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Sample records for obsessive-compulsive disorder extending

  1. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Overview What is obsessive-compulsive disorder? Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an illness that causes people to have unwanted thoughts (obsessions) ...

  2. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder KidsHealth > For Teens > Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Print A ... Diagnosing OCD Getting Therapy for OCD What Is Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder? Everyone feels anxiety, fear, uncertainty, or worry at ...

  3. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2 million American adults have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a brain disorder that often begins in childhood. The persistent, ... be personalized. Imaging studies show that people with OCD have differences in specific brain areas, compared with other people. Successfully treated patients ...

  4. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. [Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strock, Margaret

    This booklet provides an overview of the causes, symptoms, and incidence of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and addresses the key features of OCD, including obsessions, compulsions, realizations of senselessness, resistance, and shame and secrecy. Research findings into the causes of OCD are reviewed which indicate that the brains of…

  5. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... help determine specific, personalized treatments to treat OCD. Environment People who have experienced abuse (physical or sexual) in childhood or other trauma are at an increased risk for developing OCD. In some ... About Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) CBT Boosts ...

  6. [Obsessive compulsive disorders].

    PubMed

    1993-07-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD) are a nosographic entity. Their biological rating in serotonergic pathways and the efficacy of serotonergic antidepressants allows for developing a clinical and biological models of OCD. J. Guyotat, one of the first in 1959 to observe the favorable effects of antidepressants on OCD, presents their history. Epidemiological surveys conducted since 1980 have shown that the prevalence of OCD was underestimated until then. The prevalence is 2 to 3% in the adult population, with more women affected. The disorder develops early in childhood and adolescence. Loss of time is an important criteria for OCD but, according to M. Bourgeois, who reviewed the symptoms precisely, this does not warrant identifying a separate "primary obsessive slowness" syndrome. According to M. Bouvard, the prognosis of the disorder, in contrast to that for rituals observed in children between 3 and 5 years of age, is poor, with a risk of chronicity and social disturbances. The prevalence of OCD in children and adolescents is 0.8% and remains stable. The comorbidity, in particular with tics, is discussed. The favorable effects of fluoxetine are reported. J.M. Chignon reviews the concept of comorbidity, developed in internal medicine, and explains that it could be rigorously applied to psychiatry only starting with the DSM III-R. The comorbidity of OCD with other psychiatric diseases is highly variable: it is reviewed for personality disorders (0 to 55%), schizophrenia (4%), substance abuse (10%) and especially depression: one third of patients with OCD will develop a major depressive episode. Based on a clinical case report, M. Faruch leads us from symptoms to behavior therapy. The symptom must be considered for itself, whether it is part or not of the obsessive neurosis. It is legitimate to use antidepressants in combination with behavior therapy.

  7. Obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrea; King, Audrey; Hollander, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The obsessive-compulsive spectrum is an important concept referring to a number of disorders drawn from several diagnostic categories that share core obsessive-compulsive features. These disorders can be grouped by the focus of their symptoms: bodily preoccupation, impulse control, or neurological disorders. Although the disorders are clearly distinct from one another, they have intriguing similarities in phenomenology, etiology, pathophysiology, patient characteristics, and treatment response. In combination with the knowledge gained through many years of research on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), the concept of a spectrum has generated much fruitful research on the spectrum disorders. It has become apparent that these disorders can also be viewed as being on a continuum of compulsivity to impulsivity, characterized by harm avoidance at the compulsive end and risk seeking at the impulsive end. The compulsive and impulsive disorders differ in systematic ways that are just beginning to be understood. Here, we review these concepts and several representative obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders including both compulsive and impulsive disorders, as well as the three different symptom clusters: OCD, body dysmorphic disorder, pathological gambling, sexual compulsivity, and autism spectrum disorders. PMID:22033547

  8. Psilocybin and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, James Allen

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric disorder with considerable morbidity and mortality. This condition disables many individuals and is often refractory to treatment. Research suggests that serotonin plays a role in OCD symptom reduction. We present a case of an individual who successfully used psilocybin, a serotonergic agent, to reduce the core symptoms of OCD for several years. Although not endorsing this form of treatment, we feel that the successful use of this agent highlights the role of serotonergic factors in OCD and the need for further, legitimate research into the value of psilocybin in the treatment of anxiety disorders. PMID:25364991

  9. Psilocybin and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, James Allen

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric disorder with considerable morbidity and mortality. This condition disables many individuals and is often refractory to treatment. Research suggests that serotonin plays a role in OCD symptom reduction. We present a case of an individual who successfully used psilocybin, a serotonergic agent, to reduce the core symptoms of OCD for several years. Although not endorsing this form of treatment, we feel that the successful use of this agent highlights the role of serotonergic factors in OCD and the need for further, legitimate research into the value of psilocybin in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  10. [Obsessive-compulsive disorder. A hidden disorder].

    PubMed

    Haraldsson, Magnús

    2015-02-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a common and often chronic psychiatric illness that significantly interferes with the patient´s functioning and quality of life. The disorder is characterized by excessive intrusive and inappropriate anxiety evoking thoughts as well as time consuming compulsions that cause significant impairment and distress. The symptoms are often accompanied by shame and guilt and the knowledge of the general public and professional community about the disorder is limited. Hence it is frequently misdiagnosed or diagnosed late. There are indications that the disorder is hereditary and that neurobiological processes are involved in its pathophysiology. Several psychological theories about the causes of obsessive-compulsive disorder are supported by empirical evidence. Evidence based treatment is either with serotoninergic medications or cognitive behavioral therapy, particularly a form of behavioral therapy called exposure response prevention. Better treatment options are needed because almost a third of people with obsessive-compulsive disorder respond inadequatly to treatment. In this review article two cases of obsessive-compulsive disorder are presented. The former case is a young man with typical symptoms that respond well to treatment and the latter is a middle aged lady with severe treatment resistant symptoms. She underwent stereotactic implantation of electrodes and received deep brain stimulation, which is an experimental treatment for severe obsessive-compulsive disorder that does not respond to any conventional treatment. Landspitali University Hospital, Division of Psychiatry. Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland.

  11. Aripiprazole Improved Obsessive Compulsive Symptoms in Asperger's Disorder.

    PubMed

    Celik, Gonca; Tahiroglu, Aysegul Yolga; Firat, Sunay; Avci, Ayşe

    2011-12-01

    There are many comorbid disorders associated with autism spectrum disorders in child and adolescent population. Although obsessive compulsive disorder and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) comorbidity has common in clinical practice, there are few reports about psychopharmacological treatment for obsessive compulsive symptoms in children with ASD in the literacy. We report a successful treatment case with aripiprazole in Asperger's Disorder with obsessive compulsive symptoms. The Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale was performed to assess symptom variety. This case report supports the effectiveness of aripiprazole in treatment of obsessive compulsive symptoms in Asperger's Disorder or ASDs. Aripiprazole may be beneficial to obsessive compulsive disorder comorbid autism spectrum disorders in child and adolescent age group.

  12. Disgust implicated in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed Central

    Sprengelmeyer, R; Young, A W; Pundt, I; Sprengelmeyer, A; Calder, A J; Berrios, G; Winkel, R; Vollmöeller, W; Kuhn, W; Sartory, G; Przuntek, H

    1997-01-01

    Psychiatric classificatory systems consider obsessions and compulsions as forms of anxiety disorder. However, the neurology of diseases associated with obsessive-compulsive symptoms suggests the involvement of fronto-striatal regions likely to be involved in the mediation of the emotion of disgust, suggesting that dysfunctions of disgust should be considered alongside anxiety in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive behaviours. We therefore tested recognition of facial expressions of basic emotions (including disgust) by groups of participants with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and with Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (GTS) with an without co-present obsessive-compulsive behaviours (GTS with OCB; GTS without OCB). A group of people suffering from panic disorder and generalized anxiety were also included in the study. Both groups with obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCD; GTS with OCB) showed impaired recognition of facial expressions of disgust. Such problems were not evident in participants with panic disorder and generalized anxiety, or for participants with GTS without obsessions or compulsions, indicating that the deficit is closely related to the presence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Participants with OCD were able to assign words to emotion categories without difficulty, showing that their problem with disgust is linked to a failure to recognize this emotion in others and not a comprehension or response criterion effect. Impaired recognition of disgust is consistent with the neurology of OCD and with the idea that abnormal experience of disgust may be involved in the genesis of obsessions and compulsions. PMID:9447734

  13. Trichotillomania and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Stein, D J; Simeon, D; Cohen, L J; Hollander, E

    1995-01-01

    Trichotillomania, a disorder characterized by repetitive hair pulling, has been only recently systemically investigated. Such research was encouraged by data that showed obsessive-compulsive disorder, which is also characterized by ritual behaviors, responds selectively to serotonin reuptake inhibitors. In this review, we consider similarities and contrasts in the diagnosis, demographics, phenomenology, neurochemistry, neuropsychiatry, and treatment of trichotillomania and obsessive-compulsive disorder. We argue that a view of trichotillomania as an obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorder that may involve disturbances in grooming behaviors comprises a useful clinical and research heuristic. Nevertheless, there may also be important differences between the two disorders; in particular, trichotillomania has a number of characteristics in common with impulsive disorders. Further empirical investigation is necessary to determine the nature of these complex disorders and their relationship to one another.

  14. [Obsessive-compulsive disorders in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Klein, R G; Rapoport, J L

    1990-01-01

    The research recently conducted and ongoing in adolescent obsessive-compulsive disorder indicates that the clinical signs and symptoms are indistinguishable from those seen in adults. Comorbidity appears to follow the same trends in adolescents and adults, with anxiety and affective symptomatology predominating. Contrary to expectation, Gilles de la Tourette disorder does not appear either as a concurrent syndrome, or as an eventual outcome in obsessive-compulsive adolescents. Males are greatly over-represented among adolescents with an early childhood onset. The neurological and neuropsychological findings are the only ones that appear to distinguish the adolescent and adult obsessive-compulsive patients. The findings point to frequent neurological abnormalities in adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder. The natural history over the short-term seems to be negatively affected by severity. The clinical efficacy of clomipramine and the failure of another tricyclic antidepressant parallels the therapeutic experience reported in adult patients. The presence of depression is unrelated to the efficacy of clomipramine. The neuropsychological and neurological abnormalities, together with the data from the longitudinal and treatment studies, strongly suggest that obsessive-compulsive disorder in adolescents is not a variant of the overall group of anxiety disorders.

  15. The Validation of a New Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Scale: The Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foa, Edna B.; Kozak, Michael J.; Salkovskis, Paul M.; Coles, Meredith E.; Amir, Nader

    1998-01-01

    The Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (OCI), a new self-report measure for determining the diagnosis and severity of obsessive- compulsive disorder (OCD), was validated with 141 patients with OCD, 58 with social phobia, 44 with posttraumatic stress disorder, and 194 nonpatients. The OCI exhibited satisfactory reliability and validity with all four…

  16. Anxiety Sensitivity and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calamari, John E.; Rector, Neil A.; Woodard, John L.; Cohen, Robyn J.; Chik, Heather M.

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity (AS), a cognitive risk factor for anxiety disorders, was evaluated in a homogeneous obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) sample. A total of 280 individuals with OCD completed measures. Evaluation of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index revealed a latent structure that was congruent with previous studies showing a single higher order…

  17. Inhibitory Control in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krikorian, Robert; Zimmerman, Molly E.; Fleck, David E.

    2004-01-01

    The clinical features of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) suggest that a fundamental deficit of inhibitory control is intrinsic to the disorder. In this preliminary study, we sought to examine cognitive disinhibition in OCD by using an established laboratory technique. The stop signal task was administered to a higher functioning, untreated…

  18. A meta-analysis examining the relations among pathological gambling, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and obsessive-compulsive traits.

    PubMed

    Durdle, Heather; Gorey, Kevin M; Stewart, Sherry H

    2008-10-01

    Pathological gambling has been proposed to belong to the obsessive-compulsive spectrum of disorders. Disorders on this spectrum are thought to share similar clinical features, neurobiology, and responses to treatment as Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. A total of 18 studies were included in a meta-analysis to assess the strength of the association between these disorders. A strong relationship (effect size = 1.01) was found between pathological gambling and obsessive-compulsive traits. A weak relationship was found between pathological gambling and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (.07) and Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder (effect size = .23). These results suggest pathological gambling and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder are distinct disorders. However, pathological gamblers do appear to show high rates of obsessive-compulsive traits relative to controls. These findings are only moderately supportive of the inclusion of pathological gambling within the obsessive-compulsive spectrum of conditions.

  19. A Case of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twohig, Michael P.; Whittal, Maureen L.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the case of a 51-year old woman with obsessive-compulsive disorder. "Caroline" reported obsessions of harming people secondary to spreading her "bad energy," which is experienced as dust on her hands and in her mouth. To prevent harm coming to others she mentally "vacuums" the dust, creates mental protective barriers around…

  20. Teaching Students with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leininger, Melissa; Dyches, Tina Taylor; Prater, Mary Anne; Heath, Melissa Allen

    2010-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neurobiological condition affecting 1 of every 200 school-age children. OCD greatly affects students' academic, behavioral, and social functioning, and it can lead to additional problem such as depression. To effectively collaborate with other individuals providing appropriate support to students with OCD,…

  1. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and the School Counselor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertlieb, Ellen C.

    2008-01-01

    The current article is designed to provide school counselors an understanding of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The causes, characteristics, and treatment approaches are presented with examples focusing on school-related issues. The article concludes with a discussion about the role that the school counselor can take in helping the child…

  2. Comparing Treatment Approaches for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gariglietti, Kelli P.; Schemmel, Todd A.

    The current status of research literature relevant to obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is reviewed. Models proposing the etiology and maintenance of OCD, empirically established treatments for OCD, and research supporting cognitive approaches to treatment are also included in the review. Until recently, most of the controlled research…

  3. Anorexia Nervosa with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Pani, Adyapad; Santra, Gouranga; Biswas, Kali Das

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of an adolescent female, previously nonobese, belonging to educated average socioeconomic Muslim family. She stopped taking food, developed a perception of distorted body image with occasional episodes of binge eating and forced vomiting. She became amenorrheic and emaciated with loss of secondary sexual characters. She satisfied the criteria for anorexia nervosa with obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:27608877

  4. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Late Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calamari, John E.; Pontarelli, Noelle K.; Armstrong, Kerrie M.; Salstrom, Seoka A.

    2012-01-01

    Although obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has received increasing attention, the study and treatment of OCD in late life has been neglected. The obsessions and compulsions seen with older adults do not appear to differ from the symptoms experienced by other age groups, although developmental issues might influence symptom focus (e.g., memory…

  5. Aripiprazole Improved Obsessive Compulsive Symptoms in Asperger's Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tahiroglu, Aysegul Yolga; Firat, Sunay; Avci, Ayşe

    2011-01-01

    There are many comorbid disorders associated with autism spectrum disorders in child and adolescent population. Although obsessive compulsive disorder and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) comorbidity has common in clinical practice, there are few reports about psychopharmacological treatment for obsessive compulsive symptoms in children with ASD in the literacy. We report a successful treatment case with aripiprazole in Asperger's Disorder with obsessive compulsive symptoms. The Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale was performed to assess symptom variety. This case report supports the effectiveness of aripiprazole in treatment of obsessive compulsive symptoms in Asperger's Disorder or ASDs. Aripiprazole may be beneficial to obsessive compulsive disorder comorbid autism spectrum disorders in child and adolescent age group. PMID:23429759

  6. Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Traits in Youth with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Park, Jennifer M; Storch, Eric A; Pinto, Anthony; Lewin, Adam B

    2016-04-01

    While interest in the relationship between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and obsessive compulsive personality disorder has increased, there are currently no studies that have examined the presence of obsessive compulsive personality traits (OCPTs) in youth. The current study sought to determine the latent factors and psychometric properties of a modified version of the Childhood Retrospective Perfectionism Questionnaire (CHIRP) and examine the correlates of specific OCPTs (e.g., rigidity, perfectionism) in youth with OCD. Participants included 96 treatment-seeking youth diagnosed with primary OCD (and a parent). Parents and youth completed measures of OCPTs, OCD severity, depression, and disability. A confirmatory factor analysis of the modified CHIRP resulted in a two-factor model: perfectionism and preoccupation with details. The CHIRP and its subscales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency and preliminary evidence for convergent and divergent validity. Obsessive compulsive traits in youth were also found to be associated with the checking, symmetry and contamination symptom dimensions.

  7. Neuromodulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bais, Melisse; Figee, Martijn; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-09-01

    Neuromodulation techniques in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) involve electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and deep brain stimulation (DBS). This article reviews the available literature on the efficacy and applicability of these techniques in OCD. ECT is used for the treatment of comorbid depression or psychosis. One case report on tDCS showed no effects in OCD. Low-frequency TMS provides significant but mostly transient improvement of obsessive-compulsive symptoms. DBS shows a response rate of 60% in open and sham-controlled studies. In OCD, it can be concluded that DBS, although more invasive, is the most efficacious technique. PMID:25150569

  8. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  9. Understudied Clinical Dimensions in Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Adam B.; Caporino, Nicole; Murphy, Tanya K.; Geffken, Gary R.; Storch, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the phenomenology and treatment sensitivity of insight, avoidance, indecisiveness, overvalued responsibility, pervasive slowness, and pathological doubting among youth with Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) using the ancillary items on the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS). These factors…

  10. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and related disorders: a comprehensive survey

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Michele; Gabrielli, Filippo; Albano, Claudio; Fornaro, Stefania; Rizzato, Salvatore; Mattei, Chiara; Solano, Paola; Vinciguerra, Valentina; Fornaro, Pantaleo

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to present a comprehensive, updated survey on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and obsessive-compulsive related disorders (OCRDs) and their clinical management via literature review, critical analysis and synthesis. Information on OCD and OCRD current nosography, clinical phenomenology and etiology, may lead to a better comprehension of their management. Clinicians should become familiar with the broad spectrum of OCD disorders, since it is a pivotal issue in current clinical psychiatry. PMID:19450269

  11. Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... They may not be able to express their anger directly. People with OCPD have feelings that they ... personality disorders. The social isolation and difficulty handling anger that are common with OCPD may lead to ...

  12. Cognitive Dysfunction in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Benzina, Nabil; Mallet, Luc; Burguière, Eric; N'Diaye, Karim; Pelissolo, Antoine

    2016-09-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental disorder featuring obsessions (intrusive thoughts) and compulsions (repetitive behaviors performed in the context of rigid rituals). There is strong evidence for a neurobiological basis of this disorder, involving limbic cortical regions and related basal ganglion areas. However, more research is needed to lift the veil on the precise nature of that involvement and the way it drives the clinical expression of OCD. Altered cognitive functions may underlie the symptoms and thus draw a link between the clinical expression of the disorder and its neurobiological etiology. Our extensive review demonstrates that OCD patients do present a broad range of neuropsychological dysfunctions across all cognitive domains (memory, attention, flexibility, inhibition, verbal fluency, planning, decision-making), but some methodological issues temper this observation. Thus, future research should have a more integrative approach to cognitive functioning, gathering contributions of both experimental psychology and more fundamental neurosciences. PMID:27423459

  13. Pure Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in Three Generations

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Alireza; Haghighi, Mohammad; Shamsaei, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric disorder, which has been shown to affect 2 - 3.5% of people, during their lifetimes. Identification of familial more homogenous characteristics of OCD may help to define relevant subtypes and increase the power of genetic and neurobiological studies of OCD. Case Presentation; This case report describes an adult woman suffering from symptoms of energy loss, insomnia, lack of appetite, and depressed mood. The patient history was positive for counting coercion. The patient’s genogram revealed counting coercion in three generations of her family. Conclusions: This case highlights the issue whether counting can be a distinctive feature among inflicted and not inflicted individuals, such as hoarding. Also, it is still unclear what is it really transferred; the vulnerability to disease, which is transferred among three generations, or the symptoms of counting itself, by genes. Further studies are required to answer the debates on this issue. PMID:26288641

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory: Child Version in Children and Adolescents with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anna M.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Arnold, Elysse B.; McGuire, Joseph F.; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Child Version (OCI-CV) were examined in ninety-six youth with a primary/co-primary diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A confirmatory factor analysis revealed an acceptable model of fit with factors consisting of doubting/checking, obsessing, hoarding, washing,…

  15. Pharmacological treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) affects up to 2.5% of the population of the course of a lifetime and produces substantial morbidity. Approximately 70% of patients can experience significant symptomatic relief with appropriate pharmacotherapy. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the main stay of pharmacological treatment. These are typically used at higher doses and for longer periods than in depression. Remission is, unfortunately, uncommon. Proven second-line treatments include the tricyclic clomipramine and the addition of low-dose neuroleptic medications. Other augmentation strategies have been explored for patients refractory to proven interventions, but they are not as of yet robustly supported by controlled studies. The combination of medication with psychotherapy is often used, though careful studies have not documented synergistic benefit in adult patients. OCD refractory to available treatments remains a profound clinical challenge. PMID:25150568

  16. Standards of care for obsessive-compulsive disorder centres.

    PubMed

    Menchón, José M; van Ameringen, Michael; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Denys, Damiaan; Figee, Martijn; Grant, Jon E; Hollander, Eric; Marazziti, Donatella; Nicolini, Humberto; Pallanti, Stefano; Ruck, Christian; Shavitt, Roseli; Stein, Dan J; Andersson, Erik; Bipeta, Rajshekhar; Cath, Danielle C; Drummond, Lynne; Feusner, Jamie; Geller, Daniel A; Hranov, Georgi; Lochner, Christine; Matsunaga, Hisato; McCabe, Randy E; Mpavaenda, Davis; Nakamae, Takashi; O'Kearney, Richard; Pasquini, Massimo; Pérez Rivera, Ricardo; Poyurovsky, Michael; Real, Eva; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Soreni, Noam; Swinson, Richard P; Vulink, Nienke; Zohar, Joseph; Fineberg, Naomi

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, many assessment and care units for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been set up in order to detect, diagnose and to properly manage this complex disorder, but there is no consensus regarding the key functions that these units should perform. The International College of Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS) together with the Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders Network (OCRN) of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) and the Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders Section of the World Psychiaric Association (WPA) has developed a standards of care programme for OCD centres. The goals of this collaborative initiative are promoting basic standards, improving the quality of clinical care and enhance the validity and reliability of research results provided by different facilities and countries. PMID:27359333

  17. Standards of care for obsessive-compulsive disorder centres.

    PubMed

    Menchón, José M; van Ameringen, Michael; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Denys, Damiaan; Figee, Martijn; Grant, Jon E; Hollander, Eric; Marazziti, Donatella; Nicolini, Humberto; Pallanti, Stefano; Ruck, Christian; Shavitt, Roseli; Stein, Dan J; Andersson, Erik; Bipeta, Rajshekhar; Cath, Danielle C; Drummond, Lynne; Feusner, Jamie; Geller, Daniel A; Hranov, Georgi; Lochner, Christine; Matsunaga, Hisato; McCabe, Randy E; Mpavaenda, Davis; Nakamae, Takashi; O'Kearney, Richard; Pasquini, Massimo; Pérez Rivera, Ricardo; Poyurovsky, Michael; Real, Eva; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Soreni, Noam; Swinson, Richard P; Vulink, Nienke; Zohar, Joseph; Fineberg, Naomi

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, many assessment and care units for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been set up in order to detect, diagnose and to properly manage this complex disorder, but there is no consensus regarding the key functions that these units should perform. The International College of Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS) together with the Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders Network (OCRN) of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) and the Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders Section of the World Psychiaric Association (WPA) has developed a standards of care programme for OCD centres. The goals of this collaborative initiative are promoting basic standards, improving the quality of clinical care and enhance the validity and reliability of research results provided by different facilities and countries.

