiuchus molecular cloud with visual extinction of ~31 mag. It exhibits large and extended (~900 AU) emission, which is believed to come from the emission of PAHs and very small dust grains. Uniform polarization vectors from imaging polarization and the absorption-dominated polarization profile from spectropolarimetry consistently indicate a uniform foreground magnetic field oriented at about 30 deg from the North.We also model the predicted polarization patterns expected to arise from different magnetic field morphologies, which can be distinguished by high-resolution observations. As an example, we present the mid-IR polarization modeling of AB Aur, a well-studied Herbig Ae star. We incorporate polarization from dichroic absorption, emission and scattering in the modeling. The observed polarization structures are well reproduced by two components: emissive polarization arising from a poloidal B field and scattering polarization by 0.01-1 μm dust grains.

  8. On the reconstructing the coronal magnetic field from Fe XIII 10747 A emission line observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Inhester, B.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic fields in the solar corona are the dominant fields that determine the static and dynamic properties of this outermost region of the solar atmosphere. It is within this tenuous region that the magnetic force dominates the gas pressure. Direct measurement of the coronal magnetic field is one of the most challenging problems in observational solar astronomy. To date, one of the promising measurement methods that have been successfully demonstrated is the spectropolarimetric measurement of the Fe XIII 10747 A forbidden emission line (CEL) (Lin, Penn, Tomczyk 2000; Lin, Kuhn, Coulter 2004; Tomczyk et al. 2007) formed due to Hanle and Zeeman effects. However, because coronal measurements are integrated over line-of-site (LOS), it is impossible to derive the configuration of the coronal magnetic field from a single observation (from a single viewing direction). Recent development in vector tomography techniques based on IR forbidden CEL polarization measurements from several viewing direction (Kramar, Inhester, Solanki 2006; Kramar, Inhester 2007) has the potential to resolve the 3D coronal magnetic field structure. In this paper, we will present a study of the effects of instrumental characteristics on the results of vector tomographic inversion using simulated data. We also investigate the sensitivity of the vector tomographic inversion to different coronal magnetic field configuration.

  9. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Tomczyk, S. E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2016-03-10

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  10. Observations of ferrofluid flow under a uniform rotating magnetic field in a spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Díaz, Isaac; Rinaldi, Carlos; Khushrushahi, Shahriar; Zahn, Markus

    2012-04-01

    Flow of a ferrofluid in spherical and cylindrical geometries were measured under the influence of a uniform rotating magnetic field produced by two perpendicular spherical coils, a so-called fluxball, excited by quadrature currents. Using an ultrasound velocity profile technique and a commercial oil based ferrofluid (EFH1, Ferrotec) we observed rotational flow around the z-axis. In comparison, the radial component of the flow was found to be negligible. Results show that the magnitude of the azimuthal velocity profile increases as the applied magnetic field amplitude increases. This behavior is also observed for ferrofluid in a cylindrical container placed inside the fluxball cavity and inside a two-pole stator winding. These results indicate that inhomogeneities in the magnetic field produced by slots and finite height of the stator winding used in prior experiments are not the source of previously observed flows produced by a two pole stator winding. The experiments reported here either point to the existence of non-uniform demagnetizing magnetic fields due to the finite height of the cylindrical container, the existence of couple stresses and spin viscosity in ferrofluids, or to the need to develop alternate governing and constitutive equations capable of describing the experimental observations.

  11. Difficulties in Field-Based Observation among Pre-Service Teachers: Implications to Practice Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abas, Maripaz C.

    2016-01-01

    Field-based observation has long been a central part of pre-service teacher education in many countries and is crucial for implementing effective practicum of pre-service teachers. This paper focused on the perspectives of graduating pre-service teachers regarding their difficulties related to administrative support, cooperating teachers, student…

  12. Inferring plasma flow velocities from photospheric vector magnetic field observations for the investigation of flare onsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J. C.; Büchner, J.; Zhang, H.

    2008-09-01

    The amount of emergence and submergence of magnetized plasma and the horizontal motion of the footpoints of flux tubes might be crucial for the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Although the rate of flux emergence and submergence can be observationally determined near the polarity inversion line (Chae et al., 2004), the same is not true for regions away from the PIL. Also, the horizontal motions cannot be directly measured in the solar photosphere. In this sense, the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field provides valuable information which can be used to estimate photospheric plasma flows since magnetic field and plasma are closely associated (frozen-in-condition). We used three methods to estimate the photospheric plasma motion from magnetic field observations. The methods were applied to photospheric vector magnetic field data of active region NOAA 9077, observed by the Huairou Solar Observing Station (HSOS) of the National Astronomical Observatories of China before and after the ‘Bastille Day’ flare on July 13th and 14th, 2000.

  13. Observations of the longitudinal magnetic field in the transition region and photosphere of a sunspot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, W., Jr.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Hagyard, M. J.; West, E. A.; Woodgate, B. E.; Shine, R. A.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; West, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission spacraft has observed for the first time the longitudinal component of the magnetic field by means of the Zeeman effect in the transition region above a sunspot. The data presented here were obtained on three days in one sunspot, have spatial resolutions of 10 arcsec and 3 arcsec, and yield maximum field strengths greater than 1000 G above the umbrae in the spot. The method of analysis, including a line-width calibration feature used during some of the observations, is described in some detail in an appendix; the line width is required for the determination of the longitudinal magnetic field from the observed circular polarization. The transition region data for one day are compared with photospheric magnetograms from the Marshall Space Flight Center. Vertical gradients of the magnetic field are compared from the two sets of data; the maximum gradients of 0.41 to 0.62 G/km occur above the umbra and agree with or are smaller than values observed previously in the photosphere and low chromosphere.

  14. Precise calibration of CCD images with a small field of view. Application to observations of Phoebe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Vienne, A.; Han, Y. B.; Li, Z. L.

    2004-09-01

    A precise astrometric calibration method is presented for a CCD image with a small field of view. Its detailed computational formulae are given, and its feasibility and accuracy are tested by the observations of both the star and Phoebe, the 9th satellite of Saturn. This new method can also be applicable to other planetary satellites, asteroids and optical counterparts of extragalactic radio sources.

  15. A biophysical observation model for field potentials of networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons

    PubMed Central

    beim Graben, Peter; Rodrigues, Serafim

    2013-01-01

    We present a biophysical approach for the coupling of neural network activity as resulting from proper dipole currents of cortical pyramidal neurons to the electric field in extracellular fluid. Starting from a reduced three-compartment model of a single pyramidal neuron, we derive an observation model for dendritic dipole currents in extracellular space and thereby for the dendritic field potential (DFP) that contributes to the local field potential (LFP) of a neural population. This work aligns and satisfies the widespread dipole assumption that is motivated by the “open-field” configuration of the DFP around cortical pyramidal cells. Our reduced three-compartment scheme allows to derive networks of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) models, which facilitates comparison with existing neural network and observation models. In particular, by means of numerical simulations we compare our approach with an ad hoc model by Mazzoni et al. (2008), and conclude that our biophysically motivated approach yields substantial improvement. PMID:23316157

  16. Direct observation of Oersted-field-induced magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostripes

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, V.; Pizzini, S.; Rougemaille, N.; Ranno, L.; Fruchart, O.; Wagner, E.; Vogel, J.; Cros, V.; Jimenez, E.; Camarero, J.; Urbanek, M.; Gaudin, G.; Sirotti, F.

    2011-01-15

    We have used time-resolved x-ray photoemission electron microscopy to investigate the magnetization dynamics induced by nanosecond current pulses in NiFe/Cu/Co nanostripes. A large tilt of the NiFe magnetization in the direction transverse to the stripe is observed during the pulses. We show that this effect cannot be quantitatively understood from the amplitude of the Oersted field and the shape anisotropy. High-frequency oscillations observed at the onset of the pulses are attributed to precessional motion of the NiFe magnetization about the effective field. We discuss the possible origins of the large magnetization tilt and the potential implications of the static and dynamic effects of the Oersted field on current-induced domain-wall motion in such stripes.

  17. Radar observations of field-aligned plasma propagations associated with nasa's PMG experiment. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    NASA's Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) tethered satellite mission was launched in June 1993 to verify the ability of hollow cathode plasma sources to couple electric currents from an electrodynamic tether into the ambient ionospheric plasma. This large-scale coupling process resulted in turbulent plasma signatures associated with the orbiting plasma generator, which propagated over great distances along the earth's geomagnetic field lines. VHF radars in Hilo, Hawaii and Jicamarca, Peru recorded observations of these field-aligned disturbances as part of the experiment. Based on analysis of these radar observations and tracking data of PMG's orbit, the effective propagation velocity of these traveling plasma waveforms was calculated to be of the order of 1000 meters per second. Detection of these disturbances, associated with PMG's passage overhead, supports the existence of a phantom current loop allowing current flow along the magnetic field lines of the earth and into the lower ionosphere from either end of an electrodynamic tether.

  18. Radar observations of field-aligned plasma propagations associated with NASA's PMG experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Darren M.

    1994-09-01

    NASA's Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) tethered satellite mission was launched in June 1993 to verify the ability of hollow cathode plasma sources to couple electric currents from an electrodynamic tether into the ambient ionospheric plasma. This large-scale coupling process resulted in turbulent plasma signatures associated with the orbiting plasma generator, which propagated over great distances along the earth's geomagnetic field lines. VHF radars in Hilo, Hawaii and Jicamarca, Peru recorded observations of these field-aligned disturbances as part of the experiment. Based on analysis of these radar observations and tracking data of PMG's orbit, the effective propagation velocity of these traveling plasma waveforms was calculated to be of the order of 1000 meters per second. Detection of these disturbances, associated with PMG's passage overhead, supports the existence of a phantom current loop allowing current flow along the magnetic field lines of the earth and into the lower ionosphere from either end of an electrodynamic tether.

  19. High-latitude dayside electric fields and currents during strong northward interplanetary magnetic field - Observations and model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. Robert; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    1988-01-01

    On July 23, 1983 the IMF turned strongly northward, becoming about 22 nT for several hours. Using a combined data set of ionospheric convection measurements made by the Sondre Stromfjord incoherent scatter radar and convection inferred from Greenland magnetometer measurements, the onset of the reconfiguration of the high-latitude ionospheric currents is found to occur about 3 min after the northward IMF encounters the magnetopause. The large-scale reconfiguration of currents, however, appears to evolve over a period of about 22 min. These observations and the results of numerical simulations indicate that the dayside polar-cap electric field observed during strong northward IMF is produced by a direct electrical current coupling with the solar wind.

  20. Cosmic Rays, Magnetic Fields and Diffuse Emissions: Combining Observations from Radio to Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Peter

    With the advent of WMAP, Planck, and Fermi-LAT telescopes the diffuse emission from the Milky Way has received renewed attention. Observations of the different components of the diffuse emission reveal information on Cosmic Rays (CRs), magnetic fields (B-fields) and the interstellar medium. CRs interact with the interstellar medium and the B-fields in the Milky Way, producing diffuse emission from radio to gamma rays. The fundamental problem is that CRs, B-fields, and the interstellar medium are not precisely known. In fact, despite intensive studies, the B-field intensity and topology, and CR spectra and distribution throughout the Galaxy are still uncertain. As a consequence unequivocally disentangling and describing the diffuse components simultaneously using a single wavelength domain is impossible. Our approach to disentangling and describing the diffuse emission components is to simultaneously consider the diffuse emission in multiple frequency domains. We propose to exploit the entire database of the present radio surveys, microwave observations (WMAP and Planck), X-ray observations (INTEGRAL) and gamma-ray observations (COMPTEL and Fermi-LAT) in order to analyze their diffuse emission in a combined multi-wavelength approach. We will jointly infer information on the spectra and distribution of CRs in the Galaxy, and on Galactic B-fields, with unprecedented accuracy. Finally we will be able to describe the baseline Galactic diffuse emissions and characterize Milky Way structures and their emission mechanisms, which have attracted the attention of the scientific community recently. This project is innovative and essential for maximizing the scientific return from the presently available data in a multidisciplinary view and uses novel approaches. The results will benefit NASA-related science generally and the return from the named missions specifically.

  1. EVIDENCE FOR QUASI-ISOTROPIC MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM HINODE QUIET-SUN OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Asensio Ramos, A.

    2009-08-20

    Some recent investigations of spectropolarimetric observations of the Zeeman effect in the Fe I lines at 630 nm carried out with the Hinode solar space telescope have concluded that the strength of the magnetic field vector in the internetwork regions of the quiet Sun is in the hG regime and that its inclination is predominantly horizontal. We critically reconsider the analysis of such observations and carry out a complete Bayesian analysis with the aim of extracting as much information as possible from them, including error bars. We apply the recently developed BAYES-ME code that carries out a complete Bayesian inference for Milne-Eddington atmospheres. The sampling of the posterior distribution function is obtained with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo scheme and the marginal distributions are analyzed in detail. The Kullback-Leibler divergence is used to study the extent to which the observations introduce new information in the inference process resulting in sufficiently constrained parameters. Our analysis clearly shows that only upper limits to the magnetic field strength can be inferred, with fields in the kG regime completely discarded. Furthermore, the noise level present in the analyzed Hinode observations induces a substantial loss of information for constraining the azimuth of the magnetic field. Concerning the inclination of the field, we demonstrate that some information is available to constrain it for those pixels with the largest polarimetric signal. The results also point out that the field in pixels with small polarimetric signals can be nicely reproduced in terms of a quasi-isotropic distribution.

  2. Cone of Darkness: Finding Blank-sky Positions for Multi-object Wide-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N. P. F.

    2014-05-01

    We present the Cone of Darkness, an application to automatically configure blank-sky positions for a series of stacked, wide-field observations, such as those carried out by the SAMI instrument on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT). The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) uses a plug-plate to mount its 13×61 core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical plane at the telescope's prime focus. To make the most efficient use of each plug-plate, several observing fields are typically stacked to produce a single plate. When choosing blank-sky positions for the observations it is most effective to select these such that one set of 26 holes gives valid sky positions for all fields on the plate. However, when carried out manually this selection process is tedious and includes a significant risk of error. The Cone of Darkness software aims to provide uniform blank-sky position coverage over the field of observation, within the limits set by the distribution of target positions and the chosen input catalogs. This will then facilitate the production of the best representative median sky spectrum for use in sky subtraction. The application, written in C++, is configurable, making it usable for a range of instruments. Given the plate characteristics and the positions of target holes, the software segments the unallocated space on the plate and determines the position which best fits the uniform distribution requirement. This position is checked, for each field, against the selected catalog using a TAP ADQL search. The process is then repeated until the desired number of sky positions is attained.

  3. Explaining Mercury's Magnetic Field Observables Using Dynamo Models with Stable Layers and Laterally Variable Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z.; Zuber, M. T.; Stanley, S.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury's surface magnetic field is unique among planetary fields for its weak intensity, spin-aligned axisymmetry, and large dipole offset (Anderson et al., 2011). Reproducing these features with dynamo models is challenging and requires additions to the 'standard' dynamo setup. Here we explain the magnetic field observables by a combination of two effects: (1) a stably-stratified layer at the top of the outer core, and (2) a low-degree spherical harmonic (SH) heat flux variation at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). A stably-stratified layer at the top of the outer core was proposed by Stevenson (1980,1982) to explain the weak intensity and axisymmetry of Saturn's magnetic field. Recent studies (Christensen, 2006, Christensen & Wicht, 2008) used a stable layer to produce the low-intensity and axisymmetric features of Mercury's magnetic field, but didn't typically produce a dipole offset similar to the observed value. Stratification in Mercury's upper core region can occur due to a sub-adiabatic heat flux or an enrichment of sulfur there. Mercury's equator-to-north pole crustal thinning trend suggests a low degree SH global crustal thickness pattern, which can result in heat flux variability at the CMB. We use the Kuang & Bloxham (1999) numerical dynamo scheme to model Mercury's magnetic field generation. We use an internal structure model for Mercury that has a stably-stratified layer at the top of the outer core. We also apply degree-1 SH heat flux variations at the CMB. We vary the stable layer thickness, the inner core size and the magnitude of the CMB heat flux variations. We find models that can produce surface magnetic fields with a weak intensity, high axisymmetry and a large offset, similar to the observed features of Mercury.

  4. Observation of Landau levels in potassium-intercalated graphite under a zero magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Guo, Donghui; Kondo, Takahiro; Machida, Takahiro; Iwatake, Keigo; Okada, Susumu; Nakamura, Junji

    2012-01-01

    The charge carriers in graphene are massless Dirac fermions and exhibit a relativistic Landau-level quantization in a magnetic field. Recently, it has been reported that, without any external magnetic field, quantized energy levels have been also observed from strained graphene nanobubbles on a platinum surface, which were attributed to the Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions in graphene formed by a strain-induced pseudomagnetic field. Here we show the generation of the Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions on a partially potassium-intercalated graphite surface without applying external magnetic field. Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions indicate the graphene character in partially potassium-intercalated graphite. The generation of the Landau levels is ascribed to a vector potential induced by the perturbation of nearest-neighbour hopping, which may originate from a strain or a gradient of on-site potentials at the perimeters of potassium-free domains.

  5. Observation of thermally driven field-like spin torque in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Arnab; Shukla, Amit Kumar; Konishi, Katsunori; Jain, Sourabh; Asam, Nagarjuna; Bhuktare, Swapnil; Singh, Hanuman; Lam, Duc Duong; Fujii, Yuya; Miwa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Tulapurkar, Ashwin A.

    2016-07-01

    We report the thermally driven giant field-like spin-torque in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) on application of heat current from top to bottom. The field-like term is detected by the shift of the magneto-resistance hysteresis loop applying temperature gradient. We observed that the field-like term depends on the magnetic symmetry of the MTJ. In asymmetric structures, with different ferromagnetic materials for free and fixed layers, the field-like term is greatly enhanced. Our results show that a pure spin current density of the order of 109 A/m2 can be produced by creating a 120 mK temperature difference across 0.9 nm thick MgO tunnelling barrier. Our results will be useful for writing MTJ and domain wall-based memories using thermally driven spin torque.

  6. The Z3 model of Saturns magnetic field and the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic field observations obtained by the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer are compared with the Z(sub 3) model magnetic field. These Pioneer 11 observations, obtained at close-in radial distances, constitute an important and independent test of the Z(sub 3) zonal harmonic model, which was derived from Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 fluxgate magnetometer observations. Differences between the Pioneer 11 magnetometer and the Z(sub 3) model field are found to be small (approximately 1%) and quantitatively consistent with the expected instrumental accuracy. A detailed examination of these differences in spacecraft payload coordinates shows that they are uniquely associated with the instrument frame of reference and operation. A much improved fit to the Pioneer 11 observations is obtained by rotation of the instrument coordinate system about the spacecraft spin axis by 1.4 degree. With this adjustment, possibly associated with an instrumental phase lag or roll attitude error, the Pioneer 11 vector helium magnetometer observations are fully consistent with the Voyager Z(sub 3) model.

  7. Use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems in Observations of Glaciers, Ice Sheets, Sea Ice and Snow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld Mayer, M. U.

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) are being used increasingly in observations of the Earth, especially as such UAS become smaller, lighter and hence less expensive. In this paper, we present examples of observations of snow fields, glaciers and ice sheets and of sea ice in the Arctic that have been collected from UAS. We further examine possibilities for instrument miniaturization, using smaller UAS and smaller sensors for collecting data. The quality and type of data is compared to that of satellite observations, observations from manned aircraft and to measurements made during field experiments on the ground. For example, a small UAS can be sent out to observe a sudden event, such as a natural catastrophe, and provide high-resolution imagery, but a satellite has the advantage of providing the same type of data over much of the Earth's surface and for several years, but the data is generally of lower resolution. Data collected on the ground typically have the best control and quality, but the survey area is usually small. Here we compare micro-topographic measurements made on snow fields the Colorado Rocky Mountains with airborne and satellite data.

  8. The performance of field scientists undertaking observations of early life fossils while in simulated space suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, D.; Rask, J. C.; George, S. C.; de Leon, P.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Blank, J.; Slocombe, J.; Silburn, K.; Steele, H.; Gargarno, M.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulated Apollo Extravehicular Activity's (EVA) at the 3.45 Ga Australian 'Pilbara Dawn of life' (Western Australia) trail with field and non-field scientists using the University of North Dakota's NDX-1 pressurizable space suit to overview the effectiveness of scientist astronauts employing their field observation skills while looking for stromatolite fossil evidence. Off-world scientist astronauts will be faced with space suit limitations in vision, human sense perception, mobility, dexterity, the space suit fit, time limitations, and the psychological fear of death from accidents, causing physical fatigue reducing field science performance. Finding evidence of visible biosignatures for past life such as stromatolite fossils, on Mars, is a very significant discovery. Our preliminary overview trials showed that when in simulated EVAs, 25% stromatolite fossil evidence is missed with more incorrect identifications compared to ground truth surveys but providing quality characterization descriptions becomes less affected by simulated EVA limitations as the science importance of the features increases. Field scientists focused more on capturing high value characterization detail from the rock features whereas non-field scientists focused more on finding many features. We identified technologies and training to improve off-world field science performance. The data collected is also useful for NASA's "EVA performance and crew health" research program requirements but further work will be required to confirm the conclusions.

  9. Field and material stresses predict observable surface forces in optical and electrostatic manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Brandon A.; Sheppard, Cheyenne J.

    2016-09-01

    The momentum of light in media has been one of the most debated topics in physics over the past one hundred years. Originally a theoretical debate over the electrodynamics of moving media, practical applications have emerged over the past few decades due to interest in optical manipulation and nanotechnology. Resolution of the debate identifies a kinetic momentum as the momentum of the fields responsible for center of mass translations and a canonical momentum related to the coupled field and material system. The optical momentum resolution has been considered incomplete because it did not uniquely identify the full stress-energy-momentum (SEM) tensor of the field-kinetic subsystem. A consequence of this partial resolution is that the field-kinetic momentum could be described by three of the leading formulations found in the literature. The Abraham, Einstein-Laub, and Chu SEM tensors share the field-kinetic momentum, but their SEM tensors differ resulting in competing force densities. We can show now that the Abraham and Einstein-Laub formulations are invalid since their SEM tensors are not frame invariant, whereas the Chu SEM tensor satisfies relativistic principles as the field-kinetic formulation. However, a number of reports indicate that the force distribution in matter may not accurately represent experimental observations. In this correspondence, we show that the field-kinetic SEM tensor can be used along with the corresponding material subsystem to accurately predict experimental force and stress distributions. We model experimental examples from optical and static manipulation of particles and fluids.

  10. Space Technology 5 Multipoint Observations of Temporal and Spatial Variability of Field-Aligned Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Wang, Y.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST5) is a constellation mission consisting of three microsatellites. It provides the first multipoint magnetic field measurements in low Earth orbit, which enables us to separate spatial and temporal variations. In this paper, we present a study of the temporal variability of field-aligned currents using the ST5 data. We examine the field-aligned current observations during and after a geomagnetic storm and compare the magnetic field profiles at the three spacecraft. The multipoint data demonstrate that mesoscale current structures, commonly embedded within large-scale current sheets, are very dynamic with highly variable current density and/or polarity in approx.10 min time scales. On the other hand, the data also show that the time scales for the currents to be relatively stable are approx.1 min for mesoscale currents and approx.10 min for large-scale currents. These temporal features are very likely associated with dynamic variations of their charge carriers (mainly electrons) as they respond to the variations of the parallel electric field in auroral acceleration region. The characteristic time scales for the temporal variability of mesoscale field-aligned currents are found to be consistent with those of auroral parallel electric field.

  11. Gridded field observations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and decabromodiphenyl ethane in the atmosphere of north China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yifan; Ma, Jin; Qiu, Xinghua; Lin, Yan; Yang, Qiaoyun; Zhu, Tong

    2013-08-06

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are important pollutants, yet few data on ambient BFRs levels have been available for North China, one of the most developed regions of the country. In this study, we investigated levels and spatial distributions of BFRs based on gridded field observations coupled with passive air sampling in the aforementioned region. A model incorporating both point and nonpoint sources was developed to simulate the spatial distribution and to achieve source apportionment. Although high concentration was observed at an electronic-waste (e-waste) recycling site, the median level of the sum of tri-, tetra-, hepta-, hexa-, and hepta-PBDEs (∑10PBDEs) was 0.56 ng/sample, which was lower than those observed previously in mainland China. Source apportionment revealed that nonpoint emissions contributed nearly 78% of ∑10PBDEs observed in this study. In contrast, high levels of BDE-209 and DBDPE were observed, with median concentrations of 4.0 and 10.2 ng/sample, respectively. Point sources located in the region around Laizhou Bay, Shandong Province were the major sources, which contributed 31% of BDE-209 and 70% of DBDPE observed in this study, indicating that this manufacturing base was the most important source region for atmospheric deca-BFRs in North China. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report source apportionment of atmospheric BFRs based on gridded field observations.

  12. MAVEN MAG Observations of Magnetic Field Enhancements and Decreases in the Induced Magnetosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soobiah, Y. I. J.; Espley, J. R.; Connerney, J. E. P.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Gruesbeck, J.; Halekas, J. S.; Mitchell, D. L.; McFadden, J. P.; Brain, D. A.; Jakosky, B. M.; Schneider, N. M.; Mazelle, C. X.; Andersson, L.; Ergun, R. E.; Jain, S.; Deighan, J.; McClintock, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent results have shown the occurrence of a large-scale flux rope (enhancement in magnetic field strength and rotation in magnetic field vectors) on the dayside of Mars as associated with a dayside current sheet region forming at the proximity of strong crustal magnetic fields. This dayside current sheet region including the example of the large-scale flux rope occurred when the draped solar wind magnetic field showed a +By component in the MSO frame. All events involved similar anisotropic pitch angle distribution of electrons with low-energy field aligned electrons and higher-energy trapped electrons, indicating either the mixing of trapped magnetosheath electrons with low energy field aligned ionospheric electrons and/or the pitch angle diffusion of ionospheric electrons. During a time of weak draped field, the current sheet region became highly extended and was observed alongside a decrease in magnetic field strength and highly anisotropic plasma indicative of a mirror mode structure or magnetic hole. The occurrence of magnetic decreases or magnetic holes are an established feature of the solar wind and are often found in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and have also been observed near Jupiter, Venus and comets. More recently, mirror mode structures have been reported within the Earth's magnetosphere. The occurrence of the mirror mode instability could result in the excitation of ULF waves and has also been related to Alfvén waves that could cause heating of the local plasma. Hence, both the large-scale flux ropes and mirror mode structures of current sheet regions on the dayside of Mars may have an important role in ionospheric heating and atmospheric escape at Mars. Therefore, using an automated routine we will attempt to search for the occurrence of magnetic field enhancements and magnetic field decreases in measurements of magnetic field by the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) satellite Magnetometer (MAG) instrument whilst comparing to the

  13. A theory of electron cyclotron waves generated along auroral field lines observed by ground facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Yoon, Peter H.; Freund, H. P.

    1989-01-01

    A generation mechanism for radio waves in the frequency range 150 - 700 kHz observed by ground facilities is suggested in terms of an electromagnetic electron cyclotron instability driven by auroral electrons. The excited waves can propagate downward along the ambient magnetic field lines and are thus observable with ground facilities. The trapped auroral electrons are supposed to play an important role in the generation process, because they give rise to a thermal anisotropy which consequently leads to the instability. The present work is a natural extension of the theory proposed earlier by Wu et al. (1983) which was discussed in a different context but may be used to explain the observed waves originated at low altitudes. This paper presents a possible wave generation mechanism valid in the entire auroral field-line region of interest.

  14. Retrieval of Hydrometeor Drop Size Distributions from TRMM Field Campaign Profiler Doppler Velocity Spectra Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Christopher R.; Gage, Kenneth S.

    2003-01-01

    Consistent with the original proposal and work plan, this project focused on estimating the raindrop size distributions (DSDs) retrieved from vertically pointing Doppler radar profilers and analyzing the relationship of the retrieved DSDs with the dynamics of the precipitation processes. The first phase of this project focused on developing the model to retrieve the DSD from the observed Doppler velocity spectra. The second phase used this model to perform DSD retrievals from the profiler observations made during the TRMM Ground Validation Field Campaigns of TEFLUN-B, TRMM-LBA, and KWAJEX. The third phase of this project established collaborations with scientists involved with each field campaign in order to validate the profiler DSD estimates and to enable the profiler retrievals to be used in their research. Through these collaborations, the retrieved DSDs were placed into context with the dynamical processes of the observed precipitating cloud systems.

  15. Squeezed bispectrum in the δ N formalism: local observer effect in field space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Yuichiro; Vennin, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    The prospects of future galaxy surveys for non-Gaussianity measurements call for the development of robust techniques for computing the bispectrum of primordial cosmological perturbations. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to the calculation of the squeezed bispectrum in multiple-field inflation. With use of the δ N formalism, our framework sheds new light on the recently pointed out difference between the squeezed bispectrum for global observers and that for local observers, while allowing one to calculate both. For local observers in particular, the squeezed bispectrum is found to vanish in single-field inflation. Furthermore, our framework allows one to go beyond the near-equilateral ("small hierarchy") limit, and to automatically include intrinsic non-Gaussianities that do not need to be calculated separately. The explicit computational programme of our method is given and illustrated with a few examples.

  16. Magnetic field observations on DE-A and -B. [Dynamics Explorer A and B satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farthing, W. H.; Sugiura, M.; Ledley, B. G.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Magnetic field observations are conducted on each of the DE-A and -B satellites by a triaxial fluxgate magnetometer. In the basic mode the instrumental resolution is + or - 1.5 nT; in addition, the DE-A magnetometer has two modes of higher resolution: + or - 0.25 nT and + or - 20 pT. The sampling rate is 16 vector samples per second in all modes. The experiment objectives include observations of field-aligned currents, magnetospheric equatorial currents, and ULF waves. These observations, taking full advantage of the specifically selected orbits of the two spacecraft and of the unique combination of instruments, are performed to achieve a better understanding of the electrodynamic coupling within the atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere system and of wave-particle interactions which contribute to the coupling processes.

  17. Cassini SAR, radiometry, scatterometry and altimetry observations of Titan's dune fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Le, Gall A.; Janssen, M.A.; Wye, L.C.; Hayes, A.G.; Radebaugh, J.; Savage, C.; Zebker, H.; Lorenz, R.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Kirk, R.L.; Lopes, R.M.C.; Wall, S.; Callahan, P.; Stofan, E.R.; Farr, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Large expanses of linear dunes cover Titan's equatorial regions. As the Cassini mission continues, more dune fields are becoming unveiled and examined by the microwave radar in all its modes of operation (SAR, radiometry, scatterometry, altimetry) and with an increasing variety of observational geometries. In this paper, we report on Cassini's radar instrument observations of the dune fields mapped through May 2009 and present our key findings in terms of Titan's geology and climate. We estimate that dune fields cover ???12.5% of Titan's surface, which corresponds to an area of ???10millionkm2, roughly the area of the United States. If dune sand-sized particles are mainly composed of solid organics as suggested by VIMS observations (Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and atmospheric modeling and supported by radiometry data, dune fields are the largest known organic reservoir on Titan. Dune regions are, with the exception of the polar lakes and seas, the least reflective and most emissive features on this moon. Interestingly, we also find a latitudinal dependence in the dune field microwave properties: up to a latitude of ???11??, dune fields tend to become less emissive and brighter as one moves northward. Above ???11?? this trend is reversed. The microwave signatures of the dune regions are thought to be primarily controlled by the interdune proportion (relative to that of the dune), roughness and degree of sand cover. In agreement with radiometry and scatterometry observations, SAR images suggest that the fraction of interdunes increases northward up to a latitude of ???14??. In general, scattering from the subsurface (volume scattering and surface scattering from buried interfaces) makes interdunal regions brighter than the dunes. The observed latitudinal trend may therefore also be partially caused by a gradual thinning of the interdunal sand cover or surrounding sand sheets to the north, thus allowing wave penetration in the underlying

  18. Hinode magnetic-field observations of solar flares for exploring the energy storage and trigger mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Toshifumi; Inoue, Satoshi; Kawabata, Yusuke

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares abruptly release the free energy stored as a non-potential magnetic field in the corona and may be accompanied by eruptions of the coronal plasma. Magnetic reconnection is considered as a physical process in which the magnetic energy is converted to kinetic energy, thermal energy, and particle acceleration, but the location of magnetic reconnection is difficult to identify directly because of low emission measure at the reconnection region. We are still lack of observational knowledge on the 3D magnetic configuration and physical conditions for leading to flare trigger. Accurate measurements of vector magnetic fields at the solar photosphere, provided by the Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode, help us in exploring how the free energy is stored in the solar atmosphere and how the release of the energy is triggered. This presentation will review the magnetic field configuration and possible candidates for flare trigger primarily based on Hinode observations of some large flare events, which may include X5.4/X1.3 flares on 7 March 2012, X1.2 flare on 7 January 2014 and two M-class flares on 2 February 2014. The 7 March 2012 events were observed in an active region with delta-type sunspots, showing a strong shear in the entire magnetic system. For the sheared magnetic structure, the inclusion of a small-scale trigger field was identified near the polarity inversion line with excitation of a high-speed material flow in the horizontally oriented magnetic field formed nearly in parallel to the polarity inversion line. The observations suggest that gas dynamics at the solar surface play a vital role of leading to the onset of flares. The 7 January 2014 event is an exceptional event which most scientists would not be able to predict its occurrence. The flare unexpectedly happened apart from the sheared magnetic field region. The M-class flares on 2 February 2014 were observed in the magnetic field configuration, in which four magnetic domains were

  19. Magnetic field rotation at the dayside magnetopause: AMPTE/IRM observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Keyser, J.; Roth, M.

    1998-04-01

    Given the large-scale magnetosheath flow pattern around the magnetosphere, the tangential discontinuity magnetopause model of De Keyser and Roth predicts, for a prescribed magnetic field rotation angle and rotation sense, where equilibrium is possible on the dayside magnetopause surface and where it is not. In this paper we verify these predictions using 5 s time resolution magnetic field and plasma observations of the low-latitude dayside magnetospheric boundary acquired by the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Ion Release Module satellite. The model is confirmed by (1) the dominant presence of large positive magnetic field rotations among the dawnside crossings north of the equator, (2) the observation of positive and negative rotations near the stagnation point and at the duskside, and (3) the rare occurrence and questionable tangential discontinuity nature of low magnetic shear dawnside crossings. The absence of tangential discontinuity equilibrium in dawnside low shear crossings is consistent with the observation of increased dawnside low-latitude boundary layer thickness for northward magnetosheath field reported in the literature.

  20. Observational Analysis of the Relation between Coronal Loop Heating and Photospheric Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsukawa, Y.

    2007-10-01

    The solar corona and the photosphere are linked through magnetic field lines, and heating energy is supposed to be supplied from the footpoints of each coronal loop along magnetic field lines. Thus it is important to examine properties of photospheric magnetic fields at the footpoints of the coronal loops in order to understand heating of the coronal loops. We performed simultaneous observations of photospheric magnetic properties and coronal loop structures using the ground based telescopes and Transition Region And Coronal Explorer (TRACE). Footpoint locations were identified in the TRACE images, and the structure in the photosphere was examined by Advanced Stokes Polarimeter (ASP) or Dutch Open Telescope (DOT). Most of the coronal loops emanating from a sunspot had their footpoints around the boundary between the umbra and the penumbra. Furthermore, bright loops were revealed to have their footpoints at the locations where there was highly interlaced magnetic configuration. We observed fragmentation of an umbra and formation of a light bridge in decaying sunspots, and found possible association between such phenomena in the decaying spots and the coronal loops. These observational results suggest that spatial fluctuation of magnetic fields forms current sheets at the base of the corona, resulting in heating of the coronal loops.

  1. Observations of a Newly "Captured" Magnetosheath Field Line: Evidence for "Double Reconnection"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Michael O.; Avanov, Levon A.; Craven, Paul D.; Mozer, Forrest S.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    We have begun an investigation of the nature of the low-latitude boundary layer in the mid-altitude cusp region using data from the Polar spacecraft. This region has been routinely sampled for about three months each year for the periods 1999-2001 and 2004-2006. The low-to-mid-energy ion instruments frequently observed dense, magnetosheath-like plasma deep (in terms of distance from the magnetopause and in invariant latitude) in the magnetosphere. One such case, taken during a period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), shows magnetosheath ions within the magnetosphere with velocity distributions resulting from two separate merging sites along the same field lines. Cold ionospheric ions were also observed counterstreaming along the field lines, evidence that these field lines were closed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that double merging can produce closed field .lines populated by solar wind plasma. Through the use of individual cases such as this and statistical studies of a broader database we seek to understand the morphology of the LLBL as it projects from the sub-solar region into the cusp. We will present preliminary results of our ongoing study.

