Sample records for observing system epos

  1. The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) Services for Solid Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Massimo; Atakan, Kuvvet; Pedersen, Helle; Consortium, Epos

    2016-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) aims to create a pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. The main vision of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is to address the three basic challenges in Earth Sciences: (i) unravelling the Earth's deformational processes which are part of the Earth system evolution in time, (ii) understanding the geo-hazards and their implications to society, and (iii) contributing to the safe and sustainable use of geo-resources. The mission of EPOS is to monitor and understand the dynamic and complex Earth system by relying on new e-science opportunities and integrating diverse and advanced Research Infrastructures in Europe for solid Earth Science. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. EPOS will improve our ability to better manage the use of the subsurface of the Earth. Through integration of data, models and facilities EPOS will allow the Earth Science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and to human welfare. EPOS has now started its Implementation Phase (EPOS-IP). One of the main challenges during the implementation phase is the integration of multidisciplinary data into a single e-infrastructure. Multidisciplinary data are organized and governed by the Thematic Core Services (TCS) and are driven by various scientific communities encompassing a wide spectrum of Earth science disciplines. These include Data, Data-products, Services and Software (DDSS), from seismology, near fault observatories, geodetic observations, volcano observations

  2. The Core Services of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Euteneuer, F. H.; Lauterjung, J.

    2013-12-01

    The ESFRI project European Plate Observing System (EPOS) was launched in November 2010 and has now completed its year 3 of the four-year preparatory phase. EPOS will create a single sustainable, permanent observation infrastructure, integrating existing geophysical monitoring networks, local observatories and experimental laboratories in Europe and adjacent regions. EPOS' technical Work Package 6 has developed a three layer architectural model for the construction of the EPOS Core Services (CS) during the subsequent implementation phase. The Poster will present and detail on these three layers, consisting of the EPOS Integrated Core Services (ICS), the Thematic Core Services (TCS) and the existing National Research Infrastructures & Data Centers. The basic layer of the architecture is established by the National Research Infrastructures (RIs) & Data Centers, which generate data and information and are responsible for the operation of the instrumentation. National RIs will provide their data to the Thematic Cores Services. The Thematic Core Services constitute the community layer of EPOS architecture and they will: 1) consist of existing (e.g. ORFEUS, EMSC), developing (e.g. EUREF/GNSS) or still to be developed Service Providers for specific thematic communities, as represented within EPOS through the technical EPOS Working Groups (e.g., seismology, volcanology, geodesy, geology, analytic labs for rock physics, geomagnetism, geo-resources ... and many others), 2) provide data services to specific communities, 3) link the National Research Infrastructures to the EPOS Integrated Services, 4) include Service Providers (e.g. OneGeology+, Intermagnet) that may be merely linked or partially integrated and 5) consist of Integrated Laboratories and RIs spanning multiple EPOS disciplines and taking advantage of other existing Thematic Services. The EPOS Integrated Services constitute the ICT layer of the EPOS portal and they will: 1) provide access to multidisciplinary data

  3. European Plate Observing System - Norway (EPOS-N): A National Consortium for the Norwegian Implementation of EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakan, Kuvvet; Tellefsen, Karen

    2017-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) aims to create a pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. The main vision of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is to address the three basic challenges in Earth Science: (i) unravelling the Earth's deformational processes which are part of the Earth system evolution in time, (ii) understanding geo-hazards and their implications to society, and (iii) contributing to the safe and sustainable use of geo-resources. The mission of EPOS-Norway is therefore in line with the European vision of EPOS, i.e. monitor and understand the dynamic and complex Earth system by relying on new e-science opportunities and integrating diverse and advanced Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science. The EPOS-Norway project started in January 2016 with a national consortium consisting of six institutions. These are: University of Bergen (Coordinator), NORSAR, National Mapping Authority, Geological Survey of Norway, Christian Michelsen Research and University of Oslo. EPOS-N will during the next five years focus on the implementation of three main components. These are: (i) Developing a Norwegian e-Infrastructure to integrate the Norwegian Solid Earth data from the seismological and geodetic networks, as well as the data from the geological and geophysical data repositories, (ii) Improving the monitoring capacity in the Arctic, including Northern Norway and the Arctic islands, and (iii) Establishing a national Solid Earth Science Forum providing a constant feedback mechanism for improved integration of multidisciplinary data, as well as training of young scientists for future utilization of all available solid Earth observational data through a single e-infrastructure. Currently, a list of data, data products, software and services (DDSS) is being prepared. These elements will be integrated in the EPOS-N data/web-portal, which will allow users to browse, select and download

  4. The Demonstrator for the European Plate Observing System (EPOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Euteneuer, F.; Ulbricht, D.; Lauterjung, J.; Bailo, D.; Jeffery, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    An important outcome of the 4-year Preparatory Phase of the ESFRI project European Plate Observing System (EPOS) was the development and first implementation of the EPOS Demonstrator by the project's ICT Working Group 7. The Demonstrator implements the vertical integration of the three-layer architectural scheme for EPOS, connecting the Integrated Core Services (ICS), Thematic Core Services (TCS) and the National Research Infrastructures (NRI). The demonstrator provides a single GUI with central key discovery and query functionalities, based on already existing services by the seismic, geologic and geodetic communities. More specifically the seismic services of the Demonstrator utilize webservices and APIs for data and discovery of raw seismic data (FDSN webservices by the EIDA Network), events (Geoportal by EMSC) and analytical data products (e.g., hazard maps by EFEHR via OGC WMS). For geologic services, the EPOS Demonstrator accesses OneGeology Europe which serves the community with geologic maps and point information via OGC webservices. The Demonstrator also provides access to raw geodetic data via a newly developed universal tool called GSAC. The Demonstrator itself resembles the future Integrated Core Service (ICS) and provides direct access to the end user. Its core functionality lies in a metadata catalogue, which serves as the central information hub and stores information about all RIs, related persons, projects, financial background and technical access information. The database schema of the catalogue is based on CERIF, which has been slightly adapted. Currently, the portal provides basic query functions as well as cross domain search. [www.epos.cineca.it

  5. FIN-EPOS - Finnish national initiative of the European Plate Observing System: Bringing Finnish solid Earth infrastructures into EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuorinen, Tommi; Korja, Annakaisa

    2017-04-01

    FIN-EPOS consortium is a joint community of Finnish national research institutes tasked with operating and maintaining solid-earth geophysical and geological observatories and laboratories in Finland. These national research infrastructures (NRIs) seek to join EPOS research infrastructure (EPOS RI) and further pursue Finland's participation as a founding member in EPOS ERIC (European Research Infrastructure Consortium). Current partners of FIN-EPOS are the University of Helsinki (UH), the University of and Oulu (UO), Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (FGI) of the National Land Survey (NLS), Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Geological Survey of Finland (GTK), CSC - IT Center for Science and MIKES Metrology at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd. The consortium is hosted by the Institute of Seismology, UH (ISUH). The primary purpose of the consortium is to act as a coordinating body between various NRIs and the EPOS RI. FIN-EPOS engages in planning and development of the national EPOS RI and will provide support in EPOS implementation phase (IP) for the partner NRIs. FIN-EPOS also promotes the awareness of EPOS in Finland and is open to new partner NRIs that would benefit from participating in EPOS. The consortium additionally seeks to advance solid Earth science education, technologies and innovations in Finland and is actively engaging in Nordic co-operation and collaboration of solid Earth RIs. The main short term objective of FIN-EPOS is to make Finnish geoscientific data provided by NRIs interoperable with the Thematic Core Services (TCS) in the EPOS IP. Consortium partners commit into applying and following metadata and data format standards provided by EPOS. FIN-EPOS will also provide a national Finnish language web portal where users are identified and their user rights for EPOS resources are defined.

  6. Contributions of the German Research Center for Geosciences (GFZ) to the EPOS Implementation Phase 2015-18 (European Plate Observing System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Lauterjung, J.

    2016-12-01

    The European Plate Observing System project is currently approaching the end of year one of its four-year Implementation Phase 2015-18 (EPOS-IP). Established under the Horizon 2020 Programme INFRADEV-3, the EPOS cyberinfrastructure is being established as an ERIC (European Research Infrastructure Consortium) and encompasses the implementation of both the EPOS Integrated Core Services (ICS) for solid Earth Science and a multitude of EPOS Thematic Core Services (TCS). The TCS-Elements themselves will integrate a number of Service Providers that deliver Data, Data Products, Services and Software (DDSS) to their specific scientific community. As one of the 29 awardees of the EC grant, the German Research Center for Geosciences (GFZ) plays an important role in the implementation of EPOS and its Thematic and Integrated Core Services. The presented poster will give an overview of GFZ's participation in nine technical EPOS Work Packages (WP7 ICS Development, WP8 Seismology, WP11 Volcano Observations, WP12 Satellite Data, WP13 Geomagnetic Observations, WP14 Anthropogenic Hazards, WP15 Geological Information and Modelling, WP16 Multi-Scale Laboratories and WP17 Geo Energy Test Beds) as well as in four administrative EPOS Work Packages (WP2 Communication, WP3 Harmonization, WP4 Legal & Governance, and WP5 Financial).

  7. Contributions of the German Research Center for Geosciences (GFZ) to the EPOS (European Plate Observing System) Implementation Phase 2015-18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Lauterjung, J.

    2017-12-01

    The European Plate Observing System project is currently approaching the end of year two of its four-year Implementation Phase 2015-18 (EPOS-IP). Under the Horizon 2020 Programme INFRADEV-3, the EPOS cyberinfrastructure is being established as an ERIC (European Research Infrastructure Consortium) and encompasses the implementation of both the EPOS Integrated Core Services (ICS) for solid Earth Science and a multitude of EPOS Thematic Core Services (TCS). During year two, a basic set of ICS and TCS services was developed and implemented, so that in October 2017 the validation phase (year 3) of EPOS is ready to be launched. Up to now, various TCS-Elements have integrated different Service Providers (SD) that are delivering Data, Data Products, Services and Software (DDSS) to their specific scientific community. As one of the 29 awardees of the EC grant, the German Research Center for Geosciences (GFZ) plays an important role in the implementation of EPOS and its Thematic and Integrated Core Services. The presented poster will give an overview of GFZ's participation in the work of nine technical EPOS Work Packages (WP7 ICS Development, WP8 Seismology, WP11 Volcano Observations, WP12 Satellite Data, WP13 Geomagnetic Observations, WP14 Anthropogenic Hazards, WP15 Geological Information and Modelling, WP16 Multi-Scale Laboratories and WP17 Geo Energy Test Beds) as well as in four administrative EPOS Work Packages (WP2 Communication, WP3 Harmonization, WP4 Legal & Governance, and WP5 Financial).

  8. The European Plate Observing System (EPOS): Integrating Thematic Services for Solid Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakan, Kuvvet; Bailo, Daniele; Consortium, Epos

    2016-04-01

    The mission of EPOS is to monitor and understand the dynamic and complex Earth system by relying on new e-science opportunities and integrating diverse and advanced Research Infrastructures in Europe for solid Earth Science. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. Through integration of data, models and facilities EPOS will allow the Earth Science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and to human welfare. EPOS, during its Implementation Phase (EPOS-IP), will integrate multidisciplinary data into a single e-infrastructure. Multidisciplinary data are organized and governed by the Thematic Core Services (TCS) and are driven by various scientific communities encompassing a wide spectrum of Earth science disciplines. These include Data, Data-products, Services and Software (DDSS), from seismology, near fault observatories, geodetic observations, volcano observations, satellite observations, geomagnetic observations, as well as data from various anthropogenic hazard episodes, geological information and modelling. In addition, transnational access to multi-scale laboratories and geo-energy test-beds for low-carbon energy will be provided. TCS DDSS will be integrated into Integrated Core Services (ICS), a platform that will ensure their interoperability and access to these services by the scientific community as well as other users within the society. This requires dedicated tasks for interactions with the various TCS-WPs, as well as the various distributed ICS (ICS-Ds), such as High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities, large scale data storage

  9. Ethics issues in scientific data and service provision: evidence and challenges for the European Plate Observing System (EPOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Massimo; Freda, Carmela; Haslinger, Florian; Consortium, Epos

    2016-04-01

    Addressing Ethics issues is nowadays a relevant challenge for any initiative, program or project dealing with scientific data and products provision, access to services for scientific purposes and communication with different stakeholders, including society. This is corroborated by the evidence that Ethics has very high priority in EU funded research. Indeed, all the activities carried out under Horizon 2020 must comply with ethical principles and national, Union and international legislation. This implies that "For all activities funded by the European Union, Ethics is an integral part of research from beginning to end, and ethical compliance is seen as pivotal to achieve real research excellence." Here, we present the experience of EPOS, a public pan-European research infrastructure. EPOS aims at integrating data, data products, services and software (DDSS) for solid Earth science generated and provided by monitoring networks, observing systems and facilities belonging to European countries. EPOS fosters the integrated use of multidisciplinary solid Earth data to improve the understanding of physical and chemical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis as well as those driving tectonics and surface dynamics. The EPOS integration plan will make significant contributions to understanding and mitigating geo-hazards, yielding data for hazard assessment, data products for engaging different stakeholders, and services for training, education and communication to society. Numerous national research infrastructures engaged in EPOS are deployed for the monitoring of areas prone to geo-hazards and for the surveillance of the national territory including areas used for exploiting geo-resources. The EPOS community is therefore already trained to provide services to public (civil defence agencies, local and national authorities) and private (petroleum industry, mining industry, geothermal companies, aviation security) stakeholders. Our ability to

  10. The "Volcano Observations" Thematic Core Service of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS): status of the implementation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    The European volcanological community contributes to implementation of European Plate Observing System (EPOS) by making operational an integrated platform to guarantee a seamless access to the data provided by the European Solid Earth communities. To achieve this objective, the Volcano Observations Work Package (WP11) will implement a Thematic Core Services (TCS) which is planned to give access to the data and services provided by the European Volcano Observatories (VO) and some Volcanological Research Institutions (VRI; as university departments, laboratories, etc.); both types are considered as national research infrastructures (RI) over which to build the TCS. Currently, the networks on European volcanoes consist of thousands of stations or sites where volcanological parameters are continuously or periodically measured. These sites are equipped with instruments for geophysical (seismic, geodetic, gravimetric, electromagnetic), geochemical (volcanic plumes, fumaroles, groundwater, rivers, soils), environmental observations (e.g. meteorological and air quality parameters), as well as various prototypal monitoring systems (e.g. Doppler radars, ground based SAR). In Europe also operate laboratories for sample analysis (rocks, gases, isotopes, etc.), and almost continuous analysis of space-borne data (SAR, thermal imagery, SO2 and ash), as well as high-performance computing centres. All these RIs provide high-quality information (observations) on the current status of European volcanoes and the geodynamic background of the surrounding areas. The implementation of the Volcano Observations TCS is addressing technical and management issues, both considering the current heterogeneous state of the art of the volcanological research infrastructures in Europe. Indeed, the frame of the VO and VRI is now too fragmented to be considered as a unique distributed infrastructure, thus the main effort planned in the frame of the EPOS-IP is focused to create services aimed at

  11. Romanian contribution to research infrastructure database for EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Constantin; Craiu, Andreea; Tataru, Dragos; Balan, Stefan; Muntean, Alexandra; Nastase, Eduard; Oaie, Gheorghe; Asimopolos, Laurentiu; Panaiotu, Cristian

    2014-05-01

    European Plate Observation System - EPOS is a long-term plan to facilitate integrated use of data, models and facilities from mainly distributed existing, but also new, research infrastructures for solid Earth Science. In EPOS Preparatory Phase were integrated the national Research Infrastructures at pan European level in order to create the EPOS distributed research infrastructures, structure in which, at the present time, Romania participates by means of the earth science research infrastructures of the national interest declared on the National Roadmap. The mission of EPOS is to build an efficient and comprehensive multidisciplinary research platform for solid Earth Sciences in Europe and to allow the scientific community to study the same phenomena from different points of view, in different time periods and spatial scales (laboratory and field experiments). At national scale, research and monitoring infrastructures have gathered a vast amount of geological and geophysical data, which have been used by research networks to underpin our understanding of the Earth. EPOS promotes the creation of comprehensive national and regional consortia, as well as the organization of collective actions. To serve the EPOS goals, in Romania a group of National Research Institutes, together with their infrastructures, gathered in an EPOS National Consortium, as follows: 1. National Institute for Earth Physics - Seismic, strong motion, GPS and Geomagnetic network and Experimental Laboratory; 2. National Institute of Marine Geology and Geoecology - Marine Research infrastructure and Euxinus integrated regional Black Sea observation and early-warning system; 3. Geological Institute of Romania - Surlari National Geomagnetic Observatory and National lithoteque (the latter as part of the National Museum of Geology) 4. University of Bucharest - Paleomagnetic Laboratory After national dissemination of EPOS initiative other Research Institutes and companies from the potential

  12. Progress of Geomagnetism towards integration of data and services in EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, Simon; Hejda, Pavel; Chambodut, Aude; Curto, Juan-Jose; Matzka, Jürgen; Thomson, Alan; Korja, Toivo; Rasmussen, Thorkild; Smirnov, Maxim; Viljanen, Ari; Kauristie, Kirsti

    2017-04-01

    The geomagnetism community is involved in the European Plate Observing System (EPOS), a European Research Infrastructure through which science communities will offer a number of services that will integrate to simplify cross-disciplinary research. The Geomagnetism community will provide data from geomagnetic observatories, from producers of geomagnetic indices and events, from geomagnetic models and from magneto-telluric observations. A number of these services (data from the INTERMAGNET network and the World Data Centre, indices and events from the International Service of Geomagnetic Indices and the access to the International Geomagnetic Reference Field and World Magnetic Model) will be integrated into EPOS systems in the first wave of services to be connected. This poster will describe the contribution from geomagnetism to EPOS. It will include a description of the data and services that the geomagnetic community will provide and also discuss how metadata will be made available from the community to the EPOS core IT systems. Finally it will describe how the provision of geomagnetic services in EPOS will be guided and governed by members of the community .

  13. The EPOS Architecture: Integrated Services for solid Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Massimo; Consortium, Epos

    2013-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) represents a scientific vision and an IT approach in which innovative multidisciplinary research is made possible for a better understanding of the physical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, unrest episodes and tsunamis as well as those driving tectonics and Earth surface dynamics. EPOS has a long-term plan to facilitate integrated use of data, models and facilities from existing (but also new) distributed research infrastructures, for solid Earth science. One primary purpose of EPOS is to take full advantage of the new e-science opportunities coming available. The aim is to obtain an efficient and comprehensive multidisciplinary research platform for the Earth sciences in Europe. The EPOS preparatory phase (EPOS PP), funded by the European Commission within the Capacities program, started on November 1st 2010 and it has completed its first two years of activity. EPOS is presently mid-way through its preparatory phase and to date it has achieved all the objectives, milestones and deliverables planned in its roadmap towards construction. The EPOS mission is to integrate the existing research infrastructures (RIs) in solid Earth science warranting increased accessibility and usability of multidisciplinary data from monitoring networks, laboratory experiments and computational simulations. This is expected to enhance worldwide interoperability in the Earth Sciences and establish a leading, integrated European infrastructure offering services to researchers and other stakeholders. The Preparatory Phase aims at leveraging the project to the level of maturity required to implement the EPOS construction phase, with a defined legal structure, detailed technical planning and financial plan. We will present the EPOS architecture, which relies on the integration of the main outcomes from legal, governance and financial work following the strategic EPOS roadmap and according to the technical work done during the

  14. The EPOS e-Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Keith; Bailo, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is integrating geoscientific information concerning earth movements in Europe. We are approaching the end of the PP (Preparatory Project) phase and in October 2014 expect to continue with the full project within ESFRI (European Strategic Framework for Research Infrastructures). The key aspects of EPOS concern providing services to allow homogeneous access by end-users over heterogeneous data, software, facilities, equipment and services. The e-infrastructure of EPOS is the heart of the project since it integrates the work on organisational, legal, economic and scientific aspects. Following the creation of an inventory of relevant organisations, persons, facilities, equipment, services, datasets and software (RIDE) the scale of integration required became apparent. The EPOS e-infrastructure architecture has been developed systematically based on recorded primary (user) requirements and secondary (interoperation with other systems) requirements through Strawman, Woodman and Ironman phases with the specification - and developed confirmatory prototypes - becoming more precise and progressively moving from paper to implemented system. The EPOS architecture is based on global core services (Integrated Core Services - ICS) which access thematic nodes (domain-specific European-wide collections, called thematic Core Services - TCS), national nodes and specific institutional nodes. The key aspect is the metadata catalog. In one dimension this is described in 3 levels: (1) discovery metadata using well-known and commonly used standards such as DC (Dublin Core) to enable users (via an intelligent user interface) to search for objects within the EPOS environment relevant to their needs; (2) contextual metadata providing the context of the object described in the catalog to enable a user or the system to determine the relevance of the discovered object(s) to their requirement - the context includes projects, funding, organisations

  15. Near Fault Observatories (NFO) services and integration plan for European Plate Observing System (EPOS) Implementation Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaraluce, Lauro

    2016-04-01

    Coherently with the EPOS vision aimed at creating a pan-European infrastructure for Earth Sciences supporting research for a more sustainable society, we are working on the integration of NFOs and services implementation facilitating their data and products discovery and usage. NFOs are National Research Infrastructures (NRI) consisting of advanced networks of multi-parametric sensors continuously monitoring the chemical and physical processes related to the common underlying Earth instabilities governing active faults evolution and the genesis of earthquakes. These infrastructures will enable advancements in understanding of earthquakes generation processes and associated ground shaking due to their high-quality near-source multidisciplinary data. In EPOS-IP seven NFOs are going to be linked: 1) the Altotiberina and 2) Irpinia Observatories in Italy, 3) Corinth in Greece, 4) South-Iceland Seismic Zone, 5) Valais in Switzerland, 6) Marmara Sea (GEO Supersite) in Turkey and 7) Vrancea in Romania. EPOS-IP aims to implement integrated services from a technical, legal, governance and financial point of view. Accordingly, our first effort within this first core group of NFOs will be establishing legal governance for such a young community to ensure a long-term sustainability of the envisaged services including the full adoption of the EPOS data policy. The establishment of a Board including representatives of each NFO formally appointed by the Institutions supporting the NRI is a basic requirement to provide and validate a stable governance mechanism supporting the initiatives finalised to the services provision. Extremely dense networks and less common instruments deserve an extraordinary work on data quality control and description. We will work on linking all the NFOs in a single distributed network of observatories with instrumental and monitoring standards based on common protocols for observation, analysis, and data access and distributed channels. We will rely on

  16. Tumor biology of non-metastatic stages of clear cell renal cell carcinoma; overexpression of stearoyl desaturase-1, EPO/EPO-R system and hypoxia-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Stoyanoff, Tania Romina; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Todaro, Juan Santiago; Espada, Joaquín Diego; Colavita, Juan Pablo Melana; Brandan, Nora Cristina; Torres, Adriana Mónica; Aguirre, María Victoria

    2016-10-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common subtype of renal carcinomas. There is great interest to know the molecular basis of the tumor biology of ccRCC that might contribute to a better understanding of the aggressive biological behavior of this cancer and to identify early biomarkers of disease. This study describes the relationship among proliferation, survival, and apoptosis with the expression of key molecules related to tumoral hypoxia (hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, erythropoietin (EPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)), their receptors (EPO-R, VEGFR-2), and stearoyl desaturase-1 (SCD-1) in early stages of ccRCC. Tissue samples were obtained at the Urology Unit of the J.R. Vidal Hospital (Corrientes, Argentina), from patients who underwent radical nephrectomy for renal cancer between 2011 and 2014. Four experimental groups according to pathological stage and nuclear grade were organized: T1G1 (n = 6), T2G1 (n = 4), T1G2 (n = 7), and T2G2 (n = 7). The expression of HIF-1α, EPO, EPO-R, VEGF, VEGFR-2, Bcl-x L , and SCD-1 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and/or RT-PCR. Apoptosis was assessed by the TUNEL in situ assay, and tumor proliferation was determined by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Data revealed that HIF-1α, EPO, EPO-R, VEGF, and VEGF-R2 were overexpressed in most samples. The T1G1 group showed the highest EPO levels, approximately 200 % compared with distal renal tissue. Bcl-x L overexpression was concomitant with the enhancement of proliferative indexes. SCD-1 expression increased with the tumor size and nuclear grade. Moreover, the direct correlations observed between SCD-1/HIF-1α and SCD-1/Ki-67 increments suggest a link among these molecules, which would determine tumor progression in early stages of ccRCC. Our results demonstrate the relationship among proliferation, survival, and apoptosis with the expression of key molecules related to tumoral hypoxia (HIF-1α, EPO, VEGF), their

  17. The EPOS Implementation Phase: building thematic and integrated services for solid Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Massimo; Epos Consortium, the

    2015-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) has a scientific vision and approach aimed at creating a pan-European infrastructure for Earth sciences to support a safe and sustainable society. To follow this vision, the EPOS mission is integrating a suite of diverse and advanced Research Infrastructures (RIs) in Europe relying on new e-science opportunities to monitor and understand the dynamic and complex Earth system. To this goal, the EPOS Preparatory Phase has designed a long-term plan to facilitate integrated use of data and products as well as access to facilities from mainly distributed existing and new research infrastructures for solid Earth Science. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth surface dynamics. Through integration of data, models and facilities EPOS will allow the Earth Science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and to human welfare. Since its conception EPOS has been built as "a single, Pan-European, sustainable and distributed infrastructure". EPOS is, indeed, the sole infrastructure for solid Earth Science in ESFRI and its pan-European dimension is demonstrated by the participation of 23 countries in its preparatory phase. EPOS is presently moving into its implementation phase further extending its pan-European dimension. The EPOS Implementation Phase project (EPOS IP) builds on the achievements of the successful EPOS preparatory phase project. The EPOS IP objectives are synergetic and coherent with the establishment of the new legal subject (the EPOS-ERIC in Italy). EPOS coordinates the existing and new solid Earth RIs within Europe and builds the

  18. The EPOS ICT Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Keith; Harrison, Matt; Bailo, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    The EPOS-PP Project 2010-2014 proposed an architecture and demonstrated feasibility with a prototype. Requirements based on use cases were collected and an inventory of assets (e.g. datasets, software, users, computing resources, equipment/detectors, laboratory services) (RIDE) was developed. The architecture evolved through three stages of refinement with much consultation both with the EPOS community representing EPOS users and participants in geoscience and with the overall ICT community especially those working on research such as the RDA (Research Data Alliance) community. The architecture consists of a central ICS (Integrated Core Services) consisting of a portal and catalog, the latter providing to end-users a 'map' of all EPOS resources (datasets, software, users, computing, equipment/detectors etc.). ICS is extended to ICS-d (distributed ICS) for certain services (such as visualisation software services or Cloud computing resources) and CES (Computational Earth Science) for specific simulation or analytical processing. ICS also communicates with TCS (Thematic Core Services) which represent European-wide portals to national and local assets, resources and services in the various specific domains (e.g. seismology, volcanology, geodesy) of EPOS. The EPOS-IP project 2015-2019 started October 2015. Two work-packages cover the ICT aspects; WP6 involves interaction with the TCS while WP7 concentrates on ICS including interoperation with ICS-d and CES offerings: in short the ICT architecture. Based on the experience and results of EPOS-PP the ICT team held a pre-meeting in July 2015 and set out a project plan. The first major activity involved requirements (re-)collection with use cases and also updating the inventory of assets held by the various TCS in EPOS. The RIDE database of assets is currently being converted to CERIF (Common European Research Information Format - an EU Recommendation to Member States) to provide the basis for the EPOS-IP ICS Catalog. In

  19. Building Thematic and Integrated Services for European Solid Earth Sciences: the EPOS Integrated Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, M.; Cocco, M.

    2017-12-01

    EPOS (European Plate Observing System) has been designed with the vision of creating a pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. In accordance with this scientific vision, the EPOS mission is to integrate the diverse and advanced European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science relying on new e-science opportunities to monitor and unravel the dynamic and complex Earth System. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. To accomplish its mission, EPOS is engaging different stakeholders, to allow the Earth sciences to open new horizons in our understanding of the planet. EPOS also aims at contributing to prepare society for geo-hazards and to responsibly manage the exploitation of geo-resources. Through integration of data, models and facilities, EPOS will allow the Earth science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and human welfare. The research infrastructures (RIs) that EPOS is coordinating include: i) distributed geophysical observing systems (seismological and geodetic networks); ii) local observatories (including geomagnetic, near-fault and volcano observatories); iii) analytical and experimental laboratories; iv) integrated satellite data and geological information services; v) new services for natural and anthropogenic hazards; vi) access to geo-energy test beds. Here we present the activities planned for the implementation phase focusing on the TCS, the ICS and on their interoperability. We will discuss the data, data-products, software and services (DDSS) presently under

  20. The EPOS implementation of thematic services for solid Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Massimo; Consortium, Epos

    2014-05-01

    The mission of EPOS is to build an efficient and comprehensive multidisciplinary research platform for the solid Earth sciences in Europe. In particular, EPOS is a long-term plan to facilitate integrated use of data, models and facilities from mainly distributed existing, but also new, research infrastructures for Earth Science. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the physical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, unrest episodes, ground stability, and tsunamis as well as those processes driving tectonics and Earth surface dynamics. EPOS will allow the Earth Science community to make a significant step forward by developing new concepts and tools for accurate, durable, and sustainable answers to societal questions concerning geo-hazards and those geodynamic phenomena relevant to the environment and human welfare. EPOS coordinates the existing and new solid Earth RIs within Europe and is building the integrating RI elements. This integration requires a significant coordination between, among others, disciplinary (thematic) communities, national RIs policies and initiatives, as well as geo- and IT-scientists. The RIs that EPOS coordinates include: i) Regionally-distributed geophysical observing systems (seismological and geodetic networks); ii) Local observatories (including geomagnetic, near-fault and volcano observatories); iii) Analytical and experimental laboratories; iv) Integrated satellite data and geological information services. We present the results achieved during the EPOS Preparatory Phase (which will end on October 2014) and the progress towards construction in terms of both the design of the integrated core services (ICS) and the development of thematic core services (TCS) for the different communities participating to the integration plan. We will focus on discussing the strategies adopted to foster the necessary implementation of TCS, clarifying their crucial role as domain

  1. Setting the stage for the EPOS ERIC: Integration of the legal, governance and financial framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakan, Kuvvet; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Bozzoli, Sabrina; Freda, Carmela; Giardini, Domenico; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kohler, Elisabeth; Kontkanen, Pirjo; Lauterjung, Jörn; Pedersen, Helle; Saleh, Kauzar; Sangianantoni, Agata

    2017-04-01

    EPOS - the European Plate Observing System - is the ESFRI infrastructure serving the need of the solid Earth science community at large. The EPOS mission is to create a single sustainable, and distributed infrastructure that integrates the diverse European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science under a common framework. Thematic Core Services (TCS) and Integrated Core Services (Central Hub, ICS-C and Distributed, ICS-D) are key elements, together with NRIs (National Research Infrastructures), in the EPOS architecture. Following the preparatory phase, EPOS has initiated formal steps to adopt an ERIC legal framework (European Research Infrastructure Consortium). The statutory seat of EPOS will be in Rome, Italy, while the ICS-C will be jointly operated by France, UK and Denmark. The TCS planned so far cover: seismology, near-fault observatories, GNSS data and products, volcano observations, satellite data, geomagnetic observations, anthropogenic hazards, geological information modelling, multiscale laboratories and geo-energy test beds for low carbon energy. In the ERIC process, EPOS and all its services must achieve sustainability from a legal, governance, financial, and technical point of view, as well as full harmonization with national infrastructure roadmaps. As EPOS is a distributed infrastructure, the TCSs have to be linked to the future EPOS ERIC from legal and governance perspectives. For this purpose the TCSs have started to organize themselves as consortia and negotiate agreements to define the roles of the different actors in the consortium as well as their commitment to contribute to the EPOS activities. The link to the EPOS ERIC shall be made by service agreements of dedicated Service Providers. A common EPOS data policy has also been developed, based on the general principles of Open Access and paying careful attention to licensing issues, quality control, and intellectual property rights, which shall apply to the data, data products

  2. EPOS Seismology services and their users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslinger, Florian; Dupont, Aurelien; Michelini, Alberto; Rietbrock, Andreas; Sleeman, Reinoud; Wiemer, Stefan; Basili, Roberto; Bossu, Rémy; Cakti, Eser; Cotton, Fabrice; Crawford, Wayne; Crowley, Helen; Danciu, Laurentiu; Diaz, Jordi; Garth, Tom; Locati, Mario; Luzi, Lucia; Pitilakis, Kyriazis; Roumelioti, Zafeiria; Strollo, Angelo

    2017-04-01

    The construction of seismological community services for the European Plate Observing System Research Infrastructure (EPOS) is by now well under way. A significant number of services are already operational, largely based on those existing at established institutions or collaborations like ORFEUS, EMSC, AHEAD and EFEHR, and more are being added to be ready for internal validation by late 2017. In this presentation we focus on a number of issues related to the interaction of the community of users with the services provided by the seismological part of the EPOS research infrastructure. How users interact with a service (and how satisfied they are with this interaction) is viewed as one important component of the validation of a service within EPOS, and certainly is key to the uptake of a service and from that also it's attributed value. Within EPOS Seismology, the following aspects of user interaction have already surfaced: - user identification (and potential tracking) versus ease-of-access and openness Requesting users to identify themselves when accessing a service provides various advantages to providers and users (e.g. quantifying & qualifying the service use, customization of services and interfaces, handling access rights and quotas), but may impact the ease of access and also shy away users who don't wish to be identified for whatever reason. - service availability versus cost There is a clear and prominent connection between the availability of a service, both regarding uptime and capacity, and its operational cost (IT systems and personnel), and it is often not clear where to draw the line (and based on which considerations). In connection to that, how to best utilize third-party IT infrastructures (either commercial or public), and what the long-term cost implications of that might be, is equally open. - licensing and attribution The issue of intellectual property and associated licensing policies for data, products and services is only recently gaining

  3. CzechGeo/EPOS - Building a national data portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zednik, J.; Hejda, P.

    2012-04-01

    CzechGeo/EPOS is the consortium of seven geoscience institutions in the Czech Republic (Institute of Geophysics AS CR Prague, Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics AS CR Prague, Institute of Geonics AS CR Ostrava, Institute of Physics of the Earth, Masaryk University Brno, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Science, Charles University Prague, and Research Institute of Geodesy, Cartography and Topography Zdiby). These institutions operate a distributed system of seismic, GPS, magnetic, gravimetric and geodynamic observatories. The operational and personal costs of CzechGeo/EPOS are mostly covered by the Ministry of education, sports and youth within the support of twelve large research infrastructures in the Czech Republic. Web pages of the project www.czechgeo.cz are being built as a data portal which should integrate all the data and services provided by the involved institutions and research infrastructures. Seismic portal offers selected portions of digital data from permanent, local and temporary seismic stations, locations of seismic events in the country and worldwide, daily seismograms from permanent observatories and local seismic network Webnet, seismic bulletins and catalogs, and macroseismic observations on the territory of the Czech Republic. Magnetic portal involves besides real-time magnetograms also recent state of geomagnetic activity and its forecast for the next day. GPS portal will provide preprocessed data from regional GPS stations. Building the national portal is closely related with the development of the Preparatory phase of the EPOS (European Plate Observing System) project.

  4. EPOS IP - Data, Data Products, Services and Software (DDSS Master Table)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalek, Jan; Atakan, Kuvvet

    2017-04-01

    The "European Plate Observing System - Implementation Phase" (EPOS IP, 2014-2019) project is about building a pan-European infrastructure for accessing solid Earth science data. This ambitious plan started in 2002 already with a Conception Phase and continued by an EPOS PP (Preparatory Phase, 2010-2014) where about 20 partners joined the project. The current EPOS IP project includes 47 partners plus 6 associate partners from 25 countries from all over Europe and several international organizations (ORFEUS, EMSC, EUREF). However, the community contributing to the EPOS integration plan is larger than the official partnership of EPOS IP project, because more countries are represented by the international organizations and because within each country there are several research institutions involved. The list of Data, Data Products, Services and Software (DDSS) provided by individual institutions, consortia or organizations which will become part of the EPOS system are currently collected in document called DDSS Master Table. There are 10 work packages (WP8-WP17) creating the Thematic Core Services (TCS) always grouped by a specific topic: Seismology, Near Fault Observatories, GNSS Data and Products, Volcano Observations, Satellite Data, Geomagnetic Observations, Anthropogenic Hazards, Geological Information and Modelling, Multi-scale laboratories and Geo-Energy Test Beds for Low Carbon Energy. Each of this group declared a list of DDSS elements which are about to be implemented. Currently there are about 455 DDSS elements in the DDSS Master Table. These DDSS elements are of different maturity and about 122 are declared by TCS groups to be ready for implementation which means that the data are well described with metadata, following the standards specific for their domain and, in the best case, with some services allowing their access already. The DDSS elements differ by its complexity as well. The DDSS Master Table serves as an overview of the DDSS elements and

  5. Applying e-procurement system in the healthcare: the EPOS paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketikidis, Panayiotis H.; Kontogeorgis, Apostolos; Stalidis, George; Kaggelides, Kostis

    2010-03-01

    One of the goals of procurement is to establish a competitive price, while e-procurement utilises electronic commerce to identify potential sources of supply, to purchase goods and services, to exchange contractual information and to interact with suppliers. Extensive academic work has been extensively devoted to e-procurement in diverse industries. However, applying e-procurement in the healthcare sector remains unexplored. It lacks an efficient e-procurement mechanism that will enable hospitals and healthcare suppliers to electronically exchange contractual information, aided by the technologies of optimisation and business rules. The development and deployment of e-procurement requires a major effort in the coordination of complex interorganisational business process. This article presents an e-procurement optimised system (EPOS) for the healthcare marketplace, a complete methodological approach for deploying and operating such system, as piloted in public and private hospitals in three European countries (Greece, Spain and Belgium) and suppliers of healthcare items in the fourth country (Italy). The efficient e-procurement mechanism that EPOS suggests enables hospitals and pharmaceutical and medical equipment suppliers to electronically exchange contractual information.

  6. Building thematic and integrated services for solid Earth sciences: the EPOS integrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Massimo; Consortium, Epos

    2016-04-01

    Services (ICS) to provide a novel research platform to different stakeholders; designing the access to distributed computational resources (ICS-d); ensuring sustainability and governance of TCS and EPOS-ERIC. The research infrastructures (RIs) that EPOS is coordinating include: i) distributed geophysical observing systems (seismological and geodetic networks); ii) local observatories (including geomagnetic, near-fault and volcano observatories); iii) analytical and experimental laboratories; iv) integrated satellite data and geological information services; v) new services for natural and anthropogenic hazards; vi) access to geo-energy test beds. Here we present the activities planned for the implementation phase focusing on the TCS, the ICS and on their interoperability. We will discuss the data, data-products, software and services (DDSS) presently under implementation, which will be validated and tested during the project lifetime. Particular attention will be given to showing the progress toward the establishment of EPOS-ERIC Headquarter, to coordinate and harmonize national RIs and EPOS services, and the ICS central hub as a key contribution for providing multidisciplinary services for solid Earth science as well as the glue to keep ICT aspects integrated and rationalized across EPOS. It will be an important and timely opportunity to discuss the EPOS roadmap toward the operation of the novel multidisciplinary platform for discoveries to foster scientific excellence in solid Earth science.

  7. EMSODEV and EPOS-IP: key findings for effective management of EU research infrastructure projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materia, Paola; Bozzoli, Sabrina; Beranzoli, Laura; Cocco, Massimo; Favali, Paolo; Freda, Carmela; Sangianantoni, Agata

    2017-04-01

    EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory, http://www.emso-eu.org) and EPOS (European Plate Observing System, https://www.epos-ip.org) are pan-European Research Infrastructures (RIs) in the ESFRI 2016 Roadmap. EMSO has recently become an ERIC (European Research Infrastructure Consortium), whilst EPOS application is in progress. Both ERICs will be hosted in Italy and the "Representing Entity" is INGV. EMSO consists of oceanic environment observation systems spanning from the Arctic through the Atlantic and Mediterranean, to the Black Sea for long-term, high-resolution, real-time monitoring of natural and man-induced processes such as hazards, climate, and marine ecosystems changes to study their evolution and interconnections. EPOS aims at creating a pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of Earth's physical and chemical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability, tsunami, and all those processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. Following the conclusion of their Preparatory Phases the two RIs are now in their Implementation Phase still supported by the EC through the EMSODEV and EPOS-IP projects, both run by dedicated Project Management Offices at INGV with sound experience in EU projects. EMSODEV (H2020 project, 2015-2018) involves 11 partners and 9 associate partners and aims at improving the harmonization among the EMSO ERIC observation systems through the realization of EMSO Generic Instrument Modules (EGIMs), and a Data Management Platform (DMP) to implement interoperability and standardization. The DMP will provide access to data from all EMSO nodes, providing a unified, homogeneous, infrastructure-scale and user-oriented platform integrated with the increased measurement capabilities and functions provided by the EGIMs. EPOS IP (H2020 project, 2015

  8. The Satellite Data Thematic Core Service within the EPOS Research Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manunta, Michele; Casu, Francesco; Zinno, Ivana; De Luca, Claudio; Buonanno, Sabatino; Zeni, Giovanni; Wright, Tim; Hooper, Andy; Diament, Michel; Ostanciaux, Emilie; Mandea, Mioara; Walter, Thomas; Maccaferri, Francesco; Fernandez, Josè; Stramondo, Salvatore; Bignami, Christian; Bally, Philippe; Pinto, Salvatore; Marin, Alessandro; Cuomo, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    EPOS, the European Plate Observing System, is a long-term plan to facilitate the integrated use of data, data products, software and services, available from distributed Research Infrastructures (RI), for solid Earth science in Europe. Indeed, EPOS integrates a large number of existing European RIs belonging to several fields of the Earth science, from seismology to geodesy, near fault and volcanic observatories as well as anthropogenic hazards. The EPOS vision is that the integration of the existing national and trans-national research infrastructures will increase access and use of the multidisciplinary data recorded by the solid Earth monitoring networks, acquired in laboratory experiments and/or produced by computational simulations. The establishment of EPOS will foster the interoperability of products and services in the Earth science field to a worldwide community of users. Accordingly, the EPOS aim is to integrate the diverse and advanced European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science, and build on new e-science opportunities to monitor and understand the dynamic and complex solid-Earth System. One of the EPOS Thematic Core Services (TCS), referred to as Satellite Data, aims at developing, implementing and deploying advanced satellite data products and services, mainly based on Copernicus data (namely Sentinel acquisitions), for the Earth science community. This work intends to present the technological enhancements, fostered by EPOS, to deploy effective satellite services in a harmonized and integrated way. In particular, the Satellite Data TCS will deploy five services, EPOSAR, GDM, COMET, 3D-Def and MOD, which are mainly based on the exploitation of SAR data acquired by the Sentinel-1 constellation and designed to provide information on Earth surface displacements. In particular, the planned services will provide both advanced DInSAR products (deformation maps, velocity maps, deformation time series) and value-added measurements (source model

  9. EPOS data and service provision to scientists and other stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Massimo; EPOS Team

    2017-04-01

    EPOS brings together European nations and combines solid Earth science infrastructures and their associated data and services together with the scientific expertise into one integrated delivery system for solid Earth science. By improving and facilitating the integration, access, use, and re-use of solid Earth science data, data products, services and facilities EPOS is developing a holistic, sustainable, multidisciplinary research platform to provide coordinated access to harmonized and quality controlled data from diverse Earth science disciplines, together with tools for their use in analysis and modelling. EPOS has been designed with the vision of creating a single distributed pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. In accordance with this scientific vision, the EPOS mission is to integrate the diverse and advanced European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth relying on new e-science opportunities to monitor and unravel the dynamic and complex Earth System. EPOS is presently in its implementation phase, which consists of the EPOS IP project and the legal establishment of EPOS-ERIC. The EPOS Implementation Phase builds on the achievements of the successful EPOS Preparatory Phase project. The EPOS implementation phase will last from 2015 to 2019. The key objectives of the project are: implementing Thematic Core Services (TCS), the domain-specific service hubs for coordinating and harmonizing national resources/plans with the European dimension of EPOS; building the Integrated Core Services (ICS) to provide a novel research platform to different stakeholders; designing the access to distributed computational resources (ICS-D); ensuring sustainability and governance of TCS and EPOS-ERIC. Here we present the activities planned for the implementation phase focusing on the TCS, the ICS and on their interoperability. We will present and discuss the data and service provision focusing on the data, data

  10. EPOS-Seismology: building the Thematic Core Service for Seismology during the EPOS Implementation Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslinger, Florian; EPOS Seismology Consortium, the

    2015-04-01

    After the successful completion of the EPOS Preparatory Phase, the community of European Research Infrastructures in Seismology is now moving ahead with the build-up of the Thematic Core Service (TCS) for Seismology in EPOS, EPOS-Seismology. Seismology is a domain where European-level infrastructures have been developed since decades, often supported by large-scale EU projects. Today these infrastructures provide services to access earthquake waveforms (ORFEUS), parameters (EMSC) and hazard data and products (EFEHR). The existing organizations constitute the backbone of infrastructures that also in future will continue to manage and host the services of the TCS EPOS-Seismology. While the governance and internal structure of these organizations will remain active, and continue to provide direct interaction with the community, EPOS-Seismology will provide the integration of these within EPOS. The main challenge in the build-up of the TCS EPOS-Seismology is to improve and extend these existing services, producing a single framework which is technically, organizationally and financially integrated with the EPOS architecture, and to further engage various kinds of end users (e.g. scientists, engineers, public managers, citizen scientists). On the technical side the focus lies on four major tasks: - the construction of the next generation software architecture for the European Integrated (waveform) Data Archive EIDA, developing advanced metadata and station information services, fully integrate strong motion waveforms and derived parametric engineering-domain data, and advancing the integration of mobile (temporary) networks and OBS deployments in EIDA; - the further development and expansion of services to access seismological products of scientific interest as provided by the community by implementing a common collection and development (IT) platform, improvements in the earthquake information services e.g. by introducing more robust quality indicators and diversifying

  11. EPOS Data and Service Provision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailo, Daniele; Jeffery, Keith G.; Atakan, Kuvvet; Harrison, Matt

    2017-04-01

    )data collection into the EPOS metadata catalog. In parallel work proceeds on the user interface softsare, the APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) to the TCS services, the harvesting method and software, the AAAI (Authentication, Authorisation, Accounting Infrastructure) and the system manager. The next steps will involve interfaces to ICS-D (Distributed ICS i.e. facilities and services for computing, data storage, detectors and instruments for data collection etc.) to which requests, software and data will be deployed and from which data will be generated. Associated with this will be the development of the workflow system which will assist the end-user in building a workflow to achieve the scientific objectives.

  12. EPOS-GNSS - Improving the infrastructure for GNSS data and products in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Rui; Bos, Machiel; Bruyninx, Carine; Crocker, Paul; Dousa, Jan; Socquet, Anne; Walpersdorf, Andrea; Avallone, Antonio; Ganas, Athanassios; Gunnar, Benedikt; Ionescu, Constantin; Kenyeres, Ambrus; Ozener, Haluk; Vergnolle, Mathilde; Lidberg, Martin; Liwosz, Tomek; Soehne, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    EPOS-IP WP10 - "GNSS Data & Products" is the Working Package 10 of the European Plate Observing System - Implementation Phase project in charge of implementing services for the geo-sciences community to access existing Pan-European Geodetic Infrastructures. WP10 is currently formed by representatives of participating European institutions but in the operational phase contributions will be solicited from the entire geodetic community. In fact, WP10 also includes members from other institutions/countries that formally are not participating in the EPOS-IP but will be key players in the future services to be provided by EPOS. Additionally, several partners are also key partners at EUREF, which is also actively collaborating with EPOS. The geodetic component of EPOS is dealing essentially with implementing an e-infrastructure to store and disseminate the continuous GNSS data from existing Research Infrastructures. Present efforts are on developing geodetic tools to support Solid Earth research by optimizing the existing resources. However, other research and technical applications (e.g., reference frames, meteorology, space weather) can also benefit in the future from the optimization of the geodetic resources in Europe. We present and discuss the status of the implementation of the thematic and core services (TCS) for GNSS data within EPOS and the related business plan. We explain the tools and web-services being developed towards the implementation of the best solutions that will permit to the end-users, and in particular geo-scientists, to access the geodetic data, derived solutions, and associated metadata using a transparent and standardized processes. We also detail the different DDSS (Data, Data-Products, Services, Software) that will be made available for the Operational Phase of EPOS, which will start to be tested and made available during 2017 and 2018.

  13. EPO-independent functional EPO receptor in breast cancer enhances estrogen receptor activity and promotes cell proliferation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Reinbothe, Susann; Larsson, Anna-Maria; Vaapil, Marica

    Highlights: • New anti-human EPOR antibody confirms full-length EPOR expression in breast cancer cells. • Proliferation of breast cancer cells is not affected by rhEPO treatment in vitro. • EPOR knockdown impairs proliferation of ERa positive breast cancer cells. • EPOR knockdown reduces AKT phosphorylation and ERa activity. - Abstract: The main function of Erythropoietin (EPO) and its receptor (EPOR) is the stimulation of erythropoiesis. Recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) is therefore used to treat anemia in cancer patients. However, clinical trials have indicated that rhEPO treatment might promote tumor progression and has a negative effect on patient survival. In addition,more » EPOR expression has been detected in several cancer forms. Using a newly produced anti-EPOR antibody that reliably detects the full-length isoform of the EPOR we show that breast cancer tissue and cells express the EPOR protein. rhEPO stimulation of cultured EPOR expressing breast cancer cells did not result in increased proliferation, overt activation of EPOR (receptor phosphorylation) or a consistent activation of canonical EPOR signaling pathway mediators such as JAK2, STAT3, STAT5, or AKT. However, EPOR knockdown experiments suggested functional EPO receptors in estrogen receptor positive (ERα{sup +}) breast cancer cells, as reduced EPOR expression resulted in decreased proliferation. This effect on proliferation was not seen in ERα negative cells. EPOR knockdown decreased ERα activity further supports a mechanism by which EPOR affects proliferation via ERα-mediated mechanisms. We show that EPOR protein is expressed in breast cancer cells, where it appears to promote proliferation by an EPO-independent mechanism in ERα expressing breast cancer cells.« less

  14. Detection of recombinant EPO in blood and urine samples with EPO WGA MAIIA, IEF and SAR-PAGE after microdose injections.

    PubMed

    Dehnes, Yvette; Shalina, Alexandra; Myrvold, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The misuse of microdoses of performance enhancing drugs like erythropoietin (EPO) constitutes a major challenge in doping analysis. When injected intravenously, the half-life of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) like epoetin alfa, beta, and zeta is only a few hours and hence, the window for direct detection of rhEPO in urine is small. In order to investigate the detection window for rhEPO directly in blood and urine with a combined affinity chromatography and lateral flow immunoassay (EPO WGA MAIIA), we recruited nine healthy people who each received six intravenously injected microdoses (7.5 IU/kg) of NeoRecormon (epoetin beta) over a period of three weeks. Blood and urine samples were collected in the days following the injections and analyzed with EPO WGA MAIIA as well as the current validated methods for rhEPO; isoelectric focusing (IEF) and sarcosyl polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SAR-PAGE). For samples collected 18 h after a microdose, the sensitivity of the EPO WGA MAIIA assay was 100% in plasma and 87.5% in urine samples at the respective 98% specificity threshold levels. In comparison, the sensitivity in plasma and urine was 75% and 100%, respectively, with IEF, and 87.5% in plasma and 100% in urine when analyzed with SAR-PAGE. We conclude that EPO WGA MAIIA is a sensitive assay for the detection of rhEPO, with the potential of being a fast, supplemental screening assay for use in doping analysis.

  15. Improvement of anemia in W/WV mice by recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) mediated through EPO receptors with lowered affinity.

    PubMed

    Kabaya, K; Akiyama, H; Nishi, N; Misaizu, T; Okada, Y; Kawagishi, M; Amano, K; Kusaka, M; Seki, M; Uzumaki, H

    1995-01-01

    We studied the effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) on anemic W/WV mice which manifested severe anemia accompanied by mutation of the W gene encoding tyrosine kinase type receptor (c-kit gene) of bone marrow hematopoietic cells. Nine-week-old male W/WV mice or normal littermates (+/+) were used. Since serum EPO concentration in W/WV mice increased in proportion to severity of anemia, EPO production in the kidneys of these animals was found to be regulated normally. Hematocrit in +/+ mice increased and a maximal response was also obtained with 2,000 IU/kg of rHuEPO. On the other hand, hematocrit in W/WV mice increased in a dose-responsive manner by administration with 2,000 and 10,000 IU/kg, showing different responses to rHuEPO in these two types of mice. The responsiveness of W/WV mice to rHuEPO was low in terms of increases in erythroblastic precursor cells (CFU-E), and immature cells in the bone marrow. Scatchard analysis of the specific binding of 125I-rHuEPO against bone marrow cells revealed that the different responsiveness to rHuEPO between W/WV and +/+ mice may be correlated with differences in affinity of EPO receptor of bone marrow cells in these mice. From these results, a high dose of rHuEPO is capable of improving the anemia in W/WV mice that had EPO receptors with lowered affinity, indicating the possible effectiveness of rHuEPO in anemic patients with EPO receptor abnormality.

  16. The EPOS Legal and Governance Framework : tailoring the infrastructure to fit the needs of the EPOS services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Helle; Kontkanen, Pirjo; Korja, Annakaisa; Lauterjung, Jörn; Haslinger, Florian; Sangianantoni, Agata; Bartolini, Alessandro; Consortium, Epos

    2016-04-01

    One of the most important issues regarding a pan-European distributed large scale research infrastructure is the setting up of its legal and governance structure as this will shape the very operation of the undertaking, i.e. the decision-making process, the allocation of tasks and resources as well as the relationship between the different bodies. Ensuring long-term operational services requires a robust, coherent and transparent legal and governance framework across all of the EPOS TCS (Thematic Core Services) and ICS (Integrated Core Services) that is well aligned to the EPOS global architecture. The chosen model for the EPOS legal entity is the ERIC (European Research Infrastructure Consortium). While the statutory seat of EPOS-ERIC will be in Rome, Italy, most of the services will be hosted in other countries. Specific agreements between EPOS-ERIC and the legal bodies hosting EPOS services will be implemented to allow proper coordination of activities. The objective is to avoid multiple agreements and, where possible, to standardize them in order to reach a harmonized situation across all services. For the governance careful attention will be paid to the decision-making process, the type of decisions and the voting rights, the definition of responsibilities, rights and duties, the reporting mechanisms, as well as other issues like who within a TCS represents the service to the 'outside' world or who advices the TCS on which subjects. Data policy is another crucial issue as EPOS aims to provide interdisciplinary services to researchers interested in geoscience, including access to data, metadata, data products, software and IT tools. EPOS also provides access to computational resources for visualization and processing. Beyond the general principles of Open Access and Open Source the following questions have to be addressed: scope and nature of data that will be accepted; intellectual property rights in data and terms under which data will be shared; openness and

  17. Detection of EPO gene doping in blood.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Elmo W I; Jurkiewicz, Magdalena; Moser, Dirk A; Simon, Perikles

    2012-11-01

    Gene doping--or the abuse of gene therapy--will continue to threaten the sports world. History has shown that progress in medical research is likely to be abused in order to enhance human performance. In this review, we critically discuss the progress and the risks associated with the field of erythropoietin (EPO) gene therapy and its applicability to EPO gene doping. We present typical vector systems that are employed in ex vivo and in vivo gene therapy trials. Due to associated risks, gene doping is not a feasible alternative to conventional EPO or blood doping at this time. Nevertheless, it is well described that about half of the elite athlete population is in principle willing to risk its health to gain a competitive advantage. This includes the use of technologies that lack safety approval. Sophisticated detection approaches are a prerequisite for prevention of unapproved and uncontrolled use of gene therapy technology. In this review, we present current detection approaches for EPO gene doping, with a focus on blood-based direct and indirect approaches. Gene doping is detectable in principle, and recent DNA-based detection strategies enable long-term detection of transgenic DNA (tDNA) following in vivo gene transfer. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Efficient breathing at neonatal ages: A sex and Epo-dependent issue.

    PubMed

    Iturri, Pablo; Bairam, Aida; Soliz, Jorge

    2017-11-01

    During postnatal life, the respiratory control system undergoes intense development and is highly responsive to stimuli emerging from the environment. In fact, interruption of breathing prevents gas exchange and results in systemic hypoxia that, if prolonged, can lead to cardio-respiratory failure or sudden infant death. Moreover, in newborns and infants, respiratory disorders related to neural control dysfunction show significant sexual dimorphism with a higher prevalence in males. To this day, the therapeutic tools available to alleviate these respiratory disorders remain limited. Furthermore, the factors explaining the sexual dimorphism in newborns and during infancy remain unknown. Erythropoietin (Epo) was originally discovered as a cytokine able to increase the production of red blood cells upon conditions of reduced oxygen availability. We now know that Epo is a cytokine also secreted by neurons and astrocytes that protects the brain during trauma or hypoxic stress in a sex dependent manner. In this novel line of research, our previous studies demonstrated at adult ages that cerebral Epo acts as a respiratory stimulant in rodents and humans. These results provided a strong rationale for exploring the role of cerebral Epo in neuronal respiratory control during postnatal development. The objective of this review is to summarize our recent findings showing that cerebral Epo is a potent sex-specific respiratory stimulant at neonatal ages. Keeping in mind that Epo is routinely and safely administrated in newborn humans for anemia and neonatal asphyxia, we predict that our research provides the basis necessary to promote the clinical use of Epo against neonatal respiratory disorders related to neural control dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. EPO in NASA's Science Mission Directorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthi, A.; Cooper, L. P.

    2005-05-01

    The Science Mission Directorate (SMD) at NASA believes very strongly in education and public outreach (EPO) and has embedded such programs within its missions. There are also some funding opportunities that are available outside the mission context. We will provide an overview of the various funding opportunities available through the SMD at NASA to carry out EPO programs. We will introduce speakers who have won such EPO awards and they will discuss their experience with writing the proposals and carrying out their projects.

  20. Upregulation of erythropoietin receptor in UT-7/EPO cells inhibits simulated microgravity-induced cell apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Li-xue; Cui, Shao-yan; Zhong, Jian; Yi, Zong-chun; Sun, Yan; Fan, Yu-bo; Zhuang, Feng-yuan

    2011-07-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation can be altered in either spaceflight or under simulated microgravity experiments on the ground, however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Our previous study showed that exposure of the human erythropoietin (EPO)-dependent leukemia cell line UT-7/EPO to conditions of simulated microgravity significantly inhibited the cellular proliferation rate and induced cell apoptosis. We postulated that the downregulation of the erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) expression in UT-7/EPO cells under simulated microgravity may be a possible reason for microgravity triggered apoptosis. In this paper, a human EPOR gene was transferred into UT-7/EPO cells and the resulting expression of EPOR on the surface of UT-7/EPO cells increased approximately 61% ( p < 0.05) as selected by the antibiotic G418. It was also shown through cytometry assays and morphological observations that microgravity-induced apoptosis markedly decreased in these UT-7/EPO-EPOR cells. Thus, we concluded that upregulation of EPOR in UT-7/EPO cells could inhibit the simulated microgravity-induced cell apoptosis in this EPO dependent cell line.

  1. Virus-mediated EpoR76E Therapy Slows Optic Nerve Axonopathy in Experimental Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Bond, Wesley S; Hines-Beard, Jessica; GoldenMerry, YPaul L; Davis, Mara; Farooque, Alma; Sappington, Rebecca M; Calkins, David J; Rex, Tonia S

    2016-02-01

    Glaucoma, a common cause of blindness, is currently treated by intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering interventions. However, this approach is insufficient to completely prevent vision loss. Here, we evaluate an IOP-independent gene therapy strategy using a modified erythropoietin, EPO-R76E, which has reduced erythropoietic function. We used two models of glaucoma, the murine microbead occlusion model and the DBA/2J mouse. Systemic recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene delivery of EpoR76E (rAAV.EpoR76E) was performed concurrent with elevation of IOP. Axon structure and active anterograde transport were preserved in both models. Vision, as determined by the flash visual evoked potential, was preserved in the DBA/2J. These results show that systemic EpoR76E gene therapy protects retinal ganglion cells from glaucomatous degeneration in two different models. This suggests that EPO targets a component of the neurodegenerative pathway that is common to both models. The efficacy of rAAV.EpoR76E delivered at onset of IOP elevation supports clinical relevance of this treatment.

  2. The Solar System Radio Explorer Kiosk - Leveraging Other E/PO Programs for Greater Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, L. N.; Reinisch, B. W.; Taylor, W. W.; Thieman, J. R.; Mendez, F.; Riccobono, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Solar System Radio Explorer Kiosk (SSREK) - a newly won small E/PO follow-on to a NASA/OSS research grant - is designed to leverage existing NASA E/PO projects and other education programs to enable a large return from a small investment. The SSREK project will create an interactive museum kiosk to engage and teach visitors about Jupiter and the Sun by learning what their low frequency radio bursts may be telling us about these worlds. This project will work with the network of radio observers and the archive of data obtained through the NASA-sponsored Radio Jove project. The SSREK project is partnering with the Maryland Science Center (MSC) as a test site for the SSREK. The MSC will enable us to ensure that this project meets the requirements of their museum environment. We are also partnering with the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) to help us enable museum visitors with visual impairments to share in the excitement of science and help these visitors recognize how other senses besides sight can be used to do science. Both the MSC and NFB will assist us in formative and summative evaluation of the project. All of the software and designs for the wheelchair-accessible arcade-style cabinet will be made available on the associated web site hosted at NASA/GSFC - further extending the reach of the project.

  3. rhEPO Enhances Cellular Anti-oxidant Capacity to Protect Long-Term Cultured Aging Primary Nerve Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huqing; Fan, Jiaxin; Chen, Mengyi; Yao, Qingling; Gao, Zhen; Zhang, Guilian; Wu, Haiqin; Yu, Xiaorui

    2017-08-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) may protect the nervous system of animals against aging damage, making it a potential anti-aging drug for the nervous system. However, experimental evidence from natural aging nerve cell models is lacking, and the efficacy of EPO and underlying mechanism of this effect warrant further study. Thus, the present study used long-term cultured primary nerve cells to successfully mimic the natural aging process of nerve cells. Starting on the 11th day of culture, cells were treated with different concentrations of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO). Using double immunofluorescence labeling, we found that rhEPO significantly improved the morphology of long-term cultured primary nerve cells and increased the total number of long-term cultured primary cells. However, rhEPO did not improve the ratio of nerve cells. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to measure nerve cell activity and showed that rhEPO significantly improved the activity of long-term cultured primary nerve cells. Moreover, Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) double immunofluorescence labeling flow cytometry revealed that rhEPO reduced the apoptotic rate of long-term cultured primary nerve cells. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) immunohistochemistry staining showed that rhEPO significantly reduced the aging rate of long-term cultured primary nerve cells. Immunochemistry revealed that rhEPO enhanced intracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione (GSH) abundance and reduced the intracellular malondialdehyde (MDA) level. In addition, this effect depended on the dose, was maximized at a dose of 100 U/ml and was more pronounced than that of vitamin E. In summary, this study finds that rhEPO protects long-term cultured primary nerve cells from aging in a dose-dependent manner. The mechanism of this effect may be associated with the enhancement of the intracellular anti

  4. A test of the hadronic interaction model EPOS with air shower data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Kolotaev, Y.; Luczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; van Buren, J.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.

    2009-03-01

    Predictions of the hadronic interaction model EPOS 1.61 as implemented in the air shower simulation program CORSIKA are compared to observations with the KASCADE experiment. The investigations reveal that the predictions of EPOS are not compatible with KASCADE measurements. The discrepancies seen are most likely due to use of a set of inelastic hadronic cross sections that are too high.

  5. Test of the hadronic interaction model EPOS with KASCADE air shower data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörandel, J. R.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Kolotaev, Y.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G.; Ulrich, H.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.; KASCADE-Grande Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    Predictions of the hadronic interaction model EPOS 1.61 as implemented in the air shower simulation program CORSIKA are compared to observations with the KASCADE experiment. The investigations reveal that the predictions of EPOS are not compatible with KASCADE measurements. The discrepancies seen are most likely due to use of a set of inelastic hadronic cross sections that are too high.

  6. NASA Astrophysics EPO Community: Enhancing STEM Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolone, L.; Manning, J.; Lawton, B.; Meinke, B. K.; Smith, D. A.; Schultz, G.; NASA Astrophysics EPO community

    2015-11-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach (EPO) community and Forum work together to capitalize on the cutting-edge discoveries of NASA Astrophysics missions to enhance Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) instruction. In 2010, the Astrophysics EPO community identified online professional development for classroom educators and multiwavelength resources as a common interest and priority for collaborative efforts. The result is NASA's Multiwavelength Universe, a 2-3 week online professional development experience for classroom educators. The course uses a mix of synchronous sessions (live WebEx teleconferences) and asynchronous activities (readings and activities that educators complete on their own on the Moodle, and moderated by course facilitators). The NASA SMD Astrophysics EPO community has proven expertise in providing both professional development and resources to K-12 Educators. These mission- and grant-based EPO programs are uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present examples of how the NASA Astrophysics EPO community and Forum engage the K-12 education community in these ways, including associated metrics and evaluation findings.

  7. Development and evaluation of gastroretentive raft forming systems incorporating curcumin-Eudragit® EPO solid dispersions for gastric ulcer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kerdsakundee, Nattha; Mahattanadul, Sirima; Wiwattanapatapee, Ruedeekorn

    2015-08-01

    Novel raft forming systems incorporating curcumin-Eudragit® EPO solid dispersions were developed to prolong the gastric residence time and provide for a controlled release therapy of curcumin to treat gastric ulcers. The solid dispersions of curcumin with Eudragit® EPO were prepared by the solvent evaporation method at various ratios to improve the solubility and the dissolution of curcumin. The optimum weight ratio of 1:5 for curcumin to Eudragit® EPO was used to incorporate into the raft forming systems. The raft forming formulations were composed of curcumin-Eudragit® EPO solid dispersions, sodium alginate as a gelling polymer and calcium carbonate for generating divalent Ca(2+) ions and carbon dioxide to form a floating raft. All formulations formed a gelled raft in 1min and sustained buoyancy on the 0.1N hydrochloric acid (pH 1.2) surface with a 60-85% release of curcumin within 8h. The curative effect on the acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer in rats was determined. The curcumin raft forming formulations at 40mg/kg once daily showed a superior curative effect on the gastric ulcer in terms of the ulcer index and healing index than the standard antisecretory agent: lansoprazole (1mg/kg, twice daily) and a curcumin suspension (40mg/kg, twice daily). These studies demonstrated that the new raft forming systems containing curcumin solid dispersions are promising carriers for a stomach-specific delivery of poorly soluble lipophilic compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The EGI-Engage EPOS Competence Center - Interoperating heterogeneous AAI mechanisms and Orchestrating distributed computational resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailo, Daniele; Scardaci, Diego; Spinuso, Alessandro; Sterzel, Mariusz; Schwichtenberg, Horst; Gemuend, Andre

    2016-04-01

    The mission of EGI-Engage project [1] is to accelerate the implementation of the Open Science Commons vision, where researchers from all disciplines have easy and open access to the innovative digital services, data, knowledge and expertise they need for collaborative and excellent research. The Open Science Commons is grounded on three pillars: the e-Infrastructure Commons, an ecosystem of services that constitute the foundation layer of distributed infrastructures; the Open Data Commons, where observations, results and applications are increasingly available for scientific research and for anyone to use and reuse; and the Knowledge Commons, in which communities have shared ownership of knowledge, participate in the co-development of software and are technically supported to exploit state-of-the-art digital services. To develop the Knowledge Commons, EGI-Engage is supporting the work of a set of community-specific Competence Centres, with participants from user communities (scientific institutes), National Grid Initiatives (NGIs), technology and service providers. Competence Centres collect and analyse requirements, integrate community-specific applications into state-of-the-art services, foster interoperability across e-Infrastructures, and evolve services through a user-centric development model. One of these Competence Centres is focussed on the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) [2] as representative of the solid earth science communities. EPOS is a pan-European long-term plan to integrate data, software and services from the distributed (and already existing) Research Infrastructures all over Europe, in the domain of the solid earth science. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. EPOS will improve our ability to better

  9. The hadronic interaction model EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    EPOS is a sophisticated multiple scattering approach based on partons and Pomerons (parton ladders), with special emphasis on high parton densities. The latter aspect, particularly important in proton-nucleus or nucleus-nucleus collisions, is taken care of via an effective treatment of Pomeron-Pomeron interactions, referred to as parton ladder splitting. In addition, collective effects are introduced after separating the high density central core from the peripheral corona. EPOS is the successor of the NEXUS model.