  18. Psychobiology of anxiety disorders and obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Stein, Dan J

    2008-09-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is currently classified as an anxiety disorder. However, there is growing interest in the concept of an obsessive-compulsive spectrum of disorders (OCSDs). The relationship between anxiety disorders and OCSDs has been questioned. The psychobiology of anxiety disorders and OCSDs is briefly reviewed in this article. While there appear to be several distinct contrasts in the underlying psychobiology of these conditions, there is also evidence of overlapping mechanisms. In addition, there are crucial gaps in our current database, confounding nosological decision-making. Conceptualizing various anxiety disorders and putative OCSDs as lying within a broader spectrum of emotional disorders may be useful. However, clinicians must also recognize that individual anxiety and obsessive-compulsive spectrum conditions, including disorders characterized by body-focused repetitive behaviors, have distinct psychobiological underpinnings and require different treatment approaches.

  19. Brain Imaging in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMaster, Frank P.; O'Neill, Joseph; Rosenberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroimaging findings support the frontal-striatal-thalamic model of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder. Glutamate is also implicated in the pathological finding of the disease. Implications for pediatric OCD treatments are discussed.

  20. Predictors of Treatment Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kingery, Julie Newman; Drake, Kelly L.; Grados, Marco A.

    2008-01-01

    The study examines predictors of treatment response in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder, which is a severe mental illness causing distress and impaired functioning. Summarized findings of psychosocial factors and medication interventions are presented.

  1. Management of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Seibell, Phillip J; Hollander, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, often debilitating disorder characterized by the presence of obsessions and compulsions. Obsessions are repetitive thoughts or images which are experienced as intrusive and unwanted; they cause marked anxiety and distress. Compulsions (also known as rituals) are repetitive behaviors or mental acts that individuals with OCD perform in an attempt to decrease their anxiety. Patients tend to hide their symptoms due to shame; the amount of time between onset of symptoms and appropriate treatment is often many years. The disorder likely results from several etiological variables; functional imaging studies have consistently shown hyperactivity in the orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, thalamus, and striatum. The mainstays of treatment include cognitive-behavioral therapy in the form of exposure and response prevention (ERP) and serotonin reuptake inhibiting medications. Several pharmacological augmentation strategies exist for treatment-resistant OCD, with addition of antipsychotics being most commonly employed. Radio and neurosurgical procedures, including gamma knife radiation and deep brain stimulation, are reserved for severe, treatment-refractory disease that has not responded to multiple treatments, and some patients may benefit from transcranial magnetic stimulation. PMID:25165567

  2. The correlates of obsessive-compulsive, schizotypal, and borderline personality disorders in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Melca, Isabela A; Yücel, Murat; Mendlowicz, Mauro V; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2015-06-01

    We assessed correlates of obsessive-compulsive (OCPD), schizotypal (SPD) and borderline (BPD) personality disorders in 110 obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients. We found OCD patients with OCPD (20.9%) to exhibit higher rates of hoarding and bipolar disorders, increased severity of hoarding and symmetry, lower prevalence of unacceptable thoughts involving sex and religion and less non-planning impulsivity. Conversely, OCD patients with SPD (13.6%) displayed more frequently bipolar disorder, increased severity of depression and OCD neutralization, greater prevalence of "low-order" behaviors (i.e., touching), lower low-planning impulsivity and greater "behavioral" compulsivity. Finally, in exploratory analyses, OCD patients with BPD (21.8%) exhibited lower education, higher rates of several comorbid psychiatric disorders, greater frequency of compulsions involving interpersonal domains (e.g. reassurance seeking), increased severity of depression, anxiety and OCD dimensions other than symmetry and hoarding, more motor and non-planning impulsivity, and greater "cognitive" compulsivity. These findings highlight the importance of assessing personality disorders in OCD samples.

  3. Sleep and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

    PubMed

    Paterson, Jessica L; Reynolds, Amy C; Ferguson, Sally A; Dawson, Drew

    2013-12-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic mental illness that can have a debilitating effect on daily functioning. A body of research reveals altered sleep behaviour in OCD sufferers; however, findings are inconsistent and there is no consensus on the nature of this relationship. Understanding sleep disturbance in OCD is of critical importance given the known negative consequences of disturbed sleep for mood and emotional wellbeing. A systematic literature search was conducted of five databases for studies assessing sleep in adults diagnosed with OCD. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria and qualitative data analysis methods were used to identify common themes. There was some evidence of reduced total sleep time and sleep efficiency in OCD patients. Many of the sleep disturbances noted were characteristic of depression. However, some OCD sufferers displayed delayed sleep onset and offset and an increased prevalence of delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Severe OCD symptoms were consistently associated with greater sleep disturbance. While the sleep of OCD patients has not been a major focus to date, the existing literature suggests that addressing sleep disturbance in OCD patients may ensure a holistic approach to treatment, enhance treatment efficacy, mitigate relapse and protect against the onset of co-morbid psychiatric illnesses.

  4. Behavioral Impulsivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Amitai; McKay, Dean

    2016-09-01

    Background Grassi et al. (2015) collected data to examine impulsivity in individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) compared to nonpsychiatric controls. Their aim was to examine whether OCD may be fully captured by the behavioral addiction model, using the prototypical mechanism underlying drug addiction as their framework. Based on their findings, Grassi et al. concluded that OCD shares behavioral components with addictions, particularly behavioral impulsivity and risky decision making. Furthermore, the authors suggested that this model may be superior to the prevailing psychological model of OCD. Findings We argue that based on the nature of their data as well as the current dominant conceptualization of OCD in the literature, this conclusion is untenable. The authors inferred behavioral impulsivity, whereas their main finding was concerning cognitive impulsivity or difficulties in planning. Such items on the Barratt impulsiveness scale have been shown in other research to overpredict behavioral impulsive tendencies in OCD, where the nature of the condition involves doubting of action and a conservative estimate of how one's cognitions may impact behavior. Conclusions We conclude that similar to drug addiction, compulsive rituals in OCD may be governed by a negative reinforcement mechanism; the available data indicate that OCD does not share the two main components seen in addiction, namely, behavioral impulsivity and risky decision making. PMID:27156379

  5. Behavioral inhibition and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Coles, Meredith E; Schofield, Casey A; Pietrefesa, Ashley S

    2006-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition is frequently cited as a vulnerability factor for development of anxiety. However, few studies have examined the unique relationship between behavioral inhibition and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Therefore, the current study addressed the relationship between behavioral inhibition and OCD in a number of ways. In a large unselected student sample, frequency of current OC symptoms was significantly correlated with retrospective self-reports of total levels of childhood behavioral inhibition. In addition, frequency of current OC symptoms was also significantly correlated with both social and nonsocial components of behavioral inhibition. Further, there was evidence for a unique relationship between behavioral inhibition and OC symptoms beyond the relationship of behavioral inhibition and social anxiety. In addition, results showed that reports of childhood levels of behavioral inhibition significantly predicted levels of OCD symptoms in adulthood. Finally, preliminary evidence suggested that behavioral inhibition may be more strongly associated with some types of OC symptoms than others, and that overprotective parenting may moderate the impact of behavioral inhibition on OC symptoms. The current findings suggest the utility of additional research examining the role of behavioral inhibition in the etiology of OCD. PMID:16621440

  6. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: What an Educator Needs to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaturvedi, Amrita; Murdick, Nikki L.; Gartin, Barbara C.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) impairs social, emotional and academic functioning. Individuals with OCD may have co-morbid disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, oppositional defiant disorder, or Tourette syndrome. Challenges occur when students with OCD become a part of the general education…

  7. Dream content and intrusive thoughts in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cavallotti, Simone; Casetta, Cecilia; Fanti, Valentina; Gambini, Orsola; Ostinelli, Edoardo G; Ranieri, Rebecca; Vanelli, Irene; D'Agostino, Armando

    2016-10-30

    Although central to any exhaustive theory of human subjectivity, the relationship between dream and waking consciousness remains uncertain. Some findings suggest that dream consciousness can be influenced by severe disorders of thought content. The suppression of unwanted thoughts has been shown to influence dream content in healthy individuals. In order to better define this phenomenon, we evaluated the persistence of obsessive/compulsive themes across the dream and waking cognition of OCD patients and in a control group of healthy subjects. Participants were administered a shortened version of the Thematic Apperception Test to produce a waking fantasy narration, and were trained to keep a dream diary. Dream and waking narrative contents were analyzed in order to recognize obsessive/compulsive themes, and to calculate Mean Dream Obsession/Compulsion (MDO, MDC) and Mean TAT Obsession/Compulsion (MTO, MTC) parameters. No differences were found between the two populations in terms of MDO, MDC, MTO, nor MTC. Density of obsessive and compulsive themes were significantly higher in dream reports than in waking narratives for both groups. No correlation was observed between MDO/MDC scores and Y-BOCS obsession/compulsion scores in the OCD group. These findings strengthen the discontinuity hypothesis, suggesting that ruminative aspects of cognition are somehow interrupted during dream activity.

  8. Dream content and intrusive thoughts in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cavallotti, Simone; Casetta, Cecilia; Fanti, Valentina; Gambini, Orsola; Ostinelli, Edoardo G; Ranieri, Rebecca; Vanelli, Irene; D'Agostino, Armando

    2016-10-30

    Although central to any exhaustive theory of human subjectivity, the relationship between dream and waking consciousness remains uncertain. Some findings suggest that dream consciousness can be influenced by severe disorders of thought content. The suppression of unwanted thoughts has been shown to influence dream content in healthy individuals. In order to better define this phenomenon, we evaluated the persistence of obsessive/compulsive themes across the dream and waking cognition of OCD patients and in a control group of healthy subjects. Participants were administered a shortened version of the Thematic Apperception Test to produce a waking fantasy narration, and were trained to keep a dream diary. Dream and waking narrative contents were analyzed in order to recognize obsessive/compulsive themes, and to calculate Mean Dream Obsession/Compulsion (MDO, MDC) and Mean TAT Obsession/Compulsion (MTO, MTC) parameters. No differences were found between the two populations in terms of MDO, MDC, MTO, nor MTC. Density of obsessive and compulsive themes were significantly higher in dream reports than in waking narratives for both groups. No correlation was observed between MDO/MDC scores and Y-BOCS obsession/compulsion scores in the OCD group. These findings strengthen the discontinuity hypothesis, suggesting that ruminative aspects of cognition are somehow interrupted during dream activity. PMID:27525832

  9. The extended fronto-striatal model of obsessive compulsive disorder: convergence from event-related potentials, neuropsychology and neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Melloni, Margherita; Urbistondo, Claudia; Sedeño, Lucas; Gelormini, Carlos; Kichic, Rafael; Ibanez, Agustin

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we explored convergent evidence supporting the fronto-striatal model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (FSMOCD) and the contribution of event-related potential (ERP) studies to this model. First, we considered minor modifications to the FSMOCD model based on neuroimaging and neuropsychological data. We noted the brain areas most affected in this disorder -anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), basal ganglia (BG), and orbito-frontal cortex (OFC) and their related cognitive functions, such as monitoring and inhibition. Then, we assessed the ERPs that are directly related to the FSMOCD, including the error-related negativity (ERN), N200, and P600. Several OCD studies present enhanced ERN and N2 responses during conflict tasks as well as an enhanced P600 during working memory (WM) tasks. Evidence from ERP studies (especially regarding ERN and N200 amplitude enhancement), neuroimaging and neuropsychological findings suggests abnormal activity in the OFC, ACC, and BG in OCD patients. Moreover, additional findings from these analyses suggest dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal cortex involvement, which might be related to executive function (EF) deficits. Thus, these convergent results suggest the existence of a self-monitoring imbalance involving inhibitory deficits and executive dysfunctions. OCD patients present an impaired ability to monitor, control, and inhibit intrusive thoughts, urges, feelings, and behaviors. In the current model, this imbalance is triggered by an excitatory role of the BG (associated with cognitive or motor actions without volitional control) and inhibitory activity of the OFC as well as excessive monitoring of the ACC to block excitatory impulses. This imbalance would interact with the reduced activation of the parietal-DLPC network, leading to executive dysfunction. ERP research may provide further insight regarding the temporal dynamics of action monitoring and executive functioning in OCD. PMID:23015786

  10. [Symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder in neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Kutlubaev, M A

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common form of neurosis. Symptoms of OCD could develop as a sign of focal brain lesion, particularly in multiple sclerosis, extrapyramidal disorders, epilepsy, less frequently - in other diseases. Timely diagnosis and treatment of the symptoms of OCD is an important aspect in the management of mentioned neurological disorders. PMID:27240053

  11. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbing, Mary-Lee C.; Ficca, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder characterized by disturbing thoughts, impulses, or images (obsessions); repetitive or ritualistic behaviors (compulsions); or the presence of both. Although some may believe this disorder is isolated to the adult population, it affects anywhere from 1% to 4% of children in the United…

  12. Prospective relationship between obsessive-compulsive and depressive symptoms during multimodal treatment in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Johanna M; McNamara, Joseph P H; Reid, Adam M; Storch, Eric A; Geffken, Gary R; Mason, Dana M; Murphy, Tanya K; Bussing, Regina

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the prospective relationship between obsessive-compulsive and depressive symptoms during a multimodal treatment study involving youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Participants included fifty-six youth, aged 7-17 years (M = 12.16 years) who were enrolled in a two-site randomized controlled pharmacological and cognitive behavioral therapy treatment trial. Obsessive-compulsive severity was measured using the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, and depressive symptoms were rated using the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised. Multi-level modeling analyses indicated that, on average over the course of treatment, variable and less severe obsessive-compulsive symptoms significantly predicted a decrease in depressive symptoms. Additionally, week-to-week fluctuations in OCD severity did not significantly predict weekly changes in depressive symptom severity. Level of baseline depressive symptom severity did not moderate these relationships. Findings suggest that when treating youth with OCD with co-occurring depression, therapists should begin by treating obsessive-compulsive symptoms, as when these are targeted effectively, depressive symptoms diminish as well.

  13. Parent-Child Agreement in the Assessment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canavera, Kristin E.; Wilkins, Kendall C.; Pincus, Donna B.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to extend research regarding parent-child agreement in the assessment of anxiety disorders to include youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Ninety-three children and adolescents with OCD (50 female, 43 male), ages 6 to 17 years, and their parents were administered the Anxiety Disorders Interview…

  14. The relationships between obsessive-compulsive symptom dimensions and cognitions in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Brakoulias, Vlasios; Starcevic, Vladan; Berle, David; Milicevic, Denise; Hannan, Anthony; Martin, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Several studies have linked obsessive-compulsive symptoms to specific obsessive-compulsive cognitions, however methodologies have varied, and no study has determined obsessive-compulsive symptoms using the most widely used clinician rating scale, the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). Considering that almost all studies that used factor analysis to ascertain OCD symptom dimensions were based on the Y-BOCS and that self-report instruments assessing obsessive-compulsive symptoms correlate poorly with the Y-BOCS, there is a need to use the Y-BOCS to examine the relationship between obsessive-compulsive cognitions and obsessive-compulsive symptom dimensions. This study examined the relationship between five Y-BOCS-derived obsessive-compulsive symptom dimensions and the three obsessive-compulsive cognitive domains identified by the obsessive-beliefs questionnaire (OBQ). The symmetry/ordering symptom dimension was associated with increased perfectionism/intolerance of uncertainty, the unacceptable/taboo thoughts symptom dimension was associated with increased importance/control of thoughts and the doubt/checking symptom dimension was associated with increased responsibility/threat estimation. There was no statistical evidence of an association between any OBQ belief sub-scale and the hoarding symptom dimension nor the contamination/cleaning symptom dimension. The findings encourage symptom-based approaches to cognitive-behavioural therapy for some OCD symptoms and call for further research on cognitions associated with contamination/cleaning symptoms and hoarding.

  15. Obsessive compulsive symptoms in patients with Schizophrenia on Clozapine and with Obsessive Compulsive disorder: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Mairead; Chorcorain, Aoife Ni; Griffith, Eleanor; Trimble, Tim; O'Callaghan, Eadbard

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive compulsive symptoms are commonly reported in those with schizophrenia. Clozapine has previously been reported to induce, aggravate and alleviate these symptoms. It is unclear if these are similar to the symptoms experienced by those with obsessive compulsive disorder. This study describes the obsessive compulsive symptom profile of a population of patients with schizophrenia treated with clozapine (n = 62) and compares this with patients with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (n = 35). All participants were attending an outpatient community mental health service. The Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (which measures the frequency and associated distress of a range of "behavioural" and "cognitive" symptoms), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and a demographic questionnaire were completed. In addition the schizophrenia group treated with clozapine completed the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. The OCD group reported significantly more symptoms for all OCI subscales compared to the clozapine group. Overall fourteen (22%) of the schizophrenia treated with clozapine group had clinically significant total OCI scores. Two (3%) had documented OCS pre clozapine. De novo OCS was reported in twelve (19%) cases. Nine (11%) had documented OC symptoms pre-clozapine while only two (3%) had symptoms after clozapine was initiated. In terms of OC symptom profile, the clozapine group scored highest on the Doubting scale, a cognitive symptom whereas the OCD group scored highest on Washing, a behavioural symptom. Both groups reported greater distress with cognitive rather than behavioural symptoms. Medication including clozapine dose was not correlated with symptom severity. Anxiety correlated highly with obsessive compulsive symptoms in the Clozapine group but not the OCD group. Within the Clozapine group, Obsessing correlated highly with Unusual Thought Content. Findings suggest that obsessive compulsive symptoms in the Clozapine group may reflect a subtype of 'schizo

  16. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Adults with Down's Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V. P.; Day, S.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated demographic and phenomenological characteristics of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in nine adults with Down syndrome (DS), and possible effects on adaptive behavior. Results suggest OCD is more common in the DS population than the non-DS population. Ordering and tidiness was the most common form of OCD found, and…

  17. Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorder Symptoms in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulkowski, Michael L.; Mariaskin, Amy; Storch, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the occurrence of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSDs) and associated symptomology in college students. Participants: Participants included 358 undergraduate students. Results: Results suggest that clinically significant levels of OCSD symptoms are relatively common. Additionally, OCSD symptoms…

  18. Correlates of Insight among Youth with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Adam B.; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Peris, Tara S.; Chang, Susanna; McCracken, James T.; Piacentini, John

    2010-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) may lack insight into the irrational nature of their symptoms. Among adults with OCD, poor insight has been linked to greater symptom severity, increased likelihood of comorbid symptoms, lower adaptive functioning, and worse treatment outcomes. Parallel work regarding insight among…

  19. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Childhood and Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, James J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reviews literature on Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) in children and adolescents, emphasizing clinical presentation, evaluation, and treatment options. Notes that patients with OCD show remarkable similarities in clinical presentations, and have distinct profiles on cognitive, behavioral, and psychological measures. Concludes that advances in…

  20. Family Accommodation in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Geffken, Gary R.; Merlo, Lisa J.; Jacob, Marni L.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Larson, Michael J.; Fernandez, Melanie; Grabill, Kristen

    2007-01-01

    Despite the importance of the family in the treatment of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), relatively little empirical attention has been directed to family accommodation of symptoms. This study examined the relations among family accommodation, OCD symptom severity, functional impairment, and internalizing and externalizing behavior…

  1. Cognitive Appraisals in Young People with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libby, Sarah; Reynolds, Shirley; Derisley, Jo; Clark, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Background: A number of cognitive appraisals have been identified as important in the manifestation of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in adults. There have, however, been few attempts to explore these cognitive appraisals in clinical groups of young people. Method: This study compared young people aged between 11 and 18 years with OCD (N =…

  2. Genetics of obsessive-compulsive disorder and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Browne, Heidi A; Gair, Shannon L; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Grice, Dorothy E

    2014-09-01

    Twin and family studies support a significant genetic contribution to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and related disorders, such as chronic tic disorders, trichotillomania, skin-picking disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, and hoarding disorder. Recently, population-based studies and novel laboratory-based methods have confirmed substantial heritability in OCD. Genome-wide association studies and candidate gene association studies have provided information on specific gene variations that may be involved in the pathobiology of OCD, though a substantial portion of the genetic risk architecture remains unknown.