  2. Magnetic field fluctuations observed by the Swarm constellation in the nighttime mid-latitude topside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Luhr, H.; Kervalishvili, G.; Rauberg, J.; Michaelis, I.; Stolle, C.; Kwak, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    Using single-satellite observations on Low-Earth-Orbits (LEO), some previous studies suggested that electric and magnetic field fluctuations observed in the nighttime mid-latitude ionosphere originate from medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs). With the inherently 1-dimensional sampling, however, those studies could not confirm whether (1) the electric and magnetic field fluctuations are spatial structures rather than temporal variations, and (2) horizontal shapes of the field fluctuation regions generally have mirror symmetry with respect to the magnetic equator, just as MSTIDs do. In this presentation we analyze magnetic field data sampled by three identical Swarm satellites. The results support the idea of a close connection between mid-latitude magnetic fluctuations (MMFs) and MSTIDs in the nighttime sector. Combined with the relationship between MMFs and MSTIDs, the MMF climatology can be used for extending that of MSTIDs, which has been poorly investigated over oceans. In addition, we have conducted a scale size analysis and found that coherence lengths of MMFs are typically shorter than 150 km. We also discuss the possibility that the MMF regions are aligned with the background magnetic field.

  3. Toward the Direct Measurement of Coronal Magnetic Fields: An Airborne Infrared Spectrometer for Eclipse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samra, J.; DeLuca, E. E.; Golub, L.; Cheimets, P.

    2014-12-01

    The solar magnetic field enables the heating of the corona and provides its underlying structure. Energy stored in coronal magnetic fields is released in flares and coronal mass ejections (CME) and provides the ultimate source of energy for space weather. Therefore, direct measurements of the coronal magnetic field have significant potential to enhance understanding of coronal dynamics and improve solar forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of coronal field lines in the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on the origin of the slow solar wind. While current instruments routinely observe only the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, a proposed airborne spectrometer will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. The targeted lines are four forbidden magnetic dipole transitions between 2 and 4 μm. The airborne system will consist of a telescope, grating spectrometer, and pointing/stabilization system to be flown on the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) during the August 2017 total solar eclipse. The project incorporates several optical engineering challenges, centered around maintaining adequate spectral and spatial resolution in a compact and inexpensive package and on a moving platform. Design studies are currently underway to examine the tradeoffs between various optical geometries and control strategies for the pointing/stabilization system. The results will be presented and interpreted in terms of the consequences for the scientific questions. In addition, results from a laboratory prototype and simulations of the final system will be presented.

  4. Seasonal-scale nearshore morphological evolution: Field observations and numerical modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggiero, P.; Walstra, D.-J.R.; Gelfenbaum, G.; van, Ormondt M.

    2009-01-01

    A coupled waves-currents-bathymetric evolution model (DELFT-3D) is compared with field measurements to test hypotheses regarding the processes responsible for alongshore varying nearshore morphological changes at seasonal time scales. A 2001 field experiment, along the beaches adjacent to Grays Harbor, Washington, USA, captured the transition between the high-energy erosive conditions of winter and the low-energy beach-building conditions typical of summer. The experiment documented shoreline progradation on the order of 10-20 m and on average approximately 70 m of onshore sandbar migration during a four-month period. Significant alongshore variability was observed in the morphological response of the sandbar over a 4 km reach of coast with sandbar movement ranging from 20 m of offshore migration to over 175 m of onshore bar migration, the largest seasonal-scale onshore migration event observed in a natural setting. Both observations and model results suggest that, in the case investigated here, alongshore variations in initial bathymetry are primarily responsible for the observed alongshore variable morphological changes. Alongshore varying incident hydrodynamic forcing, occasionally significant in this region due to a tidal inlet and associated ebb-tidal delta, was relatively minor during the study period and appears to play an insignificant role in the observed alongshore variability in sandbar behavior at kilometer-scale. The role of fully three-dimensional cell circulation patterns in explaining the observed morphological variability also appears to be minor, at least in the case investigated here. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Voyager Observations of Magnetic Fields and Cosmic Rays in the Heliosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Stone, E.; McDonald, F. B.

    2011-01-01

    The major features of the profile of greater than 70 MeV/nuc cosmic ray intensity (CRI) observed by Voyager 1 (VI) in the heliosheath from 2005.8-2010.24 are described by the empirical "CR-B" relation as the cumulative effect of variations of the magnetic field strength B. The CRI profile observed by Voyager 2 (V2) from 2008.60 to 2010.28 in the heliosheath is also described by the CR-B relation. On a smaller scale, of the order of a hundred days, a sequence on CRI decreases observed by V 1 during 2006 was interpreted as the effect of a propagating interplanetary shock first interacting with the termination shock, then moving past V1, and finally reflecting from the heliopause and propagating back to V1. Our observations show that the second CRI decrease in this sequence began during the passage of a "Global Merged Interaction Region" (GMIR), 40 days after the arrival of the GMIR and its possible shock. The first and third CRI decreases in the sequence were associated with local enhancements of B. The magnetic field observations associated with the second sequence of 3 cosmic ray intensity decreases observed by V 1 in 2007/2008 are more difficult to reconcile with the scenario of Webber et al. (2009) and the CR-B relation. The discrepancy might indicate the importance of latitudinal effects

  6. Field-aligned currents and magnetospheric convection - A comparison between MHD simulations and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond J.; Ogino, Tatsuki

    1988-01-01

    A time-dependent three-dimensional MHD model was used to investigate the magnetospheric configuration as a function of the interplanetary magnetic field direction when it was in the y-z plane in geocentric solar magnetospheric coordinates. The model results show large global convection cells, tail lobe cells, high-latitude polarcap cells, and low latitude cells. The field-aligned currents generated in the model magnetosphere and the model convection system are compared with observations from low-altitude polar orbiting satellites.

  7. Observation of Thermoelectric Currents in High-Field Superconductor-Ferromagnet Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolenda, S.; Wolf, M. J.; Beckmann, D.

    2016-03-01

    We report on the experimental observation of spin-dependent thermoelectric currents in superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions in high magnetic fields. The thermoelectric signals are due to a spin-dependent lifting of the particle-hole symmetry, and are found to be in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. The maximum Seebeck coefficient inferred from the data is about -100 μ V /K , much larger than commonly found in metallic structures. Our results directly prove the coupling of spin and heat transport in high-field superconductors.

  8. Observational Signatures and Non-Gaussianities ofGeneral Single Field Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang; Huang, Min-xin; Kachru, Shamit; Shiu, Gary

    2006-05-05

    We perform a general study of primordial scalar non-Gaussianities in single field inflationary models. We consider models where the inflaton Lagrangian is an arbitrary function of the scalar field and its first derivative, and the sound speed is arbitrary. We find that under reasonable assumptions, the non-Gaussianity is completely determined by 5 parameters. In special limits of the parameter space, one finds distinctive ''shapes'' of the non-Gaussianity. In models with a small sound speed, several of these shapes would become potentially observable in the near future. Different limits of our formulae recover various previously known results.

  9. Effects of the Observed Meridional Flow Variations since 1996 on the Sun's Polar Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The cause of the low and extended minimum in solar activity between Sunspot Cycles 23 and 24 was the small size of Sunspot Cycle 24 itself - small cycles start late and leave behind low minima. Cycle 24 is small because the polar fields produced during Cycle 23 were substantially weaker than those produced during the previous cycles and those (weak) polar fields are the seeds for the activity of the following cycle. The polar fields are produced by the latitudinal transport of magnetic flux that emerged in low-latitude active regions. The polar fields thus depend upon the details of both the flux emergence and the flux transport. We have measured the flux transport flows (differential rotation, meridional flow, and supergranules) since 1996 and find systematic and substantial variation in the meridional flow alone. Here we present experiments using a Surface Flux Transport Model in which magnetic field data from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI are assimilated into the model only at latitudes between 45-degrees north and south of the equator (this assures that the details of the active region flux emergence are well represented). This flux is then transported in both longitude and latitude by the observed flows. In one experiment the meridional flow is given by the time averaged (and north-south symmetric) meridional flow profile. In the second experiment the time-varying and north-south asymmetric meridional flow is used. Differences between the observed polar fields and those produced in these two experiments allow us to ascertain the effects of these meridional flow variations on the Sun s polar fields.

  10. Generating wind fields that honour point observations and physical conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlabing, Dirk; Bárdossy, András

    2015-04-01

    Wind exhibits a strong spatial and temporal variability. In the application of lake modelling, these features are important for simulating water flows and stratification correctly, as mean and variance of wind speed determine the input of momentum into the lake. This makes a mere interpolation of point measurements an unsuitable method for producing model input. Additionally to concrete point measurements, more subtle aspects of wind fields are to be reproduced. It follows from the fact that wind vectors represent moving air that a wind field has to be divergency-free in order to be mass-conservative. Further, a temporal sequence of wind fields has to comply with the Navier-Stokes equation in order to conserve momentum. All these constraints can be met by representing the conditioned wind field as a linear combination of unconditioned, normally distributed random fields that individually possess the same spatial covariance structuref as observed wind fields. The aim of having the same covariance structure in the conditioned wind field is formulated as an optimization problem with respect to the weights used in the linear combination. With the help of Quadratic Programming (QP) and exploiting the convexity of the problem, feasible solutions can easily be found. In this QP problem, observations become linear constraints. Conservation laws can be incorporated by introducing control volumes in a similar fashion as they are used in fluid mechanics. Budgets of flows through these control volumes become integral conditions in the QP problem. The applicability of the approach will be shown using an artificial example and real-world data measured on shore and on a moving boat on Lake Constance.

  11. Clear widens the field for observations of the Sun with multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Dirk; Gorceix, Nicolas; Goode, Philip R.; Marino, Jose; Rimmele, Thomas; Berkefeld, Thomas; Wöger, Friedrich; Zhang, Xianyu; Rigaut, François; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    The multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) pathfinder Clear on the New Solar Telescope in Big Bear Lake has provided the first-ever MCAO-corrected observations of the Sun that show a clearly and visibly widened corrected field of view compared to quasi-simultaneous observations with classical adaptive optics (CAO) correction. Clear simultaneously uses three deformable mirrors, each conjugated to a different altitude, to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. While the MCAO correction was most effective over an angle that is approximately three times wider than the angle that was corrected by CAO, the full 53'' field of view did benefit from MCAO correction. We further demonstrate that ground-layer-only correction is attractive for solar observations as a complementary flavor of adaptive optics for observational programs that require homogenous seeing improvement over a wide field rather than diffraction-limited resolution. We show illustrative images of solar granulation and of a sunspot obtained on different days in July 2016, and present a brief quantitative analysis of the generalized Fried parameters of the images. The movies associated to Fig. 1 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Magnetospheric Response to Interplanetary Field Enhancements: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Peter; Russell, Christopher; Lai, Hairong

    2014-05-01

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth's magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth's field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth's magnetopause. These ground stations spread across many

  13. Observation of magnetic field generation via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Ross, J. S.; Zylstra, A. B.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C. C.; Levy, M. C.; Li, C. K.; Meinecke, J.; Morita, T.; Petrasso, R.; Plechaty, C.; Remington, B. A.; Ryutov, D. D.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Takabe, H.; Park, H.-S.

    2015-02-01

    Collisionless shocks can be produced as a result of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow, and therefore are common in many astrophysical systems. The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of sufficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability efficiently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. This result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.

  14. A 4-meter wide field coronagraph space telescope for general astrophysics and exoplanet observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenerelli, Domenick; Angel, Roger; Burge, Jim; Guyon, Olivier; Zabludoff, Ann; Belikov, Ruslan; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Egerman, Robert

    2010-07-01

    The Wide Field Coronagraph Telescope (WFCT) is a 4-meter space telescope for general astrophysics and exoplanet observations that meets the 2000 Decadal Committee requirements. This paper presents a design for a 4-m diameter, off-axis space telescope that offers high performance in both wide field and coronagraphic imaging modes. A 3.8 x 3.3-m unobstructed elliptical pupil is provided for direct coronagraphic imaging of exoplanets and a 4-m diameter pupil for wide-field imaging from far-ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared (IR). The off-axis wide-field optics are all reflective and designed to deliver an average of 12 nm wavefront aberrations over a 6 x 24 arcminute field of view (FOV), therefore providing diffraction-limited images down to 300 nm wavelength and 15 mas images down to a wavelength limit set only by the mirror coatings. The coronagraph with phase-induced amplitude apodization (PIAA) provides diffraction suppression around a 360-degree field with high Strehl and sensitivity at the 1e-10 level to an inner working angle of 2 λ/D (or 50 mas at 500 nm wavelength). This paper focuses on the optical design that allows the above imaging features to be combined in single telescope, and gives a preliminary spacecraft design and costing, assuming a distant trailing orbit.

  15. Observations of ELF fields near the low-altitude CRRES chemical releases

    SciTech Connect

    Koons, H.C.; Roeder, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) performed a series of seven low altitude chemical releases between September 10, 1990, and August 12, 1991. Immediately following each chemical release, electric and magnetic fields were detected by the extremely low frequency wave analyzer sensors of the Low Altitude Satellite Studies of Ionospheric Irregularities (LASSII) experiment on the spacecraft. The time series and spectra of the two field components are quite similar for each of the releases but vary in detail from release to release. The index of refraction estimated from the ratio of the magnetic field to the electric field is too small by about 2 orders of magnitude for either the right hand wave or the extraordinary wave modes which are the only propagating electromagnetic modes in the detected band above the O+ ion gyrofrequency (about 30 Hz). ELF hiss observed at higher altitudes is found to be propagating in the extraordinary wave mode with the correct index of refraction. This confirms that the intensity measurements are being made correctly by the instrument and that an alternative explanation is required for the signals detected following the chemical releases. The authors show that the waves are primarily electrostatic and that the magnitude of the wave magnetic field is consistent with the transverse magnetic field component of ion acoustic waves.

  16. Observation of magnetic field generation via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Ross, J. S.; Zylstra, A. B.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C. C.; Levy, M. C.; Li, C. K.; Meinecke, J.; Morita, T.; Petrasso, R.; Plechaty, C.; Remington, B. A.; Ryutov, D. D.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Takabe, H.; Park, H.-S.

    2015-01-19

    Collisionless shocks can be produced as a result of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow, and therefore are common in many astrophysical systems. The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of su fficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability effi ciently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. Furthermore, this result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.

  17. Structure of Mercury's Global Magnetic Field Determined from MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Johnson, C. L.; Korth, H.; Purucker, M. E.; Winslow, R. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L.; Raines, J. M.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2011-12-01

    On 18 March 2011, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was inserted into a near-polar orbit about Mercury with a periapsis altitude of 200 km, an inclination of 82.5°, an apoapsis altitude of 15,300 km, and nominal orbit period of 12 hours. Magnetometer (MAG) data acquired since 23 March provide multiple circuits in solar local time and planetary longitude and yield extensive coverage of the planetary magnetic field sufficient to resolve the dominant magnetic fields of internal and external origin. Plasma pressures exceeding the magnetic pressure are commonly found within ±30° latitude of the equator and complicate solutions for the planetary field that use conventional spherical harmonic analysis. However, because the planetary field constrains the locations of external currents (e.g., the magnetopause and tail currents) to be symmetric about the magnetic equator, the location of that equator can be identified from the geometry of the magnetic field without the need to correct for local plasma pressures and external currents. We identify Mercury's magnetic equator from the orbital positions at which the cylindrical radial magnetic field component vanishes and find that the magnetic equator is offset north of the geographic equator by 484 ± 11 km. With this offset for the dipole we then analyze the tilt, position, and intensity of the best-fit dipole moment and find that the global planetary field is best represented as a southward-directed dipole, centered on the spin axis, tilted from that axis by less than 2.5°, and having a moment of 195 ± 10 nT-RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius. Mercury's axially symmetric but equatorially asymmetric field may imply lateral variations in heat flow at the planet's core-mantle boundary. This solution provides the basis for defining Mercury-solar-magnetospheric coordinates used to order observations of Mercury's magnetosphere, constructing a model for the magnetopause and

  18. Spontaneous Formation of Closed-Field Torus Equilibrium via Current Jump Observed in an Electron-Cyclotron-Heated Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshinaga, T.; Uchida, M.; Tanaka, H.; Maekawa, T.

    2006-03-31

    Spontaneous current jump resulting in the formation of closed field equilibrium has been observed in electron-cyclotron-heated toroidal plasmas under steady external fields composed of a toroidal field and a relatively weak vertical field in the low aspect ratio torus experiment device. This bridges the gap between the open field equilibrium maintained by a pressure-driven current in the external field and the closed field equilibrium at a larger current. Experimental results and theoretical analyses suggest a current jump model that is based on the asymmetric electron confinement along the field line appearing upon simultaneous transitions of field topology and equilibrium.

  19. 1969 - 2010: Multicolor Photometric Observations of Population II Field Horizontal-Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. Davis

    2010-05-01

    From 1969 to 2010 I have been involved in a photometric study of Population II Field Horizontal-Branch stars. I started by making Stromgren four-color observations at Kitt Peak National Observatory and then Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. I had taken spectral plates of all my selected areas on which I marked all the A-type stars. These stars were then observed photometrically. New FHB stars could be identified by their large c1 indices, caused by their greater (u-b) colors. Later four new filters were added ( U V B S ). With Richard Boyle of the Vatican Observatory we observed on Mt. Graham (Arizona) on the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope.We plan follow-up observations of the new FHB stars found.

  20. 1969 to 2010: Multicolor Photometric Observations of Population II Field Horizontal-Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. D.

    2011-04-01

    From 1969 to 2010 I have been involved in a photometric study of Population II Field Horizontal-Branch Stars and published several papers on this topic in BOTT from 1967 thru 1972. I started by making Strömgren four-color observations at Kitt Peak National Observatory and then at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. I had taken spectral plates of all my selected areas on which I marked all the A-type stars. These stars were then observed photometrically. New FHB stars could be identified by their large c indices, caused by their greater (u-b) colors. Later four new filters were added (U, V, B, S). With Richard Boyle of the Vatican Observatory we observed on Mt. Graham (Arizona) on the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope. We are making follow-up observations of the new FHB stars found.

  1. Finite field of view effects on inversion of limb thermal emission observations. [balloon sounding of stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Guo, J.; Conrath, B. J.; Kunde, V. G.; Maguire, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that the technique of thermal emission spectroscopy provides an effective means for remote sounding of stratospheric temperature structure and constituent distributions. One procedure for measuring the stratospheric infrared spectrum involves the conduction of observations along ray paths tangent to the stratospheric limb. Thermal emission limb tangent observations have certain advantages compared to other types of observations. The techniques for determining temperature and trace gas distributions from limb thermal emission radiances are based on the assumption that the bulk of opacity lies near the tangent point. Ideally, the field of view (FOV) of the observing instrument should be very small. The effect of a finite FOV is to reduce the spatial resolution of the retrieved temperature and constituent profiles. The present investigation is concerned with the effects of the FOV on the inversion of infrared thermal emission measurements for balloon platforms. Attention is given to a convenient method for determining the weighting functions.

  2. Proto-Type Development of Optical Wide-field Patrol Network and Test Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Choi, Y.; Jo, J.; Moon, H.; Yim, H.; Park, Y.; Hae, Y.; Park, S.; Choi, J.; Son, J.

    2014-09-01

    We present a prototype system developed for optical satellite tracking and its early test observation results. The main objective of the OWL (Optical Wide-field patroL) network is to get orbital information for Korean domestic satellites using optical means only and to maintain their orbital elements. The network is composed of 5 small wide-field telescopes deployed over the world. Each observing station is operated in fully robotic manner from receiving observation schedule to reporting the result, and controlled by the headquarter located in Daejeon, Korea, where orbit calculation and observation strategy will be determined. We developed a compact telescope system for robotic observation and easy maintenance. The telescope is 0.5m of aperture diameter with Rechey-Cretian configuration and its field of view is 1.1 deg. It is equipped with 4K CCD with 9um pixel size, and its pixel scale is 1.2 arcsec/pixel. A chopper wheel with variable speed is adopted to get more points in a single shot. The CCD camera and all the rotating parts (chopper wheel, de-rotator, and filter wheel) are integrated into one compact component called a wheel station. Each observing station is equipped with a fully automatic dome and heavy duty environment monitoring system. We could get an image every 20 seconds and up to ~100 trail points in a single exposure. Each point is time-tagged by ~1/1000 second precision. For one of best cases, we could estimate satellite position with RMS ~ 0.5km accuracy in the along-track with only 4 exposures (~100 points). The first system was installed at the Mongolian site after completing verification test at the testbed site in Daejeon, Korea. The second and third system will be installed in the end of this year.

  3. Phase microscopy using light-field reconstruction method for cell observation.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-08-01

    The refractive index (RI) distribution can serve as a natural label for undyed cell imaging. However, the majority of images obtained through quantitative phase microscopy is integrated along the illumination angle and cannot reflect additional information about the refractive map on a certain plane. Herein, a light-field reconstruction method to image the RI map within a depth of 0.2 μm is proposed. It records quantitative phase-delay images using a four-step phase shifting method in different directions and then reconstructs a similar scattered light field for the refractive sample on the focus plane. It can image the RI of samples, transparent cell samples in particular, in a manner similar to the observation of scattering characteristics. The light-field reconstruction method is therefore a powerful tool for use in cytobiology studies.

  4. Observation of spectrum effect on the measurement of intrinsic error field on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui-Hui; Sun, You-Wen; Qian, Jin-Ping; Shi, Tong-Hui; Shen, Biao; Gu, Shuai; Liu, Yue-Qiang; Guo, Wen-Feng; Chu, Nan; He, Kai-Yang; Jia, Man-Ni; Chen, Da-Long; Xue, Min-Min; Ren, Jie; Wang, Yong; Sheng, Zhi-Cai; Xiao, Bing-Jia; Luo, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Yong; Liu, Hai-Qing; Zhao, Hai-Lin; Zeng, Long; Gong, Xian-Zu; Liang, Yun-Feng; Wan, Bao-Nian; The EAST Team

    2016-06-01

    Intrinsic error field on EAST is measured using the ‘compass scan’ technique with different n  =  1 magnetic perturbation coil configurations in ohmically heated discharges. The intrinsic error field measured using a non-resonant dominated spectrum with even connection of the upper and lower resonant magnetic perturbation coils is of the order {{b}r2,1}/{{B}\\text{T}}≃ {{10}-5} and the toroidal phase of intrinsic error field is around {{60}{^\\circ}} . A clear difference between the results using the two coil configurations, resonant and non-resonant dominated spectra, is observed. The ‘resonant’ and ‘non-resonant’ terminology is based on vacuum modeling. The penetration thresholds of the non-resonant dominated cases are much smaller than that of the resonant cases. The difference of penetration thresholds between the resonant and non-resonant cases is reduced by plasma response modeling using the MARS-F code.

  5. Observation of field emission from GeSn nanoparticles epitaxially grown on silicon nanopillar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bartolomeo, Antonio; Passacantando, Maurizio; Niu, Gang; Schlykow, Viktoria; Lupina, Grzegorz; Giubileo, Filippo; Schroeder, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We apply molecular beam epitaxy to grow GeSn-nanoparticles on top of Si-nanopillars patterned onto p-type Si wafers. We use x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm a metallic behavior of the nanoparticle surface due to partial Sn segregation as well as the presence of a superficial Ge oxide. We report the observation of stable field emission (FE) current from the GeSn-nanoparticles, with turn on field of 65 {{V}} μ {{{m}}}-{{1}} and field enhancement factor β ˜ 100 at anode-cathode distance of ˜0.6 μm. We prove that FE can be enhanced by preventing GeSn nanoparticles oxidation or by breaking the oxide layer through electrical stress. Finally, we show that GeSn/p-Si junctions have a rectifying behavior.

  6. Land subsidence caused by the East Mesa geothermal field, California, observed using SAR interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Massonnet, D.; Holzer, T.; Vadon, H.

    1997-01-01

    Interferometric combination of pairs of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired by the ERS-1 satellite maps the deformation field associated with the activity of the East Mesa geothermal plant, located in southern California. SAR interferometry is applied to this flat area without the need of a digital terrain model. Several combinations are used to ascertain the nature of the phenomenon. Short term interferograms reveal surface phase changes on agricultural fields similar to what had been observed previously with SEASAT radar data. Long term (2 years) interferograms allow the study of land subsidence and improve prior knowledge of the displacement field, and agree with existing, sparse levelling data. This example illustrates the power of the interferometric technique for deriving accurate industrial intelligence as well as its potential for legal action, in cases involving environmental damages. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Orbit and Gravity Field Solutions from Swarm GPS Observations - First Result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggi, A.; Dahle, C.; Arnold, D.; Bock, H.; Flechtner, F.

    2014-12-01

    Although ESA's Earth Explorer Mission Swarm is primarily dedicated to measure the Earth's magnetic field, it may also serve as a gravity field mission. Equipped with GPS receivers, accelerometers, star-tracker assemblies and laser retro-reflectors, the three Swarm satellites are potentially capable to be used as a high-low satellite-to-satellite tracking (hl-SST) observing system, following the missions CHAMP (first single-satellite hl-SST mission), GRACE (twin-satellite mission with additional ultra-precise low-low SST and GOCE (single-satellite mission additionally equipped with a gradiometer). GRACE, dedicated to measure the time-variability of the gravity field, is the only mission still in orbit, but its lifetime will likely end before launch of its follow-on mission GRACE-FO in August 2017 primarily due to aging of the onboard batteries after meanwhile more than 12 years of operation. Swarm is probably a good candidate to provide time-variable gravity field solutions and to close a potential gap between GRACE and GRACE-FO. Consisting of three satellites, Swarm also offers to use inter-satellite GPS-derived baselines as additional observations. However, as of today it is not clear if such information will substantially improve the gravity field solutions. Nevertheless, the properties of the Swarm constellation with two lower satellites flying in a pendulum-like orbit and a slightly differently inclined third satellite at higher altitude still represent a unique observing system raising expectations at least compared to CHAMP derived time-variable gravity field solutions. Whatever processing method will be applied for Swarm gravity field recovery, its success strongly depends on the quality of the Swarm Level 1b data as well as the quality of the derived Swarm orbits. With first Level 1b data sets available since mid of May 2014 (excluding accelerometer data), first results for Swarm orbits and baselines, as well as Swarm gravity field solutions are presented

  8. Constraints on the Observed Zonal Flows from the Magnetic Fields in Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. J.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2003-05-01

    The zonal winds on the surface of the giant planets are very strong ( 100m/s ) and stable (on a decadal time scale). Observations by the Galileo probe suggest that the zonal flow might be deep seated. However, the magnitude of the zonal flow must be reduced to a small value in the interior of the giant planets because the flow is defined relative to the magnetic field frame of reference (System III) and very large zonal flows can not be tolerated in a high conductivity region. The mechanisms for reducing the magnitude of the zonal flow and the coupling between the zonal flow and magnetic field are unclear. Here we use a coupled Navier-Stokes equation and the magnetic induction equation in steady state to study this. From Navier-Stokes, we find that the zonal flow vth can be expressed in three parts: vth(s,z) = a(s) + Bth2/4μ0ρ Ω s + F(grad(ρ ),Bth)/4μ0ρ Ω s, where a(s) is an arbitrary function of cylindrical radius (s) only, z is the coordinate parallel to the rotation axis, Bth is the toroidal field, μ 0 is the permeability of free space, ρ (s,z) is the density, Ω is the planetary rotation and F is a function of the density gradient (grad(ρ )) and the toroidal magnetic field. The first part is the geostrophic flow consistent with the Taylor-Proudman theorem. The second part is due to the tensile force that arises from the curvature of the toroidal field, and always leads a prograde flow. The third part comes from the density variation and meridional gradient of the toroidal field, and may lead to the prograde flow or the retrograde flow. Whether the flow observed on the surface could be reduced to small values in the interior will depend on the direction of the flow, the density gradient and also the structure of the toroidal magnetic field. It can also be shown that the magnitude of the generated toroidal magnetic field in the interior of the giant planets is very large and around 10 Tesla for consistency with the observed zonal flow on the surface of

  9. Magneto-frictional Modeling of Coronal Nonlinear Force-free Fields. II. Application to Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2016-09-01

    A magneto-frictional module has been implemented and tested in the Message Passing Interface Adaptive Mesh Refinement Versatile Advection Code (MPI-AMRVAC) in the first paper of this series. Here, we apply the magneto-frictional method to observations to demonstrate its applicability in both Cartesian and spherical coordinates, and in uniform and block-adaptive octree grids. We first reconstruct a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) on a uniform grid of 1803 cells in Cartesian coordinates, with boundary conditions provided by the vector magnetic field observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) at 06:00 UT on 2010 November 11 in active region NOAA 11123. The reconstructed NLFFF successfully reproduces the sheared and twisted field lines and magnetic null points. Next, we adopt a three-level block-adaptive grid to model the same active region with a higher spatial resolution on the bottom boundary and a coarser treatment of regions higher up. The force-free and divergence-free metrics obtained are comparable to the run with a uniform grid, and the reconstructed field topology is also very similar. Finally, a group of active regions, including NOAA 11401, 11402, 11405, and 11407, observed at 03:00 UT on 2012 January 23 by SDO/HMI is modeled with a five-level block-adaptive grid in spherical coordinates, where we reach a local resolution of 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 06 pixel-1 in an area of 790 Mm × 604 Mm. Local high spatial resolution and a large field of view in NLFFF modeling can be achieved simultaneously in parallel and block-adaptive magneto-frictional relaxations.

  10. Chandra X-ray Observations of Young Clusters. Volume II; Orion Flanking Fields Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Solange V.; Rebull, Luisa; Stauffer, John; Strom, Stephen; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Hearty, Thomas; Kopan, Eugene L.; Pravdo, Steven; Makidon, Russell; Jones, Burton

    2004-01-01

    We present results of Chandra observations of two flanking fields (FFs) in Orion, outside the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). The observations were taken with the ACIS-I camera with an exposure time of about 48 ks each field. We present a catalog of 417 sources, which includes X-ray luminosity, optical and infrared photometry, and X-ray variability information. We have found 91 variable sources, 33 of which have a flarelike light curve and 11 of which have a pattern of a steady increase or decrease over a 10 hr period. The optical and infrared photometry for the stars identified as X-ray sources are consistent with most of these objects being pre-main-sequence stars with ages younger than 10 Myr. We present evidence for an age difference among the X-ray-selected samples of NGC 2264, Orion FFs, and ONC, with NGC 2264 being the oldest and ONC being the youngest.

  11. Observation of Bose-Einstein condensation in a strong synthetic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Colin J.; Burton, William Cody; Chung, Woo Chang; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Extensions of Berry’s phase and the quantum Hall effect have led to the discovery of new states of matter with topological properties. Traditionally, this has been achieved using magnetic fields or spin-orbit interactions, which couple only to charged particles. For neutral ultracold atoms, synthetic magnetic fields have been created that are strong enough to realize the Harper-Hofstadter model. We report the first observation of Bose-Einstein condensation in this system and study the Harper-Hofstadter Hamiltonian with one-half flux quantum per lattice unit cell. The diffraction pattern of the superfluid state directly shows the momentum distribution of the wavefunction, which is gauge-dependent. It reveals both the reduced symmetry of the vector potential and the twofold degeneracy of the ground state. We explore an adiabatic many-body state preparation protocol via the Mott insulating phase and observe the superfluid ground state in a three-dimensional lattice with strong interactions.

  12. Kilometric radio waves generated along auroral field lines observed by ground facilities - A theoretical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Wu, C. S.; Yoon, Peter H.

    1991-01-01

    A theory of generation of radio waves observed by ground-based facilities in the frequency range 150-700 kHz is discussed. This work is a continuation of an earlier discussion (Wu et al., 1989) in which it was proposed that the trapped electrons along the auroral field lines can lead to a cyclotron instability which amplifies the whistler waves observed at ground level. The objective of the present study is to investigate the propagation effect on the wave amplification and to examine whether the proposed mechanism is indeed viable.

  13. Observing the nonequilibrium dynamics of the quantum transverse-field Ising chain in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Viehmann, Oliver; von Delft, Jan; Marquardt, Florian

    2013-01-18

    We show how a quantum Ising spin chain in a time-dependent transverse magnetic field can be simulated and experimentally probed in the framework of circuit QED with current technology. The proposed setup provides a new platform for observing the nonequilibrium dynamics of interacting many-body systems. We calculate its spectrum to offer a guideline for its initial experimental characterization. We demonstrate that quench dynamics and the propagation of localized excitations can be observed with the proposed setup and discuss further possible applications and modifications of this circuit QED quantum simulator.

  14. Observation of enhanced field emission properties of Au/TiO2 nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Girish P.; Bagal, Vivekanand S.; Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; Late, Dattatray J.; More, Mahendra A.; Chavan, Padmakar G.

    2016-05-01

    Simple and low-cost method of thermal annealing was used to decorate Gold (Au) nanoparticles on aligned TiO2 nanotubes. The aligned TiO2 nanotubes were decorated by Au nanoparticles with an average diameter of 9, 18 and 28 nm (aligned TiO2 nanotubes referred as specimen A and TiO2 nanotubes decorated by Au nanoparticles with average diameter of 9, 18 and 28 nm are referred as specimen B, C and D, respectively). The detailed characterization such as structural, morphological and elemental analysis of TiO2 and Au/TiO2 nanocomposite have been carried out using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, the meticulous comparative field emission characteristics of the aligned TiO2 nanotubes and Au/TiO2 nanocomposite have been performed. The turn-on field defined for the current density of 10 μA/cm2 has been found to be 3.9, 2.8, 3.2 and 3.7 V/μm for specimen A, B, C and D, respectively. The observed low turn-on field of specimen B has been found to be superior than the other semiconducting nanocomposites reported in the literature. The emission current stability over a period of 3 h is found to be better for all the specimens. To the best of our knowledge, a systematic field emission study of Au/TiO2 nanocomposite has not been explored. The observed superior field emission study of Au/TiO2 nanocomposite indicates their possible use in micro/nanoelectronic devices.

  15. Simulation of Satellite Observations of Induced Magnetic Fields using Scripted Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaudo, J. T.; Constable, C.; Parker, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    Scripted finite element methods allow flexible investigations of the influence of asymmetric external source fields and 3-dimensional (3D) internal electrical conductivity structure in the problem of global geomagnetic depth sounding. Our forward modeling is performed in the time and frequency domains via FlexPDE, a commercial finite element modeling package, and the technique has been validated against known solutions to 3D steady state and time-dependent problems. The induction problem is formulated in terms of the magnetic vector potential and electric scalar potential, and mesh density is managed both explicitly and through adaptive mesh refinement. We investigate the effects of 3D Earth conductivity on both satellite and ground-based magnetic field observations in the form of a geographically varying conductance map of the crust and oceans overlying a radially symmetric core and mantle. This map is used in conjunction with a novel boundary condition based on Ampere's Law to model variable near-surface induction without the computational expense of a 3D crust/ocean mesh and is valid for magnetic signals in the frequency range of interest for satellite induction studies. The simulated external magnetic field is aligned with Earth's magnetic pole, rather than its rotational pole, and increases in magnitude along the Earth/Sun axis. Earth rotates through this field with a period of 24 hours. Electromagnetic c-responses estimated from satellite data under the assumption that the primary and induced fields are dipolar in structure are known to be biased with respect to local time. We investigate the influence of Earth's rotation through the non-uniform external field on these c-responses, to determine whether this can explain the observed local time bias.

  16. Magnetic field observations in the near-field the 28 June 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers, California, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, M.J.; Mueller, R.J.; Sasai, Yoichi

    1994-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that large magnetic field changes occur prior to, and during, large earthquakes. Two continuously operating proton magnetometers, LSBM and OCHM, at distances of 17.3 and 24.2 km, respectively, from the epicenter of the 28 June 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers earthquake, recorded data through the earthquake and its aftershocks. These two stations are part of a differentially connected array of proton magnetometers that has been operated along the San Andreas fault since 1976. The instruments have a sensitivity of 0.25 nT or better and transmit data every 10 min through the GOES satellite to the USGS headquarters in Menlo Park, California. Seismomagnetic offsets of −1.2 ± 0.6 and −0.7 ± 0.7 nT were observed at these sites. In comparison, offsets of −0.3 ± 0.2 and −1.3 ± 0.2 nT were observed during the 8 July 1986 ML 5.9 North Palm Springs earthquake, which occurred directly beneath the OCHM magnetometer site. The observations are generally consistent with seismomagnetic models of the earthquake, in which fault geometry and slip have the same from as that determined by either inversion of the seismic data or inversion of geodetically determined ground displacements produced by the earthquake. In these models, right-lateral rupture occurs on connected fault segments in a homogeneous medium with average magnetization of 2 A/m. The fault-slip distribution has roughly the same form as the observed surface rupture, and the total moment release is 1.1 × 1020 Nm. There is no indication of diffusion-like character to the magnetic field offsets that might indicate these effects result from fluid flow phenomena. It thus seems unlikely that these earthquake-generated offsets and those produced by the North Palm Springs earthquake were generated by electrokinetic effects. Also, there are no indications of enhanced low-frequency magnetic noise before the earthquake at frequencies below 0.001 Hz.

  17. Convulsive threshold in humans and rats and magnetic field changes: observations during total solar eclipse.

    PubMed

    Keshavan, M S; Gangadhar, B N; Gautam, R U; Ajit, V B; Kapur, R L

    1981-03-10

    Convulsive thresholds were measured in 26 psychiatric patients who were receiving electroconvulsive treatment, and in 8 rats subjects to electroconvulsive shocks, during the recent the recent total solar eclipse day (February 16th, 1980) and on control days. Our results showed that there was a significant reduction in the convulsive thresholds of both humans and rats at the time of solar eclipse, probably occurring due to the observed geomagnetic field variation of 19 Gammas.