  10. Current status of the EPOS WG4 - GNSS and Other Geodetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Rui; Bastos, Luísa; Bruyninx, Carine; D'Agostino, Nicola; Dousa, Jan; Ganas, Athanassios; Lidberg, Martin; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu

    2013-04-01

    WG4 - "EPOS Geodetic Data and Other Geodetic Data" is the Working Group of the EPOS project in charge of defining and preparing the integration of the existing Pan-European Geodetic Infrastructures that will support the European Geosciences, which is the ultimate goal of the EPOS project. The WG4 is formed by representatives of the participating EPOS countries (23) but it is also open to the entire geodetic community. In fact, WG4 also includes members from countries that formally are not part of the current phase of EPOS. In an ongoing effort, the majority of existing GNSS Research Infrastructures in Europe were identified. The current database, available at http://epos-couch.cloudant.com/epos-couch/_design/epos-couch/, lists a total of 50 Research Infrastructures managing a total of 1534 GNSS CORS sites. This presentation intends to detail the work being produced within the working group WG4 related with the definition of strategies towards the implementation of the best solutions that will permit to the end-users, and in particular geo-scientists, to access the geodetic data, derived solutions, and associated metadata using transparent and uniform processes. The first step toward the design of an implementation and business plan is the definition of the core services for geodetic data within EPOS. In this talk, we will present the current status of the discussion about the content of core services. Three levels of core services could be distinguished, for which their content need to be defined. The 3 levels are: (1) the core services associated to data (diffusion, archive, long-term preservation, quality check, rapid analysis) (2) core services associated to geodetic products (analysis, products definition like position time series, velocity field and Zenithal Total Delay) (3) User oriented services (reference frames, real-time solutions for early warning systems, strain rate maps, meteorology, space weather, …). Current propositions and remaining open

  11. The Contribution of the Geodetic Community (WG4) to EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R. M. S.; Bastos, L. C.; Bruyninx, C.; D'Agostino, N.; Dousa, J.; Ganas, A.; Lidberg, M.; Nocquet, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    WG4 - "EPOS Geodetic Data and Infrastructure" is the Working Group of the EPOS project responsible to define and prepare the integration of the existing Pan-European Geodetic Infrastructures into a unique future consistent infrastructure that supports the European Geosciences, which is the ultimate goal of the EPOS project. The WG4 is formed by representatives of the participating EPOS countries and from EUREF (European Reference Frame), which also ensures the inclusion and the contact with countries that formally are not part of the current phase of EPOS. In reality, the fact that Europe is formed by many countries (having different laws and policies) lacking an infrastructure similar to UNAVCO (which concentrates the effort of the local geo-science community) raises the difficulties to create a common geodetic infrastructure serving not only the entire geo-science community, but also many other areas of great social-economic impact. The benefits of the creation of such infrastructure (shared and easily accessed by all) are evident in order to optimize the existing and future geodetic resources. This presentation intends to detail the work being produced within the working group WG4 related with the definition of strategies towards the implementation of the best solutions that will permit to the end-users, and in particular geo-scientists, to access the geodetic data, derived solutions, and associated metadata using transparent and uniform processes. Discussed issues include the access to high-rate data in near real-time, storage and backup of historical and future data, the sustainability of the networks in order to achieve long-term stability in the observation infrastructure, seamless access to the data, open data policies, and processing tools.

  12. Epo's Chronicles: A Weekly Webcomic That Teaches Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.; Prasad, K.; Simonnet, A.; John, K.; McLin, K.; Hill, L.

    2009-01-01

    Sonoma State University Education and Public Outreach presents Epo's Chronicles: a weekly web comic about Epo, a sentient spaceship/observatory and its humanoid companion, Alkina. Follow the adventures of Epo and Alkina as they explore the Universe and try to discover their origins. The comic employs a fictional story line incorporating both recent and classic scientific discoveries from NASA missions while educating the young and the young at heart in a creative and engaging way. Each weekly "eposode” is translated into French, Italian and Spanish, and is accompanied by supporting information including glossary entries, multi-media clips, and links to additional resources. Visit Epo's Chronicles at: http://eposchronicles.com

  13. Designing Effective EPO Products for Museums: Preliminary Evaluation Findings from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) EPO Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, M.; Bartolone, L.; Baldassari, C.; Hoyer-Winfield, S.

    2011-09-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission includes a comprehensive EPO program in astronomy and heliophysics that is overseen and implemented by the Adler Planetarium in Chicago, Illinois. Several EPO components were developed specifically for informal institutions, especially museums and planetaria. The program includes an internationally distributed planetarium show with accompanying informal educational materials. Our evaluator, the Program Evaluation and Research Group (PERG) at Lesley University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, assesses the effectiveness of the EPO program. In late 2009 through early 2010, more than 70 planetaria worldwide received the IBEX planetarium show. Of the many U.S. planetaria, the first 25 received the IBEX planetarium show and were offered the opportunity to receive, at no charge, accompanying informal education materials, including posters, lithographs, demonstration materials, lesson plans, and more. In Spring 2010, PERG staff conducted a study designed to gauge the effectiveness of the distribution process for the planetarium show, gather information on the professional development needs of the organizations, and document reactions of museum staff to the IBEX informal education materials and their usefulness as companion pieces to the planetarium show. In this paper, we will present preliminary findings of this particular study, in the hopes that future EPO work can make use of data in this report.

  14. Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) 2010 Education and Public Outreach (EPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2013-10-01

    The Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, Directorate Integration Office conducts analog field test activities, such as Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS), to validate exploration system architecture concepts and conduct technology demonstrations. Education and Public Outreach (EPO) activities have been a part of DRATS missions in the past to engage students, educators, and the general public in analog activities. However, in 2010, for the first time, EPO was elevated as a principal task for the mission and metrics were collected for all EPO activities. EPO activities were planned well in advance of the mission, with emphasis on creating a multitude of activities to attract students of all ages. Web-based and social media interaction between August 31 and September 14, 2010 resulted in 62,260 DRATS Flickr views; 10,906 views of DRATS videos on YouTube; 1,483 new DRATS Twitter followers; and a 111% increase in DRATS Facebook fan interactions. Over 7,000 outreach participants were directly involved in the DRATS 2010 analog mission via student visitations at both the integrated dry-runs prior to the field mission and during the field mission; by participating in live, interactive webcasts and virtual events; and online voting to determine a traverse site as part of the NASA initiative for Participatory Exploration (PE).

  15. The Legacy of NASA Astrophysics E/PO: Conducting Professional Development, Developing Key Themes & Resources, and Broadening E/PO Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, Brandon L.; Smith, Denise A.; Meinke, Bonnie K.; Bartolone, Lindsay; Manning, Jim; Schultz, Gregory R.; NASA Astrophysics E/PO Community

    2016-01-01

    For the past six years, NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) has coordinated the work of its mission- and program-embedded education and public outreach (E/PO) efforts through four forums representing its four science divisions. The Astrophysics Forum, as the others, has built on SMD's long-standing principle of partnering scientists and educators and embedding E/PO in its missions to encourage and coordinate collaborative efforts to make the most efficient and effective use of NASA resources, personnel, data and discoveries in leveraged ways, in support of the nation's science education. Three priorities established early in the Forum's period of activity were to collaboratively enhance professional development for formal and informal educators, develop key themes & resources centered on astrophysics topics, and broaden the reach of astrophysics E/PO to traditionally underserved audiences in STEM subjects. This presentation will highlight some of the achievements of the Astrophysics E/PO community and Forum in these priority areas. This work constitutes an ongoing legacy--a firm foundation on which the new structure of NASA SMD education efforts will go forward.

  16. The EPOS Vision for the Open Science Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Keith; Harrison, Matt; Cocco, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Cloud computing offers dynamic elastic scalability for data processing on demand. For much research activity, demand for computing is uneven over time and so CLOUD computing offers both cost-effectiveness and capacity advantages. However, as reported repeatedly by the EC Cloud Expert Group, there are barriers to the uptake of Cloud Computing: (1) security and privacy; (2) interoperability (avoidance of lock-in); (3) lack of appropriate systems development environments for application programmers to characterise their applications to allow CLOUD middleware to optimize their deployment and execution. From CERN, the Helix-Nebula group has proposed the architecture for the European Open Science Cloud. They are discussing with other e-Infrastructure groups such as EGI (GRIDs), EUDAT (data curation), AARC (network authentication and authorisation) and also with the EIROFORUM group of 'international treaty' RIs (Research Infrastructures) and the ESFRI (European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures) RIs including EPOS. Many of these RIs are either e-RIs (electronic-RIs) or have an e-RI interface for access and use. The EPOS architecture is centred on a portal: ICS (Integrated Core Services). The architectural design already allows for access to e-RIs (which may include any or all of data, software, users and resources such as computers or instruments). Those within any one domain (subject area) of EPOS are considered within the TCS (Thematic Core Services). Those outside, or available across multiple domains of EPOS, are ICS-d (Integrated Core Services-Distributed) since the intention is that they will be used by any or all of the TCS via the ICS. Another such service type is CES (Computational Earth Science); effectively an ICS-d specializing in high performance computation, analytics, simulation or visualization offered by a TCS for others to use. Already discussions are underway between EPOS and EGI, EUDAT, AARC and Helix-Nebula for those offerings to be

  17. [Chronic Rhinosinusitis - EPOS 2012 Part I].

    PubMed

    Riechelmann, H

    2013-03-01

    An expert group of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) and the European Rhinologic Society (ERS) has recently published the revised position paper for acute and chronic rhinosinusitis (EPOS 2012). In the following article, the most important aspects of the EPOS 2012 paper concerning chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) are referenced. Every 10th European is suffering from a chronic inflammation of the nose and paranasal sinuses.2 EPOS key messages according CRS are: 1. CRS is an inflammatory disease, not an infection. 2. CRS comes in 2 different subtypes, namely CRS without polyps (CRSsNP) and CRS with polyps (CRSwNP). CRSwNP is diagnosed, when nasal polyps are visible at an appropriate nasal endoscopic examination. Otherwise CRSsNP is classified. In the EPOS 2012 paper the current pathogenetic knowledge of these 2 different CRS subtypes are discussed. Current research focuses on epithelial/immune cell interactions, the biofilm hypothesis and the superantigen hypothesis. Both CRS subtypes may be associated with different frequencies with other diseases, especially allergies, asthma and aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). These comorbidities should be recorded and treated. The standard diagnostic procedures include medical history, nasal endoscopy, CT-scans of the paranasal sinus, and allergy test of common inhalant allergens. The classification of disease severity in mild, moderate and severe was complemented with a concept of symptom control in controlled, partly controlled and uncontrolled. Also, a 'difficult-to-treat-CRS' was defined. The choice of therapy depends upon symptom intensity. In patients with moderate and severe symptoms, usually several weeks of conservative treatment including topical steroids are administered. In non-responders, surgical treatment (functional endonasal sinus surgery) is indicated. The EPOS Group offers evidence-based treatment algorithms for general practitioners and ENT-specialists. © Georg Thieme

  18. [Construction and expression of recombinant human serum albumin-EPO fusion protein].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Chun; Gou, Xing-Hua; Han, Lei; Li, De-Hua; Zhao, Lan-Ying; Wu, Qia-Qing

    2011-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To construct the recombinant plasmid pCI-HLE encoding human serum album-EPO (HSA-EPO) fusion protein and to express it in CHO cell. The cDNA encoding human serum album and EPO were amplified by PCR, and then spliced with the synsitic DNA fragment encoding GS (GGGGS), by overlap PCR extension to form LEPO. After BamH I digestion, the HSA and LEPO was ligated to generate the fusion HSA-EPO gene and was then cloned into the expression vector pCI-neo to generate the recombinant plasmid pCI-HLE. The plasmid pCI-HLE was transfected into CHO cell by liposome protocol. Then, the recombinant cells were screened by G418 and identified by PCR and Western blot. Expression of fusion protein was evaluated by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Restrictive enzymes digestion and DNA sequencing revealed that HSA-EPO fusion gene was cloned into expression vector pCI-neo successfully. PCR and Western blot analysis confirmed that the fusion gene was integrated in the genome of CHO cells and expressed successfully. The HSA-EPO production varied from 86 Iu/(mL x 10(6) x 72 h) to 637 IU/(mLx 10(6) x 72 h). The results confirmed that HSA-EPO fusion gene can be expressed in the CHO cells, with EPO immunogenicity, which could serve as foundation for the development of long-lasting recombinant HSA-EPO protein.

  19. Sun-Earth Connection EPO's with Multiple Uses and Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Russell, R.; Lu, G.; Richmond, A.; Maute, A.; Haller, D.; Conery, C.; Bintner, G.; Kiessling, D.; Hughes, W. J.

    2005-05-01

    The three-year life of an EPO grant can be a journey guided by clear goals and enriched by collaborative and outreach opportunities connecting Space sciences to Earth sciences for both K-12 and public audiences. This point is illustrated by two EPO projects funded by NASA Sun-Earth Connection research grants to the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. They are entering their final year coordinated by the Office of Education and Outreach at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. The content focus of both projects is well aligned with HAO's research mission and the expertise of our scientists, addressing solar dynamics, space weather, and the impacts of solar events on the magnetosphere, as well as societies inhabiting Earth's surface. The first project (Gang Lu, PI) develops presentation resources, inquiry activities, and tips that will help HAO scientists be better prepared to visit K-12 classrooms. Unexpectedly, the simultaneous development of a Teachers' Guide to NCAR's new Climate Discovery exhibit, which takes an Earth system approach to climate and global change, has created a niche for this EPO resource to be revised and repurposed for a needed unit in the guide about the exhibit's graphic panels on Sun-Earth connections. The second project (Art Richmond, PI) engages two high school "Teachers in Residence" to develop resources they can utilize with their students. Excited by exceptional educational graphics and animations in the new Physics of the Aurora: Earth Systems module co-produced by HAO and the COMET Program for advanced undergraduate courses, they chose to adapt appropriate sections of the module to enrich Earth science and math concepts addressed in their 9th and 10th grade astronomy and general physics classes. Simultaneously, the Windows to the Universe web site, which continuously updates space science content and is now developing a new Space Weather section with support from the Center for

  20. NASA Astrophysics EPO Community: Enhancing STEM Experience of Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, J.; Meinke, B. K.; Lawton, B.; Smith, D. A.; Bartolone, L.; Schultz, G.; NASA Astrophysics EPO Community

    2015-11-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach (EPO) community and Forum work together to capitalize on the cutting-edge discoveries of NASA Astrophysics missions to enhance the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) experience of undergraduates. The NASA SMD Astrophysics EPO community has proven expertise in providing both professional development and resources to faculty at two- and four-year institutions and in offering internships and student collaboration opportunities. These mission- and grant-based EPO programs are uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present examples of how the NASA Astrophysics EPO community and Forum engage the higher education community in these ways, including associated metrics and evaluation findings.

  1. Working with NASA's OSS E/PO Support Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miner, E. D.; Lowes, L. L.

    2001-11-01

    With greater and greater emphasis on the inclusion of a public engagement component in all government-supported research funding, many members of the DPS are finding it difficult to find sufficient time and funding to develop a wide-reaching and effective E/PO program. NASA's Office of Space Science, over the last five years, has built a Support Network to assist its funded scientists to establish partnerships with local and/or national science formal or informal education organizations, who are anxious to connect with and use the expertise of space scientists. The OSS Support Network consists of four theme-based 'Forums,' including the Solar System Exploration (SSE) Forum, specifically designed for working with planetary scientists, and seven regional 'Brokers-Facilitators' who are more familiar with partnership and other potential avenues for involvement by scientists. The services provided by the Support Network are free to both the scientists and their potential partners and is not limited to NASA-funded scientists. In addition to its assistance to space scientists, the Support Network is involved in a number of other overarching efforts, including support of a Solar System Ambassador Program, a Solar System Educator Program, Space Place (web and e-mail science products for libraries and small planetariums and museums), an on-line Space Science Resource Directory, annual reports of Space Science E/PO activity, identifying and filling in 'holes' and 'over-populations' in a solar system E/PO product matrix of grade level versus product versus content, research on product effectiveness, and scientific and educational evaluation of space science products. Forum and Broker-Facilitator contact information is available at http://spacescience.nasa.gov/education/resources/ecosystem/index.htm. Handouts with additional information will be available at the meeting.

  2. Enhancement of bioavailability by formulating rhEPO ionic complex with lysine into PEG-PLA micelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanan; Sun, Fengying; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Renyu; Dou, Changlin; Liu, Wanhui; Sun, Kaoxiang; Li, Youxin

    2013-10-01

    A composite micelle of ionic complex encapsulated into poly(ethylene glycol)-poly( d, l-lactide) (PEG-PLA) di-block copolymeric micelles was used for protein drug delivery to improve its pharmacokinetic performance. In this study, recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO, as a model protein) was formulated with lysine into composite micelles at a diameter of 71.5 nm with narrow polydispersity indices (PDIs < 0.3). Only a trace amount of protein was in aggregate form. The zeta potential of the spherical micelles was ranging from -0.54 to 1.39 mv, and encapsulation efficiency is high (80 %). The stability of rhEPO was improved significantly in composite micelles in vitro. Pharmacokinetic studies in rats showed significant, enhanced plasma retention of the composite micelles in comparison with native rhEPO. Areas under curve (AUCs) of the rhEPO released from the composite micelles were 4.5- and 2.3-folds higher than those of the native rhEPO and rhEPO-loaded PEG-PLA micelle, respectively. In addition, the composite micelles exhibited good biocompatibility using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay with human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells. All these features are preferable for utilizing the composite micelles as a novel protein delivery system.

  3. Scientist-Educator Partnerships: the Cornerstone of Astrophysics E/PO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Bonnie K.; Smith, Denise A.; Lawton, Brandon; Eisenhamer, Bonnie; Jirdeh, Hussein

    2015-11-01

    For nearly two decades, NASA has partnered scientists and educators by embedding Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) programs and funding in its science missions and research activities. This enables scientist and educators to work side-by-side in translating cutting-edge NASA science and technology for classrooms, museums, and public venues.The Office of Public Outreach at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) is uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. As home to both Hubble Space Telescope and the future James Webb Space Telescope, STScI leverages the expertise of its scientists to create partnerships with its collocated Education Team to translate cutting-edge NASA science into new and effective learning tools. In addition, STScI is home of the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics Science E/PO Forum, which facilitates connections both within the SMD E/PO community and beyond to scientists and educators across all NASA Astrophysics missions. These collaborations strengthen partnerships, build best practices, and enhance coherence for NASA SMD-funded E/PO missions and programs.We will present examples of astronomers’ engagement in our E/PO efforts, such as NASA Science4Girls.

  4. EPO Program and Product Evaluation Throughout the Development Lifecycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, C.; Butcher, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    stages during development allows for modifications and improvements to the product before time and money have been wasted going down the wrong path. Depending on the product and the stage of development, there are several evaluation tools to employ: surveys, observations, expert analysis, heuristic evaluations, feedback forms, diary studies, use case testing and interviews. In the case of developing the 'Sensors, Circuits, and Satellites' product, surveys were collected from teachers and students who participated in the lesson or activity. Audio recordings were also made of the teachers as they completed each activity to collect direct quotes, questions, concerns, and feedback. Facilitators completed feedback forms to capture quotes and observations of the students working through the activities and engaging with the product. All of these data provided valuable insight into the participants' experiences and effectiveness of the product. A complement of tools and techniques is the best approach to evaluating EPO products and programs. These will vary based on application, but can easily be implemented at key points in the development lifecycle to produce feedback and data used to assess and meet EPO goals and objectives.

  5. An Intranasal Formulation of Erythropoietin (Neuro-EPO) Prevents Memory Deficits and Amyloid Toxicity in the APPSwe Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Cruz, Yamila; Strehaiano, Manon; Rodríguez Obaya, Teresita; García Rodríguez, Julío César; Maurice, Tangui

    2017-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a cytokine known to have effective cytoprotective action in the brain, particularly in ischemic, traumatic, inflammatory, and neurodegenerative conditions. We previously reported the neuroprotective effect of a low sialic form of EPO, Neuro-EPO, applied intranasally in rodent models of stroke or cerebellar ataxia and in a non-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we analyzed the protective effect of Neuro-EPO in APPSwe mice, a reference transgenic mouse model of AD. Mice were administered 3 times a day, 3 days in the week with Neuro-EPO (125, 250 μg/kg) intranasally, between 12 and 14 months of age. Motor responses, general activity, and memory responses were analyzed during and after treatment. The deficits in spontaneous alternation, place learning in the water-maze, and novel object recognition observed in APPSwe mice were alleviated by the low dose of Neuro-EPO. Oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, trophic factor levels, and a synaptic marker were analyzed in the hippocampus or cortex of the animals. The increases in lipid peroxidation or in GFAP and Iba-1 contents in APPSwe mice were significantly reduced after Neuro-EPO. Activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways was analyzed. The increases in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, TNFα, or Fas ligand levels observed in APPSwe mice were reduced by Neuro-EPO. Finally, immunohistochemical and ELISA analyses of Aβ1-42 levels in the APPSwe mouse cortex and hippocampus showed a marked reduction in Aβ deposits and in soluble and insoluble Aβ1-42 forms. This study therefore confirmed the neuroprotective activity of EPO, particularly for an intranasally deliverable formulation, devoid of erythropoietic side effects, in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Neuro-EPO alleviated memory alterations, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, apoptosis induction, and amyloid load in 14-month-old APPSwe mice.

  6. Our Place in Space: Exploring the Earth-Moon System and Beyond with NASA's CINDI E/PO Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Hairston, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Where does space begin? How far is the Moon? How far is Mars? How does our dynamic star, the Sun, affect its family of planets? All of these questions relate to exploration of our Solar System, and are also part of the Education/Public Outreach (E/PO) Program for NASA’s CINDI project, a space weather mission of opportunity. The Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation has been flying aboard the US Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite in the upper atmosphere of the Earth since April 2008. The Earth’s ionosphere, the part of the atmosphere CINDI studies, is also in space. The CINDI E/PO program uses this fact in lessons designed to help students in middle schools and introductory astronomy classes develop a sense of their place in space. In the activity "How High is Space?" students’ start by building an 8-page scale model of the Earth’s atmosphere with 100 km/page. The peak of Mount Everest, commercial airplanes, and the tops of thunderheads all appear at the bottom of the first page of the model, with astronaut altitude -where space begins- at the top of the same sheet of paper. In "Where Would CINDI Be?" the idea of scale is further developed by modeling the Earth-Moon system to scale first in size, then in distance, using half of standard containers of play dough. With a lowest altitude of about 400 km, similar to that of the International Space Station and orbiting Space Shuttle, CINDI is close to the Earth when compared with the nearly thousand times greater distance to the Moon. Comparing and combining the atmosphere and Earth-Moon system models help reinforce ideas of scale and build student understanding of how far away the Moon actually is. These scale models have also been adapted for use in Family Science Nights, and to include the planet Mars. In this presentation, we will show how we use CINDI’s scale modeling activities and others from our broader space sciences E/PO program in formal and informal

  7. Legacy Clinical Data from the Epo TBI Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    investigators through the Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury (FITBIR) Informatics System. This trial was funded by National Institute of Neurological...Effects of Erythropoietin (Epo) on Cerebral Vascular Dysfunction and Anemia in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)” which we will share with other...the format required by FITBIR. 2. KEYWORDS: Traumatic brain injury Erythropoietin Anemia Transfusion threshold 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS: What

  8. LSST Survey Data: Models for EPO Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, J. K.; Borne, K. D.

    2007-12-01

    The potential for education and public outreach with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is as far reaching as the telescope itself. LSST data will be available to the public, giving anyone with a web browser a movie-like window on the Universe. The LSST project is unique in designing its data management and data access systems with the public and community users in mind. The enormous volume of data to be generated by LSST is staggering: 30 Terabytes per night, 10 Petabytes per year. The final database of extracted science parameters from the images will also be enormous -- 50-100 Petabytes -- a rich gold mine for data mining and scientific discovery potential. LSST will also generate 100,000 astronomical alerts per night, for 10 years. The LSST EPO team is examining models for EPO interaction with the survey data, particularly in how the community (amateurs, teachers, students, and general public) can participate in the discovery process. We will outline some of our models of community interaction for inquiry-based science using the LSST survey data, and we invite discussion on these topics.

  9. NASA Astrophysics EPO Resources For Engaging Girls in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Mendoza, D.; Smith, D.; Hasan, H.

    2011-09-01

    A new collaboration among the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics EPO community is to engage girls in science who do not self-select as being interested in science, through the library setting. The collaboration seeks to (i) improve how girls view themselves as someone who knows about, uses, and sometimes contributes to science, and (ii) increase the capacity of EPO practitioners and librarians (both school and public) to engage girls in science. As part of this collaboration, we are collating the research on audience needs and best practices, and SMD EPO resources, activities and projects that focus on or can be recast toward engaging girls in science. This ASP article highlights several available resources and individual projects, such as: (i) Afterschool Universe, an out-of-school hands-on astronomy curriculum targeted at middle school students and an approved Great Science for Girls curriculum; (ii) Big Explosions and Strong Gravity, a Girl Scout patch-earning event for middle school aged girls to learn astronomy through hands-on activities and interaction with actual astronomers; and (iii) the JWST-NIRCAM Train the Trainer workshops and activities for Girl Scouts of USA leaders; etc. The NASA Astrophysics EPO community welcomes the broader EPO community to discuss with us how best to engage non-science-attentive girls in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), and to explore further collaborations on this theme.

  10. Sky Fest: A Model of Successful Scientist Participation in E/PO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, H.; Shipp, S. S.; Shaner, A. J.; LaConte, K.; Shupla, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    Participation in outreach events is an easy way for scientists to get involved with E/PO and reach many people with minimal time commitment. At the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) in Houston, Texas, the E/PO team holds Sky Fest outreach events several times a year. These events each have a science content theme and include several activities for children and their parents, night sky viewing through telescopes, and scientist presentations. LPI scientists have the opportunity to participate in Sky Fest events either by helping lead an activity or by giving the scientist presentation (a short lecture and/or demonstration). Scientists are involved in at least one preparation meeting before the event. This allows them to ask questions, understand what activity they will be leading, and learn the key points that they should be sharing with the public, as well as techniques for effectively teaching members of the public about the event topic. During the event, each activity is run by one E/PO specialist and one scientist, enabling the scientist to learn about effective E/PO practices from the E/PO specialist and the E/PO specialist to get more science information about the event topic. E/PO specialists working together with scientists at stations provides a more complete, richer experience for event participants. Surveys of event participants have shown that interacting one-on-one with scientists is often one of their favorite parts of the events. Interviews with scientists indicated that they enjoyed Sky Fest because there was very little time involved on their parts outside of the actual event; the activities were created and/or chosen by the E/PO professionals, and setup for the events was completed before they arrived. They also enjoyed presenting their topic to people without a background in science, and who would not have otherwise sought out the information that was presented.

  11. Scientists Delivering EPO Content - Lessons Learned and Advice from the Trenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, N. E.

    2012-12-01

    The need for scientists to participate in Education and Public Outreach events has perhaps never been greater than it is now. Between the need for schools to provide accurate science content to their students, the prevalence of misconceptions in the public regarding science issues, and communicating to the tax paying public what is being done on federally funded projects, it critically important that scientists be engaged in communicating with the public. However, the demand on a scientist's time to perform such activities, which are typically outside the scope of work for many professionals, can be taxing and presents roadblocks to performing such activities. While there may not be an optimal method for how to address the conflict between the time and demand to perform EPO activities, there are several possible approaches that may both reduce the impact on the scientist and provide maximum impact to the EPO community. One, do you really want to participate in EPO activities, knowing that it will require an amount of time and effort to perform and are there ways to ensure that the effort will be recognized as part of your job? In both cases, if the answer is no, it is probably not wise to continue, unless the scope of your job can be expanded. Two, it is vitally important to work with an EPO professional (if one exists at your location) and set realistic expectations for how much you are willing to do over a month/year. It is also important to work with an EPO professional to develop appropriate content for the audiences you'd work with. Ultimately, identifying an EPO professional that you can work with to both structure your involvement and develop an approach to EPO is vital. In the case where no such support is available, it is critical that you understand your audience and what they expect and need in order to understand the message. Three, funding opportunities often exist where EPO content can be developed in partnership with an EPO professional and present

  12. Current status of the EPOS WG4 - GNSS and Other Geodetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Rui; Bastos, Luisa; Bruyninx, Carine; D'Agostino, Nicola; Dousa, Jan; Ganas, Athanassios; Lidberg, Martin; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu

    2014-05-01

    WG4 - "EPOS Geodetic Data and Other Geodetic Data" is the Working Group of the EPOS project in charge of defining and preparing the integration of the existing Pan-European Geodetic Infrastructures that will support European Geosciences, which is the ultimate goal of the EPOS project. The WG4 is formed by representatives of the participating EPOS countries (23) but it is also open to the entire geodetic community. In fact, WG4 also already includes members from countries that formally are not integrating EPOS in this first step. The geodetic component of EPOS (WG4) is dealing essentially with Research Infrastructures focused on continuous operating GNSS (cGNSS) in the current phase. The option of concentrating the efforts on the presently most generalized geodetic tool supporting research on Solid Earth was decided in order to optimize the existing resources. Nevertheless, WG4 will continue to pursue the development of tools and methodologies that permit the access of the EPOS community to other geodetic information (e.g., gravimetry). Furthermore, although the focus is on Solid Earth applications, other research and technical applications (e.g., reference frames, meteorology, space weather) can also benefit from the efforts of WG4 EPOS towards the optimization of the geodetic resources in Europe. We will present and discuss the plans for the implementation of the thematic and core services (TCS) for geodetic data within EPOS and the related business plan. We will focus on strategies towards the implementation of the best solutions that will permit to the end-users, and in particular geo-scientists, to access the geodetic data, derived solutions, and associated metadata using transparent and uniform processes. Five pillars have been defined proposed for the TCS: Dissemination, Preservation, Monitoring, and Analysis of geodetic data plus the Support and Governance Infrastructure. Current proposals and remaining open questions will be discussed.

  13. Women in EPOS: the role of women in a large pan-European Research Infrastructure for Solid Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calignano, Elisa; Freda, Carmela; Baracchi, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Women are outnumbered by men in geosciences senior research positions, but what is the situation if we consider large pan-European Research Infrastructures? With this contribution we want to show an analysis of the role of women in the implementation of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS): a planned research infrastructure for European Solid Earth sciences, integrating national and transnational research infrastructures to enable innovative multidisciplinary research. EPOS involves 256 national research infrastructures, 47 partners (universities and research institutes) from 25 European countries and 4 international organizations. The EPOS integrated platform demands significant coordination between diverse solid Earth disciplinary communities, national research infrastructures and the policies and initiatives they drive, geoscientists and information technologists. The EPOS architecture takes into account governance, legal, financial and technical issues and is designed so that the enterprise works as a single, but distributed, sustainable research infrastructure. A solid management structure is vital for the successful implementation and sustainability of EPOS. The internal organization relies on community-specific Working Packages (WPs), Transversal WPs in charge of the overall EPOS integration and implementation, several governing, executive and advisory bodies, a Project Management Office (PMO) and the Project Coordinator. Driven by the timely debate on gender balance and commitment of the European Commission to promote gender equality in research and innovation, we decided to conduct a mapping exercise on a project that crosses European national borders and that brings together diverse geoscience disciplines under one management structure. We present an analysis of women representation in decision-making positions in each EPOS Working Package (WP Leader, proxy, legal, financial and IT contact persons), in the Boards and Councils and in the PMO

  14. NASA Astrophysics EPO Community: Serving Groups Historically Underrepresented in STEM Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Smith, D. A.; Lawton, B.; Bartolone, L.; Schultz, G.; Manning, J.; NASA Astrophysics EPO Community

    2015-11-01

    Four Science Education and Public Outreach Forums support and coordinate the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) education and public outreach (EPO) community. The mission- and grant-based EPO programs of this EPO community are uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. The Forums engage underserved audiences through coordinated efforts such as NASAScience4Girls and Their Families, which partners NASA science education programs with public libraries to provide NASA-themed, hands-on education activities for girls and their families, along with training for librarians. We present examples of how the NASA EPO community and Forums serve groups historically underrepresented in STEM fields via the NASAScience4Girls and Their Families initiative, including associated metrics and evaluation findings.

  15. EPOS Thematic Core Service Anthropogenic Hazards: Implementation Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Lasocki, Stanislaw; Grasso, Jean Robert; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Styles, Peter; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Sterzel, Mariusz; Garcia, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    EPOS Thematic Core Service ANTHROPOGENIC HAZARDS (TCS AH) aims to integrate distributed research infrastructures (RI) to facilitate and stimulate research on anthropogenic hazards (AH) especially those associated with the exploration and exploitation of geo-resources. The innovative element is the uniqueness of the integrated RI which comprises two main deliverables: (1) Exceptional datasets, called "episodes", which comprehensively describe a geophysical process; induced or triggered by human technological activity, posing hazard for populations, infrastructure and the environment, (2) Problem-oriented, bespoke services uniquely designed for the discrimination and analysis of correlations between technology, geophysical response and resulting hazard. These objectives will be achieved through the Science-Industry Synergy (SIS) built by EPOS WG10, ensuring bi-directional information exchange, including unique and previously unavailable data furnished by industrial partners. The Episodes and services to be integrated have been selected using strict criteria during the EPOS PP. The data are related to a wide spectrum of inducing technologies, with seismic/aseismic deformation and production history as a minimum data set requirement and the quality of software services is confirmed and referenced in literature. Implementation of TCS AH is planned for four years and requires five major activities: (1) Strategic Activities and Governance: will define and establish the governance structure to ensure the long-term sustainability of these research infrastructures for data provision through EPOS. (2) Coordination and Interaction with the Community: will establish robust communication channels within the whole TCS AH community while supporting global EPOS communication strategy. (3) Interoperability with EPOS Integrated Core Service (ICS) and Testing Activities: will coordinate and ensure interoperability between the RIs and the ICS. Within this modality a functional e

  16. Tools for Scientist Engagement in E/PO: NASA SMD Community Workspace and Online Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, H.; Shipp, S. S.; Grier, J.; Gross, N. A.; Buxner, S.; Bartolone, L.; Peticolas, L. M.; Woroner, M.; Schwerin, T. G.

    2014-12-01

    The Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forums are here to help you get involved in E/PO! The Forums have been developing several online resources to support scientists who are - or who are interested in becoming - involved in E/PO. These include NASA Wavelength, EarthSpace, and the SMD E/PO online community workspace. NASA Wavelength is the one-stop shop of all peer-reviewed NASA education resources to find materials you - or your audiences - can use. Browse by audience (pre-K through 12, higher education, and informal education) or topic, or choose to search for something specific by keyword and audience. http://nasawavelength.org. EarthSpace, an online clearinghouse of Earth and space materials for use in the higher education classroom, is driven by a powerful search engine that allows you to browse the collection of resources by science topic, audience, type of material or key terms. All materials are peer-reviewed before posting, and because all submissions receive a digital object identifier (doi), submitted materials can be listed as publications. http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace. The SMD E/PO online community workspace contains many resources for scientists. These include one-page guides on how to get involved, tips on how to make the most of your time spent on E/PO, and sample activities, as well as news on funding, policy, and what's happening in the E/PO community. The workspace also provides scientists and the public pathways to find opportunities for participation in E/PO, to learn about SMD E/PO projects and their impacts, to connect with SMD E/PO practitioners, and to explore resources to improve professional E/PO practice, including literature reviews, information about the Next Generation Science Standards, and best practices in evaluation and engaging diverse audiences. http://smdepo.org.

  17. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO): cross-linking with disuccinimidyl esters and identification of the interfacing domains in EPO.

    PubMed Central

    Haniu, M.; Narhi, L. O.; Arakawa, T.; Elliott, S.; Rohde, M. F.

    1993-01-01

    Several amino groups of recombinant human erythropoietin are selectively cross-linked by specific cross-linkers including disuccinimidyl suberate or dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate). Intramolecular cross-linkings are obtained without significant change of the protein conformation using appropriate concentrations (0.2 mM) of the cross-linkers, which possess an 11-12-A length of a spacer between two reacting groups. Intramolecularly cross-linked peptides obtained suggest that several amino groups in erythropoietin (EPO) are positioned at a distance of near 12 A in the solution state. These interfacing amino groups include Lys 20-Lys 154, Lys 45-Lys 140, Lys 52-Lys 154, Lys 52-Lys 140, and Ala 1-Lys 116. A comparison of the cross-linking results between nonglycosylated EPO and glycosylated EPO suggests that both proteins retain high similarity regarding protein conformation. These results fit a structural model similar to that of human growth hormone, in which four alpha-helical bundles and a long stretch of beta-sheet structure are involved in the active protein. PMID:8401229

  18. Dose effect evaluation and therapeutic window of the neuro-EPO nasal application for the treatment of the focal ischemia model in the Mongolian gerbil.

    PubMed

    Teste, Iliana Sosa; Tamos, Yuneidys Mengana; Cruz, Yamila Rodríguez; Cernada, Adriana Muñoz; Rodríguez, Janette Cruz; Martínez, Nelvis Subirós; Antich, Rosa Maria Coro; González-Quevedo, Alina; Rodríguez, Julio Cesar García

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of disability in Cuba and in several developed countries. A possible neuroprotective agent is the rHu-EPO, whose effects have been demonstrated in models of brain ischemia. The Neuro-EPO is a derivative of the rHu-EPO that avoids the stimulation of erythropoiesis. The aim of this study was to determine the Neuro-EPO delivery into the central nervous system (CNS) to exert a neuroprotective effect in cerebral ischemia model of the Mongolian gerbil. The Neuro-EPO in a rate of 249.4 UI every 8 hours for 4 days showed 25% higher viability efficacy (P > 0.01), improving neurological score and behavior of the spontaneous exploratory activity, the preservation of CA3 areas of the hippocampus, the cortex, and thalamic nuclei in the focal ischemia model of the Mongolian gerbil. In summary, this study, the average dose-used Neuro-EPO (249.4 UI/10 μL/every 8 hours for 4 days), proved to be valid indicators of viability, neurological status, and spontaneous exploratory activity, being significantly lower than that reported for the systemically use of the rHu-EPO as a neuroprotectant. Indeed, up to 12 h after brain ischemia is very positive Neuro-EPO administration by the nasal route as a candidate for neuroprotection.

  19. Some Empirical Notes on the Epo Epidemic in Professional Cycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodewijkx, Hein F. M.; Brouwer, Bram

    2011-01-01

    The 1990-2010 period in professional cycling is labeled by some as the epo epidemic. Surprisingly, performance enhancement by epo and blood doping is not that clear-cut for endurance athletes, leading to the question whether doping indeed strongly influenced cyclists' performances from the 1990s onwards. We examined the records (1947-2008) of the…

  20. NASA's Science Education and Public Outreach Forums: Bringing Communities and Resources Together to Increase Effectiveness and Sustainability of E/PO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mangala; Smith, D.; Mendez, B.; Shipp, S.; Schwerin, T.; Stockman, S.; Cooper, L.

    2010-03-01

    The AAS-HEAD community has a rich history of involvement in education and public outreach (E/PO). HEAD members have been using NASA science and educational resources to engage and educate youth and adults nationwide in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics topics. Four new Science Education and Public Outreach Forums ("Forums") funded by NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) are working in partnership with the research and education community to ensure that current and future SMD-funded E/PO activities form a seamless whole, with easy entry points for scientists, engineers, faculty, students, K-12 formal and informal science educators, general public, and E/PO professionals alike. These Forums support the astrophysics, heliophysics, planetary and Earth science divisions of NASA SMD in three core areas: 1) E/PO community engagement and development to facilitate clear paths of involvement for scientists, engineers and others interested - or potentially interested - in participating in SMD-funded E/PO activities. Collaborations with science professionals are vital for infusing current, accurate SMD mission and research findings into educational products and activities. Forum activities will yield readily accessible information on effective E/PO strategies, resources, and expertise; context for individual E/PO activities; and opportunities for collaboration. 2) A rigorous analysis of SMD-funded E/PO products and activities to help understand how the existing collection supports education standards and audience needs and to identify areas of opportunity for new materials and activities. K-12 formal, informal, and higher education products and activities are included in this analysis. 3) Finally, to address E/PO-related systemic issues and coordinate related activities across the four SMD science divisions. By supporting the NASA E/PO community and facilitating coordination of E/PO activities within and across disciplines, the SMD-Forum partnerships will

  1. E-research platform of EPOS Thematic Core Service "ANTHROPOGENIC HAZARDS"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Lasocki, Stanisław; Grasso, Jean Robert; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Garcia, Alexander; Cassidy, Nigel; Sterzel, Mariusz; Szepieniec, Tomasz; Dineva, Savka; Biggare, Pascal; Saccorotti, Gilberto; Sileny, Jan; Fischer, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    EPOS Thematic Core Service ANTHROPOGENIC HAZARDS (TCS AH) aims to create new research opportunities in the field of anthropogenic hazards evoked by exploitation of georesources. TCS AH, based on the prototype built in the framework of the IS-EPOS project (https://tcs.ah-epos.eu/), financed from Polish structural funds (POIG.02.03.00-14-090/13-00), is being further developed within EPOS IP project (H2020-INFRADEV-1-2015-1, INFRADEV-3-2015). TCS AH is designed as a functional e-research environment to ensure a researcher the maximum possible freedom for in silico experimentation by providing a virtual laboratory in which researcher will be able to create own workspace with own processing streams. The unique integrated RI is: (i) data gathered in the so- called "episodes", comprehensively describing a geophysical process, induced or triggered by human technological activity, which under certain circumstances can become hazardous for people, infrastructure and the environment and (ii) problem-oriented, specific high-level services, with the particular attention devoted to methods analyzing correlations between technology, geophysical response and resulting hazard. Services to be implemented are grouped within six blocks: (1) Basic services for data integration and handling; (2) Services for physical models of stress/strain changes over time and space as driven by geo-resource production; (3) Services for analysing geophysical signals; (4) Services to extract the relation between technological operations and observed induced seismic/deformation; (5) Services to quantitative probabilistic assessments of anthropogenic seismic hazard - statistical properties of anthropogenic seismic series and their dependence on time-varying anthropogenesis; ground motion prediction equations; stationary and time-dependent probabilistic seismic hazard estimates, related to time-changeable technological factors inducing the seismic process; (6) Simulator for Multi

  2. Multiscale Laboratory Infrastructure and Services to users: Plans within EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiers, Chris; Willingshofer, Ernst; Drury, Martyn; Funiciello, Francesca; Rosenau, Matthias; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Sagnotti, Leonardo; EPOS WG6, Corrado Cimarelli

    2015-04-01

    The participant countries in EPOS embody a wide range of world-class laboratory infrastructures ranging from high temperature and pressure experimental facilities, to electron microscopy, micro-beam analysis, analogue modeling and paleomagnetic laboratories. Most data produced by the various laboratory centres and networks are presently available only in limited "final form" in publications. Many data remain inaccessible and/or poorly preserved. However, the data produced at the participating laboratories are crucial to serving society's need for geo-resources exploration and for protection against geo-hazards. Indeed, to model resource formation and system behaviour during exploitation, we need an understanding from the molecular to the continental scale, based on experimental data. This contribution will describe the plans that the laboratories community in Europe is making, in the context of EPOS. The main objectives are: • To collect and harmonize available and emerging laboratory data on the properties and processes controlling rock system behaviour at multiple scales, in order to generate products accessible and interoperable through services for supporting research activities. • To co-ordinate the development, integration and trans-national usage of the major solid Earth Science laboratory centres and specialist networks. The length scales encompassed by the infrastructures included range from the nano- and micrometer levels (electron microscopy and micro-beam analysis) to the scale of experiments on centimetre sized samples, and to analogue model experiments simulating the reservoir scale, the basin scale and the plate scale. • To provide products and services supporting research into Geo-resources and Geo-storage, Geo-hazards and Earth System Evolution. If the EPOS Implementation Phase proposal presently under construction is successful, then a range of services and transnational activities will be put in place to realize these objectives.

  3. Use of EPO as an adjuvant in PDT of brain tumors to reduce damage to normal brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon, Cesar A.; Lilge, Lothar

    2004-10-01

    In order to reduce damage to surrounding normal brain in the treatment of brain tumors with photodynamic therapy (PDT), we have investigated the use of the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO) to exploit its well-established role as a neuroprotective agent. In vitro experiments demonstrated that EPO does not confer protection from PDT to rat glioma cells. In vivo testing of the possibility of EPO protecting normal brain tissue was carried out. The normal brains of Lewis rats were treated with Photofrin mediated PDT (6.25 mg/Kg B.W. 22 hours pre irradiation) and the outcome of the treatment compared between animals that received EPO (5000 U/Kg B.W. 22 hours pre irradiation) and controls. This comparison was made based on the volume of necrosis, as measured with the viability stain 2,3,5- Triphenyl tetrazoium chloride (TTC), and incidence of apoptosis, as measured with in situ end labeling assay (ISEL). Western blotting showed that EPO reaches the normal brain and activates the anti-apoptotic protein PKB/AKT1 within the brain cortex. The comparison based on volume of necrosis showed no statistical significance between the two groups. No clear difference was observed in the ISEL staining between the groups. A possible lack of responsivity in the assays that give rise to these results is discussed and future corrections are described.

  4. Oxidative stress induces the decline of brain EPO expression in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Chen, Yubao; Shao, Siying; Tang, Qing; Chen, Weihai; Chen, Yi; Xu, Xiaoyu

    2016-10-01

    Brain Erythropoietin (EPO), an important neurotrophic factor and neuroprotective factor, was found to be associated with aging. Studies found EPO expression was significantly decreased in the hippocampus of aging rat compared with that of the youth. But mechanisms of the decline of the brain EPO during aging remain unclear. The present study utilized a d-galactose (d-gal)-induced aging model in which the inducement of aging was mainly oxidative injury, to explore underlying mechanisms for the decline of brain EPO in aging rats. d-gal-induced aging rats (2months) were simulated by subcutaneously injecting with d-gal at doses of 50mg·kg(-1), 150mg·kg(-1) and 250mg·kg(-1) daily for 8weeks while the control group received vehicle only. These groups were all compared with the aging rats (24months) which had received no other treatment. The cognitive impairment was assessed using Morris water maze (MWM) in the prepared models, and the amount of β-galactosidase, the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) level and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the hippocampus was examined by assay kits. The levels of EPO, EPOR, p-JAK2 and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) in the hippocampus were detected by western blot. Additionally, the correlation coefficient between EPO/EPOR expression and MDA level was analyzed. The MWM test showed that compared to control group, the escape latency was significantly extended and the times of crossing the platform was decreased at the doses of 150mg·kg(-1) and 250mg·kg(-1) (p<0.05). Also, the amount of β-galactosidase and the MDA level in the hippocampus were significantly increased but the SOD activity was significantly decreased (p<0.05, 0.01 and 0.01, respectively). Similar to aging rats, the expressions of EPO, EPOR, p-JAK2, and HIF-2αin the brain of d-gal-treated rats were significantly decreased (p<0.05) at 150mg·kg(-1) and 250mg·kg(-1). Interestingly, negative correlations were found between EPOR (r=-0

  5. Development of an anti-EPO antibody detection kit based on lab-on-a-chip and bridging antibody technologies.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin-Gyo; Seong, Jihyun; Han, Sunmi; Heo, Tae-Hwe

    2018-05-17

    Immunogenicity is a major concern in the use of biological drugs. In particular, antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare condition that is caused by administration of recombinant erythropoietin. There are numerous assay platforms for detect EPO anti-drug antibody (ADA), and most have appropriate assay sensitivity, but in need of improvement in terms of assay turnaround time and user accessibility. Here, the new method was developed based on lab-on-a-chip technology and bridging ELISA. The FREND™ Cartridge is equipped with a microfluidic lateral flow channel, enabling easy, fast and accurate immunoassays with small sample volumes. Biotinylated EPO was immobilized on the avidin-coated solid phase of the test zone in the FREND™ cartridge. Initially, ADA in the serum sample binds to the detector conjugate (EPO-HRP-anti HRP antibody-FL bead) in the conjugation zone, and it flows into the test zone prepared with capture complex (avidin-biotinylated EPO). Unbound detector complexes are captured in the reference zone. The FREND™ system detects and quantifies the fluorescence signals in each zone and then calculates the concentration of EPO ADA in the sample. The FREND™ EPO ADA kit may be useful in local clinics as a rapid method for monitoring patients administered recombinant erythropoietin. Copyright © 2018 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dose Effect Evaluation and Therapeutic Window of the Neuro-EPO Nasal Application for the Treatment of the Focal Ischemia Model in the Mongolian Gerbil

    PubMed Central

    Teste, Iliana Sosa; Tamos, Yuneidys Mengana; Cruz, Yamila Rodríguez; Cernada, Adriana Muñoz; Rodríguez, Janette Cruz; Martínez, Nelvis Subirós; Antich, Rosa Maria Coro; González-Quevedo, Alina; Rodríguez, Julio Cesar García

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of disability in Cuba and in several developed countries. A possible neuroprotective agent is the rHu-EPO, whose effects have been demonstrated in models of brain ischemia. The Neuro-EPO is a derivative of the rHu-EPO that avoids the stimulation of erythropoiesis. The aim of this study was to determine the Neuro-EPO delivery into the central nervous system (CNS) to exert a neuroprotective effect in cerebral ischemia model of the Mongolian gerbil. The Neuro-EPO in a rate of 249.4 UI every 8 hours for 4 days showed 25% higher viability efficacy (P > 0.01), improving neurological score and behavior of the spontaneous exploratory activity, the preservation of CA3 areas of the hippocampus, the cortex, and thalamic nuclei in the focal ischemia model of the Mongolian gerbil. In summary, this study, the average dose-used Neuro-EPO (249.4 UI/10 μL/every 8 hours for 4 days), proved to be valid indicators of viability, neurological status, and spontaneous exploratory activity, being significantly lower than that reported for the systemically use of the rHu-EPO as a neuroprotectant. Indeed, up to 12 h after brain ischemia is very positive Neuro-EPO administration by the nasal route as a candidate for neuroprotection. PMID:22701364

  7. Integrating Near Fault Observatories (NFO) for EPOS Implementation Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaraluce, Lauro

    2015-04-01

    Following the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) project vision aimed at creating a pan-European infrastructure for Earth sciences to support science for a more sustainable society, we are working on the integration of Near-Fault Observatories (NFOs). NFOs are state of the art research infrastructures consisting of advanced networks of multi-parametric sensors continuously monitoring the chemical and physical processes related to the common underlying earth instabilities governing active faults evolution and the genesis of earthquakes. Such a methodological approach, currently applicable only at the local scale (areas of tens to few hundreds of kilometres), is based on extremely dense networks and less common instruments deserving an extraordinary work on data quality control and multi-parameter data description. These networks in fact usually complement regional seismic and geodetic networks (typically with station spacing of 50-100km) with high-density distributions of seismic, geodetic, geochemical and geophysical sensors located typically within 10-20 km of active faults where large earthquakes are expected in the future. In the initial phase of EPOS-IP, seven NFO nodes will be linked: the Alto Tiberina and Irpinia Observatories in Italy, the Corinth Observatory in Greece, the South-Iceland Seismic Zone, the Valais Observatory in Switzerland, Marmara Sea GEO Supersite in Turkey (EU MARSite) and the Vrancea Observatory in Romania. Our work is aimed at establishing standards and integration within this first core group of NFOs while other NFOs are expected to be installed in the next years adopting the standards established and developed within the EPOS Thematic Core Services (TCS). The goal of our group is to build upon the initial development supported by these few key national observatories coordinated under previous EU projects (NERA and REAKT), inclusive and harmonised TCS supporting the installation over the next decade of tens of near

  8. EUDAT and EPOS moving towards the efficient management of scientific data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiameni, Giuseppe; Bailo, Daniele; Cacciari, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    This abstract presents the collaboration between the European Collaborative Data Infrastructure (EUDAT) and the pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science (EPOS) which draws on the management of scientific data sets through a reciprocal support agreement. EUDAT is a Consortium of European Data Centers and Scientific Communities whose focus is the development and realisation of the Collaborative Data Infrastructure (CDI), a common model for managing data spanning all European research data centres and data repositories and providing an interoperable layer of common data services. The EUDAT Service Suite is a set of a) implementations of the CDI model and b) standards, developed and offered by members of the EUDAT Consortium. These EUDAT Services include a baseline of CDI-compliant interface and API services - a "CDI Gateway" - plus a number of web-based GUIs and command-line client tools. On the other hand,the EPOS initiative aims at creating a pan-European infrastructure for the solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. In accordance with this scientific vision, the mission of EPOS is to integrate the diverse and advanced European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth Science relying on new e-science opportunities to monitor and unravel the dynamic and complex Earth System. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. Through the integration of data, models and facilities EPOS will allow the Earth Science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and to human welfare. To achieve this integration challenge and the

  9. The Contribution for Improving GNSS Data and Derived Products for Solid Earth Sciences Promoted by EPOS-IP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R. M. S.; Bos, M. S.; Bruyninx, C.; Crocker, P.; Dousa, J.; Walpersdorf, A.; Socquet, A.; Avallone, A.; Ganas, A.; Ionescu, C.; Kenyeres, A.; Ofeigsson, B.; Ozener, H.; Vergnolle, M.; Lidberg, M.; Liwosz, T.; Soehne, W.; Bezdeka, P.; Cardoso, R.; Cotte, N.; Couto, R.; D'Agostino, N.; Deprez, A.; Fabian, A.; Gonçalves, H.; Féres, L.; Legrand, J.; Menut, J. L.; Nastase, E.; Ngo, K. M.; Sigurðarson, F.; Vaclavovic, P.

    2017-12-01

    The GNSS working group part of the EPOS-IP (European Plate Observing System - Implementation Phase) project oversees the implementation of services focused on GNSS data and derived products for the use of the geo-sciences community. The objective is to serve essentially the Solid Earth community, but other scientific and technical communities will also be able the benefit of the efforts being carried out to access the data (and derived products) of the European Geodetic Infrastructures. The geodetic component of EPOS is dealing essentially with implementing an e-infrastructure to store and disseminate continuous GNSS data (and derived solutions) from existing Research Infrastructures and new dedicated services. Present efforts are on developing an integrated software package, called GLASS, that will permit to disseminate quality controlled data (using special tools) in a seamless way from dozens of Geodetic Research Infrastructures in Europe. Conceptually, GLASS can be used in a single Research Infrastructure or in hundreds cooperative ones. We present and discuss the status of the implementation of these services, including also the generation of products - time-series, velocity fields and strain rate fields. In concrete, we will present the results of the current validation phase of these services and we will discuss in detail the technical and cooperative efforts being implemented. EPOS-IP is a project funded by the ESFRI European Union.

  10. Simulated microgravity induce apoptosis and down-regulation of erythropoietin receptor of UT-7/EPO cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Li-xue; Cui, Shao-yan; Zhong, Jian; Yi, Zong-chun; Sun, Yan; Fan, Yu-bo; Zhuang, Feng-yuan

    2010-11-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation can be alternated on either spaceflight or under simulated microgravity experiments on the ground; however, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. In the present study, we have demonstrated that exposure of human erythropoietin (EPO)-dependent leukemia cell line UT-7/EPO cells to conditions of simulated microgravity with a rotary culture instrument significantly inhibited the cellular proliferation rate. Adding higher concentrations of EPO to the culture medium failed to improve the inhibitory status. Cell apoptosis was detected by fluorescence staining of cell nuclei and a flow cytometry assay using Annexin V/PI double staining. This microgravity-induced apoptosis in UT-7/EPO cells could be blocked by a pancaspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Immunoblotting demonstrated that rotary culture resulted in a reduction of the expression of Bcl-xL, an anti-apoptotic protein, and the cleavage of caspase-3. Furthermore, rotary culture reduced surface localization and protein content, as well as the mRNA expression of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) of UT-7/EPO. Take together, the findings indicated that simulated microgravity may induce mitochondrial related apoptosis of UT-7/EPO cell through depressing the EPO-EPOR pathway.

  11. Ethical implication of providing scientific data and services to diverse stakeholders: the case of the EPOS research infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freda, Carmela; Atakan, Kuvvet; Cocco, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    EPOS, the European Plate Observing System, is an ESFRI infrastructure serving the needs of the solid Earth science community as a whole. EPOS promotes the use of multidisciplinary solid Earth data to improve the understanding of physical and chemical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis as well as those driving tectonics and surface dynamics. The EPOS mission is to create a single, sustainable, and distributed infrastructure that integrates the diverse European research infrastructures for solid Earth science under a common framework with the final goal of delivering a suite of domain-specific and multidisciplinary data, products, and services in one single and integrated platform. Addressing ethics issues is a relevant challenge for any initiative, program or project dealing with scientific data and products provision, access to services for scientific purposes and communication with different stakeholders, including industry and society at large. In examining the role of EPOS on openly and freely delivering scientific data and products to diverse stakeholders including but not limited to scientists, we are looking at ethical issues associated with the use and re-use of these data and products possibly leading to a malevolent use and/or misuse of the data with implications on, for example, national security, environmental protection and risk communication. Moreover, EPOS is aware that the research promoted by the use of data delivered through its platform can have a profound influence on the environment, human health and wellbeing, economic development, and other facets of societies. We know there is nothing intrinsically bad about openly and freely delivering scientific data, as it serves as a tool for leveraging researches leading to solutions for a responsible management of Earth's resources and mitigation of natural hazards. However, we must evaluate the effects of such a data provision and feel the obligation to adopt a responsible

  12. EPOS-IP WP10: services and data provision for the GNSS community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Rui

    2016-04-01

    The EPOS-IP WP10 - "GNSS Data & Products" is the Working Package of the EPOS-IP project in charge of implementing the necessary services in order that the geo-sciences community can access the existing Pan-European Geodetic Infrastructures. The WP10 is formed by representatives of the participating institutions (10) but it is also open to the entire geodetic community. In fact, WP10 also includes members from other institutions/countries that formally are not participating in the EPOS-IP. During the EPOS-IP project, the geodetic component of EPOS (WP10) is dealing essentially with Research Infrastructures focused on continuous operating GNSS (cGNSS). The option of concentrating the efforts on the presently most generalized geodetic tool supporting research on Solid Earth was decided in order to optimize the existing resources. Furthermore, although the focus is on Solid Earth applications, other research and technical applications (e.g., reference frames, meteorology, space weather) can also benefit from the efforts of WP10 towards the optimization of the geodetic resources in Europe. We will present and discuss the plans for the implementation of the thematic and core services (TCS) for GNSS data within EPOS and the related business plan. We will focus on strategies towards the implementation of the best solutions that will permit to the end-users, and in particular geo-scientists, to access the geodetic data, derived solutions, and associated metadata using transparent and uniform processes. The collaboration with EUREF is also an essential component of the implementation plan.

  13. Get Involved in Education and Public Outreach! The Science Mission Directorate Science E/PO Forums Are Here to Help

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipp, S. S.; Buxner, S.; Schwerin, T. G.; Hsu, B. C.; Peticolas, L. M.; Smith, D.; Meinke, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    programs in context (e.g., Beyond IYA, Sun-Earth Day, launch events, 50 Years of Solar System Exploration, Earth Science Week), and get your programs and products disseminated. 4) Connections to education professionals to collaborate with you on educational programs, involve intended audience members as partners to guide your programs, reach a broader audience, and insure impact with external partners through the E/PO community contact database and workspace profiles, conferences, meetings, and SMD E/PO community annual retreats. Recently developed, the NASA SMD Scientist Speaker's Bureau (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/speaker) offers an online portal to connect scientists interested in getting involved in E/PO projects - giving public talks, classroom visits, and virtual connections - with audiences. Learn more about the Forums and the opportunities to become involved in E/PO and to share your science with students, educators, and the general public at http://smdepo.org.

  14. Online Workspace to Connect Scientists with NASA's Science E/PO Efforts and Practitioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipp, Stephanie; Bartolone , Lindsay; Peticolas, Laura; Woroner, Morgan; Dalton, Heather; Schwerin, Theresa; Smith, Denise

    2014-11-01

    There is a growing awareness of the need for a scientifically literate public in light of challenges facing society today, and also a growing concern about the preparedness of our future workforce to meet those challenges. Federal priorities for science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education call for improvement of teacher training, increased youth and public engagement, greater involvement of underrepresented populations, and investment in undergraduate and graduate education. How can planetary scientists contribute to these priorities? How can they “make their work and findings comprehensible, appealing, and available to the public” as called for in the Planetary Decadal Survey?NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) workspace provides the SMD E/PO community of practice - scientists and educators funded to conduct SMD E/PO or those using NASA’s science discoveries in E/PO endeavors - with an online environment in which to communicate, collaborate, and coordinate activities, thus helping to increase effectiveness of E/PO efforts. The workspace offers interested scientists avenues to partner with SMD E/PO practitioners and learn about E/PO projects and impacts, as well as to advertise their own efforts to reach a broader audience. Through the workspace, scientists can become aware of opportunities for involvement and explore resources to improve professional practice, including literature reviews of best practices for program impact, mechanisms for engaging diverse audiences, and large- and small-scale program evaluation. Scientists will find “how to” manuals for getting started and increasing impact with public presentations, classroom visits, and other audiences, as well as primers with activity ideas and resources that can augment E/PO interactions with different audiences. The poster will introduce the workspace to interested scientists and highlight pathways to resources of interest that can help

  15. NASA Astrophysics EPO Community: Increasing and Sustaining Youth and Public Engagement in STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, B.; Smith, D. A.; Bartolone, L.; Meinke, B. K.; Schultz, G.; Manning, J.; NASA Astrophysics EPO Community

    2015-11-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach (EPO) community and Forum work together to capitalize on the cutting-edge discoveries of NASA Astrophysics missions to enable youth to engage directly in doing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) inside and outside of school. The NASA SMD Astrophysics EPO community has proven expertise in providing student opportunities that reinforce research skills; exhibits, multimedia shows, and visualizations that inspire and engage; professional development for informal educators; and partnerships that provide local, regional, and national reach. These mission- and grant-based EPO programs are uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present examples of how the NASA Astrophysics EPO community and Forum support youth and public engagement in STEM in these ways, including associated metrics and evaluation findings.

  16. Automated Patent Searching in the EPO: From Online Searching to Document Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuyts, Annemie; Jonckheere, Charles

    The European Patent Office (EPO) has recently implemented the last part of its ambitious automation project aimed at creating an automated search environment for approximately 1200 EPO patent search examiners. The examiners now have at their disposal an integrated set of tools offering a full range of functionalities from online searching, via…

  17. Engaging Scientists in Meaningful E/PO: How the NASA SMD E/PO Community Addresses the Needs of the Higher Ed Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, James; Meinke, Bonnie K.; Schultz, Gregory R.; Smith, Denise A.; Lawton, Brandon L.; Gurton, Suzanne; NASA Astrophysics E/PO Community

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum (SEPOF) coordinates the work of NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics EPO projects and their teams to bring cutting-edge discoveries of NASA missions to the introductory astronomy college classroom. The Astrophysics Forum assists scientist and educator involvement in SMD E/PO (uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise) and makes SMD E/PO resources and expertise accessible to the science and education communities. We present three new opportunities for college instructors to bring the latest NASA discoveries in Astrophysics into their classrooms.To address the expressed needs of the higher education community, the Astrophysics Forum collaborated with the Astrophysics E/PO community, researchers, and Astronomy 101 instructors to place individual science discoveries and learning resources into context for higher education audiences. Among these resources are two Resource Guides on the topics of cosmology and exoplanets, each including a variety of accessible sources.The Astrophysics Forum also coordinates the development of the Astro 101 slide set series--5 to 7-slide presentations on new discoveries from NASA Astrophysics missions relevant to topics in introductory astronomy courses. These sets enable Astronomy 101 instructors to include new discoveries not yet in their textbooks into the broader context of the course: http://www.astrosociety.org/education/astronomy-resource-guides/.The Astrophysics Forum also coordinated the development of 12 monthly Universe Discovery Guides, each featuring a theme and a representative object well-placed for viewing, with an accompanying interpretive story, strategies for conveying the topics, and supporting NASA-approved education activities and background information from a spectrum of NASA missions and programs: http://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/news-display.cfm?News_ID=611

  18. Characterization of a hypoxia-response element in the Epo locus of the pufferfish, Takifugu rubripes.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Rashmi P; Tohari, Sumanty; Ho, Adrian; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2010-06-01

    Animals respond to hypoxia by increasing synthesis of the glycoprotein hormone erythropoietin (Epo) which in turn stimulates the production of red blood cells. The gene encoding Epo has been recently cloned in teleost fishes such as the pufferfish Takifugu rubripes (fugu) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). It has been shown that the transcription levels of Epo in teleost fishes increase in response to anemia or hypoxia in a manner similar to its human ortholog. However, the cis-regulatory element(s) mediating the hypoxia response of Epo gene in fishes has not been identified. In the present study, using the human hepatoma cell line (Hep3B), we have identified and characterized a hypoxia response element (HRE) in the fugu Epo locus. The sequence of the fugu HRE (ACGTGCTG) is identical to that of the HRE in the human EPO locus. However, unlike the HRE in the mammalian Epo locus, which is located in the 3' region of the gene, the fugu HRE is located in the 5' flanking region and on the opposite strand of DNA. This HRE is conserved in other teleosts such as Tetraodon and zebrafish in a similar location. A 365-bp fragment containing the fugu HRE was able to drive GFP expression in the liver of transgenic zebrafish. However, we could not ascertain if the expression of transgene is induced by hypoxia in vivo due to the low and variable levels of GFP expression in transgenic zebrafish. Our investigations also revealed that the Epo locus has experienced extensive rearrangements during vertebrate evolution. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Earliest Phases of Star Formation (EPoS): a Herschel key project. The thermal structure of low-mass molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launhardt, R.; Stutz, A. M.; Schmiedeke, A.; Henning, Th.; Krause, O.; Balog, Z.; Beuther, H.; Birkmann, S.; Hennemann, M.; Kainulainen, J.; Khanzadyan, T.; Linz, H.; Lippok, N.; Nielbock, M.; Pitann, J.; Ragan, S.; Risacher, C.; Schmalzl, M.; Shirley, Y. L.; Stecklum, B.; Steinacker, J.; Tackenberg, J.

    2013-03-01

    Context. The temperature and density structure of molecular cloud cores are the most important physical quantities that determine the course of the protostellar collapse and the properties of the stars they form. Nevertheless, density profiles often rely either on the simplifying assumption of isothermality or on observationally poorly constrained model temperature profiles. The instruments of the Herschel satellite provide us for the first time with both the spectral coverage and the spatial resolution that is needed to directly measure the dust temperature structure of nearby molecular cloud cores. Aims: With the aim of better constraining the initial physical conditions in molecular cloud cores at the onset of protostellar collapse, in particular of measuring their temperature structure, we initiated the guaranteed time key project (GTKP) "The Earliest Phases of Star Formation" (EPoS) with the Herschel satellite. This paper gives an overview of the low-mass sources in the EPoS project, the Herschel and complementary ground-based observations, our analysis method, and the initial results of the survey. Methods: We study the thermal dust emission of 12 previously well-characterized, isolated, nearby globules using FIR and submm continuum maps at up to eight wavelengths between 100 μm and 1.2 mm. Our sample contains both globules with starless cores and embedded protostars at different early evolutionary stages. The dust emission maps are used to extract spatially resolved SEDs, which are then fit independently with modified blackbody curves to obtain line-of-sight-averaged dust temperature and column density maps. Results: We find that the thermal structure of all globules (mean mass 7 M⊙) is dominated by external heating from the interstellar radiation field and moderate shielding by thin extended halos. All globules have warm outer envelopes (14-20 K) and colder dense interiors (8-12 K) with column densities of a few 1022 cm-2. The protostars embedded in some

  20. The Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) Education and Outreach (E/PO) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peticolas, L. M.; Craig, N.; Odenwald, S. F.; Walker, A.; Russell, C. T.; Angelopoulos, V.; Willard, C.; Larson, M. B.; Hiscock, W. A.; Stoke, J. M.; Moldwin, M. B.