  3. Should an obsessive-compulsive spectrum grouping of disorders be included in DSM-V?

    PubMed

    Phillips, Katharine A; Stein, Dan J; Rauch, Scott L; Hollander, Eric; Fallon, Brian A; Barsky, Arthur; Fineberg, Naomi; Mataix-Cols, David; Ferrão, Ygor Arzeno; Saxena, Sanjaya; Wilhelm, Sabine; Kelly, Megan M; Clark, Lee Anna; Pinto, Anthony; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Farrow, Joanne; Leckman, James

    2010-06-01

    The obsessive-compulsive (OC) spectrum has been discussed in the literature for two decades. Proponents of this concept propose that certain disorders characterized by repetitive thoughts and/or behaviors are related to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and suggest that such disorders be grouped together in the same category (i.e. grouping, or "chapter") in DSM. This article addresses this topic and presents options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V. The article builds upon and extends prior reviews of this topic that were prepared for and discussed at a DSM-V Research Planning Conference on Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders held in 2006. Our preliminary recommendation is that an OC-spectrum grouping of disorders be included in DSM-V. Furthermore, we preliminarily recommend that consideration be given to including this group of disorders within a larger supraordinate category of "Anxiety and Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders." These preliminary recommendations must be evaluated in light of recommendations for, and constraints upon, the overall structure of DSM-V.

  4. Treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and OCD-related disorders using GVG

    DOEpatents

    Dewey, Stephen L.; Brodie, Jonathan D.; Ashby, Jr., Charles R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to the use of gamma vinyl-GABA (GVG) to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and OCD-related disorders, and to reduce or eliminate behaviors associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and OCD-related disorders.

  5. Interpersonal hostility and suspicious thinking in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tellawi, Ghazel; Williams, Monnica T; Chasson, Gregory S

    2016-09-30

    Individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may struggle with hostility and suspicious thinking, but this has not been the subject of much research. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between hostility, suspicious thinking, and OCD severity. Participants included 66 outpatients in treatment for OCD, 27 in treatment for other disorders, and 68 students (n=161). All completed the Inventory of Hostility and Suspicious Thinking (IHS), a measure of psychotic thinking/paranoia, the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). As expected, the IHS was significantly positively correlated with the BAI and BDI-II. Additionally, regression analyses revealed that individuals with OCD have higher levels of hostility than students. Hostility was also significantly positively associated with increased OCD severity. Hostility and suspicious thoughts are prominent in anxiety disorders in general, and thus necessitate continued research. PMID:27428083

  6. Interpersonal Functioning in Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Nicole M.; Ansell, Emily B.; Simpson, H. Blair; Pinto, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The core symptoms of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) often lead to interpersonal difficulties. However, little research has explored interpersonal functioning in OCPD. The current study examined interpersonal problems, interpersonal sensitivities, empathy, and systemizing, the drive to analyze and derive underlying rules for systems, in a sample of 25 OCPD individuals, 25 individuals with comorbid OCPD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and 25 healthy controls. We found that OCPD individuals reported hostile-dominant interpersonal problems and sensitivities with warm-dominant behavior by others while OCPD+OCD individuals reported submissive interpersonal problems and sensitivities with warm-submissive behavior by others. Individuals with OCPD, with and without OCD, reported less empathic perspective taking relative to healthy controls. Finally, we found that OCPD males reported a higher drive to analyze and derive rules for systems than OCPD females. Overall, results suggest that there are interpersonal deficits associated with OCPD and the clinical implications of these deficits are discussed. PMID:25046040

  7. Obsessive-compulsive disorder: case study and discussion of treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Turk, J; Marks, I M; Horder, J

    1990-01-01

    A patient's own account of her obsessive-compulsive disorder is presented. She describes her distressing experiences, the impact of the disturbance on her and her family's life and her subsequent improvement using the technique of exposure and response prevention. The treatments available are discussed and the benefits of self-directed behavioural psychotherapy are reviewed. A comment from a general practitioner is appended. PMID:2114137

  8. Venlafaxine augmentation with agomelatine in a patient with obsessive-compulsive disorder and suicidal behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Concerto, Carmen; Battaglia, Eliana; Costanzo, Maria C; Battaglia, Fortunato; Aguglia, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a chronic and disabling condition that often proves to be treatment resistant. Of the patients suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder, 10%–27% may attempt suicide at least once in their life. We report the case of a patient who presented severe obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms and attempted suicide ingesting 25 tablets of fluoxetine (20 mg). The patient was treated with venlafaxine and agomelatine and showed improvement of obsessive symptoms and suicidal ideation. Future studies are needed to investigate this treatment regime in large cohorts of obsessive-compulsive disorder patients with suicidal ideation. PMID:27489668

  9. Venlafaxine augmentation with agomelatine in a patient with obsessive-compulsive disorder and suicidal behaviors.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, Maria S; Concerto, Carmen; Battaglia, Eliana; Costanzo, Maria C; Battaglia, Fortunato; Aguglia, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a chronic and disabling condition that often proves to be treatment resistant. Of the patients suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder, 10%-27% may attempt suicide at least once in their life. We report the case of a patient who presented severe obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms and attempted suicide ingesting 25 tablets of fluoxetine (20 mg). The patient was treated with venlafaxine and agomelatine and showed improvement of obsessive symptoms and suicidal ideation. Future studies are needed to investigate this treatment regime in large cohorts of obsessive-compulsive disorder patients with suicidal ideation.

  10. Predicting Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Subtypes Using Cognitive Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Zahra; Mohammadi, Nourollah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies have emphasized the important role of cognitive beliefs in etiology and maintenance of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). OCD has different subtypes, but the specific role of cognitive beliefs in OCD symptomatology is not clear. The aim of the current study was to determine whether the cognitive factors proposed by Obsessive Compulsive Cognitions Working Group (OCCWG) could specifically predict subtypes of OCD. Method: The question was investigated in a sample of 208 university students (mean age = 21, SD = 1.6). The target population was selected by cluster sampling. All participants completed two questionnaires including Obsessive Beliefs Questionnaire (OBQ-44) and Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression analysis. Results: Regression analysis demonstrated that “responsibility/ threat over estimation” was a significant predictor of obsessive and compulsive behaviors and predicted washing, checking, obsessing, hoarding, and neutralizing subtypes of OCD. Furthermore, “perfectionism and intolerance of uncertainty” was the most significant predictor of ordering and hoarding while “importance/ control of thought” predicted ordering only. Conclusion: This study found evidence in support of Salkovskis’ cognitive theory about the central role of inflated responsibility beliefs in developing different subtypes of OCD. Besides, the results revealed those other cognitive beliefs had less important role in the development of OCD symptoms. PMID:27437003

  11. Contemporary models of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: An evaluation with a large clinical sample.

    PubMed

    De Nadai, Alessandro; Nagpal, Prianka S; Piacentini, John; Peris, Tara S; Geffken, Gary R; Geller, Daniel A; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A; Lewin, Adam B

    2015-09-30

    We evaluated the construct validity of the Child Yale-Brofwn Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CYBOCS) in a large clinical sample (N=730) using confirmatory factor analysis. Results found inadequate fit for a priori models, though a model accounting for overlapping item content displayed good fit. Parallel obsessions/compulsions items may provide largely redundant information on the CYBOCS. Findings suggest modifying the CYBOCS to reduce burden on researchers, patients, and clinicians, and to more accurately measure pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

  12. Defining Treatment Response and Remission in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Signal Detection Analysis of the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Lewin, Adam B.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the optimal Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) percent reduction cutoffs for predicting treatment response and clinical remission among children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Youth with OCD (N = 109; range 7 to 19 years) received 14 sessions of weekly or intensive…

  13. Dance-Like Movements in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Bavle, Amar; Kumar, Kottur; Sharath, Vishwaraj

    2016-01-01

    The presentation of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is sometimes unusual and can mimic other disorders. There are a number of rare and varied manifestations of this disorder, reported in literature. The case reported here, presented with a hitherto unreported symptom; a dance-like compulsion in a case of OCD. This symptom is notable for the influence of cultural environment, on the content of symptom manifestation, in a psychiatric disorder. When one symptom in a disorder presents itself very prominently, the other symptoms, which are less prominent become masked; and need to be elicited by detailed assessment. PMID:27114632

  14. Dance-Like Movements in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Amar; Kumar, Kottur; Sharath, Vishwaraj

    2016-01-01

    The presentation of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is sometimes unusual and can mimic other disorders. There are a number of rare and varied manifestations of this disorder, reported in literature. The case reported here, presented with a hitherto unreported symptom; a dance-like compulsion in a case of OCD. This symptom is notable for the influence of cultural environment, on the content of symptom manifestation, in a psychiatric disorder. When one symptom in a disorder presents itself very prominently, the other symptoms, which are less prominent become masked; and need to be elicited by detailed assessment. PMID:27114632

  15. Insight in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Jane L.; Phillips, Katharine A.; Coles, Meredith E.; Rasmussen, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Similarities between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) have been described in terms of clinical presentation, comorbidity rates, treatment response profiles, and other features. This is the first study to compare insight in OCD and BDD measuring global insight and numerous components of insight. We compared insight in 64 adult outpatients with DSM-IV OCD and 85 adult outpatients with DSM-IV BDD using a reliable and valid measure (the Brown Assessment of Beliefs Scale [BABS]). BDD patients had significantly poorer global insight than OCD patients. BDD patients also had significantly poorer insight on the following components of insight: conviction that the belief is accurate, perception of other’s views of the belief, explanation for differing views, willingness to consider that the belief is wrong, and recognition that the belief has a psychiatric/psychological cause. Poorer insight was significantly positively correlated with more severe symptoms of the disorder only in the BDD group. PMID:14671731

  16. The relationship between metacognitions and insight in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Önen, Sinay; Karakaş Uğurlu, Görkem; Çayköylü, Ali

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between metacognitions and insight in obsessive compulsive disorder. One hundred individuals who had been diagnosed according to "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition Text Revision" criteria as having obsessive compulsive disorder and 50 healthy controls are included in the study. A sociodemographic and clinical data form, the Yale-Brown Obsession and Compulsion Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory were given to the participants. Insight is assessed by the 11th item of the Yale-Brown Obsession and Compulsion Scale. The Metacognition Questionnaire-30 was administered to both the obsessive compulsive disorder and the control groups to assess metacognitions. We found that the metacognition scores were statistically different in all groups and that the metacognition scores were higher in the obsessive compulsive disorder with good insight group than in the obsessive compulsive disorder with poor insight and control groups. In the obsessive compulsive disorder with poor insight group, all of the metacognition subscale scores were lower than those in the obsessive compulsive disorder with good insight group. Our findings elucidate the relationship between metacognitions and insight in obsessive compulsive disorder.

  17. Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Research in etiology, neurobiology, genetics, clinical correlates, and evidence-based treatments in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder indicate a need for the revision of the Practice Parameters for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder first published a decade ago. The…

  18. Abnormal Sexual Behavior in an Adult Male with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Raguraman, Janakiraman; Priyadharshini, Kothai R.; Chandrasekaran, R.; Vijaysagar, John

    2004-01-01

    A male patient with homosexual obsession in obsessive compulsive disorder shows a better outcome following a combination of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. This case report emphasizes the importance of combination therapy in obsessive compulsive disorder with abnormal sexual impulses and behavior. PMID:21206800

  19. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Presenting with Compulsions to Urinate Frequently.

    PubMed

    Jiwanmall, Stephen Amarjeet; Kattula, Dheeraj

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common psychiatric disorder which is easily recognized. However, sometimes patients of OCD present in such an atypical presentation of symptoms and a pathway to care involving multiple specialities. We report a case of a girl who had consulted several physicians and a urologist for frequent micturition, who was treated as a case of OCD after clarifying the compulsive nature of her symptom. There was significant improvement in her condition following 8 weeks of treatment with 200 mg of Sertraline and behaviour therapy. PMID:27570353

  20. Intact coding region of the serotonin transporter gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Altemus, M.; Murphy, D.L.; Greenberg, B.; Lesch, K.P.

    1996-07-26

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that obsessive-compulsive disorder is genetically transmitted in some families, although no genetic abnormalities have been identified in individuals with this disorder. The selective response of obsessive-compulsive disorder to treatment with agents which block serotonin reuptake suggests the gene coding for the serotonin transporter as a candidate gene. The primary structure of the serotonin-transporter coding region was sequenced in 22 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, using direct PCR sequencing of cDNA synthesized from platelet serotonin-transporter mRNA. No variations in amino acid sequence were found among the obsessive-compulsive disorder patients or healthy controls. These results do not support a role for alteration in the primary structure of the coding region of the serotonin-transporter gene in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder. 27 refs.

  1. The Presentation of Childhood Obsessive--Compulsive Disorder across Home and School Settings: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabuncuoglu, Osman; Berkem, Meral

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the exact pattern of obsessive--compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms in children displayed across school and home settings. Twenty-six school children (aged 7 through 17) with OCD were tested using the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS), the Clinical Global Impression (CGI)--severity subscale and…

  2. A Review of the Pharmacotherapy of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Schizophrenia: The Case of Sam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randhawa, Ramandeep S.

    2005-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive symptoms are a common feature of schizophrenia, and high rates of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been reported in schizophrenic patients. Effective pharmacotherapeutic options are available for both OCD and schizophrenia, and for some patients combining medications targeted at both conditions may be a helpful…

  3. Serum Cytokine Profiles of Children with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Shows the Evidence of Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Tuğba; Çim, Abdullah; Kaya, Savaş

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous reports have described an association between autoimmunity and primary obsessive compulsive disorder. This study aimed to investigate any differences in the levels of T helper 1, 2, and 17 effector cell cytokines between obsessive compulsive disorder patients and the control group. Methods: The study included 34 children (23 males, 11 females), aged between 7 and 17 years, with a diagnosis of obsessive compulsive disorder prior to receiving treatment. The control group consisted of age- and gender-matched children. Study participants were assessed using the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, Present and Lifetime version, Children’s Yale Brown Obsession Compulsion Scale, and Children’s Depression Inventory. Cytokine serum concentrations were measured using the BD Cytometric Bead Array Human Th1/Th2/Th17 Cytokine Kit. Results: Interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-2 levels were significantly higher in obsessive compulsive disorder patients, However, there was no correlation between T helper 1 and 17 cytokine profiles in the obsessive compulsive disorder group. The duration and severity of obsessive compulsive disorder symptoms were not significantly associated with interleukin-17A, interferon-gamma-γ, interleukin-10, interleukin-6, interleukin-4, and interleukin-2 levels. Interestingly, a negative correlation was found between tumor necrosis factor-α levels and Clinical Global Impression scores. Conclusions: These findings suggest, in some cases, obsessive compulsive disorder may develop on a background of autoimmunity, and interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-17A may play a role in these autoimmune processes. Therefore, we believe it is important to investigate for obsessive compulsive disorder symptoms in patients with autoimmune disease and, conversely, autoimmune diseases in obsessive compulsive disorder patients. PMID:27207913

  4. Neurological soft signs in schizophrenia and obsessive compulsive disorder spectrum.

    PubMed

    Tumkaya, S; Karadag, F; Oguzhanoglu, N K

    2012-04-01

    Obsessive compulsive symptoms are more frequent in patients with schizophrenia compared to normal population. Patients with obsessive compulsive disorder may also exhibit psychosis-like symptoms. Based on these findings, it has been suggested that there is a spectrum of disorders between OCD and schizophrenia. We compared two OCD groups (with good and poor insight) and two schizophrenia groups (with and without OCD) in this recommended spectrum especially in terms of neurological soft signs (NSSs) associated with sensory integration. The schizophrenia with OCD (schizo-obsessive) group exhibited worse performance than the schizophrenia group (p=0.002) in only graphesthesia tasks. Moreover, schizo-obsessive patients exhibited worse performance compared to OCD patients in terms of graphesthesia (p=0.001) and audiovisual integration (p=0.001). Interestingly, OCD patients with poor insight tended to exhibit graphesthesia deficit in a similar manner to schizo-obsessive patients rather than OCD patients. According to our results, graphesthesia disorder is strongly associated both with OCD and schizophrenia. This suggests that neurodevelopmental disorders that lead to graphesthesia disorder overlap in comorbid OCD and schizophrenia patients.

  5. Screening for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anxiety Disorder Treating Anxiety Disorders: Educational Videos Clinical Practice Review for Major Depressive Disorder Meetings & Events Mental Health Apps Announcements Awards Alies Muskin Career Development ...

  6. Why Do Eating Disorders and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Co-Occur?

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Lauren O.; Forbush, Kelsie T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an alternative, dimensionally based approach to understanding the reasons for comorbidity between eating disorders and obsessive compulsive disorder. Participants from a representative community sample (N=407; 47% female) completed self-report measures of eating pathology, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, perfectionism, and neuroticism. Hierarchical multiple regression indicated that neuroticism and perfectionism completely mediated associations between most obsessive-compulsive and eating disorder symptoms. However, body dissatisfaction shared unique associations with checking, cleaning, and obsessive rituals that could not be explained by these personality traits. Results suggest that shared personality traits play a key role in the comorbidity between eating disorders characterized by binge eating and dietary restraint and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Future studies are needed to examine whether similar underlying neurocognitive processes that give rise to compulsive checking, cleaning, and obsessive rituals may also contribute to the development and maintenance of body checking in individuals diagnosed with eating disorders. PMID:23557823

  7. The relationship between eating disorder symptoms and obsessive compulsive disorder in primigravida women

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadirizi, Soheila; Kordi, Masoumeh; Shakeri, Mohamad Taghi; Modares-Gharavi, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Eating Disorder Symptoms are among the most common disorders in perinatal period and are influenced by various environmental and psychosocial factors such as anxiety disorders. So, the aim of this study was to determine the relationship between Eating Disorder symptoms and Obsessive Compulsive disorder in primigravida women. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried on 213 in primigravida women referring to Mashhad health care centers, selected through a two stage sampling method (cluster-convenience) in Mashhad in 2013. Demographic and prenatal characteristics Questionnaire, Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q)(26Q) and Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Questionnaire (30Q) were completed by the subjects. The statistical analysis was performed with various statistical tests such as Pearson correlation coefficient, t-test, one-way ANOVA and linear regression. Significance level was considered as P < 0.05. Results: Based on the findings 94.6% of the subjects had Obsessive Compulsive disorder, and 18% had Eating Disorder Symptoms. In addition, there was a poor positive correlation between the rate of Eating Disorder Symptoms and Obsessive Compulsive. Conclusions: There was a correlation between the Eating Disorder Symptoms and Obsessive Compulsive in pregnant women. It is recommended to eliminate or decrease Eating Disorder Symptoms and Obsessive Compulsive among Iranian pregnant women through preventive measures. PMID:26793246

  8. Cigarette smoking in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder: a report from the International College of Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS).