  18. Observations of Field Line Resonances by Low-Altitude ST-5 Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST-5) mission is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6deg inclination angle. Due to the Earth's rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pe 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2- 3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that this unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  19. TAOS Project: Searching for Variable Stars in the Selected TAOS Fields and Optical Followup Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngeow, Chow Choong; Chang, D.; Pan, K.; Chung, T.; Koptelova, E.; TAOS Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    The Taiwan-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) project is aimed to find Kuiper Belt Objects (KBO) and measure their size distribution using the occultation technique. The TAOS project employed four 20-inch wide-field (F/1.9, 3 degree-squared FOV) telescopes, equipped with a 2K x 2K CCD, to simultaneously monitor the same patch of the sky. All four TAOS telescopes, which can be operated automatically, were located at the Lulin Observatory in central Taiwan. The TAOS project has been continuously taking data since 2005. In addition of finding KBO, the dense sampling strategy employed in TAOS can also be used to find variable stars. We report the search of variable stars from selected TAOS fields at this Meeting. For example, we found about 50 candidate variables (out of 2600 stars) in TAOS 60 Field (RA: 04h48m00s, DEC: +20d46m20s, with limiting magnitudes about15 mag. at S/N=10), including three previously known variables, using sigma deviation and Stetson's J-index methods. The available data in this field spanned about 150 days in time. However, TAOS observations were conducted using a customized filter. We therefore initiated a followup program to observe and construct the light curves of these candidate variables in the BVRI bands, using the Lulin's One-Meter telescope, Lulin's SLT telescope (16-inch aperture) and 32-inch telescope from the Tenagra II Observatory. The multi-band optical followup observation will help in improving the classification of these candidates, estimate their BVRI mean magnitudes, colors as well as extinction. This will enable a wide range of research in astrophysics for these variables. We also present our preliminary results based on the first season of the followup observations. CCN acknowledges the support from NSC 98-2112-M-008-013-MY3.

  20. Calculating Coronal Mass Ejection Magnetic Field at 1 AU Using Solar Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Kunkel, V.

    2013-12-01

    It is well-established that most major nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms are caused by solar wind structures with long durations of strong southward (Bz < 0) interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Such geoeffective IMF structures are associated with CME events at the Sun. Unfortunately, neither the duration nor the internal magnetic field vector of the ejecta--the key determinants of geoeffectiveness--is measurable until the observer (e.g., Earth) passes through the ejecta. In this paper, we discuss the quantitative relationships between the ejecta magnetic field at 1 AU and remotely observable solar quantities associated with the eruption of a given CME. In particular, we show that observed CME trajectories (position-time data) within, say, 1/3 AU of the Sun, contain sufficient information to allow the calculation of the ejecta magnetic field (magnitude and components) at 1 AU using the Erupting Flux Rope (EFR) model of CMEs. Furthermore, in order to accurately determine the size and arrival time of the ejecta as seen by a fixed observer at 1 AU (e.g., ACE), it is essential to accurately calculate the three-dimensional geometry of the underlying magnetic structure. Accordingly, we have extended the physics-based EFR model to include a self-consistent calculation of the transverse expansion taking into account the non-symmetric drag coupling between an expanding CME flux rope and the ambient solar wind. The dependence of the minor radius of the flux rope at 1 AU that determines the perceived size of the ejecta on solar quantities is discussed. Work supported by the NRL Base Program.

  1. Electric field observations of time constants related to charging and charge neutralization processes in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Evans, D. S.; Troim, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Polar 5 electric field results are reviewed, and the transients from Polar 3 are presented. The phenomena are discussed from the standpoint of space charge. On the basis of the Polar 5 results, the large magnitude of the electric field from Polar 3 is seen as indicating that the observed space charge was probably within a few km or less of the payload. Reference is made to Cole's prediction (1960) that charges in the ionosphere would reach equilibrium with a time constant of the order of a few microsec. The processes involved in the two cases presented here require time constants of the order of ms. If the sheath dimensions are taken to be between 50 and 100 m, which is not considered unreasonable in view of the electric field measurements, then a qualitative estimate of the neutralization time would be the transit time for ions across the sheath. Since the kinetic velocity of a 1-eV proton is approximately 14 m/s, it would traverse the distance in 4 to 8 ms, assuming freedom of movement across magnetic field lines. This is the order of the decay times observed on Polar 5.

  2. Neural network integration of field observations for soil endocrine disruptor characterisation.

    PubMed

    Aitkenhead, M J; Rhind, S M; Zhang, Z L; Kyle, C E; Coull, M C

    2014-01-15

    A neural network approach was used to predict the presence and concentration of a range of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), based on field observations. Soil sample concentrations of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and site environmental characteristics, drawn from the National Soil Inventory of Scotland (NSIS) database, were used. Neural network models were trained to predict soil EDC concentrations using field observations for 184 sites. The results showed that presence/absence and concentration of several of the EDCs, mostly no longer in production, could be predicted with some accuracy. We were able to predict concentrations of seven of 31 compounds with r(2) values greater than 0.25 for log-normalised values and of eight with log-normalised predictions converted to a linear scale. Additional statistical analyses were carried out, including Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), Mean Error (ME), Willmott's index of agreement, Percent Bias (PBIAS) and ratio of root mean square to standard deviation (RSR). These analyses allowed us to demonstrate that the neural network models were making meaningful predictions of EDC concentration. We identified the main predictive input parameters in each case, based on a sensitivity analysis of the trained neural network model. We also demonstrated the capacity of the method for predicting the presence and level of EDC concentration in the field, identified further developments required to make this process as rapid and operator-friendly as possible and discussed the potential value of a system for field surveys of soil composition.

  3. Observation of field-induced Fermi surface reconstruction in CeRhIn5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huiqiu; Jiao, Lin; Weng, Zongfa; Chen, Ye; Steglich, Frank; Graf, David; Singleton, John; Jaime, Marcelo; Bauer, Eric; Thompson, Joe

    2015-03-01

    CeRhIn5 provides a prototype compound for studying quantum criticality and its interplay with superconductivity. Application of pressure suppresses the antiferromagnetic (AF) order and gives rise to superconductivity. A sharp change of Fermi surface was observed just at the pressure-tuning AF quantum critical point (QCP), which was argued to support the scenario of local quantum criticality. By measuring the dHvA oscillations and specific heat in a pulsed magnetic field, we have demonstrated the existence of a field-induced AF QCP around Bc0 =50T in this compound. In this presentation, we will report the measurements of dHvA effect and Hall resistivity of CeRhIn5 performed by using the 45T hybrid magnet and the pulsed field magnet at NHMFL. Field-induced changes of the dHvA frequencies and Hall coefficient are observed around B* =31T. Detailed analyses suggest that the Fermi surface reconstruction at B* corresponds to a localized-itinerant transition of Ce 4f-electrons attributed to the Kondo effect. Our results indicate that multiple quantum phase transitions may exist in CeRhIn5 which can be classified by the measurements of Fermi surface topology.

  4. Reconstructing solar magnetic fields from historical observations. I. Renormalized Ca K spectroheliograms and pseudo-magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Virtanen, Ilpo; Mursula, Kalevi; Tlatov, Andrey; Bertello, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The present work is the first in a series of articles that develop a new proxy to represent the evolution of magnetic activity in past solar cycles by combining the information from historical Ca II K line spectroheliograms and sunspot magnetic field measurements. Methods: We use synoptic (Carrington) maps from 1915-1985 that were derived from daily Ca K line observations at Mount Wilson Observatory to identify the chromospheric plages and to create synoptic pseudo-magnetograms. We use historical observations of sunspot magnetic fields from 1917 to the present to assign polarity to pixels situated within plages. The original Ca K spectroheliograms are nonuniform in their brightness, and we develop a novel approach to re-normalize their intensities. Results: We show that a homogeneous long-term series of pseudo-magnetograms can be successfully constructed by combining sunspot field measurements and plages with renormalized intensities. In our tests, about 80% of pixels situated within plages showed the same magnetic polarity as the synoptic magnetograms taken with the Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope. Finally, we discuss possible approaches to further improve the agreement between observed and pseudo-magnetograms.

  5. Observation of far-field Mach waves generated by the 2001 Kokoxili supershear earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallée, M.; Dunham, Eric M.

    2012-03-01

    Regional surface wave observations offer a powerful tool for determining source properties of large earthquakes, especially rupture velocity. Supershear ruptures, being faster than surface wave phase velocities, create far-field surface wave Mach cones along which waves from all sections of the fault arrive simultaneously and, over a sufficiently narrow frequency band, in phase. We present the first observation of far-field Mach waves from the major Kokoxili earthquake (Tibet, 2001/11/14, Mw 7.9) and confirm that ground motion amplitudes are indeed enhanced on the Mach cone. Theory predicts that on the Mach cone, bandpassed surface wave seismograms from a large supershear rupture will be identical to those from much smaller events with similar focal mechanisms, with an amplitude ratio equal to the ratio of the seismic moments of the two events. Cross-correlation of 15-25 s Love waves from the Kokoxili event with those from a much smaller (Mw 5) foreshock indicates a high degree of similarity (correlation coefficients ranging from 0.8 to 0.95) in waveforms recorded at stations near the far-field Mach cone. This similarity vanishes away from the Mach cone. These observations provide further evidence for supershear propagation of the Kokoxili rupture, and demonstrate how this simple waveform correlation procedure can be used to identify supershear ruptures.

  6. The Influence of Dissolution on Bedrock Channel Evolution: Insights from Modelling and Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, E.; Myre, J. M.; Covington, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the large global distribution of soluble bedrock, fluvial geomorphological studies typically regard dissolution as a negligible erosion mechanism in bedrock channels when compared to rates of mechanical erosion. Limited prior field observations have suggested that at the transition from insoluble to soluble substrate bedrock channels become wider, less steep, or both. By extending the Fastscape landscape evolution model to include dissolution as an erosion mechanism, we repeatedly produce landscapes with trunk streams consistent with field observations. However, in small tributaries, channel steepening occurs at the contact of the insoluble and soluble lithologies. Furthermore, as the main channel in a basin encounters the soluble layer, the increased erosion due to dissolution acts produces a local increase in the rate of base level lowering, resulting in steepening of channels upstream of the lithologic contact. The increased erosion at the lithological contact in the main stem also causes hillsope steepening in the soluble reaches. Independent field observations in the Buffalo National River Basin agree with the model results. Knickpoints and slot canyons are common at the lithologic contact in small tributaries, and channel widening occurs in soluble reaches in the main stem.

  7. Constraining the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field Strength using Split-band Type II Radio Burst Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, P.; Ramesh, R.; Hariharan, K.; Kathiravan, C.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-11-01

    We report on low-frequency radio (85-35 MHz) spectral observations of four different type II radio bursts, which exhibited fundamental-harmonic emission and split-band structure. Each of the bursts was found to be closely associated with a whitelight coronal mass ejection (CME) close to the Sun. We estimated the coronal magnetic field strength from the split-band characteristics of the bursts, by assuming a model for the coronal electron density distribution. The choice of the model was constrained, based on the following criteria: (1) when the radio burst is observed simultaneously in the upper and lower bands of the fundamental component, the location of the plasma level corresponding to the frequency of the burst in the lower band should be consistent with the deprojected location of the leading edge (LE) of the associated CME; (2) the drift speed of the type II bursts derived from such a model should agree closely with the deprojected speed of the LE of the corresponding CMEs. With the above conditions, we find that: (1) the estimated field strengths are unique to each type II burst, and (2) the radial variation of the field strength in the different events indicate a pattern. It is steepest for the case where the heliocentric distance range over which the associated burst is observed is closest to the Sun, and vice versa.

  8. Validation of EGSIEM gravity field products with globally distributed in situ ocean bottom pressure observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poropat, Lea; Bergmann-Wolf, Inga; Flechtner, Frank; Dobslaw, Henryk

    2016-04-01

    Time variable global gravity field models that are processed by different research institutions all across Europe are currently compared and subsequently combined within the "European Gravity Field Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM)" project funded by the European Union. To objectively assess differences between the results from different groups, and also to evaluate the impact of changes in the data processing at an individual institution in preparation of a new data release, a validation of the final GRACE gravity fields against independent observations is required. 
For such a validation, we apply data from a set of globally distributed ocean bottom pressure sensors. The in situ observations have been thoroughly revised for outliers, instrumental drift and jumps, and were additionally reduced for tides. GRACE monthly mean solutions are then validated with the monthly resampled in situ observations. The validation typically concentrates on seasonal to interannual signals, but in case of GRACE-based series with daily sampling available from, e.g., Kalman Smoother Solutions, also sub-monthly signal variability can be assessed.

  9. Earthquake-related Electric Field Changes Observed in the Ionosphere and Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yingying; Du, Xuebin; An, Zhanghui; Liu, Jun; Tan, Dacheng; Chen, Junying

    2015-06-01

    The changes of the ionospheric electric field before and after four huge earthquakes, which include the Ms 8.7 earthquake of 2004 and the Ms 8.5 earthquake of 2005 in Sumatra of Indonesia, the Ms 8.0 Wenchuan earthquake of 2008 in China, the Ms 8.8 earthquake of 2010 in Chile, and their strong aftershocks are studied in this paper. The significant results revealed that the power spectral density of low-frequency electric field below 20 Hz in the ionosphere, a kind of electromagnetic radiation phenomena, increased abnormally before and after the earthquakes and partially corresponded to the increased power spectral density of the low-frequency geoelectric field in time. This research preliminarily indicates that the low-frequency electromagnetic radiation during the imminent stages before such earthquakes could be detected by the observation of the ionospheric electric field. However, the spatial, temporal, and intensive complexities of the electric field anomalies in the ionosphere before earthquakes have come in sight also.

  10. Magnetospheric Multiscale Satellites Observations of Parallel Electric Fields Associated with Magnetic Reconnection.

    PubMed

    Ergun, R E; Goodrich, K A; Wilder, F D; Holmes, J C; Stawarz, J E; Eriksson, S; Sturner, A P; Malaspina, D M; Usanova, M E; Torbert, R B; Lindqvist, P-A; Khotyaintsev, Y; Burch, J L; Strangeway, R J; Russell, C T; Pollock, C J; Giles, B L; Hesse, M; Chen, L J; Lapenta, G; Goldman, M V; Newman, D L; Schwartz, S J; Eastwood, J P; Phan, T D; Mozer, F S; Drake, J; Shay, M A; Cassak, P A; Nakamura, R; Marklund, G

    2016-06-10

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale satellites of parallel electric fields (E_{∥}) associated with magnetic reconnection in the subsolar region of the Earth's magnetopause. E_{∥} events near the electron diffusion region have amplitudes on the order of 100  mV/m, which are significantly larger than those predicted for an antiparallel reconnection electric field. This Letter addresses specific types of E_{∥} events, which appear as large-amplitude, near unipolar spikes that are associated with tangled, reconnected magnetic fields. These E_{∥} events are primarily in or near a current layer near the separatrix and are interpreted to be double layers that may be responsible for secondary reconnection in tangled magnetic fields or flux ropes. These results are telling of the three-dimensional nature of magnetopause reconnection and indicate that magnetopause reconnection may be often patchy and/or drive turbulence along the separatrix that results in flux ropes and/or tangled magnetic fields.

  11. Fitting a toroidal force-free field to multispacecraft observations of a magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Matsuoka, Ayako

    2010-10-01

    A torus-type flux rope model with an arbitrary aspect ratio was applied to an interplanetary magnetic cloud observed by ACE and Nozomi on 16-18 April 1999, when Nozomi was 0.2 AU downstream of ACE in the solar wind within 3° of heliocentric longitude. The large and small radii of the torus, the direction of the symmetric axis, and the crossing points of the spacecraft were determined so that they would minimize the sum of the square of the difference between the model field and the hourly averages of the observed field. Self-similar expansion of the flux rope was assumed in proportion with the heliocentric distance. The best fit model had large and small radii of 0.16 and 0.09 AU, respectively. Both spacecraft passed through the northern part of the torus. Difference in the magnetic field observed by the two spacecraft was explained by the difference in their paths through the magnetic cloud. The model fit was consistent with the direction of the vector normal to the preceding planar magnetic structures. The chirality of the flux rope was positive (left handed), suggesting that the solar source was on the Northern Hemisphere. Assuming a probable association with the filament disappearance observed on 13 April 1999 at N16 E00, it is inferred that the filament had traveled in interplanetary space across the ecliptic plane. It was also found that nearly the same fitting result was obtained using a single-spacecraft observation in the case of a torus-shaped magnetic cloud with a small aspect ratio.

  12. Use of real-time tools to support field operations of NSF's Lower Atmosphere Observing Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M.; Stossmeister, G.; Johnson, E.; Martin, C.; Webster, C.; Dixon, M.; Maclean, G.

    2012-12-01

    NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) operates Lower Atmosphere Observing Facilities (LAOF) for the scientific community, under sponsorship of the National Science Foundation. In order to obtain the highest quality dataset during field campaigns, real-time decision-making critically depends on the availability of timely data and reliable communications between field operations staff and instrument operators. EOL incorporates the latest technologies to monitor the health of instrumentation, facilitate remote operations of instrumentation and keep project participants abreast of changing conditions in the field. As the availability of bandwidth on mobile communication networks and the capabilities of their associated devices (smart phone, tablets, etc.) improved, so has the ability of researchers to respond to rapidly changing conditions and coordinate ever more detailed measurements from multiple remote fixed, portable and airborne platforms. This presentation will describe several new tools that EOL is making available to project investigators and how these tools are being used in a mobile computing environment to support enhanced data collection during field campaigns. LAOF platforms such as radars, aircraft, sondes, balloons and surface stations all rely on displays of real-time data for their operations. Data from sondes are ingested into the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) for assimilation into regional forecasting models that help guide project operations. Since many of EOL's projects occur around the globe and at the same time instrument complexity has increased, automated monitoring of instrumentation platforms and systems has become essential. Tools are being developed to allow remote instrument control of our suite of observing systems where feasible. The Computing, Data and Software (CDS) Facility of EOL develops and supports a Field Catalog used in field campaigns for nearly two decades. Today, the Field Catalog serves as a hub for the

  13. A framework of field observations and spatial data for understanding dust emissions in the Mojave Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantine, J.; Reynolds, R. L.; Chavez, P.; Bogle, R.; Clow, G.; Fulton, R.; Reheis, M.; Urban, F.; Wallace, C.; Yount, J.

    2007-12-01

    Modeling dust events at landscape to regional scales requires field observations of dust-source characteristics, mapping of source types by remote sensing, and wind fields representing the conditions that mobilize dust from the surface. A conceptual framework has been built for understanding dust-source types and their dynamics in the Mojave Desert. Observations of dust events in the Mojave indicate five general source types: 1) Sparsely vegetated surfaces that are vulnerable during periods of drought; 2) wet playas where a near-surface groundwater table generates "fluffy" (very soft sediment) conditions; 3) transitional playas where groundwater extraction has lowered the water table, and playa surface composition produces sediments that are vulnerable to erosion; 4) ephemeral flood deposits; and 5) anthropogenic sources where off-road vehicles, military training exercises, and dirt roads create a disturbed surface. Some sources are perennial and others are strongly influenced (sometimes in opposite ways) by precipitation cycles. A multi-year study of precipitation, vegetation, winds, and saltation at several plots in the Mojave National Preserve shows that blooms of annual vegetation in wet years can leave biomass that protects the surface for more than a year after the rains. Monitoring of the wet Franklin Lake Playa shows that a shallow ground-water table is associated with more vulnerable conditions for dust emission. Repeat photography of the relations between winds and dustiness at transitional Mesquite Lake Playa shows that dust is mobilized during the spring when winds are greater than about 5 m/s. Satellite images reveal dust emission from ephemeral fluvial systems, such as the Mojave River Sink, at the end of wet spring seasons. Satellite images also document dust emissions from areas of heavy military and off-road vehicle activity. Landsat imagery was used to map perennial vegetation cover for the Mojave Desert, calibrated to 250 field transects. The

  14. Intercomparison of surface heat transfer in the Arctic for multiple reanalyses, satellite data and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repina, Irina; Mazilkina, Alexandra; Ivanov, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated surface heat fluxes from reanalyses (ERAInterim, NCEP/NCAR, ASR) in the Arctic Ocean during summer and fall. Several types of surface conditions are compared: very new ice cover during a period of low temperature, ice-free conditions, ice with leads and melt ponds, pack ice and marginal ice zone. Meteorological and micrometeorological observations were used to validate the temperature profiles and surface heat fluxes in the major reanalyses. We use data from Nansen and Amundsen basins observation system (NABOS) project to evaluate the performance of reanalyses forin the Arctic Ocean. The NABOS field experiment was carried out in the central part of the Arctic and in the eastern Arctic seas during summer and fall period of 2004-2009 and 2013. Compared data arrays are independent and sufficiently detailed to perform trustworthy evaluations. With the explicit treatment of the ice concentration, ERA-Interim generally reproduces the surface heat transfer, while NCEP/NCAR, based on a 55% concentration threshold, shows obvious disagreement with the observations in highly ice-covered and ice-free situations. The spatial and temporal patterns of the resulting flux fields are investigated and compared with those derived from satellite observations such as HOAPS, from blended data such as AOFLUX (in the open water cases). A computation of the sensible heat flux at the surface is formulated on the basis of spatial variations of the surface temperature estimated from satellite data. Based on the comparison of field experiments data, satellite-derived data and reanalysis the causes of underestimation of the values of turbulent heat fluxes in the Arctic modern reanalysis are investigated. Obtained differences are related to the temperature and structural inhomogeneity of the surface and the development of space-organized convection fields. Reanalyses data are sometimes used to calculate the surface heat budgets over polynyas to estimate ice production in

  15. Dust emissions of organic soils observed in the field and laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobeck, T. M.; Baddock, M. C.; Guo, Z.; Van Pelt, R.; Acosta-Martinez, V.; Tatarko, J.

    2011-12-01

    . In the laboratory wind tunnel, samples with the same ratio of erodible to non-erodible aggregates as the field soils were abraded and dust emissions were observed with the same sampling system as used in the field wind tunnel. In the dust generator, 5 gm samples < 8 mm diameter of each organic soil were rotated in a 50 cm long tube and the dust generated was observed with the GRIMM during a 20 minute run. Comparisons of the field dust emission rates with the laboratory results will be presented.

  16. A Cosmic Train Wreck: JVLA Radio Observations of the HST Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Connor; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Ogrean, Georgiana A.; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Kraft, Ralph P.; Dawson, William; Brüggen, Marcus; Roediger, Elke; Bulbul, Esra; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The galaxy cluster mergers observed in the HST Frontier Fields represent some of the most energetic events in the Universe. Major cluster mergers leave distinct signatures in the ICM in the form of shocks, turbulence, and diffuse cluster radio sources. These diffuse radio sources, so-called radio relics and halos, provide evidence for the acceleration of relativistic particles and the presence of large scale magnetic fields in the ICM. Observations of these halos and relics allow us to (i) study the physics of particle acceleration and its relation with shocks and turbulence in the ICM and (ii) constrain the dynamical evolution of the merger eventsWe present Jansky Very Large Array 1-4 GHz observations of the Frontier cluster Abell 2744. We confirm the presence of the known giant radio halo and radio relic via our deep radio images. Owing to the much greater sensitivity of the JVLA compared to previous observations, we are able to detect a previously unobserved long Mpc-size filament of synchrotron emission to the south west of the cluster core. We also present a radio spectral index image of the diffuse cluster emission to test the origin of the radio relic and halo, related to the underlying particle acceleration mechanism. Finally, we carry out a search for radio emission from the 'jellyfish' galaxies in A2744 to estimate their star formation rate. These highly disturbed galaxies are likely influenced by the cluster merger event, although the precise origin of these galaxies is still being debated.

  17. Estimation of Transpiration and Water Use Efficiency Using Satellite and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.; Quick, B. E.

    2003-01-01

    Structure and function of terrestrial plant communities bring about intimate relations between water, energy, and carbon exchange between land surface and atmosphere. Total evaporation, which is the sum of transpiration, soil evaporation and evaporation of intercepted water, couples water and energy balance equations. The rate of transpiration, which is the major fraction of total evaporation over most of the terrestrial land surface, is linked to the rate of carbon accumulation because functioning of stomata is optimized by both of these processes. Thus, quantifying the spatial and temporal variations of the transpiration efficiency (which is defined as the ratio of the rate of carbon accumulation and transpiration), and water use efficiency (defined as the ratio of the rate of carbon accumulation and total evaporation), and evaluation of modeling results against observations, are of significant importance in developing a better understanding of land surface processes. An approach has been developed for quantifying spatial and temporal variations of transpiration, and water-use efficiency based on biophysical process-based models, satellite and field observations. Calculations have been done using concurrent meteorological data derived from satellite observations and four dimensional data assimilation for four consecutive years (1987-1990) over an agricultural area in the Northern Great Plains of the US, and compared with field observations within and outside the study area. The paper provides substantive new information about interannual variation, particularly the effect of drought, on the efficiency values at a regional scale.

  18. Discrepancies between Observational Data and Theoretical Forecast in Single Field Slow Roll Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorós, Jaume; de Haro, Jaume

    2016-12-01

    The PLANCK collaboration has determined, or greatly constrained, values for the spectral parameters of the CMB radiation, namely the spectral index n s , its running α s , the running of the running β s , using a growing body of measurements of CMB anisotropies by the Planck satellite and other missions. These values do not follow the hierarchy of sizes predicted by single field, slow roll inflationary theory, and are thus difficult to fit for such inflation models. In this work we present first a study of 49 single field, slow roll inflationary potentials in which we assess the likelyhood of these models fitting the spectral parameters to their currently most accurate determination given by the PLANCK collaboration. We check numerically with a MATLAB program the spectral parameters that each model can yield for a very broad, comprehensive list of possible parameter and field values. The comparison of spectral parameter values supported by the models with their determinations by the PLANCK collaboration leads to the conclusion that the data provided by PLANCK2015 TT+lowP and PLANCK2015 TT,TE,EE+lowP taking into account the running of the running disfavours 40 of the 49 models with confidence level at least 92.8 %. Next, we discuss the reliability of the current computations of these spectral parameters. We identify a bias in the method of determination of the spectral parameters by least residue parameter fitting (using MCMC or any other scheme) currently used to reconstruct the power spectrum of scalar perturbations. This bias can explain the observed contradiction between theory and observations. Its removal is computationally costly, but necessary in order to compare the forecasts of single field, slow roll theories with observations.

  19. An interplanetary magnetic field enhancement observed by five spacecraft: Deducing the magnetic structure, size and mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H.; Russell, C. T.; Delzanno, G.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-12-01

    Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs) were discovered almost 30 years ago in the PVO magnetic-field records and attributed to the interaction between solar wind and dust particles from comets or asteroids, but the physics of this interaction remained obscure. Our current understanding is that IFEs result from collisions of small interplanetary bodies that produce electrically charged nanometer-scale dust particles possibly enhanced by tribo-electric charging in the collision. These charged dust particles in turn interact with the magnetized solar wind. Momentum is transferred from the solar wind to the dust cloud via the collective effect of the formation of a magnetic barrier. This momentum transfer accelerates the particles to near the solar wind speed and moves the dust outward through the solar gravitational potential well. Multi-spacecraft observations can help us to determine the speed of the IFE and the orientation of the current sheet. They enable us to reconstruct the pressure profile of an IFE in three dimensions and estimate the mass contained in the IFE. We have done these reconstructions with an IFE observed on March 3, 2011 with Wind, ACE, ARTEMIS P1 and P2 and Geotail. We find that the magnetic field near the center of the IFE is highly twisted indicating a complicated magnetic topology as expected in a plasma-charged dust interaction. The magnetic field and plasma properties during this event distinguish it from a typical flux rope. Based on the statistical results obtained at 1 AU and the assumption that all the IFEs are self-similar, we find that this IFE has a radial scale length several times longer than the cross flow radius and contains a mass of about 108 kg. The rates of collisions expected for objects of this size are consistent with the observed rates of these disturbances.

  20. Observed Enhancement of Reflectivity and Electric Field in Long-Lived Florida Anvils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Willett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    A study of two long-lived Florida anvils showed that reflectivity >20 dBZ increased in area, thickness and sometimes magnitude at mid-level well downstream of the convective cores. In these same regions electric fields maintained strengths >10 kV m1 for many tens of minutes and became quite uniform over tens of kilometers. Millimetric aggregates persisted at 9 to 10 km for extended times and distances. Aggregation of ice particles enhanced by strong electric fields might have contributed to reflectivity growth in the early anvil, but is unlikely to explain observations further out in the anvil. The enhanced reflectivity and existence of small, medium and large ice particles far out into the anvil suggest that an updraft was acting, perhaps in weak convective cells formed by instability generated from the evaporation and melting of falling ice particles. We conclude that charge separation must have occurred in these anvils, perhaps at the melting level but also at higher altitudes, in order to maintain fields >10 kV m 1 at 9 to 10 km for extended periods of time over large distances. We speculate that charge separation occurred as a result of ice-ice particle collisions (without supercooled water being present) via either a non-inductive or perhaps even an inductive mechanism, given the observed broad ice particle spectra, the strong pre-existing electric fields and the many tens of minutes available for particle interactions. The observations, particularly in the early anvil, show that the charge structure in these anvils was quite complex.

  1. An Evaluation of Tropical Cyclogenesis Theories through Intercomparison of Field Experiment Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helms, C. N.; Hart, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The process by which tropical cyclones evolve from loosely organized convective clusters into well organized systems is still poorly understood. A number of theories have been proposed to explain this evolution based on vortex dynamics, adiabatic processes, and diabatic processes. Due to the data sparse location in which many of these systems develop, many studies of tropical cyclogenesis theory are limited to either a few case studies or are forced to rely on simulations to critically evaluate the theories. The recent PREDICT and GRIP field experiments have provided a new opportunity to examine these theories using unusually dense observations. The present study aims at using this new data in conjunction with data from previous field experiments, such as NAMMA, GATE, and TOGA COARE, to evaluate three existing theories: top-down vortex merger (Ritchie and Holland, 1997; Simpson et al., 1997), top-down shower-head (Emanuel, 1993; Bister and Emanuel, 1997), and bottom-up vortex merger (Montgomery and Enagonio, 1998; Enagonio and Montgomery, 2001). Additionally, these observations are used to briefly examine the newer marsupial framework for tropical cyclogenesis in African easterly waves (Dunkerton et al. 2009). The processes associated with each of these theories create unique signatures in wind, vorticity, potential temperature, and humidity fields. Timelines of these fields, created from composited mean dropsonde soundings, are used to determine the system-wide evolution. Further, the temporal evolution of sub-system processes, which are minimized or removed as a result of the compositing process, are identified in isobaric surface plot series. While previous studies have shown that no theory completely explains tropical cyclogenesis, it is hoped that a thorough analysis of these data sets will highlight both consistencies and inconsistencies between theory and observation.

  2. Voyager 1 observations of the interstellar magnetic field and the transition from the heliosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F. E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com

    2014-04-01

    Voyager 1 (V1) has been observing interstellar magnetic fields for more than one year beginning ≈2012/209, when V1 crossed a current sheet, a 'CS0' having the structure of a tangential discontinuity. The inclination of this current sheet is consistent with an interstellar magnetic field B draped on a blunt heliopause. Two other current sheets (sector boundaries) were observed at ≈2012/167 and ≈2011/276 with high inclinations (99° ± 10° and 89° ± 10°, respectively). From 2013.0 to ≈2013.6, the difference between the azimuthal angle λ of B from the Parker spiral angle at the latitude 34.°6 of V1 was λ – λ{sub P} = 22° ± 3° and the corresponding difference of the elevation angle δ was δ – δ{sub P} = 23° ± 8°. During 2012, the deviation from the Parker spiral angle was somewhat smaller. The interstellar magnetic field has a 'west to east polarity,' opposite to the direction of planetary motions. The magnitude of B varied smoothly in the range 0.38-0.59 nT with an average B = 0.486 ± 0.045 after 2012/237.7. The transition from heliosheath to interstellar magnetic fields is related to a 'two-step' increase in the cosmic ray intensity observed by V1 from ≈2012.30 to ≈2012.65. The first step increase began near the end of an unusual 'away-polarity' sector, and it reached a plateau when V1 moved into a 'toward-polarity' sector that ended at CS0. The second step increase began slowly after V1 crossed CS0, and it ended abruptly at 2012/237.728.

  3. Mars gravity field error analysis from simulated radio tracking of Mars Observer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.E.; Lerch, F.J. ); Chan, J.C.; Chinn, D.S.; Iz, H.B.; Mallama, A.; Patel, G.B. )

    1990-08-30

    The Mars Observer (MO) Mission, in a near-polar orbit at 360-410 km altitude for nearly a 2-year observing period, will greatly improve our understanding of the geophysics of Mars, including its gravity field. To assess the expected improvement of the gravity field, the authors have conducted an error analysis based upon the mission plan for the Mars Observer radio tracking data from the Deep Space Network. Their results indicate that it should be possible to obtain a high-resolution model (spherical harmonics complete to degree and order 50 corresponding to a 200-km horizontal resolution) for the gravitational field of the planet. This model, in combination with topography from MO altimetry, should provide for an improved determination of the broad scale density structure and stress state of the Martian crust and upper mantle. The mathematical model for the error analysis is based on the representation of doppler tracking data as a function of the Martian gravity field in spherical harmonics, solar radiation pressure, atmospheric drag, angular momentum desaturation residual acceleration (AMDRA) effects, tracking station biases, and the MO orbit parameters. Two approaches are employed. In the first case, the error covariance matrix of the gravity model is estimated including the effects from all the nongravitational parameters (noise-only case). In the second case, the gravity recovery error is computed as above but includes unmodelled systematic effects from atmospheric drag, AMDRA, and solar radiation pressure (biased case). The error spectrum of gravity shows an order of magnitude of improvement over current knowledge based on doppler data precision from a single station of 0.3 mm s{sup {minus}1} noise for 1-min integration intervals during three 60-day periods.

  4. Observed chlorine concentrations during Jack Rabbit I and Lyme Bay field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Steven; Chang, Joseph; Huq, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    As part of planning for a series of field experiments where large quantities (up to 20 tons) of pressurized liquefied chlorine will be released, observations from previous chlorine field experiments are analyzed to estimate the ranges of chlorine concentrations expected at various downwind distances. In five field experiment days during the summer 2010 Jack Rabbit I (JR I) field trials, up to two tons of chlorine were released and concentrations were observed at distances, x, from 25 to 500 m. In the 1927 Lyme Bay (LB) experiments, there were four days of trials, where 3-10 tons of chlorine were released in about 15 min from the back of a ship. Concentrations were sampled at LB from four ships sailing across the cloud path at downwind distances in the range from about 350 to 3000 m. Thus, the distances from which JR I concentrations were available slightly overlapped the LB distances. One-minute arc-maximum chlorine concentrations, C (g/m3), were analyzed from four JR I trials and two LB trials. Normalized concentrations (Cu/Q) were plotted versus x (m), where u (m/s) is measured wind speed at heights of 2-10 m and Q (g/s) is continuous mass release rate. It is found that the JR I and LB Cu/Q observations smoothly merge with each other and fall along a line with approximate slope of -2 at distances beyond about 200 m (i.e., Cu/Q is proportional to x-2). At x < 200 m, where dense gas effects are more important, the slope is less (about -1.5). Most of the data points are within a factor of two of the "best-fit" line.

  5. Observed Enhancement of Reflectivity and Electric Field in Long-Lived Florida Anvils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Willett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    A study of two long-lived Florida anvils showed that reflectivity greater than 20 dBZ increased in area, thickness and sometimes magnitude at mid-level well downstream of the convective cores. In these same regions electric fields maintained strengths greater than 10 kV m(sup -1) for many tens of minutes and became quite uniform over tens of kilometers. Millimetric aggregates persisted at 9 to 10 km for extended times and distances. Aggregation of ice particles enhanced by strong electric fields might have contributed to reflectivity growth in the early anvil, but is unlikely to explain observations further out in the anvil. The enhanced reflectivity and existence of small, medium and large ice particles far out into the anvil suggest that an updraft was acting, perhaps in weak convective cells formed by instability generated from the evaporation and melting of falling ice particles. We conclude that charge separation must have occurred in these anvils, perhaps at the melting level but also at higher altitudes, in order to maintain fields greater than 10 kV m(sup -1) at 9 to 10 km for extended periods of time over large distances. We speculate that charge separation occurred as a result of ice-ice particle collisions (without supercooled water being present) via either a noninductive or perhaps even an inductive mechanism, given the observed broad ice particle spectra, the strong pre-existing electric fields and the many tens of minutes available for particle interactions. The observations, particularly in the early anvil, show that the charge structure in these anvils was quite complex.

  6. Balloon observations of ultra-low-frequency waves in the electric field above the South Pole

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, B.; Benbrrook, J.R.; Bering E.A. III; Byrne, G.J.; Theall, J.R. )

    1988-01-01

    The physics of ultra-low-frequency waves in the magnetosphere, near the cusp and in the polar cap, is important because this region is one where ultra-low-frequency wave energy from the magnetopause can most easily enter the magnetosphere. During the 1985-1986 South Pole balloon campaign, eight stratospheric balloon payloads were launched from Amundsen-Scott Station, South Geographic Pole, Antarctica, to record data on ultra-low-frequency waves. The payloads were instrumented with three-axis double-probe electric field detectors and X-ray scintillation counters. This paper concentrates on the third flight of this series, which was launched at 2205 universal time on 21 December 1985. Good data were received from the payload until the transmitter failed at 0342 universal time on 22 December. During most of the four hours that the balloon was afloat, an intense ultra-low-frequency wave event was in progress. The electric-field data from this period have been examined in detail and compared with magnetic field data, obtained with ground-based fluxgate and induction magnetometers to determine the characteristics of the waves. After float was reached, the electric-field data in figure 1 show large-amplitude, quasi-periodic fluctuations suggesting the presence of intense ultra-low-frequency wave activity. In conclusion, the electric-field signature observed from flight 3 appears to have been essentially an electrostatic event or possibly a short-wavelength hydromagnetic wave with a varying and interesting polarization character. The authors are continuing the analysis of the data to determine the source of the observed ultra-low-frequency waves.