    2008-12-01

    During the pre-launch phase of NASA’s THEMIS mission, the Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program successfully brought the excitement of THEMIS to the public, students and teachers through a variety of programs. The Geomagnetic Event Observation Network by Students (GEONS) was the main effort during this time, a project in which 13 magnetometers were placed in or near 13 rural schools across the country. High school teachers and a few middle school teachers at these and/or neighboring schools took part in a long-term professional development program based around space science and the magnetometer data. The teachers created week-long to semester-long projects during which their students worked on THEMIS lessons that they, their colleagues, and the E/PO team created. In addition to this program, THEMIS E/PO also launched the only Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS) Great Explorations in Mathematics and Science (GEMS) site in Nevada. This site provides a sustainable place for teacher professional development using hands-on GEMS activities, and has been used by teachers around the state of Nevada. Short-term professional development for K-12 teachers (one-hour to two-day workshops), with a focus on the Tribal College and Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) communities have reached hundreds of teachers across the country. A Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) ViewSpace show on auroras and THEMIS was created and distributed, and shown in over a hundred science centers and museums nationwide. The THEMIS E/PO program developed and maintained a THEMIS E/PO Website for dissemination of (1) information and multimedia about the science and engineering of THEMIS, (2) updated news about the mission in language appropriate for the public, (3) the GEONS data, the GEONS teacher guides with classroom activities, and (4) information about the THEMIS E/PO program. Hundreds of thousands of visitors have viewed this website. In this

  1. The role of renal function loss on circadian misalignment of cytokines EPO, IGF-1, IL-6 and TNF-alfa in chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, Karien; Koch, Birgit; van Someren, Eus; Wielders, Jos; Ter Wee, Piet; Nagtegaal, Elsbeth; Gaillard, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of renal disease. Circadian sleep-wake rhythm is disturbed in renal disease. Awareness of other disturbed rhythms, such as inflammation processes, can affect the treatment of patients with renal disease. Knowledge of possibly related circadian misalignment of the cytokines erythropoietin (EPO), Insulin Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and interleukins (IL) however is limited. We therefore performed an observational study. The objective of this study was to characterize levels of EPO, IGF-1 and inflammation markers IL-6 and TNF-α, related to renal function. The study population consisted of patients with various degrees of renal function, admitted to our hospital. During 24 hours, blood of 28 subjects with various degrees of renal function was collected every 2 hours. The patients were stable, not acutely ill and they were waiting for a procedure, such as elective surgery. Circadian parameters of EPO, IGF-1, IL-6 and TNF-α were measured in serum and were correlated with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and Hb, using Pearson correlations. Although diurnal variations in EPO level were found in 15 out of 28 patients, the curves did not show a consistent phase. The presence of an EPO rhythm was not related to GFR. No diurnal rhythm could be detected for IGF-1, IL-6 and TNF-α. Mean levels of IGF-1 were correlated inversely to mean levels of EPO (p=0.03). When divided based on GFR and Hb subjects with GFR 10-30 ml/min and lower Hb had the highest IGF-1 levels (p=0.02). A relationship between Il-6, TNF-α and EPO or GFR was not found. The existence of a circadian (mis)alignment of EPO, IGF-1, IL-6 and TNF-α was not found. The association between high IGF-1 and low Hb suggests that EPO and IGF-1 have an alternating role, dependent on GFR, in stimulating erythropoiesis. These results could have consequences for the treatment of anemia.

  2. Nurturing The STEM Pipeline: Graduate Student Leadership In NIRCam's Ongoing E/PO Mission For JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlingman, Wayne M.; Stock, N.; Teske, J.; Tyler, K.; Biller, B.; Donley, J.; Hedden, A.; Knierman, K.; Young, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Astronomy Camp for Girl Scout Leaders is an education and public outreach (E/PO) program offered by the science team of the Near-InfraRed Camera (NIRCam) for NASA's 6.5-meter James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Since 2003, astronomy graduate students have helped design and lead biannual "Train the Trainer” workshops for adults from the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), engaging these trainers in the process of scientific inquiry and equipping them to host astronomy-related activities at the troop level. These workshops have helped revise the national GSUSA badge curriculum and directly benefitted thousands of young girls of all ages, not only in general science and math education but also in specific astronomical and technological concepts relating to JWST. To date, nine graduate students have become members of NIRCam's E/PO team. They have developed curriculum and activities used to teach concepts in stellar nucleosynthesis, lookback time, galaxy classification, etc. They have also contributed to the overall strategic approach and helped lead more general activities in basic astronomy (night sky, phases of the Moon, the scale of the Solar System and beyond, stars, galaxies, telescopes, etc.) as well as JWST-specific research areas in extrasolar planetary systems and cosmology, to pave the way for girls and women to understand the first images from JWST. The resulting experience has empowered these students to propose and to develop their own E/PO programs after graduation as postdocs and young faculty. They also continue as part of NIRCam's growing worldwide network of 160 trainers teaching young women essential STEM-related concepts using astronomy, the night sky environment, applied math, engineering, and critical thinking. NIRCam and its E/PO program are funded by NASA under contract NAS5-02105.

  3. Improving Existing EPO Efforts with Data Access through the National Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddick, M. J.; Christian, C. A.; O'Mullane, W. J.

    2005-05-01

    The National Virtual Observatory (NVO) is developing tools to enable astronomy data to be shared seamlessly across the Internet. The goal of the NVO is to allow anyone on the Internet to access all astronomy data ever measured, with any instrument, in any wavelength. The NVO's research efforts focus on allowing scientists to access existing online data, adding value to each dataset by virtue of its connection to others. Similarly, the NVO's Education and Public Outreach (EPO) efforts focus on connecting existing projects with the our seamless access to real, modern astronomy data from thousands of research projects. We hope that this connection will provide countless opportunities to expand and enhance existing EPO projects. Some of the projects currently working with NVO are the CLEA labs at Gettysburg College, Project LITE at Boston University, and Adler Planetarium. In this poster, I will describe the current EPO efforts that incorporate the NVO's data access tools. I will also provide a tutorial for EPO developers, with practical suggestions on how to incorporate NVO tools into existing projects. I will also give contact information for further help.

  4. [The effect of hypoxia preconditioning no binding activity of HIF-1 on the HRE with EPO in the hippocampus of mice].

    PubMed

    Shao, Guo; Zhou, Wei-Hua; Gao, Cui-Ying; Zhang, Ran; Lu, Guo-Wei

    2007-02-01

    To observe change of binding activity of HIF-1 with erythropoietin (EPO) hypoxia response element (HRE) in the hippocampus of mice preconditioned to hypoxia and explore relationship between the changes and the preconditioning. The hippocampus was removed from mice exposed to hypoxia for 0 run (control group), 1 run (H1 group) and 4 runs(H4 group). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)and real time PCR were used to detect the change of activity of HIF-1 on HRE of EPO. Both in vitro and in vivo binding tests showed that the HIF-1 DNA-binding activities were increased in group H1 and markedly increased in group H4. The increase of HIF-1 and HRE of EPO binding activities is thought be involved in hypoxic preconditioning.

  5. Hematopoietic stem cells with controllable tEpoR transgenes have a competitive advantage in bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kirby, S; Walton, W; Smithies, O

    2000-06-15

    In a previous study, it was found that a truncated erythropoietin receptor transgene (tEpoR tg) enables multilineage hematopoietic progenitor amplification after treatment with erythropoietin (epo) in vitro and in vivo. This study used competitive bone marrow (BM) repopulation to show that tEpoR tg facilitates transplantation by hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Individual multilineage colonies, committed myeloid progenitor colonies, and lymphoid colonies (pre-B colony-forming units) were grown from the marrow of animals 6 months after they received a 50/50 mixture of transgene and wild-type BM cells. In epo-treated recipients, the transgene-bearing cells significantly outcompeted the wild-type cells (84%-100% versus 16%-0%, respectively). In recipients treated with phosphate-buffered saline, the repopulation was minimally different from the donor mixture (49%-64% transgene versus 51%-36% wild-type). The epo-induced repopulation advantage is maintained in secondary transplants. In addition, neither accelerated HSC depletion nor uncontrollable proliferation occurred during epo-stimulated serial transplants of transgene-containing BM. Thus, the tEpoR tg functions in a benign fashion in HSC and allows for a significant and controllable repopulation advantage in vivo without excessive HSC depletion relative to wild-type BM. (Blood. 2000;95:3710-3715)

  6. Current markers of the Athlete Blood Passport do not flag microdose EPO doping.

    PubMed

    Ashenden, Michael; Gough, Clare E; Garnham, Andrew; Gore, Christopher J; Sharpe, Ken

    2011-09-01

    The Athlete Blood Passport is the most recent tool adopted by anti-doping authorities to detect athletes using performance-enhancing drugs such as recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO). This strategy relies on detecting abnormal variations in haematological variables caused by doping, against a background of biological and analytical variability. Ten subjects were given twice weekly intravenous injections of rhEPO for up to 12 weeks. Full blood counts were measured using a Sysmex XE-2100 automated haematology analyser, and total haemoglobin mass via a carbon monoxide rebreathing test. The sensitivity of the passport to flag abnormal deviations in blood values was evaluated using dedicated Athlete Blood Passport software. Our treatment regimen elicited a 10% increase in total haemoglobin mass equivalent to approximately two bags of reinfused blood. The passport software did not flag any subjects as being suspicious of doping whilst they were receiving rhEPO. We conclude that it is possible for athletes to use rhEPO without eliciting abnormal changes in the blood variables currently monitored by the Athlete Blood Passport.

  7. Importance of E/PO Activity in Lunar Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terazono, J.

    2018-04-01

    Upon rise of momentum for lunar science and explorations, we should regard importance of E/PO (Education and Public Outreach) in this area. The author will show significance of strategy and human resource cultivation of this area.

  8. Stabilization of a supersaturated solution of mefenamic acid from a solid dispersion with EUDRAGIT(®) EPO.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Taro; Higashi, Kenjirou; Suzuki, Toyofumi; Tomono, Kazuo; Moribe, Kunikazu; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2012-10-01

    The stabilization mechanism of a supersaturated solution of mefenamic acid (MFA) from a solid dispersion with EUDRAGIT(®) EPO (EPO) was investigated. The solid dispersions were prepared by cryogenic grinding method. Powder X-ray diffractometry, in vitro dissolution test, in vivo oral absorption study, infrared spectroscopy, and solid- and solution-state NMR spectroscopies were used to characterize the solid dispersions. Dissolution tests in acetate buffer (pH 5.5) revealed that solid dispersion showed > 200-fold higher concentration of MFA. Supersaturated solution was stable over 1 month and exhibited improved oral bioavailability of MFA in rats, with a 7.8-fold higher area under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve. Solid-state (1)H spin-lattice relaxation time (T(1)) measurement showed that MFA was almost monomolecularly dispersed in the EPO polymer matrix. Intermolecular interaction between MFA and EPO was indicated by solid-state infrared and (13)C-T(1) measurements. Solution-state (1)H-NMR measurement demonstrated that MFA existed in monomolecular state in supersaturated solution. (1)H-T(1) and difference nuclear Overhauser effect measurements indicated that cross relaxation occurred between MFA and EPO due to the small distance between them. The formation and high stability of the supersaturated solution were attributable to the specifically formed intermolecular interactions between MFA and EPO.

  9. Validation of whole-blood transcriptome signature during microdose recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) administration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guan; Durussel, Jérôme; Shurlock, Jonathan; Mooses, Martin; Fuku, Noriyuki; Bruinvels, Georgie; Pedlar, Charles; Burden, Richard; Murray, Andrew; Yee, Brendan; Keenan, Anne; McClure, John D; Sottas, Pierre-Edouard; Pitsiladis, Yannis P

    2017-11-14

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) can improve human performance and is therefore frequently abused by athletes. As a result, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) introduced the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) as an indirect method to detect blood doping. Despite this progress, challenges remain to detect blood manipulations such as the use of microdoses of rHuEpo. Forty-five whole-blood transcriptional markers of rHuEpo previously derived from a high-dose rHuEpo administration trial were used to assess whether microdoses of rHuEpo could be detected in 14 trained subjects and whether these markers may be confounded by exercise (n = 14 trained subjects) and altitude training (n = 21 elite runners and n = 4 elite rowers, respectively). Differential gene expression analysis was carried out following normalisation and significance declared following application of a 5% false discovery rate (FDR) and a 1.5 fold-change. Adaptive model analysis was also applied to incorporate these markers for the detection of rHuEpo. ALAS2, BCL2L1, DCAF12, EPB42, GMPR, SELENBP1, SLC4A1, TMOD1 and TRIM58 were differentially expressed during and throughout the post phase of microdose rHuEpo administration. The CD247 and TRIM58 genes were significantly up- and down-regulated, respectively, immediately following exercise when compared with the baseline both before and after rHuEpo/placebo. No significant gene expression changes were found 30 min after exercise in either rHuEpo or placebo groups. ALAS2, BCL2L1, DCAF12, SLC4A1, TMOD1 and TRIM58 tended to be significantly expressed in the elite runners ten days after arriving at altitude and one week after returning from altitude (FDR > 0.059, fold-change varying from 1.39 to 1.63). Following application of the adaptive model, 15 genes showed a high sensitivity (≥ 93%) and specificity (≥ 71%), with BCL2L1 and CSDA having the highest sensitivity (93%) and specificity (93%). Current results provide further evidence that

  10. The Year of the Solar System: An E/PO Community's Approach to Sharing Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipp, S. S.; Boonstra, D.; Shupla, C.; Dalton, H.; Scalice, D.; Planetary Science E/Po Community

    2010-12-01

    YSS offers the opportunity to raise awareness, build excitement, and make connections with educators, students and the public about planetary science activities. The planetary science education and public outreach (E/PO) community is engaging and educating their audiences through ongoing mission and program activities. Based on discussion with partners, the community is presenting its products in the context of monthly thematic topics that are tied to the big questions of planetary science: how did the Sun’s family of planets and bodies originate and how have they evolved; and how did life begin and evolve on Earth, has it evolved elsewhere in our solar system, and what are characteristics that lead to the origins of life? Each month explores different compelling aspects of the solar system - its formation, volcanism, ice, life. Resources, activities, and events are interwoven in thematic context, and presented with ideas through which formal and informal educators can engage their audiences. The month-to-month themes place the big questions in a logical sequence of deepening learning experiences - and highlight mission milestones and viewing events. YSS encourages active participation and communication with its audiences. It includes nation-wide activities, such as a Walk Through the Solar System, held between October 2010 to March 2011, in which museums, libraries, science centers, schools, planetariums, amateur astronomers, and others are kicking off YSS by creating their own scale models of the solar system and sharing their events through online posting of pictures, video, and stories. YSS offers the E/PO community the opportunity to collaborate with each other and partners. The thematic approach leverages existing products, providing a home and allowing a “shelf life” that can outlast individual projects and missions. The broad themes highlight missions and programs multiple times. YSS also leverages existing online resources and social media. Hosted on

  11. Chronic preclinical safety evaluation of EPO-018B, a pegylated peptidic erythropoiesis-stimulating agent in monkeys and rats

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gong, Xue-Lian; Gu, Xiao-Lei

    EPO-018B, a synthetic peptide-based erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA), is mainly designed for treatment of anemia caused by chronic renal failure and chemotherapy against cancer. It overcomes the deficiencies of currently approved ESA, including the frequent administration of temperature-sensitive recombinant protein and anti-EPO antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). This study was designed to evaluate the potential chronic toxicity of EPO-018B. Subcutaneous administration doses were designed as 0, 0.2, 1 and 10 mg/kg for six months for 160 rats (20/gender/group) and 0, 0.3, 3 and 20 mg/kg for nine months for 32 monkeys (4/gender/group) once every three weeks. The vehicles receivedmore » the same volume of physiological saline injection. All animals survived to the scheduled necropsies after six weeks (for rats) and fourteen weeks (for monkeys) recovery period, except for the two high-dose female rats and two high-dose male monkeys, which were considered related to the increased RBCs, chronic blood hyperviscosity and chronic cardiac injury. EPO-018B is supposed to be subcutaneously injected once every month and the intended human therapeutic dose is 0.025 mg/kg. The study findings at 0.2 mg/kg for rats and 0.3 mg/kg for monkeys were considered to be the study NOAEL (the no observed adverse effect level), which were more than ten times the intended human therapeutic dose. Higher doses caused adverse effects related to the liver toxicity, cardiotoxicity, appearance of neutralizing antibodies of EPO-018B and the decrease of serum glucose and cholesterol. Most treatment-induced effects were reversible or revealed ongoing recovery upon the discontinuation of treatment. The sequelae occurred in rats and monkeys were considered secondary to exaggerated pharmacology and would less likely occur in the intended patient population. As to the differences between human beings and animals, the safety of EPO-018B need to be further confirmed in the future

  12. The contribution of the Volcano Observations Work Package to the implementation of the European Plate Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The overall aim of the implementation phase of European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is to make the integrated platform operational in order to guarantee seamless access to the data provided by the European Solid Earth communities. The Volcano Observations Work Package (WP11) contributes to this objective by implementing a Thematic Core Service (TCS) which is planned to give access to the data and services provided by the European Volcano Observatories (VO) and some Volcanological Research Institutions (VRI; such as university departments, laboratories, etc.). Both types are considered as national research infrastructures (RI) which the TCS will integrate. Currently, monitoring networks on European volcanoes consist of thousands of stations or sites where volcanological parameters are continuously or periodically measured. These sites are equipped with instruments for geophysical (seismic, geodetic, gravimetric, electromagnetic), geochemical (volcanic plumes, fumaroles, groundwater, rivers, soils), environmental observations (e.g. meteorological and air quality parameters), as well as various prototypal monitoring systems (e.g. Doppler radars, ground based SAR). Across Europe several laboratories provide sample characterization (rocks, gases, isotopes, etc.), quasi-continuous analysis of space-borne data (SAR, thermal imagery, SO2 and ash), as well as high-performance computing facilities. All these RIs provide high-quality information (observations) on the current status of European volcanoes and the geodynamic background of the surrounding areas. The implementation of the Volcano Observations TCS will address technical as well as managerial issues, both considering the current heterogeneous state-of-the-art of the volcanological research infrastructures in Europe. Indeed, the current arrangement of individual VO and VRI is considered too fragmented to be considered as a unique distributed infrastructure. Therefore, the main effort in the framework of the EPOS

  13. We Need You! The Importance of Scientist Involvement in Education and Public Outreach (E/PO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, S.; Hsu, B. C.; Meinke, B. K.; Shipp, S. S.; Schwerin, T. G.; Peticolas, L. M.; Smith, D.; Dalton, H.

    2013-12-01

    Active engagement of scientists in education and public outreach (E/PO) activities is beneficial for scientists, classrooms, and the general public. Scientist visibility in the public arena is important to garner public support, whose tax dollars fund scientific programs. Scientists are important disseminators of current, accurate scientific knowledge. They also, perhaps more importantly, understand the nature and process of science and have the means of understanding and addressing many of the issues facing society. Research has shown that while the public is interested in science, not all members are necessarily scientifically literate; additionally there is evidence than many students are not prepared for, or choosing to participate in science careers. And yet, a scientifically engaged, literate, and supportive public is a necessary partner in addressing important global challenges of the future. E/PO is a wonderful opportunity for scientists to demonstrate that science is interesting, exciting, fun, challenging, and relevant to society. In doing so, they can transfer ownership of science to the public through a variety of vehicles by increasing access to scientific thought and discovery. Through partnerships with E/PO professionals, teachers, or journalists, scientists can improve their communication and teaching skills, whether in an E/PO setting or their higher education careers. Sharing with the public what scientists do is an effective way to engage people in the scientific process and to express scientists' enthusiasm for what they do. Scientist involvement in E/PO also shows the public that scientists are real people and provides important role models for the next generation of scientists. There are many opportunities to get involved in E/PO! Find information on EarthSpace, a national clearinghouse for higher education materials in Earth and space science through an abstract by Nicholas Gross, et al. Learn about NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD

  14. EPOS-WP16: A Platform for European Multi-scale Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiers, Chris; Drury, Martyn; Kan-Parker, Mirjam; Lange, Otto; Willingshofer, Ernst; Funiciello, Francesca; Rosenau, Matthias; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Sagnotti, Leonardo; W16 Participants

    2016-04-01

    The participant countries in EPOS embody a wide range of world-class laboratory infrastructures ranging from high temperature and pressure experimental facilities, to electron microscopy, micro-beam analysis, analogue modeling and paleomagnetic laboratories. Most data produced by the various laboratory centres and networks are presently available only in limited "final form" in publications. As such many data remain inaccessible and/or poorly preserved. However, the data produced at the participating laboratories are crucial to serving society's need for geo-resources exploration and for protection against geo-hazards. Indeed, to model resource formation and system behaviour during exploitation, we need an understanding from the molecular to the continental scale, based on experimental data. This contribution will describe the work plans that the laboratories community in Europe is making, in the context of EPOS. The main objectives are: - To collect and harmonize available and emerging laboratory data on the properties and processes controlling rock system behaviour at multiple scales, in order to generate products accessible and interoperable through services for supporting research activities. - To co-ordinate the development, integration and trans-national usage of the major solid Earth Science laboratory centres and specialist networks. The length scales encompassed by the infrastructures included range from the nano- and micrometer levels (electron microscopy and micro-beam analysis) to the scale of experiments on centimetre sized samples, and to analogue model experiments simulating the reservoir scale, the basin scale and the plate scale. - To provide products and services supporting research into Geo-resources and Geo-storage, Geo-hazards and Earth System Evolution.

  15. "Edigey" as the Common Heritage of the Turkic People: Historical Basis of the Epos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assanov, Zhubanazar A.; Pangereyev, Abat Sh.; Baltymova, Mira R.; Borash, Bayan T.; Idrissova, Elmira T.

    2016-01-01

    Today we know that the heroic epos "Edigey" remained among the Turkic people living in the south from Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan to Siberia, as well as in foreign countries: Turkey and Romania. "Edigey" epos has more than 40 versions, some of which consist of fifteen or sixteen thousand lines. Therefore, a narrow study is not…

  16. Worldwide nanotechnology development: a comparative study of USPTO, EPO, and JPO patents (1976-2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Lin, Yiling; Chen, Hsinchun; Roco, Mihail C.

    2007-12-01

    To assess worldwide development of nanotechnology, this paper compares the numbers and contents of nanotechnology patents in the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), European Patent Office (EPO), and Japan Patent Office (JPO). It uses the patent databases as indicators of nanotechnology trends via bibliographic analysis, content map analysis, and citation network analysis on nanotechnology patents per country, institution, and technology field. The numbers of nanotechnology patents published in USPTO and EPO have continued to increase quasi-exponentially since 1980, while those published in JPO stabilized after 1993. Institutions and individuals located in the same region as a repository's patent office have a higher contribution to the nanotechnology patent publication in that repository ("home advantage" effect). The USPTO and EPO databases had similar high-productivity contributing countries and technology fields with large number of patents, but quite different high-impact countries and technology fields after the average number of received cites. Bibliographic analysis on USPTO and EPO patents shows that researchers in the United States and Japan published larger numbers of patents than other countries, and that their patents were more frequently cited by other patents. Nanotechnology patents covered physics research topics in all three repositories. In addition, USPTO showed the broadest representation in coverage in biomedical and electronics areas. The analysis of citations by technology field indicates that USPTO had a clear pattern of knowledge diffusion from highly cited fields to less cited fields, while EPO showed knowledge exchange mainly occurred among highly cited fields.

  17. Dynamic Ligand Modulation of EPO Receptor Pools, and Dysregulation by Polycythemia-Associated EPOR Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Seema; Verma, Rakesh; Pradeep, Anamika; Leu, Karen; Mortensen, R. Bruce; Young, Peter R.; Oyasu, Miho; Schatz, Peter J.; Green, Jennifer M.; Wojchowski, Don M.

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and its cell surface receptor (EPOR) are essential for erythropoiesis; can modulate non-erythroid target tissues; and have been reported to affect the progression of certain cancers. Basic studies of EPOR expression and trafficking, however, have been hindered by low-level EPOR occurrence, and the limited specificity of anti-EPOR antibodies. Consequently, these aspects of EPOR biology are not well defined, nor are actions of polycythemia- associated mutated EPOR alleles. Using novel rabbit monoclonal antibodies to intracellular, PY- activated and extracellular EPOR domains, the following properties of the endogenous hEPOR in erythroid progenitors first are unambiguously defined. 1) High- Mr EPOR forms become obviously expressed only when EPO is limited. 2) EPOR-68K plus -70K species sequentially accumulate, and EPOR-70K comprises an apparent cell surface EPOR population. 3) Brefeldin A, N-glycanase and associated analyses point to EPOR-68K as a core-glycosylated intracellular EPOR pool (of modest size). 4) In contrast to recent reports, EPOR inward trafficking is shown (in UT7epo cells, and primary proerythroblasts) to be sharply ligand-dependent. Beyond this, when C-terminal truncated hEPOR-T mutant alleles as harbored by polycythemia patients are co-expressed with the wild-type EPOR in EPO-dependent erythroid progenitors, several specific events become altered. First, EPOR-T alleles are persistently activated upon EPO- challenge, yet are also subject to apparent turn-over (to low-Mr EPOR products). Furthermore, during exponential cell growth EPOR-T species become both over-represented, and hyper-activated. Interestingly, EPOR-T expression also results in an EPO dose-dependent loss of endogenous wild-type EPOR's (and, therefore, a squelching of EPOR C-terminal- mediated negative feedback effects). New knowledge concerning regulated EPOR expression and trafficking therefore is provided, together with new insight into mechanisms via which

  18. Engaging Scientists in Meaningful E/PO: How the NASA SMD E/PO Community Addresses the needs of Underrepresented Audiences through NASA Science4Girls and Their Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Bonnie K.; Smith, Denise A.; Bleacher, Lora; Hauck, Karin; Soeffing, Cassie; NASA SMD E/PO Community

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum (SEPOF) coordinates the work of individual NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics EPO projects and their teams to bring the NASA science education resources and expertise to libraries nationwide. The Astrophysics Forum assists scientists and educators with becoming involved in SMD E/PO (which is uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise) and makes SMD E/PO resources and expertise accessible to the science and education communities. The NASA Science4Girls and Their Families initiative partners NASA science education programs with public libraries to provide NASA-themed hands-on education activities for girls and their families. As such, the initiative engages girls in all four NASA science discipline areas (Astrophysics, Earth Science, Planetary Science, and Heliophysics), which enables audiences to experience the full range of NASA science topics and the different career skills each requires. The events focus on engaging this particular underserved and underrepresented audience in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) via use of research-based best practices, collaborations with libraries, partnerships with local and national organizations, and remote engagement of audiences.

  19. In vivo evaluation of EPO-secreting cells immobilized in different alginate-PLL microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Ponce, S; Orive, G; Hernández, R M; Gascón, A R; Canals, J M; Muñoz, M T; Pedraz, J L

    2006-11-01

    Alginates are the most employed biomaterials for cell encapsulation due to their abundance, easy gelling properties and apparent biocompatibility. However, as natural polymers different impurities including endotoxins, proteins and polyphenols can be found in their composition. Several purification protocols as well as different batteries of assays to prove the biocompatibility of the alginates in vitro have been recently developed. However, little is known about how the use of alginates with different purity grade may affect the host immune response after their implantation in vivo. The present paper investigates the long-term functionality and biocompatibility of murine erythropoietin (EPO) secreting C2C12 cells entrapped in microcapsules elaborated with alginates with different properties (purity, composition and viscosity). Results showed that independently of the alginate type employed, the animals presented elevated hematocrit levels until day 130, remaining at values between 70-87%. However, histological analysis of the explanted devices showed higher overgrowth around non-biomedical grade alginate microcapsules which could be directly related with higher impurity content of this type of alginate. Although EPO delivery may be limited by the formation of a fibrotic layer around non-biomedical grade alginate microcapsules, the high EPO secretion of the encapsulated cells together with the pharmacodynamic behaviour and the angiogenic and immune-modulatory properties of EPO result in no direct correlation between the biocompatibility of the alginate and the therapeutic response obtained.

  20. Engaging Scientists in Meaningful E/PO: How the NASA SMD E/PO Community Addresses Informal Educators' Preferences for PD and Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolone, Lindsay; Nelson, Andi; Smith, Denise A.; NASA SMD Astrophysics E/PO Community

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum (SEPOF) coordinates the work of NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics EPO projects. These teams work together to capitalize on the cutting-edge discoveries of NASA Astrophysics missions to support educators in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) and to enable youth to engage in doing STEM inside and outside of school. The Astrophysics Forum assists scientists and educators with becoming involved in SMD E/PO, which is uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise, and makes SMD E/PO resources and expertise accessible to the science and education communities. Informal educators participated in a recent nationally-distributed survey from the NASA SMD SEPOF Informal Education Working Group. The results show the preferences of staff from museums, parks, public libraries, community/afterschool centers, and others with regard to professional development and material resources. The results of the survey will be presented during this session.In addition, we present opportunities for the astronomy community to participate in collaborations supporting the NASA SMD efforts in K-12 Formal Education, Informal Science Education, and Outreach. These efforts focus on enhancing instruction, as well as youth and public engagement, in STEM via use of research-based best practices, collaborations with libraries, partnerships with local and national organizations, and remote engagement of audiences. The Forums' efforts for the Formal, Informal Science Education and Outreach communities include a literature review, appraisal of informal educators' needs, coordination of audience-based NASA resources and opportunities, professional development, plus support with the Next Generation Science Standards. Learn how to join in our collaborative efforts to support the K-12 Formal Education community and to reach the informal

  1. Astronomy EPO and the 2012 Hysteria: Your Personal Guide to Joining the Battle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, K.

    2011-09-01

    Individual members of the astronomical community have, in recent months, begun to take up the charge and rally against the vast army of pseudoscience, superstition, and snake oil salesmen that is the 2012 phenomenon. EPO specialists and facilities are in a unique and vitally important position to move to the forefront of this battle, given our long-standing dedication to improving the astronomical education of the general public. This poster documents concrete ways in which the astronomy EPO community can (and should) combat the 2012 movement.

  2. SOFIA Education and Public Outreach (EPO): Scientist/Educator Partnerships at 41,000 Feet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, D.; Devore, E.; Bennett, M.

    2003-12-01

    NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) represents a unique opportunity for education and public outreach (EPO). SOFIA is the first research observatory -- airborne or ground-based -- in which close participation by educators and journalists is being designed into both the physical facility and the administrative structure of the observatory. With the overall goal of contributing to the public's awareness and understanding of science in general and astronomy in particular, the SOFIA EPO program will include formal K-12 and undergraduate educational activities, informal education, public outreach, and media relations. One of the most exciting and unique aspects of the SOFIA EPO program is the observatory's ability to carry up to 10 educators on science flights, enabling those educators to partner with scientists and participate in real research. Some 200 formal and informal educators per year are expected to participate in the SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors program once full-scale operation is achieved. Educators who have participated in the Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors program will be encouraged to continue their scientific partnerships and will be supported in their efforts to carry new-found knowledge and enthusiasm to their students, other educators in their communities and the general public. The Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors will be supported as a national network via continued communications and material support from the SOFIA EPO program office, and will constitute a wide-spread outreach cadre for NASA and space sciences based on their experiences with airborne astronomy. Scientists, engineers, and other members of the SOFIA team will be encouraged to partner with local teachers and visit their classrooms as a part of the SOFIA Education Partners Program. Training for scientist-educators will be offered via the Astronomical Society of the Pacific's Project ASTRO network of astronomy education sites around the USA. This

  3. EPOS-WP16: A coherent and collaborative network of Solid Earth Multi-scale laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calignano, Elisa; Rosenau, Matthias; Lange, Otto; Spiers, Chris; Willingshofer, Ernst; Drury, Martyn; van Kan-Parker, Mirjam; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Funiciello, Francesca; Trippanera, Daniele; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Tesei, Telemaco; Winkler, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    Laboratory facilities are an integral part of Earth Science research. The diversity of methods employed in such infrastructures reflects the multi-scale nature of the Earth system and is essential for the understanding of its evolution, for the assessment of geo-hazards and for the sustainable exploitation of geo-resources. In the frame of EPOS (European Plate Observing System), the Working Package 16 represents a developing community of European Geoscience Multi-scale laboratories. The participant and collaborating institutions (Utrecht University, GFZ, RomaTre University, INGV, NERC, CSIC-ICTJA, CNRS, LMU, C4G-UBI, ETH, CNR*) embody several types of laboratory infrastructures, engaged in different fields of interest of Earth Science: from high temperature and pressure experimental facilities, to electron microscopy, micro-beam analysis, analogue tectonic and geodynamic modelling and paleomagnetic laboratories. The length scales encompassed by these infrastructures range from the nano- and micrometre levels (electron microscopy and micro-beam analysis) to the scale of experiments on centimetres-sized samples, and to analogue model experiments simulating the reservoir scale, the basin scale and the plate scale. The aim of WP16 is to provide two services by the year 2019: first, providing virtual access to data from laboratories (data service) and, second, providing physical access to laboratories (transnational access, TNA). Regarding the development of a data service, the current status is such that most data produced by the various laboratory centres and networks are available only in limited "final form" in publications, many data remain inaccessible and/or poorly preserved. Within EPOS the TCS Multi-scale laboratories is collecting and harmonizing available and emerging laboratory data on the properties and process controlling rock system behaviour at all relevant scales, in order to generate products accessible and interoperable through services for supporting

  4. EPOS Multi-Scale Laboratory platform: a long-term reference tool for experimental Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippanera, Daniele; Tesei, Telemaco; Funiciello, Francesca; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Rosenau, Matthias; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Lange, Otto; Calignano, Elisa; Spiers, Chris; Drury, Martin; Willingshofer, Ernst; Winkler, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    With continuous progress on scientific research, a large amount of datasets has been and will be produced. The data access and sharing along with their storage and homogenization within a unique and coherent framework is a new challenge for the whole scientific community. This is particularly emphasized for geo-scientific laboratories, encompassing the most diverse Earth Science disciplines and typology of data. To this aim the "Multiscale Laboratories" Work Package (WP16), operating in the framework of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS), is developing a virtual platform of geo-scientific data and services for the worldwide community of laboratories. This long-term project aims at merging the top class multidisciplinary laboratories in Geoscience into a coherent and collaborative network, facilitating the standardization of virtual access to data, data products and software. This will help our community to evolve beyond the stage in which most of data produced by the different laboratories are available only within the related scholarly publications (often as print-version only) or they remain unpublished and inaccessible on local devices. The EPOS multi-scale laboratory platform will provide the possibility to easily share and discover data by means of open access, DOI-referenced, online data publication including long-term storage, managing and curation services and to set up a cohesive community of laboratories. The WP16 is starting with three pilot cases laboratories: (1) rock physics, (2) palaeomagnetic, and (3) analogue modelling. As a proof of concept, first analogue modelling datasets have been published via GFZ Data Services (http://doidb.wdc-terra.org/search/public/ui?&sort=updated+desc&q=epos). The datasets include rock analogue material properties (e.g. friction data, rheology data, SEM imagery), as well as supplementary figures, images and movies from experiments on tectonic processes. A metadata catalogue tailored to the specific communities

  5. The Legacy of NASA Astrophysics E/PO: Scientist Engagement and Higher Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Jim; Smith, Denise A.; Meinke, Bonnie; Lawton, Brandon; Schulz, Gregory; Bartolone, Lindsay; Bianchi, Luciana; NASA SMD Astrophysics E/PO Community

    2016-01-01

    For the past six years, NASA's Science Mission Directorate has coordinated the work of its mission- and program-embedded education and public outreach (E/PO) efforts through four forums representing its four science divisions. The Astrophysics forum, as the others, has built on the long-standing mission E/PO 1% allocation and embedded scientist/educator partnerships to encourage and coordinate collaborative efforts to make the most efficient and effective use of NASA resources, personnel, data and discoveries in leveraged ways, in support of the nation's science education. Two of the priorities established early in the forum's period of activity were to enhance scientist engagement in E/PO and to coordinate the community in providing useful higher education resources based on determined needs. This presentation will highlight some of the achievements for these two priorities over the past six years, how the products and efforts are being preserved, and how they can continue to be accessed as NASA SMD transitions to a new Education and Communication landscape. The work constitutes an ongoing legacy--a firm foundation on which the new structure of NASA SMD Education efforts will go forward.

  6. Space Science for Middle School Teachers: Integrating CINDI E/PO into a Long-Term Professional Development Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Hairston, M. R.

    2005-12-01

    Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) targeting pre-college education can be focused on teachers or students, but is ultimately only effective if it impacts classrooms. A challenge in the teacher workshop model is tracking the impact we have actually made. Teachers may be excited by our offerings, and rate workshops highly, but is our E/PO actually making a difference with pre-college students? In June 2005 we ran our second four-day teacher workshop for the joint NASA/U.S. Air Force sponsored ionospheric instrument package, the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) with a new twist. We experimented with the integration of our workshop into a long-term professional development program for 6th and 7th grade teachers at UT Dallas. Immediate direct benefits to the CINDI E/PO program included knowledge of teacher backgrounds prior to the workshop, a narrow target grade level range, and the elimination of the need for separate recruiting efforts. More importantly, by working within a year-long program supported by a Teacher Quality Grant we have been able to better assess teacher learning and the impact our outreach efforts is having on the middle school students of participants. The 20-contact hours our workshop contributed to the Teacher Quality Summer Institute were specifically designed to meet Texas standards for middle school science, and made connections between space weather, Earth systems, basic physics, technology, and communications. Participants were able to interact with members of the science team in formal settings and over casual lunches. We will present our motivations for this experiment, participant feedback, and lessons learned. In addition, we will give an update on our CINDI Educator Guide, and the newly completed Cindi in Space comic book. For the latest on CINDI E/PO, curriculum materials, and the comic book in pdf format, go to http://cindispace.utdallas.edu/education/.

  7. The Contribution of OLG Data and Analysis Centre to EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stangl, Günter; Krauss, Sandro

    2013-04-01

    OLG (Observatory Lustbuehel Graz) as a joint venture of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying works as a GNSS data centre and analyses GNSS data for reference maintenance, geokinematics and ionosphere research. Due to the change from epoch to permanent sites regions in Africa, Asia and Europe are investigated since 1995. Presently, observations from about 300 GNSS stations are used for analysis. Most of the stations are public and are retrieved from different global, regional and local data centres. In addition some institutions provide their private data to the OLG. After presenting the main regions Austria, Central Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean and the Western Indian Ocean the question will be how these data and products could be included into EPOS.

  8. EPO for the NASA SDO Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Learning Suite for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellagher, Emily; Scherrer, D. K.

    2013-07-01

    EVE Education and Public Outreach (EPO) promotes an understanding of the process of science and concepts within solar science and sun-earth connections. EVE EPO also features working scientists, current research and career awareness. One of the highlights for of this years projects is the digitization of solar lessons and the collaboration with the other instrument teams to develop new resources for students and educators. Digital lesson suite: EVE EPO has taken the best solar lessons and reworked then to make then more engaging, to reflect SDO data and made them SMARTboard compatible. We are creating a website that Students and teachers can access these lesson and use them online or download them. Project team collaboration: The SDO instruments (EVE, AIA and HMI) teams have created a comic book series for upper elementary and middle school students with the SDO mascot Camilla. These comics may be printed or read on mobile devices. Many teachers are looking for resources to use with their students via the Ipad so our collaboration helps supply teachers with a great resource that teachers about solar concepts and helps dispel solar misconceptions.Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): EVE Education and Public Outreach (EPO) promotes an understanding of the process of science and concepts within solar science and sun-earth connections. EVE EPO also features working scientists, current research and career awareness. One of the highlights for of this years projects is the digitization of solar lessons and the collaboration with the other instrument teams to develop new resources for students and educators. Digital lesson suite: EVE EPO has taken the best solar lessons and reworked then to make then more engaging, to reflect SDO data and made them SMARTboard compatible. We are creating a website that Students and teachers can access these lesson and use them online or download them. Project team collaboration: The SDO instruments (EVE, AIA and HMI) teams have created a

  9. Amateur Astronomers: Secret Agents of EPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berendsen, M.; White, V.; Devore, E.; Reynolds, M.

    2008-06-01

    Amateur astronomers prime the public to be more interested, receptive, and excited about space science, missions, and programs. Through recent research and targeted programs, amateur astronomy outreach is being increasingly recognized by professional astronomers, educators, and other amateurs as a valued and important service. The Night Sky Network program, administered by the ASP, is the first nationwide research-based program specifically targeted to support outreach by amateur astronomers. This Network of trained and informed amateur astronomers can provide a stimulating introduction to your EPO programs as Network members share the night sky with families, students, and youth groups.

  10. Dual Delivery of EPO and BMP2 from a Novel Modular Poly-ɛ-Caprolactone Construct to Increase the Bone Formation in Prefabricated Bone Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Janki Jayesh; Modes, Jane E.; Flanagan, Colleen L.; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Edwards, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) is a biocompatible polymer that has mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering; however, it must be integrated with biologics to stimulate bone formation. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) delivered from PCL produces bone when implanted subcutaneously, and erythropoietin (EPO) works synergistically with BMP2. In this study, EPO and BMP2 are adsorbed separately on two 3D-printed PCL scaffold modules that are assembled for codelivery on a single scaffold structure. This assembled modular PCL scaffold with dual BMP2 and EPO delivery was shown to increase bone growth in an ectopic location when compared with BMP2 delivery along a replicate scaffold structure. EPO (200 IU/mL) and BMP2 (65 μg/mL) were adsorbed onto the outer and inner portions of a modular scaffold, respectively. Protein binding and release studies were first quantified. Subsequently, EPO+BMP2 and BMP2 scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in mice for 4 and 8 weeks, and the regenerated bone was analyzed with microcomputed tomography and histology; 8.6±1.4 μg BMP2 (22%) and 140±29 IU EPO (69.8%) bound to the scaffold and <1% BMP2 and 83% EPO was released in 7 days. Increased endothelial cell proliferation on EPO-adsorbed PCL discs indicated protein bioactivity. At 4 and 8 weeks, dual BMP2 and EPO delivery regenerated more bone (5.1±1.1 and 5.5±1.6 mm3) than BMP2 alone (3.8±1.1 and 4.3±1.7 mm3). BMP2 and EPO scaffolds had more ingrowth (1.4%±0.6%) in the outer module when compared with BMP2 (0.8%±0.3%) at 4 weeks. Dual delivery produced more dense cellular marrow, while BMP2 had more fatty marrow. Dual EPO and BMP2 delivery is a potential method to regenerate bone faster for prefabricated flaps. PMID:25809081

  11. Dual Delivery of EPO and BMP2 from a Novel Modular Poly-ɛ-Caprolactone Construct to Increase the Bone Formation in Prefabricated Bone Flaps.

    PubMed

    Patel, Janki Jayesh; Modes, Jane E; Flanagan, Colleen L; Krebsbach, Paul H; Edwards, Sean P; Hollister, Scott J

    2015-09-01

    Poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) is a biocompatible polymer that has mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering; however, it must be integrated with biologics to stimulate bone formation. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) delivered from PCL produces bone when implanted subcutaneously, and erythropoietin (EPO) works synergistically with BMP2. In this study, EPO and BMP2 are adsorbed separately on two 3D-printed PCL scaffold modules that are assembled for codelivery on a single scaffold structure. This assembled modular PCL scaffold with dual BMP2 and EPO delivery was shown to increase bone growth in an ectopic location when compared with BMP2 delivery along a replicate scaffold structure. EPO (200 IU/mL) and BMP2 (65 μg/mL) were adsorbed onto the outer and inner portions of a modular scaffold, respectively. Protein binding and release studies were first quantified. Subsequently, EPO+BMP2 and BMP2 scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in mice for 4 and 8 weeks, and the regenerated bone was analyzed with microcomputed tomography and histology; 8.6±1.4 μg BMP2 (22%) and 140±29 IU EPO (69.8%) bound to the scaffold and <1% BMP2 and 83% EPO was released in 7 days. Increased endothelial cell proliferation on EPO-adsorbed PCL discs indicated protein bioactivity. At 4 and 8 weeks, dual BMP2 and EPO delivery regenerated more bone (5.1±1.1 and 5.5±1.6 mm(3)) than BMP2 alone (3.8±1.1 and 4.3±1.7 mm(3)). BMP2 and EPO scaffolds had more ingrowth (1.4%±0.6%) in the outer module when compared with BMP2 (0.8%±0.3%) at 4 weeks. Dual delivery produced more dense cellular marrow, while BMP2 had more fatty marrow. Dual EPO and BMP2 delivery is a potential method to regenerate bone faster for prefabricated flaps.

  12. The EPOS-CC Score: An Integration of Independent, Tumor- and Patient-Associated Risk Factors to Predict 5-years Overall Survival Following Colorectal Cancer Surgery.

    PubMed

    Haga, Yoshio; Ikejiri, Koji; Wada, Yasuo; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Koike, Shoichiro; Nakamura, Seiji; Koseki, Masato

    2015-06-01

    Surgical audit is an essential task for the estimation of postoperative outcome and comparison of quality of care. Previous studies on surgical audits focused on short-term outcomes, such as postoperative mortality. We propose a surgical audit evaluating long-term outcome following colorectal cancer surgery. The predictive model for this audit is designated as 'Estimation of Postoperative Overall Survival for Colorectal Cancer (EPOS-CC)'. Thirty-one tumor-related and physiological variables were prospectively collected in 889 patients undergoing elective resection for colorectal cancer between April 2005 and April 2007 in 16 Japanese hospitals. Postoperative overall survival was assessed over a 5-years period. The EPOS-CC score was established by selecting significant variables in a uni- and multivariate analysis and allocating a risk-adjusted multiplication factor to each variable using Cox regression analysis. For validation, the EPOS-CC score was compared to the predictive power of UICC stage. Inter-hospital variability of the observed-to-estimated 5-years survival was assessed to estimate quality of care. Among the 889 patients, 804 (90%) completed the 5-years follow-up. Univariate analysis displayed a significant correlation with 5-years survival for 14 physiological and nine tumor-related variables (p < 0.005). Highly significant p-values below 0.0001 were found for age, ASA score, severe pulmonary disease, respiratory history, performance status, hypoalbuminemia, alteration of hemoglobin, serum sodium level, and for all histological variables except tumor location. Age, TNM stage, lymphatic invasion, performance status, and serum sodium level were independent variables in the multivariate analysis and were entered the EPOS-CC model for the prediction of survival. Risk-adjusted multiplication factors between 1.5 (distant metastasis) and 0.16 (serum sodium level) were accorded to the different variables. The predictive power of EPOS-CC was superior to the one

  13. Interactive Panel and Audience Discussion: The Future is Here: Can EPO Navigate the Digital Age?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipp, S. S.; Dribin, N.; Gay, P. L.; Stockman, S.

    2010-08-01

    The digital divide refers to the gap between individuals with access to digital technology and those with limited or no access. In the EPO profession there is another digital divide: the divide between EPO practitioners who believe Twitter and other forms of social networking are the downfall of literacy—and perhaps of American society, and those who see boundless potential for engaging a global audience in Earth and space science. One thing is certain: we're not in our parent's world anymore—our's is a world increasingly run by electrons and hand-held devices that inform, entertain, connect, and fragment our audiences into an infinite number of special-interest groups with shortened attention spans that form and reform in nonlinear ways. How does EPO evolve to match the new media and electronic realities? Is there still a place for storytelling, for laddered learning experiences, for traditional methods? How do we adapt? How do we rise to the new challenges of the new media age?

  14. The SDO Education and Outreach (E/PO) Program: Changing Perceptions One Program at a Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drobnes, E.; Littleton, A.; Pesnell, W. D.; Buhr, S.; Beck, K.; Durscher, R.; Hill, S.; McCaffrey, M.; McKenzie, D. E.; Myers, D.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program began as a series of discrete efforts implemented by each of the instrument teams and has evolved into a well-rounded program with a full suite of national and international programs. The SDO E/PO team has put forth much effort in the past few years to increase our cohesiveness by adopting common goals and increasing the amount of overlap between our programs. In this paper, we outline the context and overall philosophy for our combined programs, present a brief overview of all SDO E/PO programs along with more detailed highlight of a few key programs, followed by a review of our results up to date. Concluding is a summary of the successes, failures, and lessons learned that future missions can use as a guide, while further incorporating their own content to enhance the public's knowledge and appreciation of NASA?s science and technology as well as its benefit to society.

  15. 42 CFR 414.335 - Payment for EPO furnished to a home dialysis patient for use in the home.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for EPO furnished to a home dialysis patient for use in the home. 414.335 Section 414.335 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... for EPO furnished to a home dialysis patient for use in the home. (a) Prior to January 1, 2011...

  16. A Planetary Geophysicist Does EPO: Lessons Learned Along the Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, W. S.

    2011-12-01

    My "day job" is numerical modeling of the interiors of the terrestrial planets, but I have also done EPO projects for the last 17 years while at the Lunar and Planetary Institute. These range from single, hour long talks in classrooms or astronomy clubs, to week-long summer workshops for teachers and librarians, and even semester-long programs, along with a number of curriculum development projects. EPO projects are a great way to help develop both the next generation of scientists and, more importantly, of scientifically literate citizens and taxpayers. Here are a few lessons learned along the way in the school of hard knocks. (1) An engaging delivery style is even more important in EPO presentations than it is in college lectures or conference presentations. Emphasize a few key concepts rather than numerous facts, and keep the jargon out. Good analogies can go a long way towards explaining a concept to any age group. I teach the role of size in planetary cooling by first asking students how long it takes to cook food of various sizes (a hamburger, roast beef, turkey). (2) If you will be working with a group of students for more than one class period, classroom friendly activities strengthen the learning process. Such activities do not need to be elaborate - when teaching about the Moon, I sometimes assign students to take their parents outside at night and show them how to find lava flows on the Moon. Teachers usually need to have classroom activities that are aligned to state or national teaching standards. Fortunately, many effective, standards-aligned activities already exist, so you don't need to reinvent the wheel. For a useful listing of planetary science and astronomy activities, see the LPI website www.lpi.usra.edu/education/resources/ (3) Although EPO work can be personally rewarding, it is not always well rewarded in a professional context, and it can be difficult to find the time and financial resources to sustain major projects. We sometimes use a

  17. IS-EPOS - a prototype of EPOS Thematic Core Service for seismic processes induced by human operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Lasocki, Stanislaw; Leptokaropoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-05-01

    The community focused on seismic processes induced by human operations has been organized within EPOS Integration Program as Working Group 10 Infrastructure for Georesources. This group has brought together representatives from the scientific community and industry from 13 European countries. WG10 aims to integrate the research infrastructure (RI) in the area of seismicity induced (IS) by human activity: tremors and rockbursts in underground mines, seismicity associated with conventional and unconventional oil and gas production, induced by geothermal energy extraction and by underground reposition and storage of liquids (e.g. water disposal associated with energy extraction) and gases (CO2 sequestration, inter alia) and triggered by filling surface water reservoirs, etc. WG10 priority is to create new research opportunities in the field responding to global challenges connected with exploitation of georesources. WG10 has prepared the model of integration fulfilling the scientific mission and raising the visibility of stakeholders. The end-state Induced Seismicity Thematic Core Service (IS TCS) has been designed together with key metrics for TCS benefits in four areas: scientific, societal, economic and capacity building. IS-EPOS project, funded by National Centre for Research and Development, Poland within the program "Innovative Economy Operational Program Priority Axis 2 - R&D Infrastructure", aims at building a prototype of IS TCS. The prototype will implement fully the designed logic of IS TCS. Research infrastructure integrated within the prototype will comprise altogether seven comprehensive data cases of seismicity linked to deep mining related, associating geothermal production and triggered by reservoir impoundment. The implemented thematic services will enable studies within the use-case "Clustering of induced earthquakes". The IS TCS prototype is expected to reach full functionality by the end of 2014.

  18. 42 CFR 414.335 - Payment for EPO furnished to a home dialysis patient for use in the home.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for EPO furnished to a home dialysis patient for use in the home. 414.335 Section 414.335 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....335 Payment for EPO furnished to a home dialysis patient for use in the home. (a) Prior to January 1...

  19. Dawn Mission E/PO Use of NASA Archived Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Dawn Mission is a mission in time to the very origins of the solar system. We will orbit both Vesta and Ceres for extended periods of time, collecting data that we hope will answer fundamental questions about the formation of planet earth and the solar system in general. Because of the length of this mission, our EPO plan has a unique opportunity to involve students, teachers, parents, and the general public in the anticipation and excitement of the cruise, arrival, and exploration of these asteroids. This presentation focuses on the Clickworkers activity of the Dawn EPO because of its extensive repurposing of NASA images as EPO resources. Clickworkers was designed by Bob Kanefsky at NASA AMES. Currently, it engages the public in counting and classifying craters using NASA images of Mars. The Dawn mission is developing and extending the curricular material within the existing Clickworkers activity as well as adding images of Eros and of course eventually, Vesta and Ceres. Our plan is to use the Clickworkers activity and accompanying curricular material to inform and educate the general public in preparation for the first images from Vesta and then Ceres. For example, what can be learned from counting and classifying craters. We are also informing people of the scientific process by using images from several of NASA's missions to demonstrate the accumulation of facts and information that is the process of science. We will present and discuss our difficulties: . First of which is preparing appropriate information about cratering for people. Scientists have developed an understanding of crater counting, classification, and analysis over years of study and research. How do we scaffold enough information to make the activity meaningful and a learning experience for our clients. . Another difficulty is communicating key concepts in terms that are accessible to space science neophytes. The scaffolding may be correct, but not in terms that the general public can relate

  20. Pettit prepares for a NASA EPO Activity in the JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-14

    ISS030-E-074053 (14 Feb. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Don Pettit, Expedition 30 flight engineer, prepares for a NASA Education Payload Operations (EPO) activity in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. Pettit is working with a soft Earth ball and an eraser tied to dental floss to demonstrate the space station orbiting Earth.

  1. Pettit prepares for a NASA EPO Activity in the JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-14

    ISS030-E-074051 (14 Feb. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Don Pettit, Expedition 30 flight engineer, prepares for a NASA Education Payload Operations (EPO) activity in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. Pettit is working with a soft Earth ball and an eraser tied to dental floss to demonstrate the space station orbiting Earth.

  2. "A Scientist Has Many Things to Do:" EPO Strategies that Focus on the Processes of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laursen, S. L.; Brickley, A. L.

    2011-09-01

    Scientists' effort in education and public outreach (EPO) is best invested in sharing their expertise on the nature and processes of science - the "understandings of science" that are emphasized in the National Science Education Standards, but that are difficult to teach and poorly supported by existing curricular materials. These understandings address the intellectual process of science - posing questions, gathering and interpreting evidence - and the social process of science as a human endeavor for building knowledge. We share several ways of incorporating concepts about the nature and processes of science into EP/O activities and making them focal points in their own right. Hands-on activities used at science festivals and in classrooms and professional development workshops illustrate key scientific thinking skills such as observing, classifying, making predictions, and drawing inferences. A more comprehensive approach is exemplified by Upward and Outward: Scientific Inquiry on the Tibetan Plateau, a 20-minute educational documentary film for school science classrooms and teacher professional development. The film portrays the intellectual and human processes of science through an inside view of a research project; classroom assessments offer evidence of its impact on students' ideas about these processes.

  3. Centre for Research Infrastructure of Polish GNSS Data - response and possible contribution to EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araszkiewicz, Andrzej; Rohm, Witold; Bosy, Jaroslaw; Szolucha, Marcin; Kaplon, Jan; Kroszczynski, Krzysztof

    2017-04-01

    In the frame of the first call under Action 4.2: Development of modern research infrastructure of the science sector in the Smart Growth Operational Programme 2014-2020 in the late of 2016 the "EPOS-PL" project has launched. Following institutes are responsible for the implementation of this project: Institute of Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences - Project Leader, Academic Computer Centre Cyfronet AGH University of Science and Technology, Central Mining Institute, the Institute of Geodesy and Cartography, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Military University of Technology. In addition, resources constituting entrepreneur's own contribution will come from the Polish Mining Group. Research Infrastructure EPOS-PL will integrate both existing and newly built National Research Infrastructures (Theme Centre for Research Infrastructures), which, under the premise of the program EPOS, are financed exclusively by the national founds. In addition, the e-science platform will be developed. The Centre for Research Infrastructure of GNSS Data (CIBDG - Task 5) will be built based on the experience and facilities of two institutions: Military University of Technology and Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences. The project includes the construction of the National GNNS Repository with data QC procedures and adaptation of two Regional GNNS Analysis Centres for rapid and long-term geodynamical monitoring.

  4. Training Young Astronomers in EPO: An Update on the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, A.; Fienberg, R. T.; Gurton, S.; Schmitt, A. H.; Schatz, D.; Prather, E. E.

    2014-07-01

    The American Astronomical Society, with organizations active in EPO, has launched professional-development workshops and a community of practice to help improve early-career astronomers' ability to communicate effectively. Called “Astronomy Ambassadors,” the program provides mentoring and training for participants, from advanced undergraduates to beginning faculty. By learning to implement effective EPO strategies, Ambassadors become better teachers, meeting presenters, and representatives of our science to the public and government. Because young astronomers are a more diverse group than those who now do most outreach, they help the astronomy community present a more multicultural and gender-balanced face to the public, enabling underserved groups to see themselves as scientists. Ambassadors are given a library of outreach activities and materials, including many developed by cooperating organizations such as the ASP, plus some that have been created by Andrew Fraknoi specifically for this program.

  5. EPOS: Integrating seismological Research Infrastructures within Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck Van, Torild; Clinton, John; Haslinger, Florian; Michelini, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    Seismological data, products and models are currently produced in Europe within individual countries or research organizations, and with the contribution of coordinating organizations like ORFEUS and EMSC. In spite of these partly scattered resources, significant scientific results are obtained, excellent monitoring and information systems are operational and a huge amount of research quality data is being archived and disseminated. The seismological community, however, realizes that an effective European-scale integration of seismological and related geophysical data, products and models, combined with broad and easy access, is needed to facilitate future top level geoscience, for example, to appropriately harness the technological advancements enabling large scale and near-real time data processing. Here we present the technical concepts and developments within European seismology that will build the next generation of integrated services. Within the EPOS initiative and a number of related projects, where seismology infrastructure and IT developments are merging, in depth discussions are on-going on how to realize an effective integration. Concepts and visions addressing the obviously complex challenges resulting from the current highly distributed facilities and resources in Europe are emerging and are already partly being implemented. We will provide an overview of developments within key EU projects (NERA, VERCE, COOPEUS, EUDAT, REAKT, COMMIT, etc) and demonstrate how these are in coherence with EPOS and other on-going global initiatives. Within seismology current focus is on addressing IT related challenges to a) organize distributed data archives, develop metadata attributes for improved data searching, specifically including quality indicators, and define products from data and/or models, and b) define and create(on-line) monitoring, data access and processing tools. While developments to meet those challenges originate partly from within the community

  6. 2017 Solar Eclipse in Hopkinsville, KY: E/PO Feedback from Two Venues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Timothy E.; Consolmagno, Guy

    2017-10-01

    Hopkinsville, Kentucky was the largest town in the region of maximum totality for the 21 August 2017 Solar Eclipse, and transformed itself into “Eclipseville” with extensive media attention. Here we give 2 on-the-ground reports on education and public outreach (E/PO) activities from Hopkinsville. One of us (TD) partnered with the Kentucky Division of Emergency Management (KYEM) and was in the Hopkinsville VIP area, and the other (GC) led a series of E/PO events at the Hopkinsville Church of Ss. Peter & Paul, which were nationally advertised in diocesan newspapers. In addition, both of us were interviewed extensively by local and national media before the event. Pre-event planning by KYEM extended for over a year, and culminated in a 6-hour, 12 July 2017 Tabletop Exercise (TTX) run by FEMA. This face-to-face workshop drew over 250 participants, including Kentucky’s Lt. Governor, health and public safety officials at the state-level and from the 21 Kentucky counties in the path of totality, mayors and convention-bureau officials from the affected KY towns, the KY National Guard, the U.S. Depts. of Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, and Transportation, the National Weather Service, the U.S. Coast Guard for riverboat traffic, the U.S. Forest Service, the American Red Cross, representatives from ATT, Verizon and Sprint, and representatives from local universities—it was the largest TTX in Kentucky’s history. Here, we report on E/PO feedback we assembled from the VIP and parochial sites, including the most frequently asked questions, which types of answers seemed to be most effective, and how actual events compared with the large-crowd preparations and planning.

  7. Success of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Education & Public Outreach (E/PO) in Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, M. S.; Lowder, S. C.; McKenzie, D. E.

    2013-03-01

    The Space Public Outreach Team (SPOT) program at Montana State University (MSU) is the main component of SDO E/PO efforts in Montana. SPOT brings energetic presentations of recent science & NASA missions to students in primary & secondary schools. Presenters are university undergraduates that visit a diverse group of K-12 students from both rural & urban areas of Montana. This program is extremely cost effective, a valuable service-learning experience for undergraduates at MSU and has repeatedly received praise from both teachers and students. A complementary effort for training schoolteachers entitled NASA Education Activity Training (NEAT) is also employed. NEAT illustrates to teachers inexpensive and highly effective methods for demonstrating difficult science concepts to their students. We will highlight the successes and lessons learned from SPOT & NEAT, so that other E/PO programs can use it as a template to further science literacy in our nation's schools.

  8. Comparison between two treatment protocols with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) in the treatment of late anemia in neonates with Rh-isoimmunization.

    PubMed

    Zuppa, A A; Alighieri, G; Fracchiolla, A; Catenazzi, P; D'Antuono, A; Riccardi, R; Cavani, M; Romagnoli, C

    2012-01-01

    [corrected] The Rh-hemolytic disease can lead to a late anemia by hemolytic and hyporigenerative mechanism. We compared the effectiveness of rHuEPO in two care protocols that differ for doses of rHuEPO administrated and for timing of administration. A cohort of 14 neonates was investigated. The neonates were treated with two different protocols. Protocol A: a dose of 200 U/kg/day of rHuEpo administered subcutaneously starting from the end of the second week of life; Protocol B: a dose of 400 U/kg/day of rHuEpo administered subcutaneously starting from the end of the first week of life. The hematocrit values in the protocol A group decreased during treatment (32,5% vs 25,2%), whereas the hematocrit value in protocol B group remained almost stable (38,7% vs 42,8%). The mean numbers of platelets remained stable in both groups while neutrophils increased in protocol A group and decreased in protocol B (p<0,05). Reticulocyte count increased during treatment in both groups, although only in protocol B group it was statistically significative (p<0,05). Our results suggest a similar efficacy between the two treatment protocols. Increasing doses of rHuEPO do not seem enhancing their effectiveness and the incidence of side effects.

  9. Generation of transgenic chickens expressing the human erythropoietin (hEPO) gene in an oviduct-specific manner: Production of transgenic chicken eggs containing human erythropoietin in egg whites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohyang; Nam, Yu Hwa; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2018-01-01

    The transgenic chicken has been considered as a prospective bioreactor for large-scale production of costly pharmaceutical proteins. In the present study, we report successful generation of transgenic hens that lay eggs containing a high concentration of human erythropoietin (hEPO) in the ovalbumin. Using a feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based pseudotyped lentivirus vector enveloped with G glycoproteins of the vesicular stomatitis virus, the replication-defective vector virus carrying the hEPO gene under the control of the chicken ovalbumin promoter was microinjected to the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid chicken eggs (stage X). Stable germline transmission of the hEPO transgene to the G1 progeny, which were non-mosaic and hemizygous for the hEPO gene under the ovalbumin promoter, was confirmed by mating of a G0 rooster with non-transgenic hens. Quantitative analysis of hEPO in the egg whites and in the blood samples taken from G1 transgenic chickens showed 4,810 ~ 6,600 IU/ml (40.1 ~ 55.0 μg/ml) and almost no detectable concentration, respectively, indicating tightly regulated oviduct-specific expression of the hEPO transgene. In terms of biological activity, there was no difference between the recombinant hEPO contained in the transgenic egg white and the commercially available counterpart, in vitro. We suggest that these results imply an important step toward efficient production of human cytokines from a transgenic animal bioreactor. PMID:29847554

  10. Development of the AuScope Australian Earth Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawling, T.

    2017-12-01

    Advances in monitoring technology and significant investment in new national research initiatives, will provide significant new opportunities for delivery of novel geoscience data streams from across the Australian continent over the next decade. The AuScope Australian Earth Observing System (AEOS) is linking field and laboratory infrastructure across Australia to form a national sensor array focusing on the Solid Earth. As such AuScope is working with these programs to deploy observational infrastructure, including MT, passive seismic, and GNSS networks across the entire Australian Continent. Where possible the observational grid will be co-located with strategic basement drilling in areas of shallow cover and tied with national reflection seismic and sampling transects. This integrated suite of distributed earth observation and imaging sensors will provide unprecedented imaging fidelity of our crust, across all length and time scales, to fundamental and applied researchers in the earth, environmental and geospatial sciences. The AEOS will the Earth Science community's Square Kilometer Array (SKA) - a distributed telescope that looks INTO the earth rather than away from it - a 10 million SKA. The AEOS is strongly aligned with other community strategic initiatives including the UNCOVER research program as well as other National Collaborative Research Infrastructure programs such as the Terrestrial Environmental Research Network (TERN) and the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) providing an interdisciplinary collaboration platform across the earth and environmental sciences. There is also very close alignment between AuScope and similar international programs such as EPOS, the USArray and EarthCube - potential collaborative linkages we are currently in the process of pursuing more fomally. The AuScope AEOS Infrastructure System is ultimately designed to enable the progressive construction, refinement and ongoing enrichment of a live, "FAIR" four

  11. The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Education and Outreach (E/PO) Program: Changing Perceptions One Program at a Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drobnes, Emilie; Littleton, A.; Pesnell, William D.; Beck, K.; Buhr, S.; Durscher, R.; Hill, S.; McCaffrey, M.; McKenzie, D. E.; Myers, D.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We outline the context and overall philosophy for the combined Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program, present a brief overview of all SDO E/PO programs along with more detailed highlights of a few key programs, followed by a review of our results to date, conclude a summary of the successes, failures, and lessons learned, which future missions can use as a guide, while incorporating their own content to enhance the public's knowledge and appreciation of science and technology as well as its benefit to society.

  12. Engaging Scientists in Meaningful E/PO: NASA Science4Girls and Their Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Smith, D. A.; Bleacher, L.; Hauck, K.; Soeffing, C.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education and Public Outreach Forums coordinate the participation of SMD education and public outreach (EPO) programs in Women's History Month through the NASA Science4Girls and Their Families initiative. The initiative partners NASA science education programs with public libraries to provide NASA-themed hands-on education activities for girls and their families. These NASA science education programs are mission- and grant-based E/PO programs are uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. As such, the initiative engages girls in all four NASA science discipline areas (Astrophysics, Earth Science, Planetary Science, and Heliophysics), which enables audiences to experience the full range of NASA science topics and the different career skills each requires. The events focus on engaging underserved and underrepresented audiences in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) via use of research-based best practices, collaborations with libraries, partnerships with local and national organizations, and remote engagement of audiences.

  13. High-versus low-dose erythropoietin in extremely low birth weight infants. The European Multicenter rhEPO Study Group.

    PubMed

    Maier, R F; Obladen, M; Kattner, E; Natzschka, J; Messer, J; Regazzoni, B M; Speer, C P; Fellman, V; Grauel, E L; Groneck, P; Wagner, M; Moriette, G; Salle, B L; Verellen, G; Scigalla, P

    1998-05-01

    To investigate whether a weekly 1500 IU/kg dose of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is more effective than a dose of 750 IU/kg/week in preventing anemia and reducing the transfusion need in infants with birth weights less than 1000 gm. In a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial, 184 infants with birth weights between 500 and 999 gm were treated with either rhEPO 750 (low-dose group) or 1500 IU/kg/week (high-dose group) from day 3 of life until 37 weeks' corrected age. Thirty-two percent of the infants in each group did not receive any transfusion during the treatment period. The total volume of erythrocytes received was similar in each group. The success rate, defined as no transfusion needed and hematocrit value 0.30 L/L or greater, was 27.6% in the low-dose and 29.5% in the high-dose group (p = 0.96). Doubling the rhEPO dose of 750 IU/kg/week is not indicated in infants with birth weights less than 1000 gm.

  14. Epos TCS Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manunta, Michele; Mandea, Mioara; Fernández-Turiel, José Luis; Stramondo, Salvatore; Wright, Tim; Walter, Thomas; Bally, Philippe; Casu, Francesco; Zeni, Giovanni; Buonanno, Sabatino; Zinno, Ivana; Tizzani, Pietro; Castaldo, Raffaele; Ostanciaux, Emilie; Diament, Michel; Hooper, Andy; Maccaferri, Francesco; Lanari, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    TCS Satellite Data is devoted to provide Earth Observation (EO) services, transversal with respect to the large EPOS community, suitable to be used in several application scenarios. In particular, the main goal is to contribute with mature services that have already well demonstrated their effectiveness and relevance in investigating the physical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and unrest episodes as well as those driving tectonics and Earth surface dynamics. The TCS Satellite Data will provide two kinds of services: satellite products/services, and Value-added satellite products/services. The satellite products/services are composed of three (EPOSAR, GDM and COMET) well-identified and partly already operational elements for delivering Level 1 products. Such services will be devoted to the generation of SAR interferograms, DTM and ground displacement maps through the exploitation of different advanced EO techniques for InSAR and optical data analysis. The Value-added satellite products/services are composed of 4 elements (EPOSAR, 3D-Def, Mod and COMET) of Level 2 and 3 products. Such services integrate satellite and in situ measurements and observations to retrieve information on source mechanism, such as the geometry (spatial location, depth, volume changes) and the physical parameters of the deformation sources, through the exploitation of modelling approaches. The TCS Satellite Data will provide products in two different processing and delivery modes: 1- surveillance mode - routinely product generation; 2- on demand mode - product generation performed on demand by the user. Concerning the surveillance mode, the goal is providing continuous satellite measurements in areas of particular interest from a geophysical perspective (supersites). The objective is the detection of displacement patterns changing along time and their geophysical explanation. This is a valid approach for inter-seismic movements and volcanic unrest, post-seismic and post

  15. Comparative response to single or divided doses of parenteral iron for functional iron deficiency in hemodialysis patients receiving erythropoietin (EPO).