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Nicolini, Humberto; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Benatti, Beatrice; Spagnolin, Gregorio; Palazzo, M Carlotta; Marazziti, Donatella; Hollander, Eric; Fineberg, Naomi; Stein, Dan J; Pallanti, Stefano; Van Ameringen, Michael; Lochner, Christine; Hranov, Georgi; Karamustafalioglu, Oguz; Hranov, Luchezar; Zohar, Joseph; Denys, Damiaan; Altamura, A Carlo; Menchon, Jose M

    2015-10-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) showed a lower prevalence of cigarette smoking compared to other psychiatric disorders in previous and recent reports. We assessed the prevalence and clinical correlates of the phenomenon in an international sample of 504 OCD patients recruited through the International College of Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS) network. Cigarette smoking showed a cross-sectional prevalence of 24.4% in the sample, with significant differences across countries. Females were more represented among smoking patients (16% vs 7%; p<.001). Patients with comorbid Tourette's syndrome (p<.05) and tic disorder (p<.05) were also more represented among smoking subjects. Former smokers reported a higher number of suicide attempts (p<.05). We found a lower cross-sectional prevalence of smoking among OCD patients compared to findings from previous studies in patients with other psychiatric disorders but higher compared to previous and more recent OCD studies. Geographic differences were found and smoking was more common in females and comorbid Tourette's syndrome/tic disorder.

  9. Use of benzodiazepines in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Starcevic, Vladan; Berle, David; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Brakoulias, Vlasios; Ferrão, Ygor A; Viswasam, Kirupamani; Shavitt, Roseli; Miguel, Euripedes; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the frequency of benzodiazepine (BDZ) use in a large sample of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and ascertain the type of BDZ used and the correlates and predictors of BDZ use in OCD. The sample consisted of 955 patients with OCD from a comprehensive, cross-sectional, multicentre study conducted by the Brazilian Research Consortium on Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders between 2003 and 2009. The rate of BDZ use over time in this OCD sample was 38.4%. Of individuals taking BDZs, 96.7% used them in combination with other medications, usually serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The most commonly used BDZ was clonazepam. Current age, current level of anxiety and number of additional medications for OCD taken over time significantly predicted BDZ use. This is the first study to comprehensively examine BDZ use in OCD patients, demonstrating that it is relatively common, despite recommendations from treatment guidelines. Use of BDZs in combination with several other medications over time and in patients with marked anxiety suggests that OCD patients taking BDZs may be more complex and more difficult to manage. This calls for further research and clarification of the role of BDZs in the treatment of OCD.

  10. Cingulate and thalamic metabolites in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Joseph; Lai, Tsz M; Sheen, Courtney; Salgari, Giulia C; Ly, Ronald; Armstrong, Casey; Chang, Susanna; Levitt, Jennifer G; Salamon, Noriko; Alger, Jeffry R; Feusner, Jamie D

    2016-08-30

    Focal brain metabolic effects detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) represent prospective indices of clinical status and guides to treatment design. Sampling bilateral pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC), anterior middle cingulate cortex (aMCC), and thalamus in 40 adult patients and 16 healthy controls, we examined relationships of the neurometabolites glutamate+glutamine (Glx), creatine+phosphocreatine (Cr), and choline-compounds (Cho) with OCD diagnosis and multiple symptom types. The latter included OC core symptoms (Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale - YBOCS), depressive symptoms (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale - MADRS), and general functioning (Global Assessment Scale - GAS). pACC Glx was 9.7% higher in patients than controls. Within patients, Cr and Cho correlated negatively with YBOCS and MADRS, while Cr correlated positively with the GAS. In aMCC, Cr and Cho correlated negatively with MADRS, while Cr in thalamus correlated positively with GAS. These findings present moderate support for glutamatergic and cingulocentric perspectives on OCD. Based on our prior metabolic model of OCD, we offer one possible interpretation of these group and correlational effects as consequences of a corticothalamic state of elevated glutamatergic receptor activity alongside below-normal glutamatergic transporter activity. PMID:27317876

  11. Striatal circuits, habits, and implications for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Burguière, Eric; Monteiro, Patricia; Mallet, Luc; Feng, Guoping; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates abnormalities in corticostriatal circuits in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and OC-spectrum disorders. Parallels between the emergence of repetitive, compulsive behaviors and the acquisition of automated behaviors suggest that the expression of compulsions could in part involve loss of control of such habitual behaviors. The view that striatal circuit dysfunction is involved in OC-spectrum disorders is strengthened by imaging and other evidence in humans, by discovery of genes related to OCD syndromes, and by functional studies in animal models of these disorders. We highlight this growing concordance of work in genetics and neurobiology suggesting that frontostriatal circuits, and their links with basal ganglia, thalamus and brainstem, are promising candidates for therapeutic intervention in OCD. PMID:25241072

  12. Delusional misidentification syndromes in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Melca, Isabela A; Rodrigues, Clarissa L; Serra-Pinheiro, Maria A; Pantelis, Christos; Velakoulis, Dennis; Mendlowicz, Mauro V; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2013-06-01

    Delusional misidentification syndromes (DMS) have been rarely reported in patients with conditions other than schizophrenia-related disorders, diffuse brain disease (dementia) and focal neurological illness. In this report, we describe DMS (i.e. Capgras and Fregoli syndromes) in two patients with severe and treatment resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), one with paranoid personality disorder (PPD) and the other with a pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) not otherwise specified. While our findings highlight an interesting phenomenon (the occurrence of DMS in OCD), it is presently unclear whether this association is rare or underreported. Misidentification syndromes might be the ultimate result of a combination of obsessive fears and preexisting cognitive bias/deficits, such as mistrustfulness (in PPD) or poor theory of mind (in PDD).

  13. Superstitiousness in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, Peter; Viaud-Delmon, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    It has been speculated that superstitiousness and obsessivecompulsive disorder (OCD) exist along a continuum. The distinction between superstitious behavior italic>and superstitious belief, however, is crucial for any theoretical account of claimed associations between superstitiousness and OCD. By demonstrating that there is a dichotomy between behavior and belief, which is experimentally testable, we can differentiate superstitious behavior from superstitious belief, or magical ideation. Different brain circuits are responsible for these two forms of superstitiousness; thus, determining which type of superstition is prominent in the symptomatology of an individual patient may inform us about the primarily affected neurocognitive systems. PMID:20623929

  14. Prevalence and clinical correlates of obsessive-compulsive disorder in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Devi, Sugnyani; Rao, Naren P; Badamath, Suresh; Chandrashekhar, C R; Janardhan Reddy, Y C

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive compulsive symptoms frequently occur in a substantial proportion of patients with schizophrenia. The term schizoobsessive has been proposed to delineate this subgroup of schizophrenia patients who present with obsessive-compulsive symptoms/disorder. However, whether this co-occurrence is more than just co-morbidity and represents a distinct subgroup remains controversial. A striking variation is noted across studies examining prevalence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms/disorder in schizophrenia patients and their impact on clinical profile of schizophrenia. Hence, in this study, we examined the prevalence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms/disorder in a large sample of consecutively hospitalized schizophrenia patients and compared the clinical and functional characteristics of schizophrenia patients with and without obsessive-compulsive symptoms/disorder. We evaluated 200 consecutive subjects with the DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, Brown Assessment of Beliefs Scale, Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale, Global Assessment of Functioning Scale, Family Interview for Genetic Studies and World Health Organization Quality of Life scale. The prevalence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia was 24% (n=48); 37 of them had obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and 11 had obsessive-compulsive symptoms not amounting to a clinical diagnosis of OCD (OCS). Schizophrenia patients with OCS/OCD had an earlier age at onset of schizophrenia symptoms, lower positive symptoms score, higher co-morbidity with Axis II disorders, higher occurrence of OCD in family and better quality of life. Findings of the study indicate a higher prevalence of OCS/OCD in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia patients with and without OCS/OCD have comparable clinical profile with few exceptions. High rates of OCD in first degree

  15. Shared or induced obsessive compulsive disorder: Is it a reality?

    PubMed Central

    Kirpekar, V. C.; Gawande, S.; Tadke, R.; Bhave, S. H.; Faye, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Shared or induced obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is not yet a distinct diagnosis in classification of psychiatric disorders. In fact, though recognized as a diagnostic category, shared or induced psychotic disorders are rare and most of the literature is based on the case reports. Materials and Methods: We are reporting three case studies manifested with shared or induced OCD (cases with obsessive symptoms that were shared from the primary case in their family). Results: All the cases were treated considering shared or induced OCD as psychopathology. Response to treatment modalities in first and second case and poor response to treatment in third case is suggestive of shared or induced OCD as a distinct entity. It is different from shared psychosis in many ways. Conclusion: Shared or induced OCD is a distinct diagnosis. Greater awareness about this entity among mental health professionals is needed. PMID:24574562

  16. The Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale: Reliability and Validity for Use among 5 to 8 Year Olds with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Jennifer; Flessner, Christopher A.; Garcia, Abbe

    2011-01-01

    The Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) is the instrument of choice for assessing symptom severity in older children (i.e., 8-18 years) diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The reliability and validity of this measure for use among younger children (i.e., 5-8 years of age), however, has never been examined.…

  17. Recent advances in the genetics of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Jack F

    2009-08-01

    This article reviews recent developments in understanding the genetic etiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Family studies provide further support for the familial aggregation of OCD. Genome-wide linkage studies indicate that specific chromosomal regions are linked to OCD. Moreover, results from recent molecular genetic studies suggest that several candidate genes are associated with OCD. However, specific genes causing OCD have not been conclusively identified, and the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder has not been elucidated. The search for genes is complicated by the clinical and etiologic heterogeneity of OCD, as well as the possibility of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Despite this complexity, further refinement of the phenotype and developments in molecular and statistical genetics hold promise for further deepening our genetic understanding of OCD in the future.

  18. Preschool children with obsessive-compulsive disorder and fluoxetine treatment.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Eyup Sabri; Kandulu, Rasiha; Akyol Ardic, Ulku

    2012-03-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder which can substantially disable children's ability to function at home and school. Clinicians frequently rely on knowledge about symptoms that can be examined early in treatment to determine future treatment effectiveness. However, OCD in preschoolers has also received little attention in literature. To the best of our knowledge, there is only one retrospective chart review and one case report in the literature for preschool cases treated with SSRIs. Therefore, the effect of fluoxetine on preschool children was imprecisely understood. The aim of this case report was to examine the efficacy and safety of fluoxetine treatment for pediatric OCD. Four preschool children with OCD completed an 8-week fluoxetine (up to 20 mg) trial. We diagnosed OCD according to Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria and symptoms of OCD were assessed with the Childrens' Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS). Initial and post-treatment symptom severity and improvement were assessed by using the severity (S) and improvement (I) scales of Clinical Global Impressions Scale (CGI). The CY-BOCS total, obsessions and compulsions subscale scores and CGI-S scores were significantly improved for all of the cases at the end of the eighth week. In this case report four preschool children, with severe OCD and resistant to the previous non-psychopharmacologic treatment responded well to fluoxetine monotherapy. On the other hand, the usage of SSRIs in preschool children remains highly controversial, due to the lack of data on safety and efficacy. PMID:22271063

  19. Somatic treatments excluding psychopharmacology in obsessive- compulsive disorder: a review.

    PubMed

    Atmaca, Murad

    2013-06-01

    Somatic treatments other than psychotropic drugs are increasingly used in the patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), however there has been little systematic review of them. Therefore, the present review deals with a variety of somatic treatment methods excluding psychotropic drugs. A literature search was performed on the PubMed database from the beginning of 1980, to September 2012, for published English, Turkish and French-language articles of somatic treatment approaches (excluding psychopharmacological agents) in the treatment of OCD. The search was carried out by using some terms in detail. Afterwards, the obtained investigations on electroconvusive therapy (ECT), deep brain stimulation (DBS), neurosurgical methods and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were presented. Although psychopharmacological treatment and psychotherapeutic approaches are primary treatment modalities in the management of OCD, other somatic treatment options seem to be used as alternatives, especially for patients with treatmentresistant OCD. PMID:24032546

  20. Learning From Animal Models of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Patricia; Feng, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) affects 2%-3% of the population worldwide and can cause significant distress and disability. Substantial challenges remain in the field of OCD research and therapeutics. Approved interventions alleviate symptoms only partially, with 30%-40% of patients being resistant to treatment. Although the etiology of OCD is still unknown, research evidence points toward the involvement of cortico-striato-thalamocortical circuitry. This review focuses on the most recent behavioral, genetics, and neurophysiologic findings from animal models of OCD. Based on evidence from these models and parallels with human studies, we discuss the circuit hyperactivity hypothesis for OCD, a potential circuitry dysfunction of action termination, and the involvement of candidate genes. Adding a more biologically valid framework to OCD will help researchers define and test new hypotheses and facilitate the development of targeted therapies based on disease-specific mechanisms.

  1. Evidence-Based Assessment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Amy M; Bergman, R Lindsay; Piacentini, John; McGuire, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric illness that often develops in childhood, affects 1%-2% of the population, and causes significant impairment across the lifespan. The first step in identifying and treating OCD is a thorough evidence-based assessment. This paper reviews the administration pragmatics, psychometric properties, and limitations of commonly used assessment measures for adults and youths with OCD. This includes diagnostic interviews, clinician-administered symptom severity scales, self-report measures, and parent/child measures. Additionally, adjunctive measures that assess important related factors (ie, impairment, family accommodation, and insight) are also discussed. This paper concludes with recommendations for an evidence-based assessment based on individualized assessment goals that include generating an OCD diagnosis, determining symptom severity, and monitoring treatment progress. PMID:27594793

  2. Somatic treatments excluding psychopharmacology in obsessive- compulsive disorder: a review.

    PubMed

    Atmaca, Murad

    2013-06-01

    Somatic treatments other than psychotropic drugs are increasingly used in the patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), however there has been little systematic review of them. Therefore, the present review deals with a variety of somatic treatment methods excluding psychotropic drugs. A literature search was performed on the PubMed database from the beginning of 1980, to September 2012, for published English, Turkish and French-language articles of somatic treatment approaches (excluding psychopharmacological agents) in the treatment of OCD. The search was carried out by using some terms in detail. Afterwards, the obtained investigations on electroconvusive therapy (ECT), deep brain stimulation (DBS), neurosurgical methods and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were presented. Although psychopharmacological treatment and psychotherapeutic approaches are primary treatment modalities in the management of OCD, other somatic treatment options seem to be used as alternatives, especially for patients with treatmentresistant OCD.

  3. Cognitive behavioral therapy of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Foa, Edna B

    2010-01-01

    Until the mid-1960s, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was considered to be treatment-resistant, as both psychodynamic psychotherapy and medication had been unsuccessful in significantly reducing OCD symptoms. The first real breakthrough came in 1966 with the introduction of exposure and ritual prevention. This paper will discuss the cognitive behavioral conceptualizations that influenced the development of cognitive behavioral treatments for OCD. There will be a brief discussion of the use of psychodynamic psychotherapy and early behavioral therapy, neither of which produced successful outcomes with OCD. The main part of the paper will be devoted to current cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with an emphasis on variants of exposure and ritual or response prevention (EX/RP) treatments, the therapy that has shown the most empirical evidence of its efficacy.

  4. Learning From Animal Models of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Patricia; Feng, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) affects 2%-3% of the population worldwide and can cause significant distress and disability. Substantial challenges remain in the field of OCD research and therapeutics. Approved interventions alleviate symptoms only partially, with 30%-40% of patients being resistant to treatment. Although the etiology of OCD is still unknown, research evidence points toward the involvement of cortico-striato-thalamocortical circuitry. This review focuses on the most recent behavioral, genetics, and neurophysiologic findings from animal models of OCD. Based on evidence from these models and parallels with human studies, we discuss the circuit hyperactivity hypothesis for OCD, a potential circuitry dysfunction of action termination, and the involvement of candidate genes. Adding a more biologically valid framework to OCD will help researchers define and test new hypotheses and facilitate the development of targeted therapies based on disease-specific mechanisms. PMID:26037910

  5. Glutamate modulators in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pittenger, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Established treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are of benefit in approximately 3 of every 4 patients, but refractory disease remains distressingly common, and many treatment responders continue to experience considerable morbidity. This motivates a search for new insights into pathophysiology that may inform novel treatment strategies. Much recent work has focused on the neurotransmitter glutamate. Several lines of neurochemical and genetic evidence suggests that glutamate dysregulation may contribute to OCD, although much remains unclear. The off-label use of a number of pharmacological agents approved for other indications has been investigated in refractory OCD. We summarize investigations of memantine, riluzole, ketamine, D-cycloserine, glycine, N-acetylserine, topiramate, and lamotrigine. Evidence exists for benefit from each of these in some patients; though none has been proven effective with sufficient clarity to be considered part of standard care, these agents are options in individuals whose symptoms are refractory to better-established therapeutic strategies. PMID:26236057

  6. [Explicative psychopathology in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a postrationalist viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Mannino, Gherardo

    2011-01-01

    While descriptive psychopathology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is now well-established, there is still a lack of a satisfying model of explicative psychopathology that explains the mechanisms that generate obsessive phenomenology. The main attempts to delineate such a model are based on cognitive therapy: according to this approach OCD is a consequence of dysfunctional beliefs (i.e. overestimation of the risk or of the influence of one's own mind on the reality). On the contrary, according to postrationalist cognitive approach, OCD would be based on a characteristic personality structure, which could be identified not only in patients with OCD but also in those who will never develop symptoms. In symptomatic individuals this organization ("Obsessive" Personal Meaning Organization) is more rigidly structured. In particular, there is crystallization of so-called diachronic attitude, which is the key to explain most of the symptoms. PMID:22322688

  7. Hoarding and its relation to obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kevin D; Watson, David

    2005-07-01

    Although hoarding is observed in some patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), it has not been shown to share a specific relation with OCD. Across two studies, we found that (a) whereas the classic OCD symptoms of checking, rituals, and contamination intercorrelated consistently strongly with one another, hoarding related only moderately to both these OCD symptoms and to depression; (b) OCD patients were distinguished from both other patients and non-patients by classic OCD symptoms, but not by hoarding; and (c) whereas OCD symptoms showed consistent relations with Negative Affect, hoarding largely was uncorrelated with this dimension. These results do not support a specific OCD-hoarding relation but rather call into question the trend of considering it a specific symptom of OCD. PMID:15896286

  8. The assessment and management of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    McConaghy, N

    1991-06-01

    This article describes obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and discusses its diagnosis and its management by behavioural therapy combined with antidepressant medication. Patients with OCD experience recurrent distressing thoughts which may lead them to avoid certain situations and to carry out protective rituals. Behavioural treatment is considered specific. The therapist establishes a relationship with the patient by which he or she can be motivated to cease the thoughts and the avoidance and ritual behaviour. The patient's family can play an important role in the therapy. The treatment is usually easier if the patient can accept taking clomipramine. Patients who, despite severe symptoms, are able to carry out their normal activities usually respond well to treatment. Those who cannot tolerate stress and have had to cease most of their normal activities usually do not respond well and require supportive therapy.

  9. Scrupulosity: a unique subtype of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David; Huppert, Jonathan D

    2010-08-01

    The earliest descriptions of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) were religious, as was the understanding of their origins. With the emancipation, religion in OCD was relegated to its status today: a less common symptom of OCD in most Western societies known as scrupulosity. The frequency of scrupulosity in OCD varies in the literature from 0% to 93% of cases, and this variability seems predicated on the importance of religious belief and observance in the community examined. Despite the similarities between religious ritual and compulsions, the evidence to date that religion increases the risk of the development of OCD is scarce. Scrupulosity is presented as a classic version of OCD, with obsessions and compulsions, distress, and diminished functioning similar to those of other forms of OCD. The differentiation between normal religiosity and scrupulosity is presented, and the unique aspects of cognitive-behavioral therapy in treating scrupulosity, especially in religious populations, are reviewed.

  10. Psychometric properties of the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale in youth with autism spectrum disorders and obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Monica S; McGuire, Joseph F; Arnold, Elysse B; Lewin, Adam B; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) were investigated in 46 treatment-seeking youth, 7-15 years of age, who were diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and exhibited obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The CY-BOCS Total score exhibited good internal consistency, with differing internal consistencies observed on the Obsession Severity scale (α = 0.86) and Compulsion Severity scale (α = 0.59). Good to excellent inter-rater reliability was observed for the CY-BOCS Total score and both Severity scales. Convergent and divergent validity of the CY-BOCS Total score and both Severity scales were satisfactory. Insight into obsessive-compulsive symptoms was moderately associated with the CY-BOCS Total score. The CY-BOCS demonstrated treatment sensitivity, demonstrating significant changes in obsessive-compulsive symptoms within a subsample of youth receiving cognitive-behavioral treatment. Overall, the CY-BOCS demonstrated adequate psychometric properties and utility in assessing obsessive-compulsive symptoms in youth with ASD and clinically significant obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

  11. Differential-diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in the borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Brunnhuber, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive symptoms are clinically unspecific and can be found in numerous disorders. Within the framework of psychotherapeutically treatable illnesses, the classical obsessive-compulsive neurosis can be distinguished from early anancastia in the case of borderline personality disorder. The text refers to some aspects of the obsessive-compulsive disorder within these earlier disorders. At least five characteristics can be discussed: In the course of this, the varying functions of obsessive-compulsive symptoms for the inner-psychological organization become clear and specifically show that on a low structural level, symptoms do not appear to be primarily pathological but are a part of a "quasi-physiological" and ego-sustaining mechanism. What remains open to discussion in the end is, whether there may be an important substratum for the basis of a historiographical biology as called repeatedly for from psychosomatic theory repeatedly. In addition to this, the awareness of both forms is an important requirement for treatment.