  7. In vivo Observation of Tree Drought Response with Low-Field NMR and Neutron Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Michael W.; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F.; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee T.; Nelson, Ron O.; Vogel, Sven C.; Sandin, Henrik J.; Sevanto, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature in the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. These results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment. PMID:27200037

  8. In vivo observation of tree drought response with low-field NMR and neutron imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Malone, Michael W.; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F.; ...

    2016-05-06

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature inmore » the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. Lastly, these results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment.« less

  9. Radio observations of interplanetary magnetic field structures out of the ecliptic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Fainberg, J.; Weber, R. R.; Alvarez, H.; Haddock, F. T.; Potter, W. H.

    1976-01-01

    New observations of the out-of-the ecliptic trajectories of type 3 solar radio bursts have been obtained from simultaneous direction finding measurements on two independent satellite experiments, IMP-6 with spin plane in the ecliptic, and RAE-2 with spin plane normal to the ecliptic. Burst exciter trajectories were observed which originated at the active region and then crossed the ecliptic plane at about 0.8 AU. A considerable large scale north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field is followed by the exciters. The apparent north-south and east-west angular source sizes observed by the two spacecraft are approximately equal, and range from 25 deg at 600 KHz to 110 deg at 80 KHz.

  10. High-speed video and electric field observation of upward flashes in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saba, Marcelo M. F.; Schumann, Carina; Ferro, Marco A. S.; Paiva, Amanda R.; Jaques, Robson; Warner, Tom A.

    2015-04-01

    Upward flashes from tall towers in Brazil have been observed since January 2012. They have been responsible for damages on equipment installed nearby tall structures that caused their initiation. Almost all upward flashes were observed with high-speed cameras and electric field sensors; a combination of measurements that provides a very accurate classification and characterization of their properties. Although present during all seasons, upward flashes are predominant during summer. They are almost always initiated by a preceding positive cloud-to-ground flash. This study is based on an up-to-date database of 86 upward flashes observed during the last three years. The main characteristics described in this work are: time interval between triggering event and the upward leader initiation, characteristics of the triggering +CG flashes, upward leader characteristics (polarity, presence of recoil leaders and branching), initial continuous current (duration, presence of pulses and recoil leaders), flash duration and presence of subsequence of return stroke.

  11. Using MERRA Gridded Innovation for Quantifying Uncertainties in Analysis Fields and Diagnosing Observing System Inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, A.; Redder, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    MERRA is a NASA reanalysis for the satellite era using a major new version of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System Version 5 (GEOS-5). The Project focuses on historical analyses of the hydrological cycle on a broad range of weather and climate time scales and places the NASA EOS suite of observations in a climate context. The characterization of uncertainty in reanalysis fields is a commonly requested feature by users of such data. While intercomparison with reference data sets is common practice for ascertaining the realism of the datasets, such studies typically are restricted to long term climatological statistics and seldom provide state dependent measures of the uncertainties involved. In principle, variational data assimilation algorithms have the ability of producing error estimates for the analysis variables (typically surface pressure, winds, temperature, moisture and ozone) consistent with the assumed background and observation error statistics. However, these "perceived error estimates" are expensive to obtain and are limited by the somewhat simplistic errors assumed in the algorithm. The observation minus forecast residuals (innovations) by-product of any assimilation system constitutes a powerful tool for estimating the systematic and random errors in the analysis fields. Unfortunately, such data is usually not readily available with reanalysis products, often requiring the tedious decoding of large datasets and not so-user friendly file formats. With MERRA we have introduced a gridded version of the observations/innovations used in the assimilation process, using the same grid and data formats as the regular datasets. Such dataset empowers the user with the ability of conveniently performing observing system related analysis and error estimates. The scope of this dataset will be briefly described. We will present a systematic analysis of MERRA innovation time series for the conventional observing system, including maximum

  12. Using MERRA Gridded Innovations for Quantifying Uncertainties in Analysis Fields and Diagnosing Observing System Inhomogeneities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    da Silva, Arlindo; Redder, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    MERRA is a NASA reanalysis for the satellite era using a major new version of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System Version 5 (GEOS-5). The project focuses on historical analyses of the hydrological cycle on a broad range of weather and climate time scales and places the NASA EOS suite of observations in a climate context. The characterization of uncertainty in reanalysis fields is a commonly requested feature by users of such data. While intercomparison with reference data sets is common practice for ascertaining the realism of the datasets, such studies typically are restricted to long term climatological statistics and seldom provide state dependent measures of the uncertainties involved. In principle, variational data assimilation algorithms have the ability of producing error estimates for the analysis variables (typically surface pressure, winds, temperature, moisture and ozone) consistent with the assumed background and observation error statistics. However, these "perceived error estimates" are expensive to obtain and are limited by the somewhat simplistic errors assumed in the algorithm. The observation minus forecast residuals (innovations) by-product of any assimilation system constitutes a powerful tool for estimating the systematic and random errors in the analysis fields. Unfortunately, such data is usually not readily available with reanalysis products, often requiring the tedious decoding of large datasets and not so-user friendly file formats. With MERRA we have introduced a gridded version of the observations/innovations used in the assimilation process, using the same grid and data formats as the regular datasets. Such dataset empowers the user with the ability of conveniently performing observing system related analysis and error estimates. The scope of this dataset will be briefly described. We will present a systematic analysis of MERRA innovation time series for the conventional observing system, including maximum

  13. The robustness of using near-UV observations to detect and study exoplanet magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J.; Christie, D.; Arras, P.; Johnson, R.

    2015-10-01

    Studying the magnetic fields of exoplanets will allow for the investigation of their formation history, evolution, interior structure, rotation period, atmospheric dynamics, moons, and potential habitability. We previously observed the transits of 16 exoplanets as they crossed the face of their host-star in the near-UV in an attempt to detect their magnetic fields (Turner et al. 2013; Pearson et al. 2014; Turner et al. in press). It was postulated that the magnetic fields of all our targets could be constrained if their near-UV light curves start earlier than in their optical light curves (Vidotto et al. 2011). This effect can be explained by the presence of a bow shock in front of the planet formed by interactions between the stellar coronal material and the planet's magnetosphere. Furthermore, if the shocked material in the magnetosheath is optically thick, it will absorb starlight and cause an early ingress in the near- UV light curve. We do not observe an early ingress in any of our targets (See Figure 1 for an example light curve in our study), but determine upper limits on their magnetic field strengths. All our magnetic field upper limits are well below the predicted magnetic field strengths for hot Jupiters (Reiners & Christensen 2010; Sanchez-Lavega 2004). The upper limits we derived assume that there is an absorbing species in the near-UV. Therefore, our upper limits cannot be trusted if there is no species to cause the absorption. In this study we simulate the atomic physics, chemistry, radiation transport, and dynamics of the plasma characteristics in the vicinity of a hot Jupiter using the widely used radiative transfer code CLOUDY (Ferland et al. 2013). Using CLOUDY we have investigated whether there is an absorption species in the near-UV that can exist to cause an observable early ingress. The number density of hydrogen in the bow shock was varied from 104 - -108 cm-3 and the output spectrum was calculated (Figure 2) and compared to the input

  14. New Approach for Environmental Monitoring and Plant Observation Using a Light-Field Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schima, Robert; Mollenhauer, Hannes; Grenzdörffer, Görres; Merbach, Ines; Lausch, Angela; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of gaining a better understanding of ecosystems and the processes in nature accentuates the need for observing exactly these processes with a higher temporal and spatial resolution. In the field of environmental monitoring, an inexpensive and field applicable imaging technique to derive three-dimensional information about plants and vegetation would represent a decisive contribution to the understanding of the interactions and dynamics of ecosystems. This is particularly true for the monitoring of plant growth and the frequently mentioned lack of morphological information about the plants, e.g. plant height, vegetation canopy, leaf position or leaf arrangement. Therefore, an innovative and inexpensive light-field (plenoptic) camera, the Lytro LF, and a stereo vision system, based on two industrial cameras, were tested and evaluated as possible measurement tools for the given monitoring purpose. In this instance, the usage of a light field camera offers the promising opportunity of providing three-dimensional information without any additional requirements during the field measurements based on one single shot, which represents a substantial methodological improvement in the area of environmental research and monitoring. Since the Lytro LF was designed as a daily-life consumer camera, it does not support depth or distance estimation or rather an external triggering by default. Therefore, different technical modifications and a calibration routine had to be figured out during the preliminary study. As a result, the used light-field camera was proven suitable as a depth and distance measurement tool with a measuring range of approximately one meter. Consequently, this confirms the assumption that a light field camera holds the potential of being a promising measurement tool for environmental monitoring purposes, especially with regard to a low methodological effort in field. Within the framework of the Global Change Experimental Facility Project, founded by

  15. Mercury's Time-Averaged and Induced Magnetic Fields from MESSENGER Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Winslow, R. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Purucker, M. E.; Korth, H.; Al Asad, M. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Baker, D. N.; Hauck, S. A.; Phillips, R. J.; Zuber, M. T.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Observations from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) have allowed the construction of a baseline, time-averaged model for Mercury's magnetosphere. The model, constructed with the approximation that the magnetospheric shape can be represented as a paraboloid, includes two external (magnetopause and magnetotail) current systems and an internal (dipole) field. We take advantage of the geometry of the orbital MAG data to constrain all but one of the model parameters, and their ranges, directly from the observations. These parameters are then used as a priori constraints in the magnetospheric model, and the remaining parameter, the dipole moment, is estimated from a grid search. The model provides an excellent fit to the MAG observations, with a root-mean-square misfit of less than 20 nT globally. The mean distance from the planetary dipole origin to the magnetopause subsolar point, RSS, is 1.45 RM (where RM = 2440 km) and the mean planetary dipole moment is 190 nT- RM3. Temporal variations in the global-scale magnetic fields result from changes in solar wind ram pressure, Pram, at Mercury that arise from the planet's 88-day eccentric orbit around the Sun and from transient, rapid changes in solar wind conditions. For a constant planetary dipole moment, RSS varies as Pram-1/6. However, magnetopause crossings obtained from several Mercury years of MESSENGER observations indicate that RSS is proportional to Pram-1/a where a is greater than 6, suggesting induction in Mercury's highly conducting metallic interior. We obtain an effective dipole moment that varies by up to ˜15% about its mean value. We further investigate the periodic 88-day induction signature and use the paraboloid model to describe the spatial structure in the inducing magnetopause field, together with estimates for the outer radius of Mercury's liquid core and possible overlying solid iron sulfide layer, to calculate induced core fields. The baseline magnetospheric model is adapted to include the 88-day

  16. Observations of photospheric magnetic fields and shear flows in flaring active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, T.; Ferguson, S.; Frank, Z.; Title, A.; Topka, K.

    1988-01-01

    Horizontal flows in the photosphere and subsurface convection zone move the footpoints of coronal magnetic field lines. Magnetic energy to power flares can be stored in the corona if the flows drive the fields far from the potential configuration. Videodisk movies were shown with 0.5 to 1 arcsecond resolution of the following simultaneous observations: green continuum, longitudinal magnetogram, Fe I 5576 A line center (mid-photosphere), H alpha wings, and H alpha line center. The movies show a 90 x 90 arcsecond field of view of an active region at S29, W11. When viewed at speeds of a few thousand times real-time, the photospheric movies clearly show the active region fields being distorted by a remarkable combination of systematic flows and small eruptions of new flux. Magnetic bipoles are emerging over a large area, and the polarities are systematically flowing apart. The horizontal flows were mapped in detail from the continuum movies, and these may be used to predict the future evolution of the region. The horizontal flows are not discernable in H alpha. The H alpha movies strongly suggest reconnection processes in the fibrils joining opposite polarities. When viewed in combination with the magnetic movies, the cause for this evolution is apparent: opposite polarity fields collide and partially cancel, and the fibrils reconnect above the surface. This type of reconnection, driven by subphotospheric flows, complicates the chromospheric and coronal fields, causing visible braiding and twisting of the fibrils. Some of the transient emission events in the fibrils and adjacent plage may also be related.

  17. Testing MHD models of prominences and flares with observations of solar plasma electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukal, Peter V.; Behr, Bradford B.

    1995-02-01

    We present measurements of electric fields in quiescent prominences and in a small flare surge, obtained with CRI electrograph at the NSO/SP 40 cm coronagraph, in 1993 and 1994. Our results on the 9 brightest quiescent prominences enable us to place r.m.s. upper limits of Et less than 2 - 5 V/cm on the component of E transverse to the line of sight. We show that these upper limits may be difficult to reconcile with non-ideal MHD models of quiescent prominences formed in extended neutral sheets, whethere or not the tearing mode instability is present. They do, however, seem consistent with ideal MHD models of prominence support. We point out also that these upper limits are within a factor 4 of the minimum value of anistropic electric field that exists due to motional Stark effect in any thermal plasma permeated by a directed magnetic field. Our data on the flare surge suggest and electric field of intensity E approximately 35 V/cm, oriented approximately parallel to the inferred magnetic field. This detection of Eparallel needs to be verified in other flares. But we note that a detectable Eparallel would not be expected in the current interruption flare mechanism, if only a single double layer is present. We show further that the observed relatively narrow, approximately-Gaussian, and only slightly Doppler-shifted Paschen lines, seem inconsistent with the multiple double layers invoked in other models based on the current interruption mechanism. Our detection of Eparallel does seem consistent with reconnection (including tearing-mode) models of flares, provided the field-aligned electrical conductivity is anomalous over substantial volumes of the plasma circuit joining the reconnecting domain to the photosphere.

  18. High-Speed Electric Field Measurements and Lightning Mapping Observations at Langmuir Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rison, W.; Edens, H. E.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Winn, W. P.; Aulich, G.; Hunyady, S. J.; Thomas, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    During the summer of 2007 we recorded broadband RF radiation waveforms, together with ground-based slow and fast electric field waveforms, from lightning in the vicinity of Langmuir Laboratory in central New Mexico. Three-dimensional observations of the lightning flashes from New Mexico Tech's Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) give context for interpreting the RF and electric field waveforms. In addition, high-speed in-situ vector electric field waveforms were recorded by a newly developed balloon-borne instrument. The broadband RF radiation was received using a Rhode & Schwarz model HE010 active rod antenna with a 100~MHz bandwidth, which was sampled at up to 400~MHz. Log-detected RF waveforms for two side-by-side LMA stations, one operating at 63 MHz (TV channel 3) and the other at 183 MHz (TV channel 9), and ground-based fast and slow electric field waveforms, were digitized at 25~MHz. All ground-based waveforms had a depth of 1~second, and were time-tagged with a GPS receiver. These comprehensive datasets are being used to study various processes associated with lightning flashes --- in particular, to detect high-frequency electrical activity at the onset of a flash. The ground based measurements, in conjunction with the in-situ vector field measurements, will be used to study the transfer of charge during a flash. Measurements of the log-detected RF (which is used by the LMA to map lightning flashes), in conjunction with the broadband RF and electric field waveforms, will help us better understand what types of events are detected and located by the LMA. In this paper we will present the results for a few interesting lightning flashes. ~

  19. DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, and Irregularities Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics

  20. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1985-06-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  1. Neutral hydrogen and magnetic fields in M83 observed with the SKA Pathfinder KAT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, G.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Lucero, D.; Carignan, C.; Jarrett, T.; Elson, E.; Oozeer, N.; Randriamampandry, T. H.; van Zee, L.

    2016-10-01

    We present new KAT-7 observations of the neutral hydrogen (H I) spectral line, and polarized radio continuum emission, in the grand-design spiral M83. These observations provide a sensitive probe of the outer-disc structure and kinematics, revealing a vast and massive neutral gas distribution that appears to be tightly coupled to the interaction of the galaxy with the environment. We present a new rotation curve extending out to a radius of 50 kpc. Based on our new H I data set and comparison with multiwavelength data from the literature, we consider the impact of mergers on the outer disc and discuss the evolution of M83. We also study the periphery of the H I distribution and reveal a sharp edge to the gaseous disc that is consistent with photoionization or ram pressure from the intergalactic medium. The radio continuum emission is not nearly as extended as the H I and is restricted to the main optical disc. Despite the relatively low angular resolution, we are able to draw broad conclusions about the large-scale magnetic field topology. We show that the magnetic field of M83 is similar in form to other nearby star-forming galaxies, and suggest that the disc-halo interface may host a large-scale regular magnetic field.

  2. Observation of soil moisture variability in agricultural and grassland field soils using a wireless sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priesack, Eckart; Schuh, Max

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture dynamics is a key factor of energy and matter exchange between land surface and atmosphere. Therefore long-term observation of temporal and spatial soil moisture variability is important in studying impacts of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems and their possible feedbacks to the atmosphere. Within the framework of the network of terrestrial environmental observatories TERENO we installed at the research farm Scheyern in soils of two fields (of ca. 5 ha size each) the SoilNet wireless sensor network (Biogena et al. 2010). The SoilNet in Scheyern consists of 94 sensor units, 45 for the agricultural field site and 49 for the grassland site. Each sensor unit comprises 6 SPADE sensors, two sensors placed at the depths 10, 30 and 50 cm. The SPADE sensor (sceme.de GmbH, Horn-Bad Meinberg Germany) consists of a TDT sensor to estimate volumetric soil water content from soil electrical permittivity by sending an electromagnetic signal and measuring its propagation time, which depends on the soil dielectric properties and hence on soil water content. Additionally the SPADE sensor contains a temperature sensor (DS18B20). First results obtained from the SoilNet measurements at both fields sites will be presented and discussed. The observed high temporal and spatial variability will be analysed and related to agricultural management and basic soil properties (bulk density, soil texture, organic matter content and soil hydraulic characteristics).

  3. Salinity selection and preference of the grey snapper Lutjanus griseus: field and laboratory observations.

    PubMed

    Serrano, X; Grosell, M; Serafy, J E

    2010-05-01

    Field observations were supplemented with laboratory experiments to reveal patterns of salinity selection and preference for grey snapper Lutjanus griseus (c. 21 cm total length, L(T)), an ecologically and economically important species in the south-eastern U.S.A. Fish abundance data were examined from a long-term field survey conducted in the mangrove habitats of Biscayne Bay, Florida, where salinities ranged from <1 to 40. First, regression analyses indicated significant, positive linear relationships with salinity for both L. griseus frequency of occurrence and concentration (density when present). These patterns are inconsistent with physiological expectations of minimizing energetic osmoregulatory costs. Next, the salinity preference and swimming activity of 11 L. griseus (ranging from 18 to 23 cm L(T)) were investigated using a newly developed electronic shuttlebox system. In the laboratory, fish preferred intermediate salinities in the range of 9-23. Swimming activity (measured in terms of spontaneous swimming speed) followed a parabolic relationship with salinity, with reduced activity at salinity extremes perhaps reflecting compensation for higher osmoregulatory costs. It is suspected that the basis of the discrepancy between laboratory and field observations for size classes at or near maturity ultimately relates to the reproductive imperative to move towards offshore (high-salinity) coral-reef habitats, a necessity that probably overrides the strategy of minimizing osmoregulatory energetic costs.

  4. Observation of Novel Low-Field FMR modes in Permalloy Antidot Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Long, Lance; Bhat, Vinayak; Farmer, Barry; Woods, Justin; Hastings, Todd; Sklenar, Joseph; Ketterson, John

    2013-03-01

    Permalloy films of thickness 23 nm were patterned with square arrays of square antidots (AD) with feature size D = 120 nm, and lattice constants d = 200, 300, 500 and 700 nm (total sample area = 2 mm x 2mm), using electron beam lithography. Our broad-band (frequencies f = 10 MHz-15 GHz) and narrow-band (9.7 GHz) FMR measurements of even dilute (D/d <<1) AD lattices (ADL) reveal remarkably reproducible absorption spectra in the low-frequency, hysteretic regime in which disordered domain wall (DW) patterns and unsaturated magnetization textures are expected for unpatterned films, but in the present case are strongly affected by the periodic ADL. Other modes in the saturated regime exhibit strong dependence on the angle between the applied DC field H and the ADL axes, as confirmed by our micromagnetic simulations. Novel modes are observed at DC fields above that of the uniform mode, which simulations indicate are localized at AD edges. Other novel modes are observed for DC fields below that of the uniform mode, which simulated power and phase maps indicate are confined to ADL interstices oriented parallel to H. These results show even dilute AD concentrations can effect strong control of DW evolution. Research at Kentucky is supported by U.S. DoE Grant DE-FG02-97ER45653 and NSF Grant EPS-0814194.

  5. Observation of a magnetic field dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyungyu; Restrepo, Oscar; Antolin, Nikolas; Windl, Wolfgang; Barnes, Stewart; Heremans, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Can phonons respond to magnetic fields? From the simple point of view of the classical lattice vibrations, there is no clue that phonons possess any magnetic characteristics. Here, we report for the first time that the lattice thermal conductivity can show a response to an external magnetic field in a non-magnetic semiconductor crystal. We observe a magnetic field dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity in a high quality 2x1015 Te doped single crystal of InSb. The electronic contribution is over 106 times smaller than the lattice. The effect is observed in the temperature regime where the Umklapp processes start appearing, and still mainly involve phonons with long mean free paths. A special thermal design is employed to obtain a high accuracy heat flux measurement. Detailed experimental procedures and results are presented along with a brief discussion about possible origins of the effect. HJ and JPH are supported by AFOSR MURI ``Cryogenic Peltier Cooling'' Contract #FA9550-10-1-0533; ODR and WW are supported by the Center for Emergent Materials, an NSF MRSEC at The Ohio State University (Grant DMR-0820414).

  6. TSUBASA (MDS-1) observations of energetic electrons and magnetic field variations in outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.; Matsuoka, H.; Liu, H.; Koshiishi, H.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Goka, T.

    2002-12-01

    We have investigated variations of energetic electrons (> 0.4 MeV) and magnetic field in the radiation belt obtained from the Standard DOse Monitor (SDOM) and the MAgnetoMeter (MAM) of the Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA) onboard TSUBASA (the Mission Demonstration Test Satellite (MDS)-1) launched on February 4, 2002. Since TSUBASA is operated in the geostationary transfer orbit, it has provided rare opportunities of directly observing near-equatorial radiation belt plasma particles and magnetic field, having already included several large magnetic storms. The energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt are contributors to the total radiation dose deposited in lightly shielded spacecraft electronics for high altitude orbits and are known to have a drastic variability associated with geomagnetic storm and high speed solar wind streams. The abrupt energetic electron flux decreases in the outside of outer radiation belt show characteristic variations of in situ magnetic field. These observations have implications for the possible mechanisms of the depletion and the following recovery and/or buildup of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  7. STAR FORMATION IN THE CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH: OBSERVATIONS CONFRONT SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Damen, Maaike; Franx, Marijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Labbe, Ivo; Toft, Sune; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Wuyts, Stijn

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the star formation history of the universe using FIREWORKS, a multiwavelength survey of the Chandra Deep Field South. We study the evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR) with redshift in different mass bins from z = 0 to z approx 3. We find that the sSFR increases with redshift for all masses. The logarithmic increase of the sSFR with redshift is nearly independent of mass, but this cannot yet be verified at the lowest-mass bins at z>0.8, due to incompleteness. We convert the sSFRs to a dimensionless growth rate to facilitate a comparison with a semianalytic galaxy formation model that was implemented on the Millennium Simulation. The model predicts that the growth rates and sSFRs increase similarly with redshift for all masses, consistent with the observations. However, we find that for all masses, the inferred observed growth rates increase more rapidly with redshift than the model predictions. We discuss several possible causes for this discrepancy, ranging from field-to-field variance, conversions to SFR, and shape of the initial mass function. We find that none of these can solve the discrepancy completely. We conclude that the models need to be adapted to produce the steep increase in growth rate between redshift z = 0 and z = 1.

  8. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  9. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, R.F.

    1985-06-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated. 15 references.

  10. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Hector; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. We observed a skull-guided wave propagation over a lateral distance of at least 3 mm, with a half-decay length in the direction perpendicular to the skull ranging from 35 to 300 μm at 6 and 0.5 MHz, respectively. Propagation losses are mostly attributed to the heterogenous acoustic properties of the skull.. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  11. The gravity field, orientation, and ephemeris of Mercury from MESSENGER observations after three years in orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazarico, Erwan; Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2014-12-01

    We have analyzed 3 years of radio tracking data from the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit around Mercury and determined the gravity field, planetary orientation, and ephemeris of the innermost planet. With improvements in spatial coverage, force modeling, and data weighting, we refined an earlier global gravity field both in quality and resolution, and we present here a spherical harmonic solution to degree and order 50. In this field, termed HgM005, uncertainties in low-degree coefficients are reduced by an order of magnitude relative to earlier global fields, and we obtained a preliminary value of the tidal Love number k2 of 0.451 ± 0.014. We also estimated Mercury's pole position, and we obtained an obliquity value of 2.06 ± 0.16 arcmin, in good agreement with analysis of Earth-based radar observations. From our updated rotation period (58.646146 ± 0.000011 days) and Mercury ephemeris, we verified experimentally the planet's 3:2 spin-orbit resonance to greater accuracy than previously possible. We present a detailed analysis of the HgM005 covariance matrix, and we describe some near-circular frozen orbits around Mercury that could be advantageous for future exploration.

  12. Assimilating concentration observations for transport and dispersion modeling in a meandering wind field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, Sue Ellen; Beyer-Lout, Anke; Long, Kerrie J.; Young, George S.

    Assimilating concentration data into an atmospheric transport and dispersion model can provide information to improve downwind concentration forecasts. The forecast model is typically a one-way coupled set of equations: the meteorological equations impact the concentration, but the concentration does not generally affect the meteorological field. Thus, indirect methods of using concentration data to influence the meteorological variables are required. The problem studied here involves a simple wind field forcing Gaussian dispersion. Two methods of assimilating concentration data to infer the wind direction are demonstrated. The first method is Lagrangian in nature and treats the puff as an entity using feature extraction coupled with nudging. The second method is an Eulerian field approach akin to traditional variational approaches, but minimizes the error by using a genetic algorithm (GA) to directly optimize the match between observations and predictions. Both methods show success at inferring the wind field. The GA-variational method, however, is more accurate but requires more computational time. Dynamic assimilation of a continuous release modeled by a Gaussian plume is also demonstrated using the genetic algorithm approach.

  13. Ultraviolet Galaxy Counts From STIS Observations of The Hubble Deep Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Brown, T. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present galaxy counts in the near and far ultraviolet (NUV and FUV) obtained from Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of portions of the Hubble Deep Field North, (HDFN), the Hubble Deep Field South, (HDFS) and a parallel field near the HDFN. All three fields have deep (AB>29) optical imaging, and we determine magnitudes by taking the ultraviolet flux detected within the limiting optical isophote. An analysis of the UV-optical colors of detected objects, combined with a visual inspection of the UV images, indicates that there are no detectable objects in the UV images which are not also detected in the optical. We measure the detection area and completeness as a function of magnitude by taking the size-magnitude distribution of galaxies in the entire HDFN WFPC2 V+I image, applying the measured UV-optical colors from the detected galaxies, and determining the total area over which each galaxy would have been detected in the UV images. The average area for the simulated galaxies in each UV magnitude bin, (including galaxies which would not be detected at all), provides the effective area and completeness for the bin. We test this procedure with Monte Carlo simulations. The galaxy counts reach to AB=29 in both the NUV and FUV; 1 magnitude fainter than the HDF F30OW counts, and 7 magnitudes fainter than balloon-based counts. We compare our measured counts to various models.

  14. Sub-solar Magnetopause Observation and Simulation of a Tripolar Guide-Magnetic Field Perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Cassak, P.; Retino, A.; Mozer, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Polar satellite recorded two reconnection exhausts within 6 min on 1 April 2001 at a rather symmetric sub-solar magnetopause that displayed different out-of-plane signatures for similar solar wind conditions. The first case was reported by Mozer et al. [2002] and displayed a bipolar guide field supporting a quadrupole Hall field consistent with a single X-line. The second case, however, shows the first known example of a tripolar guide-field perturbation at Earth's magnetopause reminiscent of the types of solar wind exhausts that Eriksson et al. [2014; 2015] have reported to be in agreement with multiple X-lines. A dedicated particle-in-cell simulation is performed for the prevailing conditions across the magnetopause. We propose an explanation in terms of asymmetric Hall magnetic fields due to a presence of a magnetic island between two X-lines, and discuss how higher resolution MMS observations can be used to further study this problem at the magnetopause.

  15. The Gravity Field, Orientation, and Ephemeris of Mercury from MESSENGER Observations After Three Years in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazarico, Erwan M.; Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Gregory; Neumann, Gregory A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed three years of radio tracking data from the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit around Mercury and determined the gravity field, planetary orientation, and ephemeris of the innermost planet. With improvements in spatial coverage, force modeling, and data weighting, we refined an earlier global gravity field both in quality and resolution, and we present here a spherical harmonic solution to degree and order 50. In this field, termed HgM005, uncertainties in low-degree coefficients are reduced by an order of magnitude relative to the earlier global field, and we obtained a preliminary value of the tidal Love number k(sub 2) of 0.451+/-0.014. We also estimated Mercury's pole position, and we obtained an obliquity value of 2.06 +/- 0.16 arcmin, in good agreement with analysis of Earth-based radar observations. From our updated rotation period (58.646146 +/- 0.000011 days) and Mercury ephemeris, we verified experimentally the planet's 3: 2 spin-orbit resonance to greater accuracy than previously possible. We present a detailed analysis of the HgM005 covariance matrix, and we describe some near-circular frozen orbits around Mercury that could be advantageous for future exploration.

  16. Prominence plasma and magnetic field structure - A coordinated observation with IRIS, Hinode and THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Labrosse, Nicolas; Levens, Peter; Lopez Ariste, Arturo

    2016-07-01

    During an international campaign in 2014, utilising both space-based (IRIS and Hinode) and ground-based (THEMIS) instruments, we focused on observing prominences. We compare IRIS observations with those of Hinode (EIS and SOT) in order to build a more complete picture of the prominence structure for a quiescent prominence observed on 15 July 2014, identified to have tornado-like structure. THEMIS provides valuable information on the orientation and strength of the internal magnetic field. Here we find there is almost ubiquitously horizontal field with respect to the local limb, with possibly a turbulent component. The Mg II lines form the majority of our IRIS analysis, with a mixture of reversed and non-reversed profiles present in the prominence spectra. Comparing the differences between the Mg II data from IRIS and the Ca II images from Hinode/SOT provides an intriguing insight into the prominence legs in these channels. We present plasma diagnostics from IRIS, with line of sight velocities of around 10 km/s in either direction along the magnetic loops of material in the front of the prominence, and line widths comparable to those found for prominences by previous authors (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2014). We also take a look into the lines formed at higher, coronal plasma temperatures, as seen by Hinode/EIS, to compare plasma structures at a full range of temperatures.

  17. Inferring spatial clouds statistics from limited field-of-view, zenith observations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.H.; Thorne, L.R.

    1996-04-01

    Many of the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) measurements produce a time series of zenith observations, but spatial averages are often the desired data product. One possible approach to deriving spatial averages from temporal averages is to invoke Taylor`s hypothesis where and when it is valid. Taylor`s hypothesis states that when the turbulence is small compared with the mean flow, the covariance in time is related to the covariance in space by the speed of the mean flow. For clouds fields, Taylor`s hypothesis would apply when the {open_quotes}local{close_quotes} turbulence is small compared with advective flow (mean wind). The objective of this study is to determine under what conditions Taylor`s hypothesis holds or does not hold true for broken cloud fields.

  18. Supernova and optical transient observations using the three wide-field telescope array of the KMTNet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Dae-Sik; Kim, Sang Chul; Lee, Jae-Joon; Pak, Mina; Park, Hong Soo; He, Matthias Y.; Antoniadis, John; Ni, Yuan Qi; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Park, Byeong-Gon; Kim, Dong-Jin; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Yongseok; Gonzalez, Santiago

    2016-08-01

    The Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) is a network of three new 1.6-m, wide-field telescopes spread over three different sites in Chile, South Africa and Australia. Each telescope is equipped with a four square degree wide-field CCD camera, making the KMTNet an ideal facility for discovering and monitoring early supernovae and other rapidly evolving optical transients by providing 24-hour continuous sky coverage. We describe our inaugurating program of observing supernovae and optical transients using about 20% of the KMTNet time in 2015-2019. Our early results include detection of infant supernovae, novae and peculiar transients as well as numerous variable stars and low surface brightness objects such as dwarf galaxies.

  19. Laboratory and Field Observations of Microcystis aeruginosa in nearly homogeneous turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Anne; Hondzo, Miki; Guala, Michele

    2015-11-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is a single-celled cyanobacterium, forming large colonies on the surface of freshwater ecosystems during summer, and producing a toxin (microcystin) that in high concentration can be harmful to humans and animals. In addition to water temperature, light and nutrient abundance, fluid motion is also an abiotic environmental factor affecting the growth and metabolism of Microcystis. Systematic investigations in a laboratory bioreactor are paired with field measurements in the lacustrine photic zone from two sites in Lake Minnetonka (MN) to ensure that dissipation levels, water temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH are correctly reproduced under laboratory conditions. Laboratory results for biomass accrual and photosynthetic activity suggest that turbulence levels within the range observed in the field, mediates the metabolism, rather than the cell population growth, of Microcystis aeruginosa. This work was supported by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and University of Minnesota start-up funding.

  20. The fields of reference stars for optical positional observations of astrometric extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dement'eva, A. A.; Ryl'Kov, V. P.

    The Pulkovo programme (Pul ERS) and the techniques used to create a catalogue of coordinates and magnitudes for more than 7000 faint stars in 73 small fields around extragalactic radiosources (ERS) are described. Accurate positions of stars in the fields around ERS 2200+420 and ERS 2021+614 are given. The catalogue containing 223 stars is presented. The errors of coordinate reductions in the system of reference stars from the CMC catalogue are found to be 1.5-2.0 times smaller than for those in the system of the PPM catalogue. This programme (Pul ERS) is required for quick identification of the extragalactic radio sources and for obtaining their characteristics from observations with large telescopes and CCD detectors.

  1. Observations of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes in a reversed field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnoli, G.; Bergsâker, H.; Tennfors, E.; Zonca, F.; Martines, E.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Cecconello, M.; Antoni, V.; Cavazzana, R.; Malmberg, J.-A.

    2005-04-01

    High frequency peaks in the spectra of magnetic field signals have been detected at the edge of Extrap-T2R [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello, J. R. Drake, R. M. Gravestijn, A. Hedqvist, and J.-A. Malmberg, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion, 43, 1457 (2001)]. The measured fluctuation is found to be mainly polarized along the toroidal direction, with high toroidal periodicity n and Alfvénic scaling (f∝B/√mini ). Calculations for a reversed field pinch plasma predict the existence of an edge resonant, high frequency, high-n number toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmode with the observed frequency scaling. In addition, gas puffing experiments show that edge density fluctuations are responsible for the rapid changes of mode frequency. Finally a coupling with the electron drift turbulence is proposed as drive mechanism for the eigenmode.

  2. Magnetic Field and Plasma Observations at Mars: Initial Results of the Mars Global Surveyor Mission

    PubMed

    Acuña; Connerney; Wasilewski; Lin; Anderson; Carlson; McFadden; Curtis; Mitchell; Reme; Mazelle; Sauvaud; d'Uston; Cros; Medale; Bauer; Cloutier; Mayhew; Winterhalter; Ness

    1998-03-13

    The magnetometer and electron reflectometer investigation (MAG/ER) on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft has obtained magnetic field and plasma observations throughout the near-Mars environment, from beyond the influence of Mars to just above the surface (at an altitude of approximately 100 kilometers). The solar wind interaction with Mars is in many ways similar to that at Venus and at an active comet, that is, primarily an ionospheric-atmospheric interaction. No significant planetary magnetic field of global scale has been detected to date (<2 x 10(21) Gauss-cubic centimeter), but here the discovery of multiple magnetic anomalies of small spatial scale in the crust of Mars is reported.

  3. Optical and X-ray observations of the PSR 1913 + 16 field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidsen, A.; Liebert, J.; Spinrad, H.; Middleditch, J.; Chanan, G.; Mason, K. O.; Sanford, P. W.; Margon, B.

    1975-01-01

    We have obtained medium-resolution spectra in the yellow of seven stars in the error box of the binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16, using the image-tube scanner at the Lick 3-m telescope. None of the objects is spectroscopically abnormal and thus a strong candidate for membership in the system. The data are used to establish the extinction in the field, which is modest for this low galactic latitude. For three of the stars, limits of the order V exceeding 23 mag on optical pulsations with the frequency of the radio pulsar are derived. X-ray observations of the field have been obtained in the 2.5-7.5 keV band, using the UCL experiment aboard OAO Copernicus. No source is detected, with a 2 sigma upper limit on the time-averaged flux of 1.0 times 10 to the -10th power ergs per sq cm per sec.