    PubMed

    Saltissi, D; Sauvage, D; Westhuyzen, J

    1998-01-01

    EPO treatment rapidly corrects anemia in patients with end-stage renal failure treated with hemodialysis, as long as sufficient iron is available. Absolute and relative (to demand) iron deficiency blunts the erythropoietic response and parenteral iron is frequently required during the course of therapy to restore EPO efficacy. Since the optimum time course of iron administration to restore EPO response in the short term is unknown, we compared three protocols of i.v. iron dextran administration in apparent functionally iron-deficient HD patients on oral iron therapy (hemoglobin < 10.0 g/dl plus ferritin < 100 micrograms/l and/or transferrin saturation < 20%). Intravenous iron (Imferon; Fisons Pty Ltd.) was given either as a single 600 mg dose (n = 15, Group I) or in divided doses of 100 mg administered on 6 successive dialyses (n = 14, Group II) or weekly for 6 weeks (n = 14, Group III). Response was monitored for 8 weeks. No adverse effects were observed. Collectively, mean hemoglobin increased (p < 0.01) by 0.4-0.5 g/dl plateauing at 4 weeks (between group comparison, p = 0.92). Mean ferritin concentrations changed with time (p < 0.01), peaking at 2 weeks in Groups I and II and at 4 weeks in Group III. Mean transferrin saturation levels also increased during the study (p < 0.001). The between group comparisons for the trends in iron indices were significant (p < 0.01 and 0.05 respectively). As there were no clinically significant differences in hemoglobin response at 4 weeks, single dose iron infusion would seem to be the most expedient in the short term, however frequent small doses are similarly effective.

  16. Minimal doses of a sequence-optimized transgene mediate high-level and long-term EPO expression in vivo: challenging CpG-free gene design.

    PubMed

    Kosovac, D; Wild, J; Ludwig, C; Meissner, S; Bauer, A P; Wagner, R

    2011-02-01

    Advanced gene delivery techniques can be combined with rational gene design to further improve the efficiency of plasmid DNA (pDNA)-mediated transgene expression in vivo. Herein, we analyzed the influence of intragenic sequence modifications on transgene expression in vitro and in vivo using murine erythropoietin (mEPO) as a transgene model. A single electro-gene transfer of an RNA- and codon-optimized mEPOopt gene into skeletal muscle resulted in a 3- to 4-fold increase of mEPO production sustained for >1 year and triggered a significant increase in hematocrit and hemoglobin without causing adverse effects. mEPO expression and hematologic levels were significantly lower when using comparable amounts of the wild type (mEPOwt) gene and only marginal effects were induced by mEPOΔCpG lacking intragenic CpG dinucleotides, even at high pDNA amounts. Corresponding with these observations, in vitro analysis of transfected cells revealed a 2- to 3-fold increased (mEPOopt) and 50% decreased (mEPOΔCpG) erythropoietin expression compared with mEPOwt, respectively. RNA analyses demonstrated that the specific design of the transgene sequence influenced expression levels by modulating transcriptional activity and nuclear plus cytoplasmic RNA amounts rather than translation. In sum, whereas CpG depletion negatively interferes with efficient expression in postmitotic tissues, mEPOopt doses <0.5 μg were sufficient to trigger optimal long-term hematologic effects encouraging the use of sequence-optimized transgenes to further reduce effective pDNA amounts.

  17. A novel reporter gene assay for recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yushuai; Zhou, Yong; Yu, Lei; Li, Xiang; Shi, Xinchang; Qin, Xi; Rao, Chunming; Wang, Junzhi

    2014-11-01

    Accurate determination of in vitro biological activity of therapeutic erythropoietin is essential in quality control of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) pharmaceutical products. However, most of currently-used methods leave much to be desired so that a simpler, quicker and more accurate method is urgently needed. The bioassay described here utilizes a sub clone of UT-7/epo cell line stably transfected with luciferase gene under the control of sis inducible element and interferon γ-activated sequence element promoter. Active erythropoietin could induce the expression of luciferase by signaling through the erythropoietin receptor and the dose-response curve showed good linearity, yielding a coefficient of determination of 0.99 or higher. The optimized assay was simpler with the operation completed within 24h and more sensitive with EC50 being 0.077IU/mL. The accuracy estimates ranged from 81.7% to 102.4%, and both intra-assay and inter-assay precision was below 15.0%. The robustness of the assay was demonstrated by no effect of passage levels of the cells on the performance of the assay (p values: 0.772 for sample 1 and 0.943 for sample 2). Besides, Bland-Altman analysis showed a high consistency of the new assay with in vivo reticulocyte assay in results. These results suggested that the new reporter gene assay can be a viable supplement to the traditional reticulocyte assay and employed in potency determination of rHuEPO pharmaceutical products. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. EPOS Thematic Core Service Anthropogenic Hazards for SHEER project: maintain, process and manage your project research data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Lasocki, Stanislaw; Staszek, Monika; Olszewska, Dorota; Urban, Pawel; Jaroslawski, Janusz; Cielesta, Szymon; Mirek, Janusz; Wiszniowski, Jan; Picozzi, Matteo; Solaro, Giuseppe; Pringle, Jamie; Toon, Sam; Cesca, Simone; Kuehn, Daniela; Ruigrok, Elmer; Gunning, Andrew; Isherwood, Catherine

    2017-04-01

    The main objective of the "Shale gas exploration and exploitation induced risks - SHEER" project (Horizon 2020, call LCE 16-2014) is to develop a probabilistic methodology to assess and mitigate the short- and the long-term environmental risks associated with the exploration and exploitation of shale gas. To this end, the SHEER project makes use of a large amount of heterogeneous data of various types. This data, from different disciplines of science e.g. geophysical, geochemical, geological, technological, etc., must be homogenized, harmonized and made accessible exclusively for all project participants. This requires to develop an over-arching structure for high-level multidisciplinary data integration. The bespoke solution is provided by Thematic Core Service Anthropogenic Hazards (TCS AH) developed in the framework of European Plate Observing System Program (https://tcs.ah-epos.eu/, infrastructural projects IS-EPOS, POIG.02.03.00-14-090/13-00 and EPOS IP, H2020-INFRADEV-1-2015-1). TCS AH provides virtual access to a comprehensive, wide-scale and high quality research infrastructure in the field of induced seismicity and other anthropogenic hazards evoked by exploration and exploitation of geo-resources. TCS AH is designed as a functional e-research environment to ensure a researcher the maximum possible freedom for experimentation by providing a virtual laboratory flexible to create own workspace for processing streams. A data-management process promotes the use of research infrastructure in novel ways providing an access to (i) data gathered in the so-called "episodes", comprehensively describing a geophysical process, induced or triggered by human technological activity, which under certain circumstances can become hazardous for people, infrastructure and the environment, (ii) problem-oriented, specific services, with the particular attention devoted to methods analyzing correlations between technology, geophysical response and resulting hazards, (iii) the

  19. STEREO-IMPACT E/PO at NASA's Sun-Earth Day Event: Participation in Total Eclipse 2006 Webcast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, N.; Peticolas, L. M.; Mendez, B. J.; Luhmann, J. G.; Higdon, R.

    2006-05-01

    The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) is planned for launch in late Summer 2006. STEREO will study the Sun with two spacecraft in orbit around the Sun moving on opposite sides of Earth. The primary science goal is to understand the nature of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). This presentation will focus on one of the informal education efforts of our E/PO program for the IMPACT instrument suite aboard STEREO. We will share our participation in NASA's Sun-Earth Day event which is scheduled to coincide with a total solar eclipse in March and is titled In a Different Light. We will show how this live eclipse Webcast, which reaches thousands of science center attendees, can inspire the public to observe, understand and be part of the Sun-Earth-Moon system. We will present video clips of STEREO-IMPACT team members Janet Luhmann and Nahide Craig participating in the Exploratorium's live Webcast of the 2006 solar eclipse on location from Side, Turkey, and the experiences and remarks of the other STEREO scientist from the path of totality from Africa.

  20. EPOS Thematic Core Service ANTHROPOGENIC HAZARDS (TCS AH) - development of e-research platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlecka-Sikora, Beata

    2017-04-01

    TCS AH is based on IS-EPOS Platform. The Platform facilitates research on anthropogenic hazards and is available online, free of charge https://tcs.ah-epos.eu/. The Platform is a final product of the IS-EPOS project, founded by the national programme - POIG - which was implemented in 2013-2015 (POIG.02.03.00-14-090/13-00). The platform is a result of a joint work of scientific community and industrial partners. Currently, the development of TCS AH is carried under EPOS IP project (H2020-INFRADEV-1-2015-1, INFRADEV-3-2015). Platform is an open virtual access point for researchers and Ph. D. students interested in anthropogenic seismicity and related hazards. This environment is designed to ensure a researcher the maximum possible liberty for experimentation by providing a virtual laboratory, in which the researcher can design own processing streams and process the data integrated on the platform. TCS AH integrates: data and specific high-level services. Data gathered in the so-called "episodes", comprehensively describing a geophysical process, induced or triggered by human technological activity, which, under certain circumstances can become hazardous for people, infrastructure and the environment. 7 sets of seismic, geological and technological data were made available on the Platform. The data come from Poland, Germany, UK and Vietnam, and refer to underground mining, reservoir impoundment, shale gas exploitation and geothermal energy production. The next at least 19 new episodes related to conventional hydrocarbon extraction, reservoir treatment, underground mining and geothermal energy production are being integrated within the framework of EPOS IP project. The heterogeneous multi-disciplinary data (seismic, displacement, geomechanical data, production data etc.) are transformed to unified structures to form integrated and validated datasets. To deal with this various data the problem-oriented services were designed and implemented. The particular attention

  1. The Invisible Universe Online for Teachers - A SOFIA and SIRTF EPO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, A.; Bennett, M.; Buxner, S.; Devore, E.; Keller, J.; Slater, T.; Thaller, M.; Conceptual Astronomy; Physics Education Research CAPER Team

    2003-12-01

    The SOFIA and SIRTF EPO Programs have partnered with the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team in designing, evaluating, and facilitating an online program for K-12 teachers to experience multiwavelength astronomy. An aggressive approach to online course design and delivery has resulted in a highly successful learning experience for teacher-participants. Important aspects of the Invisible Universe Online will eventually be used as a part of SOFIA's Airborne Ambassadors Program for pre-flight training of educators. The Invisible Universe Online is delivered via WebCT through the Montana State University National Teacher Enhancement Network (http://btc.montana.edu/). Currently in its fourth semester, the course has served 115 K-12 teachers. This distance learning online class presents our search for astronomical origins and provides an enhanced understanding of how astronomers use all energies of light to unfold the secrets of the universe. We cover the long chain of events from the birth of the universe through the formation of galaxies, stars, and planets by focusing on the scientific questions, technological challenges, and space missions pursuing this search for origins. Through textbook and internet readings, inquiry exploration with interactive java applets, and asynchronous discussions, we help our students achieve the following course goals: develop scientific background knowledge of astronomical objects and phenomena at multiple wavelengths; understand contemporary scientific research questions related to how galaxies formed in the early universe and how stars and planetary systems form and evolve; describe strategies and technologies for using non-visible wavelengths of EM radiation to study various phenomena; and integrate related issues of astronomical science and technology into K-12 classrooms. This course is being developed, evaluated, and offered through the support of SOFIA and SIRTF EPO Programs, two NASA infrared missions

  2. Increasing the use of evaluation data collection in an EPO program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taber, J. J.; Bohon, W.; Bravo, T. K.; Dordevic, M.; Dorr, P. M.; Hubenthal, M.; Johnson, J. A.; Sumy, D.; Welti, R.; Davis, H. B.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past two years, the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program has sought to increase the evaluation rigor of its programs and products. Specifically we sought to make evaluation an integral part of our work; enabling staff to demonstrate why we do the activities we do, enhancing the impact or our products/programs, and empowering staff to make evidence-based claims. The Collaborative Impact Analysis Method (Davis and Scalice, 2015) was selected as it allowed us to combine staff's knowledge of programs, audiences and content with the expertise of an outside evaluation expert, through consultations and a qualitative rubric assessing the initial state of each product/program's evaluation. Staff then developed action plans to make improvements to the programs over time. A key part of the initial action plans has been the collection and analysis of new evaluation data. The most frequently used tools were surveys as they were relatively straightforward to implement and analyze, and could be adapted for different situations. Examples include: brand awareness, value of booth interactions, assessing community interest in a data app, and user surveys of social media and specific web pages. Other evaluation activities included beta testing of new software, and interviews with students and faculty involved in summer field experiences. The surveys have allowed us to document increased impact in some areas, to improve the usability of products and activities, and to provide baseline impact data. The direct involvement of staff in the process has helped staff appreciate the value of evaluation, but there are also challenges to this approach. Since many of the surveys are developed and conducted by EPO staff, rather than being primarily handled by the evaluator, the process takes considerably more staff time to implement. We are still determining how to best manage and present the data and analysis; our current approach

  3. Development of an in vitro Bioassay for Recombinant Human Erythropoietin (rHuEPO) Based on Proliferative Stimulation of an Erythroid Cell Line and Analysis of Sialic Acid Dependent Microheterogeneity: UT-7 Cell Bioassay.

    PubMed

    Metta, Manoj Kumar; Malkhed, Vasavi; Tantravahi, Srinivasan; Vuruputuri, Uma; Kunaparaju, Rajkumar

    2017-04-01

    Determination of biological activity and its comparison with clinical behavior is important in the quality assessment of therapeutic glycoproteins. In vivo studies are usually employed for evaluating bioactivity of these glycomolecules. However, alternative methods are required to simplify the bioassay and avoid ethical issues associated with in vivo studies. Negatively charged sialic acid residues are known to be critical for in vivo bioactivity of rHuEPO. To address this need, we employed the human acute myeloid leukemia cell line UT-7 for the determination of proliferative stimulation induced by rHuEPO. Relative potencies of various intact and sugar-trimmed rHuEPO preparations were estimated using the International Standard for Human r-DNA derived EPO (87/684) as a reference for bioactivity. The cellular response was measured with a multi-channel photometer using a colorimetric microassay, based on the metabolism of the Resazurin sodium by cell viability. For a resourceful probing of physiological features of rHuEPO with significance, we obtained partly or completely desialylated rHuEPO digested by the neuraminidase enzyme without degradation of carbohydrates. Two-fold higher specific activity was shown by asialoerythropoietin in in vitro analysis compared with the sialoerythropoietin. Further, computational studies were also carried out to construct the 3D model of the erythropoietin (EPO) protein structure using standard comparative modeling methods. The quality of the model was validated using Procheck and protein structure analysis (ProSA) server tools. N-glycan units were constructed; moreover, EPO protein was glycosylated at potential glycosylation amino acid residue sites. The method described should be suitable for potency assessments of pharmaceutical formulations of rHuEPO (European Pharmacopeia, 2016).

  4. Different expression patterns of Ngb and EPOR in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus revealed distinctive therapeutic effects of intranasal delivery of Neuro-EPO for ischemic insults to the gerbil brain.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Mengana, Yuneidis; Cruz, Yamila Rodríguez; Muñoz, Adriana; Testé, Iliana Sosa; García, Jorge Daniel; Wu, Yonghong; Rodríguez, Julio César García; Zhang, Chenggang

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of intranasally delivered recombinant human neuronal erythropoietin (Neuro-EPO) on brain injury induced by unilateral permanent ischemia in the Mongolian gerbil. Expression of EPO receptor (EPOR) and neuroglobin (Ngb) over 5 weeks after intranasal treatment with Neuro-EPO was determined using immunohistochemistry. Mortality of Neuro-EPO-treated gerbils decreased after surgery, and the sensory and motor function was significantly improved. Histopathological mapping showed that Neuro-EPO significantly reduced delayed neuronal death in the brain. Expression of Ngb was upregulated in the cerebral cortex at most time points (expect for 10 min and 48 hr) and in the hippocampus at 10 min and from 48 hr to 5 weeks, whereas EPOR was almost downregulated or unchanged in the brain (expect for 48 hr). The 10 min and 48 hr seemed to be two time points for the brain to switch the expression of both Ngb and EPOR to early and late recovery phase, respectively. In addition, there were two phases, 10 min to 1 hr and 24 hr to 72 hr, respectively, closing to the "golden hour" of about 60 min and the "silver day" of 1 to 3 days, for the brain to recover from stroke onset with intranasal Neuro-EPO treatment. Therefore, the results suggest that the intranasal administration of Neuro-EPO is effective in the treatment of acute brain ischemia. The different expression patterns of Ngb and EPOR is probably due to ischemic tolerance in the cerebral cortex and ischemic sensitivity in the hippocampus.

  5. Different Expression Patterns of Ngb and EPOR in the Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus Revealed Distinctive Therapeutic Effects of Intranasal Delivery of Neuro-EPO for Ischemic Insults to the Gerbil Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Mengana, Yuneidis; Cruz, Yamila Rodríguez; Muñoz, Adriana; Testé, Iliana Sosa; García, Jorge Daniel; Wu, Yonghong; Rodríguez, Julio César García; Zhang, Chenggang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of intranasally delivered recombinant human neuronal erythropoietin (Neuro-EPO) on brain injury induced by unilateral permanent ischemia in the Mongolian gerbil. Expression of EPO receptor (EPOR) and neuroglobin (Ngb) over 5 weeks after intranasal treatment with Neuro-EPO was determined using immunohistochemistry. Mortality of Neuro-EPO-treated gerbils decreased after surgery, and the sensory and motor function was significantly improved. Histopathological mapping showed that Neuro-EPO significantly reduced delayed neuronal death in the brain. Expression of Ngb was upregulated in the cerebral cortex at most time points (expect for 10 min and 48 hr) and in the hippocampus at 10 min and from 48 hr to 5 weeks, whereas EPOR was almost downregulated or unchanged in the brain (expect for 48 hr). The 10 min and 48 hr seemed to be two time points for the brain to switch the expression of both Ngb and EPOR to early and late recovery phase, respectively. In addition, there were two phases, 10 min to 1 hr and 24 hr to 72 hr, respectively, closing to the “golden hour” of about 60 min and the “silver day” of 1 to 3 days, for the brain to recover from stroke onset with intranasal Neuro-EPO treatment. Therefore, the results suggest that the intranasal administration of Neuro-EPO is effective in the treatment of acute brain ischemia. The different expression patterns of Ngb and EPOR is probably due to ischemic tolerance in the cerebral cortex and ischemic sensitivity in the hippocampus. PMID:21339183

  6. Therapeutic impact of rHuEPO on abnormal platelet APP, BACE 1, presenilin 1, ADAM 10 and Aβ expressions in chronic kidney disease patients with cognitive dysfunction like Alzheimer's disease: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    G, Vinothkumar; S, Krishnakumar; Sureshkumar; G, Shivashekar; S, Sreedhar; Preethikrishnan; S, Dinesh; A, Sundaram; D, Balakrishnan; Riya; P, Venkataraman

    2018-08-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is reported to be a major cause of morbidity in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The senile plaques (SPs) in the brain are one of the most pathophysiological characteristics of cognitive dysfunction and its major constituent amyloid β (Aβ) released from amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β (BACE1) and γ (presenilin 1) secretases . Platelets contain more than 95% of the circulating APP and implicate as a candidate biomarker for cognitive decline. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is a standard therapy for anemia in CKD and also acts as a neuroprotective agent. The aim of the study is to determine the impact of rHuEPO therapy on platelet APP processing in CKD with Cognitive Dysfunction. A total of 60 subjects comprising of 30 CKD without cognitive dysfunction and 30 CKD with cognitive dysfunction based on neuropsychological assessment. APP, BACE1, Presenilin 1, ADAM 10 (α secretase) and Aβ expressions in platelets were determined by western blotting and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in platelet rich plasma (PRP) was done by spectrophotometrically. The parameters were statistically compared with Alzheimer's disease (AD), Normocytic normochromic anemic and healthy subjects. Significantly (p < 0.05) decreased APP, ADAM 10 while increased BACE1, Presenilin 1, Aβ and LPO were observed in CKD with cognitive dysfunction like AD subjects compared to other groups. The parameters were reassessed in CKD with cognitive dysfunction subjects after rHuEPO (100 IU/ kg, weekly twice, 6 months) therapy. All the parameters were retrieved significantly (p < 0.05) along with improved neuropsychological tests scoring after rHuEPO therapy. This study demonstrated that rHuEPO is an effective neuroprotective agent in the context of CKD associated cognitive dysfunction and proved its clinical usefulness. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Current perspectives on protective roles of erythropoietin in cardiovascular system: erythropoietin receptor as a novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Kagaya, Yutaka; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Wang, Wanting; Takeda, Morihiko; Nakano, Makoto; Satoh, Kimio; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2012-06-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a principal regulator that promotes proliferation and terminal differentiation of erythroid progenitor cells. EPO receptors are expressed not only in hematopoietic lineage cells but also in the cardiovascular system. We performed animal experiments using transgene-rescued EPO receptor null mutant mice (EpoR-/- rescued) that express the EPO receptor exclusively in the hematopoietic cells. The results of these experiments suggest that endogenous EPO/EPO receptor system in the heart exerts cardioprotective effects against myocardial injury induced by ischemia followed by reperfusion and pressure-overload induced left ventricular dysfunction. Many animal experiments have shown that the administration of recombinant human EPO also elicits cardioprotective effects against myocardial injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion. In contrast to the promising results of these animal experiments, recent clinical trials failed to demonstrate the reduction in infarct size or improvement of cardiac function by the administration of recombinant human EPO in patients with acute myocardial infarction who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention. It should be tested in future clinical studies whether a relatively low dose of recombinant human EPO or its derivatives that have no erythropoietic action reduces infarct size and ameliorates cardiac dysfunction in patients with acute myocardial infarction. In this article, we review implications of anemia associated with chronic heart failure, roles of the endogenous EPO/EPO receptor system, and the effects of the administration of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in pathologic conditions of the heart by focusing on the EPO receptor as a potential candidate of novel therapeutic targets in cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Applied automatic offset detection using HECTOR within EPOS-IP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R. M. S.; Bos, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that offsets are present in most GNSS coordinate time series. These offsets need to be taken into account in the analysis to avoid incorrect estimation of the tectonic motions. The time of the offsets are normally determined by visual inspection of the time series but with the ever increasing amount of GNSS stations, this is becoming too time consuming and automatic offset detection algorithms are required. This is particularly true in projects like EPOS (European Plate Observing System), where the routinely analysis of thousands of daily time-series will be required. It is also planned to include stations installed for technical applications which metadata is also not always properly maintained. In this research we present an offset detection scheme that uses the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) to determine the most likely time of an offset. The novelty of this scheme is that it takes the temporal correlation of the noise into account. This aspect is normally ignored due to the fact that it significantly increases the computation time. However, it needs to be taken into account to ensure that the estimated BIC value is correct. We were able to create a fast algorithm by adopting the methodology implemented in HECTOR (Bos et al., 2013). We evaluate the feasibility of the approach using the core IGS network, where most of the offsets have been accurately determined, which permit to have an external evaluation of this new outlier detection approach to be included in HECTOR. We also apply the scheme to regional networks in Iberia where such offsets are often not documented properly in order to compare the normal manual approach with the new automatic approach. Finally, we also compare the optimal approach used by HECTOR with other algorithms such as MIDAS and STARS.

  9. Preparing for and Observing the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J.

    2015-11-01

    I discuss ongoing plans and discussions for EPO and scientific observing of the 21 August 2017 total solar eclipse. I discuss aspects of EPO based on my experiences at the 60 solar eclipses I have seen. I share cloud statistics along the eclipse path compiled by Jay Anderson, the foremost eclipse meteorologist. I show some sample observations of composite imagery, of spectra, and of terrestrial temperature changes based on observations of recent eclipses, including 2012 from Australia and 2013 from Gabon. Links to various mapping sites of totality, partial phases, and other eclipse-related information, including that provided by Michael Zeiler, Fred Espenak (retired from NASA) and Xavier Jubier can be found on the website I run for the International Astronomical Union's Working Group on Eclipses at http://www.eclipses.info.

  10. Recombinant erythropoietin acutely decreases renal perfusion and decouples the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

    PubMed

    Aachmann-Andersen, Niels J; Christensen, Soren J; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Oturai, Peter; Johansson, Pär I; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Olsen, Niels V

    2018-03-01

    The effect of recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO) on renal and systemic hemodynamics was evaluated in a randomized double-blinded, cross-over study. Sixteen healthy subjects were tested with placebo, or low-dose rhEPO for 2 weeks, or high-dose rhEPO for 3 days. Subjects refrained from excessive salt intake, according to instructions from a dietitian. Renal clearance studies were done for measurements of renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the segmentel tubular handling of sodium and water (lithium clearance). rhEPO increased arterial blood pressure, total peripheral resistance, and renal vascular resistance, and decreased renal plasma flow in the high-dose rhEPO intervention and tended to decrease GFR. In spite of the decrease in renal perfusion, rhEPO tended to decrease reabsorption of sodium and water in the proximal tubule and induced a prompt decrease in circulating levels of renin and aldosterone, independent of changes in red blood cell mass, blood volumes, and blood pressure. We also found changes in biomarkers showing evidence that rhEPO induced a prothrombotic state. Our results suggest that rhEPO causes a direct downregulation in proximal tubular reabsorption that seems to decouple the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system from changes in renal hemodynamics. This may serve as a negative feed-back mechanism on endogenous synthesis of EPO when circulating levels of EPO are high. These results demonstrates for the first time in humans a direct effect of rhEPO on renal hemodynamics and a decoupling of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  11. Development of erythropoietin receptor-targeted drug delivery system against breast cancer using tamoxifen-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers

    PubMed Central

    Beh, Chaw Yee; How, Chee Wun; Foo, Jhi Biau; Foong, Jia Ning; Selvarajah, Gayathri Thevi; Rasedee, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM) has been used in the treatment of breast cancers and is supplemented with erythropoietin (EPO) to alleviate the cancer-related anemia. The purported deleterious effects caused by the use of EPO with chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer-related anemia vary across studies and remain controversial. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has the potential to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs. In this study, we simultaneously incorporated two pharmacological active ingredients in one nanocarrier to develop EPO-conjugated TAM-loaded lipid nanoparticles (EPO-TAMNLC), a targeted delivery system, to enhance the cytotoxic activity while reducing the side effects of the ingredients. The effect of temperature in modulating the thermodynamic parameters associated with the binding of EPO and TAMNLC was assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry, while the unfolding of EPO structure was determined using fluorescence-quenching approach. The association efficiency of EPO and TAMNLC was 55.43%. Unlike binding of albumin to TAMNLC, the binding of EPO to TAMNLC occurred through endothermic and entropy-driven reaction. The EPO-TAMNLC formulation was stable because of the hydrophobic interaction and the high free energy, suggesting the spontaneity of the interactions between EPO and TAMNLC. The EPO-TAMNLC enhanced the in vitro cytotoxicity of TAM to MCF-7 cells. The EPO surface-functionalized TAMNLC could sequentially deliver EPO and TAM as well as improving site-specific delivery of these therapeutic compounds. PMID:28352153

  12. Long-term and stable correction of uremic anemia by intramuscular injection of plasmids containing hypoxia-regulated system of erythropoietin expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yarong; Du, Dewei; Li, Zhanting; Wei, Junxia; Yang, Angang

    2012-01-01

    Relative deficiency in production of glycoprotein hormone erythropoietin (Epo) is a major cause of renal anemia. This study planned to investigate whether the hypoxia-regulated system of Epo expression, constructed by fusing Epo gene to the chimeric phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) hypoxia response elements (HRE) in combination with cytomegalovirus immediate-early (CMV IE) basal gene promoter and delivered by plasmid intramuscular injection, might provide a long-term physiologically regulated Epo secretion expression to correct the anemia in adenine-induced uremic rats. Plasmid vectors (pHRE-Epo) were synthesized by fusing human Epo cDNA to the HRE/CMV promoter. Hypoxia-inducible activity of this promoter was evaluated first in vitro and then in vivo in healthy and uremic rats (n = 30 per group). The vectors (pCMV-Epo) in which Epo expression was directed by a constitutive CMV gene promoter served as control. ANOVA and Student's t-test were used to analyze between-group differences. A high-level expression of Epo was induced by hypoxia in vitro and in vivo. Though both pHRE-Epo and pCMV-Epo corrected anemia, the hematocrit of the pCMV-Epo-treated rats exceeded the normal (P < 0.05), but that of the pHRE-Epo-treated rats didn't. Hypoxia-regulated system of Epo gene expression constructed by fusing Epo to the HRE/CMV promoter and delivered by plasmid intramuscular injection may provide a long-term and stable Epo expression and secretion in vivo to correct the anemia in adenine-induced uremic rats. PMID:22990115

  13. EPO Receptor Gain-of-Function Causes Hereditary Polycythemia, Alters CD34+ Cell Differentiation and Increases Circulating Endothelial Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Perrotta, Silverio; Cucciolla, Valeria; Ferraro, Marcella; Ronzoni, Luisa; Tramontano, Annunziata; Rossi, Francesca; Scudieri, Anna Chiara; Borriello, Adriana; Roberti, Domenico; Nobili, Bruno; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Oliva, Adriana; Amendola, Giovanni; Migliaccio, Anna Rita; Mancuso, Patrizia; Martin-Padura, Ines; Bertolini, Francesco; Yoon, Donghoon; Prchal, Josef T.; Della Ragione, Fulvio

    2010-01-01

    Background Gain-of-function of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) mutations represent the major cause of primary hereditary polycythemia. EPOR is also found in non-erythroid tissues, although its physiological role is still undefined. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe a family with polycythemia due to a heterozygous mutation of the EPOR gene that causes a G→T change at nucleotide 1251 of exon 8. The novel EPOR G1251T mutation results in the replacement of a glutamate residue by a stop codon at amino acid 393. Differently from polycythemia vera, EPOR G1251T CD34+ cells proliferate and differentiate towards the erythroid phenotype in the presence of minimal amounts of EPO. Moreover, the affected individuals show a 20-fold increase of circulating endothelial precursors. The analysis of erythroid precursor membranes demonstrates a heretofore undescribed accumulation of the truncated EPOR, probably due to the absence of residues involved in the EPO-dependent receptor internalization and degradation. Mutated receptor expression in EPOR-negative cells results in EPOR and Stat5 phosphorylation. Moreover, patient erythroid precursors present an increased activation of EPOR and its effectors, including Stat5 and Erk1/2 pathway. Conclusions/Significance Our data provide an unanticipated mechanism for autosomal dominant inherited polycythemia due to a heterozygous EPOR mutation and suggest a regulatory role of EPO/EPOR pathway in human circulating endothelial precursors homeostasis. PMID:20700488

  14. Engaging Scientists in Meaningful E/PO: The Universe Discovery Guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Lawton, B.; Gurton, S.; Smith, D. A.; Manning, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    For the 2009 International Year of Astronomy, the then-existing NASA Origins Forum collaborated with the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) to create a series of monthly "Discovery Guides" for informal educator and amateur astronomer use in educating the public about featured sky objects and associated NASA science themes. Today's NASA Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum (SEPOF), one of a new generation of forums coordinating the work of NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) EPO efforts—in collaboration with the ASP and NASA SMD missions and programs--has adapted the Discovery Guides into "evergreen" educational resources suitable for a variety of audiences. The Guides focus on "deep sky" objects and astrophysics themes (stars and stellar evolution, galaxies and the universe, and exoplanets), showcasing EPO resources from more than 30 NASA astrophysics missions and programs in a coordinated and cohesive "big picture" approach across the electromagnetic spectrum, grounded in best practices to best serve the needs of the target audiences. Each monthly guide features a theme and a representative object well-placed for viewing, with an accompanying interpretive story, finding charts, strategies for conveying the topics, and complementary supporting NASA-approved education activities and background information from a spectrum of NASA missions and programs. The Universe Discovery Guides are downloadable from the NASA Night Sky Network web site at nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov. We will share the Forum-led Collaborative's experience in developing the guides, how they place individual science discoveries and learning resources into context for audiences, and how the Guides can be readily used in scientist public outreach efforts, in college and university introductory astronomy classes, and in other engagements between scientists, students and the public.

  15. Building Bridges Between EPO Professionals Across Scientific Disciplines: Partnerships with NSF Centers (First Steps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, D.; Black, K.; Schultz, S.

    2010-08-01

    NASA, NSF and other funding organizations support science education and outreach to achieve their broader impact goals. Organizations like ASP and the NSF Research Centers Educators Network (NRCEN) are building networks of education and public outreach (EPO) professionals to enhance programmatic success in reaching these goals. As the professionals who provide these programs to the various scientific communities, we are often the key connectors between investigators at cutting-edge research centers, the education world and the public. However, our profession does not have strong ties for sharing best practices across the different scientific disciplines. To develop those ties, we need to identify our common interests and build on them by sharing lessons learned and best practices. We will use the technique of concept mapping to develop a schematic of how each of us addresses our broader impact goals and discuss the common and divergent features. We will also present the education and outreach logic model that was recently developed by the 27 Education Directors of NSF-funded Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers (MRSEC). Building on this information, we will collaboratively develop a list of key areas of similar interest between ASP and NRCEN EPO professionals.

  16. Epos Working Group 10 Infrastructure for Georesources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Lasocki, Stanisław; Kwiatek, Grzegorz

    2013-04-01

    Working Group 10 "Infrastructure for Georesources" deals primarily with induced seismicity (IS) infrastructure. Established during the EPOS Annual Meeting in Utrecht, November 2011, WG10 aims to integrate the research infrastructure in the area of seismicity induced by human activity: tremors and rockbursts in underground mines, seismicity associated with conventional and unconventional oil and gas production, induced by geothermal energy extraction and by underground reposition and storage of liquids (e.g. water disposal associated with energy extraction) and gases (CO2 sequestration, inter alia) and triggered by filling surface water reservoirs, etc. Until now the research in the area of IS has been organized around induced technologies rather than physical problems, common for these shallow seismic processes. This has hampered the integration of IS research community and the research progress. WG10 intends to work out a first step towards changing the IS research perspective from the present, technology-oriented, to physical problems-oriented without, however, losing touch with technological conditions of IS generation. This will be achieved by the integration of IS Research Infrastructure (ISRI) and the creation of Induced Seismicity Node within EPOS. The ISRI to be integrated has three components: data, software and reports. The IS data consists of seismic data and auxiliary data: geological, displacement, geomechanical, geodetic, etc, and last, but by no means least, technological data. A research in the field of IS cannot do without this last data class. The IS software comprises common software tools for data handling and visualisation, standard and advanced software for research and software based on newly proposed algorithms for tests and development. The IS reports are both peer reviewed and unreviewed as well as an internet forum. In addition to that the IS Node will play a significant role in integrating IS community and accelerating research, it will

  17. European Plate Observing System - the Arctic dimension and the Nordic collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakan, K.; Heikkinen, P.; Juhlin, C.; Thybo, H.; Vogfjord, K.

    2012-04-01

    Within the framework of the EPOS project, Nordic interests are significant, not only in fundamental scientific issues related to geodynamic processes, but also in terms of the application of these to several central problems such as, hydrocarbon exploration and production including the related environmental issues, CO2 storage (or other toxic waste repositories) in geological formations, geothermal energy (natural and hot-dry rock) utilization and mining, geohazards (earthquakes, landslides and volcanic eruptions) and their consequences to the society. The Arctic dimension including Fennoscandia, the northern North Atlantic and the Arctic Sea constitutes an area of considerable geographical extent within the European plate. The region also contains a significant part of the European plate boundary submerged under the North Atlantic and the Arctic sea, where geodynamic processes such as rifting and fracturing are especially energetic. In particular, where the plate boundary is exposed on land in the South Iceland seismic zone, large earthquakes are frequently observed including two Mw6.5 events in 2000 and one Mw6.3 event in 2008. But, seismic hazard is not confined to the plate boundary. Significant intra-plate earthquakes have recently occurred in the region (Mw6.1 in the continental shelf near Spitsbergen in 2008, Mw5.0 in Southern Sweden in 2008, Mw5.2 near Kaliningrad in 2004) showing that there is considerable seismic hazard in the region. In addition, submarine landslide earthquakes are always of concern due to possible tsunami generation. Volcanic activity occurs on the plate boundary and is particularly strong in the rift zones of Iceland, where on average two volcanic eruptions occur per decade. subaerial volcanic eruptions also occur on Jan Mayen island, farther north on the Mid Atlantic ridge. Together, the Danish seismic network in Greenland, the Norwegian seismic arrays and national network traversing the length of Norway and the Icelandic seismic and

  18. Designing, Supporting, and Sustaining an Online Community of Practice: NASA EPO Workspace as an Ongoing Exploration of the Value of Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, B.; Davis, H. B.

    2015-12-01

    Increasingly, geographically diverse organizations, like NASA's Science Mission Directorate Education and Public Outreach personnel (SMD EPO), are looking for ways to facilitate group interactions in meaningful ways while limiting costs. Towards this end, of particular interest, and showing great potential are communities of practice. Communities of practice represent relationships in real-time between and among people sharing a common practice. They facilitate the sharing of information, building collective knowledge, and growing of the principles of practice. In 2010-11, SMD EPO established a website to support EPO professionals, facilitate headquarters reporting, and foster a community of practice. The purpose of this evaluation is to examine the design and use of the workspace and the value created for both individual community members and SMD EPO, the sponsoring organization. The online workspace was launched in 2010-11 for the members of NASA's SMDEPO community. The online workspace was designed to help facilitate the efficient sharing of information, be a central repository for resources, help facilitate and support knowledge creation, and ultimately lead to the development of an online community of practice. This study examines the role of the online workspace component of a community in the work of a community of practice. Much has been studied revealing the importance of communities of practice to organizations, project success, and knowledge management and some of these same successes hold true for virtual communities of practice. Additionally, we look at the outcomes of housting the online community for these past years in respect to knowledge building and personal and organizational value, the affects on professional dvelopment opportunities, how community members have benefited, and how the workspace has evolved to better serve the community.

  19. The AIA Solar Learning Center: Taking Inquiry-based EPO Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills-Davey, Meredith; Attrill, G. D. R.; Engell, A.

    2009-05-01

    The observations of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO-AIA) are expected to be groundbreaking within the field of heliophysics. To properly promote and explain the data produced by AIA, it is important that an innovative EPO effort be put forth. This has led to the development of "The AIA Solar Learning Center” (SLC), an inquiry-based educational website geared towards teaching about AIA and the Sun in general. The goal of the SLC is to provide K-12 students, teachers, parents, and homeschoolers with information and education about the Sun, primarily through hands-on activity modules that explain different aspects of our nearest star and the methods of observing it. While each module ultimately aims to impart information about the Sun or some related physical process, the activities also range across a host of different disciplines, including geology, chemistry, history, music, and art. In order to make the content applicable and accessible, activities are tailored to multiple difficulty levels, catering to different age groups. There is also a strong push towards facilitating teachers; activities are designed to fulfill specific teaching standards, and a host of additional teaching material is provided, including lesson plans and powerpoint presentations. Ultimately, the SLC aims to make science and the Sun inviting and accessible. The "Meet the Scientists” page will provide pictures and personal bios of participating scientists. Students will have the opportunity to interactively ask solar-related questions. There is even a host of lighter fare, such as a solar music playlist and links to relevant Facebook pages.

  20. Reuniting the Solar System: Integrated Education and Public Outreach Projects for Solar System Exploration Missions and Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowes, Leslie; Lindstrom, Marilyn; Stockman, Stephanie; Scalice, Daniela; Klug, Sheri

    2003-01-01

    The Solar System Exploration Education Forum has worked for five years to foster Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) cooperation among missions and programs in order to leverage resources and better meet the needs of educators and the public. These efforts are coming together in a number of programs and products and in '2004 - The Year of the Solar System.' NASA's practice of having independent E/PO programs for each mission and its public affairs emphasis on uniqueness has led to a public perception of a fragmented solar system exploration program. By working to integrate solar system E/PO, the breadth and depth of the solar system exploration program is revealed. When emphasis is put on what missions have in common, as well as their differences, each mission is seen in the context of the whole program.

  1. Collaboration as a Strategy to Transform the Impact of EPO Efforts in the New York Center for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirsky, A.; Rogers, K. L.; Meissner, M.; Busby, G.; Roberge, W.

    2014-12-01

    The New York Center for Astrobiology (NYCA) EPO effort is a collaboration combining expertise in evaluation and assessment of STEM educational modules with disciplinary expertise in astrobiology. In practice, the NYCA partners with external experts in professional development, informal education and evaluation to assist in developing and implementing certain programs of the NYCA EPO activities. Two specific program initiatives of the NYCA EPO effort offer excellent examples of programs with strong science content knowledge as well as using effective tools to address the NSF impact categories. These are the ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp (EMBHSSC, in conjunction with RPI's STEM Pipeline Initiative) and the Astrobiology Teachers Academy (ATA). The EMBHSSC for middle school students focuses on NASA astrobiology initiatives around the "Quest for Life" theme. The Camp has a comprehensive evaluation component and uses pre-and post- assessment of student knowledge and interest in STEM. Recent data suggest that every student has shown a measurable gain in these areas. The ATA is a weeklong summer intensive professional development program for P-12 STEM teachers that combines discipline scientists in the NYCA with an external evaluation organization, the Association for the Cooperative Advancement of Science and Education (ACASE). The goal is for teachers to develop a new learning module for a course they teach that uses astrobiology as a content focus to engage students. The Academy has scientists collaborating with teachers in this effort, providing content and assistance in designing instructional activities. Assessments are woven into the fabric of the work in a few ways: 1. There is a purposeful focus on assessment as part of the learning module, and the content of the ATA; 2. ACASE offers teachers a tool for tracking their students' attainment of the learning goals identified in their learning module; 3. There are daily evaluations of the teachers

  2. Using Telescopic Observations to Mentor High School Students in STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLin, K. M.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2011-09-01

    Over the past two summers (2009 and 2010) the NASA EPO Group at Sonoma State University (SSU) has sponsored local high school students in a summer science internship program at the University. The students, chosen from Sonoma County high schools in a competitive selection process, work in various science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields throughout the School of Science and Technology at SSU. The two interns sponsored by the EPO Group each summer monitor active galaxies using GORT, the NASA/Fermi-sponsored optical robotic telescope operated by the Group. They are mentored in their projects by EPO Group personnel and by SSU undergraduates who have experience with the telescope. The students learn about the sky, telescopes and the active galaxies they observe. They also learn how to make telescopic observations and how to reduce the CCD images obtained. Interns also participate in weekly meetings with other interns working on different projects around campus. At the end of the summer all the interns present their research results at a symposium held on campus.The symposium is attended by the interns themselves, their parents, their high school science teachers, and university faculty and administrators.The program has had a positive impact on how our interns view science, and specifically on their view of astronomy, as reported by the interns themselves in the first two years of the program.

  3. Using Telescopic Observations to Mentor High School Students in STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLin, Kevin M.; Cominsky, Lynn R.

    2011-03-01

    Over the past two summers (2009/2010) the NASA E/PO Group at Sonoma State University has sponsored local high school students in a summer science internship program at the University. The students, chosen from Sonoma County high schools in a competitive selection process, work in various STEM fields throughout the School of Science and Technology at SSU. The two interns sponsored by the E/PO Group each summer use GORT, the NASA/Fermi-sponsored robotic observatory operated by the Group, to monitor active galaxies. They are mentored in their projects by E/PO Group personnel and by SSU undergraduates who have experience with the telescope. The students learn about the sky, telescopes and the active galaxies they observe. They also learn how to make telescopic observations and how to reduce the CCD images obtained. Interns also participate in weekly meetings with other interns working on different projects around campus. At the end of the summer all the interns present their research results at a symposium held on campus.The symposium is attended by the interns themselves, their parents and sponsoring high school science teachers, and university faculty and administrators.The program has had a positive impact on how our interns view science, as reported by themselves, and specifically on their view of astronomy, in the first year of the program.

  4. Biphasic cultivation strategy to avoid Epo-Fc aggregation and optimize protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kaisermayer, Christian; Reinhart, David; Gili, Andreas; Chang, Martina; Aberg, Per-Mikael; Castan, Andreas; Kunert, Renate

    2016-06-10

    In biphasic cultivations, the culture conditions are initially kept at an optimum for rapid cell growth and biomass accumulation. In the second phase, the culture is shifted to conditions ensuring maximum specific protein production and the protein quality required. The influence of specific culture parameters is cell line dependent and their impact on product quality needs to be investigated. In this study, a biphasic cultivation strategy for a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line expressing an erythropoietin fusion protein (Epo-Fc) was developed. Cultures were run in batch mode and after an initial growth phase, cultivation temperature and pH were shifted. Applying a DoE (Design of Experiments) approach, a fractional factorial design was used to systematically evaluate the influence of cultivation temperature and pH as well as their synergistic effect on cell growth as well as on recombinant protein production and aggregation. All three responses were influenced by the cultivation temperature. Additionally, an interaction between pH and temperature was found to be related to protein aggregation. Compared with the initial standard conditions of 37°C and pH 7.05, a parameter shift to low temperature and acidic pH resulted in a decrease in the aggregate fraction from 75% to less than 1%. Furthermore, the synergistic effect of temperature and pH substantially lowered the cell-specific rates of glucose and glutamine consumption as well as lactate and ammonium production. The optimized culture conditions also led to an increase of the cell-specific rates of recombinant Epo-Fc production, thus resulting in a more economic bioprocess. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Climate Discovery: Integrating Research With Exhibit, Public Tours, K-12, and Web-based EPO Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, S. Q.; Carbone, L.; Gardiner, L.; Johnson, R.; Russell, R.; Advisory Committee, S.; Ammann, C.; Lu, G.; Richmond, A.; Maute, A.; Haller, D.; Conery, C.; Bintner, G.

    2005-12-01

    The Climate Discovery Exhibit at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Mesa Lab provides an exciting conceptual outline for the integration of several EPO activities with other well-established NCAR educational resources and programs. The exhibit is organized into four topic areas intended to build understanding among NCAR's 80,000 annual visitors, including 10,000 school children, about Earth system processes and scientific methods contributing to a growing body of knowledge about climate and global change. These topics include: 'Sun-Earth Connections,' 'Climate Now,' 'Climate Past,' and 'Climate Future.' Exhibit text, graphics, film and electronic media, and interactives are developed and updated through collaborations between NCAR's climate research scientists and staff in the Office of Education and Outreach (EO) at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). With funding from NCAR, paleoclimatologists have contributed data and ideas for a new exhibit Teachers' Guide unit about 'Climate Past.' This collection of middle-school level, standards-aligned lessons are intended to help students gain understanding about how scientists use proxy data and direct observations to describe past climates. Two NASA EPO's have funded the development of 'Sun-Earth Connection' lessons, visual media, and tips for scientists and teachers. Integrated with related content and activities from the NASA-funded Windows to the Universe web site, these products have been adapted to form a second unit in the Climate Discovery Teachers' Guide about the Sun's influence on Earth's climate. Other lesson plans, previously developed by on-going efforts of EO staff and NSF's previously-funded Project Learn program are providing content for a third Teachers' Guide unit on 'Climate Now' - the dynamic atmospheric and geological processes that regulate Earth's climate. EO has plans to collaborate with NCAR climatologists and computer modelers in the next year to develop

  6. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin with Additional Processable Protein Domains: Purification of Protein Synthesized in Escherichia coli Heterologous Expression System.

    PubMed

    Grunina, T M; Demidenko, A V; Lyaschuk, A M; Poponova, M S; Galushkina, Z M; Soboleva, L A; Cherepushkin, S A; Polyakov, N B; Grumov, D A; Solovyev, A I; Zhukhovitsky, V G; Boksha, I S; Subbotina, M E; Gromov, A V; Lunin, V G; Karyagina, A S

    2017-11-01

    Three variants of human recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO) with additional N-terminal protein domains were obtained by synthesis in an Escherichia coli heterologous expression system. These domains included (i) maltose-binding protein (MBP), (ii) MBP with six histidine residues (6His) in N-terminal position, (iii) s-tag (15-a.a. oligopeptide derived from bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A) with N-terminal 6His. Both variants of the chimeric protein containing MBP domain were prone to aggregation under nondenaturing conditions, and further purification of EPO after the domain cleavage by enterokinase proved to be impossible. In the case of 6His-s-tag-EPO chimeric protein, the products obtained after cleavage with enterokinase were successfully separated by column chromatography, and rhEPO without additional domains was obtained. Results of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry showed that after refolding 6His-s-tag-EPO formed a structure similar to that of one of native EPO with two disulfide bonds. Both 6His-s-tag-EPO and rhEPO without additional protein domains purified after proteolysis possessed the same biological activity in vitro in the cell culture.

  7. Inhaled Epoprostenol Through Noninvasive Routes of Ventilator Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Mahmoud A; Sasidhar, Madhu; Lam, Simon W

    2018-06-01

    The administration of inhaled epoprostenol (iEPO) through noninvasive routes of ventilator support systems has never been previously evaluated. Describe the use of iEPO when administered through noninvasive routes of ventilator support systems. Critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit who received iEPO through noninvasive routes were analyzed. Improvements in respiratory status and hemodynamic parameters were evaluated. Safety end points assessed included hypotension, rebound hypoxemia, significant bleeding, and thrombocytopenia. A total of 36 patients received iEPO through noninvasive routes: high-flow oxygen therapy through nasal cannula, n = 29 (81%) and noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation, n = 7 (19%). Sixteen patients had improvement in their respiratory status: mean decrease in fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO 2 ), 20% ± 13%; mean increase in partial pressure of arterial oxygen to FiO 2 (PaO 2 /FiO 2 ) ratio, 60 ± 50 mm Hg; and mean decrease in HFNC oxygen flow rate, 6 ± 3 liters per minute (LPM). Eight patients had declines in their respiratory status (mean increase in FiO 2 , 30% ± 20%; mean decrease in PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio, 38 ± 20 mm Hg; and mean increase in HFNC oxygen flow rate, 15 ± 10 LPM), and 12 patients had no change in their respiratory status. Conclusion and Relevance: This represents the first evaluation of the administration of iEPO through noninvasive routes of ventilator support systems and demonstrates that in critically ill patients, iEPO could be administered through a noninvasive route. Further evaluation is needed to determine the extent of benefit with this route of administration.

  8. Systemic administration of erythropoietin inhibits retinopathy in RCS rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weiyong; Chung, Sook H; Irhimeh, Mohammad R; Li, Shiying; Lee, So-Ra; Gillies, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats develop vasculopathy as photoreceptors degenerate. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of erythropoietin (EPO) on retinopathy in RCS rats. Fluorescein angiography was used to monitor retinal vascular changes over time. Changes in retinal glia and vasculature were studied by immunostaining. To study the effects of EPO on retinal pathology, EPO (5000 IU/kg) was injected intraperitoneally in 14 week old normal and RCS rats twice a week for 4 weeks. Changes in the retinal vasculature, glia and microglia, photoreceptor apoptosis, differential expression of p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), pro-neurotrophin 3 (pro-NT3), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα), pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), the production of CD34(+) cells and mobilization of CD34(+)/VEGF-R2(+) cells as well as recruitment of CD34(+) cells into the retina were examined after EPO treatment. RCS rats developed progressive capillary dropout and subretinal neovascularization which were accompanied by retinal gliosis. Systemic administration of EPO stabilized the retinal vasculature and inhibited the development of focal vascular lesions. Further studies showed that EPO modulated retinal gliosis, attenuated photoreceptor apoptosis and p75NTR and pro-NT3 upregulation, promoted the infiltration of ramified microglia and stimulated VEGF-A expression but had little effect on TNFα and PEDF expression. EPO stimulated the production of red and white blood cells and CD34(+) cells along with effective mobilization of CD34(+)/VEGF-R2(+) cells. Immunofluorescence study demonstrated that EPO enhanced the recruitment of CD34+ cells into the retina. Our results suggest that EPO has therapeutic potentials in treatment of neuronal and vascular pathology in retinal disease. The protective effects of EPO on photoreceptors and the retinal vasculature may involve multiple mechanisms including regulation of retinal glia and

  9. Systemic Administration of Erythropoietin Inhibits Retinopathy in RCS Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Weiyong; Chung, Sook H.; Irhimeh, Mohammad R.; Li, Shiying; Lee, So-Ra; Gillies, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats develop vasculopathy as photoreceptors degenerate. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of erythropoietin (EPO) on retinopathy in RCS rats. Methods Fluorescein angiography was used to monitor retinal vascular changes over time. Changes in retinal glia and vasculature were studied by immunostaining. To study the effects of EPO on retinal pathology, EPO (5000 IU/kg) was injected intraperitoneally in 14 week old normal and RCS rats twice a week for 4 weeks. Changes in the retinal vasculature, glia and microglia, photoreceptor apoptosis, differential expression of p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), pro-neurotrophin 3 (pro-NT3), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα), pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), the production of CD34+ cells and mobilization of CD34+/VEGF-R2+ cells as well as recruitment of CD34+ cells into the retina were examined after EPO treatment. Results RCS rats developed progressive capillary dropout and subretinal neovascularization which were accompanied by retinal gliosis. Systemic administration of EPO stabilized the retinal vasculature and inhibited the development of focal vascular lesions. Further studies showed that EPO modulated retinal gliosis, attenuated photoreceptor apoptosis and p75NTR and pro-NT3 upregulation, promoted the infiltration of ramified microglia and stimulated VEGF-A expression but had little effect on TNFα and PEDF expression. EPO stimulated the production of red and white blood cells and CD34+ cells along with effective mobilization of CD34+/VEGF-R2+ cells. Immunofluorescence study demonstrated that EPO enhanced the recruitment of CD34+ cells into the retina. Conclusions Our results suggest that EPO has therapeutic potentials in treatment of neuronal and vascular pathology in retinal disease. The protective effects of EPO on photoreceptors and the retinal vasculature may involve multiple mechanisms including

  10. Damage of tracer erythropoietin results in erroneous estimation of concentration in mouse submaxillary gland.

    PubMed

    Vidal, A; Carcagno, M; Criscuolo, M; Barcelò, A C; Alippi, R M; Leal, T; Bozzini, C E

    1993-02-01

    It has been previously reported that 1) plasma erythropoietin (Epo) titer during exposure to hypobaria is lower in nephrectomized rats and mice whose submaxillary glands (SMG) were either ablated or atrophied than in nephrectomized controls whose SMG were intact and 2) that the gland shows one of the highest levels of immunoreactive Epo (iEpo) in the body. The latter observation, however, was questioned recently when it was observed that SMG extracts degrade labeled Epo used as tracer antigen in the radioimmunoassay (RIA), thus giving invalid estimates of Epo. Since this interpretation was in turn questioned, the present study was conducted to obtain more information on the subject and make these conflicting points clear. Investigation of the reported/possible degradation of Epo by SMG homogenates was conducted via polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by radioautography or by a RIA in solid phase in which there was no simultaneous incubation of the tracer antigen with the SMG homogenates. It was observed that 125I-labeled rhEpo was degraded when incubated with SMG homogenates. Degradation was rapid, being evident when incubation lasted 30 minutes, and occurred in the presence of a protease inhibitor. It showed a high degree of specificity since it did not occur when Epo was incubated with kidney homogenate or normal mouse serum. SMG homogenate did not degrade labeled thyrotrophic hormone and degraded alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) only partially. When estimates of iEpo in SMG homogenate were performed in conditions of simultaneous (SI-RIA) or nonsimultaneous (NSI-RIA) incubation of the homogenate with tracer Epo, it was observed that while estimates of Epo in plasma were similar in both types of RIA and somewhat higher in kidney homogenate in the SI-RIA than in the NSI-RIA, estimates of Epo in SMG were about 60 times higher in the former than in the latter. Therefore, it could be concluded that most of the Epo detected by standard RIA in SMG homogenate does

  11. Confronting the EPOS-LHC model predictions on the charged particle and muon attenuation lengths of EAS with the measurements of the KASCADE-Grande observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Apel, W. D.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Fuchs, B.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Klages, H. O.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schoo, S.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.

    2015-08-01

    KASCADE-Grande was an air-shower experiment designed to study cosmic rays between 1016 and 1018 eV. The instrument was located at the site of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany at an altitude of 110 m a.s.l. and covered an area of 0.5 km2. KASCADE-Grande consisted of several detector systems dedicated to measure different components of the EAS generated by the primary cosmic rays, i.e., the muon and the electron contents of the air-shower. With such a number of EAS observables and the precision of the measurements, the KASCADE-Grande data can be used to not only study in detail the properties of cosmic rays but also to test the predictions of hadronic-interaction models. In this work, in particular, the attenuation lengths of the muon number and the charged number of particles of EAS in the atmosphere were extracted from the KASCADE-Grande data and the results were compared with the predictions of the new EPOS-LHC hadronic-interaction model.

  12. Beyond erythropoiesis: novel applications for recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Cerami, A

    2001-07-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) primarily is produced in the kidney and acts as a principal mediator of the physiologic response to hypoxia by increasing red blood cell production. Astrocytes and neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) also are known to produce EPO in response to hypoxia/ischemia. EPO appears to play a neuroprotective role based on preclinical data demonstrating the ability of recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) to shield neurons from hypoxic/ischemic stress when administered intracerebraventricularly. In CNS models, systemically administered r-HuEPO has not been intensely investigated because large glycosylated molecules generally were deemed incapable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A collaborative research effort identified expression of EPO receptors on human brain capillaries and a specific receptor-mediated transport of r-HuEPO across the BBB after a single intraperitoneal (IP) injection in rodents, with subsequent protection against various types of neuronal damage. For example, administration of r-HuEPO 24 hours before or up to 6 hours after focal ischemic stroke significantly reduced the extent of infarction. r-HuEPO also attenuated concussive brain injury, kainate-induced seizure activity, and autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These preclinical findings suggest that r-HuEPO may have therapeutic potential for stroke, head trauma, and epilepsy; additional studies are needed to confirm and extend these encouraging observations in animal models. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  13. EPO, red cells, and serum transferrin receptor in continuous and intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Koistinen, P O; Rusko, H; Irjala, K; Rajamäki, A; Penttinen, K; Sarparanta, V P; Karpakka, J; Leppäluoto, J

    2000-04-01

    Erythropoietic response in 10 healthy nonsmoking volunteers exposed to normobaric hypoxia continuously or intermittently 12 h daily for 7 d was evaluated in a randomized cross-over study. An oxygen content of 15.4% corresponding to an altitude of 2500 m was created by adding nitrogen into room air in a flat. Venous blood samples for hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), reticulocytes, serum erythropoietin (S-EPO), red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), serum ferritin (S-Ferrit), and serum soluble transferrin receptor (S-TransfR) were drawn at 8:00 a.m. S-EPO was increased from baseline values of 22.9+/-9.6 and 20.5+/-10.1 U x L(-1) to 40.7+/-12.9 (P < 0.05) and 35+/-14.3 U x L(-1) (P < 0.05) after the first night in continuous and intermittent hypoxia, respectively, and remained elevated throughout both exposures. Hb and Hct values did not show any significant changes. Red cell 2,3-DPG rose from baseline a value of 5.0+/-0.8 to 5.9+/-0.7 mmol x L(-1) (P < 0.05) after the first day in continuous hypoxia and from 5.2+/-0.7 mmol x L(-1) to 6.1+/-0.5 mmol x L(-1) on day 3 (P < 0.05) during intermittent hypoxia. The reticulocyte count rose significantly (P < 0.05) after 5 d in both experiments. S-transferrin receptor level rose significantly from 2.2+/-0.4 and 2.1+/-0.5 mg x L(-1) to 2.6+/-0.5 mg x L(-1) and 2.3+/-0.6 mg x L(-1) on day 5 (P < 0.05), to 2.7+/-0.5 mg x L(-1) and 2.5+/-0.6 mg x L(-1) on day 7 (P < 0.05) under continuous and intermittent hypoxia, respectively. We suggest that intermittent exposure to moderate normobaric hypoxia 12 h daily for 1 wk induces a similar stimulation of erythropoiesis as continuous exposure.

  14. Sustainable access to data, products, services and software from the European seismological Research Infrastructures: the EPOS TCS Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslinger, Florian; Dupont, Aurelien; Michelini, Alberto; Rietbrock, Andreas; Sleeman, Reinoud; Wiemer, Stefan; Basili, Roberto; Bossu, Rémy; Cakti, Eser; Cotton, Fabrice; Crawford, Wayne; Diaz, Jordi; Garth, Tom; Locati, Mario; Luzi, Lucia; Pinho, Rui; Pitilakis, Kyriazis; Strollo, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Easy, efficient and comprehensive access to data, data products, scientific services and scientific software is a key ingredient in enabling research at the frontiers of science. Organizing this access across the European Research Infrastructures in the field of seismology, so that it best serves user needs, takes advantage of state-of-the-art ICT solutions, provides cross-domain interoperability, and is organizationally and financially sustainable in the long term, is the core challenge of the implementation phase of the Thematic Core Service (TCS) Seismology within the EPOS-IP project. Building upon the existing European-level infrastructures ORFEUS for seismological waveforms, EMSC for seismological products, and EFEHR for seismological hazard and risk information, and implementing a pilot Computational Earth Science service starting from the results of the VERCE project, the work within the EPOS-IP project focuses on improving and extending the existing services, aligning them with global developments, to at the end produce a well coordinated framework that is technically, organizationally, and financially integrated with the EPOS architecture. This framework needs to respect the roles and responsibilities of the underlying national research infrastructures that are the data owners and main providers of data and products, and allow for active input and feedback from the (scientific) user community. At the same time, it needs to remain flexible enough to cope with unavoidable challenges in the availability of resources and dynamics of contributors. The technical work during the next years is organized in four areas: - constructing the next generation software architecture for the European Integrated (waveform) Data Archive EIDA, developing advanced metadata and station information services, fully integrate strong motion waveforms and derived parametric engineering-domain data, and advancing the integration of mobile (temporary) networks and OBS deployments in

  15. Cloud Based Earth Observation Data Exploitation Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, A.; Pinto, S.; Loekken, S.; Marin, A.

    2017-12-01

    In the last few years data produced daily by several private and public Earth Observation (EO) satellites reached the order of tens of Terabytes, representing for scientists and commercial application developers both a big opportunity for their exploitation and a challenge for their management. New IT technologies, such as Big Data and cloud computing, enable the creation of web-accessible data exploitation platforms, which offer to scientists and application developers the means to access and use EO data in a quick and cost effective way. RHEA Group is particularly active in this sector, supporting the European Space Agency (ESA) in the Exploitation Platforms (EP) initiative, developing technology to build multi cloud platforms for the processing and analysis of Earth Observation data, and collaborating with larger European initiatives such as the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) and the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC). An EP is a virtual workspace, providing a user community with access to (i) large volume of data, (ii) algorithm development and integration environment, (iii) processing software and services (e.g. toolboxes, visualization routines), (iv) computing resources, (v) collaboration tools (e.g. forums, wiki, etc.). When an EP is dedicated to a specific Theme, it becomes a Thematic Exploitation Platform (TEP). Currently, ESA has seven TEPs in a pre-operational phase dedicated to geo-hazards monitoring and prevention, costal zones, forestry areas, hydrology, polar regions, urban areas and food security. On the technology development side, solutions like the multi cloud EO data processing platform provides the technology to integrate ICT resources and EO data from different vendors in a single platform. In particular it offers (i) Multi-cloud data discovery, (ii) Multi-cloud data management and access and (iii) Multi-cloud application deployment. This platform has been demonstrated with the EGI Federated Cloud, Innovation Platform Testbed Poland

  16. Solar-B E/PO Program at Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burress, B. S.

    2005-05-01

    Chabot Space and Science Center in Oakland, California, conducts the Education/Public Outreach program for the Lockheed-Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab Solar-B Focal Plane Package project. Since opening its doors in August 2000, Chabot has carried out this program in activities and educational products in the public outreach, informal education, and formal education spheres. We propose a poster presentation that illustrates the spectrum of our Solar-B E/PO program. Solar-B, scheduled to launch in September 2006, is another step in an increasingly sophisticated investigation and understanding of our Sun, its behavior, and its effects on the Earth and our technological civilization. A mission of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Solar-B is an international collaboration between Japan, the US/NASA, and the UK/PPARC. Solar-B's main optical telescope, extreme ultraviolet imaging spectrometer, and x-ray telescope will collect data on the Sun's magnetic dynamics from the photosphere through the corona at higher spatial and time resolution than on current and previous solar satellite missions, furthering our understanding of the Sun's behavior and, ultimately, its effects on the Earth. Chabot's E/PO program for the Lockheed-Martin Solar-B Focal Plane Package is multi-faceted, including elements focused on technology/engineering, solar physics, and Sun-Earth Connection themes. In the Public Outreach arena, we conduct events surrounding NASA Sun-Earth Day themes and programs other live and/or interactive events, facilitate live solar viewing, and present a series of exhibits focused on the Solar-B and other space-based missions, the dynamic Sun, and light and optics. In the Informal Education sector we run a solar day camp for kids and produce educational products, including a poster on the Solar-B mission and CDROM multimedia packages. In Formal Education, we develop classroom curriculum guides and conduct workshops training teachers in their implementation

  17. Role of antennary structure of N-linked sugar chains in renal handling of recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Misaizu, T; Matsuki, S; Strickland, T W; Takeuchi, M; Kobata, A; Takasaki, S

    1995-12-01

    To elucidate the role of the branched structure of sugar chains of human erythropoietin (EPO) in the expression of in vivo activity, the pharmacokinetic profile of a less active recombinant human EPO sample (EPO-bi) enriched with biantennary sugar chains was compared with that of a highly active control EPO sample enriched with tetraantennary sugar chains. After an intravenous injection in rats, 125I-EPO-bi disappeared from the plasma with 3.2 times greater total body clearance (Cltot) than control 125I-EPO. Whole-body autoradiography after 20 minutes of administration indicated that the overall distribution of radioactivity is similar, but 125I-EPO-bi showed a higher level of radioactivity in the kidneys than control 125I-EPO. Quantitative determination of radioactivity in the tissues also indicated that radioactivity of 125I-EPO-bi in the kidneys was two times higher than that of control 125I-EPO. The difference in plasma disappearance between 125I-EPO-bi and control 125I-EPO was not observed in bilaterally nephrectomized rats. The distribution of 125I-EPO-bi to bone marrow and spleen was similarly inhibited by simultaneous injection of excess amounts of either the nonlabeled EPO-bi or control EPO. These results indicate that the low in vivo biologic activity of EPO-bi results from rapid clearance from the systemic circulation by renal handling. Thus, the well-branched structure of the N-linked sugar chain of EPO is suggested to play an important role in maintaining its higher plasma level, which guarantees an effective transfer to target organs and stimulation of erythroid progenitor cells.

  18. Federal STEM Policy and Politics and Their Impact on Astronomy EPO: Reflections and Provocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, G.; Storksdieck, M.; Canright, S.

    2015-11-01

    The federal government invests more than $3 billion each year across its various units in supporting STEM education and outreach. Efforts in recent years to understand and better coordinate these investments have resulted in considerable pushback, particularly those efforts that aimed at consolidation and elimination of programs deemed ineffective or duplicative. While initial plans to streamline federal STEM education were defeated, many agencies nonetheless saw cuts and elimination, and a high-level effort to coordinate STEM education at the cross-agency level is now gaining steam (CoSTEM: Committee on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education). What do all of these developments mean for education and public outreach in astronomy and related fields? How should this community operate within the opportunities and threats that CoSTEM might pose? Former director of the National Academy of Science's Board on Science Education, and now director of the Center for Research on Lifelong STEM Learning, Martin Storksdieck, reflected on past and recent developments from the perspective of a close observer, and from the perspective of someone who has been involved in astronomy education research and evaluation for nearly 20 years. Shelley Canright, Senior Advisor for Education Integration at the NASA Office of Education, shared her insights and perspectives with respect to CoSTEM and EPO, in particular from co-chairing the Federal Coordination in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education (FC-STEM) group.

  19. Old friends in new constellations--the hematopoetic growth factors G-CSF, GM-CSF, and EPO for the treatment of neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Maurer, M H; Schäbitz, W-R; Schneider, A

    2008-01-01

    Currently, growth factors which have been identified in hematopoiesis and angiogenesis are re-considered as therapeutical agents in a number of neurological diseases, mainly neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's Disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or cerebrovascular events such as stroke. Among these growth factors, erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor (G-CSF) are the most prominent. With regard to neurological disease, EPO has been tested in clinical trials for potential use in stroke, schizophrenia, and addiction, G-CSF is currently under clinical investigation for stroke treatment. The major advantage of these growth factors is their well-described pharmacological behavior and their clinical use over several years. A number of mechanisms of action in the CNS have been identified that are probably important for the beneficial action of these factors in animal models of disease, the most relevant relating to neuroprotection, neuroplasticity and stem cell growth and differentiation. In this review, we will discuss the current efforts and prerequisites of novel growth factor therapies for neurodegenerative diseases with regard to their possible mechanism of action on the molecular level and their effects on brain-derived stem cell populations. Additionally, we will describe the necessities for future research before such therapies can be envisioned.