  12. Aripiprazole augmentation in poor insight obsessive-compulsive disorder: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Michele; Gabrielli, Filippo; Mattei, Chiara; Vinciguerra, Valentina; Fornaro, Pantaleo

    2008-01-01

    Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder is associated with a relevant impairment in social and interpersonal functioning and severe disability. This seems to be particularly true for the poor insight subtype, characterised by a lack of consciousness of illness and, consequently, compliance with treatment. Poor responsiveness to serotonergic drugs in poor insight obsessive-compulsive patients may also require an augmentation therapy with atypical antipsychotics. Methods We reviewed a case in which a patient with a long history of poor insight obsessive-compulsive disorder was treated with a high dosage of serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Results The treatment resulted in a poor outcome. This patient was therefore augmentated with aripiprazole. Conclusion Doctors should consider aripiprazole as a possible augmentation strategy for serotonergic poor responder obsessive-compulsive patients, but further research on these subjects is needed. PMID:19105842

  13. Assessment and medication management of paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S Evelyn; Hezel, Dianne; Stachon, Andrea C

    2012-05-01

    Paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, yet under-recognized, neuropsychiatric illness in both clinical and community settings. Symptoms tend to be hidden or misunderstood by affected youth, and parents may inadvertently accommodate OCD, thus worsening its severity. These symptoms may include compulsive reassurance seeking, confessing and 'just right' rituals, in addition to more classic OCD behaviours. Fortunately, numerous psychometric measures are available to assist in clinical assessment of this disorder and its sequelae. Once properly diagnosed, paediatric OCD is highly treatable with empirically proven approaches including cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) and serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) medications. Clinically meaningful symptom improvement is the norm following these strategies, although full remission is not, as symptoms tend to wax and wane over time. Paediatric OCD is highly co-morbid with other anxiety disorders, tic disorders, depression and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, which also require specific attention. For moderate to severe OCD, an interdisciplinary approach combining individual and family CBT with SRI trials is recommended. For severe treatment-refractory illness, early evidence supports the benefit of augmenting agents, such as atypical antipsychotics and potentially those with glutamatergic activity. Clinical outcome assessment in paediatric OCD should always include broad domains of individual and family functioning, in addition to symptom improvement.

  14. Seeking proxies for internal states in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Lazarov, Amit; Liberman, Nira; Hermesh, Haggai; Dar, Reuven

    2014-11-01

    Pervasive doubts are a central feature of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We have theorized that obsessive doubts can arise in relation to any internal state and lead to compensatory reliance on more discernible substitutes (proxies), including rules and rituals. Previous findings corroborated this hypothesis, but were based on students with high and low OCD tendencies and did not control for anxiety. The present study tested our hypothesis in OCD participants using both anxiety disorders and nonclinical controls. Twenty OCD participants, 20 anxiety disorders participants, and 20 nonclinical participants underwent 2 experimental procedures. In the first, participants had to produce specific levels of muscle tension with and without the aid of biofeedback. In the second, participants were asked to subjectively assess their own muscle tension after viewing preprogrammed false feedback showing either increasing or decreasing levels of muscle tension. As predicted, OCD participants were less accurate than anxiety disorder and nonclinical participants in producing designated levels of muscle tension when biofeedback was not available and more likely to request the biofeedback when given the opportunity to do so. In the false feedback procedure, OCD participants were more influenced by the false biofeedback when judging their own level of muscle tension compared with the 2 controls groups. In both procedures, anxiety disorder participants did not differ from the nonclinical controls. These results support the hypothesis that individuals with OCD have attenuated access to and reduced confidence in their internal states, and that this deficit is specific to OCD and not attributable to anxiety. PMID:25133987

  15. Hoarding in Children and Adolescents with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Jack; Grados, Marco A.; Riddle, Mark A.; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Goes, Fernando S.; Cullen, Bernadette; Wang, Ying; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Fyer, Abby J.; McCracken, James T.; Geller, Dan; Murphy, Dennis L.; Knowles, James A.; Rasmussen, Steven A.; McLaughlin, Nicole C.; Piacentini, John; Pauls, David L.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Shugart, Yin-Yao; Maher, Brion; Pulver, Ann E.; Nestadt, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Compared to studies in adults, there have been few studies of hoarding in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In the current study, we evaluated OCD clinical features, Axis I disorders, and social reciprocity scores in 641 children and adolescents with OCD, of whom 163 (25%) had hoarding compulsions and 478 did not. We found that, as a group, youth with hoarding had an earlier age at onset and more severe lifetime OCD symptoms, poorer insight, more difficulty making decisions and completing tasks, and more overall impairment. The hoarding group also had a greater lifetime prevalence of panic disorder, specific phobia, Tourette disorder, and tics. As measured with the Social Reciprocity Scale, the hoarding group had more severe deficits in parent-rated domains of social communication, social motivation, and restricted interests and repetitive behavior. In a multivariable model, the overall social reciprocity score, age at onset of OCD symptoms, symmetry obsessions, and indecision were independently related to hoarding in these children and adolescents with OCD. These features should be considered as candidate risk factors for the development of hoarding behavior in pediatric OCD. PMID:25309849

  16. Shame in the obsessive compulsive related disorders: A conceptual review

    PubMed Central

    Weingarden, Hilary; Renshaw, Keith D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Theoretical and anecdotal support for the role of shame in obsessive compulsive related disorders (OCRDs) is prominent. Developing our understanding of shame’s role in OCRDs is important to building knowledge about this new diagnostic category. This review aims to consolidate our understanding of shame in each OCRD, through summarizing existing clinical, conceptual, and empirical work. Methods We provide an overview of shame, its measurement considerations, and a full review of 110 articles addressing shame in OCRDs. Results General shame and shame about having a mental illness are the broadest types of shame relevant to OCRDs; symptom-based shame and body shame may be more specific to OCRDs. In OCD, violent, sexual, or blasphemous obsessions may trigger symptom-based shame. In trichotillomania (TTM) and skin picking (SP), symptom-based shame may be related to pulling, picking, and post-pulling/picking behaviors. In hoarding disorder, symptom-based shame may accompany beliefs about being defective due to living with clutter. Body shame appears inherent to body dysmorphic disorder, while in TTM and SP it may arise as a secondary response to damage resulting from body focused repetitive behaviors. Limitations Much of the current knowledge on shame in OCRDs comes from anecdotal, case, and conceptual work. Empirical studies do not always assess specific types of shame, instead assessing shame as a general construct. Conclusions Shame is closely related to OCRDs. Clinical and research recommendations drawing from the literature are provided. PMID:25299438

  17. Compulsivity in obsessive-compulsive disorder and addictions.

    PubMed

    Figee, Martijn; Pattij, Tommy; Willuhn, Ingo; Luigjes, Judy; van den Brink, Wim; Goudriaan, Anneke; Potenza, Marc N; Robbins, Trevor W; Denys, Damiaan

    2016-05-01

    Compulsive behaviors are driven by repetitive urges and typically involve the experience of limited voluntary control over these urges, a diminished ability to delay or inhibit these behaviors, and a tendency to perform repetitive acts in a habitual or stereotyped manner. Compulsivity is not only a central characteristic of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) but is also crucial to addiction. Based on this analogy, OCD has been proposed to be part of the concept of behavioral addiction along with other non-drug-related disorders that share compulsivity, such as pathological gambling, skin-picking, trichotillomania and compulsive eating. In this review, we investigate the neurobiological overlap between compulsivity in substance-use disorders, OCD and behavioral addictions as a validation for the construct of compulsivity that could be adopted in the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC). The reviewed data suggest that compulsivity in OCD and addictions is related to impaired reward and punishment processing with attenuated dopamine release in the ventral striatum, negative reinforcement in limbic systems, cognitive and behavioral inflexibility with diminished serotonergic prefrontal control, and habitual responding with imbalances between ventral and dorsal frontostriatal recruitment. Frontostriatal abnormalities of compulsivity are promising targets for neuromodulation and other interventions for OCD and addictions. We conclude that compulsivity encompasses many of the RDoC constructs in a trans-diagnostic fashion with a common brain circuit dysfunction that can help identifying appropriate prevention and treatment targets. PMID:26774279

  18. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and gut microbiota dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Rees, Jon C

    2014-02-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a debilitating disorder for which the cause is not known and treatment options are modestly beneficial. A hypothesis is presented wherein the root cause of OCD is proposed to be a dysfunction of the gut microbiome constituency resulting in a susceptibility to obsessional thinking. Both stress and antibiotics are proposed as mechanisms by which gut microbiota are altered preceding the onset of OCD symptomology. In this light, pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) leading to episodic OCD is explained not by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections, but rather by prophylactic antibiotics that are administered as treatment. Further, stressful life events known to trigger OCD, such as pregnancy, are recast to show the possibility of altering gut microbiota prior to onset of OCD symptoms. Suggested treatment for OCD would be the directed, specie-specific (re)introduction of beneficial bacteria modifying the gut microbiome, thereby ameliorating OCD symptoms. Special considerations should be contemplated when considering efficacy of treatment, particularly the unhealthy coping strategies often observed in patients with chronic OCD that may need addressing in conjunction with microbiome remediation. PMID:24332563

  19. Obsessive beliefs and neurocognitive flexibility in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Cheryl; Cassin, Stephanie E; Rector, Neil A

    2011-05-15

    A substantial proportion of individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) do not endorse the dysfunctional beliefs proposed by cognitive models of OCD to be important in the onset and maintenance of symptoms. Previous research has attempted to characterize Low and High obsessive beliefs groups in terms of cognitive and symptom correlates to distil potential etiological differences in these subgroups of OCD patients. The current study sought to further examine potential neurocognitive differences between obsessive beliefs subgroups. Performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) was compared between a Low Beliefs OCD subgroup, a High Beliefs OCD subgroup, and two anxious control groups: Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia (PDA) and Social Phobia (SP). The High Beliefs OCD subgroup performed significantly poorer on WCST subscales compared to the other diagnostic groups. These findings were not accounted for by severity of OCD or depressive symptoms. The Low Beliefs OCD subgroup performed similar to the anxiety disorder control groups. The results suggest a potential interplay between heightened obsessive beliefs and neurocognitive inflexibility.

  20. Predictors of Parental Accommodation in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Findings from the Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Treatment Study (POTS) Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flessner, Christopher A.; Freeman, Jennifer B.; Sapyta, Jeffrey; Garcia, Abbe; Franklin, Martin E.; March, John S.; Foa, Edna

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Few studies have examined predictors of parental accommodation (assessed with the Family Accommodation Scale-Parent Report) among families of children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). No studies have examined this phenomenon using empirically derived subscales of the Family Accommodation Scale-Parent Report (i.e., Caregiver…

  1. Patient-reported outcomes in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Mythily; Soh, Pauline; Ong, Clarissa; Esmond Seow, Lee Seng; Picco, Louisa; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the article was to provide an overview of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and related measures that have been examined in the context of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The current review focused on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that evaluated three broad outcome domains: functioning, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and OCD-related symptoms. The present review ultimately included a total of 155 unique articles and 22 PROMs. An examination of the PROs revealed that OCD patients tend to suffer from significant functional disability, and report lower HRQoL than controls. OCD patients report greater symptom severity than patients with other mental disorders and evidence indicates that PROMs are sensitive to change and may be even better than clinician-rated measures at predicting treatment outcomes. Nonetheless, it should be noted that the measures reviewed lacked patient input in their development. Future research on PROMs must involve patient perspectives and include rigorous psychometric evaluation of these measures.

  2. Patient-reported outcomes in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Mythily; Soh, Pauline; Ong, Clarissa; Esmond Seow, Lee Seng; Picco, Louisa; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the article was to provide an overview of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and related measures that have been examined in the context of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The current review focused on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that evaluated three broad outcome domains: functioning, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and OCD-related symptoms. The present review ultimately included a total of 155 unique articles and 22 PROMs. An examination of the PROs revealed that OCD patients tend to suffer from significant functional disability, and report lower HRQoL than controls. OCD patients report greater symptom severity than patients with other mental disorders and evidence indicates that PROMs are sensitive to change and may be even better than clinician-rated measures at predicting treatment outcomes. Nonetheless, it should be noted that the measures reviewed lacked patient input in their development. Future research on PROMs must involve patient perspectives and include rigorous psychometric evaluation of these measures. PMID:25152661

  3. Diagnostic Stability of Internet Addiction in Obsessive-compulsive Disorder: Data from a Naturalistic One-year Treatment Study.

    PubMed

    Bipeta, Rajshekhar; Yerramilli, Srinivasa Srr; Karredla, Ashok Reddy; Gopinath, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    Whether internet addiction should be categorized as a primary psychiatric disorder or the result of an underlying psychiatric disorder still remains unclear. In addition, the relationship between internet addiction and obsessive-compulsive disorder remains to be explored. We hypothesized that internet addiction is a manifestation of underlying psychopathology, the treatment of which will improve internet addiction. We enrolled 34 control subjects (with or without internet addiction) and compared them to 38 patients with "pure" obsessive-compulsive disorder (with or without internet addiction). Internet addiction and obsessive-compulsive disorder were diagnosed based on Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), respectively. Age and Internet Addiction Test scores were comparable in both the control (years: 26.87±6.57; scores: 43.65±11.56) and obsessive-compulsive disorder groups (years: 27.00±6.13 years, p=0.69; scores: 43.47±15.21, p=0.76). Eleven patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (28.95%) were diagnosed with internet addiction as compared to three control subjects (p=0.039). In the obsessive-compulsive disorder group, no difference in the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (24.07±3.73 non-internet addiction, 23.64±4.65 internet addiction; p=0.76) score was seen between the internet addiction/obsessive-compulsive disorder and non-internet addiction/obsessive-compulsive disorder groups. As expected, the Internet Addiction Test scores were higher in the internet addiction/obsessive-compulsive disorder group (64.09±9.63) than in the non-internet addiction/obsessive-compulsive disorder group (35.07±6.37; p=0.00). All enrolled patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder were subsequently treated for a period of one year. Treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder improved Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and Internet Addiction Test scores over time. At 12 months, only

  4. Diagnostic Stability of Internet Addiction in Obsessive-compulsive Disorder: Data from a Naturalistic One-year Treatment Study

    PubMed Central

    Yerramilli, Srinivasa SRR; Karredla, Ashok Reddy; Gopinath, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    Whether internet addiction should be categorized as a primary psychiatric disorder or the result of an underlying psychiatric disorder still remains unclear. In addition, the relationship between internet addiction and obsessive-compulsive disorder remains to be explored. We hypothesized that internet addiction is a manifestation of underlying psychopathology, the treatment of which will improve internet addiction. We enrolled 34 control subjects (with or without internet addiction) and compared them to 38 patients with “pure” obsessive-compulsive disorder (with or without internet addiction). Internet addiction and obsessive-compulsive disorder were diagnosed based on Young’s Diagnostic Questionnaire and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), respectively. Age and Internet Addiction Test scores were comparable in both the control (years: 26.87±6.57; scores: 43.65±11.56) and obsessive-compulsive disorder groups (years: 27.00±6.13 years, p=0.69; scores: 43.47±15.21, p=0.76). Eleven patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (28.95%) were diagnosed with internet addiction as compared to three control subjects (p=0.039). In the obsessive-compulsive disorder group, no difference in the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (24.07±3.73 non-internet addiction, 23.64±4.65 internet addiction; p=0.76) score was seen between the internet addiction/obsessive-compulsive disorder and non-internet addiction/obsessive-compulsive disorder groups. As expected, the Internet Addiction Test scores were higher in the internet addiction/obsessive-compulsive disorder group (64.09±9.63) than in the non-internet addiction/obsessive-compulsive disorder group (35.07±6.37; p=0.00). All enrolled patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder were subsequently treated for a period of one year. Treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder improved Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and Internet Addiction Test scores over time. At 12 months

  5. Decision-making under uncertainty in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Pushkarskaya, Helen; Tolin, David; Ruderman, Lital; Kirshenbaum, Ariel; Kelly, J MacLaren; Pittenger, Christopher; Levy, Ifat

    2015-10-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) produces profound morbidity. Difficulties with decision-making and intolerance of uncertainty are prominent clinical features in many patients. The nature and etiology of these deficits are poorly understood. We used a well-validated choice task, grounded in behavioral economic theory, to investigate differences in valuation and value-based choice during decision making under uncertainty in 20 unmedicated participants with OCD and 20 matched healthy controls. Participants' choices were used to assess individual decision-making characteristics. OCD participants did not differ from healthy controls in how they valued uncertain options when outcome probabilities were known (risk) but were more likely than healthy controls to avoid uncertain options when these probabilities were imprecisely specified (ambiguity). Compared to healthy controls, individuals with OCD were less consistent in their choices and less able to identify options that should be clearly preferable. These abnormalities correlated with symptom severity. These results suggest that value-based choices during decision-making are abnormal in OCD. Individuals with OCD show elevated intolerance of uncertainty, but only when outcome probabilities are themselves uncertain. Future research focused on the neural valuation network, which is implicated in value-based computations, may provide new neurocognitive insights into the pathophysiology of OCD. Deficits in decision-making processes may represent a target for therapeutic intervention.

  6. Arbitration between Action Strategies in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Patricia; Anticevic, Alan; Lee, Daeyeol; Pittenger, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Decision making in a complex world, characterized both by predictable regularities and by frequent departures from the norm, requires dynamic switching between rapid habit-like, automatic processes and slower, more flexible evaluative processes. These strategies, formalized as "model-free" and "model-based" reinforcement learning algorithms, respectively, can lead to divergent behavioral outcomes, requiring a mechanism to arbitrate between them in a context-appropriate manner. Recent data suggest that individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) rely excessively on inflexible habit-like decision making during reinforcement-driven learning. We propose that inflexible reliance on habit in OCD may reflect a functional weakness in the mechanism for context-appropriate dynamic arbitration between model-free and model-based decision making. Support for this hypothesis derives from emerging functional imaging findings. A deficit in arbitration in OCD may help reconcile evidence for excessive reliance on habit in rewarded learning tasks with an older literature suggesting inappropriate recruitment of circuitry associated with model-based decision making in unreinforced procedural learning. The hypothesized deficit and corresponding circuitry may be a particularly fruitful target for interventions, including cognitive remediation.

  7. Decision-making under uncertainty in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Pushkarskaya, Helen; Tolin, David; Ruderman, Lital; Kirshenbaum, Ariel; Kelly, J MacLaren; Pittenger, Christopher; Levy, Ifat

    2015-10-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) produces profound morbidity. Difficulties with decision-making and intolerance of uncertainty are prominent clinical features in many patients. The nature and etiology of these deficits are poorly understood. We used a well-validated choice task, grounded in behavioral economic theory, to investigate differences in valuation and value-based choice during decision making under uncertainty in 20 unmedicated participants with OCD and 20 matched healthy controls. Participants' choices were used to assess individual decision-making characteristics. OCD participants did not differ from healthy controls in how they valued uncertain options when outcome probabilities were known (risk) but were more likely than healthy controls to avoid uncertain options when these probabilities were imprecisely specified (ambiguity). Compared to healthy controls, individuals with OCD were less consistent in their choices and less able to identify options that should be clearly preferable. These abnormalities correlated with symptom severity. These results suggest that value-based choices during decision-making are abnormal in OCD. Individuals with OCD show elevated intolerance of uncertainty, but only when outcome probabilities are themselves uncertain. Future research focused on the neural valuation network, which is implicated in value-based computations, may provide new neurocognitive insights into the pathophysiology of OCD. Deficits in decision-making processes may represent a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26343609

  8. Clinical correlates of obsessive-compulsive symptom dimensions in at-risk mental states and psychotic disorders at early stages.

    PubMed

    Mariné, Rosa; Creus, Marta; Solé, Montse; Cabezas, Ángel; Algora, Maria José; Moreno, Irene; Izquierdo, Eduard; Stojanovic-Pérez, Alexander; Labad, Javier

    2015-08-30

    We studied the clinical correlates of obsessive-compulsive symptom dimensions in 109 individuals with early psychosis (31 At-Risk Mental States [ARMS], 78 psychotic disorders with <3 years of illness) and 59 healthy subjects. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms were assessed by the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory - Revised. We also assessed the severity of psychotic symptoms, depressive symptoms and functioning. ARMS and psychotic disorder patients reported more obsessive-compulsive symptoms than did healthy subjects. The ARMS individuals also reported more overall and checking obsessive-compulsive symptoms compared with the PD patients. Different types of obsessive-compulsive symptoms were related with depressive symptoms in both diagnostic groups. However, a different pattern was observed in the relationship between obsessive-compulsive dimensions and functioning by diagnosis (better functioning in ARMS; poorer functioning in psychotic disorders). Our study suggests that obsessive-compulsive symptoms are present in the early stages of psychotic illness, as well as in individuals at risk for psychosis. Future prospective studies are needed to elucidate how obsessive-compulsive symptoms in ARMS may influence the prognosis in terms of global functioning and the risk of psychosis transition.