  4. Interaction between Japanese flowering cherry trees and some wild animals observed during physiological experiment in fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Teruko

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the weeping habit of Japanese flowering cherry tree in the field of Tama Forest Science Garden, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute at the foot of Mt. Takao. Since cherry trees at various age were the materials for our plant physiology experiments, our studies were conducted in the fields where we experienced certain difficulties. Even under such difficult environment that was rather unexpected and uncontrollable, we could obtain fruitful results on the growth of cherry tree, and found them scientifically significant, especially in terms of biological effects of gravity on earth. Moreover, a lot of interesting interactions of cherry trees with various kinds of animals were observed in parallel to the plant physiology.

  5. Impact of Deep Convection on UTLS Composition -New Observations from Recent Airborne Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, L.

    2014-12-01

    Deep convection redistributes chemical trace gas species throughout the troposphere. Tropopause-penetrating deep convection injects water vapor and pollutants into the lower stratosphere. To obtain the necessary information for characterizing its role in chemistry-climate coupling, the impact of deep convection on UTLS ozone, water vapor, and short-lived organic species has been a key component of several recent airborne field campaigns. We present selected findings and observational highlights from two airborne field campaigns. They are the CONvective TRansport of Active Species in the Tropics (CONTRAST) experiment, conducted January-February 2014 over the western Pacific using the NCAR GV research aircraft, in collaboration with the UK FAAM BAe146 and the NASA Global Hawk, and the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) experiment, conducted August-September 2013 over the north America using the NASA DC-8 and ER-2 research aircraft.

  6. Assessing the GOANNA Visual Field Algorithm Using Artificial Scotoma Generation on Human Observers

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Luke X.; Turpin, Andrew; McKendrick, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To validate the performance of a new perimetric algorithm (Gradient-Oriented Automated Natural Neighbor Approach; GOANNA) in humans using a novel combination of computer simulation and human testing, which we call Artificial Scotoma Generation (ASG). Methods Fifteen healthy observers were recruited. Baseline conventional automated perimetry was performed on the Octopus 900. Visual field sensitivity was measured using two different procedures: GOANNA and Zippy Estimation by Sequential Testing (ZEST). Four different scotoma types were induced in each observer by implementing a novel technique that inserts a step between the algorithm and the perimeter, which in turn alters presentation levels to simulate scotomata in human observers. Accuracy, precision, and unique number of locations tested were measured, with the maximum difference between a location and its neighbors (Max_d) used to stratify results. Results GOANNA sampled significantly more locations than ZEST (paired t-test, P < 0.001), while maintaining comparable test times. Difference plots showed that GOANNA displayed greater accuracy than ZEST when Max_d was in the 10 to 30 dB range (with the exception of Max_d = 20 dB; Wilcoxon, P < 0.001). Similarly, GOANNA demonstrated greater precision than ZEST when Max_d was in the 20 to 30 dB range (Wilcoxon, P < 0.001). Conclusions We have introduced a novel method for assessing accuracy of perimetric algorithms in human observers. Results observed in the current study agreed with the results seen in earlier simulation studies, and thus provide support for performing larger scale clinical trials with GOANNA in the future. Translational Relevance The GOANNA perimetric testing algorithm offers a new paradigm for visual field testing where locations for testing are chosen that target scotoma borders. Further, the ASG methodology used in this paper to assess GOANNA shows promise as a hybrid between computer simulation and patient testing, which may allow more

  7. Field Observations and Numerical Modeling of the Thermal Effects of Groundwater Flow Through a Subarctic Fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, Y.; Coon, E.; Sannel, B.; Pannetier, R.; Harp, D. R.; Frampton, A.; Painter, S. L.; Lyon, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Field observations and numerical modeling of ground temperatures are the main tools for understanding current and projecting future permafrost changes in the rapidly warming Arctic. Traditionally, most studies have focused on vertical fluxes of heat through the ground. Groundwater can transport heat in both lateral and vertical directions but its influence on ground temperatures at local scales in permafrost environments is not well understood. In this study field observations from a subarctic fen located within the sporadic permafrost zone are combined with numerical simulations for investigating coupled water and thermal fluxes. Ground temperature profiles and groundwater levels were observed in boreholes at the Tavvavuoma study site in northern Sweden. Based on these observations, one- and two-dimensional simulations down to 2 m depth across a gradient of permafrost conditions both within and surrounding the fen, were set up. To quantify the influence of groundwater flows on the ground temperature, two-dimensional scenarios representing the fen under various groundwater fluxes were developed. The observations suggest that lateral groundwater flows significantly affect ground temperatures. This is corroborated by modeling results that show seasonal ground ice melts 1 month earlier when a lateral groundwater flux is present. Further, although the thermal regime may be dominated by vertically conducted heat fluxes during most of the year, isolated high groundwater flow events can be potentially important for ground temperatures. Sporadic permafrost environments contain substantial portions of unfrozen ground, often with active groundwater flow paths such as fens. Knowledge of this heat transport mechanism is therefore important for understanding permafrost dynamics in these environments.

  8. Magnetic Field Observations of Partial Ring Current during Storm Recovery Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Lucek, E. A.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of an extensive survey of the magnetic field observations in the inner magnetosphere using 30 years of magnetospheric magnetic field data from Polar, Cluster, ISEE, and AMPTE/CCE missions. The purpose of this study is to understand the magnetic field evolution during the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms, and its implication to the ring current recovery and loss mechanisms of ring current particles. Our previous work on global ring current distribution [Le et al., 2004] has shown that a significant partial ring current is always present at all Dst levels (regardless of storm phases) even for quiet time ring current. The total current carried by the partial ring current is much stronger than (during stormtime) or at least comparable to (during quiet time) the symmetric ring current. It is now commonly believed that a strong partial ring current is formed during the storm main phase due to the enhanced earthward convection of energetic ions from nightside plasma sheet. But the presence of a strong partial ring current throughout the recovery phase remains controversial. The magnetic field generated by the ring current inflates the inner magnetosphere and causes magnetic field depressions in the equatorial magnetosphere. During the storm recovery phase, we find that the distribution of the equatorial magnetic field depression exhibits similar local time dependence as the ring current distribution obtained from the combined dataset in the earlier study. It shows that a strong partial ring current is a permanent feature throughout the recovery phase. In the early recovery phase, the partial ring current peaks near the dusk terminator as indicated by the peak of the magnetic field depression. As the recovery phase progresses, the partial ring current decays most quickly near the dusk and results in a dusk-to-midnight moving of the peak of the partial ring current. Thus the loss mechanisms work most effectively near the dusk. The magnetic field

  9. A New Feature of Field-Aligned Auroral Ion Beams Observed by Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, George; lee, Ensang; Suiyan, Fu; Fillingim, Matt; Cui, Yanbon; Hong, Jinhy; Dandouras, Iaonnis; reme, henri; Canu, Patrick; Lin, Naiguo

    2015-04-01

    Cluster measures 3D distributions in one spin of the spacecraft (4s). Field-aligned ion beams (H+, He+ and O+) are often observed accelerated out of the ionosphere. The escaping beams can be narrow in velocity space or more extended with a continuous range of velocities. Narrow velocity beams indicate the particles have been accelerated by a potential structure localized in space and beams with a wider velocity range indicate the potential structure is extended and distributed along the magnetic field. The Cluster ion composition experiment has now revealed a new feature showing some H+, He+ and O+ field-aligned beams are broken into many discrete beams each with its own velocity covering a wide velocity range. To interpret the discrete beams, the potential model requires existence of many narrow isolated potential structures along a magnetic field but there are currently no U-shaped theories or models that can explain how the discrete potential structures are formed or maintained. Our interpretation is that Cluster SC have actually crossed an auroral arc structure at a height of 3.5 RE and the discrete beams represent particles accelerated on different equi-potential contours of an aurora. While similar beams are observed in three of the four SC, the detailed features are not identical, indicating the beams have limited spatial scales and/or the dynamics include temporal variations. The distance between two discrete beams is estimated to be as small as ~145-290 meters at the SC position. This dimension mapped to the ionosphere is ~72-145 meters, which is a typical thickness of an auroral arc (Maggs and Davis, PSS 16, 205, 1968). The velocity of the beam increases as the SC moves toward the equator indicating that the auroral potential is higher at lower latitudes. This talk will discuss the new discrete beams and their interesting properties.

  10. Baroclinic tides in the Indonesian seas: Tidal fields and comparisons to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Robin; Ffield, Amy

    2008-07-01

    Barotropic and baroclinic tides were simulated for the Indonesia Seas using a primitive equation, terrain-following coordinate model, the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS) with four tidal constituents (M2, S2, K1, and O1). The region's intricate topography as well as interactions between the Pacific and Indian Ocean tides within the Indonesian Seas resulted in complex barotropic and baroclinic tidal fields. The semidiurnal tides entered from both the Pacific and Indian oceans converging in Makassar Strait and the Ceram Sea with an amphidromic point forming in the Timor Sea. Diurnal tides were dominated by the Pacific Ocean tide. The model successfully replicated the observed tidal elevation fields as determined from TOPEX/POSEIDON crossovers with better performance for the semidiurnal constituents, RMS differences of 4-6 cm, than the diurnal constituents, RMS differences of 7-10 cm. A baroclinic response was apparent in the elevations, and the locations of the observed baroclinic elevation response in TOPEX/POSEIDON data agreed with that of the model. Velocities were baroclinic for all constituents with high spatial variability, particularly near sills and in straits. Extensive interactions occurred in the internal tidal fields: between a beam and its own reflections, between internal tides generated at different locations (i.e., different sides of a channel, or beams generated nearby), and between the barotropic and baroclinic tidal beams. Owing to propagation, even regions >100 km from sills showed significant vertical and horizontal variability resulting from internal tides. This resulted in extremely complex internal tidal fields with high variability, both spatially and temporally during a tidal cycle.

  11. Understanding the Interiors of Saturn and Mercury through Magnetic Field Observation and Dynamo Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hao

    Understanding the interior structure and dynamics of a planet is a key step towards understanding the formation and evolution of a planet. In this thesis, I combine field observation and dynamo modeling to understand planetary interiors. Focus has been put on planets Saturn and Mercury. The Cassini spacecraft has been taking continuous measurements in the Saturnian system since the Saturn orbital insertion in June 2004. Since the Mercury orbital insertion in March 2011, the MESSENGER spacecraft has been examining planet Mercury. After analyzing the close-in portion of the in-situ Cassini magnetometer measurements around Saturn, I find that Saturn's magnetic field features several surprising characteristics. First, Saturn's magnetic field is extremely axisymmetric. We cannot find any consistent departure from axisymmetry, and have put an extremely tight upper bound on the dipole tilt of Saturn: the dipole tilt of Saturn has to be smaller than 0.06 degrees. Second, we find that Saturn's magnetic field is extremely stable with time. Third, we estimated the magnetic moments of Saturn up to degree 5. This is the first magnetic field model for Saturn which goes beyond degree 3. We find that not only Saturn's intrinsic magnetic field is dominated by the axial moments; among these axial moments the odd degree ones dominate. In addition, the first three odd degree axial moments all take the same sign. This sign pattern of Saturn's magnetic moments is in contrast to that of the Earth's magnetic moments which takes alternative signs for the past century. The contrast between the geometries of Saturn's magnetic field and the Earth's magnetic field lead us to propose a dynamo hypothesis which speculates that such differences are caused by structural and dynamical differences inside these two planets. Our dynamo hypothesis for Saturn has two essential ingredients. The first concerns about the existence and size of a central core inside Saturn and its influence on Saturn's dynamo

  12. Observation Of New Variable Stars In The Field Of Open Cluster M23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Jeffrey A.; Brown, T. S.; Frank, K. A.; Joshi, U.; Lacoul, B. K.; Rengstorf, N. P.; Schiefelbein, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    In 2002 a program of surveying regions containing bright open star clusters was initiated using the observing facilities at Luther College. As part of this program the half degree square field containing open cluster M23 was observed in 2003, 2005 and 2006, resulting in approximately 45,000 2.5-second images, 45,000 3.5-second images and 65,000 5.0-second images. The data set contains images from 94 nights spanning a time range from JD 2452810 to JD 2454005. We have searched for stellar variability on timescales from seconds to years in approximately 1600 stars in this field. Unambiguous variability is apparent in 30 stars ranging in magnitude from about 10 to 17. Twenty-eight of these stars have not been previously reported as variable. Seven of the stars are eclipsing binaries, including two apparent W UMa-type contact binaries and one additional eclipsing binary with a period shorter than 0.6 days. The remaining 23 variables are red pulsating stars with long periods. Most of these stars have amplitudes smaller than two magnitudes and periods between 200 and 400 days. Thus, they are likely Semi-Regular variables. We present celestial coordinates, estimated amplitude and estimated period for each of these stars, as well as several selected light curves. Finally, we have performed low-precision BVRI photometry of the field and have placed most of the observed variables on color magnitude diagrams. We are grateful for support from the Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust and the R. J. McElroy Trust.

  13. Paddy field mapping and yield estimation by satellite imagery and in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyoshi, K.; Sobue, S.

    2011-12-01

    Since Asian countries are responsible for approximately 90% of the world rice production and consumptions, rice is the most significant cereal crop in Asia. In order to ensure food security and take mitigation strategies or policies to manage food shortages, timely and accurate statistics of rice production are essential. It is time and cost consuming work to create accurate statistics of rice production by ground-based measurements. Hence, satellite remote sensing is expected to contribute food security through the systematic collection of food security related information such as crop growth or yield estimation. In 2011, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is collaborating with GISTDA (Geo-Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency, Thailand) in research projects of rice yield estimation by integrating satellite imagery and in situ data. Thailand is one of the largest rice production countries and the largest rice exporting country, therefore rice related statistics are imperative for food security and economy in the country. However, satellite observation by optical sensor in tropics including Thailand is highly limited, because the area is frequently covered by cloud. In contrast, Japanese microwave sensor, namely Phased-Array L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) on board Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) is suitable for monitoring cloudy area such as Southeast Asia, because PALSAR can penetrate clouds and collect land-surface information even if the area is covered by cloud. In this study, rice crop yield over Khon Kaen, northeast part of Thailand was estimated by combining satellite imagery and in-situ observation. This study consists of mainly two parts, paddy field mapping and yield estimation by numerical crop model. First, paddy field areas were detected by integrating PALSAR and AVNIR-2 data. PALSAR imagery has much speckle noise and the border of each landcover is ambiguous compared to that of optical sensor. To overcome this

  14. Validation Of The Earth Observation Land Data Assimilation System By The Field Data Of ESA SPARC Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernetskiy, Maxim; Gomez-Dans, Jose; Lewis, Philip

    2013-12-01

    The Earth Observation Land Data Assimilation System (EO-LDAS) project is uses the weak constraint variational data assimilation (DA) technique for the estimation of land surface parameters and their uncertainties by the remote sensing data. The main goal of the project is to make full use of different sources of optical sensors data, to provide improved estimation of structural and biophysical parameters of land surface. Therefore a software tool - the EO-LDAS prototype - was developed. Within the frame of this work, the possibilities of EO- LDAS have been demonstrated for MERIS/Envisat and CHRIS/Proba data acquired during ESA SPARC 2004 field campaign over an agricultural test-site near Barrax (Spain). We have used a regularization approach and conditions of spatial smoothness in order to better constrain the problem. The EO-LDAS prototype has been used to implement the weak constrain data assimilation (DA) system, to estimate leaf area index (LAI) and Chlorophyll (a + b) concentration as well as their uncertainties.

  15. The effects of 8 Helios observed solar proton events of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ValdezGalicia, J. F.; Alexander, P.; Otaola, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    There have been recent suggestions that large fluxes during solar energetic particle events may produce their own turbulence. To verify this argument it becomes essential to find out whether these flows cause an enhancement of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations. In the present work, power and helicity spectra of the IMF before, during and after 8 Helios-observed solar proton events in the range 0.3 - 1 AU are analyzed. In order to detect proton self generated waves, the time evolution of spectra are followed.

  16. Automated Astrometric Analysis of Satellite Observations using Wide-field Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuljan, J.; Kay, J.

    2016-09-01

    An observational trial was conducted in the South Island of New Zealand from 24 to 28 February 2015, as a collaborative effort between the United Kingdom and New Zealand in the area of space situational awareness. The aim of the trial was to observe a number of satellites in low Earth orbit using wide-field imaging from two separate locations, in order to determine the space trajectory and compare the measurements with the predictions based on the standard two-line elements. This activity was an initial step in building a space situational awareness capability at the Defence Technology Agency of the New Zealand Defence Force. New Zealand has an important strategic position as the last land mass that many satellites selected for deorbiting pass before entering the Earth's atmosphere over the dedicated disposal area in the South Pacific. A preliminary analysis of the trial data has demonstrated that relatively inexpensive equipment can be used to successfully detect satellites at moderate altitudes. A total of 60 satellite passes were observed over the five nights of observation and about 2600 images were collected. A combination of cooled CCD and standard DSLR cameras were used, with a selection of lenses between 17 mm and 50 mm in focal length, covering a relatively wide field of view of 25 to 60 degrees. The CCD cameras were equipped with custom-made GPS modules to record the time of exposure with a high accuracy of one millisecond, or better. Specialised software has been developed for automated astrometric analysis of the trial data. The astrometric solution is obtained as a two-dimensional least-squares polynomial fit to the measured pixel positions of a large number of stars (typically 1000) detected across the image. The star identification is fully automated and works well for all camera-lens combinations used in the trial. A moderate polynomial degree of 3 to 5 is selected to take into account any image distortions introduced by the lens. A typical RMS

  17. Spatiotemporal multiplexing method for visual field of view extension in holographic displays with naked eye observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, G.; Kujawińska, M.; Kozacki, T.; Zaperty, W.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we propose a method which allows to overcome the basic functional problems in holographic displays with naked eye observation caused by delivering too small images visible in narrow viewing angles. The solution is based on combining the spatiotemporal multiplexing method with a 4f optical system. It enables to increase an aperture of a holographic display and extend the angular visual field of view. The applicability of the modified display is evidenced by Wigner distribution analysis of holographic imaging with spatiotemporal multiplexing method and by the experiments performed at the display demonstrator.

  18. New Observations of the Heliospheric Magnetic Field from the Voyager Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    2007-12-01

    We review recent observations of variations of the heliospheric magnetic field B(t) made by Voyager 1 and 2 (V1 and V2), and we discuss the boundary conditions needed for models to explain the observations. Usually, observations from a spacecraft close to the Sun, such as ACE, WIND or Ulysses are used as input to a time- dependent model. Generally, the predicted profile B(t) can be compared directly with the observed profile only when either V1 or V2 is approximately radially aligned with a near-Sun spacecraft; this happens rarely and only for a brief time interval. The Bastille Day events illustrate this situation. In the absence of radial alignment of the spacecraft it is possible to predict the development of a global structure (a GMIR) with data from ACE or WIND, if they obtain a representative sample the flows that merge to form a GMIR. When latitudinal gradients are small and when there is statistical homogeneity in the azimuthal direction, it is possible to predict the statistical properties of the large-scale fluctuations of B(t) observed by V1 or V2 during a year or so. We illustrate this situation with observations from the recent solar maximum and the declining phase of the solar cycle. Predictions of detailed observations made by V1 and V2 under general conditions (e.g., when there is a large latitudinal gradient) require boundary conditions as a function of time on a surface, such as a Sun-centered sphere with a radius of 1 AU. These conditions can only be provided by global solar observations. We suggest the feasibility of such an approach, using V2 observations for 2005 and 2006. The prediction of observations in the heliosheath requires the solution of the 3-D boundary problem for the supersonic solar wind and propagation of solar wind through the termination shock into the heliosphere. The properties of B(t) observed in the heliosheath have not yet been predicted.

  19. New Observations of the Heliospheric Magnetic Field from the Voyager Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, Leonard F.

    2007-01-01

    We review recent observations of variations of the heliospheric magnetic field B(t) made by Voyager 1 and 2 (V1 and V2), and we discuss the boundary conditions needed for models to explain the observations. Usually, observations from a spacecraft close to the Sun, such as ACE, WIND or Ulysses are used as input to a time-dependent model. Generally, the predicted profile B(t) can be compared directly with the observed profile only when either V1 or V2 is approximately radially aligned with a near-Sun spacecraft; this happens rarely and only for a brief time interval. The Bastille Day events illustrate this situation. In the absence of radial alignment of the spacecraft it is possible to predict the development of a global structure (a GMIR) with data from ACE or WIND, if they obtain a representative sample the flows that merge to form a GMIR. When latitudinal gradients are small and when there is statistical homogeneity in the azimuthal direction, it is possible to predict the statistical properties of the large-scale fluctuations of B(t) observed by V1 or V2 during a year or so. We illustrate this situation with observations from the recent solar maximum and the declining phase of the solar cycle. Predictions of detailed observations made by V1 and V2 under general conditions (e.g., when there is a large latitudinal gradient) require boundary conditions as a function of time on a surface, such as a Sun-centered sphere with a radius of 1 AU. These conditions can only be provided by global solar observations. We suggest the feasibility of such an approach, using V2 observations for 2005 and 2006. The prediction of observations in the heliosheath requires the solution of the 3-D boundary problem for the supersonic solar wind and propagation of solar wind through the termination shock into the heliosphere. The properties of B(t) observed in the heliosheath have not yet been predicted.

  20. Pure Parallel Near-UV Observations with WFPC2 within High-Latitude ACS Survey Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jonathan

    2002-07-01

    In anticipation of the allocation of ACS high-latitude imaging survey{s}, we request a modification of the default pure parallel program for those WFPC2 parallels that fall within the ACS survey field. Rather than duplicate the red bands which will be done much better with ACS, we propose to observe in the near-ultraviolet F300W filter. These data will enable study of the rest-frame ultraviolet morphology of galaxies at 0observations of higher redshift galaxies by ACS.

  1. Meteor observations with Mini-Mega-TORTORA wide-field monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, S.; Orekhova, N.; Beskin, G.; Biryukov, A.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Katkova, E.; Perkov, A.; Sasyuk, V.

    2016-12-01

    Here we report on the results of meteor observations with 9-channel Mini-Mega-TORTORA (MMT-9) optical monitoring system with the wide field and high temporal resolution. During the first 1.5 years of operation more than 90 thousands of meteors have been detected, at a rate of 300-350 per night, with durations from 0.1 to 2.5 seconds and angular velocities up to 38 degrees per second. The faintest detected meteors have peak brightnesses about 10 mag, while the majority have them ranging from 4 to 8 mag. Some of the meteors have been observed in BVR filters simultaneously. Color variations along the trail for them have been determined. The parameters of the detected meteors have been published online. The database also includes data from 10 thousands of meteors detected by our previous FAVOR camera during 2006-2009.

  2. Shortwave surface radiation budget network for observing small-scale cloud inhomogeneity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, B. L.; Kalisch, J.; Macke, A.

    2015-03-01

    As part of the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), a high spatial density network of 99 silicon photodiode pyranometers was set up around Jülich (10 km x 12 km area) from April to July 2013, to capture the variability in the radiation field at the surface induced by small-scale cloud inhomogeneity. Each of these autonomously operated pyranometer stations was equipped with weather sensors for simultaneous measurements of ambient air temperature and relative humidity. In this paper, we provide the details of this unique setup of the pyranometer network and the data analysis with initial quality screening procedure we adopted. We also present some exemplary cases consisting of the days with clear, broken cloudy and overcast skies to assess our spatio-temporal observations from the network, and validate their consistency with other collocated radiation measurements available during the HOPE period.

  3. Shortwave surface radiation network for observing small-scale cloud inhomogeneity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi Madhavan, Bomidi; Kalisch, John; Macke, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    As part of the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), a high-density network of 99 silicon photodiode pyranometers was set up around Jülich (10 km × 12 km area) from April to July 2013 to capture the small-scale variability of cloud-induced radiation fields at the surface. In this paper, we provide the details of this unique setup of the pyranometer network, data processing, quality control, and uncertainty assessment under variable conditions. Some exemplary days with clear, broken cloudy, and overcast skies were explored to assess the spatiotemporal observations from the network along with other collocated radiation and sky imager measurements available during the HOPE period.

  4. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfrich, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Helfrich addresses two perspectives from which to think about observation in the classroom: that of the teacher observing her classroom, her group, and its needs, and that of the outside observer coming into the classroom. Offering advice from her own experience, she encourages and defends both. Do not be afraid of the disruption of outside…

  5. Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joosten, Albert Max

    2016-01-01

    Joosten begins his article by telling us that love and knowledge together are the foundation for our work with children. This combination is at the heart of our observation. With this as the foundation, he goes on to offer practical advice to aid our practice of observation. He offers a "List of Objects of Observation" to help guide our…

  6. Stellar magnetic field parameters from a Bayesian analysis of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, V.; Wade, G. A.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we describe a Bayesian statistical method designed to infer the magnetic properties of stars observed using high-resolution circular spectropolarimetry in the context of large surveys. This approach is well suited for analysing stars for which the stellar rotation period is not known, and therefore the rotational phases of the observations are ambiguous. The model assumes that the magnetic observations correspond to a dipole oblique rotator, a situation commonly encountered in intermediate- and high-mass stars. Using reasonable assumptions regarding the model parameter prior probability density distributions, the Bayesian algorithm determines the posterior probability densities corresponding to the surface magnetic field geometry and strength by performing a comparison between the observed and computed Stokes V profiles. Based on the results of numerical simulations, we conclude that this method yields a useful estimate of the surface dipole field strength based on a small number (i.e. one or two) of observations. On the other hand, the method provides only weak constraints on the dipole geometry. The odds ratio, a parameter computed by the algorithm that quantifies the relative appropriateness of the magnetic dipole model versus the non-magnetic model, provides a more sensitive diagnostic of the presence of weak magnetic signals embedded in noise than traditional techniques. To illustrate the application of the technique to real data, we analyse seven ESPaDOnS and Narval observations of the early B-type magnetic star LP Ori. Insufficient information is available to determine the rotational period of the star and therefore the phase of the data; hence traditional modelling techniques fail to infer the dipole strength. In contrast, the Bayesian method allows a robust determination of the dipole polar strength, ? G. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL). CFHT is operated by

  7. Tsunami damages assessment: vulnerability functions on buildings based on field and earth observation survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauraz, A. L.; Valencia, N.; Koscielny, M.; Guillande, R.; Gardi, A.; Leone, F.; Salaun, T.

    2009-04-01

    The assessment of damages caused by tsunami scenarios on coastal buildings requires using vulnerability matrixes or functions to carry out a relation between the magnitude of the phenomena and the damage expected. These functions represent the probability for a building belonging to a class of vulnerability to suffer from a mean damage level. The physical vulnerability of buildings depends on two parameters: the solicitation level applied by the tsunami on buildings and their resistance capacity. According to the authors after post-tsunami observations (Reese et al. 2007; Ruangrassamee et al. 2006; Leone et al. 2006; Peiris 2006), the level of damage is clearly linked to the water elevation of the inundated areas and the type of observed buildings. Very few works propose relations based on velocity or hydrodynamic pressure of the waves. An approach developed for the estimation of the building vulnerability consists in deriving empirical damage functions starting from field observations. As part of the SCHEMA European Project on the vulnerability assessment for tsunami hazards in the Atlantic and Mediterranean area, vulnerability functions have been elaborated for different classes of buildings in order to produce vulnerability maps for exposed areas with emphasis on extraction of building characteristics using remote sensing data. The damage detection has been carried out by field data collected after the 24 December 2006 tsunami event on the southwest area of Banda Aceh (Sumatra, Thailand) completed by photo-interpretation of satellite images to get representative functions with large population of samples. The building classes consist in several categories depending mainly on the type of construction material (timber/bamboo, traditional brick, reinforced concrete …), the type of structure (beam, pillars, etc) and the number of storeys. The level of damage has been also classified in five categories, from D0 (no damage) to D5 (total destruction). Vulnerability

  8. Structured DC Electric Fields With and Without Associated Plasma Density Gradients Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Liebrecht, C.; Roddy, P.; Hunton, D.

    2009-01-01

    DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts gathered with the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite typically reveal considerable variation at large scales (approximately 100's of km), in both daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures usually confined to the nightside. Although such electric field structures are typically associated with plasma density depletions and structures, as observed by the Planar Langmuir Probe on C/NOFS, what is surprising is the number of cases in which large amplitude, structured DC electric fields are observed without a significant plasma density counterpart structure, including their appearance at times when the ambient plasma density appears relatively quiescent. We investigate the relationship of such structured DC electric fields and the ambient plasma density in the C/NOFS satellite measurements observed thus far, taking into account both plasma density depletions and enhancements. We investigate the mapping of the electric fields along magnetic field lines from distant altitudes and latitudes to locations where the density structures, which presumably formed the original seat of the electric fields, are no longer discernible in the observations. In some cases, the electric field structures and spectral characteristics appear to mimic those associated with equatorial spread-F processes, providing important clues to their origins. We examine altitude, seasonal, and longitudinal effects in an effort to establish the origin of such structured DC electric fields observed both with, and without, associated plasma density gradients

  9. Temporal behavior and temperatures of Yasur volcano, Vanuatu from field remote sensing observations, May 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtle, E. P.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Lorenz, R. D.; Radebaugh, J.; Howell, R. R.

    2016-08-01

    We documented eruption activity at three primary vents at Yasur volcano, Tanna Island, Vanuatu using portable instrumentation in the field over a period of 5 h on 21 May 2014, and acquired aerial images of the craters and vents on 22 May 2014. Although limited in duration, our observations of eruption intervals, durations, temperatures, and speeds of ejected material illustrate the characteristics of the activity at the time at each of the primary vents, providing a useful snapshot of eruption behavior and revealing continued variability at Yasur in comparison to other observation campaigns. Hand-held, high-resolution, near-infrared observations of one of the vents gave peak temperatures of 850 °C to 930 °C for ejected clasts, with a maximum temperature of 1033 °C. These temperatures are significantly higher than previous measurements because exposed lavas could be resolved at timescales less than a second. Our aerial near-infrared images allowed us to estimate the combined area of the active vents within the crater to be 150 m2, and comparison to MODIS radiance measurements in the same time frame yields temperatures, averaged over the combined vent area, of 530-730 °C. In the context of previous observations at Yasur, the activity in May 2014 exhibited lower overall intensity, as well as differences in the nature of the eruptions at the various vents, providing insight regarding the temporal variability of Yasur's activity.

  10. Simulating observations with HARMONI: the integral field spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieleniewski, Simon; Thatte, Niranjan; Kendrew, Sarah; Houghton, Ryan; Tecza, Matthias; Clarke, Fraser; Fusco, Thierry; Swinbank, Mark

    2014-07-01

    With the next generation of extremely large telescopes commencing construction, there is an urgent need for detailed quantitative predictions of the scientific observations that these new telescopes will enable. Most of these new telescopes will have adaptive optics fully integrated with the telescope itself, allowing unprecedented spatial resolution combined with enormous sensitivity. However, the adaptive optics point spread function will be strongly wavelength dependent, requiring detailed simulations that accurately model these variations. We have developed a simulation pipeline for the HARMONI integral field spectrograph, a first light instrument for the European Extremely Large Telescope. The simulator takes high-resolution input data-cubes of astrophysical objects and processes them with accurate atmospheric, telescope and instrumental effects, to produce mock observed cubes for chosen observing parameters. The output cubes represent the result of a perfect data reduc- tion process, enabling a detailed analysis and comparison between input and output, showcasing HARMONI's capabilities. The simulations utilise a detailed knowledge of the telescope's wavelength dependent adaptive op- tics point spread function. We discuss the simulation pipeline and present an early example of the pipeline functionality for simulating observations of high redshift galaxies.

  11. Gravity waves observation of wind field in stratosphere based on a Rayleigh Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruocan; Dou, Xiankang; Sun, Dongsong; Xue, Xianghui; Zheng, Jun; Han, Yuli; Chen, Tingdi; Wang, Guocheng; Zhou, Yingjie

    2016-03-21

    Simultaneous wind and temperature measurements in stratosphere with high time-spatial resolution for gravity waves study are scarce. In this paper we perform wind field gravity waves cases in the stratosphere observed by a mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar. This lidar system with both wind and temperature measurements were implemented for atmosphere gravity waves research in the altitude region 15-60 km. Observations were carried out for two periods of time: 3 months started from November 4, 2014 in Xinzhou, China (38.425°N,112.729°E) and 2 months started from October 7, 2015 in Jiuquan, China (39.741°N, 98.495°E) . The mesoscale fluctuations of the horizontal wind velocity and the two dimensional spectra analysis of these fluctuations show the presence of dominant oscillatory modes with wavelength of 4-14 km and period of around 10 hours in several cases. The simultaneous temperature observations make it possible to identify gravity wave cases from the relationships between different variables: temperature and horizontal wind. The observed cases demonstrate the Rayleigh Doppler Lidar's capacity to study gravity waves.

  12. Energy Spectra of the Soft X-Ray Diffuse Emission in Fourteen Fields Observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Tomotaka; Mitsuda, Kazuhiasa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Takei, Yoh; Hagihara, Toshishige; Masui, Kensuke; Bauer, Michael; McCammon, Dan; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Wang, Q. Daniel; Yao, Yangsen

    2009-08-01

    The soft diffuse X-ray emission of twelve fields observed with Suzaku are presented together with two additional fields from previous analyses. All have galactic longitudes 65° < l < 295° to avoid contributions from the very bright diffuse source that extends at least 30° from the Galactic center. The surface brightnesses of the Suzaku nine fields for which apparently uncontaminated ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS) were available were statistically consistent with the RASS values, with an upper limit for differences of 17 × 10-6 c s-1 arcmin-2 in R45-band. The OVII and OVIII intensities are well correlated to each other, and OVII emission shows an intensity floor at ˜2 photons s-1 cm-2 str-1 (LU). The high-latitude O VIII emission shows a tight correlation with excess of O VII emission above the floor, with (O VIII intensity) = 0.5 × [(OVII intensity) - 2LU], suggesting that temperatures averaged over different line-of-sight show a narrow distribution around ˜0.2keV. We consider that the offset intensity of OVII arises from the Heliospheric solar wind charge exchange and perhaps from the local hot bubble, and that the excess OVII (2--7LU) is emission from more distant parts of the Galaxy. The total bolometric luminosity of this galactic emission is estimated to be 4 × 1039erg s-1, and its characteristic temperature may be related to the virial temperature of the Galaxy.

  13. Structure and Dynamics of the Sub-corotating Region of Saturn's Magnetosphere: Cassini Magnetic Field Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of the azimuthal magnetic field component, BΦ, enable the study of the sub-corotating magnetosphere, the associated global current system, the ionospheric Pedersen current, IP, and a comparison with the Cowley-Vasyliunas model. The study is strongly dependent on Cassini's highly elliptical orbits that restrict useful observations to specific orbits and parts of orbits to avoid weak azimuthal fields associated with the magnetopause or other magnetospheric currents. An example is the selection of thirteen identical orbits near 22 +/- 2 hours Local Time and restriction of the data to 4 to 10 Saturn radii. Inferred IP profiles between 10° and 25° ionospheric co-latitude, θi , when averaged, are similar in shape to model predictions with a peak value of 5 million amperes. However, the individual profiles vary significantly, the result of dynamics associated with large-scale motions of the magnetospheric field. The Cowley-Vasyliunas model also relates IP(θi) to magnetospheric rotation rates, ΩS, equivalent to the SKR period, and the sub-corotation rate, ω, and provides a means of estimating ω / ΩS in the night-side magnetosphere as compared to the dayside rotation rates obtained from azimuthal plasma velocity measurements, VΦ. Other carefully- selected orbits extend these results to different ranges in θi and Local Times and provide further values of important magnetospheric parameters and allow additional testing of the model.

  14. Observation of the Field, Current and Force Distributions in an Optimized Superconducting Levitation with Translational Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chang-Qing; Ma, Guang-Tong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Jia-Su

    2017-01-01

    The superconducting levitation realized by immersing the high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) into nonuniform magnetic field is deemed promising in a wide range of industrial applications such as maglev transportation and kinetic energy storage. Using a well-established electromagnetic model to mathematically describe the HTS, we have developed an efficient scheme that is capable of intelligently and globally optimizing the permanent magnet guideway (PMG) with single or multiple HTSs levitated above for the maglev transportation applications. With maximizing the levitation force as the principal objective, we optimized the dimensions of a Halbach-derived PMG to observe how the field, current and force distribute inside the HTSs when the optimized situation is achieved. Using a pristine PMG as a reference, we have analyzed the critical issues for enhancing the levitation force through comparing the field, current and force distributions between the optimized and pristine PMGs. It was also found that the optimized dimensions of the PMG are highly dependent upon the levitated HTS. Moreover, the guidance force is not always contradictory to the levitation force and may also be enhanced when the levitation force is prescribed to be the principle objective, depending on the configuration of levitation system and lateral displacement.