  20. Fenoterol stimulates human erythropoietin production via activation of the renin angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Freudenthaler, S M; Schenck, T; Lucht, I; Gleiter, C H

    1999-10-01

    The present study assessed the hypothesis that the beta2 sympathomimetic fenoterol influences the production of erythropoietin (EPO) by activation of the renin angiotensin system (RAS), i.e. angiotensin II. In an open, parallel, randomized study healthy volunteers received i.v. either placebo (electrolyte solution), fenoterol or fenoterol in combination with an oral dose of the AT1-receptor antagonist losartan. Compared with placebo treatment AUCEPO(0,24 h) was significantly increased after fenoterol application by 48% whereas no increase in the group receiving fenoterol and losartan could be detected. The rise of PRA was statistically significant under fenoterol and fenoterol plus lorsartan. Stimulation of EPO production during fenoterol infusion appears to be angiotensin II-mediated. Thus, angiotensin II may be considered as one important physiological modulator of EPO production in humans.

  1. New Media E/PO: Building a Digital Astronomy Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Pamela L.

    2008-05-01

    Today's communications landscape is rich with new technologies. Cell phones and laptops are the constant companions of content consumers, and as we plan tomorrow's Education and Public Outreach programs, we need to consider how to most effectively utilize these technologies with their new, dynamic content possibilities - We need to use New Media. The field of New Media includes dynamic content sites such as: blogs, pod/vodcasts, Flickr, Facebook, Ustream, Twitter, and Second Life. The first part of this talk will summarize what New Media is available in the field of astronomy. All new media technologies have one thing in common: Users can easily create and input their own content and/or comments. These new media users and content contributors can just as easily be professional researchers, E/PO professionals, amateur astronomers, stay-at-home parents, and school kids. All are welcome in the online community, and today, all voices are digitally joined in the cacophony of astronomy new media content. This rich diversity supports many opportunities for learning, mentoring, content distribution, and discussion of ideas (including the debunking of bad ideas). In the second half of this talk, ways to use new media to build a community that shares, promotes, and comments on content is discussed, and techniques for dealing with the high flux of content are outlined. Also covered are the considerations that need to be made to make content as broadly accessible as possible.

  2. Fenoterol stimulates human erythropoietin production via activation of the renin angiotensin system

    PubMed Central

    Freudenthaler, S M; Schenck, T; Lucht, I; Gleiter, C H

    1999-01-01

    Aims The present study assessed the hypothesis that the β2 sympathomimetic fenoterol influences the production of erythropoietin (EPO) by activation of the renin angiotensin system (RAS), i.e. angiotensin II. Methods In an open, parallel, randomized study healthy volunteers received i.v. either placebo (electrolyte solution), fenoterol or fenoterol in combination with an oral dose of the AT1-receptor antagonist losartan. Results Compared with placebo treatment AUCEPO(0,24 h) was significantly increased after fenoterol application by 48% whereas no increase in the group receiving fenoterol and losartan could be detected. The rise of PRA was statistically significant under fenoterol and fenoterol plus lorsartan. Conclusions Stimulation of EPO production during fenoterol infusion appears to be angiotensin II-mediated. Thus, angiotensin II may be considered as one important physiological modulator of EPO production in humans. PMID:10583037

  3. Erythropoietin-Mediated Regulation of Central Respiratory Command.

    PubMed

    Seaborn, Tommy; Caravagna, Céline

    2017-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is a cytokine expressed throughout the body, including in the central nervous system where it can act as a breathing modulator in the central respiratory network. In vitro, Epo allows maintaining the activity of respiratory neurons during acute hypoxia, resulting in inhibition of the hypoxia-induced rhythm depression. In vivo, Epo action on the central respiratory command results in enhancement of the acute hypoxic ventilatory response, allowing a better oxygenation of the body by improvement of gases exchanges in the lungs. Importantly, this effect of Epo is age-dependent, being observed at adulthood and at both early and late postnatal ages, but not at middle postnatal ages, when an important setup of the central respiratory command occurs. Epo regulation of the central respiratory command involves at least two intracellular signaling pathways, PI3K-Akt and MEK-ERK pathways. However, the exact mechanism underlying the action of Epo on the central respiratory control remains to be deciphered, as well as the exact cell types and nuclei involved in this control. Epo-mediated effect on the central respiratory command is regulated by several factors, including hypoxia, sex hormones, and an endogen antagonist. Although more knowledge is needed before reaching the clinical trial step, Epo seems to be a promising therapeutic treatment, notably against newborn breathing disorders. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Erythropoietin alleviates post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction in rats potentially through increasing the expression of angiotensin II receptor type 2 in myocardial tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hourong; Huang, Jia; Zhu, Li; Cao, Yu

    2018-01-01

    Activation of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is one of the pathological mechanisms associated with myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury following resuscitation. The present study aimed to determine whether erythropoietin (EPO) improves post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction and how it affects the renin-angiotensin system. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham, vehicle, epinephrine (EP), EPO and EP + EPO groups. Excluding the sham group, all groups underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) 4 min after asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest (CA). EP and/or EPO was administrated by intravenous injection when CPR began. The results demonstrated that the vehicle group exhibited lower mean arterial pressure, left ventricular systolic pressure, maximal ascending rate of left ventricular pressure during left ventricular isovolumic contraction and maximal descending rate of left ventricular pressure during left ventricular isovolumic relaxation (+LVdP/dt max and -LVdP/dt max, respectively), and higher left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, compared with the sham group following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Few significant differences were observed concerning the myocardial function between the vehicle and EP groups; however, compared with the vehicle group, EPO reversed myocardial function indices following ROSC, excluding-LVdP/dt max. Serum renin and angiotensin (Ang) II levels were measured by ELISA. The serum levels of renin and Ang II were significantly increased in the vehicle group compared with the sham group, which was also observed for the myocardial expression of renin and Ang II receptor type 1 (AT1R), as determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. EPO alone did not significantly reduce the high serum levels of renin and Ang II post-resuscitation, but changed the protein levels of renin and AT1R expression in myocardial tissues. However, EPO enhanced the myocardial expression of

  5. A single topical dose of erythropoietin applied on a collagen carrier enhances calvarial bone healing in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose The osteogenic potency of erythropoietin (EPO) has been documented. However, its efficacy in a large-animal model has not yet been investigated; nor has a clinically safe dosage. The purpose of this study was to overcome such limitations of previous studies and thereby pave the way for possible clinical application. Our hypothesis was that EPO increases calvarial bone healing compared to a saline control in the same subject. Methods We used a porcine calvarial defect model. In each of 18 pigs, 6 cylindrical defects (diameter: 1 cm; height: 1 cm) were drilled, allowing 3 pairwise comparisons. Treatment consisted of either 900 IU/mL EPO or an equal volume of saline in combination with either autograft, a collagen carrier, or a polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold. After an observation time of 5 weeks, the primary outcome (bone volume fraction (BV/TV)) was assessed with high-resolution quantitative computed tomography. Secondary outcome measures were histomorphometry and blood samples. Results The median BV/TV ratio of the EPO-treated collagen group was 1.06 (CI: 1.02–1.11) relative to the saline-treated collagen group. Histomorphometry showed a similar median effect size, but it did not reach statistical significance. Autograft treatment had excellent healing potential and was able to completely regenerate the bone defect independently of EPO treatment. Bony ingrowth into the PCL scaffold was sparse, both with and without EPO. Neither a substantial systemic effect nor adverse events were observed. The number of blood vessels was similar in EPO-treated defects and saline-treated defects. Interpretation Topical administration of EPO on a collagen carrier moderately increased bone healing. The dosing regime was safe, and could have possible application in the clinical setting. However, in order to increase the clinical relevance, a more potent but still clinically safe dose should be investigated. PMID:24564750

  6. Soluble erythropoietin receptor is present in the mouse brain and is required for the ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Soliz, Jorge; Gassmann, Max; Joseph, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    While erythropoietin (Epo) and its receptor (EpoR) have been widely investigated in brain, the expression and function of the soluble Epo receptor (sEpoR) remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that sEpoR, a negative regulator of Epo's binding to the EpoR, is present in the mouse brain and is down-regulated by 62% after exposure to normobaric chronic hypoxia (10% O2 for 3 days). Furthermore, while normoxic minute ventilation increased by 58% in control mice following hypoxic acclimatization, sEpoR infusion in brain during the hypoxic challenge efficiently reduced brain Epo concentration and abolished the ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH). These observations imply that hypoxic downregulation of sEpoR is required for adequate ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia, thereby underlying the function of Epo as a key factor regulating oxygen delivery not only by its classical activity on red blood cell production, but also by regulating ventilation. PMID:17584830

  7. Revisiting adult neurogenesis and the role of erythropoietin for neuronal and oligodendroglial differentiation in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Hassouna, I; Ott, C; Wüstefeld, L; Offen, N; Neher, R A; Mitkovski, M; Winkler, D; Sperling, S; Fries, L; Goebbels, S; Vreja, I C; Hagemeyer, N; Dittrich, M; Rossetti, M F; Kröhnert, K; Hannke, K; Boretius, S; Zeug, A; Höschen, C; Dandekar, T; Dere, E; Neher, E; Rizzoli, S O; Nave, K-A; Sirén, A-L; Ehrenreich, H

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) improves cognitive performance in neuropsychiatric diseases ranging from schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis to major depression and bipolar disease. This consistent EPO effect on cognition is independent of its role in hematopoiesis. The cellular mechanisms of action in brain, however, have remained unclear. Here we studied healthy young mice and observed that 3-week EPO administration was associated with an increased number of pyramidal neurons and oligodendrocytes in the hippocampus of ~20%. Under constant cognitive challenge, neuron numbers remained elevated until >6 months of age. Surprisingly, this increase occurred in absence of altered cell proliferation or apoptosis. After feeding a 15N-leucine diet, we used nanoscopic secondary ion mass spectrometry, and found that in EPO-treated mice, an equivalent number of neurons was defined by elevated 15N-leucine incorporation. In EPO-treated NG2-Cre-ERT2 mice, we confirmed enhanced differentiation of preexisting oligodendrocyte precursors in the absence of elevated DNA synthesis. A corresponding analysis of the neuronal lineage awaits the identification of suitable neuronal markers. In cultured neurospheres, EPO reduced Sox9 and stimulated miR124, associated with advanced neuronal differentiation. We are discussing a resulting working model in which EPO drives the differentiation of non-dividing precursors in both (NG2+) oligodendroglial and neuronal lineages. As endogenous EPO expression is induced by brain injury, such a mechanism of adult neurogenesis may be relevant for central nervous system regeneration. PMID:26809838

  8. Correlated receptor transport processes buffer single-cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Kallenberger, Stefan M.; Unger, Anne L.; Legewie, Stefan; Lymperopoulos, Konstantinos; Eils, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Cells typically vary in their response to extracellular ligands. Receptor transport processes modulate ligand-receptor induced signal transduction and impact the variability in cellular responses. Here, we quantitatively characterized cellular variability in erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) trafficking at the single-cell level based on live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling. Using ensembles of single-cell mathematical models reduced parameter uncertainties and showed that rapid EpoR turnover, transport of internalized EpoR back to the plasma membrane, and degradation of Epo-EpoR complexes were essential for receptor trafficking. EpoR trafficking dynamics in adherent H838 lung cancer cells closely resembled the dynamics previously characterized by mathematical modeling in suspension cells, indicating that dynamic properties of the EpoR system are widely conserved. Receptor transport processes differed by one order of magnitude between individual cells. However, the concentration of activated Epo-EpoR complexes was less variable due to the correlated kinetics of opposing transport processes acting as a buffering system. PMID:28945754

  9. Plasma soluble erythropoietin receptor is decreased during sleep in Andean highlanders with Chronic Mountain Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Corante, Noemí; Anza-Ramírez, Cecilia; Figueroa-Mujíca, Rómulo; Vizcardo-Galindo, Gustavo; Mercado, Andy; Macarlupú, José Luis; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    Excessive erythrocytosis (EE) is the main sign of Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS), a highly prevalent syndrome in Andean highlanders. Low pulse O2 saturation (SpO2) during sleep and serum androgens have been suggested to contribute to EE in CMS patients. However, whether these factors have a significant impact on the erythropoietin (Epo) system leading to EE is still unclear. We have recently shown that morning soluble Epo receptor (sEpoR), an endogenous Epo antagonist, is decreased in CMS patients suggesting increased Epo availability (increased Epo/sEpoR). The present study aimed to characterize the nocturnal concentration profile of sEpoR and Epo and their relationship with SpO2, Hct, and serum testosterone in healthy highlanders (HH) and CMS patients. Epo and sEpoR concentrations were evaluated every 4 h (6 PM to 6 AM) and nighttime SpO2 was continuously monitored (10 PM to 6 AM) in 39 male participants (CMS, n = 23; HH, n = 16) aged 21-65 yr from Cerro de Pasco, Peru (4,340 m). CMS patients showed higher serum Epo concentrations throughout the night and lower sEpoR from 10 PM to 6 AM. Consequently, Epo/sEpoR was significantly higher in the CMS group at every time point. Mean sleep-time SpO2 was lower in CMS patients compared with HH, while the percentage of sleep time spent with SpO2 < 80% was higher. Multiple-regression analysis showed mean sleep-time SpO2 and Epo/sEpoR as significant predictors of hematocrit corrected for potential confounders (age, body mass index, and testosterone). Testosterone levels were associated neither with Hct nor with erythropoietic factors. In conclusion, our results show sustained erythropoietic stimulus driven by the Epo system in CMS patients, further enhanced by a continuous exposure to accentuated nocturnal hypoxemia. PMID:27125843

  10. Erythroid cell growth and differentiation in vitro in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sytkowski, A. J.; Davis, K. L.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans and experimental animals to the altered gravitational conditions of space flight has adverse effects on the lymphoid and erythroid hematopoietic systems. Although some information is available regarding the cellular and molecular changes in lymphocytes exposed to microgravity, little is known about the erythroid cellular changes that may underlie the reduction in erythropoiesis and resultant anemia. We now report a reduction in erythroid growth and a profound inhibition of erythropoietin (Epo)-induced differentiation in a ground-based simulated microgravity model system. Rauscher murine erythroleukemia cells were grown either in tissue culture vessels at 1 x g or in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA-designed rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Logarithmic growth was observed under both conditions; however, the doubling time in simulated microgravity was only one-half of that seen at 1 x g. No difference in apoptosis was detected. Induction with Epo at the initiation of the culture resulted in differentiation of approximately 25% of the cells at 1 x g, consistent with our previous observations. In contrast, induction with Epo at the initiation of simulated microgravity resulted in only one-half of this degree of differentiation. Significantly, the growth of cells in simulated microgravity for 24 h prior to Epo induction inhibited the differentiation almost completely. The results suggest that the NASA RWV bioreactor may serve as a suitable ground-based microgravity simulator to model the cellular and molecular changes in erythroid cells observed in true microgravity.

  11. System/observer/controller identification toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Horta, Lucas G.; Phan, Minh

    1992-01-01

    System Identification is the process of constructing a mathematical model from input and output data for a system under testing, and characterizing the system uncertainties and measurement noises. The mathematical model structure can take various forms depending upon the intended use. The SYSTEM/OBSERVER/CONTROLLER IDENTIFICATION TOOLBOX (SOCIT) is a collection of functions, written in MATLAB language and expressed in M-files, that implements a variety of modern system identification techniques. For an open loop system, the central features of the SOCIT are functions for identification of a system model and its corresponding forward and backward observers directly from input and output data. The system and observers are represented by a discrete model. The identified model and observers may be used for controller design of linear systems as well as identification of modal parameters such as dampings, frequencies, and mode shapes. For a closed-loop system, an observer and its corresponding controller gain directly from input and output data.

  12. A nonerythropoietic derivative of erythropoietin protects the myocardium from ischemia–reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Fiordaliso, Fabio; Chimenti, Stefano; Staszewsky, Lidia; Bai, Antonio; Carlo, Eleonora; Cuccovillo, Ivan; Doni, Mirko; Mengozzi, Manuela; Tonelli, Rossella; Ghezzi, Pietro; Coleman, Thomas; Brines, Michael; Cerami, Anthony; Latini, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    The cytokine erythropoietin (EPO) protects the heart from ischemic injury, in part by preventing apoptosis. However, EPO administration can also raise the hemoglobin concentration, which, by increasing oxygen delivery, confounds assignment of cause and effect. The availability of EPO analogs that do not bind to the dimeric EPO receptor and lack erythropoietic activity, e.g., carbamylated EPO (CEPO), provides an opportunity to determine whether EPO possesses direct cardioprotective activity. In vivo, cardiomyocyte loss after experimental myocardial infarction (MI) of rats (40 min of occlusion with reperfusion) was reduced from ≈57% in MI-control to ≈45% in animals that were administered CEPO daily for 1 week (50 μg/kg of body weight s.c.) with the first dose administered intravenously 5 min before reperfusion. CEPO did not increase the hematocrit, yet it prevented increases in left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure, reduced LV wall stress in systole and diastole, and improved LV response to dobutamine infusion compared with vehicle-treated animals. In agreement with the cardioprotective effect observed in vivo, staurosporine-induced apoptosis of adult rat or mouse cardiomyocytes in vitro was also significantly attenuated (≈35%) by CEPO, which is comparable with the effect of EPO. These data indicate that prevention of cardiomyocyte apoptosis, in the absence of an increase in hemoglobin concentration, explains EPO's cardioprotection. Nonerythropoietic derivatives such as CEPO, devoid of the undesirable effects of EPO, e.g., thrombogenesis, could represent safer and more effective alternatives for treatment of cardiovascular diseases, such as MI and heart failure. Furthermore, these findings expand the activity spectrum of CEPO to tissues outside the nervous system. PMID:15671158

  13. EPO-cyclosporine combination therapy reduced brain infarct area in rat after acute ischemic stroke: role of innate immune-inflammatory response, micro-RNAs and MAPK family signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Chun-Man; Yeh, Kuo-Ho; Wallace, Christopher Glenn; Chen, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Hung-Sheng; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Chai, Han-Tan; Chen, Yung-Lung; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chen, Chih-Hung; Kao, Gour-Shenq; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2017-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that erythropoietin (EPO) and cyclosporine (CsA) could effectively reduce brain infarct area (BIA) in rat after acute ischemic stroke (AIS) through regulating inflammation, oxidative stress, MAPK family signaling and microRNA (miR-223/miR-30a/miR-383). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 48) were equally divided into group 1 (sham control), group 2 (AIS), group 3 [AIS+EPO (5,000 IU/kg at 0.5/24/48 h, subcutaneous)] and group 4 [AIS+CsA (20.0 mg/kg at 0.5/24/48 h, intra-peritoneal)]. By 72 h, histopathology showed that BIA was largest in group 2 and smallest in group 1, and significantly larger in group 4 than group 3 (all P<0.0001). The three microRNAs expressed were higher in group 2 than in the other three groups (all P<0.04); between these three latter groups there were no significant differences. The protein expressions of MAPK family [phosphorylated (p)-ERK1/2, p-p38/p-JNK], inflammatory (iNOS/MMP-9/TNF-α/NF-κB/IL-12/MIP-1α/CD14/CD68/Ly6g), apoptotic (caspase-3/PARP/mitochondrial-Bax), oxidative-stress (NOX-1/NOX-2/oxidized protein) and mitochondrial-damaged (cytosolic cytochrome-C) biomarkers exhibited an identical pattern to BIA findings (all P<0.0001). The cellular expressions of brain edema (AQP4+), inflammation (CD11+/glial-fibrillary-acid protein+), and cellular damage (TUNEL assay/positive Periodic acid-Schiff stain) biomarkers exhibited an identical pattern, whereas the cellular-integrity markers (neuN+/MAP2+/doublecorin+) exhibited an opposite pattern to BIA (all P value <0.001). EPO-CsA therapy markedly reduced BIA mainly by suppressing the innate immune response to inflammation, oxidative stress, microRNAs (miR-223/miR-30a/miR-383) and MAPK family signaling.

  14. The Group on Earth Observations and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achache, J.

    2006-05-01

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is leading a worldwide effort to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) over the next 10 years. The GEOSS vision, articulated in its 10-Year Implementation Plan, represents the consolidation of a global scientific and political consensus: the assessment of the state of the Earth requires continuous and coordinated observation of our planet at all scales. GEOSS aims to achieve comprehensive, coordinated and sustained observations of the Earth system in order to improve monitoring of the state of the Earth; increase understanding of Earth processes; and enhance prediction of the behaviour of the Earth system. After the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002 highlighted the urgent need for coordinated observations relating to the state of the Earth, GEO was established at the Third Earth Observation Summit in February 2005 and the GEOSS 10-Year Implementation Plan was endorsed. GEO currently involves 60 countries; the European Commission; and 43 international organizations and has begun implementation of the GEOSS 10-Year Implementation Plan. GEO programme activities cover nine societal benefit areas (Disasters; Health; Energy; Climate; Water; Weather; Ecosystems; Agriculture; Biodiversity) and five transverse or crosscutting elements (User Engagement; Architecture; Data Management; Capacity Building; Outreach). All these activities have as their final goal the establishment of the "system of systems" which will yield a broad range of basic societal benefits, including the reduction of loss of life and property from tsunamis, hurricanes, and other natural disasters; improved water resource and energy management; and improved understanding of environmental factors significant to public health. As a "system of systems", GEOSS will work with and build upon existing national, regional, and international systems to provide comprehensive, coordinated Earth observations from thousands of instruments worldwide

  15. Effects of Epoetin Alfa Titration Practices, Implemented After Changes to Product Labeling, on Hemoglobin Levels, Transfusion Use, and Hospitalization Rates.

    PubMed

    Molony, Julia T; Monda, Keri L; Li, Suying; Beaubrun, Anne C; Gilbertson, David T; Bradbury, Brian D; Collins, Allan J

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about epoetin alfa (EPO) dosing at dialysis centers after implementation of the US Medicare prospective payment system and revision of the EPO label in 2011. Retrospective cohort study. Approximately 412,000 adult hemodialysis patients with Medicare Parts A and B as primary payer in 2009 to 2012 to describe EPO dosing and hemoglobin patterns; of these, about 70,000 patients clustered in about 1,300 dialysis facilities to evaluate facility-level EPO titration practices and patient-level outcomes in 2012. Facility EPO titration practices when hemoglobin levels were <10 and >11g/dL (grouped treatment variable) determined from monthly EPO dosing and hemoglobin level patterns. Patient mean hemoglobin levels, red blood cell transfusion rates, and all-cause and cause-specific hospitalization rates using a facility-based analysis. Monthly EPO dose and hemoglobin level, red blood cell transfusion rates, and all-cause and cause-specific hospitalization rates. Monthly EPO doses declined across all hemoglobin levels, with the greatest decline in patients with hemoglobin levels < 10g/dL (July-October 2011). In 2012, nine distinct facility titration practices were identified. Across groups, mean hemoglobin levels differed slightly (10.5-10.8g/dL) but within-patient hemoglobin standard deviations were similar (∼0.68g/dL). Patients at facilities implementing greater dose reductions and smaller dose escalations had lower hemoglobin levels and higher transfusion rates. In contrast, patients at facilities that implemented greater dose escalations (and large or small dose reductions) had higher hemoglobin levels and lower transfusion rates. There were no clinically meaningful differences in all-cause or cause-specific hospitalization events across groups. Possibly incomplete claims data; excluded small facilities and those without consistent titration patterns; hemoglobin levels reported monthly; inferred facility practice from observed dosing. Following

  16. Hospitalization and survival in patients using epoprostenol for injection in the PROSPECT observational study.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Robert P; Schilz, Robert J; Chakinala, Murali M; Badesch, David B; Frost, Adaani E; McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Barst, Robyn J; Rosenberg, Daniel M; Miller, Dave P; Hartline, Brian K; Benton, Wade W; Farber, Harrison W

    2015-02-01

    Few studies have prospectively reported outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) treated with epoprostenol in the modern-day era of oral therapy and combination treatments. The Registry to Prospectively Describe Use of Epoprostenol for Injection (Veletri, prolonged room temperature stable-epoprostenol [RTS-Epo]) in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PROSPECT) was established to prospectively describe the course of PAH in patients prescribed RTS-Epo. PROSPECT is a multicenter, US-based drug registry of primarily group 1 patients with PAH treated with RTS-Epo who were parenteral-naive or parenteral-transitioned at enrollment. Patients were followed until discontinuation of RTS-Epo, withdrawal, loss to follow-up, death, or end of study (maximum 1 year). One-year freedom from hospitalization (FH) and survival estimates were summarized by prostacyclin history (parenteral-naive or parenteral-transitioned), sex, and chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). A total of 336 patients were included. The overall 1-year FH estimate was 51.0% ± 2.8% and was lower in parenteral-naive patients than parenteral-transitioned patients (42.8% ± 4.3% vs 57.1% ± 3.7%, respectively; P = .002). FH estimates were lower in male patients than female patients (38.3% ± 5.9% vs 54.6% ± 3.2%, respectively; P < .015) and in patients with CRI than patients without CRI (17.0% ± 8.4% vs 53.7% ± 2.9%, respectively; P < .001). The overall 1-year survival estimate was 84.0% ± 2.1%. Survival was poorer in parenteral-naive patients, male patients, and patients with CRI. Risk of hospitalization and mortality remain high in patients with PAH. In particular, patients who are parenteral-naive at initiation of RTS-Epo therapy, male patients, and patients with CRI require close monitoring and aggressive clinical management.

  17. Hospitalization and Survival in Patients Using Epoprostenol for Injection in the PROSPECT Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Frantz, Robert P.; Schilz, Robert J.; Chakinala, Murali M.; Badesch, David B.; Frost, Adaani E.; McLaughlin, Vallerie V.; Barst, Robyn J.; Rosenberg, Daniel M.; Miller, Dave P.; Hartline, Brian K.; Benton, Wade W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have prospectively reported outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) treated with epoprostenol in the modern-day era of oral therapy and combination treatments. The Registry to Prospectively Describe Use of Epoprostenol for Injection (Veletri, prolonged room temperature stable-epoprostenol [RTS-Epo]) in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PROSPECT) was established to prospectively describe the course of PAH in patients prescribed RTS-Epo. METHODS: PROSPECT is a multicenter, US-based drug registry of primarily group 1 patients with PAH treated with RTS-Epo who were parenteral-naive or parenteral-transitioned at enrollment. Patients were followed until discontinuation of RTS-Epo, withdrawal, loss to follow-up, death, or end of study (maximum 1 year). One-year freedom from hospitalization (FH) and survival estimates were summarized by prostacyclin history (parenteral-naive or parenteral-transitioned), sex, and chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). RESULTS: A total of 336 patients were included. The overall 1-year FH estimate was 51.0% ± 2.8% and was lower in parenteral-naive patients than parenteral-transitioned patients (42.8% ± 4.3% vs 57.1% ± 3.7%, respectively; P = .002). FH estimates were lower in male patients than female patients (38.3% ± 5.9% vs 54.6% ± 3.2%, respectively; P < .015) and in patients with CRI than patients without CRI (17.0% ± 8.4% vs 53.7% ± 2.9%, respectively; P < .001). The overall 1-year survival estimate was 84.0% ± 2.1%. Survival was poorer in parenteral-naive patients, male patients, and patients with CRI. CONCLUSIONS: Risk of hospitalization and mortality remain high in patients with PAH. In particular, patients who are parenteral-naive at initiation of RTS-Epo therapy, male patients, and patients with CRI require close monitoring and aggressive clinical management. PMID:25320967

  18. Simultaneous Expression from Both the Sense and Antisense Strand of the Erythropoietin Receptor Gene Mitigates Acute Lung Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-01

    Toronto) which immunoprecipitates EpoR but works poorly in immunoblots and not at in immunohistochemistry (Hu et al., Kidney Int. 2013 Sep;84(3):468-81...DAPI EpoR/GFP/DAPIGFP/DAPI C.. Ba/F32EpoR2Flag2GFP.cells 9 Figure 4. Screening the new MAbs to human RopE. Human embryonic kidney -293 (HEK-293) cells...ontogeny of EpoR and RopE expression Figure 7. Concordant RopE and EpoR expression was observed in the lung (left) and the kidney (right) that increase

  19. Plasma soluble erythropoietin receptor is decreased during sleep in Andean highlanders with Chronic Mountain Sickness.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte, Francisco C; Corante, Noemí; Anza-Ramírez, Cecilia; Figueroa-Mujíca, Rómulo; Vizcardo-Galindo, Gustavo; Mercado, Andy; Macarlupú, José Luis; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2016-07-01

    Excessive erythrocytosis (EE) is the main sign of Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS), a highly prevalent syndrome in Andean highlanders. Low pulse O2 saturation (SpO2) during sleep and serum androgens have been suggested to contribute to EE in CMS patients. However, whether these factors have a significant impact on the erythropoietin (Epo) system leading to EE is still unclear. We have recently shown that morning soluble Epo receptor (sEpoR), an endogenous Epo antagonist, is decreased in CMS patients suggesting increased Epo availability (increased Epo/sEpoR). The present study aimed to characterize the nocturnal concentration profile of sEpoR and Epo and their relationship with SpO2, Hct, and serum testosterone in healthy highlanders (HH) and CMS patients. Epo and sEpoR concentrations were evaluated every 4 h (6 PM to 6 AM) and nighttime SpO2 was continuously monitored (10 PM to 6 AM) in 39 male participants (CMS, n = 23; HH, n = 16) aged 21-65 yr from Cerro de Pasco, Peru (4,340 m). CMS patients showed higher serum Epo concentrations throughout the night and lower sEpoR from 10 PM to 6 AM. Consequently, Epo/sEpoR was significantly higher in the CMS group at every time point. Mean sleep-time SpO2 was lower in CMS patients compared with HH, while the percentage of sleep time spent with SpO2 < 80% was higher. Multiple-regression analysis showed mean sleep-time SpO2 and Epo/sEpoR as significant predictors of hematocrit corrected for potential confounders (age, body mass index, and testosterone). Testosterone levels were associated neither with Hct nor with erythropoietic factors. In conclusion, our results show sustained erythropoietic stimulus driven by the Epo system in CMS patients, further enhanced by a continuous exposure to accentuated nocturnal hypoxemia. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. The Anti-Aging Effect of Erythropoietin via the ERK/Nrf2-ARE Pathway in Aging Rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiqin; Zhao, Jiaxin; Chen, Mengyi; Wang, Huqing; Yao, Qingling; Fan, Jiaxin; Zhang, Meng

    2017-03-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has a neuroprotective effect and can resist aging, which most likely occur through EPO increasing the activity of antioxidant enzymes and scavenging free radicals. In this study, we verified the anti-aging function of EPO and discussed the mechanism occurring through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-ARE pathway. A rat model of aging was induced by the continuous subcutaneous injection of 5 % D-galactose for 6 weeks. At the beginning of the sixth week, physiological saline or EPO was administered twice per day through a lateral ventricle system for a total of 7 days. In one group, 2 μl PD98059 was administered 30 min before EPO. Learning and memory ability were analyzed with the Morris water maze system. HE staining was used to observe the morphological changes in the neurons in the hippocampus, and immunohistochemical staining as well as Western blots were carried out to detect the expression of ERK for each group of rats and the expression of phosphorylated-ERK (P-ERK), Nrf2, and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Real-Time PCR was carried out to detect the amount of Nrf2 mRNA and the KEAP1 mRNA expression. EPO can significantly improve learning and memory ability in aging rats and can provide protection against aging by improving the hippocampus morphology. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blots showed P-ERK, Nrf2, and Cu-Zn SOD decreases in aging rats compared to the normal group, while the expression for those proteins increased after EPO intervention. PD98059 inhibited the enhanced expression of P-ERK, Nrf2, and Cu-Zn SOD induced by EPO. Real-Time PCR results suggested that the trend of Nrf2mRNA expression was the same as that for the proteins, which confirmed that the enhancement occurred at the gene level. As such, EPO can significantly resist or delay aging and protect the brain by reducing oxidative stress. The most likely mechanism is that EPO can promote the ERK/Nrf2-ARE pathway in

  1. Unexpected hypoxia-dependent erythropoietin secretion during experimental conditions not affecting tissue oxygen supply/demand ratio.

    PubMed

    Bozzini, C E; Barceló, A C; Conti, M I; Martínez, M P; Lezón, C E; Bozzini, C; Alippi, R M

    1997-02-01

    Although a great deal of evidence supports the hypothesis that plasma erythropoietin (EPO) levels of mammals are related to the oxygen supply to the tissues relative to their oxygen needs, several observation millitate against its inherent simplicity. This study presents our results obtained from in vivo experiments that suggest that hypoxia-dependent EPO production can be altered by conditions which apparently do not modify the tissue oxygen supply/demand ratio. Hypoxia-dependent EPO production rate (EPO-PR), derived from plasma EPO titers and plasma EPO half-lives, were estimated in both transfused-polycythemic and normocythemic mouse models subjected to different treatments. From calculations of the O2 carrying capacity of blood and body O2 consumption, it was assumed that the tissue supply/demand ratios were similar in both experimental and control mice of the same model at the time of induction of EPO production. The following observations were worth noting: (1) EPO-PRs in transfused polycythemic mice whose erythropoietic rates were stimulated by intermittent exposure to hypobaria (0.5 atm, 18 hr/day x 3 weeks), phenylhydrazine administration (40 mg/kg at weekly intervals x 3 weeks) or repeated rh-EPO injections (1500 U/kg 3 times a week x 3 weeks) before transfusion were more than five times high than in comparabily polycythemic mice whose erythropoietic rates were not stimulated previously; and (2) EPO-PR in response to hypobaric hypoxia was 2.08 times normal in normocythemic mice with cyclophosphamide (100 mg/kg) induced depression of erythropoiesis, and 0.33 times normal in normocythemic mice with rh-EPO (400 U/kg x 2) induced enhancement of erythropoiesis. Although the results obtained in polycythemic mice are difficult to explain, those from normocythemic mice suggest the existence of a feedback mechanism between EPO-responsive cells and EPO-producing cells. Both demonstrate the existence of experimental conditions in which modulation of the hypoxia

  2. Adoption of the B2SAFE EUDAT replication service by the EPOS community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciari, Claudio; Fares, Massimo; Fiameni, Giuseppe; Michelini, Alberto; Danecek, Peter; Wittenburg, Peter

    2014-05-01

    B2SAFE is the EUDAT service for moving and replicating data between sites and storage systems for different purposes. The goal of B2SAFE is to keep the data from a repository safe by replicating it across different geographical and administrative zones according to a set of well-defined policies. It is also a way to store large volumes of data permanently at those sites which are providing powerful on-demand data analysis facilities. In particular, B2SAFE operates on the domain of registered data where data objects are referable via persistent identifiers (PIDs). B2SAFE is more than just copying data because the PIDs must be carefully managed when data objects are moved or replicated. The EUDAT B2SAFE Service offers functionality to replicate datasets across different data centres in a safe and efficient way while maintaining all information required to easily find and query information about the replica locations. The information about the replica locations and other important information is stored in PID records, each managed in separate administrative domains. The B2SAFE Service is implemented as an iRODS module providing a set of iRODS rules or policies to interface with the EPIC handle API and uses the iRODS middleware to replicate datasets from a source data (or community) centre to a destination data centre. The definition of the dataset(s) to replicate is flexible and up to the communities using the B2SAFE service. While the B2SAFE is internally using the EPIC handle API, communities have the choice to use any PID system they prefer to assign PIDs to their digital objects. A reference to one or more EUDAT B2SAFE PIDs is returned by the B2SAFE service when a dataset is replicated. The presentation will introduce the problem space of B2SAFE, presents the achievements that have been made during the last year for enabling communities to make use of the B2SAFE service, demonstrates a EPOS use cases, outlines the commonalities and differences between the policies

  3. Gene delivery to skeletal muscle results in sustained expression and systemic delivery of a therapeutic protein.

    PubMed

    Kessler, P D; Podsakoff, G M; Chen, X; McQuiston, S A; Colosi, P C; Matelis, L A; Kurtzman, G J; Byrne, B J

    1996-11-26

    Somatic gene therapy has been proposed as a means to achieve systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins. However, there is limited evidence that current methods of gene delivery can practically achieve this goal. In this study, we demonstrate that, following a single intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector containing the beta-galactosidase (AAV-lacZ) gene into adult BALB/c mice, protein expression was detected in myofibers for at least 32 weeks. A single intramuscular administration of an AAV vector containing a gene for human erythropoietin (AAV-Epo) into mice resulted in dose-dependent secretion of erythropoietin and corresponding increases in red blood cell production that persisted for up to 40 weeks. Primary human myotubes transduced in vitro with the AAV-Epo vector also showed dose-dependent production of Epo. These results demonstrate that rAAV vectors are able to transduce skeletal muscle and are capable of achieving sustained expression and systemic delivery of a therapeutic protein following a single intramuscular administration. Gene therapy using AAV vectors may provide a practical strategy for the treatment of inherited and acquired protein deficiencies.

  4. Gene delivery to skeletal muscle results in sustained expression and systemic delivery of a therapeutic protein

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Paul D.; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Chen, Xiaojuan; McQuiston, Susan A.; Colosi, Peter C.; Matelis, Laura A.; Kurtzman, Gary J.; Byrne, Barry J.

    1996-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy has been proposed as a means to achieve systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins. However, there is limited evidence that current methods of gene delivery can practically achieve this goal. In this study, we demonstrate that, following a single intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector containing the β-galactosidase (AAV-lacZ) gene into adult BALB/c mice, protein expression was detected in myofibers for at least 32 weeks. A single intramuscular administration of an AAV vector containing a gene for human erythropoietin (AAV-Epo) into mice resulted in dose-dependent secretion of erythropoietin and corresponding increases in red blood cell production that persisted for up to 40 weeks. Primary human myotubes transduced in vitro with the AAV-Epo vector also showed dose-dependent production of Epo. These results demonstrate that rAAV vectors are able to transduce skeletal muscle and are capable of achieving sustained expression and systemic delivery of a therapeutic protein following a single intramuscular administration. Gene therapy using AAV vectors may provide a practical strategy for the treatment of inherited and acquired protein deficiencies. PMID:8943064

  5. Vitamin K3-2,3-epoxide induction of apoptosis with activation of ROS-dependent ERK and JNK protein phosphorylation in human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jender; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Yang, Liang-Yo; Huang, Guan-Cheng; Cheng, Min-Chi; Lin, Che-Tong; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Chen, Yen-Chou

    2011-08-15

    2-Methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (menadione or vitamin K3; EPO) and K3-2,3-epoxide (EPO1), but not vitamin K3-3-OH (EPO2), exhibited cytotoxicity that caused DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation in U87 and C6 cells. EPO1 showed more-potent cytotoxicity than EPO, and the IC(50) values of EPO and EPO1 in U87 cells were 37.5 and 15.7μM, respectively. Activation of caspase 3 enzyme activity with cleavage of caspase 3 protein was detected in EPO1-treated U87 and C6 cells, and the addition of the caspase 3 peptidyl inhibitor, DEVD-FMK, reduced the cytotoxic effect of EPO1. An increase in the intracellular ROS level by EPO1 was observed in the DCHF-DA analysis, and EPO1-induced apoptosis and caspase 3 protein cleavage were prevented by adding the antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), with decreased ROS production elicited by EPO1. Activation of ERK and JNK, but not p38, via phosphorylation induction was identified in EPO1- but not EPO- or EPO2-treated U87 and C6 cells, and this was blocked by adding NAC. However, the ERK inhibitor, PD98059, and the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, showed no effect on EPO1-induced cytotoxicity in either cell type. Our findings demonstrate that 2,3-epoxide substitution significantly potentiates the apoptotic effect of vitamin K3 via stimulating ROS production, which may be useful in the chemotherapy of glioblastoma cells. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Reaction-Diffusion-Delay Model for EPO/TNF-α Interaction in articular cartilage lesion abatement

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Injuries to articular cartilage result in the development of lesions that form on the surface of the cartilage. Such lesions are associated with articular cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis. The typical injury response often causes collateral damage, primarily an effect of inflammation, which results in the spread of lesions beyond the region where the initial injury occurs. Results and discussion We present a minimal mathematical model based on known mechanisms to investigate the spread and abatement of such lesions. The first case corresponds to the parameter values listed in Table 1, while the second case has parameter values as in Table 2. In particular we represent the "balancing act" between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines that is hypothesized to be a principal mechanism in the expansion properties of cartilage damage during the typical injury response. We present preliminary results of in vitro studies that confirm the anti-inflammatory activities of the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO). We assume that the diffusion of cytokines determine the spatial behavior of injury response and lesion expansion so that a reaction diffusion system involving chemical species and chondrocyte cell state population densities is a natural way to represent cartilage injury response. We present computational results using the mathematical model showing that our representation is successful in capturing much of the interesting spatial behavior of injury associated lesion development and abatement in articular cartilage. Further, we discuss the use of this model to study the possibility of using EPO as a therapy for reducing the amount of inflammation induced collateral damage to cartilage during the typical injury response. Table 1 Model Parameter Values for Results in Figure 5 Table of Parameter Values Corresponding to Simulations in Figure 5 Parameter Value Units Reason D R 0.1 c m 2 day Determined from [13] D M 0.05 c m 2 day Determined from [13

  7. Erythropoietin mediates tissue protection through an erythropoietin and common beta-subunit heteroreceptor.

    PubMed

    Brines, Michael; Grasso, Giovanni; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Sfacteria, Alessandra; Ghezzi, Pietro; Fratelli, Maddalena; Latini, Roberto; Xie, Qiao-Wen; Smart, John; Su-Rick, Chiao-Ju; Pobre, Eileen; Diaz, Deborah; Gomez, Daniel; Hand, Carla; Coleman, Thomas; Cerami, Anthony

    2004-10-12

    The cytokine erythropoietin (Epo) is tissue-protective in preclinical models of ischemic, traumatic, toxic, and inflammatory injuries. We have recently characterized Epo derivatives that do not bind to the Epo receptor (EpoR) yet are tissue-protective. For example, carbamylated Epo (CEpo) does not stimulate erythropoiesis, yet it prevents tissue injury in a wide variety of in vivo and in vitro models. These observations suggest that another receptor is responsible for the tissue-protective actions of Epo. Notably, prior investigation suggests that EpoR physically interacts with the common beta receptor (betacR), the signal-transducing subunit shared by the granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, and the IL-3 and IL-5 receptors. However, because betacR knockout mice exhibit normal erythrocyte maturation, betacR is not required for erythropoiesis. We hypothesized that betacR in combination with the EpoR expressed by nonhematopoietic cells constitutes a tissue-protective receptor. In support of this hypothesis, membrane proteins prepared from rat brain, heart, liver, or kidney were greatly enriched in EpoR after passage over either Epo or CEpo columns but covalently bound in a complex with betacR. Further, antibodies against EpoR coimmunoprecipitated betacR from membranes prepared from neuronal-like P-19 cells that respond to Epo-induced tissue protection. Immunocytochemical studies of spinal cord neurons and cardiomyocytes protected by Epo demonstrated cellular colocalization of Epo betacR and EpoR. Finally, as predicted by the hypothesis, neither Epo nor CEpo was active in cardiomyocyte or spinal cord injury models performed in the betacR knockout mouse. These data support the concept that EpoR and betacR comprise a tissue-protective heteroreceptor.

  8. Prognostic Impact of Erythropoietin Expression and Erythropoietin Receptor Expression on Locoregional Control and Survival of Patients Irradiated for Stage II/III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.ne; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav

    Purpose: Prognostic factors can guide the physician in selecting the optimal treatment for an individual patient. This study investigates the prognostic value of erythropoietin (EPO) and EPO receptor (EPO-R) expression of tumor cells for locoregional control and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Fourteen factors were investigated in 62 patients irradiated for stage II/III NSCLC, as follows: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), histology, grading, TNM/American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack years (average number of packages of cigarettes smoked per day multiplied by the number of years smoked), smoking during radiotherapy, hemoglobinmore » levels during radiotherapy, EPO expression, and EPO-R expression. Additionally, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R were compared to those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and to those expressing neither EPO nor EPO-R. Results: On univariate analysis, improved locoregional control was associated with AJCC stage II cancer (p < 0.048), surgery (p < 0.042), no smoking during radiotherapy (p = 0.024), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). A trend was observed for a KPS of >70 (p = 0.08), an N stage of 0 to 1 (p = 0.07), and no EPO-R expression (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, AJCC stage II and no EPO expression remained significant. No smoking during radiotherapy was almost significant. On univariate analysis, improved survival was associated with N stage 0 to 1 (p = 0.009), surgery (p = 0.039), hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d (p = 0.016), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, N stage 0 to 1 and no EPO expression maintained significance. Hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d were almost significant. On subgroup analyses, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R had worse outcomes than those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and those expressing neither EPO nor RPO-R. Conclusions: EPO expression of

  9. Enabling Science Integration through the Marine Geoscience Data System Media Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, A.; Ferrini, V.; Arko, R.; Carbotte, S. M.; Goehring, L.; Simms, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Marine Geoscience Data System Media Bank (http://media.marine-geo.org) was constructed to enable the sharing of high quality images, illustrations and animations among members of the science community and to provide a new forum for education and public outreach (EPO). The initial focus of Media Bank was to serve Ridge 2000 research and EPO efforts, but it was constructed as a flexible system that could accommodate media from other multidisciplinary marine geoscience research initiatives. Media Bank currently contains digital photographs, maps, 3-D visualizations, and video clips from the Ridge 2000 and MARGINS focus sites as well as the Antarctic and Southern Ocean. We actively seek contributions of other high quality marine geoscience media for inclusion in Media Bank. Media Bank is driven by a relational database backend, enabling image browsing, sorting by category, keyword search functionality, and the creation of media galleries. All media are accompanied by a descriptive figure caption that provides easy access to expert knowledge to help foster data integration across disciplines as well as EPO efforts. In addition to access to high quality media, Media Bank also provides basic metadata including geographic position, investigator name and affiliation, as well as copyright information, and links to references and relevant data sets. Since media are tied to geospatial coordinates, a map-based interface is also provided for access to media.

  10. Using Near Real-Time Mission Data for Education and Public Outreach: Strategies from the Life in the Atacama E/PO Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, E.; Coppin, P.; Wagner, M.; Fischer, K.; Lu, L.; McCloskey, R.; Seneker, D.; Cabrol, N.; Wettergreen, D.; Waggoner, A.

    2005-01-01

    The EventScope educational telepresence project has been involved with education and public outreach for a number of NASA-sponsored missions including the Mars Exploration Rovers, the Odyssey Mission, and the Life in the Atacama project. However, during the second year of operations in the Atacama, a modified version of the EventScope public interface was used as the remote science operations interface. In addition, the EventScope lab hosted remote science operations. This intimate connection with the mission operations allowed the EventScope team to bring the experience of the mission to the public in near real-time. Playing to this strength, the lab developed strategies for releasing E/PO content as close to real-time as possible.

  11. Space Suits and Crew Survival Systems Branch Education and Public Outreach Support of NASA's Strategic Goals in Fiscal Year 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory A.

    2012-01-01

    As NASA plans to send people beyond low Earth orbit, it is important to educate and inspire the next generation of astronauts, engineers, scientist, and general public. This is so important to NASA future that it is one of the agencies strategic goals. The Space Suits and Crew Survival Systems Branch at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is actively involved in helping to achieve this goal by sharing our hardware and technical experts with students, educators, and the general public and educating them about the challenges of human space flight, with Education and Public Outreach (EPO). This paper summarizes the Space Suit and Crew Survival Systems Branch EPO efforts throughout fiscal year 2012.

  12. Space Suits and Crew Survival Systems Branch Education and Public Outreach Support of NASA's Strategic Goals in Fiscal Year 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory A.

    2013-01-01

    As NASA plans to send people beyond low Earth orbit, it is important to educate and inspire the next generation of astronauts, engineers, scientists, and the general public. This is so important to NASA s future that it is one of the agency s strategic goals. The Space Suits and Crew Survival Systems Branch at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is actively involved in achieving this goal by sharing our hardware and technical experts with students, educators, and the general public and educating them about the challenges of human space flight, with Education and Public Outreach (EPO). This paper summarizes the Space Suit and Crew Survival Systems Branch EPO efforts throughout fiscal year 2012.

  13. Challenges in integrating multidisciplinary data into a single e-infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakan, Kuvvet; Jeffery, Keith G.; Bailo, Daniele; Harrison, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) aims to create a pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. The mission of EPOS is to monitor and understand the dynamic and complex Earth system by relying on new e-science opportunities and integrating diverse and advanced Research Infrastructures in Europe for solid Earth Science. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. EPOS will improve our ability to better manage the use of the subsurface of the Earth. Through integration of data, models and facilities EPOS will allow the Earth Science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and to human welfare. EPOS is now getting into its Implementation Phase (EPOS-IP). One of the main challenges during the implementation phase is the integration of multidisciplinary data into a single e-infrastructure. Multidisciplinary data are organized and governed by the Thematic Core Services (TCS) and are driven by various scientific communities encompassing a wide spectrum of Earth science disciplines. TCS data, data products and services will be integrated into a platform "the ICS system" that will ensure their interoperability and access to these services by the scientific community as well as other users within the society. This requires dedicated tasks for interactions with the various TCS-WPs, as well as the various distributed ICS (ICS-Ds), such as High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities, large scale data storage facilities, complex processing and visualization tools etc. Computational Earth Science (CES

  14. Sensitivity Observing System Experiment (SOSE)-a new effective NWP-based tool in designing the global observing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marseille, Gert-Jan; Stoffelen, Ad; Barkmeijer, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Lacking an established methodology to test the potential impact of prospective extensions to the global observing system (GOS) in real atmospheric cases we developed such a method, called Sensitivity Observing System Experiment (SOSE). For example, since the GOS is non uniform it is of interest to investigate the benefit of complementary observing systems filling its gaps. In a SOSE adjoint sensitivity structures are used to define a pseudo true atmospheric state for the simulation of the prospective observing system. Next, the synthetic observations are used together with real observations from the existing GOS in a state-of-the-art Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model to assess the potential added value of the new observing system. Unlike full observing system simulation experiments (OSSE), SOSE can be applied to real extreme events that were badly forecast operationally and only requires the simulation of the new instrument. As such SOSE is an effective tool, for example, to define observation requirements for extensions to the GOS. These observation requirements may serve as input for the design of an operational network of prospective observing systems. In a companion paper we use SOSE to simulate potential future space borne Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL) scenarios and assess their capability to sample meteorologically sensitive areas not well captured by the current GOS, in particular over the Northern Hemisphere oceans.

  15. Jupiter System Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senske, Dave; Kwok, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the proposed mission for the Jupiter System Observer. The presentation also includes overviews of the mission timeline, science goals, and spacecraftspecifications for the satellite.

  16. Aberrant expression of erythropoietin in uterine leiomyoma: implications in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Asano, Ryoko; Asai-Sato, Mikiko; Miyagi, Yohei; Mizushima, Taichi; Koyama-Sato, Makiko; Nagashima, Yoji; Taguri, Masataka; Sakakibara, Hideya; Hirahara, Fumiki; Miyagi, Etsuko

    2015-08-01

    Myomatous erythrocytosis syndrome is a rare complication of uterine leiomyoma caused by erythropoietin (EPO) that is produced by tumor cells. We assessed the EPO expression in leiomyomas and investigated the effects of EPO on the tumor growth. Tissue samples were collected from 114 patients with uterine leiomyomas who underwent myomectomy or hysterectomy in Yokohama City University Hospital. From 17 patients, the corresponding normal myometrium was also collected. All samples were analyzed for EPO messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. EPO protein expression was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The relationships between EPO expression and clinicopathological features were retrospectively analyzed using the patients' charts. Blood vessel density and maturity were assessed using hematoxylin-eosin staining and CD34 immunohistochemistry. EPO mRNA expression was detected in 108 of 114, or 95%, of the leiomyomas. The mean EPO mRNA expression in the leiomyoma was higher than the corresponding normal myometrium (3836 ± 4122 vs 1455 ± 2141; P = .025 by Wilcoxon rank test). The EPO mRNA expression in the leiomyomas varied extensively among samples, ranging from undetectable levels to 18-fold above the mean EPO mRNA of normal myometrium. EPO protein production was observed concomitant with mRNA expression. A positive correlation of leiomyoma size and EPO mRNA expression was shown by Spearman rank correlation coefficient (ρ = 0.294; P = .001), suggesting the involvement of EPO in leiomyoma growth. The blood vessel maturity was also significantly increased in EPO-producing leiomyomas (high vessel maturity in high vs low EPO group: 67% vs 20%; P = .013 by Fisher exact test). This report demonstrates that EPO is produced in most of conventional leiomyomas and supports a model in which EPO accelerates tumor growth, possibly by inducing vessel maturity. Our study suggests one possible mechanism by which

  17. Observing System Evaluations Using GODAE Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release, distribution is unlimite 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 20091228151 14. ABSTRACT Global ocean...forecast systems, developed under the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE), are a powerful means of assessing the impact of different...components of the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS). Using a range of analysis tools and approaches, GODAE systems are useful for quantifying the

  18. Cardiac remodeling in response to chronic iron deficiency: role of the erythropoietin receptor.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yoshiro; Sawada, Hisashi; Oboshi, Makiko; Iwasaku, Toshihiro; Okuhara, Yoshitaka; Morisawa, Daisuke; Eguchi, Akiyo; Hirotani, Shinichi; Mano, Toshiaki; Tsujino, Takeshi; Masuyama, Tohru

    2015-06-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity of patients with heart failure, and iron deficiency is known as one of the causes of anemia in heart failure. Recent studies have shown that iron deficiency alone, without overt anemia, is associated with poor outcomes in patients with heart failure. Thus, to minimize the mortality in patients with heart failure, it is important to understand the link between iron deficiency and cardiac function. Chronic untreated iron deficiency results in cardiac remodeling, and we have previously reported that erythropoietin (Epo) and cardiac Epo receptor (EpoR) signaling may be associated with its remodeling. However, the link between EpoR signaling and its remodeling remains to be elucidated. Herein, we investigated the role of EpoR signaling on cardiac remodeling in response to chronic iron deficiency. Wild-type mice and transgene-rescued EpoR-null mutant mice, which express EpoR only in the hematopoietic lineage (EpoR-restricted mice), were fed with either a normal or an iron-restricted diet, and the molecular mechanisms were investigated. Dietary iron restriction gradually induced anemia, Epo secretion, and cardiac hypertrophy in wild-type mice. In contrast, EpoR-restricted mice fed with an iron-restricted diet exhibited anemia, left ventricular dilatation, and cardiac dysfunction compared with wild-type mice. Interestingly, altered cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis was observed in EpoR-restricted mice following iron deficiency. Moreover, cardiac p53 expression was increased in EpoR-restricted mice compared with wild-type mice following iron deficiency. These data indicate that EpoR signaling is associated with cardiac remodeling following chronic iron deficiency.

  19. Synthetic observations of protostellar multiple systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, O.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2018-04-01

    Observations of protostars are often compared with synthetic observations of models in order to infer the underlying physical properties of the protostars. The majority of these models have a single protostar, attended by a disc and an envelope. However, observational and numerical evidence suggests that a large fraction of protostars form as multiple systems. This means that fitting models of single protostars to observations may be inappropriate. We produce synthetic observations of protostellar multiple systems undergoing realistic, non-continuous accretion. These systems consist of multiple protostars with episodic luminosities, embedded self-consistently in discs and envelopes. We model the gas dynamics of these systems using smoothed particle hydrodynamics and we generate synthetic observations by post-processing the snapshots using the SPAMCART Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. We present simulation results of three model protostellar multiple systems. For each of these, we generate 4 × 104 synthetic spectra at different points in time and from different viewing angles. We propose a Bayesian method, using similar calculations to those presented here, but in greater numbers, to infer the physical properties of protostellar multiple systems from observations.

  20. Near Fault Observatories: multidisciplinary research infrastructures, high resolution data and scientific products available through dedicated services implemented within the EPOS-IP project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, Gaetano; Chiaraluce, Lauro; Ergintav, Semih; Bernard, Pascal; Clinton, John; Marmureanu, Alexandru; Tataru, Dragos; Vogfjord, Kristin

    2017-04-01

    Near Fault Observatories (NFOs) are innovative research infrastructures based on dense, state of the art networks of multi-parametric sensors that continuously monitor the underlying Earth instability processes over a broad time interval. They aim at understanding the physical/chemical processes responsible for earthquakes and faulting and tracking their evolution over time by enabling advancements in ground shaking prediction. EPOS-IP is aimed at contributing in creating and harmonizing data and products distributors from seven NFOs, operating on different tectonic regimes and different areas of Europe. They include plate boundary systems at South Iceland Seismic Zone, the Marmara Sea and the Corinth rift. In mountain settings, NFOs monitor the Alto Tiberina and Irpinia faults in the Apennine mountain range, the Valais region in the Alps, and the Vrancea fault in the Carpathian Mountains. They monitor diverse faulting mechanisms (strike-slip, normal and thrust), high to low angle faults, shallow and deep faults, as well as regions with fast and slow strain rate accumulation. The focus of the observatories varies, ranging from small- to large-scale seismicity and includes the role of different parameters such as fluid playing in fault initiation, the internal structure of fault systems, site effects and derived processes such as earthquake generated landslides and tsunamis. In response to their specific objectives, the NFOs operate a diverse set of monitoring instrumentation using seismic, deformation, strain, geochemical and electromagnetic equipment. Since NFO methodological approach is based on extremely dense networks and less common instruments deserving multi-parameter data description, a main goal of this group is to build inclusive and harmonised services supporting the installation over the next decade of tens of near-fault observatories monitoring active faults in different tectonic environments in Europe. The NFO Thematic Core Service (TCS) relies on

  1. Chemical synthesis of erythropoietin glycoforms for insights into the relationship between glycosylation pattern and bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Masumi; Kiuchi, Tatsuto; Nishihara, Mika; Tezuka, Katsunari; Okamoto, Ryo; Izumi, Masayuki; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The role of sialyloligosaccharides on the surface of secreted glycoproteins is still unclear because of the difficulty in the preparation of sialylglycoproteins in a homogeneous form. We selected erythropoietin (EPO) as a target molecule and designed an efficient synthetic strategy for the chemical synthesis of a homogeneous form of five EPO glycoforms varying in glycosylation position and the number of human-type biantennary sialyloligosaccharides. A segment coupling strategy performed by native chemical ligation using six peptide segments including glycopeptides yielded homogeneous EPO glycopeptides, and folding experiments of these glycopeptides afforded the correctly folded EPO glycoforms. In an in vivo erythropoiesis assay in mice, all of the EPO glycoforms displayed biological activity, in particular the EPO bearing three sialyloligosaccharides, which exhibited the highest activity. Furthermore, we observed that the hydrophilicity and biological activity of the EPO glycoforms varied depending on the glycosylation pattern. This knowledge will pave the way for the development of homogeneous biologics by chemical synthesis. PMID:26824070

  2. Increased erythropoietin concentration after repeated apneas in humans.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, Robert; Richardson, Matt; Schagatay, Erika

    2008-03-01

    Hypoxia-induced increases in red blood cell production have been found in both altitude-adapted populations and acclimatized lowlanders. This process is mediated by erythropoietin (EPO) released mainly by the hypoxic kidney. We have previously observed high hemoglobin concentrations in elite breath-hold divers and our aim was to investigate whether apnea-induced hypoxia could increase EPO concentration. Ten healthy volunteers performed 15 maximal duration apneas, divided into three series of five apneas, each series separated by 10 min of rest. Apneas within series were separated by 2 min and preceded by 1 min of hyperventilation to increase apnea duration and arterial oxygen desaturation. When EPO concentration after serial apneas was compared to baseline values, an average maximum increase of 24% was found (P < 0.01). No changes in EPO concentration were observed during a control day without apnea, eliminating possible effects of a diurnal rhythm or blood loss. We therefore conclude that serial apneas increase circulating EPO concentration in humans.

  3. The Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, Lisa Robock

    1992-01-01

    The restructuring of the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS), designed to provide comprehensive long term observations from space of changes occurring on the Earth from natural and human causes in order to have a sound scientific basis for policy decisions on protection of the future, is reported. In response to several factors, the original program approved in the fiscal year 1991 budget was restructured and somewhat reduced in scope. The resulting program uses three different sized launch vehicles to put six different spacecraft in orbit in the first phase, followed by two replacement launches for each of five of the six satellites to maintain a long term observing capability to meet the needs of global climate change research and other science objectives. The EOS system, including the space observatories, the data and information system, and the interdisciplinary global change research effort, are approved and proceeding. Elements of EOS are already in place, such as the research investigations and initial data system capabilities. The flights of precursor satellite and Shuttle missions, the ongoing data analysis, and the evolutionary enhancements to the integrated Earth science data management capabilities are all important building blocks to the full EOS program.

  4. DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cellsmore » leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.« less

  5. Erythropoietin Employs Cell Longevity Pathways of SIRT1 to Foster Endothelial Vascular Integrity During Oxidant Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jinling; Wang, Shaohui; Shang, Yan Chen; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Maiese, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Given the cytoprotective ability of erythropoietin (EPO) in cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) and the invaluable role of ECs in the central nervous system, it is imperative to elucidate the cellular pathways for EPO to protect ECs against brain injury. Here we illustrate that EPO relies upon the modulation of SIRT1 (silent mating type information regulator 2 homolog 1) in cerebral microvascular ECs to foster cytoprotection during oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). SIRT1 activation which results in the inhibition of apoptotic early membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and subsequent DNA degradation during OGD becomes a necessary component for EPO protection in ECs, since inhibition of SIRT1 activity or diminishing its expression by gene silencing abrogates cell survival supported by EPO during OGD. Furthermore, EPO promotes the subcellular trafficking of SIRT1 to the nucleus which is necessary for EPO to foster vascular protection. EPO through SIRT1 averts apoptosis through activation of protein kinase B (Akt1) and the phosphorylation and cytoplasmic retention of the forkhead transcription factor FoxO3a. SIRT1 through EPO activation also utilizes mitochondrial pathways to prevent mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome c release, and Bad, caspase 1, and caspase 3 activation. Our work identifies novel pathways for EPO in the vascular system that can govern the activity of SIRT1 to prevent apoptotic injury through Akt1, FoxO3a phosphorylation and trafficking, mitochondrial membrane permeability, Bad activation, and caspase 1 and 3 activities in ECs during oxidant stress. PMID:21722091

  6. Autonomous aerial observations to extend and complement the Earth Observing System: a science-driven systems-oriented approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandford, Stephen P.; Harrison, F. W.; Langford, John; Johnson, James W.; Qualls, Garry; Emmitt, David; Jones, W. Linwood; Shugart, Herman H., Jr.

    2004-12-01

    The current Earth observing capability depends primarily on spacecraft missions and ground-based networks to provide the critical on-going observations necessary for improved understanding of the Earth system. Aircraft missions play an important role in process studies but are limited to relatively short-duration flights. Suborbital observations have contributed to global environmental knowledge by providing in-depth, high-resolution observations that space-based and in-situ systems are challenged to provide; however, the limitations of aerial platforms - e.g., limited observing envelope, restrictions associated with crew safety and high cost of operations have restricted the suborbital program to a supporting role. For over a decade, it has been recognized that autonomous aerial observations could potentially be important. Advances in several technologies now enable autonomous aerial observation systems (AAOS) that can provide fundamentally new observational capability for Earth science and applications and thus lead scientists and engineers to rethink how suborbital assets can best contribute to Earth system science. Properly developed and integrated, these technologies will enable new Earth science and operational mission scenarios with long term persistence, higher-spatial and higher-temporal resolution at lower cost than space or ground based approaches. This paper presents the results of a science driven, systems oriented study of broad Earth science measurement needs. These needs identify aerial mission scenarios that complement and extend the current Earth Observing System. These aerial missions are analogous to space missions in their complexity and potential for providing significant data sets for Earth scientists. Mission classes are identified and presented based on science driven measurement needs in atmospheric, ocean and land studies. Also presented is a nominal concept of operations for an AAOS: an innovative set of suborbital assets that

  7. Antibody-based enzyme-linked lectin assay (ABELLA) for the sialylated recombinant human erythropoietin present in culture supernatant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Jin; Lee, Seung Jae; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2008-11-04

    The terminal sialic acid of human erythropoietin (hEPO) is essential for in vivo activity. The current resorcinol and HPLC methods for analyzing alpha2,3-linked sialic acid require more than a microgram of purified rhEPO, and purification takes a great deal of time and labor. In this study, we assessed the use of an antibody-based enzyme-linked lectin assay (ABELLA) for analyzing non-purified recombinant hEPO (rhEPO). The major problem of this method was the high background due to terminal sialylation of components of the assay (antibody and bovine serum albumin) other than rhEPO. To solve this problem, we used a monoclonal antibody (Mab 287) to capture the rhEPO, and oxidized the bovine serum albumin used for blocking with meta-periodate. The sialic acid content of non-purified rhEPO measured by ABELLA was similar to that obtained by the resorcinol method on purified rhEPO. ABELLA has advantages such as adaptability and need for minimal amounts of rhEPO (40 ng/ml). Our observations suggest that ABELLA should reduce the time and labor needed to improve culture conditions so as to increase protein sialylation, and also facilitate the study of sialylation mechanisms.

  8. [Blunted erythropoietic response in the anemia of anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Juncà, Jordi; Sorigué, Marc; Rodríguez-Hernández, Inés; Aldea, Marta; Granada, María Luisa; Sánchez-Planell, Lluis

    2015-11-20

    The cause of the anemia in anorexia nervosa (AN) has not been fully ascertained. Ferritin, folate and cobalamin values are usually within normal ranges. Anemia does not have a relationship with bone marrow changes and erythropoietin (EPO) levels have not been investigated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the EPO response in a small group of AN patients. EPO levels were measured in serum samples of 41 female AN patients (11 with anemia, and 30 with normal blood cell count). The adequacy of EPO response was assessed by comparing the increase observed in a group of normal weight patients with anemia. EPO concentrations in anemic AN patients were higher than in non-anemic: 20.63mU/mL (4.04-28.46) vs 8.7mU/mL (3.9-20.93), P=.0088, but the increase in EPO was lower than expected (27.85mU/mL [17.7-118.9]), P=.014. BMI and the difference between actual and expected EPO were inversely correlated. Inadequate EPO response may partly explain anemia in AN, but further studies are necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Fenoterol increases erythropoietin concentrations during tocolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gleiter, C H; Schreeb, K H; Goldbach, S; Herzog, S; Cunze, T; Kuhn, W

    1998-01-01

    Aims The present study was carried out to assess the effect of the selective β2- adrenoceptor agonists on erythropoietin (EPO) production. Methods Routine tocolysis with fenoterol (using the regular rate of 2 μg min−1) was used as a clinically easily accessible model. Results EPO concentrations had doubled 24 h after the start of tocolysis (P < 0.001). This increase lasted over the entire observation period of 48 h. Potassium concentrations fell significantly during the first hours of fenoterol infusion. There was no increase of human placenta lactogen during the period of EPO increase. Conclusions The data confirm our earlier results that fenoterol increases EPO concentrations following haemorrhage. In this model it was not necessary to stimulate EPO production prior to pharmacological treatment. PMID:9491829

  10. Extravehicular Activity Systems Education and Public Outreach in Support of NASA's STEM Initiatives in Fiscal Year 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather; Jennings, Mallory A.; Lamberth, Erika Guillory

    2012-01-01

    NASA's goals to send humans beyond low Earth orbit will involve the need for a strong engineering workforce. Research indicates that student interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) areas is on the decline. According to the Department of Education, the United States President has mandated that 100,000 educators be trained in STEM over the next decade to reduce this trend. NASA has aligned its Education and Public Outreach (EPO) initiatives to include emphasis in promoting STEM. The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems Project Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center actively supports this NASA initiative by providing subject matter experts and hands-on, interactive presentations to educate students, educators, and the general public about the design challenges encountered as NASA develops EVA hardware for exploration missions. This paper summarizes the EVA Systems EPO efforts and metrics from fiscal year 2011.

  11. Extravehicular Activity Systems Education and Public Outreach in Support of NASA's STEM Initiatives in Fiscal Year 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Lamberth, Erika Guillory

    2011-01-01

    NASA's goals to send humans beyond low Earth orbit will involve the need for a strong engineering workforce. Research indicates that student interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) areas is on the decline. According to the Department of Education, the United States President has mandated that 100,000 educators be trained in STEM over the next decade to reduce this trend. NASA has aligned its Education and Public Outreach (EPO) initiatives to include emphasis in promoting STEM. The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems Project Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center actively supports this NASA initiative by providing subject matter experts and hands-on, interactive presentations to educate students, educators, and the general public about the design challenges encountered as NASA develops EVA hardware for exploration missions. This paper summarizes the EVA Systems EPO efforts and metrics from fiscal year 2011.

  12. Overview of the Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program of the Caltech Tectonics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, L.; Jain, K.; Maloney, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Caltech Tectonics Observatory (TO) is an interdisciplinary center, focused on geological processes occurring at the boundaries of Earth's tectonic plates (http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu). Over the past year, the TO has made a major effort to develop an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program. Our goals are to (1) stimulate the interest of students and the general public in Earth Sciences, particularly in the study of tectonic processes, (2) inform and educate the general public about science in the context of TO discoveries and advancements, and (3) provide opportunities for graduate students, postdocs, and faculty to do outreach in the local K-12 schools. We have hosted local high school students and teachers to provide them with research experience (as part of Caltech’s “Summer Research Connection”); participated in teacher training workshops (organized by the local school district); hosted tours for local elementary school students; and brought hands-on activities into local elementary and middle school classrooms, science clubs, and science nights. We have also led local school students and teachers on geology field trips through nearby parks. In addition, we have developed education modules for undergraduate classes (as part of MARGINS program), and have written educational web articles on TO research (http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu/outreach). The presentation will give an overview of these activities and their impact on our educational program.