  9. Animal models of obsessive-compulsive disorder: utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Pino; López-Solà, Clara; Real, Eva; Segalàs, Cinto; Menchón, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling and common neuropsychiatric condition of poorly known etiology. Many attempts have been made in the last few years to develop animal models of OCD with the aim of clarifying the genetic, neurochemical, and neuroanatomical basis of the disorder, as well as of developing novel pharmacological and neurosurgical treatments that may help to improve the prognosis of the illness. The latter goal is particularly important given that around 40% of patients with OCD do not respond to currently available therapies. This article summarizes strengths and limitations of the leading animal models of OCD including genetic, pharmacologically induced, behavioral manipulation-based, and neurodevelopmental models according to their face, construct, and predictive validity. On the basis of this evaluation, we discuss that currently labeled "animal models of OCD" should be regarded not as models of OCD but, rather, as animal models of different psychopathological processes, such as compulsivity, stereotypy, or perseverance, that are present not only in OCD but also in other psychiatric or neurological disorders. Animal models might constitute a challenging approach to study the neural and genetic mechanism of these phenomena from a trans-diagnostic perspective. Animal models are also of particular interest as tools for developing new therapeutic options for OCD, with the greatest convergence focusing on the glutamatergic system, the role of ovarian and related hormones, and the exploration of new potential targets for deep brain stimulation. Finally, future research on neurocognitive deficits associated with OCD through the use of analogous animal tasks could also provide a genuine opportunity to disentangle the complex etiology of the disorder. PMID:26346234

  10. The Role of the Orbitofrontal Cortex in Normally Developing Compulsive-Like Behaviors and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, David W.; Lewis, Marc D.; Iobst, Emily

    2004-01-01

    Mounting evidence concerning obsessive-compulsive disorders points to abnormal functioning of the orbitofrontal cortices. First, patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) perform poorly on tasks that rely on response suppression/motor inhibition functions mediated by the orbitofrontal cortex relative to both normal and clinical controls.…

  11. Cortical and brainstem plasticity in Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Suppa, Antonio; Marsili, Luca; Di Stasio, Flavio; Berardelli, Isabella; Roselli, Valentina; Pasquini, Massimo; Cardona, Francesco; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2014-10-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is characterized by motor/vocal tics commonly associated with psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder. We investigated primary motor cortex and brainstem plasticity in Tourette patients, exposed and unexposed to chronic drug treatment, with and without psychiatric disturbances. We also investigated primary motor cortex and brainstem plasticity in obsessive-compulsive disorder. We studied 20 Tourette patients with and without psychiatric disturbances, 15 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 20 healthy subjects. All groups included drug-naïve patients. We conditioned the left primary motor cortex with intermittent/continuous theta-burst stimulation and recorded motor evoked potentials. We conditioned the supraorbital nerve with facilitatory/inhibitory high-frequency stimulation and recorded the blink reflex late response area. In healthy subjects, intermittent theta-burst increased and continuous theta-burst stimulation decreased motor evoked potentials. Differently, intermittent theta-burst failed to increase and continuous theta-burst stimulation failed to decrease motor evoked potentials in Tourette patients, with and without psychiatric disturbances. In obsessive-compulsive disorder, intermittent/continuous theta-burst stimulation elicited normal responses. In healthy subjects and in subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder, the blink reflex late response area increased after facilitatory high-frequency and decreased after inhibitory high-frequency stimulation. Conversely, in Tourette patients, with and without psychiatric disturbances, facilitatory/inhibitory high-frequency stimulation left the blink reflex late response area unchanged. Theta-burst and high-frequency stimulation elicited similar responses in drug-naïve and chronically treated patients. Tourette patients have reduced plasticity regardless of psychiatric disturbances. These findings suggest that abnormal plasticity contributes to the

  12. Imbalance in habitual versus goal directed neural systems during symptom provocation in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Banca, Paula; Voon, Valerie; Vestergaard, Martin D; Philipiak, Gregor; Almeida, Inês; Pocinho, Fernando; Relvas, João; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Intrusive thoughts and compulsive urges to perform stereotyped behaviours are typical symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Emerging evidence suggests a cognitive bias towards habit formation at the expense of goal-directed performance in obsessive-compulsive disorder. In this study, we test this hypothesis using a novel individualized ecologically valid symptom provocation design: a live provocation functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm with synchronous video-recording of behavioural avoidance responses. By pairing symptom provocation with online avoidance responses on a trial-by-trial basis, we sought to investigate the neural mechanisms leading to the compulsive avoidance response. In keeping with the model of habit formation in obsessive-compulsive disorder, we hypothesized that this disorder would be associated with lower activity in regions implicated in goal-directed behaviours and higher activity in regions implicated in habitual behaviours. Fifteen patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and 15 healthy control volunteers participated in this functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Online stimuli were individually tailored to achieve effective symptom provocation at neutral, intermediate and strong intensity levels. During the symptom provocation block, the participant could choose to reject or terminate the provoking stimuli resulting in cessation of the symptom provocation. We thus separately analysed the neural correlates of symptom provocation, the urge to avoid, rejection and relief. Strongly symptom-provoking conditions evoked a dichotomous pattern of deactivation/activation in patients, which was not observed either in control conditions or in healthy subjects: a deactivation of caudate-prefrontal circuits accompanied by hyperactivation of subthalamic nucleus/putaminal regions. This finding suggests a dissociation between regions engaged in goal-directed and habitual behaviours. The putaminal hyperactivity during patients

  13. Imbalance in habitual versus goal directed neural systems during symptom provocation in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Banca, Paula; Voon, Valerie; Vestergaard, Martin D.; Philipiak, Gregor; Almeida, Inês; Pocinho, Fernando; Relvas, João

    2015-01-01

    Intrusive thoughts and compulsive urges to perform stereotyped behaviours are typical symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Emerging evidence suggests a cognitive bias towards habit formation at the expense of goal-directed performance in obsessive-compulsive disorder. In this study, we test this hypothesis using a novel individualized ecologically valid symptom provocation design: a live provocation functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm with synchronous video-recording of behavioural avoidance responses. By pairing symptom provocation with online avoidance responses on a trial-by-trial basis, we sought to investigate the neural mechanisms leading to the compulsive avoidance response. In keeping with the model of habit formation in obsessive-compulsive disorder, we hypothesized that this disorder would be associated with lower activity in regions implicated in goal-directed behaviours and higher activity in regions implicated in habitual behaviours. Fifteen patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and 15 healthy control volunteers participated in this functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Online stimuli were individually tailored to achieve effective symptom provocation at neutral, intermediate and strong intensity levels. During the symptom provocation block, the participant could choose to reject or terminate the provoking stimuli resulting in cessation of the symptom provocation. We thus separately analysed the neural correlates of symptom provocation, the urge to avoid, rejection and relief. Strongly symptom-provoking conditions evoked a dichotomous pattern of deactivation/activation in patients, which was not observed either in control conditions or in healthy subjects: a deactivation of caudate-prefrontal circuits accompanied by hyperactivation of subthalamic nucleus/putaminal regions. This finding suggests a dissociation between regions engaged in goal-directed and habitual behaviours. The putaminal hyperactivity during patients

  14. A Case Study of Cognitive and Biophysical Models of Education as Linked to Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maye, Kelly M.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive and biophysical factors have been considered contributors linked to identifiable markers of obsessive compulsive and anxiety disorders. Research demonstrates multiple causes and mixed results for the short-term success of educational programs designed to ameliorate problems that children with obsessive compulsive and anxiety disorders…

  15. Evidence for a Shared Etiological Mechanism of Psychotic Symptoms and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Patients with Psychotic Disorders and Their Siblings.

    PubMed

    Swets, Marije; Van Dael, Frank; Roza, Sabine; Schoevers, Robert; Myin-Germeys, Inez; de Haan, Lieuwe

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obsessive-compulsive disorder in subjects with psychotic disorder is much higher than in the general population. The higher than chance co-occurrence has also been demonstrated at the level of subclinical expression of both phenotypes. Both extended phenotypes have been shown to cluster in families. However, little is known about the origins of their elevated co-occurrence. In the present study, evidence for a shared etiological mechanism was investigated in 3 samples with decreasing levels of familial psychosis liability: 987 patients, 973 of their unaffected siblings and 566 healthy controls. The association between the obsessive-compulsive phenotype and the psychosis phenotype c.q. psychosis liability was investigated. First, the association was assessed between (subclinical) obsessive-compulsive symptoms and psychosis liability. Second, in a cross-sib cross-trait analysis, it was examined whether (subclinical) obsessive-compulsive symptoms in the patient were associated with (subclinical) psychotic symptoms in the related unaffected sibling. Evidence was found for both associations, which is compatible with a partially shared etiological pathway underlying obsessive-compulsive and psychotic disorder. This is the first study that used a cross-sib cross-trait design in patients and unaffected siblings, thus circumventing confounding by disease-related factors present in clinical samples.

  16. Mortality Among Persons With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sandra M.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mors, Ole; Schendel, Diana E.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Plessen, Kerstin J.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Several mental disorders have consistently been found to be associated with decreased life expectancy, but little is known about whether this is also the case for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). OBJECTIVE To determine whether persons who receive a diagnosis of OCD are at increased risk of death. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Using data from Danish registers, we conducted a nationwide prospective cohort study with 30 million person-years of follow-up. The data were collected from Danish longitudinal registers. A total of 3 million people born between 1955 and 2006 were followed up from January 1, 2002, through December 31, 2011. During this period, 27 236 people died. The data were analyzed primarily in June 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We estimated mortality rate ratios (MRRs), adjusted for calendar year, age, sex, maternal and paternal age, place of residence at birth, and somatic comorbidities, to compare persons with OCT with persons without OCD. RESULTS Of 10 155 persons with OCD (5935 women and 4220 men with a mean [SD] age of 29.1 [11.3] years who contributed a total of 54 937 person-years of observation), 110 (1.1%) died during the average follow-up of 9.7 years. The risk of death by natural or unnatural causes was significantly higher among persons with OCD (MRR, 1.68 [95% CI, 1.31–2.12] for natural causes; MRR, 2.61 [95% CI, 1.91–3.47] for unnatural causes) than among the general population. After the exclusion of persons with comorbid anxiety disorders, depression, or substance use disorders, OCD was still associated with increased mortality risk (MRR, 1.88 [95% CI, 1.27–2.67]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The presence of OCD was associated with a significantly increased mortality risk. Comorbid anxiety disorders, depression, or substance use disorders further increased the risk. However, after adjusting for these and somatic comorbidities, we found that the mortality risk remained significantly increased among persons with OCD

  17. Comorbidity of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Schizophrenia in an Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Rosli, Ahmad Nabil Md.; Wan Ismail, Wan Salwina

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a girl with a history of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) subsequently exhibiting psychosis. She never attained remission since the outset. Initially she seemed to be resistant to most antipsychotics, namely, risperidone, haloperidol, paliperidone, quetiapine, and clozapine. However, she later responded remarkably better to risperidone after it was reintroduced for the second time. Recognizing and understanding the various pathogenesis of OCD or obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) in schizophrenia are vital in laying out plan to manage the patient effectively. PMID:26483984

  18. Virtual Reality for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Past and the Future

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwanguk; Kim, So-Yeon; Roh, Daeyoung; Kim, Sun I.

    2009-01-01

    The use of computers, especially for virtual reality (VR), to understand, assess, and treat various mental health problems has been developed for the last decade, including application for phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder, attention deficits, and schizophrenia. However, the number of VR tools addressing obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is still lacking due to the heterogeneous symptoms of OCD and poor understanding of the relationship between VR and OCD. This article reviews the empirical literatures for VR tools in the future, which involve applications for both clinical work and experimental research in this area, including examining symptoms using VR according to OCD patients' individual symptoms, extending OCD research in the VR setting to also study behavioral and physiological correlations of the symptoms, and expanding the use of VR for OCD to cognitive-behavioral intervention. PMID:20046385

  19. Treatment of internet addiction in patient with panic disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Santos, Veruska; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; King, Anna Lucia Spear

    2015-01-01

    Problematic Internet use is a worldwide social issue and it can be found in any age, social, educational, or economic range. In some countries like China and South Korea internet addiction (IA) is considered a public health condition and this governments support research, education and treatment. Internet addiction has been associated with others psychiatric disorders. Panic disorder (PD) and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) are anxiety disorders that involve a lot of damages in patient's life. We report a treatment of a patient with Panic Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and internet addition involving pharmacotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy was conducted 1 time per week during 10 weeks and results suggest that the treatment was an effective treatment for the anxiety and for the internet addiction.

  20. An Autistic Dimension: A Proposed Subtype of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bejerot, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the possibility that autism spectrum disorder (ASD: Asperger syndrome, autism and atypical autism) in its milder forms may be clinically important among a substantial proportion of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and discusses OCD subtypes based on this proposition. The hypothesis derives from extensive…

  1. Error-Related Negativity and Tic History in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Gregory L.; Carrasco, Melisa; Harbin, Shannon M.; Nienhuis, Jenna K.; LaRosa, Christina E.; Chen, Poyu; Fitzgerald, Kate D.; Gehring, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The error-related negativity (ERN) is a negative deflection in the event-related potential after an incorrect response, which is often increased in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, the relation of the ERN to comorbid tic disorders has not been examined in patients with OCD. This study compared ERN amplitudes…

  2. Early-Onset Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Subgroup with a Specific Clinical and Familial Pattern?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabane, Nadia; Delorme, Richard; Millet, Bruno; Mouren, Marie-Christine; Leboyer, Marion; Pauls, David

    2005-01-01

    Background: The familial nature of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been previously demonstrated. The identification of candidate symptoms such as age at onset may help to disentangle the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of the disorder. In this study, the specificity of early-onset OCD was investigated, focusing on the effect of gender,…

  3. Assessment of Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Critical Review of Current Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merlo, Lisa J.; Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Geffken, Gary R.

    2005-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a relatively common disorder among children and adolescents, and is associated with increased risk for concurrent and future distress and impairment. Many youth who suffer from OCD go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed, and do not attain appropriate treatment in a timely manner. As a result, researchers have focused…

  4. The Semantic Simon Effect in Tourette's Syndrome and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankins, D.; Bradshaw, J. L.; Georgiou-Karistianis, N.

    2006-01-01

    Core symptoms of Tourette's syndrome (TS) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may be attributed to an impairment in inhibitory control. Neuropsychological studies have addressed inhibition in both disorders, but findings have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to examine cognitive inhibition, using a semantic Simon effect paradigm,…

  5. Local-Global Processing in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Comorbid Tourette's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankins, D.; Bradshaw, J. L.; Georgiou-Karistianis, N.

    2005-01-01

    Neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies implicate attentional difficulties in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but results are inconsistent due possibly to sample heterogeneity and lack of control of comorbid disorders, such as Tourette's syndrome (TS). Nevertheless, it has been suggested that OCD symptomatology may be a result of…

  6. Rage Attacks in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Phenomenology and Clinical Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Jones, Anna M.; Lack, Caleb W.; Ale, Chelsea M.; Sulkowski, Michael L.; Lewin, Adam B.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Rage attacks have been documented in youth with varied psychiatric disorders, but few data have been reported on the clinical characteristics and correlates of rage attacks among children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Participants were 86 children (ages 6-16 years) with a primary diagnosis of OCD. Patients and their…

  7. Children with Very Early Onset Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Clinical Features and Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakatani, Eriko; Krebs, Georgina; Micali, Nadia; Turner, Cynthia; Heyman, Isobel; Mataix-Cols, David

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is emerging evidence that early onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may be a phenomenologically distinct subtype of the disorder. Previous research has shown that individuals who report an early onset display greater severity and persistence of symptoms, and they may be less responsive to treatment. To date, this question…

  8. Repetitive Behaviour in Children with High Functioning Autism and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zandt, Fiona; Prior, Margot; Kyrios, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) were compared on a range of repetitive behaviours. Parents reported similar levels of sameness behaviour and repetitive movements in the clinical groups, although children with OCD engaged in more repetitive behaviour focussed around routines and…

  9. Thought-Action Fusion and Inflated Responsibility Beliefs in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Emily Marie; Rucklidge, Julia Jane; Blampied, Neville

    2009-01-01

    In obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), inflated responsibility (IR) beliefs and thought-action fusion (TAF) are two cognitive schema argued to contribute to obsessions and compulsions. We investigated whether IR and TAF are OCD-specific or whether they occur in other anxiety disorders. Adults diagnosed with OCD (n = 20) or other anxiety disorders…

  10. Repetitive Behaviors in Autism and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: New Perspectives from a Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzzano, Laura; Borsboom, Denny; Geurts, Hilde M.

    2015-01-01

    The association between autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) seems largely dependent upon observed similarities in the repetitive behaviors that manifest in both disorders. The aim of this study was to use a network approach to explore the interactions between these behaviors. We constructed a network based on clinician's…

  11. [Personality disorders and psychiatric comorbidity in obsessive-compulsive disorder and anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Müller, B; Wewetzer, C; Jans, T; Holtkamp, K; Herpertz, S C; Warnke, A; Remschmidt, H; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to examine the course of adolescent anorexia nervosa and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria) to compare psychiatric comorbidity and personality disorders of both groups. Because anorexia nervosa patients are mainly female, we compared them only with female OCD patients. Ten years after discharge the whole sample (32 female patients; 100%) of a group of 39 (32 female; 7 male) anorexia nervosa patients could be reexamined personally. 25 (61%) female patients of a group of 116 patients (41 female; 75 male) with obsessive-compulsive disorder were also reexamined. The anorexia nervosa patients were interviewed using the Structured Interview for Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa (SIAB [39]) to assess eating disorder symptomatology. To examine comorbid psychiatric disorders we used the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, WHO [44] and SCID-II [45] for personality disorders. One fourth of the patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and 20% of the patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder had a personality disorder according to DSM-III-R. Most of them were "Cluster C"-personality disorders (AN: 28%; OCD: 20%). In the group of the female OCD patients 8% schizoid, 4% schizotype and 12% paranoid personality disorders were observed. The most prevalent psychiatric disorders were anxiety (AN: 28%; OCD: 20%) and affective disorders (AN: 16%; OCD: 16%). Our results support the view that in the course of anorexia nervosa and in obsessive-compulsive disorder there is a high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity and "Cluster C"-personality disorders according to DSM-III-R. These results might confirm a model of a high vulnerability of the serotonergic neurotransmitter system in patients with anorexia nervosa or OCD.

  12. Comparison of cognitive flexibility and planning ability in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder, patients with obsessive compulsive personality disorder, and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    PAAST, Negin; KHOSRAVI, Zohreh; MEMARI, Amir Hossein; SHAYESTEHFAR, Monir; ARBABI, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Cognitive functioning in individuals with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and with Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD) has not been adequately studied. Aim Examine the cognitive flexibility and planning ability of individuals with OCD and OCPD. Methods Twenty patients with OCD and 25 patients with OCPD who had not taken medication in the previous two weeks were identified in an outpatient psychology clinic in Tehran, and 25 healthy control subjects were identified from the university staff and local community residents. All participants were administered the 28-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), and the Tower of London (TOL) test. Two measures of the WCTS (number of perseverative errors and number of categories completed) were used to assess cognitive flexibility and three measures of the TOL (total number of moves in 12 trials, total response time, and planning time) were used to assess planning ability. Results The level of current psychological distress in the two patient groups was significantly greater than that in the control group. After adjusting for demographic variables and the level of psychological distress, both OCD patients and OCPD patients made more perseverative errors on the WCST than control subjects, and the OCD patients (but not the OCPD patients) completed significantly fewer categories than the control subjects. Both the OCD patients and OCPD patients required significantly more moves than control subjects to complete the 12 TOL tasks and OCD patients took significantly longer than both OCPD patients and control subjects to complete the tasks. Conclusions Individuals with OCD and OCPD have impaired cognitive flexibility and planning ability compared to healthy controls, and there are some differences in these measures of cognitive functioning between OCD and OCPD. Long term follow-up studies of OCD and OCPD that assess changes in cognitive measures as

  13. Exploring the role of obsessive-compulsive relevant self-worth contingencies in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    García-Soriano, Gemma; Belloch, Amparo

    2012-06-30

    This article examines whether self-worth contingencies in the personal domains of cleanliness, morality, hoarding, certainty, accuracy, religion and respect for others have specific associations with obsessive symptoms and cognitions in individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Fifty-seven patients with a primary diagnosis of OCD completed the Obsessional Concerns and Self Questionnaire (OCSQ), designed to assess the extent to which respondents consider OCD content domains relevant to their self-worth, along with a battery of other instruments. Results indicate that the OCSQ is more associated with OCD than with non-OCD anxiety symptoms, and that it is also associated with comorbid depressive symptoms in OCD patients. Moreover, the OCSQ-Order and Cleanliness and Hoarding dimensions are associated with their symptom counterparts (i.e., contamination, checking, order, hoarding and neutralizing). OCSQ domains were highly associated with dysfunctional beliefs about obsessions. However, only the OCSQ scores, but not the dysfunctional beliefs, predicted OCD symptoms. These results support cognitive conceptualizations implicating self-concept in OCD development, and they suggest the need to further analyze the influence of self-worth in OCD development and maintenance.