  15. Shuttle near-field environmental impacts - Conclusions and observations for launching at other locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koller, A. M., Jr.; Knott, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    Near field and far field environmental monitoring activities extending from the first launch of the Space Shuttle at the Kennedy Space Center have provided a database from which conclusions can now be drawn for short term, acute effects of launch and, to a lesser degree, long term cumulative effects on the natural environment. Data for the first 15 launches of the Space Shuttle from Kennedy Space Center Pad 39A are analyzed for statistical significance and reduced to graphical presentations of individual and collective disposition isopleths, summarization of observed environmental impacts (e.g., vegetation damage, fish kills), and supporting data from specialized experiments and laboratory analyses. Conclusions are drawn with regard to the near field environment at Pad A, the effects on the lagoonal complex, and the relationships of these data and conclusions to upcoming operations at Complex 39 Pad B where the environment is significantly different. The paper concludes with a subjective evaluation of the likely impacts at Vandenberg Space Launch Complex 6 for the first Shuttle launch next year.

  16. Observing soil water dynamics under two field conditions by a novel sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, W.; Sun, Y.; Schulze Lammers, P.; Schumann, H.; Berg, A.; Shi, C.; Wang, C.

    2011-10-01

    SummarySufficiently available soil water is a basic requirement in agricultural production. Monitoring soil water dynamics (SWD) in the root zone is an optimal approach for managing a crop's growth. This study presents a novel sensor system that simultaneously measures volumetric soil water content (VSWC), apparent electrical conductivity (EC a) and soil temperature at two different soil depths (shallow: 16 cm; deep: 36 cm). For testing its feasibility in the field, two prototypes were installed, one in bare soil and the other in a sugar beet ( Beta vulgaris L.) field in the summer of 2010. Following a sequence of rainfall events randomly distributed over the experimental period, we observed distinct responses from the sensors at each monitored depth in both field conditions. In addition to the multi-parameter measurements, the novel sensor design includes a series of technical advantages such as solar-powered operation, wireless communication, and being relatively easy to install/remove. Thus, the developed wireless sensor system is promising for networked applications in precision farming.

  17. Some experimental observations on circulating currents in a crossed field plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlicka, J.; Haacker, J.

    1971-01-01

    Experiments on a thermally ionized argon plasma suggest that applying a Lorentz force by means of orthogonal electric and magnetic fields to an electrically conducting fluid flow imposes necessary but not sufficient conditions for acceleration. There are, in fact, many combinations of current and magnetic field which cause decelerations of the fluid. The deceleration arises from a retarding force which may be larger than the applied Lorentz force. The retarding force causing the deceleration is a consequence of currents circulating completely within the fluid. These currents arise from differences in velocity between the central and wall regions of the duct which interact with the imposed magnetic field to produce differences in induced voltages. The observed physical effects of the circulating currents cause a loss in velocity in the central region of the duct, an increase in thermal energy in the sidewall region, and little change in thermal energy near the electrode wall region. For similar velocity profiles, the adverse effects appear to be related to the product of electrical conductivity and velocity, and performance as an accelerator appears to be controlled by the Hoffman loading parameter (i.e., the ratio of the applied to the induced currents).

  18. Observation of force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance in a homogeneous field

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, L. A.; Leskowitz, G. M.; Weitekamp, D. P.

    2004-01-01

    We report the experimental realization of BOOMERANG (better observation of magnetization, enhanced resolution, and no gradient), a sensitive and general method of magnetic resonance. The prototype millimeter-scale NMR spectrometer shows signal and noise levels in agreement with the design principles. We present 1H and 19F NMR in both solid and liquid samples, including time-domain Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy, multiple-pulse echoes, and heteronuclear J spectroscopy. By measuring a 1H-19F J coupling, this last experiment accomplishes chemically specific spectroscopy with force-detected NMR. In BOOMERANG, an assembly of permanent magnets provides a homogeneous field throughout the sample, while a harmonically suspended part of the assembly, a detector, is mechanically driven by spin-dependent forces. By placing the sample in a homogeneous field, signal dephasing by diffusion in a field gradient is made negligible, enabling application to liquids, in contrast to other force-detection methods. The design appears readily scalable to μm-scale samples where it should have sensitivity advantages over inductive detection with microcoils and where it holds great promise for application of magnetic resonance in biology, chemistry, physics, and surface science. We briefly discuss extensions of the BOOMERANG method to the μm and nm scales. PMID:15326302

  19. Observation of energetic electron confinement in a largely stochastic reversed-field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, D. J.; Chapman, B. E.; O'Connell, R.; Almagri, A. F.; Burke, D. R.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J. A.; Kaufman, M. C.; Bonomo, F.; Franz, P.; Gobbin, M.; Piovesan, P.

    2010-01-01

    Runaway electrons with energies >100 keV are observed with the appearance of an m =1 magnetic island in the core of otherwise stochastic Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] reversed-field-pinch plasmas. The island is associated with the innermost resonant tearing mode, which is usually the largest in the m =1 spectrum. The island appears over a range of mode spectra, from those with a weakly dominant mode to those, referred to as quasi single helicity, with a strongly dominant mode. In a stochastic field, the rate of electron loss increases with electron parallel velocity. Hence, high-energy electrons imply a region of reduced stochasticity. The global energy confinement time is about the same as in plasmas without high-energy electrons or an island in the core. Hence, the region of reduced stochasticity must be localized. Within a numerical reconstruction of the magnetic field topology, high-energy electrons are substantially better confined inside the island, relative to the external region. Therefore, it is deduced that the island provides a region of reduced stochasticity and that the high-energy electrons are generated and well confined within this region.

  20. A Reevaluation of Airborne HO(x) Observations from NASA Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Jennifer; Crawford, James H.; Chen, Gao; Brune, William H.; Faloona, Ian C.; Tan, David; Harder, Hartwig; Martinez, Monica

    2006-01-01

    In-situ observations of tropospheric HO(x) (OH and HO2) obtained during four NASA airborne campaigns (SUCCESS, SONEX, PEM-Tropics B and TRACE-P) are reevaluated using the NASA Langley time-dependent photochemical box model. Special attention is given to previously diagnosed discrepancies between observed and predicted HO2 which increase with higher NO(x) levels and at high solar zenith angles. This analysis shows that much of the model discrepancy at high NO(x) during SUCCESS can be attributed to modeling observations at time-scales too long to capture the nonlinearity of HO(x) chemistry under highly variable conditions for NO(x). Discrepancies at high NO(x) during SONEX can be moderated to a large extent by complete use of all available precursor observations. Differences in kinetic rate coefficients and photolysis frequencies available for previous studies versus current recommendations also explain some of the disparity. Each of these causes is shown to exert greater influence with increasing NO(x) due to both the chemical nonlinearity between HO(x) and NO(x) and the increased sensitivity of HO(x) to changes in sources at high NO(x). In contrast, discrepancies at high solar zenith angles will persist until an adequate nighttime source of HO(x) can be identified. It is important to note that this analysis falls short of fully eliminating the issue of discrepancies between observed and predicted HO(x) for high NO(x) environments. These discrepancies are not resolved with the above causes in other data sets from ground-based field studies. Nevertheless, these results highlight important considerations in the application of box models to observationally based predictions of HO(x) radicals.

  1. Variability of the wind field in the tropical oceans as observed by satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grima, N.; Bentamy, A.; Quilfen, Y.

    1995-12-01

    The wind stress is the primary force driving the tropical oceans from daily to interannual time scales. Conventional measurements from ships of the wind vectors are not available with a sufficient quality regarding data accuracy as well as their coverage. Satellite observations of the surface wind over the sea are now available on a routine basis at the Institut Francais de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer (IFREMER), derived from the European Remote Sensing-1 (ERS-1) scatterometer and altimeter and from the radiometer special sensor microwave/imager (SSM/I). More than 3 years of weekly stress fields (1991-1994) with a resolution of one degree in latitude and longitude are produced using an objective analysis method. The accuracy of these gridded winds was evaluated by comparison with TAO buoys in the tropical Pacific area (Riou, 1995). The root mean square differences are of the order of 1.2 m/s and 15 degrees. The greatest differences are observed in the TOGA/COARE region where the wind variability is largest on the weekly scale. The low frequencies (monthly to interannual) of the wind variability are discussed and compared to those obtained from the TAO buoys. In this paper the time and space scales of the sea surface wind are described using a complex EOF analysis. One of the most interesting results is that the weekly averaged wind fields derived from ERS-1 scatterometer are useful to depict a 30-50 day oscillation over the tropical Pacific Ocean.

  2. Acoustic backscatter by suspended cohesive sediments: Field observations, Seine Estuary, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Cihan; Verney, Romaric; Sheremet, Alexandru; Voulgaris, George

    2017-02-01

    Observations of suspended sediment size and concentration, flow and acoustic backscatter intensity collected on the Seine Estuary (France) are used to study the acoustic response in cohesive-sediment dominated environments. Estimates of suspended sediment concentration based on optical backscatter sensors and water samples are used to calibrate the acoustic backscatter intensity. The vertical structure of suspended sediment concentration is then estimated from acoustic backscatter information. To our knowledge, this is the first field application of the recently proposed model of acoustic scattering by flocculating suspensions based on the variation of particle density (floc-scattering model). The estimates of sediment concentration reproduce well the observations under different tidal (neap/spring) conditions, confirming the applicability of the new model in the field when detailed particle size measurements are available. When particle size measurements are not available, using estimated floc sizes based on the turbulence intensities may provide reasonable SSC profiles. During spring tide events (associated with strong currents, small flocs and large concentrations), the performances of the new floc-scattering model and the previous models given for solid particle-scattering are comparable. The floc-scattering model increases the quality of the SSC estimates especially during low-energy conditions characterized with larger flocs.

  3. Field Observation of Joint Structures in Various Types of Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Shingo; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2006-05-01

    In this study, field observations of natural fracture network systems in some intrusive and extrusive rocks were undertaken, to clarify the fracturing mechanism in the rocks. Shallow intrusives, whose depth of emplacement was less than several hundred metres, include the Momo-iwa Dacite dome on Rebun Island (Hokkaido), and Jodogahama Rhyolite in Iwate prefecture. Extrusive complexes studied include the Tojinbo Andesite and Ojima Rhyodacite in Fukui prefecture. Rocks of `granitic' composition were collected from the Takidani (Japan Alps) and Hijiori (Yamagata prefecture) plutons. The joint structure in Hijiori Granite was evaluated by analysis of core samples extracted from the HDR-3 geothermal production well. Based on detailed field observation, joint structures related to thermal contraction of a rock mass could be classified according to their inferred depth of formation. Joints from a near surface setting, such as shallow intrusive rocks and extrusives, tend to form pentagonal — hexagonal columnar structures (for a variety of rock types), whilst granitic rocks (from a deeper setting) typically exhibit a parallelepiped structure. The apparent differences in joint form are inferred to be dependent on the confining pressure, which acts on joint generation and propagation. In cases of non-confining pressure, such as the near-surface (shallow intrusive/extrusive) setting, joint networks typically form a columnar structure. On the contrary, confining pressure is considerably greater for deeper rock masses, and these form a parallelepiped joint structure.

  4. Ecological effects of pesticide use in The Netherlands: modeled and observed effects in the field ditch.

    PubMed

    de Zwart, Dick

    2005-04-01

    This study addresses the potential risks to the aquatic ecosystem posed by pesticides currently used in The Netherlands. The study used a novel method to predict aquatic exposure to pesticides based on a geographic information system (GIS) map of agricultural land use, comprising 51 crops used in open-canopy areas. Through the application of species-sensitivity distributions for aquatic organisms, in combination with rules for mixture-toxicity calculation, the modeled exposure results were transformed to risk estimates for aquatic species. The majority of the predicted risks were caused by pesticides applied to potato cropland, and approximately 95% of the predicted risk was caused by only 7 of the 261 pesticides currently used in The Netherlands. For risk verification, local toxic-risk estimates were compared with observed species composition in field ditches. The field verification study was not able to draw firm conclusions regarding the predicted impact of pesticide use on overall biodiversity. A toxicity-related shift from sensitive to more tolerant or opportunistic species could be observed for a few species.

  5. Magnetic Field Structures in a Facular Region Observed by THEMIS and Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Schmieder, B.; Bommier, V.; Gosain, S.

    2010-03-01

    The main objective of this paper is to build and compare vector magnetic maps obtained by two spectral polarimeters, i.e. THEMIS/MTR and Hinode SOT/SP, using two inversion codes (UNNOFIT and MELANIE) based on the Milne - Eddington solar atmosphere model. To this end, we used observations of a facular region within active region NOAA 10996 on 23 May 2008, and found consistent results concerning the field strength, azimuth and inclination distributions. Because SOT/SP is free from the seeing effect and has better spatial resolution, we were able to resolve small magnetic polarities with sizes of 1″ to 2″, and we could detect strong horizontal magnetic fields, which converge or diverge in negative or positive facular polarities. These findings support models which suggest the existence of small vertical flux tube bundles in faculae. A new method is proposed to get the relative formation heights of the multi-lines observed by MTR assuming the validity of a flux tube model for the faculae. We found that the Fe i 6302.5 Å line forms at a greater atmospheric height than the Fe i 5250.2 Å line.

  6. Observable pulsed fractions of thermal emission from neutron stars with toroidal magnetic fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Jillian Anne

    The observed spectra of many thermally emitting neutron stars ("The Magnificent Seven", High-Field Pulsars, etc.) suggest that the surface temperature distribution can be described by hot polar regions surrounded by a cooler equatorial belt. The hotter polar "caps" produce pulsed fractions (P F ) in the x-ray emission that, in some cases, can be quite high (e.g. PSR J1119-6127 with P F = 74 ± 14%, Gonzalez et al. 2007). In neutron stars, such a temperature distribution can be explained by the presence of a strong toroidal field in the crust (Perez-Azorin et al. 2006; Geppert et al. 2006). An elegant description of the relationship between pulsed fraction and rg /R for compact stars with hot spots was first given by Beloborodov 2002. In this study, the relationship between pulsed fraction and stellar radius (P F vs. R) for various configurations of hot spot position, beaming factor and observer angle for a 1.4 solar mass neutron star is explored. The pertinence of spot temperature and size is also examined.

  7. LAMOST OBSERVATIONS IN THE KEPLER FIELD. I. DATABASE OF LOW-RESOLUTION SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Cat, P. De; Ren, A. B.; Yang, X. H.; Fu, J. N.; Shi, J. R.; Luo, A. L.; Yang, M.; Wang, J. L.; Zhang, H. T.; Shi, H. M.; Zhang, W.; Dong, Subo; Catanzaro, G.; Frasca, A.; Corbally, C. J.; Gray, R. O.; Żakowicz, J. Molenda-; Uytterhoeven, K.; Briquet, M.; Bruntt, H.; and others

    2015-09-15

    The nearly continuous light curves with micromagnitude precision provided by the space mission Kepler are revolutionizing our view of pulsating stars. They have revealed a vast sea of low-amplitude pulsation modes that were undetectable from Earth. The long time base of Kepler light curves allows for the accurate determination of the frequencies and amplitudes of pulsation modes needed for in-depth asteroseismic modeling. However, for an asteroseismic study to be successful, the first estimates of stellar parameters need to be known and they cannot be derived from the Kepler photometry itself. The Kepler Input Catalog provides values for the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity, but not always with sufficient accuracy. Moreover, information on the chemical composition and rotation rate is lacking. We are collecting low-resolution spectra for objects in the Kepler field of view with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (lamost, Xinglong observatory, China). All of the requested fields have now been observed at least once. In this paper, we describe those observations and provide a useful database for the whole astronomical community.

  8. Description and interpretation of aircraft lightning attachment electric and magnetic field measurements and video observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, J. P.; Larigaldie, S.

    1991-01-01

    In 1988, ONERA carried out a complete airborne lightning characterization program. Among other features, the program has provided a significant amount of data from analog records of electric and magnetic field sensors to give a description of all stages of the lightning process. The initiation phase has a description of all stages of the lightning process. The initiation phase has been described in the past, so the present objective is to give a description of the other stages of the discharge, based on the observation of analog electromagnetic waveforms and of fast video (200 f/s) image processed pictures. During lightning attachment, the aircraft remains electrically connected to the lightning channel where a large variety of physical processes occur. These physical processes include recoil streamers, return strokes, and even other initiation processes of secondary discharges. Typical records of analog electromagnetic field along with relative luminosity variation of the channel, which shows that there is no extinction of the continuous current throughout the discharge process. A computation of current and potential waveforms using the transmission line formalism is presented and gives satisfactory results for the representation of two of the typical waveforms observed in the recoil streamer processes.

  9. Dynamic Recrystallization in Ice : In-Situ Observation of the Strain Field during Grain Nucleation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauve, T.; Montagnat, M.; Tommasi, A.; Vacher, P.

    2014-12-01

    close focus on a triple junction. In particular, we will provide original observations of strain-field evolution associated with the nucleation of new grains and subboundaries close to this triple junction. Associated with post-deformation analyses by AITA and EBSD, these observations enable to follow the strain redistribution due to the nucleation.

  10. Direct observation of extrasolar planets and the development of the gemini planet imager integral field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilcote, Jeffrey Kaplan

    This thesis is focused on the development and testing of a new instrument capable of finding and characterizing recently-formed Jupiter-sized planets orbiting other stars. To observe these planets, I present the design, construction and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS). GPI is a facility class instrument for the Gemini Observatory with the primary goal of directly detecting young Jovian planets. The GPI IFS utilizes an infrared transmissive lenslet array to sample a rectangular 2.7 x 2.7 arcsecond field of view and provide low-resolution spectra across five bands between 1 and 2.5 mum. The dispersing element can be replaced with a Wollaston prism to provide broadband polarimetry across the same five filter bands. The IFS construction was based at the University of California, Los Angeles in collaboration with the Universite de Montreal, Immervision and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I will present performance results, from in-lab testing, of the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The IFS is a large, complex, cryogenic, optical system requiring several years of development and testing. I will present the design and integration of the mechanical and optical performance of the spectrograph optics. The IFS passed its pre-ship review in 2011 and was shipped to University of California, Santa Cruz for integration with the remaining sub-systems of GPI. The UCLA built GPI IFS was integrated with the rest of GPI and is delivering high quality spectral datacubes of GPI's coronagraphic field. Using the NIRC2 instrument located at the Keck Observatory, my collaborators and I observed the planetary companion to beta Pictoris in L' (3.5--4.1mum). Observations taken in the fall of 2009 and 2012 are used to find the location and inclination of the planet relative to the massive debris disk orbiting beta Pictoris. We find that the planet's orbit has a position angle on the sky of 211

  11. Field observations of the electrostatic charges of blowing snow in Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omiya, S.; Sato, A.

    2011-12-01

    An electrostatic charge of blowing snow may be a contributing factor in the formation of a snow drift and a snow cornice, and changing of the trajectory of own motion. However, detailed electrification characteristics of blowing snow are not known as there are few reports of charge measurements. We carried out field observations of the electrostatic charges of blowing snow in Tobetsu, Hokkaido, Japan in the mid winter of 2011. An anemovane and a thermohygrometer were used for the meteorological observation. Charge-to-mass ratios of blowing snow were obtained by a Faraday-cage, an electrometer and an electric balance. In this observation period, the air temperature during the blowing snow event was -6.5 to -0.5 degree Celsius. The measured charges in this observation were consistent with the previous studies in sign, which is negative, but they were smaller than the previous one. In most cases, the measured values increased with the temperature decrease, which corresponds with previous studies. However, some results contradicted the tendency, and the maximum value was obtained on the day of the highest air temperature of -0.5 degree Celsius. This discrepancy may be explained from the difference of the snow surface condition on observation day. The day when the maximum value was obtained, the snow surface was covered with old snow, and hard. On the other hand, in many other cases, the snow surface was covered with the fresh snow, and soft. Blowing snow particles on the hard surface can travel longer distance than on the soft one. Therefore, it can be surmised that the hard surface makes the blowing snow particles accumulate a lot of negative charges due to a large number of collisions to the surface. This can be supported by the results of the wind tunnel experiments by Omiya and Sato (2011). By this field observation, it was newly suggested that the electrostatic charge of blowing snow are influenced greatly by the difference of the snow surface condition. REFERENCE

  12. Interrelation of geomagnetic storms and earthquakes: Insight from lab experiments and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhin, Yuri; Kamogawa, Masashi; Novikov, Victor

    statistical approach for the problem of ionosphere-lithosphere coupling, and in each case the possible behavior of fluids should be considered under electromagnetic impact on lithosphere. Experimental results supporting this idea are obtained at the spring-block model simulating the seismic cycle (slow accumulation and sharp drop of stresses in the fault gauge), as well as from field observations of water level variations in the well during ionospheric disturbances are presented and discussed. In the lab experiments it was shown that the earthquake may be triggered by very small fluid content injected into the simulated fault (<0.1 % mass of fault gauge). In the field observations it was found that water level in the well rises during sunrise, when ionosphere is excited by solar radiation, and drops during sunset (relaxation process in ionosphere). Moreover, it was shown that the water level in well correlates with geomagnetic field perturbations during geomagnetic storms. A simplified model describing interaction of geomagnetic field variations with fluid behavior near the seismogenic fault is presented. References: 1. Duma G., Ruzhin Yu. Diurnal changes of earthquake activity and geomagnetic Sq-variations // Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 3, 2003, p.p.171-177. 2. Novikov V.A. Water imbalance in the geological fault as a possible earthquake trigger // AGU 2012 Fall Meeting, Dec. 3-8, San Francisco, USA, Abstract GC42B-08.

  13. High-resolution regional gravity field recovery from Poisson wavelets using heterogeneous observational techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yihao; Luo, Zhicai; Chen, Wu; Chen, Yongqi

    2017-02-01

    We adopt Poisson wavelets for regional gravity field recovery using data acquired from various observational techniques; the method combines data of different spatial resolutions and coverage, and various spectral contents and noise levels. For managing the ill-conditioned system, the performances of the zero- and first-order Tikhonov regularization approaches are investigated. Moreover, a direct approach is proposed to properly combine Global Positioning System (GPS)/leveling data with the gravimetric quasi-geoid/geoid, where GPS/leveling data are treated as an additional observation group to form a new functional model. In this manner, the quasi-geoid/geoid that fits the local leveling system can be computed in one step, and no post-processing (e.g., corrector surface or least squares collocation) procedures are needed. As a case study, we model a new reference surface over Hong Kong. The results show solutions with first-order regularization are better than those obtained from zero-order regularization, which indicates the former may be more preferable for regional gravity field modeling. The numerical results also demonstrate the gravimetric quasi-geoid/geoid and GPS/leveling data can be combined properly using this direct approach, where no systematic errors exist between these two data sets. A comparison with 61 independent GPS/leveling points shows the accuracy of the new geoid, HKGEOID-2016, is around 1.1 cm. Further evaluation demonstrates the new geoid has improved significantly compared to the original model, HKGEOID-2000, and the standard deviation for the differences between the observed and computed geoidal heights at all GPS/leveling points is reduced from 2.4 to 0.6 cm. Finally, we conclude HKGEOID-2016 can be substituted for HKGEOID-2000 for engineering purposes and geophysical investigations in Hong Kong.

  14. Assimilation of drifter observations for the reconstruction of eulerian circulation field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molcard, A.; Ozgokmen, T.; Piterbarg, L.; Griffa, A.

    2003-04-01

    In light of the increasing number of drifting buoys in the ocean, and recent advances in the realism of ocean general circulation models toward oceanic forecasting, the problem of assimilation of Lagrangian observations data in Eulerian models is investigated. A new and general rigorous approach is developed based on optimal interpolation methods, which takes into account directly the Lagrangian nature of the observations. An idealized version of this general formulation is tested in the framework of identical twin-experiments using a reduced-gravity, quasi-geostrophic model. An extensive study is conducted to quantify the effectiveness of Lagrangian data assimilation as a function of the number of drifters, the frequency of assimilation and uncertainties associated with the forcing functions driving the ocean model. The performance of the Lagrangian assimilation technique is also compared to that of conventional methods of assimilating drifters as moving current meters, and assimilation of Eulerian data, such as fixed-point velocities. Overall the results are very favorable for the assimilation of Lagrangian observations to improve the Eulerian velocity field in ocean models. The results of our assimilation twin experiments imply an optimal sampling frequency for oceanic Lagrangian instruments in the range of 20-50% of the Lagrangian integral time scale of the flow field. The method is extended to primitive equation ocean models by using a dynamical relationship between velocity components and layer thickness based on geostrophy. The method is implemented in an idealized MICOM of midlatitude circulation, and performances of three different techniques, Pseudo-Lagrangian OI, Lagrangian OI and Pseudo-Lagrangian Kalman Filter (based on Chin et al., 1999) are compared using a comprehensive set of experiments. The main finding of this study is that two different strategies of data assimilation are simultaneously supported: (i) the strategy of adopting well

  15. Mid-Continental Intensive Field Campaign Atmospheric CO2 Observations Compared to Forward Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, L. I.; Davis, K. J.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A.; Andrews, A. E.; Jacobson, A. R.; Corbin, K.

    2009-12-01

    Two commonly used approaches to study source/sinks of CO2 are the “bottom-up” and the “top-down” methods. Because of the large discrepancies between these approaches, the North America Carbon Program devised the Mid-Continental Intensive field campaign (MCI). The MCI campaign aims at improving the carbon flux estimates of both approaches with a combination of atmospheric transport models, a denser network of in-situ atmospheric CO2 measurements and agricultural inventories. The first step in evaluating and improving inverse models is to compare observed CO2 concentrations and predicted concentrations from forwards models. This study shows a model-data comparison at multiple temporal and spatial scales for the 2007 growing season. In-situ tower-based observations are compared to two different forwards models: NOAA’s Carbon Tracker and CSU’s SiBcrop-RAMS. Observations from two tall towers of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and five towers of Ring2 PSU network are used for this comparison. The towers are located in an intensively agricultural region of the North American continent. Comparisons to date show that both models predict higher mid-summer concentrations at three sites located in the “corn belt.” Both models have difficulty reproducing the observed monthly-average spatial gradient across these sites. The models also underestimate the maximum observed spatial gradients in daytime, daily-averaged boundary layer concentrations. These results suggest that the rapid photosynthetic rates found in corn are not yet well-simulated in these models, and that these data, when used in inversions, will provide a valuable constraint on regional fluxes.

  16. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  17. Observations of field-aligned currents, particles, and plasma drift in the polar cusps near solstice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bythrow, P. F.; Potemra, T. A.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Magnetic perturbations observed by the TRIAD magnetometer within two hours of an AE-C spacecraft pass provide field-aligned current data, from the same local time in the northern hemisphere, for a study of the polar cusp. The AE-C spinning mode has allowed the use of the Z-axis magnetometer for Birkeland current observations, in conjunction with particle and drift measurements. The average B(z) were found to be 1.9 nT and -1.1 nT during the first two hourly intervals on January 15, 1977. Measurements from the low energy electron experiment revealed intense fluxes of soft, cusp-like 100 eV Maxwellian electrons throughout the prenoon polar cap. The upward directed current can be identified as the dominant cusp current appropriate for B(y) values lower than zero, while the downward directed current, which has the appropriate sign of a dayside region 1 current, is observed to lie entirely within a westerly, antisunward-convecting plasma.

  18. Spatial distribution of polychlorinated naphthalenes in the atmosphere across North China based on gridded field observations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Zhao, Yifan; Qiu, Xinghua; Ma, Jin; Yang, Qiaoyun; Shao, Min; Zhu, Tong

    2013-09-01

    Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) belong to a group of dioxin-like pollutants; however little information is available on PCNs in North China. In this study, gridded field observations by passive air sampling at 90 sites were undertaken to determine the levels, spatial distributions, and sources of PCNs in the atmosphere of North China. A median concentration of 48 pg m(-3) (range: 10-2460 pg m(-3)) for ∑29PCNs indicated heavy PCN pollution. The compositional profile indicated that nearly 90% of PCNs observed were from thermal processes rather than from commercial mixtures. Regarding the source type, a quantitative apportionment suggested that local non-point emissions contributed two-thirds of the total PCNs observed in the study, whereas a point source of electronic-waste recycling site contributed a quarter of total PCNs. The estimated toxic equivalent quantity for dioxin-like PCNs ranged from 0.97 to 687 fg TEQ m(-3), with the electronic-waste recycling site with the highest risk.

  19. The interplanetary magnetic field during solar cycle 21 ISEE-3/ICE observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Jungman, G.; Smith, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    Temporal variations in the IMF during solar cycle 21 are investigated using magnetic field observations collected by the vector helium magnetometer on the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft. Analysis of the observations reveal that the IMF magnitude, which had declined to 4.7 nT in 1976, peaked in late 1982 (two years after solar maximum) at 9.0 nT and rapidly decreased during 1983-1984 to an intensity of 6.2 nT in early 1985. The IMF intensities are compared with the auroral AE index; the observed peak in strength during 1981-1983 is related to a 50 percent increase in substorm activity levels. A decrease in Parker spiral angle, revealing the existence of high-speed streams is detected in the declining phase of the solar cycle. Variations in the intensity of the IMF correlate with Mt. Wilson magnetograph measurements of full disk magnetic flux. Source regions for the evolution of solar wind and the IMF are proposed.

  20. First faint dual-field off-axis observations in optical long baseline interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Woillez, J.; Wizinowich, P.; Ragland, S.; Akeson, R.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Colavita, M.; Eisner, J.; Monnier, J. D.; Pott, J.-U.

    2014-03-10

    Ground-based long baseline interferometers have long been limited in sensitivity in part by the short integration periods imposed by atmospheric turbulence. The first observation fainter than this limit was performed on 2011 January 22 when the Keck Interferometer observed a K = 11.5 target, about 1 mag fainter than its K = 10.3 atmospherically imposed limit; the currently demonstrated limit is K = 12.5. These observations were made possible by the Dual-Field Phase-Referencing (DFPR) instrument, part of the NSF-funded ASTrometry and phase-Referenced Astronomy project; integration times longer than the turbulence time scale are made possible by its ability to simultaneously measure the real-time effects of the atmosphere on a nearby bright guide star and correct for it on the faint target. We present the implementation of DFPR on the Keck Interferometer. Then, we detail its on-sky performance focusing on the accuracy of the turbulence correction and the resulting fringe contrast stability.

  1. Australian Soil Moisture Field Experiments in Support of Soil Moisture Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Walker, Jeff; Rudiger, Christopher; Panciera, Rocco

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale field campaigns provide the critical fink between our understanding retrieval algorithms developed at the point scale, and algorithms suitable for satellite applications at vastly larger pixel scales. Retrievals of land parameters must deal with the substantial sub-pixel heterogeneity that is present in most regions. This is particularly the case for soil moisture remote sensing, because of the long microwave wavelengths (L-band) that are optimal. Yet, airborne L-band imagers have generally been large, heavy, and required heavy-lift aircraft resources that are expensive and difficult to schedule. Indeed, US soil moisture campaigns, have been constrained by these factors, and European campaigns have used non-imagers due to instrument and aircraft size constraints. Despite these factors, these campaigns established that large-scale soil moisture remote sensing was possible, laying the groundwork for satellite missions. Starting in 2005, a series of airborne field campaigns have been conducted in Australia: to improve our understanding of soil moisture remote sensing at large scales over heterogeneous areas. These field data have been used to test and refine retrieval algorithms for soil moisture satellite missions, and most recently with the launch of the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, to provide validation measurements over a multi-pixel area. The campaigns to date have included a preparatory campaign in 2005, two National Airborne Field Experiments (NAFE), (2005 and 2006), two campaigns to the Simpson Desert (2008 and 2009), and one Australian Airborne Cal/val Experiment for SMOS (AACES), just concluded in the austral spring of 2010. The primary airborne sensor for each campaign has been the Polarimetric L-band Microwave Radiometer (PLMR), a 6-beam pushbroom imager that is small enough to be compatible with light aircraft, greatly facilitating the execution of the series of campaigns, and a key to their success. An

  2. Electric Field Observations of Plasma Convection, Shear, Alfven Waves, and other Phenomena Observed on Sounding Rockets in the Cusp and Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    On December 14,2002, a NASA Black Brant X sounding rocket was launched equatorward from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen (79 N) into the dayside cusp and subsequently cut across the open/closed field line boundary, reaching an apogee of771 km. The launch occurred during Bz negative conditions with strong By negative that was changing during the flight. SuperDarn (CUTLASS) radar and subsequent model patterns reveal a strong westward/poleward convection, indicating that the rocket traversed a rotational reversal in the afternoon merging cell. The payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particle, suprathermal electron and ion, and thermal plasma data. We provide an overview of the main observations and focus on the DC electric field results, comparing the measured E x B plasma drifts in detail with the CUTLASS radar observations of plasma drifts gathered simultaneously in the same volume. The in situ DC electric fields reveal steady poleward flows within the cusp with strong shears at the interface of the closed/open field lines and within the boundary layer. We use the observations to discuss ionospheric signatures of the open/closed character of the cusp/low latitude boundary layer as a function of the IMF. The electric field and plasma density data also reveal the presence of very strong plasma irregularities with a large range of scales (10 m to 10 km) that exist within the open field line cusp region yet disappear when the payload was equatorward of the cusp on closed field lines. These intense low frequency wave observations are consistent with strong scintillations observed on the ground at Ny Alesund during the flight. We present detailed wave characteristics and discuss them in terms of Alfven waves and static irregularities that pervade the cusp region at all altitudes.

  3. Observation of correlated electronic decay in expanding clusters triggered by near-infrared fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, B.; Arbeiter, M.; Fennel, T.; Jabbari, G.; Kuleff, A. I.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Rouzée, A.

    2015-10-01

    When an excited atom is embedded into an environment, novel relaxation pathways can emerge that are absent for isolated atoms. A well-known example is interatomic Coulombic decay, where an excited atom relaxes by transferring its excess energy to another atom in the environment, leading to its ionization. Such processes have been observed in clusters ionized by extreme-ultraviolet and X-ray lasers. Here, we report on a correlated electronic decay process that occurs following nanoplasma formation and Rydberg atom generation in the ionization of clusters by intense, non-resonant infrared laser fields. Relaxation of the Rydberg states and transfer of the available electronic energy to adjacent electrons in Rydberg states or quasifree electrons in the expanding nanoplasma leaves a distinct signature in the electron kinetic energy spectrum. These so far unobserved electron-correlation-driven energy transfer processes may play a significant role in the response of any nano-scale system to intense laser light.

  4. Tsallis Distribution Functions in the Solar Wind: Magnetic Field and Velocity Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, Leonard F.; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2007-12-06

    The distributions the fluctuations of magnetic field strengths B(t) observed on a scale of a year in the heliosphere between 1 AU and 90 AU are approximately lognormal. The PDFs of the corresponding increments of B(t) are Tsallis distributions on scales from 1 hr--128 days between 1 and 90 AU. A deterministic MHD model predicts these results. The model predicts that small chaotic structures merge to form large structures. There is a 'phase transition' near {approx}40 AU at which the there is a change from growth to decay. Between R{approx}40 and 85 AU the solar wind is in a quasi-equilibrium state described by a 'q-triplet'.

  5. Ship-based Surface Flux Observations Under Atmospheric Rivers During the CALWATER 2015 Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomquist, B.; Fairall, C. W.; Intrieri, J. M.; Wolfe, D. E.; Pezoa, S.

    2015-12-01

    The NOAA Physical Sciences Division portable flux system was deployed on the R/V Ron Brown as part of the surface observational strategy for the CALWATER 2015 field investigation. Measurements included turbulent fluxes of temperature, water vapor and wind stress. A refined 'best' set of bulk meteorological measurements for the duration of the cruise was produced from combined NOAA, DOE ARM-AMF2 and shipboard sensors. Direct eddy correlation and bulk model estimates of sensible and latent heat are broadly consistent (RMSE < 10 W/m2). We present a comparison of in-situ fluxes with gridded forecast and reanalysis datasets and assess the potential magnitude of surface flux to the vapor transport budget.

  6. Observation of correlated electronic decay in expanding clusters triggered by near-infrared fields

    PubMed Central

    Schütte, B.; Arbeiter, M.; Fennel, T.; Jabbari, G.; Kuleff, A.I.; Vrakking, M.J.J.; Rouzée, A.

    2015-01-01

    When an excited atom is embedded into an environment, novel relaxation pathways can emerge that are absent for isolated atoms. A well-known example is interatomic Coulombic decay, where an excited atom relaxes by transferring its excess energy to another atom in the environment, leading to its ionization. Such processes have been observed in clusters ionized by extreme-ultraviolet and X-ray lasers. Here, we report on a correlated electronic decay process that occurs following nanoplasma formation and Rydberg atom generation in the ionization of clusters by intense, non-resonant infrared laser fields. Relaxation of the Rydberg states and transfer of the available electronic energy to adjacent electrons in Rydberg states or quasifree electrons in the expanding nanoplasma leaves a distinct signature in the electron kinetic energy spectrum. These so far unobserved electron-correlation-driven energy transfer processes may play a significant role in the response of any nano-scale system to intense laser light. PMID:26469997

  7. Mars gravity field error analysis from simulated radio tracking of Mars Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Lerch, F. J.; Chan, J. C.; Chinn, D. S.; Iz, H. B.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on the analysis of the recovery of the Martian gravity field from tracking data in the presence of unmodeled error effects associated with different orbit orientations. The analysis was based on the mission plan for the Mars Observer (MO) radio tracking data from the Deep Space Network. From the analysis, a conservative estimate of the gravitational accuracy for the entire mission could be obtained. The results suggest that, because the atmospheric drag is the dominant error source, the spacecraft orbit could possibly be raised in altitude without a significant loss of gravitational signal. A change in altitude will also alleviate the large effects seen in the spectrum the satellite resonant orders.