  13. First-in-man-proof of concept study with molidustat: a novel selective oral HIF-prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor for the treatment of renal anaemia.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, M; Lentini, S; Arens, E R; Kaiser, A; van der Mey, D; Thuss, U; Kubitza, D; Wensing, G

    2018-07-01

    Insufficient erythropoietin (EPO) synthesis is a relevant cause of renal anaemia in patients with chronic kidney disease. Molidustat, a selective hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase (HIF-PH) inhibitor, increases endogenous EPO levels dose dependently in preclinical models. We examined the pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability and effect on EPO levels of single oral doses of molidustat in healthy male volunteers. This was a single-centre, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, group-comparison, dose-escalation study. Molidustat was administered at doses of 5, 12.5, 25, 37.5 or 50 mg as a polyethylene glycol-based solution. In total, 45 volunteers received molidustat and 14 received placebo. Molidustat was absorbed rapidly, and the mean maximum plasma concentration and area under the concentration-time curve increased dose dependently. The mean terminal half-life was 4.64-10.40 h. A significant increase in endogenous EPO was observed following single oral doses of molidustat of 12.5 mg and above. Geometric mean peak EPO levels were 14.8 IU l -1 (90% confidence interval 13.0, 16.9) for volunteers who received placebo and 39.8 IU l -1 (90% confidence interval: 29.4, 53.8) for those who received molidustat 50 mg. The time course of EPO levels resembled the normal diurnal variation in EPO. Maximum EPO levels were observed approximately 12 h postdose and returned to baseline after approximately 24-48 h. All doses of molidustat were well tolerated and there were no significant changes in vital signs or laboratory safety parameters. Oral administration of molidustat to healthy volunteers elicited a dose-dependent increase in endogenous EPO. These results support the ongoing development of molidustat as a potential new treatment for patients with renal anaemia. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. The Global Ocean Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kester, Dana

    1992-01-01

    A Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) should be established now with international coordination (1) to address issues of global change, (2) to implement operational ENSO forecasts, (3) to provide the data required to apply global ocean circulation models, and (4) to extract the greatest value from the one billion dollar investment over the next ten years in ocean remote sensing by the world's space agencies. The objectives of GOOS will focus on climatic and oceanic predictions, on assessing coastal pollution, and in determining the sustainability of living marine resources and ecosystems. GOOS will be a complete system including satellite observations, in situ observations, numerical modeling of ocean processes, and data exchange and management. A series of practical and economic benefits will be derived from the information generated by GOOS. In addition to the marine science community, these benefits will be realized by the energy industries of the world, and by the world's fisheries. The basic oceanic variables that are required to meet the oceanic and predictability objectives of GOOS include wind velocity over the ocean, sea surface temperature and salinity, oceanic profiles of temperature and salinity, surface current, sea level, the extent and thickness of sea ice, the partial pressure of CO2 in surface waters, and the chlorophyll concentration of surface waters. Ocean circulation models and coupled ocean-atmosphere models can be used to evaluate observing system design, to assimilate diverse data sets from in situ and remotely sensed observations, and ultimately to predict future states of the system. The volume of ocean data will increase enormously over the next decade as new satellite systems are launched and as complementary in situ measuring systems are deployed. These data must be transmitted, quality controlled, exchanged, analyzed, and archived with the best state-of-the-art computational methods.

  15. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived erythropoietin-producing cells ameliorate renal anemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Hitomi, Hirofumi; Kasahara, Tomoko; Katagiri, Naoko; Hoshina, Azusa; Mae, Shin-Ichi; Kotaka, Maki; Toyohara, Takafumi; Rahman, Asadur; Nakano, Daisuke; Niwa, Akira; Saito, Megumu K; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Nishiyama, Akira; Osafune, Kenji

    2017-09-27

    The production of erythropoietin (EPO) by the kidneys, a principal hormone for the hematopoietic system, is reduced in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), eventually resulting in severe anemia. Although recombinant human EPO treatment improves anemia in patients with CKD, returning to full red blood cell production without fluctuations does not always occur. We established a method to generate EPO-producing cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) by modifying previously reported hepatic differentiation protocols. These cells showed increased EPO expression and secretion in response to low oxygen conditions, prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing enzyme inhibitors, and insulin-like growth factor 1. The EPO protein secreted from hiPSC-derived EPO-producing (hiPSC-EPO) cells induced the erythropoietic differentiation of human umbilical cord blood progenitor cells in vitro. Furthermore, transplantation of hiPSC-EPO cells into mice with CKD induced by adenine treatment improved renal anemia. Thus, hiPSC-EPO cells may be a useful tool for clarifying the mechanisms of EPO production and may be useful as a therapeutic strategy for treating renal anemia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  16. The European post-marketing observational sertindole study: an investigation of the safety of antipsychotic drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Siegfried; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Hale, Anthony

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the European Post-marketing Observational Serdolect((R)) (EPOS) Study was to compare the safety of treatment with Serdolect (sertindole) with that of usual treatment in patients with schizophrenia, in normal European clinical practice. The EPOS was a multicentre, multinational, referenced, cohort study. Patients were enrolled at 226 centres in ten European countries. The study was prematurely terminated in 1998 as a result of the temporary market suspension of sertindole. Termination of the study reduced the number of patients recruited from the planned 12,000 to 2,321. While the power of the study was weakened, it did provide useful mortality information, which may be useful for future long-term studies. Crude mortality in the sertindole and non-sertindole groups was 1.45 (95% confidence interval, CI 0.53-3.16) and 1.50 (CI 0.72-2.76) deaths/100 patient-years exposed, respectively. There were no more cardiac deaths in the sertindole group than in the non-sertindole group. QT interval prolongation did not translate into an increased risk of death. Sertindole was well tolerated and caused few extrapyramidal symptoms. Although CIs remained large, this post-marketing study does not provide any evidence against the use of sertindole under normal conditions. Sertindole was well tolerated and posed no significant safety problems.

  17. Operable Data Management for Ocean Observing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, F. P.; Graybeal, J. B.; Godin, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    As oceanographic observing systems become more numerous and complex, data management solutions must follow. Most existing oceanographic data management systems fall into one of three categories: they have been developed as dedicated solutions, with limited application to other observing systems; they expect that data will be pre-processed into well-defined formats, such as netCDF; or they are conceived as robust, generic data management solutions, with complexity (high) and maturity and adoption rates (low) to match. Each approach has strengths and weaknesses; no approach yet fully addresses, nor takes advantage of, the sophistication of ocean observing systems as they are now conceived. In this presentation we describe critical data management requirements for advanced ocean observing systems, of the type envisioned by ORION and IOOS. By defining common requirements -- functional, qualitative, and programmatic -- for all such ocean observing systems, the performance and nature of the general data management solution can be characterized. Issues such as scalability, maintaining metadata relationships, data access security, visualization, and operational flexibility suggest baseline architectural characteristics, which may in turn lead to reusable components and approaches. Interoperability with other data management systems, with standards-based solutions in metadata specification and data transport protocols, and with the data management infrastructure envisioned by IOOS and ORION, can also be used to define necessary capabilities. Finally, some requirements for the software infrastructure of ocean observing systems can be inferred. Early operational results and lessons learned, from development and operations of MBARI ocean observing systems, are used to illustrate key requirements, choices, and challenges. Reference systems include the Monterey Ocean Observing System (MOOS), its component software systems (Software Infrastructure and Applications for MOOS, and

  18. Subretinal transplantation of rat MSCs and erythropoietin gene modified rat MSCs for protecting and rescuing degenerative retina in rats.

    PubMed

    Guan, Y; Cui, L; Qu, Z; Lu, L; Wang, F; Wu, Y; Zhang, J; Gao, F; Tian, H; Xu, L; Xu, G; Li, W; Jin, Y; Xu, G-T

    2013-11-01

    For degenerative retinal diseases, like the acquired form exemplified by age-related macular degeneration (AMD), there is currently no cure. This study was to explore a stem cell therapy and a stem cell based gene therapy for sodium iodate (SI)-induced retinal degeneration in rats. Three cell types, i.e., rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) alone, erythropoietin (EPO) gene modified rMSCs (EPO-rMSCs) or doxycycline (DOX) inducible EPO expression rMSCs (Tet-on EPO-rMSCs), were transplanted into the subretinal spaces of SI-treated rats. The rMSCs were prepared for transplantation after 3 to 5 passages or modified with EPO gene. During the 8 weeks after the transplantation, the rats treated with rMSCs alone or with two types of EPO-rMSCs were all monitored with fundus examination, fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) and electroretinogram. The transplantation efficiency of donor cells was examined for their survival, integration and differentiation. Following the transplantation, labeled donor cells were observed in subretinal space and adopted RPE morphology. EPO concentration in vitreous and retina of SI-treated rats which were transplanted with EPO-rMSCs or Tet-on EPO-rMSCs was markedly increased, in parallel with the improvement of retinal morphology and function. These findings suggest that rMSCs transplantation could be a new therapy for degenerative retinal diseases since it can protect and rescue RPE and retinal neurons, while EPO gene modification to rMSCs could be an even better option.

  19. Observing system simulation experiments with multiple methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Toshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    An observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) is a method to evaluate impacts of hypothetical observing systems on analysis and forecast accuracy in numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems. Since OSSE requires simulations of hypothetical observations, uncertainty of OSSE results is generally larger than that of observing system experiments (OSEs). To reduce such uncertainty, OSSEs for existing observing systems are often carried out as calibration of the OSSE system. The purpose of this study is to achieve reliable OSSE results based on results of OSSEs with multiple methods. There are three types of OSSE methods. The first one is the sensitivity observing system experiment (SOSE) based OSSE (SOSEOSSE). The second one is the ensemble of data assimilation cycles (ENDA) based OSSE (ENDA-OSSE). The third one is the nature-run (NR) based OSSE (NR-OSSE). These three OSSE methods have very different properties. The NROSSE evaluates hypothetical observations in a virtual (hypothetical) world, NR. The ENDA-OSSE is very simple method but has a sampling error problem due to a small size ensemble. The SOSE-OSSE requires a very highly accurate analysis field as a pseudo truth of the real atmosphere. We construct these three types of OSSE methods in the Japan meteorological Agency (JMA) global 4D-Var experimental system. In the conference, we will present initial results of these OSSE systems and their comparisons.

  20. The Global Observing System in the Assimilation Context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecker, Michele M.; Gelaro, R.; Pawson, S.; Reichle, R.; McCarty, W.

    2011-01-01

    Weather and climate analyses and predictions all rely on the global observing system. However, the observing system, whether atmosphere, ocean, or land surface, yields a diverse set of incomplete observations of the different components of Earth s environment. Data assimilation systems are essential to synthesize the wide diversity of in situ and remotely sensed observations into four-dimensional state estimates by combining the various observations with model-based estimates. Assimilation, or associated tools and products, are also useful in providing guidance for the evolution of the observing system of the future. This paper provides a brief overview of the global observing system and information gleaned through assimilation tools, and presents some evaluations of observing system gaps and issues.

  1. NASA Science Mission Directorate's Year of the Solar System: An Opportunity for Scientist Involvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Heather; Shipp, S.; Boonstra, D.; Shupla, C.; CoBabe-Ammann, E.; LaConte, K.; Ristvey, J.; Wessen, A.; Zimmerman-Bachman, R.; Science E/PO Community, Planetary

    2010-10-01

    Between October 2010 and August 2012 - across a Martian year - a large number of Science Mission Directorate's (SMD) planetary missions will pass milestones (e.g., EPOXI, Stardust-NExT, MESSENGER, Dawn, Juno, GRAIL, and Mars Science Laboratory), with many other missions continuing to explore (e.g., Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey, Mars Exploration Rovers, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Express, Cassini, New Horizons, and Voyager). This Year of the Solar System (YSS) offers the Planetary Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) community an opportunity to collaborate with each other and the science community. Based on audience needs from formal and informal educators, YSS is structured to have monthly thematic topics that are driven by mission milestones, as well as observing opportunities. YSS will connect to ongoing and planned events nationwide. A website for YSS is in development and will be hosted off of the existing JPL Solar System website (http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/index.cfm). Once live, scientists, educators, and E/PO professionals will have a place to interact and collaborate. YSS will tie to NASA's Big Questions in Planetary Science - how did the Sun's family of planets and minor bodies originate and how have they evolved? - how did life begin and evolve on Earth, is it elsewhere, and what characteristics of the solar system lead to the origins of life? The thematic topics are broad in order to encompass many missions and planetary bodies each month, as well as address the Big Questions. YSS will kick off in October with the theme "Solar System Components and Scale” and a national event involving building solar system scale models across the country. Scientists are encouraged to contact schools, museums, planetaria, etc. in their communities to give presentations, provide science content, and collaborate on educational materials and events related to YSS.

  2. [Theatre systems as a basis for developing medical and rehabilitation methods in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Stroganov, A E

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of existing and widely used in theatrical practice systems, a new direction in medical and rehabilitation psychiatry, namely transdramatherapy, was developed. The approach is illustrated by the original psychotherapeutic method of epos therapy directed to treatment of neurotic disorders, which has been already created and approbated.

  3. NASA SMD E/PO Community Addresses the needs of the Higher Ed Community: Introducing Slide sets for the Introductory Earth and Space Science Instructor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, S.; Meinke, B. K.; Brain, D.; Schneider, N. M.; Schultz, G. R.; Smith, D. A.; Grier, J.; Shipp, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) community and Forums work together to bring the cutting-edge discoveries of NASA Astrophysics and Planetary Science missions to the introductory astronomy college classroom. These mission- and grant-based E/PO programs are uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present two new opportunities for college instructors to bring the latest NASA discoveries in Space Science into their classrooms. The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach Forum is coordinating the development of a pilot series of slide sets to help Astronomy 101 instructors incorporate new discoveries in their classrooms. The "Astro 101 slide sets" are presentations 5-7 slides in length on a new development or discovery from a NASA Astrophysics mission relevant to topics in introductory astronomy courses. We intend for these slide sets to help Astronomy 101 instructors include new developments (discoveries not yet in their textbooks) into the broader context of the course. In a similar effort to keep the astronomy classroom apprised of the fast moving field of planetary science, the Division of Planetary Sciences (DPS) has developed the Discovery slide sets, which are 3-slide presentations that can be incorporated into college lectures. The slide sets are targeted at the Introductory Astronomy undergraduate level. Each slide set consists of three slides which cover a description of the discovery, a discussion of the underlying science, and a presentation of the big picture implications of the discovery, with a fourth slide includes links to associated press releases, images, and primary sources. Topics span all subdisciplines of planetary science, and sets are available in Farsi and Spanish. The NASA SMD Planetary Science Forum has recently partnered with the DPS to continue producing the

  4. The erythropoietin and regenerative medicine: a lesson from fish.

    PubMed

    Buemi, M; Lacquaniti, A; Bolignano, D; Maricchiolo, G; Favaloro, A; Buemi, A; Grasso, G; Donato, V; Giorgianni, G; Genovese, L; Coppolino, G; Sfacteria, A

    2009-11-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), the main haematopoietic growth factor for the proliferation and differentiation of erythroid progenitor cells, is also known for its angiogenic and regenerative properties. In this study, we aimed to test the regenerative effects of EPO administration in an experimental model of Sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) subjected to amputation of the caudal fin. Erythropoietin-treated fishes (3000 UI of human recombinant EPO-alpha immediately after cutting and after 15 days) showed an increased growth rate of their fins compared with those untreated (anova variance: P: 0.01 vs. P: 0.04). By analysing fin length at established times (15 and 30 days after cut), EPO-treated fishes always showed an increased length compared with untreated ones (T-15: 1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.7 +/- 0.2 cm, P: 0.03; T-30: 1.9 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.2 +/- 0.2 cm, P: 0.01). Moreover, exogenous EPO administration induced an enormous increase in EPO-blood levels at each observation time (T-15: 2240 +/- 210 vs. 16.7 +/- 1.8 mU mL(-1), P < 0.001; T-30: 2340 +/- 190 vs. 17.1 +/- 1.9 mU mL(-1), P < 0.001), whereas these levels remained quite unmodified in untreated fishes. Immunochemical analyses performed by confocal laser scanning microscopic observations showed an increased expression of EPO-receptors and PECAM-1 (an endothelial surface marker of vessels sprout) in the regenerating tissue, whereas no signs of inflammation or fibrosis were recognisable. All these findings confirm EPO as a new factor involved in regenerative processes, also suggesting a potential, future utility for new therapeutical applications in the field of human regenerative medicine.

  5. Present-day deformation in Europe, as seen by the EPOS-GNSS prototype solution in double difference, and first co- and post-seismic displacements associated with 2016 Amatrice and Norcia earthquakes (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socquet, Anne; Déprez, Aline; Cotte, Nathalie; Maubant, Louise; Walpersdorf, Andrea; Bato, Mary Grace

    2017-04-01

    We present here a new pan-European velocity field, obtained by processing 500+ cGPS stations in double difference, in the framework of the implementation phase of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) project. This prototype solution spans the 2000-2016 period, and includes data from RING, NOA, RENAG and European Permanent Network (EPN) cGPS netwprks. The data set is first split into daily sub-networks (between 8 and 14 sub-networks). The sub-networks consist in about 40 stations, with 2 overlapping stations. For each day and for each sub-network, the GAMIT processing is conducted independently. Once each sub-network achieves satisfactory results, a daily combination is performed in order to produce SINEX files. The Chi square value associated with the combination allows us to evaluate its quality. Eventually, a multi year combination generates position time series for each station. Each time series is visualized and the jumps associated with material change (antenna or receiver) are estimated and corrected. This procedure allows us to generate daily solutions and position time series for all stations. The associated "interseismic" velocity field has then been estimated using a times series analysis using MIDAS software, and compared to another independent estimate obtained by Kalman filtering with globk software. In addition to this velocity field we made a specific zoom on Italy and present a strain rate map as well as time series showing co- and post- seismic movements associated with the 2016 Amatrice and Norcia earthquakes.

  6. Erythropoietin regulations in humans under different environmental and experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Gunga, H-C; Kirsch, K A; Roecker, L; Kohlberg, E; Tiedemann, J; Steinach, M; Schobersberger, W

    2007-09-30

    In the adult human, the kidney is the main organ for the production and release of erythropoietin (EPO). EPO is stimulating erythropoiesis by increasing the proliferation, differentiation and maturation of the erythroid precursors. In the last decades, enormous efforts were made in the purification, molecular encoding and description of the EPO gene. This led to an incredible increase in the understanding of the EPO-feedback-regulation loop at a molecular level, especially the oxygen-dependent EPO gene expression, a key function in the regulation loop. However, studies in humans at a systemic level are still very scanty. Therefore, it is the purpose of the present review to report on the main recent investigations on EPO production and release in humans under different environmental and experimental conditions, including: (i) studies on EPO circadian, monthly and even annual variations, (ii) studies in connection with short-, medium- and long-term exercise at sea-level which will be followed (iii) by studies performed at moderate and high altitude.

  7. GEOS observation systems intercomparison investigation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berbert, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    The results of an investigation designed to determine the relative accuracy and precision of the different types of geodetic observation systems used by NASA is presented. A collocation technique was used to minimize the effects of uncertainties in the relative station locations and in the earth's gravity field model by installing accurate reference tracking systems close to the systems to be compared, and by precisely determining their relative survey. The Goddard laser and camera systems were shipped to selected sites, where they tracked the GEOS satellite simultaneously with other systems for an intercomparison observation.

  8. A role for heme oxygenase-1 in the antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects of erythropoietin: the start of a good news/bad news story?

    PubMed

    Calò, Lorenzo A; Davis, Paul A; Piccoli, Antonio; Pessina, Achille C

    2006-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is the major regulator of erythropoiesis. EPO's actions have been shown to be antiapoptotic and dependent on JAK2 signaling and Akt phosphorylation. These effects serve as link between EPO and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1 is an inducible enzyme with potent antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities which are regulated by Akt signaling. EPO's ability to alter cellular systems that involve apoptosis and oxidants suggests that EPO treatments are likely to have multiple and different effects which may start a good news/bad news story. Recombinant human EPO is the recognized treatment of choice to address anemia and to stimulate erythropoiesis in chronic renal failure patients, through its antiapoptotic action which likely involves HO-1. On the other hand, EPO treatment to address anemia in cancer patients, while providing significant improvements in cancer patients' quality of life, its effects on survival are equivocal, likely due to its linkage with HO-1. Two clinical trials of EPO in patients with solid tumors have, in fact, shown specific negative effects on survival. However, EPO's effect on tumor growth and survival is not uniformily pro growth and pro survival, as EPO may act synergistically with chemotherapy to induce apoptosis. Finally, compounds have been synthesized that do not trigger EPO receptor and thus may allow experimental distinction and, therefore, at least potentially affect at the clinical level the tissue-protective effects of EPO (e.g., antiapoptosis) without provoking its other potentially detrimental effects. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Observing System Simulation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prive, Nikki

    2015-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). The components of an OSSE are described, along with discussion of the process for validating, calibrating, and performing experiments. a.

  10. Solar System Observations with JWST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norwood, James; Hammel, Heidi; Milam, Stefanie; Stansberry, John; Lunine, Jonathan; Chanover, Nancy; Hines, Dean; Sonneborn, George; Tiscareno, Matthew; Brown, Michael; hide

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will enable a wealth of new scientific investigations in the near- and mid- infrared, with sensitivity and spatial-spectral resolution greatly surpassing its predecessors. In this paper, we focus upon Solar System science facilitated by JWST, discussing the most current information available concerning JWST instrument properties and observing techniques relevant to planetary science. We also present numerous example observing scenarios for a wide variety of Solar System targets to illustrate the potential of JWST science to the Solar System community. This paper updates and supersedes the Solar System white paper published by the JWST Project in 2010 (Lunine et al., 2010). It is based both on that paper and on a workshop held at the annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences in Reno, NV in 2012.

  11. Using Combined Marine Spatial Planning Tools and Observing System Experiments to define Gaps in the Emerging European Ocean Observing System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, G.; Pinardi, N.; Vukicevic, T.; Le Traon, P. Y.; Fernandez, V.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean observations are critical to providing accurate ocean forecasts that support operational decision making in European open and coastal seas. Observations are available in many forms from Fixed platforms e.g. Moored Buoys and tide gauges, underway measurements from Ferrybox systems, High Frequency radars and more recently from underwater Gliders and profiling floats. Observing System Simulation Experiments have been conducted to examine the relative contribution of each type of platform to an improvement in our ability to accurately forecast the future state of the ocean with HF radar and Gliders showing particular promise in improving model skill. There is considerable demand for ecosystem products and services from today's ocean observing system and biogeochemical observations are still relatively sparse particularly in coastal and shelf seas. There is a need to widen the techniques used to assess the fitness for purpose and gaps in the ocean observing system. As well as Observing System Simulation Experiments that quantify the effect of observations on the overall model skill we present a gap analysis based on (1) Examining where high model skill is required based on a marine spatial planning analysis of European seas i.e where does activity take place that requires more accurate forecasts? and (2) assessing gaps based on the capacity of the observing system to answer key societal challenges e.g. site suitability for aquaculture and ocean energy, oil spill response and contextual oceanographic products for fisheries and ecosystems. The broad based analysis will inform the development of the proposed European Ocean Observing System as a contribution to the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS).

  12. How bio-questionable are the different recombinant human erythropoietin copy products in Thailand?

    PubMed

    Halim, Liem Andhyk; Brinks, Vera; Jiskoot, Wim; Romeijn, Stefan; Praditpornsilpa, Kearkiat; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Schellekens, Huub

    2014-05-01

    The high prevalence of pure red cell aplasia in Thailand has been associated with the sharp increase in number of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) copy products, based on a classical generic regulatory pathway, which have entered the market. This study aims to assess the quality of rhEPO copy products being used in Thailand. Twelve rhEPO copy products were purchased from pharmacies in Thailand, shipped under controlled cold chain conditions to the Netherlands and characterized using (1) high performance size-exclusion chromatography, (2) asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation, (3) sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in combination with (4) Western blotting and additionally tested for (5) host cell protein impurities as well as (6) endotoxin contamination. Some of the tested rhEPO copy products showed high aggregate levels and contained a substantial amount of protein fragments. Also, one of rhEPO copy products had a high endotoxin level, exceeding the FDA limit. Our observations show that some of the tested copy products on the Thai market differ significantly from the originator rhEPO product, Epogen®. This comparison study supports a link between the quality attributes of copy rhEPO products and their immunogenicity.

  13. Synthesis and Assimilation Systems - Essential Adjuncts to the Global Ocean Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rienecker, Michele M.; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Barnier, Bernard; Behringer, David; Bell, Mike; Bourassa, Mark; Brasseur, Pierre; Breivik, Lars-Anders; Carton, James; hide

    2009-01-01

    Ocean assimilation systems synthesize diverse in situ and satellite data streams into four-dimensional state estimates by combining the various observations with the model. Assimilation is particularly important for the ocean where subsurface observations, even today, are sparse and intermittent compared with the scales needed to represent ocean variability and where satellites only sense the surface. Developments in assimilation and in the observing system have advanced our understanding and prediction of ocean variations at mesoscale and climate scales. Use of these systems for assessing the observing system helps identify the strengths of each observation type. Results indicate that the ocean remains under-sampled and that further improvements in the observing system are needed. Prospects for future advances lie in improved models and better estimates of error statistics for both models and observations. Future developments will be increasingly towards consistent analyses across components of the Earth system. However, even today ocean synthesis and assimilation systems are providing products that are useful for many applications and should be considered an integral part of the global ocean observing and information system.

  14. Topical erythropoietin promotes wound repair in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Saher; Ullmann, Yehuda; Masoud, Muhannad; Hellou, Elias; Khamaysi, Ziad; Teot, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing in diabetic patients is slower than in healthy individuals. Erythropoietin (EPO) has non-hemopoietic targets in the skin, and systemically administered EPO promotes wound healing in experimental animals. This study investigated the effect of topical EPO treatment on defective wound repair in the skin of diabetic rats. Full-thickness excisional skin wounds were made in 38 rats, of which 30 had diabetes. The wounds were then treated topically with a cream that contained either vehicle, 600 IU ml(-1) EPO (low dose), or 3,000 IU ml(-1) (high dose) EPO. We assessed the rate of wound closure during the 12-day treatment period, and microvascular density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and hydroxyproline (HP) contents, and the extent of apoptosis in wound tissues at the end of the 12-day treatment period. Topical EPO treatment significantly reduced the time to final wound closure. This increased rate of closure of the two EPO-treated wounds in diabetic rats was associated with increased MVD, VEGF, and HP contents, and a reduced extent of apoptosis. In light of our finding that topical EPO treatment promotes skin wound repair in diabetic rats, we propose that topical EPO treatment is a therapeutically beneficial method of treating chronic diabetic wounds.

  15. Developing an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program for Caltech's Tectonics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, L.; Jain, K.; Maloney, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Caltech Tectonics Observatory (TO) is an interdisciplinary center, focused on geological processes occurring at the boundaries of Earth's tectonic plates (http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu). Over the past four years, the TO has made a major effort to develop an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program. Our goals are to (1) inspire students to learn Earth Sciences, particularly tectonic processes, (2) inform and educate the general public about science in the context of TO discoveries, and (3) provide opportunities for graduate students, postdocs, and faculty to do outreach in the local K-12 schools and community colleges. Our work toward these goals includes hosting local high school teachers and students each summer for six weeks of research experience (as part of Caltech's "Summer Research Connection"); organizing and hosting an NAGT conference aimed at Geoscience teachers at community colleges; participating in teacher training workshops (organized by the local school district); hosting tours for K-12 students from local schools as well as from China; and bringing hands-on activities into local elementary, middle, and high school classrooms. We also lead local school students and teachers on geology field trips through nearby canyons; develop education modules for undergraduate classes (as part of MARGINS program); write educational web articles on TO research (http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu/outreach/highlights/), and regularly give presentations to the general public. This year, we started providing content expertise for the development of video games to teach Earth Science, being created by GameDesk Institute. And we have just formed a scientist/educator partnership with a 6th grade teacher, to help in the school district's pilot program to incorporate new national science standards (NSTA's Next Generation Science Standards, current draft), as well as use Project-Based Learning. This presentation gives an overview of these activities.

  16. NOAA Observing System Integrated Analysis (NOSIA): development and support to the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reining, R. C.; Cantrell, L. E., Jr.; Helms, D.; LaJoie, M.; Pratt, A. S.; Ries, V.; Taylor, J.; Yuen-Murphy, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    There is a deep relationship between NOSIA-II and the Federal Earth Observation Assessment (EOA) efforts (EOA 2012 and 2016) chartered under the National Science and Technology Council, Committee on Environment, Natural Resources, and Sustainability, co-chaired by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, NASA, NOAA, and USGS. NOSIA-1, which was conducted with a limited scope internal to NOAA in 2010, developed the methodology and toolset that was adopted for EOA 2012, and NOAA staffed the team that conducted the data collection, modeling, and analysis effort for EOA 2012. EOA 2012 was the first-ever integrated analysis of the relative impact of 379 observing systems and data sources contributing to the key objectives identified for 13 Societal Benefit Areas (SBA) including Weather, Climate, Disasters, Oceans and Coastal Resources, and Water Resources. This effort culminated in the first National Plan for Civil Earth Observations. NOAA conducted NOSIA-II starting in 2012 to extend the NOSIA methodology across all of NOAA's Mission Service Areas, covering a representative sample (over 1000) of NOAA's products and services. The detailed information from NOSIA-II is being integrated into EOA 2016 to underpin a broad array of Key Products, Services, and (science) Objectives (KPSO) identified by the inter-agency SBA teams. EOA 2016 is expected to provide substantially greater insight into the cross-agency impacts of observing systems contributing to a wide array of KPSOs, and by extension, to societal benefits flowing from these public-facing products. NOSIA-II is being adopted by NOAA as a corporate decision-analysis and support capability to inform leadership decisions on its integrated observing systems portfolio. Application examples include assessing the agency-wide impacts of planned decommissioning of ships and aircraft in NOAA's fleet, and the relative cost-effectiveness of alternative space-based architectures in the post-GOES-R and JPSS era

  17. Physicochemical and Pharmacokinetic Characterization of Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Meloxicam with Enhanced Dissolution Property and Storage Stability.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Masanori; Kimura, Keisuke; Kanda, Atsushi; Kawachi, Takaki; Matsuda, Akitoshi; Yuminoki, Kayo; Hashimoto, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) of meloxicam (MEL) for providing rapid onset of action. ASDs of MEL with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K-30 (MEL/PVP), HPC-SSL (MEL/HPC), and Eudragit EPO (MEL/EPO) were prepared. The physicochemical properties were characterized by focusing on morphology, crystallinity, dissolution properties, stability, and the interaction of MEL with coexisting polymers. MEL/EPO was physicochemically stable after storage at 40°C/75% RH for 30 days. In contrast, recrystallization of MEL was observed in MEL/PVP and MEL/HPC at 40°C/50% RH for 30 days. Infrared spectroscopic studies and (1)H NMR analyses of MEL/EPO revealed that Eudragit EPO interacted with MEL and reduced intermolecular binding between MEL molecules. Intermolecular interaction of drug molecules is necessary for the formation of crystalline. Thus, the interaction of MEL with Eudragit EPO and interruption of the formation of supramolecular interaction between MEL molecules might lead to the inhibition of crystal growth of MEL. Of all the MEL solid dispersions prepared, MEL/EPO showed the largest improvement in dissolution behavior. Oral administration of MEL/EPO to rats showed rapid and enhanced MEL exposure with a 2.4-fold increase in bioavailability compared with crystalline MEL. Based on these findings, MEL/EPO was physicochemically stable and provided a rapid onset of action and enhanced bioavailability after oral administration.

  18. The erythropoietin-derived peptide MK-X and erythropoietin have neuroprotective effects against ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung-Jun; Cho, Bongki; Lee, Deokho; Son, Gowoon; Lee, Yeong-Bae; Soo Han, Hyung; Kim, Eunjoo; Moon, Chanil; Moon, Cheil

    2017-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been well known as a hematopoietic cytokine over the past decades. However, recent reports have demonstrated that EPO plays a neuroprotective role in the central nervous system, and EPO has been considered as a therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases such as ischemic stroke. Despite the neuroprotective effect of EPO, clinical trials have shown its unexpected side effects, including undesirable proliferative effects such as erythropoiesis and tumor growth. Therefore, the development of EPO analogs that would confer neuroprotection without adverse effects has been attempted. In this study, we examined the potential of a novel EPO-based short peptide, MK-X, as a novel drug for stroke treatment in comparison with EPO. We found that MK-X administration with reperfusion dramatically reduced brain injury in an in vivo mouse model of ischemic stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion, whereas EPO had little effect. Similar to EPO, MK-X efficiently ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction followed by neuronal death caused by glutamate-induced oxidative stress in cultured neurons. Consistent with this effect, MK-X significantly decreased caspase-3 cleavage and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor induced by glutamate. MK-X completely mimicked the effect of EPO on multiple activation of JAK2 and its downstream PI3K/AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, and this signaling process was involved in the neuroprotective effect of MK-X. Furthermore, MK-X and EPO induced similar changes in the gene expression patterns under glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. Interestingly, the most significant difference between MK-X and EPO was that MK-X better penetrated into the brain across the brain–blood barrier than did EPO. In conclusion, we suggest that MK-X might be used as a novel drug for protection from brain injury caused by ischemic stroke, which penetrates into the brain faster in comparison with EPO, even though MK-X and EPO have

  19. Integrated Arctic Observation System Development Under Horizon 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandven, S.

    2016-12-01

    The overall objective of INTAROS is to develop an integrated Arctic Observation System (iAOS) by extending, improving and unifying existing systems in the different regions of the Arctic. INTAROS will have a strong multidisciplinary focus, with tools for integration of data from atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere and terrestrial sciences, provided by institutions in Europe, North America and Asia. Satellite earth observation data plays an increasingly important role in such observing systems, because the amount of EO data for observing the global climate and environment grows year by year. In situ observing systems are much more limited due to logistical constraints and cost limitations. The sparseness of in situ data is therefore the largest gap in the overall observing system. INTAROS will assess strengths and weaknesses of existing observing systems and contribute with innovative solutions to fill some of the critical gaps in the in situ observing network. INTAROS will develop a platform, iAOS, to search for and access data from distributed databases. The evolution into a sustainable Arctic observing system requires coordination, mobilization and cooperation between the existing European and international infrastructures (in-situ and remote including space-based), the modeling communities and relevant stakeholder groups. INTAROS will include development of community-based observing systems, where local knowledge is merged with scientific data. An integrated Arctic Observation System will enable better-informed decisions and better-documented processes within key sectors (e.g. local communities, shipping, tourism, fishing), in order to strengthen the societal and economic role of the Arctic region and support the EU strategy for the Arctic and related maritime and environmental policies.

  20. Opportunities and Resources for Scientist Participation in Education and Public Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; CoBabe-Ammann, E.; Shipp, S.; Hsu, B.

    2012-10-01

    Active engagement of scientists in Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) activities results in benefits for both the audience and scientists. Most scientists are trained in research but have little formal training in education. The Planetary Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forum helps the Science Mission Directorate support scientists currently involved in E/PO and to help scientists who are interested in becoming involved in E/PO efforts find ways to do so through a variety of avenues. We will present current and future opportunities and resources for scientists to become engaged in education and public outreach. These include upcoming NASA SMD E/PO funding opportunities, professional development resources for writing NASA SMD E/PO proposals (webinars and other online tools), toolkits for scientists interested in best practices in E/PO (online guides for K-12 education and public outreach), EarthSpace (a community web space where instructors can find and share about teaching space and earth sciences in the undergraduate classroom, including class materials news and funding opportunities, and the latest education research), thematic resources for teaching about the solar system (archived resources from Year of the Solar System), and an online database of scientists interested in connecting with education programs. Learn more about the Forum and find resources at http://smdepo.org/.

  1. Earth observing system: 1989 reference handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA is studying a coordinated effort called the Mission to Planet Earth to understand global change. The goals are to understand the Earth as a system, and to determine those processes that contribute to the environmental balance, as well as those that may result in changes. The Earth Observing System (Eos) is the centerpiece of the program. Eos will create an integrated scientific observing system that will enable multidisciplinary study of the Earth including the atmosphere, oceans, land surface, polar regions, and solid Earth. Science goals, the Eos data and information system, experiments, measuring instruments, and interdisciplinary investigations are described.

  2. The therapeutic potential of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents for tissue protection: a tale of two receptors.

    PubMed

    Brines, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a well-known therapeutic protein employed widely in the treatment of anemia. Over the past decade, abundant evidence has shown that in addition to its systemic role in the regulation of plasma pO(2) by modulating erythrocyte numbers, EPO is also a cytoprotective molecule made locally in response to injury or metabolic stress. Many studies have shown beneficial effects of EPO administration in reducing damage caused by ischemia-reperfusion, trauma, cytotoxicity, infection and inflammation in a variety of organs and tissues. Notably, the receptor mediating the nonerythropoietic effects of EPO differs from the one responsible for hematopoiesis. The tissue-protective receptor exhibits a lower affinity for EPO and is a heteromer consisting of EPO receptor monomers in association with the common receptor that is also employed by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin 3, and interleukin 5. This heteromeric receptor is expressed immediately following injury, whereas EPO production is delayed. Thus, early administration of EPO can dramatically reduce the deleterious components of the local inflammatory cascade. However, a high dose of EPO is required and this also stimulates the bone marrow to produce highly reactive platelets and activates the vascular endothelium into a prothrombotic state. To circumvent these undesirable effects, the EPO molecule has been successfully altered to selectively eliminate erythropoietic and prothrombotic potencies, while preserving tissue-protective activities. Very recently, small peptide mimetics have been developed that recapitulate the tissue-protective activities of EPO. Nonerythropoietic tissue-protective molecules hold high promise in a wide variety of acute and chronic diseases. Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. EV-3, an endogenous human erythropoietin isoform with distinct functional relevance.

    PubMed

    Bonnas, Christel; Wüstefeld, Liane; Winkler, Daniela; Kronstein-Wiedemann, Romy; Dere, Ekrem; Specht, Katja; Boxberg, Melanie; Tonn, Torsten; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Stadler, Herbert; Sillaber, Inge

    2017-06-16

    Generation of multiple mRNAs by alternative splicing is well known in the group of cytokines and has recently been reported for the human erythropoietin (EPO) gene. Here, we focus on the alternatively spliced EPO transcript characterized by deletion of exon 3 (hEPOΔ3). We show co-regulation of EPO and hEPOΔ3 in human diseased tissue. The expression of hEPOΔ3 in various human samples was low under normal conditions, and distinctly increased in pathological states. Concomitant up-regulation of hEPOΔ3 and EPO in response to hypoxic conditions was also observed in HepG2 cell cultures. Using LC-ESI-MS/MS, we provide first evidence for the existence of hEPOΔ3 derived protein EV-3 in human serum from healthy donors. Contrary to EPO, recombinant EV-3 did not promote early erythroid progenitors in cultures of human CD34+ haematopoietic stem cells. Repeated intraperitoneal administration of EV-3 in mice did not affect the haematocrit. Similar to EPO, EV-3 acted anti-apoptotic in rat hippocampal neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation. Employing the touch-screen paradigm of long-term visual discrimination learning, we obtained first in vivo evidence of beneficial effects of EV-3 on cognition. This is the first report on the presence of a naturally occurring EPO protein isoform in human serum sharing non-erythropoietic functions with EPO.

  4. Generation of a transplantable erythropoietin-producer derived from human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Takashi; Fukui, Akira; Matsumoto, Kei; Ohashi, Toya; Sado, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Hideaki; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Okabe, Masataka; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2008-06-15

    Differentiation of autologous stem cells into functional transplantable tissue for organ regeneration is a promising regenerative therapeutic approach for cancer, diabetes, and many human diseases. Yet to be established, however, is differentiation into tissue capable of producing erythropoietin (EPO), which has a critical function in anemia. We report a novel EPO-producing organ-like structure (organoid) derived from human mesenchymal stem cells. Using our previously established relay culture system, a human mesenchymal stem cell-derived, human EPO-competent organoid was established in rat omentum. The organoid-derived levels of human EPO increased in response to anemia induced by rapid blood withdrawal. In addition, the presence of an organoid in rats suppressed for native (rat) EPO production enhanced recovery from anemia when compared with control animals lacking the organoid. Together these results confirmed the generation of a stem cell-derived organoid that is capable of producing EPO and sensitive to physiological regulation.

  5. Observing System Simulation Experiments: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prive, Nikki C.; Errico, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    An overview of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) will be given, with focus on calibration and validation of OSSE frameworks. Pitfalls and practice will be discussed, including observation error characteristics, incestuousness, and experimental design. The potential use of OSSEs for investigation of the behaviour of data assimilation systems will be explored, including some results from experiments using the NASAGMAO OSSE.

  6. Hypoxia-inducible vascular endothelial growth factor gene therapy using the oxygen-dependent degradation domain in myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Lim, Soyeon; Moon, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Sung Wan; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Lee, Minhyung; Kim, Sun Hwa; Choi, Donghoon

    2010-10-01

    A hypoxia-inducible VEGF expression system with the oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain was constructed and tested to be used in gene therapy for ischemic myocardial disease. Luciferase and VEGF expression vector systems were constructed with or without the ODD domain: pEpo-SV-Luc (or pEpo-SV-VEGF) and pEpo-SV-Luc-ODD (or pEpo-SV-VEGF-ODD). In vitro gene expression efficiency of each vector type was evaluated in HEK 293 cells under both hypoxic and normoxic conditions. The amount of VEGF protein was estimated by ELISA. The VEGF expression vectors with or without the ODD domain were injected into ischemic rat myocardium. Fibrosis, neovascularization, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were assessed using Masson's trichrome staining, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) immunostaining, and the TUNEL assay, respectively. The plasmid vectors containing ODD significantly improved the expression level of VEGF protein in hypoxic conditions. The enhancement of VEGF protein production was attributed to increased protein stability due to oxygen deficiency. In a rat model of myocardial ischemia, the pEpo-SV-VEGF-ODD group exhibited less myocardial fibrosis, higher microvessel density, and less cardiomyocyte apoptosis compared to the control groups (saline and pEpo-SV-VEGF treatments). An ODD-mediated VEGF expression system that facilitates VEGF-production under hypoxia may be useful in the treatment of ischemic heart disease.

  7. Erythropoietin improves object placement recognition memory in a time dependent manner in both, uninjured animals and fimbria-fornix-lesioned male rats.

    PubMed

    Almaguer-Melian, W; Mercerón-Martinez, D; Delgado-Ocaña, S; Alberti-Amador, E; Gonzalez-Gómez, R; Bergado, Jorge A

    2018-04-01

    An increasing number of reports sustain a possible role of erythropoietin (EPO) as neuroprotective agent. In two previous articles we have evaluated EPO as plasticity promoting agent, and to contribute the restoration of brain function affected by acquired damage. We have shown that EPO is able to induce an increased synaptic efficacy in vivo along with a plasticity promoting effect. In the Morris water maze EPO administration to fimbria-fornix lesioned male rats induces a significant improvement of their spatial memory, affected by the lesion. Singularly, EPO was only effective when administered shortly after training (10 min) but not after several hours (5 h), suggesting a specific EPO effect on time dependent plasticity process. In the present paper we have expanded this line of evidence using a low stress paradigm of object placement recognition in lesioned and healthy male rats. The memory trace in this model is short-lasting; animals could recognize the change in object position when tested 24 h after, but not 48 or 72 h after the acquisition session. EPO administration 10 min after acquisition significantly prolongs retention to, at least, 72 h in healthy rats. No effect was seen if EPO was administered 5 h after training, suggesting a specific EPO modulatory effect on the consolidation process. Remarkably, early EPO treatment to fimbria fornix lesioned animals reverts the memory deficit caused by the lesion. An increased expression of the plasticity related gene arc, was also confirmed in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, that is likely to be involved in the behavioral improvement observed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Erythropoietin and Soluble Erythropoietin Receptor: A Role for Maternal Vascular Adaptation to High-Altitude Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, Gabriel H.; Vargas, Enrique; Browne, Vaughn A.; Moore, Lorna G.

    2017-01-01

    Context: An imbalance of proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors is thought to induce the widespread vascular dysfunction characteristic of preeclampsia (PreE). Erythropoietin (Epo), a pleiotropic cytokine, has important angiogenic and vasoactive properties; however, its contribution to maternal vascular dysfunction in PreE is unknown. Objectives: Because high altitude (HA) raises the incidence of PreE, we asked whether HA increased maternal Epo and soluble Epo receptor (sEpoR) levels and whether such effects differed between PreE and normotensive controls at HA. Design, Setting, and Participants: Longitudinal studies were conducted in pregnant Andean residents at HA (n = 28; 3600 m) or sea level (SL; n = 16; 300 m). Cross-sectional studies included 34 gestational age‒matched Andean PreE cases (n = 17) and controls (n = 17) in La Paz–El Alto, Bolivia (3600 to 4100 m). Results: HA augmented the pregnancy-associated rise in Epo relative to SL (P = 0.002), despite similar reductions in hemoglobin (Hb) across pregnancy at each altitude (7% to 9%, P < 0.001 for both). HA PreE cases had circulating Epo levels equivalent to those of controls but greater sEpoR (P < 0.05) and reduced Hb (P = 0.06, trend). Conclusion(s): Our findings suggest that an augmented pregnancy-associated rise in Epo may be important for successful vascular adaptation to pregnancy at HA. We further speculate that the elevated sEpoR observed in PreE vs controls at HA impedes the effect of Epo to maintain endothelial function and may, in turn, be of pathological relevance for PreE at HA. PMID:27809650

  9. Discovering erythropoietin's extra-hematopoietic functions: biology and clinical promise.

    PubMed

    Brines, M; Cerami, A

    2006-07-01

    A greatly expanded understanding of the biology of endogenous erythropoietin (EPO) has emerged since the early 1990s. Originally viewed as the renal hormone dedicated to erythrocyte production, it is now clear that EPO is produced locally by many other tissues in response to physical or metabolic stress. In its autocrine-paracrine roles, EPO mediates preconditioning (ischemic tolerance) and specifically limits the destructive potential of tumor necrosis factor alpha and other proinflammatory cytokines in the brain, heart, kidney, and other tissues. As local production of EPO is generally suppressed following injury, administration of exogenous EPO has been a successful therapeutic approach in preclinical and clinical studies, for example, following ischemia-reperfusion and toxin-induced renal injuries, and in human stroke. The therapeutic time window of tissue protection by EPO is typically very wide in experimental models, showing effectiveness when administered before, during, or after an insult and raising optimism for a high clinical potential. Although there is progress in understanding the signaling pathways responsible for EPO's tissue-protective actions that are similar to, but not as redundant as, those employed for erythrocyte maturation, much work remains to be carried out. Experimental observations also suggest the existence of EPO receptor (EPOR) isoforms mediating EPO's diverse biological activities and have identified a tissue-protective receptor complex consisting of the EPOR and the beta common receptor (CD131) subunit that is also employed by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-3 and interleukin-5. Successfully engineered analogues of EPO that selectively activate tissue protection without stimulating hematopoiesis confirm the concept of a tissue-protective receptor and have significant potential utility in the investigational and therapeutic arenas.

  10. CATOS (Computer Aided Training/Observing System): Automating animal observation and training.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jinook; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2017-02-01

    In animal behavioral biology, an automated observing/training system may be useful for several reasons: (a) continuous observation of animals for documentation of specific, irregular events, (b) long-term intensive training of animals in preparation for behavioral experiments, (c) elimination of potential cues and biases induced by humans during training and testing. Here, we describe an open-source-based system named CATOS (Computer Aided Training/Observing System) developed for such situations. There are several notable features in this system. CATOS is flexible and low cost because it is based on free open-source software libraries, common hardware parts, and open-system electronics based on Arduino. Automated video condensation is applied, leading to significantly reduced video data storage compared to the total active hours of the system. A data-viewing utility program helps a user browse recorded data quickly and more efficiently. With these features, CATOS has the potential to be applied to many different animal species in various environments such as laboratories, zoos, or even private homes. Also, an animal's free access to the device without constraint, and a gamified learning process, enhance the animal's welfare and enriches their environment. As a proof of concept, the system was built and tested with two different species. Initially, the system was tested for approximately 10 months with a domesticated cat. The cat was successfully and fully automatically trained to discriminate three different spoken words. Then, in order to test the system's adaptability to other species and hardware components, we used it to train a laboratory rat for 3 weeks.

  11. An adaptive tracking observer for failure-detection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidar, M.

    1982-01-01

    The design problem of adaptive observers applied to linear, constant and variable parameters, multi-input, multi-output systems, is considered. It is shown that, in order to keep the observer's (or Kalman filter) false-alarm rate (FAR) under a certain specified value, it is necessary to have an acceptable proper matching between the observer (or KF) model and the system parameters. An adaptive observer algorithm is introduced in order to maintain desired system-observer model matching, despite initial mismatching and/or system parameter variations. Only a properly designed adaptive observer is able to detect abrupt changes in the system (actuator, sensor failures, etc.) with adequate reliability and FAR. Conditions for convergence for the adaptive process were obtained, leading to a simple adaptive law (algorithm) with the possibility of an a priori choice of fixed adaptive gains. Simulation results show good tracking performance with small observer output errors and accurate and fast parameter identification, in both deterministic and stochastic cases.

  12. Tools You Can Use! E/PO Resources for Scientists and Faculty to Use and Contribute To: EarthSpace and the NASA SMD Scientist Speaker’s Bureau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Shupla, C.; CoBabe-Ammann, E.; Dalton, H.; Shipp, S.

    2013-10-01

    The Planetary Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forum has helped to create two tools that are designed to help scientists and higher-education science faculty make stronger connections with their audiences: EarthSpace, an education clearinghouse for the undergraduate classroom; and NASA SMD Scientist Speaker’s Bureau, an online portal to help bring science - and scientists - to the public. Are you looking for Earth and space science higher education resources and materials? Come explore EarthSpace, a searchable database of undergraduate classroom materials for faculty teaching Earth and space sciences at both the introductory and upper division levels! In addition to classroom materials, EarthSpace provides news and information about educational research, best practices, and funding opportunities. All materials submitted to EarthSpace are peer reviewed, ensuring that the quality of the EarthSpace materials is high and also providing important feedback to authors. Your submission is a reviewed publication! Learn more, search for resources, join the listserv, sign up to review materials, and submit your own at http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace. Join the new NASA SMD Scientist Speaker’s Bureau, an online portal to connect scientists interested in getting involved in E/PO projects (e.g., giving public talks, classroom visits, and virtual connections) with audiences! The Scientist Speaker’s Bureau helps educators and institutions connect with NASA scientists who are interested in giving presentations, based upon the topic, logistics, and audience. The information input into the database will be used to help match scientists (you!) with the requests being placed by educators. All Earth and space scientists funded by NASA - and/or engaged in active research using NASA’s science - are invited to become part of the Scientist Speaker’s Bureau. Submit your information into the short form at http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/speaker.

  13. Cholinergic and cytoprotective signaling cascades mediate the mitigative effect of erythropoietin on acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galal, Shereen Mohamed; Abdel-Rafei, Mohamed Khairy; Hasan, Hesham Farouk

    2018-05-01

    The present investigation aimed to evaluate the radiomitigative efficacy of the recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) against acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in a rat model. Rats were irradiated with a single sublethal dose of γ-radiation (7 Gy; total body irradiation; TBI) on the 1st day of experimental course, then received EPO (5000 IU/kg; i.p.) 24 h after irradiation, and rats were observed for 30 days of survival analysis. Administration of EPO improved 30-day survival, alleviated TBI-induced myelosuppression and pancytopenia, by augmenting lymphocytes and other white blood cells in the peripheral blood of rats, while bone marrow and spleen cellularity were restored. EPO post-exposure treatment alleviated hepatotoxicity biomarkers and restored splenic function. EPO abrogated radiation-induced oxidative stress through the upregulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α-7-nAChR) and the pro-survival Janus kinase-2 and signal transducers and activators of transcription JAK-2/STAT-3 signaling mediated via enhancing nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor-2 (Nrf-2) cytoprotective machinery in liver and spleen of irradiated rats. Moreover, EPO treatment prevented hepatic and splenic apoptosis. The present study establishes the implication of α-7-nAChR-JAK-2/STAT-3-Nrf-2 signaling cascade in the radiomitigative potential of EPO against ARS.

  14. Serum hepcidin levels and muscle iron proteins in humans injected with low- or high-dose erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Robach, Paul; Recalcati, Stefania; Girelli, Domenico; Campostrini, Natascia; Kempf, Tibor; Wollert, Kai C; Corbella, Michela; Santambrogio, Paolo; Perbellini, Luigi; Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Christensen, Britt; Moutereau, Stéphane; Lundby, Carsten; Cairo, Gaetano

    2013-07-01

    Inhibition of hepcidin expression by erythropoietic signals is of great physiological importance; however, the inhibitory pathways remain poorly understood. To investigate (i) the direct effect of erythropoietin (Epo) and (ii) the contribution of putative mediators on hepcidin repression, healthy volunteers were injected with a single dose of Epo, either low (63 IU/kg, n = 8) or high (400 IU/kg, n = 6). Low-dose Epo provoked hepcidin down-modulation within 24 h; the effect was not immediate as hepcidin circadian variations were still present following injection. High-dose Epo induced no additional effect on the hepcidin response, that is hepcidin diurnal fluctuations were not abolished in spite of extremely high Epo levels. We did not find significant changes in putative mediators of hepcidin repression, such as transferrin saturation, soluble transferrin receptor, or growth differentiation factor 15. Furthermore, the potential hepcidin inhibitor, soluble hemojuvelin, was found unaltered by Epo stimulation. This finding was consistent with the absence of signs of iron deficiency observed at the level of skeletal muscle tissue. Our data suggest that hepcidin repression by erythropoietic signals in humans may not be controlled directly by Epo, but mediated by a still undefined factor. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Human recombinant erythropoietin reduces sensorimotor dysfunction and cognitive impairment in rat models of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Reza-Zaldívar, E E; Sandoval-Avila, S; Gutiérrez-Mercado, Y K; Vázquez-Méndez, E; Canales-Aguirre, A A; Esquivel-Solís, H; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Márquez-Aguirre, A L

    2017-11-10

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) can cause anaemia and neurological disorders. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is used to manage anaemia in CKD. However, there is little evidence on the effects of rHuEPO on behaviour and cognitive function in CKD. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of rHuEPO in sensorimotor and cognitive functions in a CKD model. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control and CKD, with and without rHuEPO treatment (1050 IU per kg body weight, once weekly for 4 weeks). The Morris water maze, open field, and adhesive removal tests were performed simultaneously to kidney damage induction and treatment. Markers of anaemia and renal function were measured at the end of the study. Treatment with rHuEPO reduced kidney damage and corrected anaemia in rats with CKD. We observed reduced sensorimotor dysfunction in animals with CKD and treated with rHuEPO. These rats also completed the water maze test in a shorter time than the control groups. rHuEPO reduces kidney damage, corrects anemia, and reduces sensorimotor and cognitive dysfunction in animals with CKD. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF RECOMBINANT ERYTHROPOIETIN IN BETA-THALASSAEMIA INTERMEDIA.

    PubMed

    Asadov, Ch; Alimirzoyeva, Z; Hasanova, M; Mammadova, T; Shirinova, A

    2016-06-01

    Research objective is to study the efficacy of recombinant erythropoietin (epoetin alfa) as alternative method of treatment beta-thalassemia intermedia. Study involved 58 patients with beta-thalassemia intermedia (23 women and 35 men). In all observed patients was defined levels of hemoglobin (Hb), red blood cells (RBC), erythrocyte indexes (MCV, MCH, MCHC), hemoglobin fractions (HbA, HbA2, HbF), serum ferritin, serum erythropoietin before and after administrated rEPO. All patients received rEPO during 6 month at the dose - 10000 IU subcutaneously. The majority of patients - 39 (67%) had a good response to rEPO (increase in hemoglobin level more than 20 g/l); 16 patients (28%) had a mean response (increase in Hb 10 - 20 g/l); in 3 (5%) patients occurred poor response to rEPO therapy (increase in Hb <10 g/l). After rEPO treatment of beta-thalassemia intermedia patients there was a statistically significant change in the number of RBC, levels of HbF and sEPO. The evaluation of interdependence between the indices of the baseline sEPO and increased Hb values in patients after rEPO treatment revealed the presence of the reverse direct relationship (r=-0.67). Based on the results, it can be concluded that the use of rEPO in complex therapy of beta-thalassemia intermedia leads to increased levels of Hb and consequently reducing the need for blood transfusions, and accordingly expected to prevent severe complications of blood transfusion (alloimmunization, hypersplenism, iron overload, contamination transmissible infections) facilitating normal growth and development, and a better quality of life.

  17. Safety and efficacy of intravitreal injection of recombinant erythropoietin for protection of photoreceptor cells in a rat model of retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Z; Chen, F; Wu, X; Zhuang, C; Zhu, J; Wang, J; Ji, H; Wang, Y; Hua, X

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the safety and efficacy of exogenous erythropoietin (EPO) for the protection of photoreceptor cells in a rat model of retinal detachment (RD). Methods Recombinant rat EPO (400 ng) was injected into the vitreous cavity of normal rats to observe the eye manifestations. Retinal function was assessed by flash electroretinograms. Histopathological examination of retinal tissue was performed at 14 days and 2 months after injection, respectively. To investigate the inhibitory effect of EPO on photoreceptor cell apoptosis in RD rats, 100, 200, or 400 ng EPO was injected into the vitreous cavity immediately after RD model establishment. Apoptosis of photoreceptor cells was determined at 3 days after injection. Caspase-3 activation was measured by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence, respectively, and the level of Bcl-XL expression was analyzed by western blot. Results Intravitreal injection of EPO 400 ng into normal rats had no significant impact on retinal function, morphology, or structure. Apoptosis of retinal photoreceptor cells apparently increased after RD and was significantly reduced following EPO treatment. The thickness of the outer nuclear layer in the RD+400 ng group was significantly thicker than that in other experimental RD groups both at 14 days and at 2 months after RD (P<0.05). Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses showed decreased caspase-3 activation and increased Bcl-XL expression following EPO treatment. Conclusion Intravitreal injection of EPO 400 ng is safe, and EPO may suppress caspase-3 activation and enhance Bcl-XL expression, resulting in inhibition of apoptosis and protection of photoreceptor cells. PMID:22020175

  18. Erythropoietin and its Carbamylated Derivative Prevent the Development of Experimental Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy in STZ-Induced Diabetic NOD-SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Robert E.; Green, Karen G.; Feng, Dongyan; Dorsey, Denise A.; Parvin, Curtis A.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Xiao, Qinlgi; Brines, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Autonomic neuropathy is a significant diabetic complication resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Studies of autopsied diabetic patients and several rodent models demonstrate that the neuropathologic hallmark of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy in prevertebral ganglia is the occurrence of synaptic pathology resulting in distinctive dystrophic neurites (“neuritic dystrophy”). Our prior studies show that neuritic dystrophy is reversed by exogenous IGF-I administration without altering the metabolic severity of diabetes, i.e. functioning as a neurotrophic substance. The description of erythropoietin (EPO) synergy with IGF-I function and the recent discovery of EPO’s multifaceted neuroprotective role suggested it might substitute for IGF-I in treatment of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Our current studies demonstrate EPO receptor (EPO-R) mRNA in a cDNA set prepared from NGF-maintained rat sympathetic neuron cultures which decreased with NGF deprivation, a result which demonstrates clearly that sympathetic neurons express EPO-R, a result confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Treatment of STZ-diabetic NOD-SCID mice have demonstrated a dramatic preventative effect of EPO and carbamylated EPO (CEPO, which is neuroprotective but not hematopoietic) on the development of neuritic dystrophy. Neither EPO nor CEPO had a demonstrable effect on the metabolic severity of diabetes. Our results coupled with reported salutary effects of EPO on postural hypotension in a few clinical studies of EPO-treated anemic diabetic and non-diabetic patients may reflect a primary neurotrophic effect of EPO on the sympathetic autonomic nervous system, rather than a primary hematopoietic effect. These findings may represent a major clinical advance since EPO has been widely and safely used in anemic patients due to a variety of clinical conditions. PMID:17967455

  19. Assessing Preschool Children's Competitive Behaviour: An Observational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsiakara, Angeliki; Digelidis, Nikolaos M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a direct observational system in order to assess competitive behaviours in preschool children. Participants were 176 children (90 boys, 86 girls; M[subscript age]?=?5.2 years) from 10 kindergarten classes of one town of Central Greece. A new observational system (Observational System Assessing Competition in…

  20. How NASA's Space Science Support Network Can Assist DPS Members in Their Public Engagement Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miner, E. D.; Lowes, L. L.

    2003-12-01

    In her Carl Sagan Medal lecture last year, Heidi Hammel talked of the dos and don'ts of education and public outreach efforts by DPS members. She pointed out a number of misconceptions about what does and does not constitute "good EPO" and encouraged members to consult with "the experts" if they would like to improve their EPO effectiveness and reach. She named the DPS Education and Public Outreach Officer, Larry Lebofsky, his Deputy, Lou Mayo, and the DPS Press Officer, Ellis Miner, who also co-directs NASA's Solar System Exploration EPO Forum with Leslie Lowes. NASA's Space Science Support Network has been in existence for about six years. It has been directed by DPS member Jeff Rosendhal and is now serving as a model for NASA's new Education Enterprise. Members of the Support Network are prepared to assist (and haves been assisting) space scientists throughout the US and abroad in deciding where to spend their EPO efforts most effectively. The service is provided free of cost and includes, among other services, the following: (1) helping to establish partnerships between educators and scientists, (2) helping to link scientists and professional EPO organizations, (3) helping to link scientists to national youth and community groups, (4) providing ready access to EPO electronic and hardcopy products, (5) providing advice and direction in the preparation of EPO proposals to NASA, (6) helping to maintain several national networks of EPO volunteers, (7) encouraging (at home institutions) the broadening of scientist EPO efforts, (8) maintaining self-help websites for scientists interested in EPO.

  1. Effects of tacrolimus and erythropoietin in experimental spinal cord lesion in rats: functional and histological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    de Mesquita Coutinho, P R; Cristante, A F; de Barros Filho, T E P; Ferreira, R; dos Santos, G B

    2016-01-01

    Study design: Experimental study with rats. Objective: To evaluate functional and histological effects of tacrolimus (FK 506) and erythropoietin (EPO) after experimental spinal cord contusion injury (SCI). Setting: Brazil. Methods: Wistar rats (n=60) were submitted to SCI with the NYU Impactor system. The control group received saline; the EPO group received EPO; the group EPO+FK 506 received EPO associated with tacrolimus and the group FK 506 received tacrolimus only. The Sham group underwent SCI, but did not receive any drug. Locomotor function was evaluated after SCI by BBB (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan) weekly and by the motor-evoked potential test in 42 days. The spinal cord was histologically evaluated. Results: There was a significant difference between treated and the control groups from the seventh day on for BBB scores, with no difference between the groups EPO and EPO+FK 506 by the end of the study. There were significant differences between groups for necrosis and bleeding, but not for hiperemia, degeneration and cellular infiltrate. Axon neuron count was different between all groups (P=0.001), between EPO+FK 506 and FK 506 (P=0.011) and between EPO+FK 506 and Sham (P=0.002). Amplitude was significantly different between all groups except between control and sham. For latency, there was no difference. Conclusions: This study did not reveal significant differences in the recovery of locomotor function, or in the histological and electrophysiological analysis in animals treated with EPO and tacrolimus after thoracic SCI. PMID:26481712

  2. HPLC-MS/MS investigation of biochemical markers for the disclosure of erythropoietin abuse in sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appolonova, S. A.; Dikunets, M. A.; Rodchenkov, G. M.

    2009-04-01

    The polypeptide hormone erythropoietin (EPO), which is a forbidden doping drug, was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The hypothesis about the influence of EPO on the asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)-dimethylargininedime-thylaminohydrolase (DDAH)-NO-synthase system was verified. Changes in this system can serve as indirect biochemical markers of the presence of the forbidden EPO drug in the organism. In the test group, the concentrations of biochemical markers varied from 10 to 40 μg/ml for ADMA and symmetrical DMA (SDMA) and from 0.5 to 10 μg/ml for arginine and citrulline. A single intravenous administration of r-HuEPO (Epocrin, 2000 ME/day) for two volunteers reliably increased ADMA, SDMA, arginine, and citrulline concentrations to 40-270 μg/ml, 40-240μg/ml, 10-60 μg/ml, and 12-140 μg/ml, respectively, with respect to the reference values. The simultaneous increase in arginine, methylarginines, and citrulline contents could be an indirect marker of EPO abuse. The method is recommended for fast screening analysis.

  3. Land-cover observations as part of a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS): Progress, activities, and prospects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herold, M.; Woodcock, C.E.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Townshend, J.; Brady, M.; Steenmans, C.; Schmullius, C. C.

    2008-01-01

    The international land-cover community has been working with GEO since 2005 to build the foundations for land-cover observations as an integral part of a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) has provided the platform to elevate the societal relevance of land cover monitoring and helped to link a diverse set of global, regional, and national activities. A dedicated 2007-2009 GEO work plan task has resulted in achievements on the strategic and implementation levels. Integrated Global Observations of the Land (IGOL), the land theme of the Integrated Global Observation Strategy (IGOS), has been approved and is now in the process of transition into GEO implementation. New global land-cover maps at moderate spatial resolutions (i.e., GLOBCOVER) are being produced using guidelines and standards of the international community. The Middecadal Global Landsat Survey for 2005-2006 is extending previous 1990 and 2000 efforts for global, high-quality Landsat data. Despite this progress, essential challenges for building a sustained global land-cover-observing system remain, including: international cooperation on the continuity of global observations; ensuring consistency in land monitoring approaches; community engagement and country participation in mapping activities; commitment to ongoing quality assurance and validation; and regional networking and capacity building.

  4. An integrative 'omics' solution to the detection of recombinant human erythropoietin and blood doping.

    PubMed

    Pitsiladis, Yannis P; Durussel, Jérôme; Rabin, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    Administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHumanEPO) improves sporting performance and hence is frequently subject to abuse by athletes, although rHumanEPO is prohibited by the WADA. Approaches to detect rHumanEPO doping have improved significantly in recent years but remain imperfect. A new transcriptomic-based longitudinal screening approach is being developed that has the potential to improve the analytical performance of current detection methods. In particular, studies are being funded by WADA to identify a 'molecular signature' of rHumanEPO doping and preliminary results are promising. In the first systematic study to be conducted, the expression of hundreds of genes were found to be altered by rHumanEPO with numerous gene transcripts being differentially expressed after the first injection and further transcripts profoundly upregulated during and subsequently downregulated up to 4 weeks postadministration of the drug; with the same transcriptomic pattern observed in all participants. The identification of a blood 'molecular signature' of rHumanEPO administration is the strongest evidence to date that gene biomarkers have the potential to substantially improve the analytical performance of current antidoping methods such as the Athlete Biological Passport for rHumanEPO detection. Given the early promise of transcriptomics, research using an 'omics'-based approach involving genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics should be intensified in order to achieve improved detection of rHumanEPO and other doping substances and methods difficult to detect such a recombinant human growth hormone and blood transfusions.

  5. High serum erythropoietin levels are related to heart failure development in subjects from the general population with albuminuria: data from PREVEND.

    PubMed

    Grote Beverborg, Niels; van der Wal, Haye H; Klip, IJsbrand T; Voors, Adriaan A; de Boer, Rudolf A; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Gansevoort, Ron T; Hillege, Hans L; van der Harst, Pim; Bakker, Stephan J L; van der Meer, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In patients with heart failure (HF), serum erythropoietin (EPO) levels are elevated and associated with disease severity and outcome. Whether endogenous EPO levels are prospectively associated with the development of HF or cardiovascular events in the general population is unknown. Serum EPO levels were measured at baseline in 6686 subjects enrolled in the Prevention of REnal and Vascular ENd-stage Disease (PREVEND) study. Mean age (±SD) was 53 ± 12 years, 49.8% were male, and the median (interquartile range) EPO level was 7.7 (5.9-10.2) IU/L. During a median follow-up of 8.3 (7.7-8.8) years, 209 (3.1%) subjects were newly diagnosed with HF, 97 (1.5%) died of a cardiovascular cause, and 386 (6.0%) subjects had a non-fatal cardiovascular event (277 cardiac events and 93 strokes). Each doubling of EPO level was multivariably associated with new-onset HF [hazard ratio (HR) 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.69, P = 0.031]. EPO levels showed interaction with urinary albumin excretion (P = 0.006) and were only associated with HF in subjects with albuminuria (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.13-2.03, P = 0.005). There was an independent association of EPO levels with stroke in women (HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.24-2.65, P = 0.002), but not in men. No association was observed for EPO levels with other cardiovascular events or cardiovascular mortality. High serum EPO levels are independently associated with an increased risk of new-onset HF in subjects with albuminuria. More research into the pathophysiological mechanisms linking EPO levels to HF is needed to understand this association. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2016 European Society of Cardiology.