  14. Exploring the role of obsessive-compulsive relevant self-worth contingencies in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    García-Soriano, Gemma; Belloch, Amparo

    2012-06-30

    This article examines whether self-worth contingencies in the personal domains of cleanliness, morality, hoarding, certainty, accuracy, religion and respect for others have specific associations with obsessive symptoms and cognitions in individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Fifty-seven patients with a primary diagnosis of OCD completed the Obsessional Concerns and Self Questionnaire (OCSQ), designed to assess the extent to which respondents consider OCD content domains relevant to their self-worth, along with a battery of other instruments. Results indicate that the OCSQ is more associated with OCD than with non-OCD anxiety symptoms, and that it is also associated with comorbid depressive symptoms in OCD patients. Moreover, the OCSQ-Order and Cleanliness and Hoarding dimensions are associated with their symptom counterparts (i.e., contamination, checking, order, hoarding and neutralizing). OCSQ domains were highly associated with dysfunctional beliefs about obsessions. However, only the OCSQ scores, but not the dysfunctional beliefs, predicted OCD symptoms. These results support cognitive conceptualizations implicating self-concept in OCD development, and they suggest the need to further analyze the influence of self-worth in OCD development and maintenance. PMID:22386566

  15. [Development of sexuality and motivational aspects of sexual behavior in men with obsessive-compulsive disorders].

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    Sexual behavior and formation of sexuality in men with obsessive-compulsive disorder is one of the pressing issues in contemporary medicine. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterized by the development of intrusive thoughts, memories, movements and actions, as well as a variety of pathological fears (phobias). Increase in the number of patients with this pathology in modern clinical practice of neurotic disorders, the young age of the patients and as a result violation of interpersonal, communicational and sexual nature is quite apparent. The study involved 35 men aged 23 to 47 years with clinical signs of OCD. We determined the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms using the Yale-Brown scale. We established the presence of a mild degree of disorder in 34,3% of cases; in 48,6% of cases disorder of moderate severity was diagnosed; remaining 17.1% were assessed subclinical condition of OCD at the applicable scale. The system of motivational maintenance of sexual behavior in men with obsessive-compulsive disorders is investigated. Motives of sexual behavior of the investigated men with the pathology are determined. The presented research in men with OCD have established multidimensionality and complexity of motivational ensuring of sexual behavior.

  16. Perceived parental characteristics of patients with obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Merkel, W T; Pollard, C A; Wiener, R L; Staebler, C R

    1993-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that parents of patients with obsessive compulsive disorder exhibit specific traits. 320 consecutive inpatient admissions who met criteria for OCD, depression, and panic disorder checked a list of adjectives to describe their parents. Patients with OCD were 1) less likely to perceive their mothers as disorganized than depressives, 2) more likely to perceive their mothers as overprotective than depressives and 3) less likely to perceive their fathers as demanding than patients with panic. PMID:8404245

  17. School Psychologists' Views and Management of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Jason; Storch, Eric A.; Valderhaug, Robert; Geffken, Gary R.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, an increasing body of research has been conducted on evidence-based psychological and psychiatric treatment for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Despite this improved understanding, however, these treatments are not being performed. This study descriptively examined the practices and views of school…

  18. A School-Based Treatment Model for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloman, Glenn M.; Gallant, Jason; Storch, Eric A.

    2007-01-01

    School psychologists have expertise in the realm of school-based assessment and intervention for behavioral, educational, and psychological difficulties. Recent evidence indicates that many school psychologists lack evidenced based knowledge about assessment and treatment of pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Pediatric OCD is a…

  19. Recent Developments in the Assessment and Treatment of Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Noah C.; Abramowitz, Jonathan S.

    2010-01-01

    Although tremendous strides have recently been made in the development of assessment and treatment methods for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), more accurate methods for diagnosis, more effective treatments, and more refined instruments for monitoring progress during therapy are still needed. The present commentary highlights the…

  20. Neither Saints nor Wolves in Disguise: Ambivalent Interpersonal Attitudes and Behaviors in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moritz, Steffen; Wahl, Karina; Ertle, Andrea; Jelinek, Lena; Hauschildt, Marit; Klinge, Ruth; Hand, Iver

    2009-01-01

    Inflated responsibility is ascribed a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The aim of the study was to assess interpersonal attitudes and behaviors contributing to enhanced responsibility in OCD. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that individuals diagnosed with OCD share stronger latent aggression toward…

  1. No Evidence for Object Alternation Impairment in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moritz, Steffen; Jelinek, Lena; Hottenrott, Birgit; Klinge, Ruth; Randjbar, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have consistently ascribed the orbito-frontal cortex (OFC) a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Cognitive tests presumed sensitive to this region, such as the Object Alternation Task (OAT), are considered important tools to verify this assumption and to investigate the impact of…

  2. An Inference-Based Approach to Treating Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Kieron; Koszegi, Natalia; Aardema, Frederick; van Niekerk, Jan; Taillon, Annie

    2009-01-01

    This article outlines the conceptual and empirical basis for an inference-based approach (IBA) to treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The IBA considers that in most cases the obsessional process begins with an initial doubt (e.g., "Maybe my hands are not clean"; "Perhaps the door was not locked"; "There's a chance I made an error"; "I…

  3. D-Cycloserine for Treatment Nonresponders with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norberg, Melissa M.; Gilliam, Christina M.; Villavicencio, Anna; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Tolin, David F.

    2012-01-01

    Despite being the most effective treatment available, as many as one third of patients who receive exposure and response prevention (ERP) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) do not initially respond to treatment. Recent research suggests that the n-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor partial agonist D-Cycloserine (DCS) may speed up the course…

  4. Cognitive Inflexibility and Frontal-Cortical Activation in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Jennifer C.; Rauch, Scott L.; Rosso, Isabelle M.; Killgore, William D. S.; Price, Lauren M.; Ragan, Jennifer; Chosak, Anne; Hezel, Dianne M.; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Pauls, David L.; Jenike, Michael A.; Stewart, S. Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Deficits in cognitive flexibility and response inhibition have been linked to perturbations in cortico-striatal-thalamic circuitry in adult obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Although similar cognitive deficits have been identified in pediatric OCD, few neuroimaging studies have been conducted to examine its neural correlates in the…

  5. Evidence-Based Assessment of Child Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Recommendations for Clinical Practice and Treatment Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Adam B.; Piacentini, John

    2010-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) presents heterogeneously and can be difficult to assess in youth. This review focuses on research-supported assessment approaches for OCD in childhood. Content areas include pre-visit screening, diagnostic establishment, differential diagnosis, assessment of comorbid psychiatric conditions, tracking symptom…

  6. Four-Factor Structure of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Symptoms in Children, Adolescents, and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, S. Evelyn; Rosario, Maria C.; Baer, Lee; Carter, Alice S.; Brown, Timothy A.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Illmann, Cornelia; Leckman, James F.; Sukhodolsky, Denis; Katsovich, Lilya; Rasmussen, Steven; Goodman, Wayne; Delorme, Richard; Leboyer, Marion; Chabane, Nadia; Jenike, Michael A.; Geller, Daniel A.; Pauls, David L.

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to establish the efficacy of four-factor obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptom structure for use in child, adolescent and adult groups. Results indicated that the four-factor OCD structure is inadequate for use in children, adolescent and adult age groups.

  7. Perfectionism and Peer Relations among Children with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Huan J.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Storch, Eric A.

    2008-01-01

    The study examined perfectionism, symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and depression, and peer relationships among a clinical sample of 31 youth (age range 7-18 years) diagnosed with OCD. Using a correlational design, perfectionistic beliefs accounted for significant variance in OCD symptoms, depressive symptoms, and difficulties in…

  8. A Review of Metacognition in Psychological Models of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Clare S.; Anderson, Rebecca A.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioural models and interventions for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have always included some metacognitive elements but until recently these have been predominantly construed of as cognitive as opposed to metacognitive processes. Increasingly, psychological models of OCD are now recognising the importance of metacognitive…

  9. Developmental Alterations of Frontal-Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Kate Dimond; Welsh, Robert C.; Stern, Emily R.; Angstadt, Mike; Hanna, Gregory L.; Abelson, James L.; Taylor, Stephan F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterized by abnormalities of frontal-striatal-thalamic circuitry that appear near illness onset and persist over its course. Distinct frontal-striatal-thalamic loops through cortical centers for cognitive control (anterior cingulate cortex) and emotion processing (ventral medial frontal…

  10. Clinical Considerations when Tailoring Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Young Children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate-Summers, Molly L.; Freeman, Jennifer B.; Garcia, Abbe M.; Coyne, Lisa; Przeworski, Amy; Leonard, Henrietta L.

    2008-01-01

    Research on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy, and in particular, exposure with response prevention for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), has only been systematically evaluated in children and adolescents ages 7-17. These treatments do not address the unique characteristics of young children with OCD. This paper discusses…

  11. Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in Young Children: An Intervention Model and Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Burstein, Marcy; Becker, Kimberly D.; Drake, Kelly L.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an intervention model for young children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The intervention, designed to reduce compulsive behavior and improve parenting practices, was tested using a multiple baseline design with 7 children (M = 6 years old; 57% female) in which participants were randomly assigned to 1, 2, or 3 weeks…

  12. Treating Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Schizophrenia: The Case of Sam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peasley-Miklus, Catherine; Massie, Elise; Baslett, Gaston; Carmin, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the case of Sam, a 22-year-old male with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and schizophrenia. The patient's background, the development and characteristics of his OCD and schizophrenia, and the history of what became a rather complicated treatment are described. In addition, four problem areas of therapy are identified.

  13. Using Motivational Interviewing to Enhance Treatment Outcome in People with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Helen Blair; Zuckoff, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a leading cause of health-related disability. There are two evidence-based treatments for OCD, pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy consisting of exposure and response prevention (EX/RP). Although effective, outcome from both treatments is often limited by patient lack of adherence to the…

  14. Understanding Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Students: Symptoms and School-Based Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyches, Tina Taylor; Leininger, Melissa; Heath, Melissa Allen; Prater, Mary Anne

    2010-01-01

    This article provides current information relevant to school social workers who serve students with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), including how OCD is defined in children and adolescents, the impact of OCD on schooling, issues in identifying students with OCD, and effective interventions. The authors offer suggestions for collaboration…

  15. Family Factors Predict Treatment Outcome for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peris, Tara S.; Sugar, Catherine A.; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Chang, Susanna; Langley, Audra; Piacentini, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine family conflict, parental blame, and poor family cohesion as predictors of treatment outcome for youths receiving family-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (FCBT) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: We analyzed data from a sample of youths who were randomized to FCBT (n = 49; 59% male; M age = 12.43 years) as…

  16. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Treatment in Patients with Down Syndrome: A Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutor, Bruce; Hansen, Mark R.; Black, John L.

    2006-01-01

    In this case series we report four cases of patients with Down syndrome with symptoms consistent with obsessive compulsive disorder. Each patient experienced substantial reduction in compulsive behaviors with pharmacotherapy of an SSRI alone or with the addition of risperidone to SSRI therapy. None of the patients experienced significant side…

  17. Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale Modified for Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scahill, Lawrence; McDougle, Christopher J.; Williams, Susan K.; Dimitropoulos, Anastasia; Aman, Michael G.; McCracken, James T.; Tierney, Elaine; Arnold, L. Eugene; Cronin, Pegeen; Grados, Marco; Ghuman, Jaswinder; Koenig, Kathleen; Lam, Kristen S. L.; McGough, James; Posey, David J.; Ritz, Louise; Swiezy, Naomi B.; Vitiello, Benedetto

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine the psychometric properties of the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scales (CYBOCS) modified for pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs). Method: Raters from five Research Units on Pediatric Psychopharmacology (RUPP) Autism Network were trained to reliability. The modified scale (CYBOCS-PDD), which contains only…

  18. Increasing Knowledge about Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Support for Parents and Schools: Evaluation of Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jassi, Amita D.; Kolvenbach, Sarah; Heyman, Isobel; Macleod, Trish; Rose, Joel; Diamond, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in children can be difficult to detect. Schools and families need to be made aware of the signs and symptoms of OCD in order to facilitate access to treatment. Parents of children with OCD may require support as well as knowledge. This study evaluated two initiatives aimed at increasing knowledge and…

  19. Ethnic Identification Biases Responses to the Padua Inventory for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Monnica; Turkheimer, Eric; Schmidt, Karen; Oltmanns, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The authors report differential item functioning (DIF) between Black and White participants completing the 60-item Padua Inventory (PI) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The authors use an Internet-generated sample that included 105 Blacks, 67 Hispanics, 582 Whites, and 136 additional participants reporting an OCD diagnosis. Factor analysis…

  20. Decreased Family Accommodation Associated with Improved Therapy Outcome in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merlo, Lisa J.; Lehmkuhl, Heather D.; Geffken, Gary R.; Storch, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic, disabling condition that affects both patients and their families. Despite the identification of efficacious treatments (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications), not all patients respond fully. The purpose of the present study was to…

  1. Impact of Comorbidity on Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Merlo, Lisa J.; Larson, Michael J.; Geffken, Gary R.; Lehmkuh, Heather D.; Jacob, Marni L.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2008-01-01

    A chronic psychiatric condition among children and adolescents of concern is obsessive-compulsive disorder, which involves comorbid conditions. The impact of a range of comorbid illnesses on cognitive-behavioral therapy response and remission rates was conducted, with results revealing a negative impact on treatment response.

  2. Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Treatment Trials for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Hunna J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a meta-analysis on randomized, controlled treatment trials of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Studies were included if they employed randomized, controlled methodology and treated young people (19 years or under) with OCD. A comprehensive literature search identified 13 RCTs containing 10…

  3. Patient Adherence Predicts Outcome from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Helen Blair; Maher, Michael J.; Wang, Yuanjia; Bao, Yuanyuan; Foa, Edna B.; Franklin, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of patient adherence on outcome from exposure and response prevention (EX/RP) therapy in adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Thirty adults with OCD were randomized to EX/RP (n = 15) or EX/RP augmented by motivational interviewing strategies (n = 15). Both treatments included 3 introductory…

  4. A Structural Equation Analysis of Family Accommodation in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caporino, Nicole E.; Morgan, Jessica; Beckstead, Jason; Phares, Vicky; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Family accommodation of symptoms is counter to the primary goals of cognitive-behavioral therapy for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and can pose an obstacle to positive treatment outcomes. Although increased attention has been given to family accommodation in pediatric OCD, relatively little is known about associated child and…

  5. Speed and Accuracy on Tests of Executive Function in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Robert M.; Baribeau, Jacinthe; Milovan, Denise L.; O'Connor, Kieron

    2004-01-01

    Slowness in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been attributed to intrusive thoughts or meticulousness. Recent research suggests that slowness in OCD may be particularly evident on tests of executive function subserved by frontostriatal circuitry. In the present study, the speed and accuracy of responding on neuropsychological tests of…

  6. Is Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder a Disturbance of Security Motivation? Comment on Szechtman and Woody (2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven; McKay, Dean; Abramowitz, Jonathan S.

    2005-01-01

    H. Szechtman and E. Woody proposed that obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is caused by a malfunctioning brain security motivation system. In the current article, the authors' review of the model suggests that it is limited in the following ways: (a) It is built on a selective review of the empirical literature, (b) it offers no explanation for…

  7. Two-Year Stability and Change of Schizotypal, Borderline, Avoidant, and Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Sanislow, Charles A.; Gunderson, John G.; Pagano, Maria E.; Yen, Shirley; Zanarini, Mary C.; Shea, Tracie M.; Skodol, Andrew E.; Stout, Robert L.; Morey, Leslie C.; McGlashan, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the stability of schizotypal (STPD), borderline (BPD), avoidant (AVPD) and obsessive-compulsive (OCPD) personality disorders (PDs) over 2 years of prospective multiwave follow-up. Six hundred thirty-three participants recruited at 4 collaborating sites who met criteria for 1 or more of the 4 PDs or for major depressive…

  8. Peer Victimization in Children with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Relations with Symptoms of Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Ledley, Deborah Roth; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Johns, Natalie B.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Geffken, Gary R.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the frequency of peer victimization and psychological symptom correlates among youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The Schwartz Peer Victimization Scale, Children's Depression Inventory, and Asher Loneliness Scale were administered to 52 children and adolescents diagnosed with OCD. The child's parent or guardian…

  9. Family Therapy in Iran: A Case Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khodayarifard, Mohammad; McClenon, James

    2011-01-01

    Iranian clinical psychologists have devised family therapy methods that use cognitive behavior models that ft with their collectivist Islamic culture. The authors review Islamic-based strategies and describe family therapy with a culturally specific case of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder. Family therapy, adapted to integrated,…

  10. A Naturalistic Study of Referred Children and Adolescents with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Gabriele; Millepiedi, Stefania; Mucci, Maria; Bertini, Nicoletta; Milantoni, Luca; Arcangeli, Francesca

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To report on clinical features, comorbidity, and response to pharmacotherapy in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) naturalistically followed and treated with serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs). Method: A consecutive series of 94 patients (65 males, 29 females, age 13.6 [+ or -] 2.8 years), referred in…

  11. Cognitive Control of a Simple Mental Image in Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocak, Orhan Murat; Ozpolat, Aysegul Yilmaz; Atbasoglu, Cem; Cicek, Metehan

    2011-01-01

    The nature of obsessions has led researchers to try to determine if the main problem in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is impaired inhibitory control. Previous studies report that the effort to suppress is one of the factors that increase the frequency of obsessive thoughts. Based on these results and those of the present study that suggest…

  12. Case Series: Transformation Obsession in Young People with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volz, Chloe; Heyman, Isobel

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a previously unreported symptom of obsessive-compulsive disorder. The young people reported describe a fear of turning into someone or something else or taking on unwanted characteristics. We have called this transformation obsession. The bizarre nature of this obsession had led to misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatments in…

  13. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as a Treatment for Scrupulosity in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dehlin, John P.; Morrison, Kate L.; Twohig, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for scrupulosity-based obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Five adults were treated with eight sessions of ACT, without in-session exposure, in a multiple baseline across participants design. Daily monitoring of compulsions and avoided valued activities were tracked throughout the…

  14. The Application of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twohig, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is part of a case series illustrating the application of different therapies to a case of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). It describes the hypothetical application of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). This paper covers the philosophy and basic research on language and cognition that inform ACT. It also provides an ACT-based…

  15. Clinical and Cognitive Correlates of Depressive Symptoms among Youth with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peris, Tara S.; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Asarnow, Joan R.; Langley, Audra; McCracken, James T.; Piacentini, John

    2010-01-01

    Depression is the most common comorbidity among adults with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), yet little is known about depressive symptoms in childhood OCD. This study examined clinical and cognitive variables associated with depressive symptomatology in 71 youths (62% male, M age = 12.7 years) with primary OCD. Youths presented with a range…

  16. Clinical picture of obsessive-compulsive disorder with poor insight: a regression model.

    PubMed

    Bellino, Silvio; Patria, Luca; Ziero, Simona; Bogetto, Filippo

    2005-09-15

    DSM-IV included a type of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) with poor insight in the official classification. The present study was performed using a continuous measure of the level of insight to analyze the association between this variable and characteristics of the disorder. Seventy-four consecutive OCD outpatients (DSM-IV criteria) were assessed using: a semistructured interview for sociodemographic and clinical features, the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), the National Institute of Mental Health Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (NIMH-OCS), the Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Rating Scales (HDRS, HARS), and the Overvalued Ideas Scale (OVIS) as a continuous measure of the level of insight. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that demographic and clinical factors were related to the OVIS score. The following four factors were found to be significantly related to the OVIS score: the Y-BOCS score for compulsions, OCD chronic course, and family history of OCD were positively related, while obsessive-compulsive personality disorder was negatively related. These results suggest that poor insight identifies a group of OCD patients with distinct clinical characteristics.

  17. Disentangling depressive personality disorder from avoidant, borderline, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Huprich, Steven K; Zimmerman, Mark; Chelminski, Iwona

    2006-01-01

    Several studies have found that 3 personality disorders (PDs) tend to share moderate rates of comorbidity with depressive PD: avoidant, borderline, and obsessive-compulsive. This study sought to evaluate the diagnostic criteria of each disorder in an effort to understand where areas of overlap may occur and to modify criteria sets where reasonable to reduce any degree of overlap. One thousand two hundred psychiatric outpatients were interviewed with the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders. The highest degree of comorbidity was observed between avoidant PD and depressive PD. Logistic regression analyses indicated that 2 criteria-avoidant criterion 5 and depressive criterion 2-could be removed from the diagnostic criteria sets and reduce the rates of overlap by as much as 15%. A factor analysis of the criteria of all 4 PDs indicated that there is a common clustering of many of the symptoms of avoidant, borderline, depressive, and obsessive-compulsive PDs and that borderline symptoms tend to cluster together most consistently. Avoidant and obsessive-compulsive personality symptoms clustered in ways that may reflect a problem of how to engage with others, suggestive of an approach-avoidance conflict. Depressive PD symptoms clustered in a way suggestive of problems with anger that is directed toward oneself and others. The factor analysis results suggest that an organization of symptoms around themes of conflict may provide useful ways of understanding the personality patterns of these 4 disorders.