  8. Spatial characteristics of observed precipitation fields: A catalog of summer storms in Arizona, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennessey, N. M.; Eagleson, P. S.; Qinliang, W.; Rodrigues-Iturbe, I.

    1986-01-01

    Eight years of summer raingage observations are analyzed for a dense, 93 gage, network operated by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, in their 150 sq km Walnut Gulch catchment near Tucson, Arizona. Storms are defined by the total depths collected at each raingage during the noon to noon period for which there was depth recorded at any of the gages. For each of the resulting 428 storms, the 93 gage depths are interpolated onto a dense grid and the resulting random field is anlyzed. Presented are: storm depth isohyets at 2 mm contour intervals, first three moments of point storm depth, spatial correlation function, spatial variance function, and the spatial distribution of total rainstorm depth.

  9. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics in Collective Frog Choruses Examined by Mathematical Modeling and Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Ikkyu; Mizumoto, Takeshi; Otsuka, Takuma; Awano, Hiromitsu; Nagira, Kohei; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports theoretical and experimental studies on spatio-temporal dynamics in the choruses of male Japanese tree frogs. First, we theoretically model their calling times and positions as a system of coupled mobile oscillators. Numerical simulation of the model as well as calculation of the order parameters show that the spatio-temporal dynamics exhibits bistability between two-cluster antisynchronization and wavy antisynchronization, by assuming that the frogs are attracted to the edge of a simple circular breeding site. Second, we change the shape of the breeding site from the circle to rectangles including a straight line, and evaluate the stability of two-cluster and wavy antisynchronization. Numerical simulation shows that two-cluster antisynchronization is more frequently observed than wavy antisynchronization. Finally, we recorded frog choruses at an actual paddy field using our sound-imaging method. Analysis of the video demonstrated a consistent result with the aforementioned simulation: namely, two-cluster antisynchronization was more frequently realized.

  10. Optical amateur observations of the field of IGR J18245-2452 in M28

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monard, L. A. G.; Kuulkers, E.

    2013-04-01

    Optical observations of the field around the recently discovered X-ray transient (Atels #4925, #4929) and type I X-ray burster (ATels #4959, #4960, #4961) IGR J18245-2452 in M28 (ATels #4925, #4927) were reported by Monard (2013, vsnet-alert 15587). Images of M28 were taken at the CBA Klein Karoo Observatory one week after the discovery alert by INTEGRAL, as well as one week before the alert. A brightened star was found at (J2000.0) RA, Dec = 18h 24m 32.93s, -24deg 51' 59.6" (with an astrometric uncertainty of less than <0.03" in RA and <0.5" in Dec) as measured against the USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog, UCAC2, possibly being the optical counterpart to IGR J18245-2452 (Monard 2013).

  11. Cosmology with hybrid expansion law: scalar field reconstruction of cosmic history and observational constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Akarsu, Özgür; Kumar, Suresh; Myrzakulov, R.; Sami, M.; Xu, Lixin E-mail: sukuyd@gmail.com E-mail: samijamia@gmail.com

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a simple form of expansion history of Universe referred to as the hybrid expansion law - a product of power-law and exponential type of functions. The ansatz by construction mimics the power-law and de Sitter cosmologies as special cases but also provides an elegant description of the transition from deceleration to cosmic acceleration. We point out the Brans-Dicke realization of the cosmic history under consideration. We construct potentials for quintessence, phantom and tachyon fields, which can give rise to the hybrid expansion law in general relativity. We investigate observational constraints on the model with hybrid expansion law applied to late time acceleration as well as to early Universe a la nucleosynthesis.

  12. Kingsley Field, Klamath Falls, Oregon. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-16

    FIELD OR 68-70,73-79 APR ST -ATION 51ATION NAME YEARSMOT PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE OF WEATHER CONDITIONS FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS RAIN FREEZI N...SNOW 1OF SMOKE BLOWING DUST OAS 08 TOTALMONTH Ls.) TUDRSADO RAI & i OR AND/OR HAIL 0ILS WITH FOG AND/OR SNOW AND/Olt IWIH ST NO. OF STRS DRIZZLE...1*59 .2’ 721 .8l, TRACE, .421 920; 1.34’ 1.68’ .70i 10.41, $4 2.8Z .47101. .2d .671 2.03 .34 TRACE’ .&as .1. ST 2.06 6.65 16.4$ -6- 1.a59; .07, .02- 1

  13. TRANSVERSE COMPONENT OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE SOLAR PHOTOSPHERE OBSERVED BY SUNRISE

    SciTech Connect

    Danilovic, S.; Beeck, B.; Pietarila, A.; Schuessler, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; MartInez Pillet, V.; Bonet, J. A.; Domingo, V.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, W.; Knoelker, M.; Title, A. M.

    2010-11-10

    We present the first observations of the transverse component of a photospheric magnetic field acquired by the imaging magnetograph SUNRISE/IMaX. Using an automated detection method, we obtain statistical properties of 4536 features with significant linear polarization signal. We obtain a rate of occurrence of 7 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1} arcsec{sup -2}, which is 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than the values reported by previous studies. We show that these features have no characteristic size or lifetime. They appear preferentially at granule boundaries with most of them being caught in downflow lanes at some point. Only a small percentage are entirely and constantly embedded in upflows (16%) or downflows (8%).

  14. MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH FLUCTUATIONS IN THE HELIOSHEATH: VOYAGER 1 OBSERVATIONS DURING 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F. E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the ''microscale fluctuations'' of the magnetic field strength B on a scale of several hours observed by Voyager1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009. The microscale fluctuations of B range from coherent to stochastic structures. The amplitude of microscale fluctuations of B during 1 day is measured by the standard deviation (SD) of 48 s averages of B. The distribution of the daily values of SD is lognormal. SD(t) from day of year (DOY) 1 to 331, 2009, is very intermittent. SD(t) has a 1/f or 'pink noise' spectrum on scales from 1 to 100 days, and it has a broad multifractal spectrum f({alpha}) with 0.57 {<=} {alpha} {<=} 1.39. The time series of increments SD(t + {tau}) - SD(t) has a pink noise spectrum with {alpha}' = 0.88 {+-} 0.14 on scales from 1 to 100 days. The increments have a Tsallis (q-Gaussian) distribution on scales from 1 to 165 days, with an average q = 1.75 {+-} 0.12. The skewness S and kurtosis K have Gaussian and lognormal distributions, respectively. The largest spikes in K(t) and S(t) are often associated with a change in B across a data gap and with identifiable physical structures. The 'turbulence' observed by V1 during 2009 was weakly compressible on average but still very intermittent, highly variable, and highly compressible at times. The turbulence observed just behind the termination shock by Voyager 2 was twice as strong. These observations place strong constraints on any model of 'turbulence' in the heliosheath.

  15. Magnetic Field Strength Fluctuations in the Heliosheath: Voyager 1 Observations during 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the "microscale fluctuations" of the magnetic field strength Beta on a scale of several hours observed by Voyager I (VI) in the heliosheath during 2009. The microscale fluctuations of Beta range from coherent to stochastic structures. The amplitude of microscale fluctuations of Beta during 1 day is measured by the standard deviation (SD) of 48 s averages of B. The distribution of the daily values of SD is lognormal. SD(t) from day of year (DOY) I to 331, 2009, is very intermittent. SD(t) has a 1/f or "pink noise" spectrum on scales from I to 100 days, and it has a broad multi fractal spectrum f(alpha) with 0.57 much < alpha much < 1.39. The time series of increments SD(t + r) - SD(t) has a pink noise spectrum with alpha' = 0.88 +/- 0.14 on scales from 1 to 100 days. The increments have a Tsallis (q-Gaussian) distribution on scales from 1 to 165 days, with an average q = 1.75 +/- 0.12. The skewness S and kurtosis K have Gaussian and lognormal distributions, respectively. The largest spikes in K(t) and Set) are often associated with a change in Beta across a data gap and with identifiable physical structures. The "turbulence" observed by VI during 2009 was weakly compressible on average but still very intermittent, highly variable, and highly compressible at times. The turbulence observed just behind the termination shock by Voyager 2 was twice as strong. These observations place strong constraints on any model of "turbulence" in the heliosheath.

  16. Magnetic Field Strength Fluctuations in the Heliosheath: Voyager 1 Observations During 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brulaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the microscale fluctuations of the magnetic field strength B on a scale of several hours observed by Voyager1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009. The microscale fluctuations of B range from coherent to stochastic structures. The amplitude of microscale fluctuations of B during 1 day is measured by the standard deviation (SD) of 48 s averages of B. The distribution of the daily values of SD is lognormal. SD(t) from day of year (DOY) 1 to 331, 2009, is very intermittent. SD(t) has a 1/f or "pink noise" spectrum on scales from 1 to 100 days, and it has a broad multifractal spectrum f(alpha) with 0.57 less than or equal to alpha less than or equal to 1.39. The time series of increments SD(t + tau) -- SD(t) has a pink noise spectrum with alpha(1) = 0.88 plus or minus 0.14 on scales from 1 to 100 days. The increments have a Tsallis (q-Gaussian) distribution on scales from 1 to 165 days, with an average q = 1.75 plus or minus 0.12. The skewness S and kurtosis K have Gaussian and lognormal distributions, respectively. The largest spikes in K(t) and S(t) are often associated with a change in B across a data gap and with identifiable physical structures. The "turbulence" observed by V1 during 2009 was weakly compressible on average but still very intermittent, highly variable, and highly compressible at times. The turbulence observed just behind the termination shock by Voyager 2 was twice as strong. These observations place strong constraints on any model of turbulence in the heliosheath.

  17. Intermittency of magnetic field turbulence: Astrophysical applications of in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, Lev M.; Bykov, Andrei M.; Uvarov, Yury A.; Artemyev, Anton V.

    2015-08-01

    We briefly review some aspects of magnetic turbulence intermittency observed in space plasmas. Deviation of statistical characteristics of a system (e.g. its high statistical momenta) from the Gaussian can manifest itself as domination of rare large intensity peaks often associated with the intermittency in the system's dynamics. Thirty years ago, Zeldovich stressed the importance of the non-Gaussian appearance of the sharp values of vector and scalar physical parameters in random media as a factor of magnetic field amplification in cosmic structures. Magnetic turbulence is governing the behavior of collisionless plasmas in space and especially the physics of shocks and magnetic reconnections. Clear evidence of intermittent magnetic turbulence was found in recent in-situ spacecraft measurements of magnetic fields in the near-Earth and interplanetary plasma environments. We discuss the potentially promising approaches of incorporating the knowledge gained from spacecraft in-situ measurements into modern models describing plasma dynamics and radiation in various astrophysical systems. As an example, we discuss supernova remnants (SNRs) which are known to be the sources of energy, momentum, chemical elements, and high-energy cosmic rays (CRs) in galaxies. Supernova shocks accelerate charged particles to very high energies and may strongly amplify turbulent magnetic fields via instabilities driven by CRs. Relativistic electrons accelerated in SNRs radiate polarized synchrotron emission in a broad range of frequencies spanning from the radio to gamma-rays. We discuss the effects of intermittency of magnetic turbulence on the images of polarized synchrotron X-ray emission of young SNRs and emission spectra of pulsar wind nebula.

  18. Dual Spacecraft Observations of Lobe Magnetic Field Perturbations Before, During and after Plasmoid Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Hesse, M.; Owen, C. J.; Taguchi, S.; Fairfield, D. H.; Lepping, R. P.; Kokubun, S.; Mukai, T.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Anderson, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    This study examines a unique data set returned by IMP8 and Geotail on January 29, 1995 during a substorm which resulted in the ejection of a plasmoid. The two spacecraft (s/c) were situated in the north lobe of the tail and both observed a traveling compression region (TCR). From single s/c observations only the length of the plasmoid in X and an estimate of its height in Z can be determined. However, we show that dual s/c measurements of TCRs can be used to model all three dimensions of the underlying plasmoid and to estimate of its rate of expansion or contraction. For this event plasmoid dimensions of Delta(X) approximates 18, Delta(Y) approximates 30, and Delta(Z) approximates 10 R(sub e) are inferred from the IMP8 and Geotail lobe magnetic field measurements. The earthward end of the plasmoid was inferred to be near the mean location of the near-earth neutral line, X approximates -26 R(sub e). Its center was underneath IMP 8 at X approximates -34 R(sub e) and its tailward end appeared to be near X approximates -44 R(sub e). Furthermore, a factor of approximately 2 increase in the amplitude of the TCR occurred in the 1.5 min it took to move from IMP 8 to Geotail. Modeled using conservation of the magnetic flux, this increase in lobe compression implies that the underlying plasmoid was expanding at a rate of approximately 140 km/s. Such an expansion is comparable to recently reported V(sub y) speeds in "young" plasmoids in this region of the tail. Finally, the Geotail measurements indicate that a reconfiguration of the lobe magnetic field closely followed the ejection of the plasmoid which moved magnetic flux tubes into the wake behind the plasmoid where they would convect into the near-earth neutral line and reconnect.

  19. Recent laboratory and field observations of the chemical composition of atmospheric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. N.; Winkler, P.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Lawler, M. J.; Ortega, J.; Fry, J.; Barsanti, K. C.; McMurry, P. H.; Johnston, M. V.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will focus on understanding the species and mechanisms that are responsible for the formation and growth of atmospheric nanoparticles. We report 10 - 40 nm diameter nanoparticle chemical composition measurements performed in two coastal sites (Mace Head, Ireland, and Lewes, Delaware USA) and two forested sites (Hyytiälä, Finland, and Manitou Forest, Colorado USA) with the recently-developed High Resolution Time-of-Flight Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (HTOF-TDCIMS). These field measurements are supplemented by laboratory experiments of particle formation and growth performed at NCAR using a flow tube apparatus and a Teflon bag reaction chamber, and by thermodynamic modeling. Together, our field and laboratory observations point to crucial roles played in nanoparticle growth by two compounds: organic acids and organonitrates. The first, organic acids, are major contributors to the organic fraction in sub-20 nm diameter biogenic nanoparticles but appear to be less abundant in the organic fraction of larger particles, the latter of which are dominated by multifunctional carbonyl- and alcohol-containing compounds. The observed changes in chemical composition of the organic fraction as a function of particle size are supported by thermodynamic modeling results. The second, organonitrates, are commonly found in ambient nanoparticles as small as 10 nm in diameter. However unlike organic acids, organonitrates become increasingly more important in nanoparticle growth as particle size increases. Laboratory experiments suggest that organonitrates formed from the nitrate radical oxidation of biogenic organic compounds, a subset of total organonitrates, exhibit particularly low volatility and can thus partition into the smallest nanoparticles. This is confirmed by HTOF-TDCIMS measurements of 10 - 20 nm diameter particles, which show that particulate phase organonitrates peak in the morning, shortly following the period where

  20. An overview of observations and mesoscale synoptics during the OFCAP field project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, V.; Anderson, P.; Elvidge, A.; Gadian, A.; King, J.; Kirchgaessner, A.; Ladkin, R.; Lachlan-Cope, T.; Mobbs, S.

    2012-04-01

    It is thought that more frequent and stronger westerly flow, correlated with an increasingly positive Southern Annular Mode (SAM), has reduced the blocking capacity of the Peninsula. Resultant 'flow over' regimes have caused an increase in the frequency and intensity of Föhn and downslope wind events on the eastern side of the orography. We hypothesise that it is these events that are responsible for rapid temperature increases observed on the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula during summer in recent decades. During the Austral summer of 2011, the field phase of Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) took place to investigate the hypothesis above and how large-scale flow controls the surface climate of the Peninsula region at around 67°S. Airborne capability was provided by a Twin Otter aircraft measuring all standard meteorological variables, broad-band radiation, turbulence, and cloud properties, and two radiosonde stations. The first was located west of the Peninsula at the British Antarctic Survey's Rothera research base and the second was on the Larsen C ice shelf. Ground-based observations were made by a transect of four Automatic Weather Stations located west, on the summit, east of the Peninsula and near to the edge of the Larsen C ice shelf at about 67°S. High resolution modelling using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical model provided forecasts for flight planning. This study will give an overview of the field activities and introduce case studies of Föhn, downslope wind, gravity wave and barrier jet events.

  1. Tropical Cyclone Precipitation Types and Electrical Field Information Observed by High Altitude Aircraft Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Blakeslee, Richard; Cecil, Daniel; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Heymsfield, Gerald; Marks, Frank

    2004-01-01

    During the 1998 and 200 1 hurricane seasons of the Atlantic Ocean Basin, the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR), the ER-2 Doppler (EDOP) radar, and the Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) were flown aboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) ER-2 high altitude aircraft as part of the Third Convection And Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) and the Fourth Convection And Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4). Several hurricanes and tropical storms were sampled during these experiments. A rainfall screening technique has been developed using AMPR passive microwave observations of these tropical cyclones (TC) collected at frequencies of 10.7, 19.35,37.1, and 85.5 GHz and verified using vertical profiles of EDOP reflectivity and lower altitude horizontal reflectivity scam collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOM) P-3 radar. Matching the rainfall classification results with coincident electrical field information collected by the LIP readily identifl convective rain regions within the TC precipitation fields. Strengths and weaknesses of the rainfall classification procedure will be discussed as well as its potential as a real-time analysis tool for monitoring vertical updrafl strength and convective intensity from a remotely operated or uninhabited aerial vehicle.

  2. BLAST OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOUTH ECLIPTIC POLE FIELD: NUMBER COUNTS AND SOURCE CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Valiante, Elisabetta; Braglia, Filiberto G.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeff; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie

    2010-12-15

    We present results from a survey carried out by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) on a 9 deg{sup 2} field near the South Ecliptic Pole at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m. The median 1{sigma} depths of the maps are 36.0, 26.4, and 18.4 mJy, respectively. We apply a statistical method to estimate submillimeter galaxy number counts and find that they are in agreement with other measurements made with the same instrument and with the more recent results from Herschel/SPIRE. Thanks to the large field observed, the new measurements give additional constraints on the bright end of the counts. We identify 132, 89, and 61 sources with S/N {>=}4 at 250, 350, 500 {mu}m, respectively and provide a multi-wavelength combined catalog of 232 sources with a significance {>=}4{sigma} in at least one BLAST band. The new BLAST maps and catalogs are available publicly at http://blastexperiment.info.

  3. SPITZER 70 AND 160 {mu}m OBSERVATIONS OF THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Frayer, D. T.; Huynh, M. T.; Bhattacharya, B.; Fadda, D.; Helou, G.; Sanders, D. B.; Le Floc'h, E.; Ilbert, O.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Lee, N.; Surace, J. A.; Capak, P.; Murphy, E.; Aussel, H.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Fu, H.; Afonso-Luis, A.; Sargent, M. T.

    2009-11-15

    We present Spitzer 70 and 160 {mu}m observations of the COSMOS Spitzer survey (S-COSMOS). The data processing techniques are discussed for the publicly released products consisting of images and source catalogs. We present accurate 70 and 160 {mu}m source counts of the COSMOS field and find reasonable agreement with measurements in other fields and with model predictions. The previously reported counts for GOODS-North and the extragalactic First Look Survey are updated with the latest calibration, and counts are measured based on the large area SWIRE survey to constrain the bright source counts. We measure an extragalactic confusion noise level of {sigma} {sub c} = 9.4 {+-} 3.3 mJy (q = 5) for the MIPS 160 {mu}m band based on the deep S-COSMOS data and report an updated confusion noise level of {sigma} {sub c} = 0.35 {+-} 0.15 mJy (q = 5) for the MIPS 70 {mu}m band.

  4. Field Observations of Methane Emissions from Unconventional and Conventional Fossil Fuel Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, M.; Lindenmaier, R.; Arata, C.; Costigan, K. R.; Frankenberg, C.; Kort, E. A.; Rahn, T. A.; Henderson, B. G.; Love, S. P.; Aubrey, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Energy from methane (CH4) has lower carbon dioxide and air pollutant emissions per unit energy produced than coal or oil making it a desirable fossil fuel. Hydraulic fracturing is allowing United States to harvest the nation's abundant domestic shale gas reservoirs to achieve energy independence. However, CH4 is a gas that is hard to contain during mining, processing, transport and end-use. Therefore fugitive CH4 leaks occur that are reported in bottom up inventories by the EPA. Recent targeted field observations at selected plays have provided top down CH4 leak estimates that are larger than the reported EPA inventories. Furthermore, no long-term regional baselines are available to delineate leaks from unconventional mining operations from historical conventional mining. We will report and compare observations of fugitive CH4 leaks from conventional and unconventional mining to understand changes from technology shifts. We will report in situ and regional column measurements of CH4, its isotopologue 13CH4 and ethane (C2H6) at our Four Corners site near Farmington, NM. The region has substantial coal bed methane, conventional oil and gas production, processing and distribution with minimal hydraulic fracturing activity. We observe large enhancements in in situ and regional column CH4 with distinct time dependence. Our in situ 13CH4 observations and remote C2H6/CH4 provide strong evidence of thermogenic sources. Comparisons of WRF-simulations with emissions inventory (Edgar) with our observations show that the fugitive CH4 leaks from conventional mining are 3 times greater than reported. We also compare in situ mobile surveys of fugitive CH4 and 13CH4 leak signals in basins with conventional (San Juan) mining and unconventional (Permian and Powder River) mining. A large number of active and closed wells were sampled in these regions. Furthermore, play scale surveys on public roads allowed us to gain a regional perspective. The composition of atmospheric 13CH4

  5. DEMETER Observations of Highly Structured Plasma Density and Associated ELF Electric Field and Magnetic Field Irregularities at Middle and Low Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Liebrecht, C.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Parrot, M.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2008-01-01

    The DEMETER spacecraft frequently encounters structured plasma and electric field irregularities associated with equatorial spread-F. However, during severe geonagnetic storms, the spacecraft detects broader regions of density structures that extend to higher latitudes, in some instances to the sub-auroral regions. In addition to the electric field irregularities, ELF magnetic field irregularities are sometimes observed. for example, on the walls of the density structures, and appear related to finely-structured spatial currents and/or Alfven waves. The mid-latitude irregularities are compared with those of equatorial spread-F as well as wit11 intense irregularities associated with the trough region observed at sub-auroral latitudes.

  6. Mars Infrared Spectroscopy: From Theory and the Laboratory To Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkland, Laurel (Editor); Mustard, John (Editor); McAfee, John (Editor); Hapke, Bruce (Editor); Ramsey, Michael (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    The continuity and timely implementation of the Mars exploration strategy relies heavily on the ability of the planetary community to interpret infrared spectral data. However, the increasing mission rate, data volume, and data variety, combined with the small number of spectroscopists within the planetary community, will require a coordinated community effort for effective and timely interpretation of the newly acquired and planned data sets. Relevant spectroscopic instruments include the 1996 TES, 2001 THEMIS, 2003 Pancam, 2003 Mini-TES, 2003 Mars Express OMEGA, 2003 Mars Express PFS, and 2005 CFUSM. In light of that, leaders of the Mars spectral community met June 4-6 to address the question: What terrestrial theoretical, laboratory, and field studies are most needed to best support timely interpretations of current and planned visible infrared spectrometer data sets, in light of the Mars Program goals? A primary goal of the spectral community is to provide a reservoir of information to enhance and expand the exploration of Mars. Spectroscopy has a long history of providing the fundamental compositional discoveries in the solar system, from atmospheric constituents to surface mineralogy, from earth-based to spacecraft-based observations. However, such spectroscopic compositional discoveries, especially surface mineralogies, have usually come after long periods of detailed integration of remote observations, laboratory analyses, and field measurements. Spectroscopic information of surfaces is particularly complex and often is confounded by interference of broad, overlapping absorption features as well as confusing issues of mixtures, coatings, and grain size effects. Thus some spectroscopic compositional discoveries have come only after many years of research. However, we are entering an era of Mars exploration with missions carrying sophisticated spectrometers launching about every 2 years. It is critical that each mission provide answers to relevant questions

  7. Detection of Two Buried Cross Pipelines by Observation of the Scattered Electromagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangini, Fabio; Di Gregorio, Pietro Paolo; Frezza, Fabrizio; Muzi, Marco; Tedeschi, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    In this work we present a numerical study on the effects that can be observed in the electromagnetic scattering of a plane wave due to the presence of two crossed pipelines buried in a half-space occupied by cement. The pipeline, supposed to be used for water conveyance, is modeled as a cylindrical shell made of metallic or poly-vinyl chloride (PVC) material. In order to make the model simpler, the pipelines are supposed running parallel to the air-cement interface on two different parallel planes; moreover, initially we suppose that the two tubes make an angle of 90 degrees. We consider a circularly-polarized plane wave impinging normally to the interface between air and the previously-mentioned medium, which excites the structure in order to determine the most useful configuration in terms of scattered-field sensitivity. To perform the study, a commercially available simulator which implements the Finite Element Method was adopted. A preliminary frequency sweep allows us to choose the most suitable operating frequency depending on the dimensions of the commercial pipeline cross-section. We monitor the three components of the scattered electric field along a line just above the interface between the two media. The electromagnetic properties of the materials employed in this study are taken from the literature and, since a frequency-domain technique is adopted, no further approximation is needed. Once the ideal problem has been studied, i.e. having considered orthogonal and tangential scenario, we further complicate the model by considering different crossing angles and distances between the tubes, in two cases of PVC and metallic material. The results obtained in these cases are compared with those of the initial problem with the goal of determining the scattered field dependence on the geometrical characteristics of the cross between two pipelines. One of the practical applications in the field of Civil Engineering of this study may be the use of ground

  8. Observation of field-induced domain wall propagation in magnetic nanowires by magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Fischer, P.; Allwood, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) is used to image domain walls in magnetic ring structures formed by a 300 nm wide, 24 nm thick Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} nanowire. Both transverse and vortex type domain walls are observed after application of different field sequences. Domain walls can be observed by comparing images obtained from opposite field sequences, or else domain wall propagation observed by comparing successive images in a particular field sequence. This demonstrates the potential use of M-TXM in developing and understanding planar magnetic nanowire behavior.

  9. Convective cloud fields in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic: Satellite and ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esau, I. N.; Chernokulsky, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    Convective cloudiness in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic is considered as an atmospheric spatially self-organized convective field. Convective cloud development is usually studied as a local process reflecting the convective instability of the turbulent planetary boundary layer over a heated surface. The convective cloudiness has a different dynamical structure in high latitudes. Cloud development follows cold-air outbreaks into the areas with a relatively warm surface. As a result, the physical and morphological characteristics of clouds, such as the type of convective cloud, and their geographical localization are interrelated. It has been shown that marginal sea ice and coastal zones are the most frequently occupied by Cu hum, Cu med convective clouds, which are organized in convective rolls. Simultaneously, the open water marine areas are occupied by Cu cong, Cb, which are organized in convective cells. An intercomparison of cloud statistics using satellite data ISCCP and ground-based observations has revealed an inconsistency in the cloudiness trends in these data sources: convective cloudiness decreases in ISCCP data and increases in the groundbased observation data. In general, according to the stated hypothesis, the retreat of the sea-ice boundary may lead to an increase in the amount of convective clouds.

  10. Granular and particle-laden flows: from laboratory experiments to field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delannay, R.; Valance, A.; Mangeney, A.; Roche, O.; Richard, P.

    2017-02-01

    This review article provides an overview of dry granular flows and particle fluid mixtures, including experimental and numerical modeling at the laboratory scale, large scale hydrodynamics approaches and field observations. Over the past ten years, the theoretical and numerical approaches have made such significant progress that they are capable of providing qualitative and quantitative estimates of particle concentration and particle velocity profiles in steady and fully developed particulate flows. The next step which is currently developed is the extension of these approaches to unsteady and inhomogeneous flow configurations relevant to most of geophysical flows. We also emphasize that the up-scaling from laboratory experiments to large scale geophysical flows still poses some theoretical physical challenges. For example, the reduction of the dissipation that is responsible for the unexpected long run-out of large scale granular avalanches is not observed at the laboratory scale and its physical origin is still a matter of debate. However, we believe that the theoretical approaches have reached a mature state and that it is now reasonable to tackle complex particulate flows that incorporate more and more degrees of complexity of natural flows.

  11. CONSTRAINTS ON THE INTERGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD WITH GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Finke, Justin D.; Reyes, Luis C.; Reynolds, Kaeleigh; Georganopoulos, Markos; McCann, Kevin; Ajello, Marco; Fegan, Stephen J. E-mail: lreyes04@calpoly.edu

    2015-11-20

    Distant BL Lacertae objects emit γ-rays that interact with the extragalactic background light (EBL), creating electron–positron pairs, and reducing the flux measured by ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) at very-high energies (VHE). These pairs can Compton-scatter the cosmic microwave background, creating a γ-ray signature at slightly lower energies that is observable by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This signal is strongly dependent on the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) strength (B) and its coherence length (L{sub B}). We use IACT spectra taken from the literature for 5 VHE-detected BL Lac objects and combine them with LAT spectra for these sources to constrain these IGMF parameters. Low B values can be ruled out by the constraint that the cascade flux cannot exceed that observed by the LAT. High values of B can be ruled out from the constraint that the EBL-deabsorbed IACT spectrum cannot be greater than the LAT spectrum extrapolated into the VHE band, unless the cascade spectrum contributes a sizable fraction of the LAT flux. We rule out low B values (B ≲ 10{sup −19} G for L{sub B} ≥ 1 Mpc) at >5σ in all trials with different EBL models and data selection, except when using >1 GeV spectra and the lowest EBL models. We were not able to constrain high values of B.

  12. ULF cusp pulsations: Diurnal variations and interplanetary magnetic field correlations with ground-based observations

    SciTech Connect

    McHarg, M.G.; Olson, J.V.; Newell, P.T.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper the authors establish the Pc 5 magnetic pulsation signatures of the cusp and boundary regions for the high-latitude dayside cusp region. These signatures were determined by comparing spectrograms of the magnetic pulsations with optical observations of particle precipitation regions observed at the cusp. The ULF pulsations have a diurnal variation, and a cusp discriminant is proposed using a particular narrow-band feature in the pulsation spectrograms. The statistical distribution of this pattern over a 253-day period resembles the statistical cusp description using particle precipitation data from the Defense Meterological Satellite Program (DMSP). The distribution of the ground-based cusp discriminant is found to peak 1 hour earlier than the DMSP cusp distribution. This offset is due to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) being predominantly negative B{sub y} for the period when the data were collected. The authors find the diurnal variations so repeatable that only three main categories have statistically different IMF distributions. The identification of the signatures in the magnetic spectrograms of the boundary regions and central cusp allows the spectrogram to be used as a {open_quotes}time line{close_quotes} that shows when the station passed under different regions of the dayside oval. 36 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Constraints on the Intergalactic Magnetic Field with Gamma-Ray Observations of Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Justin D.; Reyes, Luis C.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Reynolds, Kaeleigh; Ajello, Marco; Fegan, Stephen J.; McCann, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Distant BL Lacertae objects emit γ-rays that interact with the extragalactic background light (EBL), creating electron-positron pairs, and reducing the flux measured by ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) at very-high energies (VHE). These pairs can Compton-scatter the cosmic microwave background, creating a γ-ray signature at slightly lower energies that is observable by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This signal is strongly dependent on the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) strength (B) and its coherence length (LB). We use IACT spectra taken from the literature for 5 VHE-detected BL Lac objects and combine them with LAT spectra for these sources to constrain these IGMF parameters. Low B values can be ruled out by the constraint that the cascade flux cannot exceed that observed by the LAT. High values of B can be ruled out from the constraint that the EBL-deabsorbed IACT spectrum cannot be greater than the LAT spectrum extrapolated into the VHE band, unless the cascade spectrum contributes a sizable fraction of the LAT flux. We rule out low B values (B ≲ 10-19 G for LB ≥ 1 Mpc) at >5σ in all trials with different EBL models and data selection, except when using >1 GeV spectra and the lowest EBL models. We were not able to constrain high values of B.

  14. Large-Field CO(J = 1→0) Observations of the Starburst Galaxy M 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salak, Dragan; Nakai, Naomasa; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Aya; Tsuru, Takeshi G.

    2013-06-01

    We present large-field (15.7 × 16.9 arcmin2) CO(J = 1→0) observations of the starburst galaxy M 82, at an angular resolution of 22" with the NRO 45-m telescope. The CO emission was detected in the galactic disk, outflow (driven by the galactic wind) up to ˜2 kpc above the galactic plane in the halo, and in tidal streams. The kinematics of the outflow (including CO line splitting) suggests that it has the shape of a cylinder that is diverging outwards. The mass and kinetic energy of the molecular gas outflow are estimated to be (0.26-1.0) × 109 M⊙ and (1-4) × 1056 erg. A clump of CO gas was discovered 3.5 kpc above the galactic plane; it coincides with a dark lane previously found in X-ray observations, and a peak in H I emission. A comparison with H I, hot molecular hydrogen and dust suggests that the molecular gas shows signatures of warm and cool components in the outflow and tidal streams, respectively.

  15. First field-based atmospheric observation of the reduction of reactive mercury driven by sunlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Foy, Benjamin; Tong, Yindong; Yin, Xiufeng; Zhang, Wei; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong; Zhang, Guoshuai; Wang, Xuejun; Schauer, James J.

    2016-06-01

    Hourly speciated measurements of atmospheric mercury made in a remote, high-altitude site in the Tibetan Plateau revealed the first field observations of the reduction of reactive mercury in the presence of sunlight in the atmosphere. Measurements were collected over four winter months on the shore of Nam Co Lake in the inland Tibetan Plateau. The data was analyzed to identify sources and atmospheric transformations of the speciated mercury compounds. The absence of local anthropogenic sources provided a unique opportunity to examine chemical transformations of mercury. An optimization algorithm was used to determine the parameters of a chemical box model that would match the measured reactive mercury concentrations. This required the presence of a photolytic reduction reaction previously observed in laboratory studies and in power plant plumes. In addition, the model estimated the role of vertical mixing in diluting reactive gaseous mercury during the day, and the role of bromine chemistry in oxidizing gaseous elemental mercury to produce reactive gaseous mercury. This work provides further evidence of the need to add the photolytic reduction reaction of oxidized mercury into atmospheric transport models in order to better simulate mercury deposition.

  16. Observation of exceptional points in reconfigurable non-Hermitian vector-field holographic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Choloong; Choi, Youngsun; Yoon, Jae Woong; Song, Seok Ho; Oh, Cha Hwan; Berini, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Recently, synthetic optical materials represented via non-Hermitian Hamiltonians have attracted significant attention because of their nonorthogonal eigensystems, enabling unidirectionality, nonreciprocity and unconventional beam dynamics. Such systems demand carefully configured complex optical potentials to create skewed vector spaces with a desired metric distortion. In this paper, we report optically generated non-Hermitian photonic lattices with versatile control of real and imaginary sub-lattices. In the proposed method, such lattices are generated by vector-field holographic interference of two elliptically polarized pump beams on azobenzene-doped polymer thin films. We experimentally observe violation of Friedel's law of diffraction, indicating the onset of complex lattice formation. We further create an exact parity-time symmetric lattice to demonstrate totally asymmetric diffraction at the spontaneous symmetry-breaking threshold, referred to as an exceptional point. On this basis, we provide the experimental demonstration of reconfigurable non-Hermitian photonic lattices in the optical domain and observe the purest exceptional point ever reported to date.

  17. Observation of exceptional points in reconfigurable non-Hermitian vector-field holographic lattices

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Choloong; Choi, Youngsun; Yoon, Jae Woong; Song, Seok Ho; Oh, Cha Hwan; Berini, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Recently, synthetic optical materials represented via non-Hermitian Hamiltonians have attracted significant attention because of their nonorthogonal eigensystems, enabling unidirectionality, nonreciprocity and unconventional beam dynamics. Such systems demand carefully configured complex optical potentials to create skewed vector spaces with a desired metric distortion. In this paper, we report optically generated non-Hermitian photonic lattices with versatile control of real and imaginary sub-lattices. In the proposed method, such lattices are generated by vector-field holographic interference of two elliptically polarized pump beams on azobenzene-doped polymer thin films. We experimentally observe violation of Friedel's law of diffraction, indicating the onset of complex lattice formation. We further create an exact parity-time symmetric lattice to demonstrate totally asymmetric diffraction at the spontaneous symmetry-breaking threshold, referred to as an exceptional point. On this basis, we provide the experimental demonstration of reconfigurable non-Hermitian photonic lattices in the optical domain and observe the purest exceptional point ever reported to date. PMID:27425577

  18. Diagnosis of magnetic and electric fields of chromospheric jets through spectropolarimetric observations of H I Paschen lines

    SciTech Connect

    Anan, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Casini, R. E-mail: ichimoto@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2014-05-10

    Magnetic fields govern the plasma dynamics in the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and electric fields acting on neutral atoms that move across the magnetic field enable us to study the dynamical coupling between neutrals and ions in the plasma. In order to measure the magnetic and electric fields of chromospheric jets, the full Stokes spectra of the Paschen series of neutral hydrogen in a surge and in some active region jets that took place at the solar limb were observed on 2012 May 5, using the spectropolarimeter of the Domeless Solar Telescope at Hida observatory, Japan. First, we inverted the Stokes spectra taking into account only the effect of magnetic fields on the energy structure and polarization of the hydrogen levels. Having found no definitive evidence of the effects of electric fields in the observed Stokes profiles, we then estimated an upper bound for these fields by calculating the polarization degree under the magnetic field configuration derived in the first step, with the additional presence of a perpendicular (Lorentz type) electric field of varying strength. The inferred direction of the magnetic field on the plane of the sky approximately aligns to the active region jets and the surge, with magnetic field strengths in the range 10 G < B < 640 G for the surge. Using magnetic field strengths of 70, 200, and 600 G, we obtained upper limits for possible electric fields of 0.04, 0.3, and 0.8 V cm{sup –1}, respectively. This upper bound is conservative, since in our modeling we neglected the possible contribution of collisional depolarization. Because the velocity of neutral atoms of hydrogen moving across the magnetic field derived from these upper limits of the Lorentz electric field is far below the bulk velocity of the plasma perpendicular to the magnetic field as measured by the Doppler shift, we conclude that the neutral atoms must be highly frozen to the magnetic field in the surge.