  6. Exercise aggravates cardiovascular risks and mortality in rats with disrupted nitric oxide pathway and treated with recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Meziri, Fayçal; Binda, Delphine; Touati, Sabeur; Pellegrin, Maxime; Berthelot, Alain; Touyz, Rhian M; Laurant, Pascal

    2011-08-01

    Chronic administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) can generate serious cardiovascular side effects such as arterial hypertension (HTA) in clinical and sport fields. It is hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) can protect from noxious cardiovascular effects induced by chronic administration of rHuEPO. On this base, we studied the cardiovascular effects of chronic administration of rHuEPO in exercise-trained rats treated with an inhibitor of NO synthesis (L-NAME). Rats were treated or not with rHuEPO and/or L-NAME during 6 weeks. During the same period, rats were subjected to treadmill exercise. The blood pressure was measured weekly. Endothelial function of isolated aorta and small mesenteric arteries were studied and the morphology of the latter was investigated. L-NAME induced hypertension (197 ± 6 mmHg, at the end of the protocol). Exercise prevented the rise in blood pressure induced by L-NAME (170 ± 5 mmHg). However, exercise-trained rats treated with both rHuEPO and L-NAME developed severe hypertension (228 ± 9 mmHg). Furthermore, in these exercise-trained rats treated with rHuEPO/L-NAME, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was markedly impaired in isolated aorta (60% of maximal relaxation) and small mesenteric arteries (53%). L-NAME hypertension induced an internal remodeling of small mesenteric arteries that was not modified by exercise, rHuEPO or both. Vascular ET-1 production was not increased in rHuEPO/L-NAME/training hypertensive rats. Furthermore, we observed that rHuEPO/L-NAME/training hypertensive rats died during the exercise or the recovery period (mortality 51%). Our findings suggest that the use of rHuEPO in sport, in order to improve physical performance, represents a high and fatal risk factor, especially with pre-existing cardiovascular risk.

  7. 1993 Earth Observing System reference handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asrar, Ghassem (Editor); Dokken, David Jon (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is a NASA-sponsored concept that uses space- and ground-based measurement systems to provide the scientific basis for understanding global change. The space-based components of MTPE will provide a constellation of satellites to monitor the Earth from space. Sustained observations will allow researchers to monitor climate variables overtime to determine trends; however, space-based monitoring alone is not sufficient. A comprehensive data and information system, a community of scientists performing research with the data acquired, and extensive ground campaigns are all important components. Brief descriptions of the various elements that comprise the overall mission are provided. The Earth Observing System (EOS) - a series of polar-orbiting and low-inclination satellites for long-term global observations of the land surface, biosphere, solid Earth, atmosphere, and oceans - is the centerpiece of MTPE. The elements comprising the EOS mission are described in detail.

  8. Translating Research Into E/PO That Addresses Real Needs in K-12 Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, Wil E.; Belbruno, E. A.; Roelofsen Moody, T.

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges in NASA ROSES E/PO is translating cutting edge research into products for which there is a demonstrated need. Rather than working from the premise that the "research is so cool’ that K-12 students or the public should learn about it, it is key to consult with the target audience to identify what their needs really are. The partnership between NJACE, Innovative Orbital Design, Inc., and Princeton offered a unique opportunity to translate intriguing but theoretical and mathematical research related to low energy orbits into a valuable education product. NJACE worked with educators to identify several needs with an intellectual link to this research: 1) Understanding of Gravity and Newton's Laws, 2) Understanding of Energy and Energy Transformations, 3) Integration of the sciences with math and technology, and 4) Knowledge of NASA's past accomplishments (such as the moon landings). Based on these identified needs, two science units were developed for students in grades 5-12 that integrate astronomy, physics, and the life sciences with math and technology. In addition an engaging public lecture was developed that tells a personal story of the quest for more economic space travel. In the past year, the workshops have been presented on three occasions, reaching over 75 teachers and demand exceeded available space with numerous teachers on waiting lists. The lecture has been presented numerous times at planetariums, museums, amateur astronomy and other clubs. We hope that our partnership will serve as a useful example of how to translate cutting edge research into valuable education products with an identified need. We will provide handouts with links to a website where the products and training can be downloaded in hope that others will help disseminate our product.

  9. On the development of earth observation satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Subsequent to the launching of the first LANDSAT by NASA, Japan has recognized the importance of data from earth observation satellites, has conducted studies, and is preparing to develop an independent system. The first ocean observation satellite will be launched in 1983, the second in 1985. The first land observation satellite is scheduled to be launched in 1987 and by 1990 Japan intends to have both land and ocean observation systems in regular operation. The association reception and data processing systems are being developed.

  10. Interleaved Observation Execution and Rescheduling on Earth Observing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, Lina; Frank, Jeremy; Smith, David; Morris, Robert; Dungan, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Observation scheduling for Earth orbiting satellites solves the following problem: given a set of requests for images of the Earth, a set of instruments for acquiring those images distributed on a collecting of orbiting satellites, and a set of temporal and resource constraints, generate a set of assignments of instruments and viewing times to those requests that satisfy those constraints. Observation scheduling is often construed as a constrained optimization problem with the objective of maximizing the overall utility of the science data acquired. The utility of an image is typically based on the intrinsic importance of acquiring it (for example, its importance in meeting a mission or science campaign objective) as well as the expected value of the data given current viewing conditions (for example, if the image is occluded by clouds, its value is usually diminished). Currently, science observation scheduling for Earth Observing Systems is done on the ground, for periods covering a day or more. Schedules are uplinked to the satellites and are executed rigorously. An alternative to this scenario is to do some of the decision-making about what images are to be acquired on-board. The principal argument for this capability is that the desirability of making an observation can change dynamically, because of changes in meteorological conditions (e.g. cloud cover), unforeseen events such as fires, floods, or volcanic eruptions, or un-expected changes in satellite or ground station capability. Furthermore, since satellites can only communicate with the ground between 5% to 10% of the time, it may be infeasible to make the desired changes to the schedule on the ground, and uplink the revisions in time for the on-board system to execute them. Examples of scenarios that motivate an on-board capability for revising schedules include the following. First, if a desired visual scene is completely obscured by clouds, then there is little point in taking it. In this case

  11. Developing a Carbon Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, B., III

    2015-12-01

    There is a clear need to better understand and predict future climate change, so that science can more confidently inform climate policy, including adaptation planning and future mitigation strategies. Understanding carbon cycle feedbacks, and the relationship between emissions (fossil and land use) and the resulting atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) concentrations in a changing climate has been recognized as an important goal by the IPCC. The existing surface greenhouse gas observing networks provide accurate and precise measurements of background values, but they are not configured to target the extended, complex and dynamic regions of the carbon budget. Space Agencies around the globe are committed to CO2 and CH4 observations: GOSAT-1/2, OCO-2/3, MERLin, TanSat, and CarbonSat. In addition to these Low Earth Orbit (LEO) missions, a new mission in Geostationary Orbit (GEO), geoCARB, which would provide mapping-like measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide concentrations over major land areas, has been recently proposed to the NASA Venture Program. These pioneering missions do not provide the spatial/temporal coverage to answer the key carbon-climate questions at process relevant scales nor do they address the distribution and quantification of anthropogenic sources at urban scales. They do demonstrate, however, that a well-planned future system of system integrating space-based LEO and GEO missions with extensive in situ observations could provide the accuracy, spatial resolution, and coverage needed to address critical open issues in the carbon-climate system. Dr. Diana Wickland devoted enormous energy in developing a comprehensive apprioach to understand the global carbon cycle; she understood well that an integrated, coordinated, international approach is needed. This shines through in her recent contribution in co-chairing the team that produced the "CEOS Strategy for Carbon Observations from Space." A NASA-funded community

  12. Applications and biomonitoring issues of recombinant erythropoietins for doping control.

    PubMed

    Tsitsimpikou, Christina; Kouretas, Demetrios; Tsarouhas, Konstantinos; Fitch, Kenneth; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristides

    2011-02-01

    The biochemical actions and side effects of recombinant erythropoietins (rhEPOs), their analogs and mimetics, their misuse as doping agents, and the principal analytical strategies developed to identify them in athletes' biologic fluids are reviewed. Patients who experience a range of pathologies have benefited from the administration of rhEPOs to correct severe anemia. Currently, monitoring the biologic effect of rhEPO in patients under treatment is by measuring the hemoglobin concentration. However, it may be valuable to directly monitor the actual levels of the administered drug and determine a dose-dependent correlation with any clinical adverse effect observed. This may permit the adoption of a patient-specific administration regime. Currently, the method of detecting EPO approved for doping control is an isoelectric-focusing, double-blotting, chemiluminescence assay based on charge differences between isoforms of rhEPOs and endogenous EPO in urine. The advantages and limitations of this method are presented. A new approach using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a complementary tool to the established method is discussed. The application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry for the direct detection of the rhEPO molecules may prove to be promising. Indirect evidence of rhEPO abuse by athletes is based on the analysis of blood parameters (hemoglobin hematocrit, reticulocytes, macrocytes, etc) and serum markers (concentration of EPO and serum transferrin receptors, etc). Enrichment of the screened parameters with gene or biochemical markers revealing altered erythropoiesis and adoption of longitudinal monitoring of athletes' hematologic and biochemical parameters could also be a complementary approach in the fight against doping.

  13. Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System: The Gulf Component of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, L. J.; Moersdorf, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    The United States is developing an Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) as the U.S. component of the international Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS). IOOS consists of: (1) a coastal observing system for the U.S. EEZ, estuaries, and Great Lakes; and (2) a contribution to the global component of GOOS focused on climate and maritime services. The coastal component will consist of: (1) a National Backbone of observations and products from our coastal ocean supported by federal agencies; and (2) contributions of Regional Coastal Ocean Observing Systems (RCOOS). The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System (GCOOS) is one of eleven RCOOS. This paper describes how GCOOS is progressing as a system of systems to carry out data collection, analysis, product generation, dissemination of information, and data archival. These elements are provided by federal, state, and local government agencies, academic institutions, non-government organization, and the private sector. This end-to-end system supports the seven societal goals of the IOOS, as provided by the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy: detect and forecast oceanic components of climate variability, facilitate safe and efficient marine operations, ensure national security, manage marine resources, preserve and restore healthy marine ecosystems, mitigate natural hazards, and ensure public health. The initial building blocks for GCOOS include continuing in situ observations, satellite products, models, and other information supported by federal and state government, private industry, and academia. GCOOS has compiled an inventory of such activities, together with descriptions, costs, sources of support, and possible out-year budgets. These activities provide information that will have broader use as they are integrated and enhanced. GCOOS has begun that process by several approaches. First, GCOOS has established a web site (www.gcoos.org) which is a portal to such activities and contains pertinent information

  14. Antioxidants may Attenuate Plasma Erythropoietin Decline after Hyperbaric Oxygen Diving.

    PubMed

    Mutzbauer, T S; Schneider, M; Neubauer, B; Weiss, M; Tetzlaff, K

    2015-11-01

    According to previous studies, plasma erythropoietin (EPO) may decrease after hyperbaric oxygen exposure due to oxidative stress. It is hypothesized that the decrease of EPO can be attenuated by oxygen free radical scavengers.The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether EPO plasma levels can be influenced by oral application of vitamin C and E before repeated hyperbaric oxygen exposure during diving. 16 healthy male police task force divers performed 3 morning dives on oxygen within a regular diving schedule on 3 consecutive days. They were randomized into either the placebo group or the vitamin group, receiving 1 g ascorbic acid and 600 IU D-α-tocopherol orally 60 min before the dive. Blood samples for EPO measurement were taken on days 1, 2, and 3 at T1, T3 and T5 60 min before and at T2, T4 and T6 60 min after each dive, respectively. A moderate decrease of EPO was observed beginning at T3 until T6 in the placebo group. The EPO concentrations in the vitamin group did not show relevant variations compared to baseline. Radical scavenging vitamins C and D may counteract hyperbaric oxygen related mechanisms reducing EPO production in hyperbaric oxygen exposure during diving. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Chandra Observations of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey

    2014-11-01

    Many solar system objects are now known to emit X-rays due to charge-exchange between highly charged solar wind (SW) minor ions and neutrals in their extended atmospheres, including Earth, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and the heliosphere, with total power outputs on the MW - GW scale. (Currently only upper limits exist for Saturn and Pluto.) Chandra observations of their morphology, spectra, and time dependence provide important information about the neutral atmosphere structure and the SW flux and charge state. Chandra observations of solar x-ray scattering from Earth, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and the Moon have also provided important clues for the scattering material and the solar radiation field at the body. We present here a 15 year summary of Chandra's solar system observations.

  16. Computerized Observation System (COS) for Field Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Thomas M.; And Others

    The Computerized Observation System (COS) is a software program which an observer can use with a portable microcomputer to document preservice and inservice teacher performance. Specific observable behavior such as appropriate questions and responses shown to increase student achievement are recorded as Low Inference Observation Measures. Time on…

  17. Activation of apoptotic pathway in normal, cancer ovarian cells by epothilone B.

    PubMed

    Rogalska, Aneta; Szula, Ewa; Gajek, Arkadiusz; Marczak, Agnieszka; Jóźwiak, Zofia

    2013-09-01

    The epothilones, a new class of microtubule-targeting agents, seem to be a very promising alternative to the current strategy of cancer treatment. We have analyzed the aspects of epothilone B (Epo B) on cellular metabolism of tumor (OV-90) and normal (MM 14) ovarian cells. The observed effects were compared with those of paclitaxel (PTX), which is now a standard for the treatment of ovarian cancer. The results provide direct evidence that Epo B is considerably more cytotoxic to human OV-90 ovarian cancer cells than PTX. We have found, that antitumor efficacy of this new drug is related to its apoptosis-inducing ability, which was confirmed during measurements typical markers of the process. Epo B induced changes in morphology of cells, mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release. Also a slight increase of the intracellular calcium level was observed. Moreover, we have found that ROS production, stimulated by Epo B, is directly involved in the induction of apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Defining Long Term Goals and Setting Priorities for Education and Outreach, 2003 to 2013 - Panel Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, J. A.; Atkinson, D. H.; Barlow, N.; Griffin, I.; Hoffman, J.; Kelly-Serrato, B.; Kesthelyi, L.; Klein, M.; Klug, S.; Kolvoord, B.; Lanagan, P.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Lindstrom, M.; Lopes, R.; Lowes, L.; Manifold, J.; Mastrapa, R.; Milazzo, M.; Miner, E.; Morris, P.; Runyon, C.; Sohus, A.; Urquhart, M.; Warasila, R. L.; Withers, P.; Wood, Chuck

    2001-11-01

    Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) activities are an integral part of NASA's mandated mission and detailed in its Strategic Plan. The Office of Space Science Solar System Exploration (OSS SSE) E/PO program has made great strides in defining priorities and achieving its goals in the last five years. The Education and Public Outreach panel for NASA's Decadal Survey has generated a list of key issues to be addressed for the years 2003-2013 to assist the OSS SSE in future prioritization and planning. Key issues under discussion include: improving the involvement of planetary science professionals in E/PO activities; combating scientific elitism; examining the association between E/PO programs and public relations; re-examining funding E/PO activities from an audience perspective as opposed to a mission-centered perspective; improving access to resources for scientists, educators, students and partner organizations; promoting communication between educational programs at NASA; and reaching traditionally underrepresented groups, women, minorities and the disabled with science education programs. The panel is developing a list of specific recommendations to be implemented to improve OSS SSE E/PO activities in the next decade. These recommendations deal with topics such as: the production of evaluated resource web sites for scientists and educators; the development of a policy of long-term funding for the maintenance of web sites and other tools after they are created; methods for reaching those who do not have computer access through television and public programs; and the development of a reward system to recognize and encourage scientist involvement in E/PO activities. Such key issues and recommendations will be presented, along with materials from current programs and initiatives for E/PO in the OSS SSE.

  19. Earth Observing System, Conclusions and Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The following Earth Observing Systems (E.O.S.) recommendations were suggested: (1) a program must be initiated to ensure that present time series of Earth science data are maintained and continued. (2) A data system that provides easy, integrated, and complete access to past, present, and future data must be developed as soon as possible. (3) A long term research effort must be sustained to study and understand these time series of Earth observations. (4) The E.O.S. should be established as an information system to carry out those aspects of the above recommendations which go beyond existing and currently planned activities. (5) The scientific direction of the E.O.S. should be established and continued through an international scientific steering committee.

  20. An Observer's View of the ORAC System at UKIRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, G. S.; Bridger, A. B.; Pickup, D. A.; Tan, M.; Folger, M.; Economou, F.; Adamson, A. J.; Currie, M. J.; Rees, N. P.; Purves, M.; Kackley, R. D.

    The Observatory Reduction and Acquisition Control system (ORAC) was commissioned with its first instrument at the UK Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) in October 1999, and with all of the other UKIRT instrumentation this year. ORAC's advance preparation Observing Tool makes it simpler to prepare and carry out observations. Its Observing Manager gives observers excellent feedback on their observing as it goes along, reducing wasted time. The ORAC pipelined Data Reduction system produces near-publication quality reduced data at the telescope. ORAC is now in use for all observing at UKIRT, including flexibly scheduled nights and service observing. This paper provides an observer's perspective of the system and its performance.

  1. NANOOS, the Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems: a regional Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) for the Pacific Northwest US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, J.; Martin, D.; Kosro, M.

    2012-12-01

    NANOOS is the Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems, the Pacific Northwest Regional Association of the United States Integrated Ocean Observing System (US IOOS). User driven since its inception in 2003, this regional observing system is responding to a variety of scientific and societal needs across its coastal ocean, estuaries, and shorelines. Regional priorities have been solicited and re-affirmed through active engagement with users and stakeholders. NANOOS membership is composed of an even mix of academic, governmental, industry, and non-profit organizations, who appoint representatives to the NANOOS Governing Council who confirm the priority applications of the observing system. NANOOS regional priorities are: Maritime Operations, Regional Fisheries, Ecosystem Assessment, Coastal Hazards, and Climate. NANOOS' regional coastal ocean observing system is implemented by seven partners (three universities, three state agencies, and one industry). Together, these partners conduct the observations, modeling, data management and communication, analysis products, education and outreach activities of NANOOS. Observations, designed to span coastal ocean, shorelines, and estuaries, include physical, chemical, biological and geological measurements. To date, modeling has been more limited in scope, but has provided the system with increased coverage for some parameters. The data management and communication system for NANOOS, led by the NANOOS Visualization System (NVS) is the cornerstone of the user interaction with NANOOS. NVS gives users access to observational data, both real time and archived, as well as modeling output. Given the diversity of user needs, measurements, and the complexity of the coastal environment, the challenge for the system is large. NANOOS' successes take advantage of technological advances, including real-time data transmission, profiling buoys, gliders, HF radars, and modeling. The most profound challenges NANOOS faces stem

  2. Student artistry sparks eclipse excitement on Maui: NSO/DKIST EPO for the 2016 Partial Solar Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Thomas A.; Penn, Matthew J.; Armstrong, James

    2016-05-01

    Local creativity and artistry is a powerful resource that enhances education programs and helps us generate excitement for science within our communities. In celebration of the 2016 Solar Eclipse, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) and its Daniel K Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) project were pleased to engage with students across Maui County, Hawai`i, via the 2016 Maui Eclipse Art Contest. With the help of the Maui Economic Development Board and the University of Hawai'is Institute for Astronomy, we solicited art entries from all K-12 schools in Maui County approximately 6 months prior to the eclipse. Along with divisional prizes, a grand prize was selected by a panel of local judges, which was subsequently printed on 25,000 solar eclipse viewing glasses and distributed to all Maui students. We found that the impact of a locally-sourced glasses design cannot be understated. Overall, the success of this program relied upon reaching out to individual teachers, supplying educational flyers to all schools, and visiting classrooms. On the day of the eclipse, all of the art entries were prominently displayed during a community eclipse viewing event at Kalama Beach Park in Kihei, HI, that was co-hosted by NSO and the Maui Science Center. This eclipse art contest was integral to making local connections to help promote science education on Maui, and we suggest that it could be adapted to the solar community's EPO activities for the upcoming 2017 Great American Solar Eclipse.

  3. Observing System Simulation Experiments for Fun and Profit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prive, Nikki C.

    2015-01-01

    Observing System Simulation Experiments can be powerful tools for evaluating and exploring both the behavior of data assimilation systems and the potential impacts of future observing systems. With great power comes great responsibility - given a pure modeling framework, how can we be sure our results are meaningful? The challenges and pitfalls of OSSE calibration and validation will be addressed, as well as issues of incestuousness, selection of appropriate metrics, and experiment design. The use of idealized observational networks to investigate theoretical ideas in a fully complex modeling framework will also be discussed

  4. Effect of erythropoietin on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and secretion in vitro in an acute kidney injury microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Liu, N M; Tian, J; Wang, W W; Han, G F; Cheng, J; Huang, J; Zhang, J Y

    2013-02-28

    We investigated the effect of erythropoietin (EPO) on differentiation and secretion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in an acute kidney injury microenvironment. Acute kidney injury mouse models were prepared. Both renal cortices were then immediately collected to produce the ischemia/reperfusion kidney homogenate supernatant. The morphological and ultrastructural changes in the cells were observed using an inverted microscope and a transmission electron microscope. Cytokeratin-18 was detected using flow cytometry. Bone morphogenetic protein-7 levels, hepatocyte growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor in the culture medium were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cells had high CD29 and CD44 expression, as well as low CD34 and CD45 expression. More round and oval cells with cobble-like appearances were observed after EPO treatment. In addition, an increase in the number of rough endoplasmic reticula, lysosomes, and mitochondria was observed in the cytoplasm; the intercellular junction peculiar to epithelial cells was also seen on the cell surface. After treatment with ischemia/reperfusion kidney homogenate supernatant, cytokeratin-18 expression increased significantly and EPO could magnify its expression. Bone morphogenetic protein-7 levels, hepatocyte growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor levels after treatment with ischemia/reperfusion kidney homogenate supernatant significantly decreased, whereas EPO increased the cytokine secretion. The acute kidney injury microenvironment can induce the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to partially differentiate into renal tubular epithelium-shaped cells, but weaken their secretion function. EPO intervention can boost up their differentiation function and reverse their low secretion effect.

  5. Designing the Climate Observing System of the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherhead, Elizabeth C.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Ramaswamy, V.; Abbott, Mark; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Atlas, Robert; Brasseur, Guy; Bruhwiler, Lori; Busalacchi, Antonio J.; Butler, James H.; Clack, Christopher T. M.; Cooke, Roger; Cucurull, Lidia; Davis, Sean M.; English, Jason M.; Fahey, David W.; Fine, Steven S.; Lazo, Jeffrey K.; Liang, Shunlin; Loeb, Norman G.; Rignot, Eric; Soden, Brian; Stanitski, Diane; Stephens, Graeme; Tapley, Byron D.; Thompson, Anne M.; Trenberth, Kevin E.; Wuebbles, Donald

    2018-01-01

    Climate observations are needed to address a large range of important societal issues including sea level rise, droughts, floods, extreme heat events, food security, and freshwater availability in the coming decades. Past, targeted investments in specific climate questions have resulted in tremendous improvements in issues important to human health, security, and infrastructure. However, the current climate observing system was not planned in a comprehensive, focused manner required to adequately address the full range of climate needs. A potential approach to planning the observing system of the future is presented in this article. First, this article proposes that priority be given to the most critical needs as identified within the World Climate Research Program as Grand Challenges. These currently include seven important topics: melting ice and global consequences; clouds, circulation and climate sensitivity; carbon feedbacks in the climate system; understanding and predicting weather and climate extremes; water for the food baskets of the world; regional sea-level change and coastal impacts; and near-term climate prediction. For each Grand Challenge, observations are needed for long-term monitoring, process studies and forecasting capabilities. Second, objective evaluations of proposed observing systems, including satellites, ground-based and in situ observations as well as potentially new, unidentified observational approaches, can quantify the ability to address these climate priorities. And third, investments in effective climate observations will be economically important as they will offer a magnified return on investment that justifies a far greater development of observations to serve society's needs.

  6. Erythropoietin and carbamylated erythropoietin promote histone deacetylase 5 phosphorylation and nuclear export in rat hippocampal neurons

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Jo, Hye-Ryeong; Kim, Yong-Seok; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Sungdong-gu, Seoul 133-791

    2016-01-29

    Erythropoietin (EPO) produces neurotrophic effects in animal model of neurodegeneration. However, clinical use of EPO is limited due to thrombotic risk. Carbamylated EPO (cEPO), devoid of thrombotic risk, has been proposed as a novel neuroprotective and neurotrophic agent although the molecular mechanisms of cEPO remain incomplete. Here, we show a previously unidentified role of histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) in the actions of EPO and cEPO. EPO and cEPO regulate the HDAC5 phosphorylation at two critical sites, Ser259 and Ser498 through a protein kinase D (PKD) dependent pathway. In addition, EPO and cEPO rapidly stimulates nuclear export of HDAC5 in ratmore » hippocampal neurons which expressing HDAC5-GFP. Consequently, EPO and cEPO enhanced the myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) target gene expression. Taken together, our results reveal that EPO and cEPO mediate MEF2 target gene expression via the regulation of HDAC5 phosphorylation at Ser259/498, and suggest that HDAC5 could be a potential mechanism contributing to the therapeutic actions of EPO and cEPO.« less

  7. The orphan receptor hepatic nuclear factor 4 functions as a transcriptional activator for tissue-specific and hypoxia-specific erythropoietin gene expression and is antagonized by EAR3/COUP-TF1.

    PubMed

    Galson, D L; Tsuchiya, T; Tendler, D S; Huang, L E; Ren, Y; Ogura, T; Bunn, H F

    1995-04-01

    The erythropoietin (Epo) gene is regulated by hypoxia-inducible cis-acting elements in the promoter and in a 3' enhancer, both of which contain consensus hexanucleotide hormone receptor response elements which are important for function. A group of 11 orphan nuclear receptors, transcribed and translated in vitro, were screened by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Of these, hepatic nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4), TR2-11, ROR alpha 1, and EAR3/COUP-TF1 bound specifically to the response elements in the Epo promoter and enhancer and, except for ROR alpha 1, formed DNA-protein complexes that had mobilities similar to those observed in nuclear extracts of the Epo-producing cell line Hep3B. Moreover, both anti-HNF-4 and anti-COUP antibodies were able to supershift complexes in Hep3B nuclear extracts. Like Epo, HNF-4 is expressed in kidney, liver, and Hep3B cells but not in HeLa cells. Transfection of a plasmid expressing HNF-4 into HeLa cells enabled an eightfold increase in the hypoxic induction of a luciferase reporter construct which contains the minimal Epo enhancer and Epo promoter, provided that the nuclear hormone receptor consensus DNA elements in both the promoter and the enhancer were intact. The augmentation by HNF-4 in HeLa cells could be abrogated by cotransfection with HNF-4 delta C, which retains the DNA binding domain of HNF-4 but lacks the C-terminal activation domain. Moreover, the hypoxia-induced expression of the endogenous Epo gene was significantly inhibited in Hep3B cells stably transfected with HNF-4 delta C. On the other hand, cotransfection of EAR3/COUP-TF1 and the Epo reporter either with HNF-4 into HeLa cells or alone into Hep3B cells suppressed the hypoxia induction of the Epo reporter. These electrophoretic mobility shift assay and functional experiments indicate that HNF-4 plays a critical positive role in the tissue-specific and hypoxia-inducible expression of the Epo gene, whereas the COUP family has a negative modulatory role.

  8. Longer-term outcomes of darbepoetin alfa versus epoetin alfa in patients with ESRD initiating hemodialysis: a quasi-experimental cohort study.

    PubMed

    Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Chang, Tara I; Mitani, Aya A; Wilhelm-Leen, Emilee R; Ding, Victoria; Chertow, Glenn M; Brookhart, M Alan; Goldstein, Benjamin A

    2015-07-01

    Adequately powered studies directly comparing hard clinical outcomes of darbepoetin alfa (DPO) versus epoetin alfa (EPO) in patients undergoing dialysis are lacking. Observational, registry-based, retrospective cohort study; we mimicked a cluster-randomized trial by comparing mortality and cardiovascular events in US patients initiating hemodialysis therapy in facilities (almost) exclusively using DPO versus EPO. Nonchain US hemodialysis facilities; each facility switching from EPO to DPO (2003-2010) was matched for location, profit status, and facility type with one EPO facility. Patients subsequently initiating hemodialysis therapy in these facilities were assigned their facility-level exposure. DPO versus EPO. All-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality; composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), and nonfatal stroke. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs from Cox proportional hazards regression models. Of 508 dialysis facilities that switched to DPO, 492 were matched with a similar EPO facility; 19,932 (DPO: 9,465 [47.5%]; EPO: 10,467 [52.5%]) incident hemodialysis patients were followed up for 21,918 person-years during which 5,550 deaths occurred. Almost all baseline characteristics were tightly balanced. The demographics-adjusted mortality HR for DPO (vs EPO) was 1.06 (95% CI, 1.00-1.13) and was materially unchanged after adjustment for all other baseline characteristics (HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.99-1.12). Cardiovascular mortality did not differ between groups (HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.94-1.16). Nonfatal outcomes were evaluated among 9,455 patients with fee-for-service Medicare: 4,542 (48.0%) in DPO and 4,913 (52.0%) in EPO facilities. During 10,457 and 10,363 person-years, 248 and 372 events were recorded, respectively, for strokes and MIs. We found no differences in adjusted stroke or MI rates or their composite with cardiovascular death (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.96-1.25). Nonrandom treatment assignment, potential residual confounding. In incident

  9. Human hematopoietic progenitors express erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Stopka, T; Zivny, J H; Stopkova, P; Prchal, J F; Prchal, J T

    1998-05-15

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a factor essential for erythroid cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The production of EPO by the kidneys in response to hypoxia and anemia is well documented. To determine whether EPO is also produced by hematopoietic cells, we analyzed the expression of EPO in normal human hematopoietic progenitors and in their progeny. Undifferentiated CD34(+)lin- hematopoietic progenitors do not have detectable EPO mRNA. Differentiating CD34(+) cells that are stimulated with recombinant human EPO in serum-free liquid cultures express both EPO and EPO receptor (EPOR). Because CD34(+) cells represent a heterogeneous cell population, we analyzed individual burst-forming units-erythroid (BFU-E) and nonerythroid colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage colonies for EPO mRNA. Only BFU-E colonies were positive for EPO mRNA. Lysates from pooled BFU-E colonies stained positively for EPO by immunoblotting. To further confirm the intrinsic nature of erythroid EPO, we replaced extrinsic EPO in erythroid colony cultures with EPO-mimicking peptide (EMP). We show EPO expression in the EMP-stimulated BFU-Es at both mRNA and protein levels. Stimulation of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) with EMP upregulated EPO expression. Furthermore, we found EPO and EPOR mRNAs as well as EPO protein in K562 cells, a human erythroleukemia cell line. Stimulation of K562 cells with EMP upregulated EPO expression. We suggest that EPO of erythroid origin may have a role in the regulation of erythropoiesis.

  10. Cytoprotective doses of erythropoietin or carbamylated erythropoietin have markedly different procoagulant and vasoactive activities.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Thomas R; Westenfelder, Christof; Tögel, Florian E; Yang, Ying; Hu, Zhuma; Swenson, Leanne; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Ploeg, Rutger J; d'Uscio, Livius V; Katusic, Zvonimir S; Ghezzi, Pietro; Zanetti, Adriana; Kaushansky, Kenneth; Fox, Norma E; Cerami, Anthony; Brines, Michael

    2006-04-11

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is receiving increasing attention as a potential therapy for prevention of injury and restoration of function in nonhematopoietic tissues. However, the minimum effective dose required to mimic and augment these normal paracrine functions of erythropoietin (EPO) in some organs (e.g., the brain) is higher than for treatment of anemia. Notably, a dose-dependent risk of adverse effects has been associated with rhEPO administration, especially in high-risk groups, including polycythemia-hyperviscosity syndrome, hypertension, and vascular thrombosis. Of note, several clinical trials employing relatively high dosages of rhEPO in oncology patients were recently halted after an increase in mortality and morbidity, primarily because of thrombotic events. We recently identified a heteromeric EPO receptor complex that mediates tissue protection and is distinct from the homodimeric receptor responsible for the support of erythropoiesis. Moreover, we developed receptor-selective ligands that provide tools to assess which receptor isoform mediates which biological consequence of rhEPO therapy. Here, we demonstrate that rhEPO administration in the rat increases systemic blood pressure, reduces regional renal blood flow, and increases platelet counts and procoagulant activities. In contrast, carbamylated rhEPO, a heteromeric receptor-specific ligand that is fully tissue protective, increases renal blood flow, promotes sodium excretion, reduces injury-induced elevation in procoagulant activity, and does not effect platelet production. These preclinical findings suggest that nonerythropoietic tissue-protective ligands, which appear to elicit fewer adverse effects, may be especially useful in clinical settings for tissue protection.

  11. Protective effect of erythropoietin against myocardial injury in rats with sepsis and its underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XINLIANG; DONG, SHIMIN; QIN, YANJUN; BIAN, XIAOHUA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of erythropoietin (EPO) against acute myocardial injury and its underlying mechanisms. Mice (n=146) were randomly divided in a double-blind manner into four groups, sham, Rocephin, EPO and sepsis, and mortality was observed on the seventh day after cecal ligation and puncture. In addition, a total of 252 rats were randomly divided into three groups, sham, EPO and sepsis, and indicators of cardiac function, inflammatory mediators and serum creatine kinase levels were assessed. Mitochondrial membrane potential, cell apoptosis and nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) p65 expression levels were detected using flow cytometry. Following intervention with EPO, the mortality rate in mice with sepsis was significantly reduced and the cardiac function of septic rats was significantly improved. In addition, the levels of inflammatory mediators, serum creatine kinase and apoptosis and the myocardial mitochondrial membrane potential and expression of NF-κB p65 in cardiac tissue were all improved following EPO treatment, and the differences between the results for the sepsis and EPO groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). These findings suggest that EPO reduces the myocardial inflammatory response in septic rats, attenuates the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibits myocardial cell apoptosis by reducing NF-κB p65 expression, and therefore exerts a protective effect in the myocardium. PMID:25572660

  12. The Global Ocean Observing System: One perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. Ron

    1992-01-01

    This document presents a possible organization for a Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) within the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission and the joint ocean programs with the World Meteorological Organization. The document and the organization presented here is not intended to be definitive, complete or the best possible organization for such an observation program. It is presented at this time to demonstrate three points. The first point to be made is that an international program office for GOOS along the lines of the WOCE and TOGA IPOs is essential. The second point is that national programs will have to continue to collect data at the scale of WOCE plus TOGA and more. The third point is that there are many existing groups and committees within the IOC and joint IOC/WMO ocean programs that can contribute essential experience to and form part of the basis of a Global Ocean Observing System. It is particularly important to learn from what has worked and what has not worked in the past if a successful ocean observing system is to result.

  13. The European Network of Analytical and Experimental Laboratories for Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freda, Carmela; Funiciello, Francesca; Meredith, Phil; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Troll, Valentin R.; Willingshofer, Ernst

    2013-04-01

    Integrating Earth Sciences infrastructures in Europe is the mission of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS).The integration of European analytical, experimental, and analogue laboratories plays a key role in this context and is the task of the EPOS Working Group 6 (WG6). Despite the presence in Europe of high performance infrastructures dedicated to geosciences, there is still limited collaboration in sharing facilities and best practices. The EPOS WG6 aims to overcome this limitation by pushing towards national and trans-national coordination, efficient use of current laboratory infrastructures, and future aggregation of facilities not yet included. This will be attained through the creation of common access and interoperability policies to foster and simplify personnel mobility. The EPOS ambition is to orchestrate European laboratory infrastructures with diverse, complementary tasks and competences into a single, but geographically distributed, infrastructure for rock physics, palaeomagnetism, analytical and experimental petrology and volcanology, and tectonic modeling. The WG6 is presently organizing its thematic core services within the EPOS distributed research infrastructure with the goal of joining the other EPOS communities (geologists, seismologists, volcanologists, etc...) and stakeholders (engineers, risk managers and other geosciences investigators) to: 1) develop tools and services to enhance visitor programs that will mutually benefit visitors and hosts (transnational access); 2) improve support and training activities to make facilities equally accessible to students, young researchers, and experienced users (training and dissemination); 3) collaborate in sharing technological and scientific know-how (transfer of knowledge); 4) optimize interoperability of distributed instrumentation by standardizing data collection, archive, and quality control standards (data preservation and interoperability); 5) implement a unified e-Infrastructure for data

  14. Semantics-enabled knowledge management for global Earth observation system of systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Roger L.; Durbha, Surya S.; Younan, Nicolas H.

    2007-10-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) is a distributed system of systems built on current international cooperation efforts among existing Earth observing and processing systems. The goal is to formulate an end-to-end process that enables the collection and distribution of accurate, reliable Earth Observation data, information, products, and services to both suppliers and consumers worldwide. One of the critical components in the development of such systems is the ability to obtain seamless access of data across geopolitical boundaries. In order to gain support and willingness to participate by countries around the world in such an endeavor, it is necessary to devise mechanisms whereby the data and the intellectual capital is protected through procedures that implement the policies specific to a country. Earth Observations (EO) are obtained from a multitude of sources and requires coordination among different agencies and user groups to come to a shared understanding on a set of concepts involved in a domain. It is envisaged that the data and information in a GEOSS context will be unprecedented and the current data archiving and delivery methods need to be transformed into one that allows realization of seamless interoperability. Thus, EO data integration is dependent on the resolution of conflicts arising from a variety of areas. Modularization is inevitable in distributed environments to facilitate flexible and efficient reuse of existing ontologies. Therefore, we propose a framework for modular ontologies based knowledge management approach for GEOSS and present methods to enable efficient reasoning in such systems.

  15. Classification framework for partially observed dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuan; Tino, Peter; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira

    2017-04-01

    We present a general framework for classifying partially observed dynamical systems based on the idea of learning in the model space. In contrast to the existing approaches using point estimates of model parameters to represent individual data items, we employ posterior distributions over model parameters, thus taking into account in a principled manner the uncertainty due to both the generative (observational and/or dynamic noise) and observation (sampling in time) processes. We evaluate the framework on two test beds: a biological pathway model and a stochastic double-well system. Crucially, we show that the classification performance is not impaired when the model structure used for inferring posterior distributions is much more simple than the observation-generating model structure, provided the reduced-complexity inferential model structure captures the essential characteristics needed for the given classification task.

  16. Relationship between sugar chain structure and biological activity of recombinant human erythropoietin produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, M; Inoue, N; Strickland, T W; Kubota, M; Wada, M; Shimizu, R; Hoshi, S; Kozutsumi, H; Takasaki, S; Kobata, A

    1989-01-01

    Two forms of erythropoietin, EPO-bi and EPO-tetra, with different biological activities were isolated from the culture medium of a recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cell line, B8-300, into which the human erythropoietin gene had been introduced. EPO-bi, an unusual form, showed only one-seventh the in vivo activity and 3 times higher in vitro activity of the previously described recombinant human EPO (standard EPO). In contrast, EPO-tetra showed both in vivo and in vitro activities comparable to those of the standard EPO. EPO-bi, EPO-tetra, and the standard EPO had the same amino acid composition and immunoreactivity. However, structural analyses of their N-linked sugar chains revealed that EPO-bi contains the biantennary complex type as the major sugar chain, while EPO-tetra and the standard EPO contain the tetraantennary complex type as the major sugar chain. From examination of various preparations of recombinant human EPO, we found a positive correlation between the in vivo activity of EPO and the ratio of tetraantennary to biantennary oligosaccharides. These results suggest that higher branching of the N-linked sugar chains is essential for effective expression of in vivo biological activity of EPO. PMID:2813359

  17. Carbamylated erythropoietin ameliorates the metabolic stress induced in vivo by severe chronic hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Fantacci, Monica; Bianciardi, Paola; Caretti, Anna; Coleman, Thomas R.; Cerami, Anthony; Brines, Michael; Samaja, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Ischemia and chronic hypoxia (CH) trigger a variety of adverse effects arising from metabolic stress that injures cells. In response to reduced O2, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) activates erythropoietin (Epo) as well as many other target genes that counteract the effects of O2 deficiency. Epo produced by the kidney stimulates erythrocyte production, leading to decreased HIF-1α production by improved tissue O2 delivery. However, Epo is produced by many other tissues, and it is currently unclear to what extent, if any, locally produced Epo modulates HIF-1α expression. Derivatives of Epo that possess tissue-protective activities but do not stimulate erythropoiesis [e.g., carbamylated Epo (CEpo)] are useful tools with which to determine whether exogenous Epo modulates HIF-1α in the absence of changes in hemoglobin concentration. We compared the effects of CH (6.5% O2 for 10 days) with or without CEpo administered by daily s.c. injection (10 μg/kg of body weight). CEpo administration did not alter the survival rate, weight loss, or increased hemoglobin concentration associated with CH. Therefore, CEpo does not directly suppress HIF-mediated erythropoiesis. CEpo does, however, prevent CH-induced neuronal increases of HIF-1α and Epo receptor-associated immunoreactivity (a measure of stress) while reducing the apoptotic index. In contrast, the myocardium did not exhibit increased HIF-1α expression during CH, although CEpo did reduce the apoptotic index. These observations therefore demonstrate that CEpo administration reduces the metabolic stress caused by severe CH, resulting in improved cellular survival independent of erythrocyte production. PMID:17090665

  18. Functional Erythropoietin Autocrine Loop in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Suresh M.; Acs, Geza; Fang, Dong; Herlyn, Meenhard; Elder, David E.; Xu, Xiaowei

    2005-01-01

    Although erythropoietin (Epo) is a known stimulator of erythropoiesis, recent evidence suggests that its biological functions are not confined to hematopoietic cells. To elucidate the role of Epo and erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) in melanoma, we examined the expression and function of these proteins in melanocytes and melanoma cells. We found increased expression of Epo in melanoma cells compared to melanocyte in vitro. EpoR was also strongly expressed in all of the melanoma cell lines and two of the three melanocyte cell lines examined. Epo expression was significantly higher in melanoma than in benign nevi as determined by immunohistochemistry. Although melanoma cells secreted Epo in normoxic condition in vitro, hypoxia and CoCl2 treatment increased Epo secretion. EpoR in melanoma cells was functional, because exogenous Epo increased melanoma resistance to hypoxic stress, pretreatment of melanoma cells with Epo significantly increased resistance to dacarbazine treatment, and Epo increased the phosphorylation of EpoR, RAF, and MEK. In conclusion, we demonstrated constitutive expression of Epo and EpoR as well as autonomous secretion of Epo by melanoma cells, indicating a novel autocrine loop of Epo in melanoma. The results suggest that the autocrine and paracrine functions of Epo might play a role in malignant transformation of melanocytes and in the survival of melanoma cells in hypoxia and other adverse conditions. PMID:15743794

  19. MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach Arranges a Ride to the Innermost Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, H. M.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J.; Goldstein, J.; Hallau, K. G.; Hirshon, B.; Vanhala, H.; Solomon, S. C.; Messenger Education; Public Outreach Team

    2010-12-01

    Exploration of the mysterious planet Mercury offers an unprecedented opportunity for teachers, students, and citizens to tag along for the ride, and the Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team for MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) is making sure the public gets quite a show. Since 2004, when MESSENGER was launched, MESSENGER has been gathering intriguing data and information about the Solar System's innermost planet. That journey will continue at a quickened pace after March 18, 2011, when MESSENGER enters into orbit around Mercury for one year of observations of the planet and its environment. The EPO Team - an extensive network of individuals and institutions - has sought to convey the excitement and complexity of the mission as MESSENGER's team overcomes challenges, achieves triumphs, and shares the adventure of space exploration with the American and global public. The EPO Team has developed a broad and comprehensive set of educational and outreach activities, ranging from curricular materials, teacher training, and unique mission-related student investigations to museum displays and special outreach to underserved communities and minority students. One of the most visible aspects of this effort is the MESSENGER Educator Fellows program: master science educators who conduct teacher training workshops throughout the nation for pre-K-12 educators. Educator Fellows train teachers on the EPO Team's MESSENGER Education Modules, which are also relevant to other NASA missions reaching important milestones this year (see http://www.messenger-education.org/teachers/educ_modules.php). By the time MESSENGER goes into orbit, Educator Fellows will have trained an estimated 18,000 teachers, who in turn, facilitate classroom experiences to over 1.8 million students. The EPO Team comprises individuals from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE); Center for

  20. The Integrated Ocean Observing System Data Assembly Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, R. H.; Henderson, D.; Burnett, W.; Hervey, R. V.; Crout, R.

    2008-05-01

    The Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) is the U.S. contribution to the Global Ocean Observing System and the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). As the Integrated Ocean Observing System Data Assembly Center (IOOS DAC), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration`s (NOAA) National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) collects data from ocean observing systems and performs quality control on the data. Once the IOOS DAC performs the quality control, it distributes them in real-time: (1) in World Meteorological Organization alphanumeric data formats via the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) that provides instant availability to national and international users (2) in text files via its website (http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov) that provide easy access and use, and (3) in netCDF format via its OPeNDAP/DODS Server (http://dods.ndbc.noaa.gov) that provides higher resolution data than available in WMO alphanumeric or text file formats. The IOOS DAC routinely checks and distributes data from about 200 NDBC stations that include meteorological and oceanographic observations from buoys and coastal stations, water-level estimations from tsunameters (DART), and climate monitoring from buoys (Tropical Atmosphere Ocean array (TAO)). The IOOS DAC operates continuously - 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. In addition to data from NDBC`s platforms, the IOOS DAC applies its scientific expertise and data management and communications capabilities to facilitate partnerships for the exchange and application of data and to coordinate and leverage regional assets and resources from about 350 IOOS Partner stations. The IOOS DAC through its quality control process provides feedback to its partners on the quality of their observation that can lead to improved quality of the observations. The NDBC-IOOS Data Partnerships span the Western Hemisphere with data collection from the Beaufort Sea to the Peru Current, from the International Date Line to the central Atlantic Ocean, and

  1. Interoperable Access to Near Real Time Ocean Observations with the Observing System Monitoring Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, K.; Hankin, S.; Mendelssohn, R.; Simons, R.; Smith, B.; Kern, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Observing System Monitoring Center (OSMC), a project funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Observations Division (COD), exists to join the discrete 'networks' of In Situ ocean observing platforms -- ships, surface floats, profiling floats, tide gauges, etc. - into a single, integrated system. The OSMC is addressing this goal through capabilities in three areas focusing on the needs of specific user groups: 1) it provides real time monitoring of the integrated observing system assets to assist management in optimizing the cost-effectiveness of the system for the assessment of climate variables; 2) it makes the stream of real time data coming from the observing system available to scientific end users into an easy-to-use form; and 3) in the future, it will unify the delayed-mode data from platform-focused data assembly centers into a standards- based distributed system that is readily accessible to interested users from the science and education communities. In this presentation, we will be focusing on the efforts of the OSMC to provide interoperable access to the near real time data stream that is available via the Global Telecommunications System (GTS). This is a very rich data source, and includes data from nearly all of the oceanographic platforms that are actively observing. We will discuss how the data is being served out using a number of widely used 'web services' (including OPeNDAP and SOS) and downloadable file formats (KML, csv, xls, netCDF), so that it can be accessed in web browsers and popular desktop analysis tools. We will also be discussing our use of the Environmental Research Division's Data Access Program (ERDDAP), available from NOAA/NMFS, which has allowed us to achieve our goals of serving the near real time data. From an interoperability perspective, it's important to note that access to the this stream of data is not just for humans, but also for machine-to-machine requests. We'll also delve into how we

  2. The inhibition of postinfarct ventricle remodeling without polycythaemia following local sustained intramyocardial delivery of erythropoietin within a supramolecular hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Jiang, Xue-Jun; Lin, Tao; Ren, Shan; Li, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Tang, Qi-zhu

    2009-09-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) can protect myocardium from ischemic injury, but it also plays an important role in promoting polycythaemia, the potential for thrombo-embolic complications. Local sustained delivery of bioactive agents directly to impaired tissues using biomaterials is an approach to limit systemic toxicity and improve the efficacy of therapies. The present study was performed to investigate whether local intramyocardial injection of EPO with hydrogel could enhance cardioprotective effect without causing polycythaemia after myocardial infarction (MI). To test the hypothesis, phosphate buffered solution (PBS), alpha-cyclodextrin/MPEG-PCL-MPEG hydrogel, recombined human erythropoietin (rhEPO) in PBS, or rhEPO in hydrogel were injected into the infarcted area immediately after MI in rats. The hydrogel allowed a sustained release of EPO, which inhibited cell apoptosis and increased neovasculature formation, and subsequently reduced infarct size and improved cardiac function compared with other groups. Notably, there was no evidence of polycythaemia from this therapy, with no differences in erythrocyte count and hematocrit compared with the animals received PBS or hydrogel blank injection. In conclusion, intramyocardial delivery of rhEPO with alpha-cyclodextrin/MPEG-PCL-MPEG hydrogel may lead to cardiac performance improvement after MI without apparent adverse effect.

  3. Optical data communication for Earth observation satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J.; Loecherbach, E.

    1991-10-01

    The current development status of optical communication engineering in comparison to the conventional microwave systems and the different configurations of the optical data communication for Earth observation satellite systems are described. An outlook to future optical communication satellite systems is given. During the last decade Earth observation became more and more important for the extension of the knowledge about our planet and the human influence on nature. Today pictures taken by satellites are used, for example, to discover mineral resources or to predict harvest, crops, climate, and environment variations and their influence on the population. A new and up to date application for Earth observation satellites can be the verification of disarmament arrangements and the control of crises areas. To solve these tasks a system of Earth observing satellites with sensors tailored to the envisaged mission is necessary. Besides these low Earth orbiting satellites, a global Earth observation system consists of at least two data relay satellites. The communication between the satellites will be established via Inter-Satellite Links (ISL) and Inter-Orbit Links (IOL). On these links, bitrates up to 1 Gbit/s must be taken into account. Due to the increasing scarcity of suitable frequencies, higher carrier frequencies must probably be considered, and possible interference with terrestrial radio relay systems are two main problems for a realization in microwave technique. One important step to tackle these problems is the use of optical frequencies for IOL's and ISL's.

  4. Developing an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program for the Caltech Tectonics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, L.; Nadin, E.; Avouac, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Caltech Tectonics Observatory (TO) is an interdisciplinary center, focused on geological processes occurring at the boundaries of Earth's tectonic plates. The timescales of these processes span from a few tens of seconds (the typical duration of an earthquake) to tens of millions of years (the time it takes to build mountains). Over the past four years, the TO has brought together 15 Caltech faculty from different fields, several visiting scientists from around the globe, and a few tens of graduate students and postdoctoral students, collaborating on scientific projects. A major objective of the TO now is to develop an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program. Our goals are to (1) stimulate the interest of students and the general public in Earth Sciences, particularly in the study of tectonic processes, (2) inform and educate the general public about TO discoveries and advancements, and (3) make available the data and techniques developed by the TO for use in classrooms of all levels. To this effect, we have been developing our website for accessibility by the general public and writing educational web articles on TO research. A recent well-visited example is "The science behind the recent 2008 earthquake in China." We distribute animations that illustrate the mechanisms of earthquakes and tsunamis, and the various techniques used by TO scientists in their scientific investigations. The TO website also provides access to geodetic data collected by TO instruments and to the source models of recent large earthquakes as analyzed by TO scientists. The TO hosts tours of its facilities for local elementary school students and is working on developing education modules for high school and undergraduate classes. We are now working on a plan to offer short courses over the summer for undergraduate and graduate students in other institutions, in order to train them to analyze a variety of data and use techniques developed by TO scientists.

  5. Leukemic blast cell colony formation in semisolid culture with erythropoietin: a case report of acute poorly differentiated erythroid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, M; Jinnai, I; Tagawa, M; Amenomori, T; Nishino, K; Yao, E; Nonaka, H; Kuriyama, K; Yoshida, Y; Matsuo, T

    1987-02-01

    The bone marrow of a patient with acute undifferentiated leukemia developed unique colonies after a 14-day culture in erythropoietin (EPO)-containing methylcellulose. The colonies consisted of 20 to 200 nonhemoglobinized large blast cells. Cytogenetic analysis of single colonies revealed hypotetraploid karyotypes with several marker chromosomes that were identical to those found in directly sampled bone marrow. The concurrently formed erythroid bursts showed only normal karyotypes. No leukemic colony formation was observed in other culture systems with either colony-stimulating activity (CSA) or phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocyte-conditioned medium (PHA-LCM). The leukemic colonies exhibited a complete EPO-dose dependency similar to that of the patient's normal BFU-E. Although cytochemical and immunologic marker studies of the bone marrow cells failed to clarify the cell lineage of the leukemic cells with extraordinarily large cell size, ultrastructural study revealed erythroid differentiation such as siderosome formation in the cytoplasm and ferritin particles in the rhophecytosis invaginations. These findings indicate that the patient had poorly differentiated erythroid leukemia and that some of the clonogenic cells might respond to EPO in vitro. Corresponding to this biological feature, the leukemic cells were markedly decreased in number in response to repeated RBC transfusions, and partial remission was obtained. These observations suggest that erythroid leukemia distinct from erythroleukemia (M6) with a myeloblastic component, can develop as a minor entity of human acute leukemia.

  6. Planning for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christian, E.

    2005-01-01

    The Group on Earth Observations was established to promote comprehensive, coordinated, and sustained Earth observations. Its mandate is to implement the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) in accord with the GEOSS 10-Year Implementation Plan and Reference Document. During the months over which the GEOSS Implementation Plan was developed, many issues surfaced and were addressed. This article discusses several of the more interesting or challenging of those issues-e.g. fitting in with existing organizations and securing stable funding - some of which have yet to be resolved fully as of this writing. Despite the relatively short period over which the Implementation Plan had to be developed, there is a good chance that the work undertaken will be influential for decades to come. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biosimilar versus patented erythropoietins: learning from 5 years of European and Japanese experience.

    PubMed

    Bocquet, François; Paubel, Pascal; Fusier, Isabelle; Cordonnier, Anne-Laure; Sinègre, Martine; Le Pen, Claude

    2015-02-01

    Patent expiries on leading biologics are creating new momentum in the market for biosimilars (copies of off-patent biologics), paving the way for their development. However, little is known about the factors influencing the competition between biosimilars and their reference products (REF). The aim of this study was to analyse key global erythropoietin (EPO) markets and factors affecting biosimilar EPO (BIOSIM-EPO) uptakes, and to identify countries where BIOSIM-EPOs have gained significant market shares. Inclusion criteria for countries in the study were a biosimilar regulatory framework similar to the EU framework, and biological market value higher than US$2.5 billion. Factors evaluated included EPO market size, EPO retail/hospital distribution mix, national incentives to use biosimilars and BIOSIM-EPO/REF price differences. IMS Health provided EPO consumption in volumes, values, and EPO ex-manufacturer prices from 2007 to 2012. Japan: large-sized market, mixed retail/hospital distribution, no incentives, low BIOSIM-EPO uptake (6.8 % in 2012). France: large-sized market, dominant retail distribution, no incentives, low BIOSIM-EPO uptake (5.8 %). Spain and Italy: medium-sized market, dominant hospital distribution, no incentives, moderate BIOSIM-EPO uptakes (11.5 and 8.6 %). Germany: small-sized market, dominant retail distribution, presence of incentives, high BIOSIM-EPO uptake (30.4 %). UK: small-sized market, mixed retail/hospital distribution, no incentives, low BIOSIM-EPO uptake (2.0 %). BIOSIM-EPO/REF price differences play no role at a global level (-10.8 % in Germany and -26.9 % in Japan). EPO markets have proven to be highly country-specific. EPO market sizes, EPO retail/hospital distribution mixes and BIOSIM-EPO/REF price differences may not be determining factors of BIOSIM-EPO uptakes. Prescription and substitution incentives to use BIOSIM-EPO appear to be determining factors in Germany. The heterogeneity of national EPO markets makes it

  8. Far-western blotting as a solution to the non-specificity of the anti-erythropoietin receptor antibody

    PubMed Central

    Fecková, Barbora; Kimáková, Patrícia; Ilkovičová, Lenka; Szentpéteriová, Erika; Debeljak, Nataša; Solárová, Zuzana; Sačková, Veronika; Šemeláková, Martina; Bhide, Mangesh; Solár, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is a member of the cytokine receptor family. The interaction between erythropoietin (Epo) and EpoR is important for the production and maturation of erythroid cells, resulting in the stimulation of hematopoiesis. The fact that EpoR was also detected in neoplastic cells has opened the question about the relevance of anemia treatment with recombinant Epo in cancer patients. Numerous studies have reported pro-stimulating and anti-apoptotic effects of Epo in cancer cells, thus demonstrating EpoR functionality in these cells. By contrast, a previous study claims the absence of EpoR in tumor cells. This apparent discrepancy is based, according to certain authors, on the use of non-specific anti-EpoR antibodies. With the aim of bypassing the direct detection of EpoR with an anti-EpoR antibody, the present authors propose a far-western blot methodology, which in addition, confirms the interaction of Epo with EpoR. Applying this technique, the presence of EpoR and its interaction with Epo in human ovarian adenocarcinoma A2780 and normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells was confirmed. Furthermore, modified immunoprecipitation of EpoR followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis confirmed a 57 kDa protein as a human Epo-interacting protein in both cell lines. PMID:27446474

  9. A novel transgenic chimaeric mouse system for the rapid functional evaluation of genes encoding secreted proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kakitani, Makoto; Oshima, Takeshi; Horikoshi, Kaori; Yoshitome, Tetsuo; Ueda, Akiko; Kajikawa, Miwa; Iba, Yumi; Ozone, Yoshinao; Ijima, Yuki; Yoshino, Tohko; Itoh, Mikiko; Seki, Sachiko; Aoki, Ayako; Ishihara, Toshie; Shionoya, Michiyo; Makino, Utako; Kitada, Rina; Ohguma, Atsuko; Ohta, Takami; Yoshida, Yoshimasa; Kudoh, Hiroe; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Sibuya, Kazunori; Ishida, Isao; Kakeda, Minoru; Yagi, Mikio; Yoneya, Takashi; Tomizuka, Kazuma

    2005-01-01

    A major challenge of the post-genomic era is the functional characterization of anonymous open reading frames (ORFs) identified by the Human Genome Project. In this context, there is a strong requirement for the development of technologies that enhance our ability to analyze gene functions at the level of the whole organism. Here, we describe a rapid and efficient procedure to generate transgenic chimaeric mice that continuously secrete a foreign protein into the systemic circulation. The transgene units were inserted into the genomic site adjacent to the endogenous immunoglobulin (Ig) κ locus by homologous recombination, using a modified mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell line that exhibits a high frequency of homologous recombination at the Igκ region. The resultant ES clones were injected into embryos derived from a B-cell-deficient host strain, thus producing chimaerism-independent, B-cell-specific transgene expression. This feature of the system eliminates the time-consuming breeding typically implemented in standard transgenic strategies and allows for evaluating the effect of ectopic transgene expression directly in the resulting chimaeric mice. To demonstrate the utility of this system we showed high-level protein expression in the sera and severe phenotypes in human EPO (hEPO) and murine thrombopoietin (mTPO) transgenic chimaeras. PMID:15914664

  10. Team Formation in Partially Observable Multi-Agent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agogino, Adrian K.; Tumer, Kagan

    2004-01-01

    Sets of multi-agent teams often need to maximize a global utility rating the performance of the entire system where a team cannot fully observe other teams agents. Such limited observability hinders team-members trying to pursue their team utilities to take actions that also help maximize the global utility. In this article, we show how team utilities can be used in partially observable systems. Furthermore, we show how team sizes can be manipulated to provide the best compromise between having easy to learn team utilities and having them aligned with the global utility, The results show that optimally sized teams in a partially observable environments outperform one team in a fully observable environment, by up to 30%.

  11. Construction of a patient observation system using KINECTTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaura, Kazunori; Kumazaki, Yu; Fukushima, Chika; Kato, Shingo; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2014-03-01

    Improvement in the positional accuracy of irradiation is expected by capturing patient motion (intra-fractional error) during irradiation. The present study reports the construction of a patient observation system using Microsoft® KINECTTM. By tracking movement, we made it possible to add a depth component to the acquired position coordinates and to display three-axis (X, Y, and Z) movement. Moreover, the developed system can be displayed in a graph which is constructed from the coordinate position at each time interval. Using the developed system, an observer can easily visualize patient movement. When the body phantom was moved a known distance in the X, Y, and Z directions, good coincidence was shown with each axis. We built a patient observation system which captures a patient's motion using KINECTTM.

  12. An Introduction to Observing System Simulation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prive, Nikki C.

    2017-01-01

    Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) are used to estimate the potential impact of proposed new instruments and data on numerical weather prediction. OSSEs can also be used to help design new observing platforms and to investigate the behavior of data assimilation systems. A basic overview of how to design and perform an OSSE will be given, as well as best practices and pitfalls. Some examples using the OSSE framework developed at the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office will be shown.

  13. Is erythropoietin gene a modifier factor in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Serena; Del Bo, Roberto; Scarlato, Marina; Nardini, Martina; Carlesi, Cecilia; Prelle, Alessandro; Corti, Stefania; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Briani, Chiara; Siciliano, Gabriele; Murri, Luigi; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the role of erythropoietin (EPO) as genetic determinant in the susceptibility to sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS). We sequenced a 259-bp region spanning the 3'hypoxia-responsive element of the EPO gene in 222 Italian SALS patients and 204 healthy subjects, matched for age and ethnic origin. No potentially causative variation was detected in SALS subjects; in addition, two polymorphic variants (namely C3434T and G3544T) showed the same genotype and haplotype frequencies in patients and controls. Conversely, a weak but significant association between G3544T and age of disease onset was observed (p=0.04). Overall, our data argue against the hypothesis of EPO as a genetic risk factor for motor neuron dysfunction, at least in Italian population. However, further studies on larger cohort of patients are needed to confirm the evidence of EPO gene as modifier factor.

  14. Earth Observing System Covariance Realism Updates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojeda Romero, Juan A.; Miguel, Fred

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will be given at the International Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Working Group meetings June 13-15, 2017 to discuss the Earth Observing System Covariance Realism updates.

  15. An Observation-based Assessment of Instrument Requirements for a Future Precipitation Process Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, E.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Wood, N.; Smalley, M.; Kulie, M.; Hahn, W.

    2017-12-01

    Global models exhibit substantial biases in the frequency, intensity, duration, and spatial scales of precipitation systems. Much of this uncertainty stems from an inadequate representation of the processes by which water is cycled between the surface and atmosphere and, in particular, those that govern the formation and maintenance of cloud systems and their propensity to form the precipitation. Progress toward improving precipitation process models requires observing systems capable of quantifying the coupling between the ice content, vertical mass fluxes, and precipitation yield of precipitating cloud systems. Spaceborne multi-frequency, Doppler radar offers a unique opportunity to address this need but the effectiveness of such a mission is heavily dependent on its ability to actually observe the processes of interest in the widest possible range of systems. Planning for a next generation precipitation process observing system should, therefore, start with a fundamental evaluation of the trade-offs between sensitivity, resolution, sampling, cost, and the overall potential scientific yield of the mission. Here we provide an initial assessment of the scientific and economic trade-space by evaluating hypothetical spaceborne multi-frequency radars using a combination of current real-world and model-derived synthetic observations. Specifically, we alter the field of view, vertical resolution, and sensitivity of a hypothetical Ka- and W-band radar system and propagate those changes through precipitation detection and intensity retrievals. The results suggest that sampling biases introduced by reducing sensitivity disproportionately affect the light rainfall and frozen precipitation regimes that are critical for warm cloud feedbacks and ice sheet mass balance, respectively. Coarser spatial resolution observations introduce regime-dependent biases in both precipitation occurrence and intensity that depend on cloud regime, with even the sign of the bias varying within a

  16. Susquehanna River Basin Hydrologic Observing System (SRBHOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, P. M.; Duffy, C. J.; Dressler, K. A.

    2004-12-01

    In response to the NSF-CUAHSI initiative for a national network of Hydrologic Observatories, we propose to initiate the Susquehanna River Basin Hydrologic Observing System (SRBHOS), as the northeast node. The Susquehanna has a drainage area of 71, 410 km2. From the headwaters near Cooperstown, NY, the river is formed within the glaciated Appalachian Plateau physiographic province, crossing the Valley and Ridge, then the Piedmont, before finishing its' 444 mile journey in the Coastal Plain of the Chesapeake Bay. The Susquehanna is the major source of water and nutrients to the Chesapeake. It has a rich history in resource development (logging, mining, coal, agriculture, urban and heavy industry), with an unusual resilience to environmental degradation, which continues today. The shallow Susquehanna is one of the most flood-ravaged rivers in the US with a decadal regularity of major damage from hurricane floods and rain-on-snow events. As a result of this history, it has an enormous infrastructure for climate, surface water and groundwater monitoring already in place, including the nations only regional groundwater monitoring system for drought detection. Thirty-six research institutions have formed the SRBHOS partnership to collaborate on a basin-wide network design for a new scientific observing system. Researchers at the partner universities have conducted major NSF research projects within the basin, setting the stage and showing the need for a new terrestrial hydrologic observing system. The ultimate goal of SRBHOS is to close water, energy and solute budgets from the boundary layer to the water table, extending across plot, hillslope, watershed, and river basin scales. SRBHOS is organized around an existing network of testbeds (legacy watershed sites) run by the partner universities, and research institutions. The design of the observing system, when complete, will address fundamental science questions within major physiographic regions of the basin. A nested

  17. Nitric oxide and hypoxia stimulate erythropoietin receptor via MAPK kinase in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Cokic, Bojana B Beleslin; Cokic, Vladan P; Suresh, Sukanya; Wirt, Stacey; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) expression level determines the extent of erythropoietin (EPO) response. Previously we showed that EPOR expression in endothelial cells is increased at low oxygen tension and that EPO stimulation of endothelial cells during hypoxia can increase endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) expression and activation as well as NO production. We now observe that while EPO can stimulate NO production, NO in turn can regulate EPOR expression. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) treated with 10–50 μM of NO donor diethylenetriamine NONOate (DETANO) for 24 hours showed significant induction of EPOR gene expression at 5% and 2% of oxygen. Also human bone marrow microvascular endothelial cell line (TrHBMEC) cultured at 21 and 2% oxygen with 50 μM DETANO demonstrated a time and oxygen dependent induction of EPOR mRNA expression after 24 and 48 hours, particularly at low oxygen tension. EPOR protein was also induced by DETANO at 2% oxygen in TrHBMEC and HUVEC. The activation of signaling pathways by NO donor stimulation appeared to be distinct from EPO stimulation. In reporter gene assays, DETANO treatment of HeLa cells at 2% oxygen increased EPOR promoter activity indicated by a 48% increase in luciferase activity with a 2 kb EPOR promoter fragment and a 71% increase in activity with a minimal EPOR promoter fragment containing 0.2Kb 5′. We found that DETANO activated MAPK kinase in TrHBMEC both in normoxia and hypoxia, while MAPK kinase inhibition showed significant reduction of EPOR mRNA gene expression at low oxygen tension, suggesting MAPK involvement in NO mediated induction of EPOR. Furthermore, DETANO stimulated Akt anti-apoptotic activity after 30 minutes in normoxia, whereas it inhibited Akt phosphorylation in hypoxia. In contrast, EPO did not significantly increase MAPK activity while EPO stimulated Akt phosphorylation in TrHBMEC in normoxia and hypoxia. These observations provide a new effect of NO on EPOR expression

  18. Nitric oxide and hypoxia stimulate erythropoietin receptor via MAPK kinase in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cokic, Bojana B Beleslin; Cokic, Vladan P; Suresh, Sukanya; Wirt, Stacey; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2014-03-01

    Erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) expression level determines the extent of erythropoietin (EPO) response. Previously we showed that EPOR expression in endothelial cells is increased at low oxygen tension and that EPO stimulation of endothelial cells during hypoxia can increase endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) expression and activation as well as NO production. We now observe that while EPO can stimulate NO production, NO in turn can regulate EPOR expression. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) treated with 10-50 μM of NO donor diethylenetriamine NONOate (DETANO) for 24h showed significant induction of EPOR gene expression at 5% and 2% of oxygen. Also human bone marrow microvascular endothelial cell line (TrHBMEC) cultured at 21 and 2% oxygen with 50 μM DETANO demonstrated a time and oxygen dependent induction of EPOR mRNA expression after 24 and 48 h, particularly at low oxygen tension. EPOR protein was also induced by DETANO at 2% oxygen in TrHBMEC and HUVEC. The activation of signaling pathways by NO donor stimulation appeared to be distinct from EPO stimulation. In reporter gene assays, DETANO treatment of HeLa cells at 2% oxygen increased EPOR promoter activity indicated by a 48% increase in luciferase activity with a 2 kb EPOR promoter fragment and a 71% increase in activity with a minimal EPOR promoter fragment containing 0.2 kb 5'. We found that DETANO activated MAPK kinase in TrHBMEC both in normoxia and hypoxia, while MAPK kinase inhibition showed significant reduction of EPOR mRNA gene expression at low oxygen tension, suggesting MAPK involvement in NO mediated induction of EPOR. Furthermore, DETANO stimulated Akt anti-apoptotic activity after 30 min in normoxia, whereas it inhibited Akt phosphorylation in hypoxia. In contrast, EPO did not significantly increase MAPK activity while EPO stimulated Akt phosphorylation in TrHBMEC in normoxia and hypoxia. These observations provide a new effect of NO on EPOR expression to enhance EPO

  19. NASA's mission to planet Earth: Earth observing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: global climate change; radiation, clouds, and atmospheric water; the ocean; the troposphere - greenhouse gases; land cover and the water cycle; polar ice sheets and sea level; the stratosphere - ozone chemistry; volcanoes; the Earth Observing System (EOS) - how NASA will support studies of global climate change?; research and assessment - EOS Science Investigations; EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS); EOS observations - instruments and spacecraft; a national international effort; and understanding the Earth System.