  19. Diagnosis of Magnetic and Electric Fields of Chromospheric Jets through Spectropolarimetric Observations of H I Paschen Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan, T.; Casini, R.; Ichimoto, K.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic fields govern the plasma dynamics in the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and electric fields acting on neutral atoms that move across the magnetic field enable us to study the dynamical coupling between neutrals and ions in the plasma. In order to measure the magnetic and electric fields of chromospheric jets, the full Stokes spectra of the Paschen series of neutral hydrogen in a surge and in some active region jets that took place at the solar limb were observed on 2012 May 5, using the spectropolarimeter of the Domeless Solar Telescope at Hida observatory, Japan. First, we inverted the Stokes spectra taking into account only the effect of magnetic fields on the energy structure and polarization of the hydrogen levels. Having found no definitive evidence of the effects of electric fields in the observed Stokes profiles, we then estimated an upper bound for these fields by calculating the polarization degree under the magnetic field configuration derived in the first step, with the additional presence of a perpendicular (Lorentz type) electric field of varying strength. The inferred direction of the magnetic field on the plane of the sky approximately aligns to the active region jets and the surge, with magnetic field strengths in the range 10 G < B < 640 G for the surge. Using magnetic field strengths of 70, 200, and 600 G, we obtained upper limits for possible electric fields of 0.04, 0.3, and 0.8 V cm-1, respectively. This upper bound is conservative, since in our modeling we neglected the possible contribution of collisional depolarization. Because the velocity of neutral atoms of hydrogen moving across the magnetic field derived from these upper limits of the Lorentz electric field is far below the bulk velocity of the plasma perpendicular to the magnetic field as measured by the Doppler shift, we conclude that the neutral atoms must be highly frozen to the magnetic field in the surge.

  20. Numerical Stress Field Modelling: from geophysical observations toward volcano hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currenti, Gilda; Coco, Armando; Privitera, Emanuela

    2015-04-01

    We propose numerical approaches to evaluate ground deformation caused by hydrothermal fluid circulation and pressurization of magma chambers. Our aims are focused on the developing of advanced numerical models for interpreting the observed ground deformation and evaluating the conditions leading to volcano unrest. Deformation of volcano edifice is traditionally interpreted as being induced by pressure change within a finite source, though it has also been suggested that hydrothermal fluid circulations may play an important role. To investigate both processes, numerical procedures are implemented to estimate the expected changes in stress and strain fields generated by magmatic overpressure and hydrothermal activity. Firstly, we conduct a stress-strain analysis in an inelastic medium, to determine the favorable conditions for magma chamber failure in different source geometries, reference stress states, failure criteria, rock rheologies and topographic profiles. The numerical results allow us to pinpoint the conditions promoting seismicity, ground deformation and flank instability. The stress-strain analysis provides hints about the favourable conditions which lead to magma chamber wall rupture and the onset of magma migration toward the surface. Secondly, we implemented a thermo-poroelastic model to evaluate ground deformation, caused by hydrothermal fluid circulation. The numerical model is fully coupled with TOUGH2, a commercial software simulating multi-phase and multi-component fluid flow and heat transfer. The two-way coupling is performed through: (i) the concept of effective stress, which is controlled by pore pressure and thermal expansion, and (ii) empirical expressions for porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure, which are dependent on the effective stress. Based on poroelasticity theory and the definition of failure criteria, stress and strain fields are evaluated to define the regions of the volcano edifice more likely to fail and displace

  1. THERMAL MODEL CALIBRATION FOR MINOR PLANETS OBSERVED WITH WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER/NEOWISE

    SciTech Connect

    Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Ressler, M.; Eisenhardt, P.; Grav, T.; Wright, E.; Cutri, R. M.; McMillan, R. S.; Cohen, M.

    2011-08-01

    With the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we have observed over 157,000 minor planets. Included in these are a number of near-Earth objects, main-belt asteroids, and irregular satellites which have well measured physical properties (via radar studies and in situ imaging) such as diameters. We have used these objects to validate models of thermal emission and reflected sunlight using the WISE measurements, as well as the color corrections derived in Wright et al. for the four WISE bandpasses as a function of effective temperature. We have used 50 objects with diameters measured by radar or in situ imaging to characterize the systematic errors implicit in using the WISE data with a faceted spherical near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) to compute diameters and albedos. By using the previously measured diameters and H magnitudes with a spherical NEATM model, we compute the predicted fluxes (after applying the color corrections given in Wright et al.) in each of the four WISE bands and compare them to the measured magnitudes. We find minimum systematic flux errors of 5%-10%, and hence minimum relative diameter and albedo errors of {approx}10% and {approx}20%, respectively. Additionally, visible albedos for the objects are computed and compared to the albedos at 3.4 {mu}m and 4.6 {mu}m, which contain a combination of reflected sunlight and thermal emission for most minor planets observed by WISE. Finally, we derive a linear relationship between subsolar temperature and effective temperature, which allows the color corrections given in Wright et al. to be used for minor planets by computing only subsolar temperature instead of a faceted thermophysical model. The thermal models derived in this paper are not intended to supplant previous measurements made using radar or spacecraft imaging; rather, we have used them to characterize the errors that should be expected when computing diameters and albedos of minor planets observed by WISE using a spherical

  2. Mental imagery of positive and neutral memories: A fMRI study comparing field perspective imagery to observer perspective imagery.

    PubMed

    Grol, Maud; Vingerhoets, Guy; De Raedt, Rudi

    2017-02-01

    Imagery perspective can influence what information is recalled, processing style, and emotionality; however, the understanding of possible mechanisms mediating these observed differences is still limited. We aimed to examine differences between memory recall from a field perspective and observer perspective at the neurobiological level, in order to improve our understanding of what is underlying the observed differences at the behavioral level. We conducted a fMRI study in healthy individuals, comparing imagery perspectives during recall of neutral and positive autobiographical memories. Behavioral results revealed field perspective imagery of positive memories, as compared to observer perspective, to be associated with more positive feelings afterwards. At the neurobiological level, contrasting observer perspective to field perspective imagery was associated with greater activity, or less decrease relative to the control visual search task, in the right precuneus and in the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ). Greater activity in the right TPJ during an observer perspective as compared to field perspective could reflect performing a greater shift of perspective and mental state during observer perspective imagery than field perspective imagery. Differential activity in the precuneus may reflect that during observer perspective imagery individuals are more likely to engage in (self-) evaluative processing and visuospatial processing. Our findings contribute to a growing understanding of how imagery perspective can influence the type of information that is recalled and the intensity of the emotional response. Observer perspective imagery may not automatically reduce emotional intensity but this could depend on how the imagined situation is evaluated in relation to the self-concept.

  3. Observation of linear and quadratic magnetic field-dependence of magneto-photocurrents in InAs/GaSb superlattice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally studied the magneto-photocurrents generated by direct interband transition in InAs/GaSb type II superlattice. By varying the magnetic field direction, we observed that an in-plane magnetic field induces a photocurrent linearly proportional to the magnetic field; however, a magnetic field tilted to the sample plane induces a photocurrent presenting quadratic magnetic field dependence. The magneto-photocurrents in both conditions are insensitive to the polarization state of the incident light. Theoretical models involving excitation, relaxation and Hall effect are utilized to explain the experimental results. PMID:24936166

  4. Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechem, David B.; Giangrande, Scott E.; Wittman, Carly S.; Borque, Paloma; Toto, Tami; Kollias, Pavlos

    2015-03-01

    A case of shallow cumulus and precipitating cumulus congestus sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains supersite during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment is analyzed using a multisensor observational approach and numerical simulation. Observations from a new radar suite surrounding the facility are used to characterize the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system. This is accomplished using distributions of different measures of cloud geometry and precipitation properties. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Our emphasis is on assessing the importance of time-varying versus steady state large-scale forcing on the model's ability to reproduce the evolutionary behavior of the cloud system. Additional consideration is given to how the characteristic spatial scale and homogeneity of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Results indicate that several new scanning radar estimates such as distributions of cloud top are useful to differentiate the value of time-varying (or at least temporally well-matched) forcing on LES solution fidelity.

  5. Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Mechem, David B.; Giangrande, Scott E.; Wittman, Carly S.; Borque, Paloma; Toto, Tami; Kollias, Pavlos

    2015-03-13

    A case of shallow cumulus and precipitating cumulus congestus sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) supersite is analyzed using a multi-sensor observational approach and numerical simulation. Observations from a new radar suite surrounding the facility are used to characterize the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system. This is accomplished using distributions of different measures of cloud geometry and precipitation properties. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Our emphasis is on assessing the importance of time-varying vs. steady-state large-scale forcing on the model's ability to reproduce the evolutionary behavior of the cloud system. Additional consideration is given to how the characteristic spatial scale and homogeneity of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Results indicate that several new scanning radar estimates such as distributions of cloud top are useful to differentiate the value of time-varying (or at least temporally well-matched) forcing on LES solution fidelity.

  6. Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    DOE PAGES

    Mechem, David B.; Giangrande, Scott E.; Wittman, Carly S.; ...

    2015-03-13

    A case of shallow cumulus and precipitating cumulus congestus sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) supersite is analyzed using a multi-sensor observational approach and numerical simulation. Observations from a new radar suite surrounding the facility are used to characterize the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system. This is accomplished using distributions of different measures of cloud geometry and precipitation properties. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Our emphasis ismore » on assessing the importance of time-varying vs. steady-state large-scale forcing on the model's ability to reproduce the evolutionary behavior of the cloud system. Additional consideration is given to how the characteristic spatial scale and homogeneity of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Results indicate that several new scanning radar estimates such as distributions of cloud top are useful to differentiate the value of time-varying (or at least temporally well-matched) forcing on LES solution fidelity.« less

  7. Observations of a transverse magnetic field perturbation at two altitudes on the equatorward edge of the magnetospheric cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Abe, T.; Andre, M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Fukunishi, H.; Hayakawa, H.; Matsuoka, A.; Mukai, T.; Persoon, A. M.; Retterer, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    On January 28, 1990, the Dynamic Explorer 1 (DE-1) and Akebono satellites crossed a magnetic field structure at the equatorward edge of the polar cusp at altitudes od 22,000 and 5000 km, respectively, within 6 min of each other. Locally measured plasma particles and fields and magnetometer data from a ground station near the foot of the magnetic field line are more consistent with an interpretation of the structure as that of a standing Alfven wave than that of a quasi-steady field-aligned current sheet. We discuss the observations supporting this conclusion and other related observations of field-aligned currents, Alfven waves, and ion energization near the equatorward edge of the cusp. These observations suggest that Alfven waves are commonly present near the equatorward edge of the cusp.

  8. Evaluation of High-resolution Geomagnetic Field Observation System Using HTS-SQUID Magnetometer and its Application.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, Y.; Okubo, K.; Hato, T.; Tsukamoto, A.; Tanabe, K.; Onishi, N.; Furukawa; Isogami, S.; Takeuchi, N.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic field changes associated with earthquakes have been investigated previously (1964 Stacey, 1994 Johnston et al.). Our research group also reported successful observation of "co-faulting" Earth's magnetic field changes due to piezomagnetic effects caused by earthquake rupturing in 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake of M7.2 (2011 Okubo et al.) using optoelectronic observation system with flux-gate magnetometers. This is an important finding; the electromagnetic fields originating from such sources satisfy the Maxwell equations and hence they propagate from the sources to the observation site at a speed of light in the crustal materials. Further efforts could lead us to a new system for super-early warning of destructive earthquakes with the magnetic measurements. On the other hand, the observed result in 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake was suggested that the geomagnetic variation signal accompanying fault movement, whose sources are the piezomagnetic effects, is very small; therefore development of a high-sensitive magnetometer system is very important. To solve this problem, we introduce long-term precise geomagnetic observations using high-temperature-superconductor based superconducting-quantum-interference-device (HTS-SQUID) magnetometer system. That is, our research group developed the HTS-SQUID magnetometer system for high-resolution observation of Earth's magnetic field. Since March 2012, we have observed the geomagnetic field using a HTS-SQUID magnetometer at Iwaki observation site (IWK) in Fukushima, Japan. The sampling interval of the magnetometer is 0.04 sec. The observation clock has been synchronized by use of GPS signals. An accelerometer is also installed at observation point. Additionally, in the next stage, we develop the HTS- SQUID magnetometer system Unit No.2 (mark II). In the present study, we show the results observed by our HTS-SQUID magnetometer system and make an evaluation of our geomagnetic field observation system.

  9. Permafrost response to climate change: Linking field observation with numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Rivière, A.; Quinton, W. L.; McKenzie, J. M.; Voss, C. I.

    2013-12-01

    The Scotty Creek basin (152 km2) is located in the Northwest Territories, Canada, within the peat-covered discontinuous permafrost zone with a high density of wetlands. The extensive peat layer (up to 3-4 m thick) is underlain by generally clay-rich glacial sediments. The landcover consists of peat plateaus underlain by permafrost, permafrost-free channel fens, and connected and isolated permafrost-free ombrotrophic flat bogs, occurring as a complex mosaic of patches. The runoff from peat plateaus drains into isolated bogs and a network of connected bogs and fens. During the course of field studies since 1999, stark changes have been observed on the permafrost plateaus, including a deepening of active layer, soil settlement and depression formation, and changes in the lateral and vertical extent of the unsaturated zone. In general, the area of permafrost plateaus is decreasing, and the areas of fens and bog areas are increasing. These changes affect water flow and induce changes in heat transport, which in turn affect the aforementioned changes in permafrost plateaus (i.e. feedback processes). The goal of this study is to understand the feedbacks and their effects on permafrost degradation by used of the field observations and numerical simulations. We use a modified version of the three-dimensional SUTRA model that can simulate groundwater flow and heat transport, including freeze-thaw processes. Numerical simulation of heat transport accounts for the effects of latent heat associated with freezing and thawing, and variable heat capacity, thermal conductivity, and permeability as a function of ice content. The model is used to simulate the plateau-fen-bog complex, where intensive field studies have generated a large amount of data. The SUTRA model does not simulate complex surface processes such as radiative and turbulent heat exchange, snow accumulation and melt, and canopy effects. We use an energy and water transfer model, Northern Ecosystem Soil Temperature

  10. X-ray observations of dust obscured galaxies in the Chandra deep field south

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Comastri, A.; Ranalli, P.; Akylas, A.; Salvato, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Vignali, C.; Koutoulidis, L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the properties of X-ray detected dust obscured galaxies (DOGs) in the Chandra deep field south. In recent years, it has been proposed that a significant percentage of the elusive Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGN) could be hidden among DOGs. This type of galaxy is characterized by a very high infrared (IR) to optical flux ratio (f24 μm/fR > 1000), which in the case of CT AGN could be due to the suppression of AGN emission by absorption and its subsequent re-emission in the IR. The most reliable way of confirming the CT nature of an AGN is by X-ray spectroscopy. In a previous work, we presented the properties of X-ray detected DOGs by making use of the deepest X-ray observations available at that time, the 2Ms observations of the Chandra deep fields, the Chandra deep field north (CDF-N), and the Chandra deep field south (CDF-S). In that work, we only found a moderate percentage (<50%) of CT AGN among the DOGs sample. However, we pointed out that the limited photon statistics for most of the sources in the sample did not allow us to strongly constrain this number. In this paper, we further explore the properties of the sample of DOGs in the CDF-S presented in that work by using not only a deeper 6Ms Chandra survey of the CDF-S, but also by combining these data with the 3Ms XMM-Newton survey of the CDF-S. We also take advantage of the great coverage of the CDF-S region from the UV to the far-IR to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of our sources. Out of the 14 AGN composing our sample, 9 are highly absorbed (NH > 1023 cm-2), whereas 2 look unabsorbed, and the other 3 are only moderately absorbed. Among the highly absorbed AGN, we find that only three could be considered CT AGN. In only one of these three cases, we detect a strong Fe Kα emission line; the source is already classified as a CT AGN with Chandra data in a previous work. Here we confirm its CT nature by combining Chandra and XMM-Newton data. For the other two CT

  11. The beginning of observations of large-scale solar magnetic fields at the Sayan Observatory - Instrument, plans, preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, V. M.; Peshcherov, V. S.; Demidov, M. L.

    A telescope and a system for measuring large-scale magnetic fields and the large-scale field of line-of-sight velocities in the sun photosphere have been constructed at the Sayan Observatory (USSR). The instrument permits the following synoptic observations of large-scale structures: (1) magnetograms of a large-scale magnetic field with a 3-arcmin resolution and 0.1-0.2 Gs sensitivity; (2) solar disk magnetograms in the form of half-tone images of the magnetic field distribution with 15 Gs sensitivity and 8 x 8 arcsec resolution; and (3) measurement of the mean magnetic field of the sun as a star with about 0.1 Gs sensitivity. Preliminary results of toroidal magnetic field observations are briefly discussed.

  12. Kinematic Properties of Double-barred Galaxies: Simulations versus Integral-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P.; Shen, Juntai; Cappellari, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we recently reported that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady double-barred (S2B) structure. Here we study the kinematics of these S2B simulations, and compare them to integral-field observations from ATLAS 3D and SAURON. We show that S2B galaxies exhibit several distinct kinematic features, namely: (1) significantly distorted isovelocity contours at the transition region between the two bars, (2) peaks in σ LOS along the minor axis of inner bars, which we term “σ-humps,” that are often accompanied by ring/spiral-like features of increased σ LOS, (3) {h}3{--}\\bar{v} anti-correlations in the region of the inner bar for certain orientations, and (4) rings of positive h 4 when viewed at low inclinations. The most impressive of these features are the σ-humps these evolve with the inner bar, oscillating in strength just as the inner bar does as it rotates relative to the outer bar. We show that, in cylindrical coordinates, the inner bar has similar streaming motions and velocity dispersion properties as normal large-scale bars, except for σ z , which exhibits peaks on the minor axis, i.e., humps. These σ z humps are responsible for producing the σ-humps. For three well-resolved early-type S2Bs (NGC 2859, NGC 2950, and NGC 3941) and a potential S2B candidate (NGC 3384), the S2B model qualitatively matches the integral-field data well, including the “σ-hollows” previously identified. We also discuss the kinematic effect of a nuclear disk in S2Bs.

  13. Integrated field, satellite and petrological observations of the November 2010 eruption of Erta Ale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Lorraine; Barnie, Talfan; Blundy, Jon; Brooker, Richard A.; Keir, Derek; Lewi, Elias; Saunders, Kate

    2012-12-01

    Erta Ale volcano, Ethiopia, erupted in November 2010, emplacing new lava flows on the main crater floor, the first such eruption from the southern pit into the main crater since 1973, and the first eruption at this remote volcano in the modern satellite age. For many decades, Erta Ale has contained a persistently active lava lake which is ordinarily confined, several tens of metres below the level of the main crater, within the southern pit. We combine on-the-ground field observations with multispectral imaging from the SEVIRI satellite to reconstruct the entire eruptive episode beginning on 11 November and ending prior to 14 December 2010. A period of quiescence occurred between 14 and 19 November. The main eruptive activity developed between 19 and 22 November, finally subsiding to pre-eruptive levels between 8 and 15 December. The estimated total volume of lava erupted is ˜0.006 km3. The mineralogy of the 2010 lava is plagioclase + clinopyroxene + olivine. Geochemically, the lava is slightly more mafic than previously erupted lava lining the caldera floor, but lies within the range of historical lavas from Erta Ale. SIMS analysis of olivine-hosted melt inclusions shows the Erta Ale lavas to be relatively volatile-poor, with H2O contents ≤1,300 ppm and CO2 contents of ≤200 ppm. Incompatible trace and volatile element systematics of melt inclusions show, however, that the November 2010 lavas were volatile-saturated, and that degassing and crystallisation occurred concomitantly. Volatile saturation pressures are in the range 7-42 MPa, indicating shallow crystallisation. Calculated pre-eruption and melt inclusion entrapment temperatures from mineral/liquid thermometers are ˜1,150 °C, consistent with previously published field measurements.

  14. MESSENGER Magnetic Field Observations of Upstream Ultra-Low Frequency Waves at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Boardsen, S.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Anderosn, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2012-01-01

    The region upstream from a planetary bow shock is a natural plasma laboratory containing a variety of wave particle phenomena. The study of foreshocks other than the Earth's is important for extending our understanding of collisionless shocks and foreshock physics since the bow shock strength varies with heliocentric distance from the Sun, and the sizes of the bow shocks are different at different planets. The Mercury's bow shock is unique in our solar system as it is produced by low Mach number solar wind blowing over a small magnetized body with a predominately radial interplanetary magnetic field. Previous observations of Mercury upstream ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves came exclusively from two Mercury flybys of Mariner 10. The MESSENGER orbiter data enable us to study of upstream waves in the Mercury's foreshock in depth. This paper reports an overview of upstream ULF waves in the Mercury's foreshock using high-time resolution magnetic field data, 20 samples per second, from the MESSENGER spacecraft. The most common foreshock waves have frequencies near 2 Hz, with properties similar to the I-Hz waves in the Earth's foreshock. They are present in both the flyby data and in every orbit of the orbital data we have surveyed. The most common wave phenomenon in the Earth's foreshock is the large-amplitude 30-s waves, but similar waves at Mercury have frequencies at near 0.1 Hz and occur only sporadically with short durations (a few wave cycles). Superposed on the "30-s" waves, there are spectral peaks at near 0.6 Hz, not reported previously in Mariner 10 data. We will discuss wave properties and their occurrence characteristics in this paper.

  15. Development of SELENE small sub-satellites: Rstar and Vstar for lunar gravity field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, T.; Minamino, H.; Namiki, N.; Hanada, H.; Kawano, N.; Takano, T.

    Two small sub-satellites Relay Satellite Rstar and VLBI Radio Satellite Vstar which are separated from SELENE Main Orbiter will execute four-way Doppler measurements and differential VLBI observation to make global mapping of the lunar gravity field These sub-satellites are requested to be simply structured light weighted and optimized for the selenodesy mission We have therefore adopted spin stabilization without thrusters to control orbits and attitudes which yield precise measurements of orbit perturbed by lunar gravity field We developed a low-mass type release mechanism which consists of two rings connected with 24 stretching bow springs Characteristic of the mechanism have been confirmed by the ground tests and displayed on orbit using Micro-Lab Sat We also develop four-way tracking system to track two fully moving links between lunar orbiters The transponder to receive a signal from the lunar satellite and to send a signal to an earth station has been designed by the concept of a broadband receiver instead of a PLL receiver By this concept a troublesome and difficult operation of carrier acquisition can be omitted on the last link of the four-way tracking Performances of the four-way signal acquiring process have been examined by the compatibility tests at the ground station which shows the enough performances to track two moving links between the lunar orbits Properties of the light weighted S-band patch antenna and S X-band dipole antenna have also been adjusted by ground tests The S X-band dipole antenna should have a beam wide

  16. Researching of sea waves influence on a coastal line transformation (based on field observation results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, A.; Kouznetsov, K.; Kurkin, A.; Shevchenko, G.

    2009-04-01

    The long duration registrations of bottom pressure, temperature and meteorological data took place in June - October 2007 on the shelf near 104th - 110th kilometer of interstate road Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk - Okha. Sediment transport and abrasion processes are observed in this place, it is a dangerous factor for road and railroad constructions, it can also be threat for some buildings of Vzmorie town. Distributed network of autonomous pressure gauges was installed for wave structure studying. Gauges were installed in tree lines with 100, 150 and 200 meters far from each other. Gathered data contains information about different wave's regimes under different weather conditions, it's allowed us to make analysis. Different data rows for different wave regimes were taken for analysis. Transformation of wave field along shoreline and opposite was observed. The results of observation are showed that disposition of waves was determined by swell waves with period 8-9 second. Wind waves were weaker than swell waves, conceivably because of big depths in the studied area. Much more interesting results were found in the infragravity waves range (0.5 - 5 min). For example, peaks with period above 150 and 75 seconds are presented in the spectral estimation of record from gauge 23. The same peaks were not observed in other gauges to the North and to the South from 23. However, low frequency peak was much stronger at the storm weather, but 75 seconds peak was stayed non-changed under the different weather conditions. For understanding mechanism of infra-gravitation waves generation group structure of waves were studied. Spectrum characteristics of different data rows for different wave regimes and also for their envelopes were provided. Results of this research allow us to consider that wave packets with common period 7 - 8 seconds make infra-gravitation waves with period above 5 minutes which forcing sediment transport processes. Satellite images of studied place were used in this

  17. Observations of Radiation Divergence and Stability Driven Slope Flows during the Field Experiment KASCADE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duine, Gert-Jan; Durand, Pierre; Hedde, Thierry; Roubin, Pierre; Augustin, Patrick; Fourmentin, Marc; Lohou, Fabienne; Lothon, Marie

    2014-05-01

    This work is in the frame of the PhD-thesis entitled "Dispersion of pollutants in stable boundary layer conditions in the middle valley of the Durance", financed by the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and jointly supervised by CEA and Laboratoire d'Aérologie (LA), Toulouse. It takes place in a wider context of R & D work performed at CEA to characterize the site specific atmospheric conditions, with a view to improve the knowledge of the impact of the potential release of pollutants. During the winter of 2013 the intensive field measurement campaign KASCADE (KAtabatic winds and Stability over CAdarache for Dispersion of Effluents) has been carried out at Cadarache, a research centre of CEA, located in South-Eastern France. The stability of the lower atmospheric boundary layer caused by radiative cooling at night, combined with the local orography, strongly affects the conditions for the dispersion of potential pollutants. Understanding the complex patterns of drainage flow and cold pool build up in the smaller valleys confluent to the Durance river is thus a major issue for refining the models used to assess the sanitary and environmental impact of Cadarache. Stability is easily formed in the region and in combination with the orographic complexity, there is a need to study the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL), which potentially can have a large impact on the dispersion of gaseous emissions released by the various facilities of Cadarache. KASCADE was designed to characterize the local SBL in order to feed future planned numerical simulations with WRF and impact studies involving numerical models coping with dispersion. With a focus on night time, a combination of continuous observations (SODAR and a flux-measurement tower of 30 meter [M30]) and 23 Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs) (Tethered Balloon [TB] profiling and radio-soundings) allows to study the relevant phenomena for SBL-formation. M30 was equipped with sonic anemometers at 3 levels for

  18. Some field observations and experimental insights on volcanic ash aggregates (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Del Bello, E.; Scarlato, P.

    2013-12-01

    The aggregation of ash- to dust-sized pyroclasts is a well-documented process that deeply impacts the internal dynamics and atmospheric dispersal of volcanic plumes, the geometry of the resulting fallout deposits, and the nature and occurrence of associated hazards. As such, studies of the aggregation processes have been actively promoted since decades, with an escalation after the civil aviation crisis from the 2010 Ejyafiallajokull eruption. Here we illustrate the potential of high-speed imaging in the study of ash aggregation and aggregates settling both in laboratory experiments and directly in the field. Under weak eruption plumes from the Ejyafiallajokull (Iceland), Yasur (Vanuatu), and Sakurajima (Japan) volcanoes, high-speed imaging systems captured the settling of ash-sized pyroclasts, both as individual particles and as aggregates. Relevant parameters such as the size and the settling velocity of the particles and aggregates are derived directly by image analysis, within the system spatial resolution limits. Field sampling and laboratory analyses of the imaged particles is then used to investigate their overall size distribution and textural-chemical features. In addition, the same high-speed imaging system is used to record the individual volcanic explosion, if discrete, or volcanic episode, for ongoing activity, from which the settling particles originated, potentially illuminating the sources of the ash and other relevant processes (e.g., eruption style, plume rise dynamics, electrification). In order to better constrain the observed phenomena, we are currently performing two sets of laboratory experiments. The first set of experiments aims to characterize the settling properties of individual particles, in order to allow distinguishing them from the aggregates in the field-based images. Such experiments, consisting in the imaging of free-falling individual particles, will also be used in the future to assess the simultaneous settling of large numbers

  19. Observations of QSO J2233-606 in the Southern Hubble Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sealey, K. M.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Webb, J. K.

    1998-06-01

    The Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations are expected to begin in 1998 October. We present a composite spectrum of the QSO in the HDF-S field covering UV/optical/near-IR wavelengths, obtained by combining data from the Australian National University 2.3 m telescope with STIS on the HST.1 This intermediate-resolution spectrum covers the range 1600-10000 Å and allows us to derive some basic information on the intervening absorption systems which will be important in planning future higher resolution studies of this QSO. The QSO J2233-606 coordinates are α = 22h33m37.6s, δ = -60°33'29" (J2000), the magnitude is B = 17.5, and its redshift is zem = 2.238, derived by simultaneously fitting several emission lines. The spectral index is α = -0.7 +/- 0.1, measured between the Lyα and Mg II emission lines. Many absorption systems are present, including systems with metal lines redward of the Lyα emission line at zabs = 2.204, 1.942, 1.870, 1.787 and a few very strong Lyα features at zabs = 2.077, 1.928, without similarly strong metal lines. There is a conspicuous Lyman limit (LL) absorption system that is most likely associated with the zabs = 1.942 system with a neutral hydrogen column density of NH I = (3.1 +/- 1.0) × 1017 cm-2. There is some evidence for the presence of a second LL absorber just to the blue of the conspicuous system at z = 1.870. We have employed a new technique, based on an analysis of the shape of the observed spectrum in the region of the LL absorption, to explore the properties of the gas. We tentatively conclude that this system might have suitable characteristics for measuring the deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) ratio.

  20. Prediction of the Dst index with magnetic field observations in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubicka, Manuel; Möstl, Christian; Rollett, Tanja; Boakes, Peter; Feng, Li; Eastwood, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The prediction of the effects of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) on Earth strongly depends on knowledge of the properties of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), especially it's southward component (Bz), acting as a main driver for geomagnetic storms. We are using data from a spacecraft located in the inner heliosphere, Venus Express (VEX) at 0.72 AU and will provide a proof-of-concept for predicting an ICMEs arrival time and speed at 1AU, the ICMEs Bz component at Earth and the resulting Dst index by only using data measured by VEX. To forecast the Dst index, the two well established Dst models from Burton et al. (1975) and O'Brien & McPherron (2000) are used. In combination with a drag based model (Vršnak et al. 2013) and the WSA/ENLIL model the ICMEs arrival speed at Earth is obtained. Additionally, a power law (Leitner et al. 2007) is used to scale the magnetic field from 0.72 to 1 AU. Investigation of an ICME in June 2012 shows already promising results for the Dst index (predicted: -96 nT ± 17nT, observed: -86 nT), as well as for the arrival speed (predicted: 531 km s-1± 23 kms-1, observed: 490 kms-1± 30 kms-1) and timing (˜6h ± 1h late of true arrival) . An advantage of this method is the high prediction lead time of ˜21 hours compared only ˜40-60 minutes, using an L1 located spacecraft. To further investigate the feasibility of this method, data from any spacecraft temporarily located between Sun and Earth can be used. It is possible to extend this method to arbitrary spacecraft alignments and also to apply it to data from Helios or future space missions like Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus. The techniques we develop could be routinely applied to a mission that forms an artificial Lagrange point along the Sun-Earth line, e.g. for a Sunjammer or Heliostorm mission.

  1. Comparison of Heliospheric Current Sheet Structure Obtained from Potential Magnetic Field Computations and from Observed Polarization Coronal Brightness,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    the current sheet computed with the potential field approximation appears to be distorted by a large photospheric region of unbalanced magnetic flux...1982) attributed the northward bulge in the PF current sheet to an unusually large photospheric region of unbalanced "towari" polarity that was observed...currents would not be very good observed at the earth iSvalgaard and Wilcox. 19751. Occa- for the strong localized fields of an active region , but for the

  2. Field Geologic Observation and Sample Collection Strategies for Planetary Surface Exploration: Insights from the 2010 Desert RATS Geologist Crewmembers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurtado, Jose M., Jr.; Young, Kelsey; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Garry, W. Brent; Rice, James W., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Observation is the primary role of all field geologists, and geologic observations put into an evolving conceptual context will be the most important data stream that will be relayed to Earth during a planetary exploration mission. Sample collection is also an important planetary field activity, and its success is closely tied to the quality of contextual observations. To test protocols for doing effective planetary geologic field- work, the Desert RATS(Research and Technology Studies) project deployed two prototype rovers for two weeks of simulated exploratory traverses in the San Francisco volcanic field of northern Arizona. The authors of this paper represent the geologist crew members who participated in the 2010 field test.We document the procedures adopted for Desert RATS 2010 and report on our experiences regarding these protocols. Careful consideration must be made of various issues that impact the interplay between field geologic observations and sample collection, including time management; strategies relatedtoduplicationofsamplesandobservations;logisticalconstraintson the volume and mass of samples and the volume/transfer of data collected; and paradigms for evaluation of mission success. We find that the 2010 field protocols brought to light important aspects of each of these issues, and we recommend best practices and modifications to training and operational protocols to address them. Underlying our recommendations is the recognition that the capacity of the crew to flexibly execute their activities is paramount. Careful design of mission parameters, especially field geologic protocols, is critical for enabling the crews to successfully meet their science objectives.

  3. Field geologic observation and sample collection strategies for planetary surface exploration: Insights from the 2010 Desert RATS geologist crewmembers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado, José M.; Young, Kelsey; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Garry, W. Brent; Rice, James W.

    2013-10-01

    Observation is the primary role of all field geologists, and geologic observations put into an evolving conceptual context will be the most important data stream that will be relayed to Earth during a planetary exploration mission. Sample collection is also an important planetary field activity, and its success is closely tied to the quality of contextual observations. To test protocols for doing effective planetary geologic fieldwork, the Desert RATS (Research and Technology Studies) project deployed two prototype rovers for two weeks of simulated exploratory traverses in the San Francisco volcanic field of northern Arizona. The authors of this paper represent the geologist crewmembers who participated in the 2010 field test. We document the procedures adopted for Desert RATS 2010 and report on our experiences regarding these protocols. Careful consideration must be made of various issues that impact the interplay between field geologic observations and sample collection, including time management; strategies related to duplication of samples and observations; logistical constraints on the volume and mass of samples and the volume/transfer of data collected; and paradigms for evaluation of mission success. We find that the 2010 field protocols brought to light important aspects of each of these issues, and we recommend best practices and modifications to training and operational protocols to address them. Underlying our recommendations is the recognition that the capacity of the crew to "flexibly execute" their activities is paramount. Careful design of mission parameters, especially field geologic protocols, is critical for enabling the crews to successfully meet their science objectives.

  4. Multiple Observing Modes for Wide-field Optical Surveillance of GEO Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, J.; Zimmer, P.; Ackermann, M.

    2016-09-01

    Very wide field of view optical sensors with silicon detectors are being used in multiple survey modes by J. T. McGraw and Associates to provide persistent, affordable surveillance of GEO space to faint limiting magnitudes. Examples include:

  5. classical staring mode with typical integration times of seconds provided by multiple co-directed sensors to provide a deep mosaic of tens of square degrees per exposure to faint limiting magnitude
  6. b) step-and-stare observations of several second integration time from which a continuous, overlapped, mosaicked image of GEO space can be provided
  7. time-delay and integrate (TDI) imagery obtained by driving the telescope in declination and stepping the telescope in the E-W direction, which produces repeated, overlapping (if desired), synoptic images of GEO space.
  8. With current 350 mm diameter optics, detection limits for concentrated observations (e.g. "neighborhood watch") detection limits of magnitude 18 are achieved, and for uncued survey the detection limits are fainter than magnitude 16. Each of these techniques can employ multiple telescopes to obtain search rates in excess of 1000 square degrees per hour, allowing complete uncued CONUS GEO surveillance to +/- 15 degrees latitude every two nighttime hours. With appropriate placement, sensors could provide complete coverage of GEO to these limiting magnitudes at the same survey rate. At each step of the development of this unique capability we discuss the fundamental underlying physical principals of optics, detectors, search modes and siting that enable this survey, a valuable adjunct to RF, radar, GEODSS and other optical surveys of GEO space.

  9. Plant uptake of elements in soil and pore water: field observations versus model assumptions.

    PubMed

    Raguž, Veronika; Jarsjö, Jerker; Grolander, Sara; Lindborg, Regina; Avila, Rodolfo

    2013-09-15

    Contaminant concentrations in various edible plant parts transfer hazardous substances from polluted areas to animals and humans. Thus, the accurate prediction of plant uptake of elements is of significant importance. The processes involved contain many interacting factors and are, as such, complex. In contrast, the most common way to currently quantify element transfer from soils into plants is relatively simple, using an empirical soil-to-plant