  20. Cytoprotective doses of erythropoietin or carbamylated erythropoietin have markedly different procoagulant and vasoactive activities

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Thomas R.; Westenfelder, Christof; Tögel, Florian E.; Yang, Ying; Hu, Zhuma; Swenson, LeAnne; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; d’Uscio, Livius V.; Katusic, Zvonimir S.; Ghezzi, Pietro; Zanetti, Adriana; Kaushansky, Kenneth; Fox, Norma E.; Cerami, Anthony; Brines, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is receiving increasing attention as a potential therapy for prevention of injury and restoration of function in nonhematopoietic tissues. However, the minimum effective dose required to mimic and augment these normal paracrine functions of erythropoietin (EPO) in some organs (e.g., the brain) is higher than for treatment of anemia. Notably, a dose-dependent risk of adverse effects has been associated with rhEPO administration, especially in high-risk groups, including polycythemia–hyperviscosity syndrome, hypertension, and vascular thrombosis. Of note, several clinical trials employing relatively high dosages of rhEPO in oncology patients were recently halted after an increase in mortality and morbidity, primarily because of thrombotic events. We recently identified a heteromeric EPO receptor complex that mediates tissue protection and is distinct from the homodimeric receptor responsible for the support of erythropoiesis. Moreover, we developed receptor-selective ligands that provide tools to assess which receptor isoform mediates which biological consequence of rhEPO therapy. Here, we demonstrate that rhEPO administration in the rat increases systemic blood pressure, reduces regional renal blood flow, and increases platelet counts and procoagulant activities. In contrast, carbamylated rhEPO, a heteromeric receptor-specific ligand that is fully tissue protective, increases renal blood flow, promotes sodium excretion, reduces injury-induced elevation in procoagulant activity, and does not effect platelet production. These preclinical findings suggest that nonerythropoietic tissue-protective ligands, which appear to elicit fewer adverse effects, may be especially useful in clinical settings for tissue protection. PMID:16585502

  1. The Receptor That Tames the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Brines, Michael; Cerami, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Tissue injury, hypoxia and significant metabolic stress activate innate immune responses driven by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and other proinflammatory cytokines that typically increase damage surrounding a lesion. In a compensatory protective response, erythropoietin (EPO) is synthesized in surrounding tissues, which subsequently triggers antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic processes that delimit injury and promote repair. What we refer to as the sequelae of injury or disease are often the consequences of this intentionally discoordinated, primitive system that uses a “scorched earth” strategy to rid the invader at the expense of a serious lesion. The EPO-mediated tissue-protective system depends on receptor expression that is upregulated by inflammation and hypoxia in a distinctive temporal and spatial pattern. The tissue-protective receptor (TPR) is generally not expressed by normal tissues but becomes functional immediately after injury. In contrast to robust and early receptor expression within the immediate injury site, EPO production is delayed, transient and relatively weak. The functional EPO receptor that attenuates tissue injury is distinct from the hematopoietic receptor responsible for erythropoiesis. On the basis of current evidence, the TPR is composed of the β common receptor subunit (CD131) in combination with the same EPO receptor subunit that is involved in erythropoiesis. Additional receptors, including that for the vascular endothelial growth factor, also appear to be a component of the TPR in some tissues, for example, the endothelium. The discoordination of the EPO response system and its relative weakness provide a window of opportunity to intervene with the exogenous ligand. Recently, molecules were designed that preferentially activate only the TPR and thus avoid the potential adverse consequences of activating the hematopoietic receptor. On administration, these agents successfully substitute for a relative deficiency of EPO

  2. The receptor that tames the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Brines, Michael; Cerami, Anthony

    2012-05-09

    Tissue injury, hypoxia and significant metabolic stress activate innate immune responses driven by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and other proinflammatory cytokines that typically increase damage surrounding a lesion. In a compensatory protective response, erythropoietin (EPO) is synthesized in surrounding tissues, which subsequently triggers antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic processes that delimit injury and promote repair. What we refer to as the sequelae of injury or disease are often the consequences of this intentionally discoordinated, primitive system that uses a "scorched earth" strategy to rid the invader at the expense of a serious lesion. The EPO-mediated tissue-protective system depends on receptor expression that is upregulated by inflammation and hypoxia in a distinctive temporal and spatial pattern. The tissue-protective receptor (TPR) is generally not expressed by normal tissues but becomes functional immediately after injury. In contrast to robust and early receptor expression within the immediate injury site, EPO production is delayed, transient and relatively weak. The functional EPO receptor that attenuates tissue injury is distinct from the hematopoietic receptor responsible for erythropoiesis. On the basis of current evidence, the TPR is composed of the β common receptor subunit (CD131) in combination with the same EPO receptor subunit that is involved in erythropoiesis. Additional receptors, including that for the vascular endothelial growth factor, also appear to be a component of the TPR in some tissues, for example, the endothelium. The discoordination of the EPO response system and its relative weakness provide a window of opportunity to intervene with the exogenous ligand. Recently, molecules were designed that preferentially activate only the TPR and thus avoid the potential adverse consequences of activating the hematopoietic receptor. On administration, these agents successfully substitute for a relative deficiency of EPO

  3. Promoting discovery and access to real time observations produced by regional coastal ocean observing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. M.; Snowden, D. P.; Bochenek, R.; Bickel, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the U.S. coastal waters, a network of eleven regional coastal ocean observing systems support real-time coastal and ocean observing. The platforms supported and variables acquired are diverse, ranging from current sensing high frequency (HF) radar to autonomous gliders. The system incorporates data produced by other networks and experimental systems, further increasing the breadth of the collection. Strategies promoted by the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) ensure these data are not lost at sea. Every data set deserves a description. ISO and FGDC compliant metadata enables catalog interoperability and record-sharing. Extensive use of netCDF with the Climate and Forecast convention (identifying both metadata and a structured format) is shown to be a powerful strategy to promote discovery, interoperability, and re-use of the data. To integrate specialized data which are often obscure, quality control protocols are being developed to homogenize the QC and make these data more integrate-able. Data Assembly Centers have been established to integrate some specialized streams including gliders, animal telemetry, and HF radar. Subsets of data that are ingested into the National Data Buoy Center are also routed to the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) of the World Meteorological Organization to assure wide international distribution. From the GTS, data are assimilated into now-cast and forecast models, fed to other observing systems, and used to support observation-based decision making such as forecasts, warnings, and alerts. For a few years apps were a popular way to deliver these real-time data streams to phones and tablets. Responsive and adaptive web sites are an emerging flexible strategy to provide access to the regional coastal ocean observations.

  4. The Cost-Effectiveness of Continuous Erythropoiesis Receptor Activator Once Monthly versus Epoetin Thrice Weekly for Anaemia Management in Chronic Haemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maoujoud, Omar; Ahid, Samir; Dkhissi, Hocein; Oualim, Zouhair; Cherrah, Yahia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) once monthly to epoetin beta (EpoB) thrice weekly to maintain haemoglobin (Hb) within the range 10.5–12 g/dL. Methods. Prospective cohort study and cost-effectiveness analysis. Chronic haemodialysis patients (CHP), being treated with EpoB, were selected for two periods of follow-up: period 1, maintaining prior treatment with EpoB, and period 2, conversion to CERA once monthly. Hb concentrations and costs were measured monthly. Health care payer perspective for one year was adopted. Results. 75 CHP completed the study, with a mean age of 52.9 ± 14.3 years. Baseline Hb was 11.14 ± 1.18 g/dL in EpoB phase and 11.46 ± 0.79 g/dL in CERA phase; we observed a significant increase in the proportion of patients successfully treated (Hb within the recommended range), 65.3% versus 70.7%, p: 0.008, and in the average effectiveness by 4% (0.55 versus 0.59). Average cost-effectiveness ratios were 6013.86 and 5173.64$, with an ICER CERA to EpoB at −6457.5$. Conclusion. Our health economic evaluation of ESA use in haemodialysis patients suggests that the use of CERA is cost-effective compared with EpoB. PMID:26843983

  5. Roles of silkworm endoplasmic reticulum chaperones in the secretion of recombinant proteins expressed by baculovirus system.

    PubMed

    Imai, Saki; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Xu, Jian; Li, Zhiqing; Shirai, Shintaro; Mon, Hiroaki; Morokuma, Daisuke; Lee, Jae Man

    2015-11-01

    Baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) is widely used for production of recombinant eukaryotic proteins in insect larvae or cultured cells. BEVS has advantages over bacterial expression system in producing post-translationally modified secreted proteins. However, for some unknown reason, it is very difficult for insects to secrete sufficiently for certain proteins of interest. To understand the reasons why insect cells fail to secrete some kinds of recombinant proteins, we here employed three mammalian proteins as targets, EPO, HGF, and Wnt3A, with different secretion levels in BEVS and investigated their mRNA transcriptions from the viral genome, subcellular localizations, and interactions with silkworm ER chaperones. Moreover, we observed that no significantly influence on the secretion amounts of all three proteins when depleting or overexpressing most endogenous ER chaperone genes in cultured silkworm cells. However, among all detected ER chaperones, the depletion of BiP severely decreased the recombinant protein secretion in BEVS, indicating the possible central role of Bip in silkworm secretion pathway.

  6. Biologically active recombinant human erythropoietin expressed in hairy root cultures and regenerated plantlets of Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Holger; Ramamoorthy, Siva; Wink, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Hairy root culture is a potential alternative to conventional mammalian cell culture to produce recombinant proteins due to its ease in protein recovery, low costs and absence of potentially human pathogenic contaminants. The current study focussed to develop a new platform of a hairy root culture system from Nicotiana tabacum for the production of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO), which is regularly produced in mammalian cells. The human EPO construct was amplified with C-terminal hexahistidine tag from a cDNA of Caco-2 cells. Two versions of rhEPO clones, with or without the N-terminal calreticulin (cal) fusion sequence, were produced by cloning the amplified construct into gateway binary vector pK7WG2D. Following Agrobacterium rhizogenes mediated transformation of tobacco explants; integration and expression of constructs in hairy roots were confirmed by several tests at DNA, RNA and protein levels. The amount of intracellular rhEPO from hairy root cultures with cal signal peptide was measured up to 66.75 ng g-1 of total soluble protein. The presence of the ER signal peptide (cal) was essential for the secretion of rhEPO into the spent medium; no protein was detected from hairy root cultures without ER signal peptide. The addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone enhanced the stabilization of secreted rhEPO leading to a 5.6 fold increase to a maximum concentration of 185.48 pg rhEPOHR g-1 FW hairy root cultures. The rhizo-secreted rhEPO was separated by HPLC and its biological activity was confirmed by testing distinct parameters for proliferation and survival in retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE). In addition, the rhEPO was detected to an amount 14.8 ng g-1 of total soluble leaf protein in transgenic T0 generation plantlets regenerated from hairy root cultures with cal signal peptide. PMID:28800637

  7. Observing Natural Hazards: Tsunami, Hurricane, and El Niño Observations from the NDBC Ocean Observing System of Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neil, K.; Bouchard, R.; Burnett, W. H.; Aldrich, C.

    2009-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) operates and maintains the NDBC Ocean Observing Systems of Systems (NOOSS), comprised of 3 networks that provide critical information before and during and after extreme hazards events, such as tsunamis, hurricanes, and El Niños. While each system has its own mission, they have in common the requirement to remain on station in remote areas of the ocean to provide reliable and accurate observations. After the 2004 Sumatran Tsunami, NOAA expanded its network of tsunameters from six in the Pacific Ocean to a vast network of 39 stations providing information to Tsunami Warning Centers to enable faster and more accurate tsunami warnings for coastal communities in the Pacific, Atlantic, Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. The tsunameter measurements are used to detect the amplitude and period of the tsunamis, and the data can be assimilated into models for the prediction and impact of the tsunamis to coastal communities. The network has been used for the detection of tsunamis generated by earthquakes, including the 2006 and 2007 Kuril Islands, 2007 Peru, and Solomon Islands, and most recently for the 2009 Dusky Sound, New Zealand earthquake. In August 2009, the NOAA adjusted its 2009 Atlantic Hurricane Seasonal Outlooks from above normal to near or below normal activity, primarily due to a strengthening El Niño. A key component in the detection of that El Niño was the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean Array (TAO) operated by NDBC. TAO provides real-time data for improved detection, understanding, and prediction of El Niño and La Niña. The 55-buoy TAO array spans the central and eastern equatorial Pacific providing real-time and post-deployment recovery data to support climate analysis and forecasts. Although, in this case, the El Niño benefits the tropical Atlantic, the alternate manifestation, La Niña typically enhances hurricane activity in the Atlantic. The various phases of

  8. Exploring our outer solar system - The Giant Planet System Observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Sturner, S. J.; Pitman, J. T.

    As space-faring peoples now work together to plan and implement future missions that robotically prepare for landing humans to explore the Moon, and later Mars, the time is right to develop evolutionary approaches for extending this next generation of exploration beyond Earth's terrestrial planet neighbors to the realm of the giant planets. And while initial fly-by missions have been hugely successful in providing exploratory surveys of what lies beyond Mars, we need to consider now what robotic precursor mission capabilities we need to emplace that prepare us properly, and comprehensively, for long-term robotic exploration, and eventual human habitation, beyond Mars to the outer reaches of our solar system. To develop practical strategies that can establish prioritized capabilities, and then develop a means for achieving those capabilities within realistic budget and technology considerations, and in reasonable timeframes, is our challenge. We suggest one component of such an approach to future outer planets exploration is a series of Giant Planets System Observer (GPSO) missions that provide for long- duration observations, monitoring, and relay functions to help advance our understanding of the outer planets and thereby enable a sound basis for planning their eventual exploration by humans. We envision these missions as being comparable to taking Hubble-class remote-sensing facilities, along with the space physics capabilities of long-lived geospace and heliospheric missions, to the giant planet systems and dedicating long observing lifetimes (HST, 16 yr.; Voyagers, 29 yr.) to the exhaustive study and characterization of those systems. GPSO missions could feature 20-yr+ extended mission lifetimes, direct inject trajectories to maximize useful lifetime on target, placement strategies that take advantage of natural environment shielding (e.g., Ganymede magnetic field) where possible, orbit designs having favorable planetary system viewing geometries, comprehensive

  9. Building a federated data infrastructure for integrating the European Supersites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freda, Carmela; Cocco, Massimo; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Borgstrom, Sven; Vogfjord, Kristin; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Ergintav, Semih; Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Consortium, Epos

    2017-04-01

    The integration of satellite and in-situ Earth observations fostered by the GEO Geohazards Supersites and National Laboratories (GSNL) initiative is aimed at providing access to spaceborne and in-situ geoscience data for selected sites prone to earthquake, volcanic eruptions and/or other environmental hazards. The initiative was launched with the "Frascati declaration" at the conclusion of the 3rd International Geohazards workshop of the Group of Earth Observation (GEO) held in November 2007 in Frascati, Italy. The development of the GSNL and the integration of in-situ and space Earth observations require the implementation of in-situ e-infrastructures and services for scientific users and other stakeholders. The European Commission has funded three projects to support the development of the European supersites: FUTUREVOLC for the Icelandic volcanoes, MED-SUV for Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius (Italy), and MARSITE for the Marmara Sea near fault observatory (Turkey). Because the establishment of a network of supersites in Europe will, among other advantages, facilitate the link with the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), EPOS (the European Plate Observing System) has supported these initiatives by integrating the observing systems and infrastructures developed in these three projects in its implementation plan aimed at integrating existing and new research infrastructures for solid Earth sciences. In this contribution we will present the EPOS federated approach and the key actions needed to: i) develop sustainable long-term Earth observation strategies preceding and following earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; ii) develop an innovative integrated e-infrastructure component necessary to create an effective service for users; iii) promote the strategic and outreach actions to meet the specific user needs; iv) develop expertise in the use and interpretation of Supersites data in order to promote capacity building and timely transfer of scientific

  10. Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, A.; Cerezo, F.; Fernandez, M.; Lomba, J.; Lopez, M.; Moreno, J.; Neira, A.; Quintana, C.; Torres, J.; Trigo, R.; Urena, J.; Vega, E.; Vez, E.

    2010-12-01

    The Spanish Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (MITyC) and the Ministry of Defense (MoD) signed an agreement in 2007 for the development of a "Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System" based, in first instance, on two satellites: a high resolution optical satellite, called SEOSAT/Ingenio, and a radar satellite based on SAR technology, called SEOSAR/Paz. SEOSAT/Ingenio is managed by MITyC through the Centre for the Development of Industrial Technology (CDTI), with technical and contractual support from the European Space Agency (ESA). HISDESA T together with the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA, National Institute for Aerospace Technology) will be responsible for the in-orbit operation and the commercial operation of both satellites, and for the technical management of SEOSAR/Paz on behalf of the MoD. In both cases EADS CASA Espacio (ECE) is the prime contractor leading the industrial consortia. The ground segment development will be assigned to a Spanish consortium. This system is the most important contribution of Spain to the European Programme Global Monitoring for Environment and Security, GMES. This paper presents the Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System focusing on SEOSA T/Ingenio Programme and with special emphasis in the potential contribution to the ESA Third Party Missions Programme and to the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security initiative (GMES) Data Access.

  11. The GLAST Education and Public Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plait, P.; Graves, T.; Silva, S.; Simonnet, A.; Spear, G.; Cominsky, L.

    2004-12-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in 2007, is a NASA mission designed to observe gamma rays from the most energetic objects in the Universe. The NASA Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Group at Sonoma State University is the lead institution for GLAST E/PO. Given the size of the mission itself, we have planned and are executing an ambitious outreach program, including 1) an educators guide with activities (and a beautiful poster) designed to bring the science of active galaxies into the classroom; 2) a series of classroom modules by TOPS Learning Systems, Inc. that uses the GLAST mission to teach logarithms, powers of ten, and the scale of the Universe; 3) a robotic telescope in Sonoma County, California to observe GLAST targets, aiding not only GLAST science but also teaching students how astronomers process astronomical data; 4) ten Educator Ambassadors: award-winning teachers who help the E/PO group develop, test, and disseminate educational products; 5) an interactive Virtual Visitor Center web site for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, featuring an interactive simulation of GLAST's main gamma ray detector, which is being built by the US Department of Energy, and institutions in Italy, Japan, France and Sweden; 6) a one-hour PBS NOVA television show about black holes; 7) an interactive web-based Space Mystery which teaches students about active galaxies; 8) a series of educator workshops across the country to train teachers how to use the GLAST products; 9) an educators guide based on the high-energy physics of supernovae; and 10) extensive assessment by external evaluators at WestEd. More educational materials and information about the GLAST E/PO program can be found at http://glast.sonoma.edu.

  12. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System - EOSDIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), a petabyte-scale archive of environmental data that supports global climate change research. The Earth Science Data Systems provide end-to-end capabilities to deliver data and information products to users in support of understanding the Earth system. The presentation contains photographs from space of recent events, (i.e., the effects of the tsunami in Japan, and the wildfires in Australia.) It also includes details of the Data Centers that provide the data to EOSDIS and Science Investigator-led Processing Systems. Information about the Land, Atmosphere Near-real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) and some of the uses that the system has made possible are reviewed. Also included is information about how to access the data, and evolutionary plans for the future of the system.

  13. A system decomposition approach to the design of functional observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Tyrone; Trinh, Hieu

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a system decomposition that allows the construction of a minimum-order functional observer using a state observer design approach. The system decomposition translates the functional observer design problem to that of a state observer for a smaller decomposed subsystem. Functional observability indices are introduced, and a closed-form expression for the minimum order required for a functional observer is derived in terms of those functional observability indices.

  14. The Australian Integrated Marine Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, R.; Meyers, G.; Roughan, M.; Operators, I.

    2008-12-01

    The Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) is a 92M project established with 50M from the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) and co-investments from 10 operators including Universities and government agencies (see below). It is a nationally distributed set of equipment established and maintained at sea, oceanographic data and information services that collectively will contribute to meeting the needs of marine research in both open oceans and over the continental shelf around Australia. In particular, if sustained in the long term, it will permit identification and management of climate change in the marine environment, an area of research that is as yet almost a blank page, studies relevant to conservation of marine biodiversity and research on the role of the oceans in the climate system. While as an NCRIS project IMOS is intended to support research, the data streams are also useful for many societal, environmental and economic applications, such as management of offshore industries, safety at sea, management of marine ecosystems and fisheries and tourism. The infrastructure also contributes to Australia's commitments to international programs of ocean observing and international conventions, such as the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention that established the Australian Exclusive Economic Zone, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Global Ocean Observing System and the intergovernmental coordinating activity Global Earth Observation System of Systems. IMOS is made up of nine national facilities that collect data, using different components of infrastructure and instruments, and two facilities that manage and provide access to data and enhanced data products, one for in situ data and a second for remotely sensed satellite data. The observing facilities include three for the open (bluewater) ocean (Argo Australia, Enhanced Ships of Opportunity and Southern Ocean Time Series), three facilities for coastal

  15. Erythropoietin promotes oligodendrogenesis and myelin repair following lysolecithin-induced injury in spinal cord slice culture

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cho, Yun Kyung; Kim, Gunha; Park, Serah

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lysolecithin-induced demyelination elevated EpoR expression in OPCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In association with elevated EpoR, EPO increased OPCs proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPO enhanced the oligodendrogenesis via activation of JAK2 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPO promoted myelin repair following lysolecithin-induced demyelination. -- Abstract: Here, we sought to delineate the effect of EPO on the remyelination processes using an in vitro model of demyelination. We report that lysolecithin-induced demyelination elevated EPO receptor (EpoR) expression in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), facilitating the beneficial effect of EPO on the formation of oligodendrocytes (oligodendrogenesis). In the absence of EPO, the resultant remyelination was insufficient, possibly due to amore » limiting number of oligodendrocytes rather than their progenitors, which proliferate in response to lysolecithin-induced injury. By EPO treatment, lysolecithin-induced proliferation of OPCs was accelerated and the number of myelinating oligodendrocytes and myelin recovery was increased. EPO also enhanced the differentiation of neural progenitor cells expressing EpoR at high level toward the oligodendrocyte-lineage cells through activation of cyclin E and Janus kinase 2 pathways. Induction of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes by high dose of EPO implies that EPO might be the key factor influencing the final differentiation of OPCs. Taken together, our data suggest that EPO treatment could be an effective way to enhance remyelination by promoting oligodendrogenesis in association with elevated EpoR expression in spinal cord slice culture after lysolecithin-induced demyelination.« less

  16. GENERAL EARTHQUAKE-OBSERVATION SYSTEM (GEOS).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, R.D.; Fletcher, Joe B.; Jensen, E.G.; Maxwell, G.L.; VanSchaack, J.R.; Warrick, R.E.; Cranswick, E.; Johnston, M.J.S.; McClearn, R.

    1985-01-01

    Microprocessor technology has permitted the development of a General Earthquake-Observation System (GEOS) useful for most seismic applications. Central-processing-unit control via robust software of system functions that are isolated on hardware modules permits field adaptability of the system to a wide variety of active and passive seismic experiments and straightforward modification for incorporation of improvements in technology. Various laboratory tests and numerous deployments of a set of the systems in the field have confirmed design goals, including: wide linear dynamic range (16 bit/96 dB); broad bandwidth (36 hr to 600 Hz; greater than 36 hr available); selectable sensor-type (accelerometer, seismometer, dilatometer); selectable channels (1 to 6); selectable record mode (continuous, preset, trigger); large data capacity (1. 4 to 60 Mbytes); selectable time standard (WWVB, master, manual); automatic self-calibration; simple field operation; full capability to adapt system in the field to a wide variety of experiments; low power; portability; and modest costs. System design goals for a microcomputer-controlled system with modular software and hardware components as implemented on the GEOS are presented. The systems have been deployed for 15 experiments, including: studies of near-source strong motion; high-frequency microearthquakes; crustal structure; down-hole wave propagation; teleseismicity; and earth-tidal strains.

  17. A reduced adaptive observer for multivariable systems. [using reduced dynamic ordering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, R. L.; Lindorff, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    An adaptive observer for multivariable systems is presented for which the dynamic order of the observer is reduced, subject to mild restrictions. The observer structure depends directly upon the multivariable structure of the system rather than a transformation to a single-output system. The number of adaptive gains is at most the sum of the order of the system and the number of input parameters being adapted. Moreover, for the relatively frequent specific cases for which the number of required adaptive gains is less than the sum of system order and input parameters, the number of these gains is easily determined by inspection of the system structure. This adaptive observer possesses all the properties ascribed to the single-input single-output adpative observer. Like the other adaptive observers some restriction is required of the allowable system command input to guarantee convergence of the adaptive algorithm, but the restriction is more lenient than that required by the full-order multivariable observer. This reduced observer is not restricted to cycle systems.

  18. Erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E*) from Friend virus-infected mice undergo VVFe suicide in vitro in the absence of added erythropoietin

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Del Rizzo, D.F.; Axelrad, A.A.

    The authors have investigated the effect of VVFe on the survival in suspension of erythropoietin (epo)-independent erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E*) induced by Friend polycythemia virus (FV). Spleen cells from C3Hf/Bi mice previously infected with FV were exposed to carrier-free VVFe, and the survival of CFU-E* as a function of time in liquid medium was determined from the number of erythroid colonies that developed from these cells seeded in plasma cultures without added epo. The results showed that spleen CFU-E* were highly vulnerable to VVFe. Marrow CFU-E* behaved in a similar manner. The VVFe responsible for their suicide had been presentedmore » to the progenitor cells only during the 4-h period of incubation, after which they were washed and plated in excess nonradioactive iron. They therefore conclude that CFU-E* themselves, and not only their progeny, are capable of actively incorporating iron. Under the same conditions in the absence of added epo, the effect of VVFe on the survival of normal spleen or marrow CFU-E could not be assessed because two few normal CFU-E survived the incubation period. Normal bone marrow cells incubated in complete medium containing epo retained their capacity for erythrocytic colony formation, and CFU-E could then be shown to be vulnerable to VVFe. Thus, either the iron-incorporating system of normal CFU-E was inducible by epo, or else epo permitted survival of the CFU-E so that the activity of a constitutive iron-incorporating system could be recognized.« less

  19. The wireless networking system of Earthquake precursor mobile field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Teng, Y.; Wang, X.; Fan, X.; Wang, X.

    2012-12-01

    The mobile field observation network could be real-time, reliably record and transmit large amounts of data, strengthen the physical signal observations in specific regions and specific period, it can improve the monitoring capacity and abnormal tracking capability. According to the features of scatter everywhere, a large number of current earthquake precursor observation measuring points, networking technology is based on wireless broadband accessing McWILL system, the communication system of earthquake precursor mobile field observation would real-time, reliably transmit large amounts of data to the monitoring center from measuring points through the connection about equipment and wireless accessing system, broadband wireless access system and precursor mobile observation management center system, thereby implementing remote instrument monitoring and data transmition. At present, the earthquake precursor field mobile observation network technology has been applied to fluxgate magnetometer array geomagnetic observations of Tianzhu, Xichang,and Xinjiang, it can be real-time monitoring the working status of the observational instruments of large area laid after the last two or three years, large scale field operation. Therefore, it can get geomagnetic field data of the local refinement regions and provide high-quality observational data for impending earthquake tracking forecast. Although, wireless networking technology is very suitable for mobile field observation with the features of simple, flexible networking etc, it also has the phenomenon of packet loss etc when transmitting a large number of observational data due to the wireless relatively weak signal and narrow bandwidth. In view of high sampling rate instruments, this project uses data compression and effectively solves the problem of data transmission packet loss; Control commands, status data and observational data transmission use different priorities and means, which control the packet loss rate within

  20. Geo-energy Test Beds: part of the European Plate Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Michael; Schofield, David; Luton, Christopher; Haslinger, Florian; Henninges, Jan; Giardini, Domenico

    2016-04-01

    For 2020, the EU has committed to cutting its greenhouse gas emissions to 20% below 1990 levels and further cuts are being decided for 2050. This commitment is one of the headline targets of the Europe 2020 growth strategy and is being implemented through binding legislation. This decarbonisation of the EU economy is one dimension of an overall EU energy and climate framework that is mutually interlinked with the need to ensure energy security, promote a fully integrated energy market, promote energy efficiency and promote research innovation and competitiveness. Power generation will have to take a particularly large part in emissions reductions (-54 to -68% by 2030 and -93 to -99% by 2050), mainly by focussing on increasing surface renewables (wind, tidal and solar) but also on carbon capture and storage on fossil fuel and biofuel power plants, shale gas, nuclear and geothermal power. All the above generation technologies share common geological challenges around containment, safety and environmental sustainability. In a densely populated continent, this means that high levels of subsurface management are needed to fully realise the energy potential. In response to this need, across Europe, public and private sector funded, experimental test and monitoring facilities and infrastructures (Geo-energy Test Beds, GETB) are being developed. These GETB investigate the processes, technology and practices that facilitate the sustainable exploitation of Geo-energy resources and are of intense interest to the public and regulators alike. The vision of EPOS IP Work Package 17 (wp17) is to promote research and innovation in Geo-energy that reflects core European energy priorities through provision of virtual access to data and protocols and trans-national access to GETB experiments. This will be achieved through provision of access to continuous strategic observations, promotion of the integrated use of data and models from European GETB, development of underpinning research

  1. Stability of erythropoietin repackaging in polypropylene syringes for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Marsili, Angela; Puorro, Giorgia; Pane, Chiara; de Rosa, Anna; Defazio, Giovanni; Casali, Carlo; Cittadini, Antonio; de Michele, Giuseppe; Florio, Brunello Ettore; Filla, Alessandro; Saccà, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    Introduction: Epoetin alfa (Eprex®) is a subcutaneous, injectable formulation of short half-life recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). To current knowledge there are no published studies regarding the stability of rHuEPO once repackaging occurs (r-EPO) for clinical trial purposes. Materials and methods: We assessed EPO concentration in Eprex® and r-EPO syringes at 0, 60, 90, and 120 days after repackaging in polypropylene syringes. R-EPO was administered to 56 patients taking part in a clinical trial in Friedreich Ataxia. Serum EPO levels were measured at baseline and 48 h after r-EPO administration. Results: No differences were found between r-EPO and Eprex® syringes, but both globally decreased in total EPO content during storage at 4 °C. Patients receiving r-EPO had similar levels in EPO content as expected from previous trials in Friedreich Ataxia and from pharmacokinetics studies in healthy volunteers. Discussion: We demonstrate that repackaging of EPO does not alter its concentration if compared to the original product (Eprex®). This is true both for repackaging procedures and for the stability in polypropylene tubes. The expiration date of r-EPO can be extended from 1 to 4 months after repackaging, in accordance with pharmacopeia rules.

  2. Observing System Forecast Experiments at the DAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Since the advent of meteorological satellites in the 1960's, numerous experiments have been conducted in order to evaluate the impact of these and other data on atmospheric analysis and prediction. Such studies have included both OSE'S and OSSE's. The OSE's were conducted to evaluate the impact of specific observations or classes of observations on analyses and forecasts. Such experiments have been performed for selected types of conventional data and for various satellite data sets as they became available. (See for example the 1989 ECMWF/EUMETSAT workshop proceedings on "The use of satellite data in operational numerical weather prediction" and the references contained therein.) The ODYSSEY were conducted to evaluate the potential for future observing systems to improve Numerical Weather Prediction NWP and to plan for the Global Weather Experiment and more recently for EVANS (Atlas et al., 1985a; Arnold and Day, 1986; Hoffman et al., 1990). In addition, OSSE's have been run to evaluate trade-offs in the design of observing systems and observing networks (Atlas and Emmitt, 1991; Rohaly and Krishnamurti, 1993), and to test new methodology for data assimilation (Atlas and Bloom, 1989).

  3. Data Services and Transnational Access for European Geosciences Multi-Scale Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funiciello, Francesca; Rosenau, Matthias; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Tesei, Telemaco; Trippanera, Daniele; Spires, Chris; Drury, Martyn; Kan-Parker, Mirjam; Lange, Otto; Willingshofer, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    The EC policy for research in the new millennium supports the development of european-scale research infrastructures. In this perspective, the existing research infrastructures are going to be integrated with the objective to increase their accessibility and to enhance the usability of their multidisciplinary data. Building up integrating Earth Sciences infrastructures in Europe is the mission of the Implementation Phase (IP) of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) project (2015-2019). The integration of european multiscale laboratories - analytical, experimental petrology and volcanology, magnetic and analogue laboratories - plays a key role in this context and represents a specific task of EPOS IP. In the frame of the WP16 of EPOS IP working package 16, European geosciences multiscale laboratories aims to be linked, merging local infrastructures into a coherent and collaborative network. In particular, the EPOS IP WP16-task 4 "Data services" aims at standardize data and data products, already existing and newly produced by the participating laboratories, and made them available through a new digital platform. The following data and repositories have been selected for the purpose: 1) analytical and properties data a) on volcanic ash from explosive eruptions, of interest to the aviation industry, meteorological and government institutes, b) on magmas in the context of eruption and lava flow hazard evaluation, and c) on rock systems of key importance in mineral exploration and mining operations; 2) experimental data describing: a) rock and fault properties of importance for modelling and forecasting natural and induced subsidence, seismicity and associated hazards, b) rock and fault properties relevant for modelling the containment capacity of rock systems for CO2, energy sources and wastes, c) crustal and upper mantle rheology as needed for modelling sedimentary basin formation and crustal stress distributions, d) the composition, porosity, permeability, and

  4. Using Telescopic Observations to Explore the Science of AGN with High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLin, K. M.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past several years the NASA E/PO Group at Sonoma State University has operated a small robotic telescope in northern Sonoma County, California. The telescope is used by high school and college instructors and their students from around the United States. Observations have been used both in classroom settings and in after-school or extracurricular activities. It has also been central over the past two summers (2009/2010) as part of a summer science internship program for Sonoma County high school students. The program gave these students an in-depth experience collecting and analyzing astronomical data. This poster describes some of the ways that the telescope has been used to make scientific measurements (as opposed to “pretty pictures”) of astronomical phenomena in high school settings. Some of the obstacles to implementing a set of astronomical observations in the high school classroom will be described, as will the steps we have taken to overcome them. Information is provided on how instructors can become involved in using the telescope and what support is available to help them get started in their classes.

  5. The production of recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, N; Takeuchi, M; Ohashi, H; Suzuki, T

    1995-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is the glycoprotein hormone that promotes differentiation of erythroid progenitor cells in bone marrow. The normal kidney produces EPO to maintain erythrocyte for oxygen supply. This hormone activity was found in the serum of anemic animals in the 1890s. Renal failure results in severe anemia because of reduced EPO production, therefore anemia patients expected EPO treatment for long time. However, this was difficult due to the limited amount of EPO. Many researchers have tried to isolate EPO since the 1950s. Finally Miyake and Goldwasser purified highly active EPO from the urine of aplastic anemia patients. Since then, the characteristics and structural information from the purified material accelerated the cloning of the EPO gene. Mammalian cells were essential to produce EPO, because EPO contains 40% carbohydrate that plays some important roles in its activity, stability and biosynthesis. In 1984, two groups succeeded in cloning the EPO gene and expressing this gene in mammalian cells. Recombinant human EPO is currently available for anemia treatment. In this paper, we review production in mammalian cells, molecular characterization, especially carbohydrate moieties, and clinical applications of recombinant EPO.

  6. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Andrew E.; Behnke, Jeanne; Lowe, Dawn; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has been a central component of NASA Earth observation program for over 10 years. It is one of the largest civilian science information system in the US, performing ingest, archive and distribution of over 3 terabytes of data per day much of which is from NASA s flagship missions Terra, Aqua and Aura. The system supports a variety of science disciplines including polar processes, land cover change, radiation budget, and most especially global climate change. The EOSDIS data centers, collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, archive and distribute standard data products produced by science investigator-led processing systems. Key to the success of EOSDIS is the concept of core versus community requirements. EOSDIS supports a core set of services to meet specific NASA needs and relies on community-developed services to meet specific user needs. EOSDIS offers a metadata registry, ECHO (Earth Observing System Clearinghouse), through which the scientific community can easily discover and exchange NASA s Earth science data and services. Users can search, manage, and access the contents of ECHO s registries (data and services) through user-developed and community-tailored interfaces or clients. The ECHO framework has become the primary access point for cross-Data Center search-and-order of EOSDIS and other Earth Science data holdings archived at the EOSDIS data centers. ECHO s Warehouse Inventory Search Tool (WIST) is the primary web-based client for discovering and ordering cross-discipline data from the EOSDIS data centers. The architecture of the EOSDIS provides a platform for the publication, discovery, understanding and access to NASA s Earth Observation resources and allows for easy integration of new datasets. The EOSDIS also has developed several methods for incorporating socioeconomic data into its data collection. Over the years, we have developed several methods for determining

  7. NASDA's earth observation satellite data archive policy for the earth observation data and information system (EOIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobue, Shin-ichi; Yoshida, Fumiyoshi; Ochiai, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    NASDA's new Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) is scheduled for launch in August, 1996. ADEOS carries 8 sensors to observe earth environmental phenomena and sends their data to NASDA, NASA, and other foreign ground stations around the world. The downlink data bit rate for ADEOS is 126 MB/s and the total volume of data is about 100 GB per day. To archive and manage such a large quantity of data with high reliability and easy accessibility it was necessary to develop a new mass storage system with a catalogue information database using advanced database management technology. The data will be archived and maintained in the Master Data Storage Subsystem (MDSS) which is one subsystem in NASDA's new Earth Observation data and Information System (EOIS). The MDSS is based on a SONY ID1 digital tape robotics system. This paper provides an overview of the EOIS system, with a focus on the Master Data Storage Subsystem and the NASDA Earth Observation Center (EOC) archive policy for earth observation satellite data.

  8. Expression of erythropoietin and its receptor in the brain of late-gestation fetal sheep, and responses to asphyxia caused by umbilical cord occlusion.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Meléndez, Margie; Yan, Edwin; Walker, David W

    2005-01-01

    Asphyxia and hypoxia are common threats faced by the fetus in utero. In late-gestation fetal sheep, asphyxia produced by umbilical cord occlusion (UCO) results in widespread lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. Adaptive mechanisms that might limit fetal brain damage include induction of the hemopoietic cytokine, erythropoietin (EPO). In unanesthetized fetal sheep, we investigated if 1 or 2 bouts of brief asphyxia (UCO for 10 min) induced EPO and EPO type I receptor (EPO-R) expressions, with the second UCO repeated 48 h after the first. Fetal brains were recovered 48 h after either sham, 1 x or 2 x UCO at 129-133 (term approximately 147) days of gestation and prepared for immunocytochemistry. In age-matched control brain, low levels of EPO and EPO-R proteins were present in oligodendrocytes (OLs), periventricular and cortical white matter (WM), with no EPO and very low EPO-R expression in neurons. After 1 x UCO, EPO and EPO-R expressions were increased in astrocytes (periventricular and cortical WM, striatum, corpus callosum), choroid plexus epithelial cells, scattered neurons in cortical layers IV-VI, hippocampal CA1 neurons, and in the molecular and granule layers of the cerebellum. After 2 x UCO, higher levels of EPO and EPO-R occurred in the periventricular and cortical WM, corpus callosum, hippocampal CA1, and in neurons of all cortical layers. Paradoxically, EPO and EPO-R were now lower in hippocampal CA1 neurons and cerebellar molecular and granule cell layers. Few OLs expressed EPO or EPO-R after 1 x or 2 x UCO. Thus, brief asphyxia induces EPO and EPO-R in fetal astrocytes, but only after repeated asphyxial insult in neurons. Whether this is a response to increased injury, or represents an adaptive response that limits further cell death and brain damage awaits further investigation.

  9. Role of erythropoietin in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Constance Tom; Asavaritikrai, Pundit; Teng, Ruifeng; Jia, Yi

    2007-01-01

    Multi-tissue erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R) expression provides for erythropoietin (EPO) activity beyond its known regulation of red blood cell production. This review highlights the role of EPO and EPO-R in brain development and neuroprotection. EPO-R brain expression includes neural progenitor cells (NPC), neurons, glial cells and endothelial cells. EPO is produced in brain in a hypoxia sensitive manner, stimulates NPC proliferation and differentiation, and neuron survival, and contributes to ischemic preconditioning. Mice lacking EPO or EPO-R exhibit increased neural cell apoptosis during development before embryonic death due to severe anemia. EPO administration provides neural protection in animal models of brain ischemia and trauma, reducing the extent of injury and damage. EPO stimulation of endothelial cells contributes to neuroprotection and is of particular importance since only low levels of EPO appear to cross the blood-brain barrier when administered at high dose intravenously. The therapeutic potential of EPO for brain ischemia/trauma and neurodegenerative diseases has shown promise in early clinical trial and awaits further validation. PMID:17482474

  10. Erythropoietin and the use of a transgenic model of erythropoietin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Aurélien; Jeton, Florine; El Hasnaoui-Saadani, Raja; Hagström, Luciana; Launay, Thierry; Beaudry, Michèle; Marchant, Dominique; Quidu, Patricia; Macarlupu, Jose-Luis; Favret, Fabrice; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Voituron, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Despite its well-known role in red blood cell production, it is now accepted that erythropoietin (Epo) has other physiological functions. Epo and its receptors are expressed in many tissues, such as the brain and heart. The presence of Epo/Epo receptors in these organs suggests other roles than those usually assigned to this protein. Thus, the aim of this review is to describe the effects of Epo deficiency on adaptation to normoxic and hypoxic environments and to suggest a key role of Epo on main physiological adaptive functions. Our original model of Epo-deficient (Epo-TAgh) mice allowed us to improve our knowledge of the possible role of Epo in O2 homeostasis. The use of anemic transgenic mice revealed Epo as a crucial component of adaptation to hypoxia. Epo-TAgh mice survive well in hypoxic conditions despite low hematocrit. Furthermore, Epo plays a key role in neural control of ventilatory acclimatization and response to hypoxia, in deformability of red blood cells, in cerebral and cardiac angiogenesis, and in neuro- and cardioprotection. PMID:27800506

  11. HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS OBSERVING SYSTEM PILOT PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HABSOS Pilot Project is being developed through a partnership of federal, state and academic organizations as proof-of-concept for a coastal observing system in the Gulf of Mexico. The goal is to design a HAB data management system and develop the regional communication infra...

  12. Earth Observation System Flight Dynamics System Covariance Realism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaidi, Waqar H.; Tracewell, David

    2016-01-01

    This presentation applies a covariance realism technique to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observation System (EOS) Aqua and Aura spacecraft based on inferential statistics. The technique consists of three parts: collection calculation of definitive state estimates through orbit determination, calculation of covariance realism test statistics at each covariance propagation point, and proper assessment of those test statistics.

  13. Effect of erythropoietin on the survival of retinal neurocytes in culture upon serum withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yi-Sheng; Yao, Hui-Ping; Deng, Lian-Fu; Cheng, Yu; Min, Ying-Jun

    2010-07-01

    To clarify whether erythropoietin (EPO) could substitute for the serum component in cultured retinal neurocytes suffering from serum withdrawal. The study was performed in the Shanghai Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics, Shanghai, China between April 2008 and March 2009. A total of 160 postnatal 2-3 day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were used for this study. After the retinal neurocytes were cultured for 48 hours, the culture media was replaced with serum-free media, and the cells were exposed to 1 U/ml, 3 U/ml, and 6 U/ml EPO for another 24 or 48 hours, the cell body diameter was then assessed using a computerized image-analysis system, and the survival and apoptosis rates of those cells were estimated by method of transcription and translation assay and flow cytometry. Immunocytochemistry was used to detect EPO and erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) expression. The retinal neurocytes had obvious EPO/ EPOR expression. The early (p = 0.002) and total (p = 0.049) apoptosis rates of retinal neurocytes cultured with serum withdrawal were significantly higher than that of neurocytes cultured with serum, and the cell viability of neurocytes cultured with serum withdrawal was significantly lower than that of neurocytes cultured with serum (p = 0.047). The EPO had no effect on the cell body diameter of cultured retinal neurocytes. The cell viability and the apoptosis rates of retinal neurocytes were not significantly different from that of simple serum-withdrawal culture at any EPO concentration. As the addition of EPO immediately after serum withdrawal had no effect in preventing retinal neurocytes apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal, EPO cannot substitute for the serum component.

  14. Weather Observation Systems and Efficiency of Fighting Forest Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarov, N.; Moltchanova, E.; Obersteiner, M.

    2007-12-01

    Weather observation is an essential component of modern forest fire management systems. Satellite and in-situ based weather observation systems might help to reduce forest loss, human casualties and destruction of economic capital. In this paper, we develop and apply a methodology to assess the benefits of various weather observation systems on reductions of burned area due to early fire detection. In particular, we consider a model where the air patrolling schedule is determined by a fire hazard index. The index is computed from gridded daily weather data for the area covering parts Spain and Portugal. We conduct a number of simulation experiments. First, the resolution of the original data set is artificially reduced. The reduction of the total forest burned area associated with air patrolling based on a finer weather grid indicates the benefit of using higher spatially resolved weather observations. Second, we consider a stochastic model to simulate forest fires and explore the sensitivity of the model with respect to the quality of input data. The analysis of combination of satellite and ground monitoring reveals potential cost saving due to a "system of systems effect" and substantial reduction in burned area. Finally, we estimate the marginal improvement schedule for loss of life and economic capital as a function of the improved fire observing system.

  15. Current systematic carbon-cycle observations and the need for implementing a policy-relevant carbon observing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciais, P.; Dolman, A. J.; Bombelli, A.; Duren, R.; Peregon, A.; Rayner, P. J.; Miller, C.; Gobron, N.; Kinderman, G.; Marland, G.; Gruber, N.; Chevallier, F.; Andres, R. J.; Balsamo, G.; Bopp, L.; Bréon, F.-M.; Broquet, G.; Dargaville, R.; Battin, T. J.; Borges, A.; Bovensmann, H.; Buchwitz, M.; Butler, J.; Canadell, J. G.; Cook, R. B.; DeFries, R.; Engelen, R.; Gurney, K. R.; Heinze, C.; Heimann, M.; Held, A.; Henry, M.; Law, B.; Luyssaert, S.; Miller, J.; Moriyama, T.; Moulin, C.; Myneni, R. B.; Nussli, C.; Obersteiner, M.; Ojima, D.; Pan, Y.; Paris, J.-D.; Piao, S. L.; Poulter, B.; Plummer, S.; Quegan, S.; Raymond, P.; Reichstein, M.; Rivier, L.; Sabine, C.; Schimel, D.; Tarasova, O.; Valentini, R.; Wang, R.; van der Werf, G.; Wickland, D.; Williams, M.; Zehner, C.

    2014-07-01

    A globally integrated carbon observation and analysis system is needed to improve the fundamental understanding of the global carbon cycle, to improve our ability to project future changes, and to verify the effectiveness of policies aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase carbon sequestration. Building an integrated carbon observation system requires transformational advances from the existing sparse, exploratory framework towards a dense, robust, and sustained system in all components: anthropogenic emissions, the atmosphere, the ocean, and the terrestrial biosphere. The paper is addressed to scientists, policymakers, and funding agencies who need to have a global picture of the current state of the (diverse) carbon observations. We identify the current state of carbon observations, and the needs and notional requirements for a global integrated carbon observation system that can be built in the next decade. A key conclusion is the substantial expansion of the ground-based observation networks required to reach the high spatial resolution for CO2 and CH4 fluxes, and for carbon stocks for addressing policy-relevant objectives, and attributing flux changes to underlying processes in each region. In order to establish flux and stock diagnostics over areas such as the southern oceans, tropical forests, and the Arctic, in situ observations will have to be complemented with remote-sensing measurements. Remote sensing offers the advantage of dense spatial coverage and frequent revisit. A key challenge is to bring remote-sensing measurements to a level of long-term consistency and accuracy so that they can be efficiently combined in models to reduce uncertainties, in synergy with ground-based data. Bringing tight observational constraints on fossil fuel and land use change emissions will be the biggest challenge for deployment of a policy-relevant integrated carbon observation system. This will require in situ and remotely sensed data at much higher

  16. Incorporating Parallel Computing into the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Jay W.

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric data assimilation is a method of combining actual observations with model forecasts to produce a more accurate description of the earth system than the observations or forecast alone can provide. The output of data assimilation, sometimes called the analysis, are regular, gridded datasets of observed and unobserved variables. Analysis plays a key role in numerical weather prediction and is becoming increasingly important for climate research. These applications, and the need for timely validation of scientific enhancements to the data assimilation system pose computational demands that are best met by distributed parallel software. The mission of the NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO) is to provide datasets for climate research and to support NASA satellite and aircraft missions. The system used to create these datasets is the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). The core components of the the GEOS DAS are: the GEOS General Circulation Model (GCM), the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS), the Observer, the on-line Quality Control (QC) system, the Coupler (which feeds analysis increments back to the GCM), and an I/O package for processing the large amounts of data the system produces (which will be described in another presentation in this session). The discussion will center on the following issues: the computational complexity for the whole GEOS DAS, assessment of the performance of the individual elements of GEOS DAS, and parallelization strategy for some of the components of the system.

  17. Virtual Observation System for Earth System Model: An Application to ACME Land Model Simulations

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wang, Dali; Yuan, Fengming; Hernandez, Benjamin

    Investigating and evaluating physical-chemical-biological processes within an Earth system model (EMS) can be very challenging due to the complexity of both model design and software implementation. A virtual observation system (VOS) is presented to enable interactive observation of these processes during system simulation. Based on advance computing technologies, such as compiler-based software analysis, automatic code instrumentation, and high-performance data transport, the VOS provides run-time observation capability, in-situ data analytics for Earth system model simulation, model behavior adjustment opportunities through simulation steering. A VOS for a terrestrial land model simulation within the Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy model is also presentedmore » to demonstrate the implementation details and system innovations.« less

  18. Virtual Observation System for Earth System Model: An Application to ACME Land Model Simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Dali; Yuan, Fengming; Hernandez, Benjamin; ...

    2017-01-01

    Investigating and evaluating physical-chemical-biological processes within an Earth system model (EMS) can be very challenging due to the complexity of both model design and software implementation. A virtual observation system (VOS) is presented to enable interactive observation of these processes during system simulation. Based on advance computing technologies, such as compiler-based software analysis, automatic code instrumentation, and high-performance data transport, the VOS provides run-time observation capability, in-situ data analytics for Earth system model simulation, model behavior adjustment opportunities through simulation steering. A VOS for a terrestrial land model simulation within the Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy model is also presentedmore » to demonstrate the implementation details and system innovations.« less

  19. Observation and integrated Earth-system science: A roadmap for 2016-2025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Adrian; Fellous, Jean-Louis; Ramaswamy, Venkatachalam; Trenberth, Kevin; Asrar, Ghassem; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Burrows, John P.; Ciais, Philippe; Drinkwater, Mark; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gobron, Nadine; Guilyardi, Eric; Halpern, David; Heimann, Martin; Johannessen, Johnny; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Penner, Joyce; Scholes, Robert; Shepherd, Ted

    2016-05-01

    This report is the response to a request by the Committee on Space Research of the International Council for Science to prepare a roadmap on observation and integrated Earth-system science for the coming ten years. Its focus is on the combined use of observations and modelling to address the functioning, predictability and projected evolution of interacting components of the Earth system on timescales out to a century or so. It discusses how observations support integrated Earth-system science and its applications, and identifies planned enhancements to the contributing observing systems and other requirements for observations and their processing. All types of observation are considered, but emphasis is placed on those made from space. The origins and development of the integrated view of the Earth system are outlined, noting the interactions between the main components that lead to requirements for integrated science and modelling, and for the observations that guide and support them. What constitutes an Earth-system model is discussed. Summaries are given of key cycles within the Earth system. The nature of Earth observation and the arrangements for international coordination essential for effective operation of global observing systems are introduced. Instances are given of present types of observation, what is already on the roadmap for 2016-2025 and some of the issues to be faced. Observations that are organised on a systematic basis and observations that are made for process understanding and model development, or other research or demonstration purposes, are covered. Specific accounts are given for many of the variables of the Earth system. The current status and prospects for Earth-system modelling are summarized. The evolution towards applying Earth-system models for environmental monitoring and prediction as well as for climate simulation and projection is outlined. General aspects of the improvement of models, whether through refining the

  20. Communities of Practice Transition Online - Lessons learned from NASA's EPO Online Workspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth Forum Education and Public Outreach (EP/O) community has long interacted to better their practice as a community as well as individually. Working together to share knowledge and grow, they function as a community of practice. In 2009, NASA designed and implemented an online workspace in hopes of promoting the communities continued interactions. This study examines the role of an online workspace component of a community in the work of a community of practice. Much has been studied revealing the importance of communities of practice to organizations, project success, and knowledge management and some of these same successes hold true for virtual communities of practice. Study participants were 75 Education and Public Outreach community members of NASA's Science Mission Directorate Earth Forum. In this mixed methods study, online workspace metrics were used to track participation and a survey completed by 21 members was used to quantify participation. For a more detailed analysis, 15 community members (five highly active users, five average users, and five infrequent users) selected based on survey responses, were interviewed. Finally, survey data was gathered from seven online facilitators to understand their role in the community. Data collected from these 21 community members and five facilitating members suggest that highly active users (logging into the workspace daily), were more likely to have transformative experiences, co-create knowledge, feel ownership of community knowledge, have extended opportunities for community exchange, and find new forms of evaluation. Average users shared some similar characteristics with both the highly active members and infrequent users, representing a group in transition as they become more engaged and active in the online workspace. Inactive users viewed the workspace as having little value, being difficult to navigate, being mainly for gaining basic information about events and community news, and as another demand

  1. Erythropoietin reduces anemia and transfusions after chemotherapy with paclitaxel and carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, F R; Dunleavy, T L; Harrison, B R; Boyd, J H; Varvares, M A; Dunphy, C H; Rodriguez, J J; McDonough, E M; Minster, J R; McGrady, M D

    1997-04-15

    The authors report on anemia observed during preoperative paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy in patients with advanced head and neck carcinoma and discuss how the use of recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) ameliorates this anemia, reducing the need for subsequent packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions. Response to r-HuEPO was defined as reduced hemoglobin fall during preoperative chemotherapy and reduced transfusion requirements during surgery. Thirty-six patients with advanced head and neck carcinoma were evaluable after treatment with preoperative chemotherapy using paclitaxel and carboplatin. Group 1 was comprised of 14 patients who empirically received r-HuEPO at a dose of 150 U/kg 3 times per week for 3 weeks; in patients deemed nonresponders, the dose was increased to 300 U/kg and 450 U/kg in the subsequent courses. Group 2 was comprised of 22 patients who did not receive r-HuEPO. During preoperative chemotherapy, the mean hemoglobin fall was 0.5 g/dL in Group 1 (P = 0.40). In Group 2 there was a statistically significant mean hemoglobin fall of 3.3 g/dL (P < 0.0001). There was also a nonstatistically significant trend toward fewer PRBC transfusions: none of 14 patients (0%) in Group 1 versus 4 of 22 patients (18%) in Group 2 (P = 0.141). A significant fall in hemoglobin and an increase in the need for transfusions were observed in head and neck carcinoma patients receiving carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy prior to surgery. Empiric r-HuEPO therapy appeared to prevent anemia and reduced the need for PRBC transfusions.

  2. Nonlinear observer designs for fuel cell power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgun, Haluk

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical device that combines hydrogen and oxygen, with the aid of electro-catalysts, to produce electricity. A fuel cell consists of a negatively charged anode, a positively charged cathode and an electrolyte, which transports protons or ions. A low temperature fuel cell has an electrical potential of about 0.7 Volt when generating a current density of 300--500 mA/cm2. Practical fuel cell power systems will require a combination of several cells in series (a stack) to satisfy the voltage requirements of specific applications. Fuel cells are suitable for a potentially wide variety of applications, from stationary power generation in the range of hundreds of megawatts to portable electronics in the range of a couple of watts. Efficient operation of a fuel cell system requires advanced feedback control designs. Reliable measurements from the system are necessary to implement such designs. However, most of the commercially available sensors do not operate properly in the reformate and humidified gas streams in fuel cell systems. Sensors working varying degrees of success are too big and costly, and sensors that are potentially low cost are not reliable or do not have the required life time [28]. Observer designs would eliminate sensor needs for measurements, and make feedback control implementable. Since the fuel cell system dynamics are highly nonlinear, observer design is not an easy task. In this study we aim to develop nonlinear observer design methods applicable to fuel cell systems. In part I of the thesis we design an observer to estimate the hydrogen partial pressure in the anode channel. We treat inlet partial pressure as an unknown slowly varying parameter and develop an adaptive observer that employs a nonlinear voltage injection term. However in this design Fuel Processing System (FPS) dynamics are not modelled, and their effect on the anode dynamics are treated as plant uncertainty. In part II of the thesis we study the FPS

  3. Carbon Dioxide Observational Platform System (CO-OPS), feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, D. L.; Hall, D. W.; Mcelveen, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Observational Platform System (CO-OPS) is a near-space, geostationary, multi-user, unmanned microwave powered monitoring platform system. This systems engineering feasibility study addressed identified existing requirements such as: carbon dioxide observational data requirements, communications requirements, and eye-in-the-sky requirements of other groups like the Defense Department, the Forestry Service, and the Coast Guard. In addition, potential applications in: earth system science, space system sciences, and test and verification (satellite sensors and data management techniques) were considered. The eleven month effort is summarized. Past work and methods of gathering the required observational data were assessed and rough-order-of magnitude cost estimates have shown the CO-OPS system to be most cost effective (less than $30 million within a 10 year lifetime). It was also concluded that there are no technical, schedule, or obstacles that would prevent achieving the objectives of the total 5-year CO-OPS program.

  4. Recombinant erythropoietin and analogues: a challenge for doping control.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J A; Belalcazar, V; de Bolos, C; Gutiérrez, R; Llop, E; Segura, J

    2004-04-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) increases the number of circulating erythrocytes and thus muscle oxygenation. The availability of the recombinant protein (rEPO) has increased the risk of its illegal use in sports, its detection being a difficult challenge. Five different hematopoietic parameters were initially chosen as indirect markers of rEPO abuse: concentration of serum EPO, concentration of serum-soluble transferrin receptors (sTFr), hematocrit, percentage of reticulocytes, and percentage of macrocytes. New models considering only hemoglobin, serum EPO concentration, and percentage of reticulocytes are simpler and seem to be more sensitive when low doses of rEPO are used. A more direct method of urine analysis (isoelectrofocusing, double blotting, and chemiluminescent detection) based on the charge differences between rEPO and endogenous EPO, related to their carbohydrate composition, provides proof of rEPO use. Furthermore, this approach permits the detection of darbepoetin, a direct analogue of EPO also known as NESP ("new erythropoiesis stimulating protein"). Recently a protein conjugate, "synthetic erythropoiesis protein" (SEP), containing precision-length, monodisperse, negatively charged polymers instead of oligosaccharides has been synthesized. Finally, EPO-mimetics are molecules capable of acting as EPO in dimerizing the EPO receptor. Two kinds of EPO-mimetics have been described: peptides and nonpeptides. The enhancement of oxygen availability to muscles by rEPO, analogues, and mimetics constitutes one of the main challenges to doping control. Major steps have already been developed for detection ofrEPO and some analogues. In the near future, the transfection to an athlete's body of genes that code for erythropoietin might be an emerging doping issue, and sports authorities have incorporated "gene doping" among the prohibited practices.

  5. [Erythropoietin treatment for late anaemia after haemolytic disease of the newborn].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Domínguez, E; Pérez Fernández, J M; Figueras Aloy, J; Carbonell Estrany, X

    2010-12-01

    After several years of erythropoietin (EPO) use in the prophylaxis of anaemia of prematurity, it also began to be administered to treat post-haemolytic disease anaemia of the newborn in order to avoid blood transfusions. To show the results obtained with EPO treatment in post-haemolytic disease anemia of the newborn. Observational study in 13 newborns with late anaemia due to an hemolytic disease caused by Rh isoimmunization (9 cases), AB0 isoimmunization (2 cases), glucose-6-P-dehydrogenase deficiency (1 case) or idiopathic (1 case). The newborns began EPO treatment when they reached the haematocrit level for a blood transfusion. EPO treatment was started at 26±7 days of life (15-46), with a haematocrit value of 21.7±3% (18-27) and a reticulocyte count of 3.8±2.2%. Blood transfusion was not necessary in 11 newborns (haematocrit of 30.7±4.4% and reticulocytes of 5.9±1.4%), and only 2 newborns were admitted for a blood transfusion (haematocrit 18±4.4% and reticulocytes 0.6%). Significant increases in haemoglobin and reticulocyte figures were seen after EPO treatment. EPO administration proved useful to avoid blood transfusion in 84% of treated newborns. No adverse events were detected which could be attributed to this treatment,. Copyright © 2010 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels in haemodialysis patients treated with erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Horina, J H; Schwaberger, G; Brussee, H; Sauseng-Fellegger, G; Holzer, H; Krejs, G J

    1993-01-01

    The efficacy of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) for the treatment of renal anaemia is well established. To assess the effect of rHuEpo treatment on physical performance we evaluated physical working capacity, oxygen uptake and red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) values at rest and during and after exercise on a bicycle spiroergometer in eight chronically haemodialysed patients. Follow-up examination was carried out after a mean of 14 weeks (range 9-19 weeks), when mean haemoglobin had increased from 7.8 to a stable value of 13.0 g/dl in response to rHuEpo treatment (P < 0.001). Physical working capacity and oxygen uptake at the anaerobic threshold (4 mmol/l blood lactate concentration) increased from 68 +/- 12 to 80 +/- 16 watts and 0.95 +/- 0.14 to 1.10 +/- 0.20 l/min, respectively (P < 0.01). DPG, which determines oxygen affinity to haemoglobin in red cells, increased by 13% from 13.7 +/- 1.5 to 15.5 +/- 2.2 mumol/g Hb (P < 0.05). With maximal exercise mean DPG values significantly decreased to a much lower level without rHuEpo treatment than after correction of anaemia. Therefore rHuEpo treatment results both in better oxygen transport capacity and reduced intraerythrocytic oxygen affinity, which is followed by improved oxygen delivery to tissues per unit of haemoglobin. These effects may explain the improvement of exercise capacity observed in dialysis patients after rHuEpo treatment.

  7. Erythropoietin plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes. Identification of a subgroup of responders. The Spanish Erythropathology Group.

    PubMed

    Remacha, A F; Arrizabalaga, B; Villegas, A; Manteiga, R; Calvo, T; Julià, A; Fernández Fuertes, I; González, F A; Font, L; Juncà, J; del Arco, A; Malcorra, J J; Equiza, E P; de Mendiguren, B P; Romero, M

    1999-12-01

    Anemia leading to transfusion is probably the most important problem in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEpo) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) have been used to treat patients with anemia of MDS, but fewer than 50% respond. The aim of this work was to evaluate the benefit of rHuEpo +/- G-CSF treatment and to isolate the response predictive variables in a group of selected patients with MDS. A non-randomized multicenter trial was carried out in 32 patients with MDS. The inclusion criteria were age >= 18 years, refractory anemia (RA) or refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, Hb <= 100 g/L or receiving transfusions and serum erythropoietin <= 250 U/L. These patients were treated with subcutaneous rHuEpo (300 U/kg) three times a week for 8 weeks. In the case of partial response (PR) or no response (NR) subcutaneosly administered G-CSF (1 microg/kg) three times a week was added to the rHuEpo for 8 more weeks. If the patient achieved complete response (CR) or PR in the second phase, he was included in a follow-up phase of 24 weeks in which the dose of growth factors was tapered down. Several variables, including the score published by the Scandinavian-American group, were used as possible predictive variables. An erythroid response was observed in 16 patients (50%); in 12 it was a CR and in 4 it was a PR. During the period of rHuEpo administration, 7 CR and 4 PR (34.4%) were documented. Of the 14 patients in whom G-CSF was added to rHuEpo, 7 (50%) responded (3 CR and 4 PR). No major side-effects associated with growth factors were observed. The multivariate analysis showed that of the different variables evaluated only the Scandinavian-American response score was significant with a relative probability of response of 11.8 (95% confident intervals: 2.5-53) when this score was > +1 (77% of cases responded). In contrast, when this score was <= 1 only 15 % of the cases responded. Use of the Scandinavian

  8. Large-Scale Sequencing of Two Regions in Human Chromosome 7q22: Analysis of 650 kb of Genomic Sequence around the EPO and CUTL1 Loci Reveals 17 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Glöckner, Gernot; Scherer, Stephen; Schattevoy, Ruben; Boright, Andrew; Weber, Jacqueline; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Rosenthal, André

    1998-01-01

    We have sequenced and annotated two genomic regions located in the Giemsa negative band q22 of human chromosome 7. The first region defined by the erythropoietin (EPO) locus is 228 kb in length and contains 13 genes. Whereas 3 genes (GNB2, EPO, PCOLCE) were known previously on the mRNA level, we have been able to identify 10 novel genes using a newly developed automatic annotation tool RUMMAGE-DP, which comprises >26 different programs mainly for exon prediction, homology searches, and compositional and repeat analysis. For precise annotation we have also resequenced ESTs identified to the region and assembled them to build large cDNAs. In addition, we have investigated the differential splicing of genes. Using these tools we annotated 4 of the 10 genes as a zonadhesin, a transferrin homolog, a nucleoporin-like gene, and an actin gene. Two genes showed weak similarity to an insulin-like receptor and a neuronal protein with a leucine-rich amino-terminal domain. Four predicted genes (CDS1–CDS4) CDS that have been confirmed on the mRNA level showed no similarity to known proteins and a potential function could not be assigned. The second region in 7q22 defined by the CUTL1 (CCAAT displacement protein and its splice variant) locus is 416 kb in length and contains three known genes, including PMSL12, APS, CUTL1, and a novel gene (CDS5). The CUTL1 locus, consisting of two splice variants (CDP and CASP), occupies >300 kb. Based on the G,C profile an isochore switch can be defined between the CUTL1 gene and the APS and PMSL12 genes. [Clones 37G3, 164c7, and 235f8 are deposited in GenBank under accession no. AF053356; clone 123e15, accession no. AF024533; 186d2, accession no. AF024534; 46f6, accession no. AF006752; 50h2, accession no. AF047825; and 76h2, accession no. AF030453] PMID:9799793

  9. JWST Planetary Observations Within the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan; Hammel, Heidi; Schaller, Emily; Sonneborn, George; Orton, Glenn; Rieke, George; Rieke, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    JWST provides capabilities unmatched by other telescopic facilities in the near to mid infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Its combination of broad wavelength range, high sensitivity and near diffraction-limited imaging around two microns wavelength make it a high value facility for a variety of Solar System targets. Beyond Neptune, a class of cold, large bodies that include Pluto, Triton and Eris exhibits surface deposits of nitrogen, methane, and other molecules that are poorly observed from the ground, but for which JWST might provide spectral mapping at high sensitivity and spatial resolution difficult to match with the current generation of ground-based observatories. The observatory will also provide unique sensitivity in a variety of near and mid infrared windows for observing relatively deep into the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune, searching there for minor species. It will examine the Jovian aurora in a wavelength regime where the background atmosphere is dark. Special provision of a subarray observing strategy may allow observation of Jupiter and Saturn over a larger wavelength range despite their large surface brightnesses, allowing for detailed observation of transient phenomena including large scale storms and impact-generation disturbances. JWST's observations of Saturn's moon Titan will overlap with and go beyond the 2017 end-of-mission for Cassini, providing an important extension to the time-series of meteorological studies for much of northern hemisphere summer. It will overlap with a number of other planetary missions to targets for which JWST can make unique types of observations. JWST provides a platform for linking solar system and extrasolar planet studies through its unique observational capabilities in both arenas.

  10. Computerized Systems for Collecting Real-Time Observational Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahng, SungWoo; Iwata, Brian

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 15 developers of computerized real-time observation systems found many systems have incorporated laptop or handheld computers as well as bar-code scanners. Most systems used IBM-compatible software, and ranged from free to complete systems costing more than $1,500. Data analysis programs were included with most programs. (Author/CR)

  11. A net-centric syste