  18. Neural Correlates of Symptom Dimensions in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Andrew R.; Akkal, Dalila; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Mataix-Cols, David; Kalas, Catherine; Devlin, Bernie; Birmaher, Boris; Phillips, Mary L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging on a group of pediatric subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder reveals that this group has reduced activity in neural regions underlying emotional processing, cognitive processing, and motor performance as compared to control subjects.

  19. Recent Advances in the Study of Sleep in the Anxiety Disorders, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Boland, Elaine M; Ross, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    Sleep disturbance is frequently associated with generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. This article reviews recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of the sleep disturbances in these disorders and discusses the implications for developing improved treatments.

  20. Obsessive compulsive and related disorders: comparing DSM-5 and ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Marras, Anna; Fineberg, Naomi; Pallanti, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been recognized as mainly characterized by compulsivity rather than anxiety and, therefore, was removed from the anxiety disorders chapter and given its own in both the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the Beta Draft Version of the 11th revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). This revised clustering is based on increasing evidence of common affected neurocircuits between disorders, differently from previous classification systems based on interrater agreement. In this article, we focus on the classification of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs), examining the differences in approach adopted by these 2 nosological systems, with particular attention to the proposed changes in the forthcoming ICD-11. At this stage, notable differences in the ICD classification are emerging from the previous revision, apparently converging toward a reformulation of OCRDs that is closer to the DSM-5. PMID:27401060

  1. Personality Disorders in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Comparative Study versus Other Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pena-Garijo, Josep; Edo Villamón, Silvia; Ruipérez, M. Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence for the relationship between personality disorders (PDs), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and other anxiety disorders different from OCD (non-OCD) symptomatology. Method. The sample consisted of a group of 122 individuals divided into three groups (41 OCD; 40 non-OCD, and 41 controls) matched by sex, age, and educational level. All the individuals answered the IPDE questionnaire and were evaluated by means of the SCID-I and SCID-II interviews. Results. Patients with OCD and non-OCD present a higher presence of PD. There was an increase in cluster C diagnoses in both groups, with no statistically significant differences between them. Conclusions. Presenting anxiety disorder seems to cause a specific vulnerability for PD. Most of the PDs that were presented belonged to cluster C. Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD) is the most common among OCD. However, it does not occur more frequently among OCD patients than among other anxious patients, which does not confirm the continuum between obsessive personality and OCD. Implications for categorical and dimensional diagnoses are discussed. PMID:24453917

  2. Obsessive-compulsive (anankastic) personality disorder: toward the ICD-11 classification.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Naomi A; Reghunandanan, Samar; Kolli, Sangeetha; Atmaca, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) is an early-onset disorder characterized by perfectionism, need for control, and cognitive rigidity. Its nosological status is currently under review. Historically, OCPD has been conceptualized as bearing a close relationship with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In this article, we discuss the diagnosis of OCPD in anticipation of its review for the ICD-11, from the perspective of clinical utility, global applicability, and research planning. Considering the recent establishment of an obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRD) category in DSM-5, we focus on the relationship between OCPD and the disorders that are currently thought to bear a close relationship with OCD, including DSM-5 OCRD, and other compulsive disorders such as eating disorder and autistic spectrum disorder (that were not included in the DSM-5 OCRD category), as well as with the personality disorders, focusing on nosological determinants such as phenomenology, course of illness, heritability, environmental risk factors, comorbidity, neurocognitive endophenotypes, and treatment response. Based on this analysis, we attempt to draw conclusions as to its optimal placement in diagnostic systems and draw attention to key research questions that could be explored in field trials. PMID:25388611

  3. Dissociative symptoms and dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Belli, Hasan; Ural, Cenk; Vardar, Melek Kanarya; Yesılyurt, Sema; Oncu, Fatıh

    2012-10-01

    The present study attempted to assess the dissociative symptoms and overall dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In addition, we examined the relationship between the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and dissociative symptoms. All patients admitted for the first time to the psychiatric outpatient unit were included in the study. Seventy-eight patients had been diagnosed as having OCD during the 2-year study period. Patients had to meet the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for OCD. Most (76.9%; n = 60) of the patients were female, and 23.1% (n = 18) of the patients were male. Dissociation Questionnaire was used to measure dissociative symptoms. The Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Dissociative Disorders interviews and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Checklist and Severity Scale were used. Eleven (14%) of the patients with OCD had comorbid dissociative disorder. The most prevalent disorder in our study was dissociative depersonalization disorder. Dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder were common as well. The mean Yale-Brown score was 23.37 ± 7.27 points. Dissociation Questionnaire scores were between 0.40 and 3.87 points, and the mean was 2.23 ± 0.76 points. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between Yale-Brown points and Dissociation Questionnaire points. We conclude that dissociative symptoms among patients with OCD should alert clinicians for the presence of a chronic and complex dissociative disorder. Clinicians may overlook an underlying dissociative process in patients who have severe symptoms of OCD. However, a lack of adequate response to cognitive-behavioral and drug therapy may be a consequence of dissociative process.

  4. Behavioral treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder in African Americans: clinical issues.

    PubMed

    Williams, K E; Chambless, D L; Steketee, G

    1998-06-01

    African Americans with obessive-compulsive disorder are underrepresented in behavioral treatment outcome studies. This paper consists of a clinical discussion of issues arising during the treatment with exposure plus response prevention of two African-American women with obessive-compulsive disorder. Clinical issues, such as excessive shame, insanity fears, and a sense of uniqueness, complicated the treatment process. However, both clients made significant improvement as assessed by behavioral testing, target ratings and the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale.

  5. Cross-Disorder Genetic Analysis of Tic Disorders, Obsessive-Compulsive, and Hoarding Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zilhão, Nuno R; Smit, Dirk J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cath, Danielle C

    2016-01-01

    Hoarding, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Tourette's disorder (TD) are psychiatric disorders that share symptom overlap, which might partly be the result of shared genetic variation. Population-based twin studies have found significant genetic correlations between hoarding and OCD symptoms, with genetic correlations varying between 0.1 and 0.45. For tic disorders, studies examining these correlations are lacking. Other lines of research, including clinical samples and GWAS or CNV data to explore genetic relationships between tic disorders and OCD, have only found very modest if any shared genetic variation. Our aim was to extend current knowledge on the genetic structure underlying hoarding, OC symptoms (OCS), and lifetime tic symptoms and, in a trivariate analysis, assess the degree of common and unique genetic factors contributing to the etiology of these disorders. Data have been gathered from participants in the Netherlands Twin Register comprising a total of 5293 individuals from a sample of adult monozygotic (n = 2460) and dizygotic (n = 2833) twin pairs (mean age 33.61 years). The data on Hoarding, OCS, and tic symptoms were simultaneously analyzed in Mplus. A liability threshold model was fitted to the twin data, analyzing heritability of phenotypes and of their comorbidity. Following the criteria for a probable clinical diagnosis in all phenotypes, 6.8% of participants had a diagnosis of probable hoarding disorder (HD), 6.3% of OCS, and 12.8% of any probable lifetime tic disorder. Genetic factors explained 50.4, 70.1, and 61.1% of the phenotypic covariance between hoarding-OCS, hoarding-tics, and OCS-tics, respectively. Substantial genetic correlations were observed between hoarding and OCS (0.41), hoarding and tics (0.35), and between OCS and tics (0.37). These results support the contribution of genetic factors in the development of these disorders and their comorbidity. Furthermore, tics were mostly influenced by specific

  6. Comparison of cognitive flexibility and planning ability in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder, patients with obsessive compulsive personality disorder, and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    PAAST, Negin; KHOSRAVI, Zohreh; MEMARI, Amir Hossein; SHAYESTEHFAR, Monir; ARBABI, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Cognitive functioning in individuals with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and with Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD) has not been adequately studied. Aim Examine the cognitive flexibility and planning ability of individuals with OCD and OCPD. Methods Twenty patients with OCD and 25 patients with OCPD who had not taken medication in the previous two weeks were identified in an outpatient psychology clinic in Tehran, and 25 healthy control subjects were identified from the university staff and local community residents. All participants were administered the 28-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), and the Tower of London (TOL) test. Two measures of the WCTS (number of perseverative errors and number of categories completed) were used to assess cognitive flexibility and three measures of the TOL (total number of moves in 12 trials, total response time, and planning time) were used to assess planning ability. Results The level of current psychological distress in the two patient groups was significantly greater than that in the control group. After adjusting for demographic variables and the level of psychological distress, both OCD patients and OCPD patients made more perseverative errors on the WCST than control subjects, and the OCD patients (but not the OCPD patients) completed significantly fewer categories than the control subjects. Both the OCD patients and OCPD patients required significantly more moves than control subjects to complete the 12 TOL tasks and OCD patients took significantly longer than both OCPD patients and control subjects to complete the tasks. Conclusions Individuals with OCD and OCPD have impaired cognitive flexibility and planning ability compared to healthy controls, and there are some differences in these measures of cognitive functioning between OCD and OCPD. Long term follow-up studies of OCD and OCPD that assess changes in cognitive measures as

  7. Family study of obsessive-compulsive disorder in a Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, H; Weissbecker, K; Mejía, J M; Sánchez de Carmona, M

    1993-01-01

    Twenty seven obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients were studied at the Instituto Mexicano de Psiquiatría in Mexico City. This is the first sample of OCD patients studied in Latin America. There was a significant sex ratio difference and a significant difference in the type of obsessions and compulsions displayed by males and females. Co-morbidity data demonstrated a high frequency of obsessive-compulsive personality disorders, depression, sexual abuse, suicidal attempts and neurological damage. Approximately one third of OCD cases demonstrated a positive family history. There was a higher than expected frequency of first degree relatives affected with OCD. In addition, this study may support the hypothesis that OCD and tics are genetically related.

  8. A review of obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    This article is a review of recent literature on obsessive-compulsive disorder in the pediatric population. Areas covered include: a brief historical perspective, clinical presentation in relation to symptoms found in different age groups, epidemiology, psychiatric comorbidity, etiology (with regards to genetics, neuroimaging, and familial factors), clinical course and prognosis, and treatment, with special emphasis on individual and family-based cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychopharmacology. PMID:22275846

  9. Course of illness in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, A; Tonna, M; Odone, A; Stubbs, B; Ghaemi, S N

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We updated our recent systematic review searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to investigate course of illness in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 13 relevant papers which found that the majority of comorbid OCD cases appeared to be related to mood episodes. OC symptoms in comorbid patients appeared more often during depressive episodes, and comorbid BD and OCD cycled together, with OC symptoms often remitting during manic/hypomanic episodes. PMID:27025465

  10. Course of illness in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, A; Tonna, M; Odone, A; Stubbs, B; Ghaemi, S N

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We updated our recent systematic review searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to investigate course of illness in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 13 relevant papers which found that the majority of comorbid OCD cases appeared to be related to mood episodes. OC symptoms in comorbid patients appeared more often during depressive episodes, and comorbid BD and OCD cycled together, with OC symptoms often remitting during manic/hypomanic episodes.

  11. Tourette's disorder with and without obsessive-compulsive disorder in adults: are they different?

    PubMed

    Coffey, B J; Miguel, E C; Biederman, J; Baer, L; Rauch, S L; O'Sullivan, R L; Savage, C R; Phillips, K; Borgman, A; Green-Leibovitz, M I; Moore, E; Park, K S; Jenike, M A

    1998-04-01

    Clinical research has documented a bidirectional overlap between Tourette's disorder (TD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) from familial-genetic, phenomenological, comorbidity, and natural history perspectives. Patients with Tourette's disorder plus obsessive-compulsive disorder (TD + OCD), a putative subtype, share features of both. The purpose of this exploratory study was to evaluate correlates of patients with TD, OCD, and TD + OCD to determine whether TD + OCD is a subtype of TD, OCD, or an additive form of both. Sixty-one subjects with TD, OCD, or TD + OCD were evaluated with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R supplemented with additional modules. The three groups differed in the rates of bipolar disorder (p < .04), social phobia (p < .02), body dysmorphic disorder (p < .002), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (p < .03), and substance use disorders (p < .04). These findings were accounted for by the elevated rates of the disorders in the TD + OCD group compared with the TD and OCD groups. These finding are most consistent with the hypothesis that TD + OCD is a more severe disorder than TD and OCD and may be more etiologically linked to TD than to OCD. These findings highlight the importance of assessment of the full spectrum of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with TD and OCD.

  12. Electrical stimulation in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis alleviates severe obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Luyten, L; Hendrickx, S; Raymaekers, S; Gabriëls, L; Nuttin, B

    2016-09-01

    In 1998, we proposed deep brain stimulation as a last-resort treatment option for patients suffering from severe, treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here, 24 OCD patients were included in a long-term follow-up study to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation in the anterior limbs of the internal capsule (ALIC) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST). We find that electrical stimulation in the ALIC/BST area is safe and significantly decreases obsessions, compulsions, and associated anxiety and depressive symptoms, and improves global functioning in a blinded crossover trial (n=17), after 4 years (n=18), and at last follow-up (up to 171 months, n=24). Moreover, our data indicate that BST may be a better stimulation target compared with ALIC to alleviate OCD symptoms. We conclude that electrical stimulation in BST is a promising therapeutic option for otherwise treatment-resistant OCD patients. PMID:26303665

  13. Assessment of obsessive beliefs: Comparing individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder to a medical sample.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Makilim Nunes; Magna, Luiz Alberto; McKay, Dean; Del-Porto, José Alberto

    2011-03-01

    Cognitive behavior models for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) are based currently on the presence of specific beliefs associated with the disorder. Among these beliefs are inflated responsibility, concerns over thought-action fusion, and overimportance of thoughts. The aim of this study was to compare scores from the subscales of the Obsessive Beliefs Questionnaire (OBQ-87), developed by the Obsessive-Compulsive Cognitions Working Group (OCCWG, 2001), in 24 patients from an OCD clinic (OCD) and 24 patients from a Medical Clinic (MC) for ambulatory and chronic diseases. All OCD patients were diagnosed using the SCID, and the OCD portion of the SCID was used to rule out patients with OCD from the MC group. The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (YBOCS) and Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale (DAS) were also administered. The results indicated that, contrary to predictions, in the domains of Tolerance for Uncertainty, Threat estimation, Responsibility and Perfectionism, the MC group presented higher scores than the OCD group. The same findings occurred with DAS, which was significantly correlated with the OBQ. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed, as well as suggestions for future research with both groups.

  14. Obsessive-compulsive disorder in the postpartum period: diagnosis, differential diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Verinder; Sommerdyk, Christina

    2015-07-01

    Childbirth can trigger or exacerbate a variety of psychiatric disorders but the extant literature has focused primarily on mood disorders. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) after childbirth can occur alone or in combination with other psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder. Due to the general lack of awareness of the relationship between childbirth and OCD among clinicians as well as patients, the disorder may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed as major depressive disorder. This article describes the prevalence, clinical features, common psychiatric comorbidities, differential diagnosis and potential consequences of underdiagnosis or misdiagnosis. Using case vignettes strategies for its detection and clinical management are suggested. Finally, areas in need of further research are proposed.

  15. Psychological treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Alcázar, Ana I; Sánchez-Meca, Julio; Rosa-Alcázar, Ángel; Iniesta-Sepúlveda, Marina; Olivares-Rodríguez, José; Parada-Navas, José L

    2015-01-01

    Although several meta-analyses have investigated the efficacy of psychological treatments for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), there is not yet a consensus on the most efficacious treatment components. A meta-analysis was carried out to examine the efficacy of the different treatment techniques used in the psychological interventions of pediatric OCD. An exhaustive literature search from 1983 to February 2014 enabled us to locate 46 published articles that applied some kind of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). For each group the effect size was the standardized pretest-posttest mean change, and it was calculated for obsessive-compulsive symptoms and for other outcome measures. The results clearly showed large effect sizes for CBT in reducing obsessive-compulsive symptoms and, to a lesser extent, other outcome measures (d + = 1.860; 95% CI: 1.639; 2.081). The most promising treatments are those based on multicomponent programs comprising ERP, cognitive strategies, and relapse prevention. The analysis of other potential moderator variables and the implications for clinical practice are discussed. PMID:25901842

  16. Social cognition and metacognition in obsessive-compulsive disorder: an explorative pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mavrogiorgou, Paraskevi; Bethge, Mareike; Luksnat, Stefanie; Nalato, Fabio; Juckel, Georg; Brüne, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a severe psychiatric condition that is, among other features, characterized by marked impairment in social functioning. Although theoretically plausible with regard to neurobiological underpinnings of OCD, there is little research about possible impairments in social cognitive and meta-cognitive abilities and their connections with social functioning in patients with OCD. Accordingly, we sought to examine social cognitive skills and metacognition in OCD. Twenty OCD patients and age-, sex-, and education-matched 20 healthy controls were assessed using neurocognitive and diverse social cognitive skills including the Ekman 60 Faces test, the Hinting Task, the faux pas test, and a proverb test. In addition, the Metacognition Questionnaire-30 was administered to both the OCD and the control groups. Social functioning was measured using the Personal and Social Performance Scale. Symptom severity in patients was determined by the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale and the Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory. No group differences emerged in basic social cognitive abilities. In contrast, compared to controls, OCD patients scored higher on all MCQ dimensions, particularly negative beliefs about worry, uncontrollability, and danger; beliefs about need to control thoughts; and cognitive self-consciousness. There were no significant correlations between social or metacognitive parameters and OCD symptom severity. However, in the patient group, depression and metacognition predicted social functioning. OCD patients show normal basal social cognitive abilities, but dysfunctional metacognitive profiles, which may contribute to their psychosocial impairment.

  17. Lamotrigine Augmentation Versus Placebo in Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Khalkhali, Mohammadrasoul; Zarrabi, Homa; Kafie, Moosa; Heidarzadeh, Abtin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Serotonin reuptake inhibitors are frequently used in first-line treatments for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Nevertheless, many of these patients do not respond well to initial therapy. The hypothesis of glutamatergic dysfunction in specific brain regions has been proposed in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder. This study was designed to evaluate the possible efficacy of lamotrigine, a glutamatergic agent in Serotonin reuptake inhibitors-resistant patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Method: This study was a 12-week, double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of adjunctive fixed-doses of lamotrigine (100 mg) to Serotonin reuptake inhibitors therapy in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Eligible subjects who had a total Y-BOCS of 21 or above were randomly assigned to receive adjunctive treatment with either lamotrigine (n = 26), or placebo (n = 27). Response to lamotrigine was defined as clinical improvement (>25% decrease in the total Y-BOCS score), which was administered at weeks 0, 8 and 12. Results: At the endpoint (week 12), significant differences were observed in obsession, compulsion, and total Y-BOCS scores comparing lamotrigine to placebo (P = 0.01, 0.005 and 0.007 respectively). The mean reduction in obsession, compulsion and total scores in lamotrigine group was about 4.15, 4.50 and 8.73, respectively. Similarly, the mean reductions in the placebo group were 2.52, 2.56 and 5.07. Effect sizes for efficacy measureswerecalculatedbyCohen’sd, and it was calculated as 0.54 for the total YBOCS. Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence that this augmentation is well tolerated and may be an effective strategy for patients with refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:27437007

  18. Comorbid Personality Disorders in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Its Symptom Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Bulli, Francesco; Melli, Gabriele; Cavalletti, Veronica; Stopani, Eleonora; Carraresi, Claudia

    2016-06-01

    The current paper was aimed at: (1) investigating the comorbidity between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and personality disorders (PDs) using an OCD sample and clinician-administered structured interviews; (2) exploring the associations of different cluster comorbid PDs with the specific symptom dimensions of OCD; (3) analyzing the variables which could play a significant role in the probability of having at least one comorbid PD, controlling for confounding variables. The SCID-II and Y-BOCS, together with a series of self-report measures of OCD, depression and anxiety symptoms were administered to a clinical sample of 159 patients with a primary diagnosis of OCD. 20.8 % of the participants suffered from at least one comorbid PD; the most common was obsessive-compulsive PD (9.4 %), followed by narcissistic PD (6.3 %). In OCD patients with comorbid cluster C PDs, the percentage of responsibility for harm, injury, or bad luck symptoms was significantly greater than other OCD symptom dimensions (p < .005). Logistic regression found some evidence supporting the association between severity of OCD symptoms and comorbid PDs. PDs are prevalent among Italian people with OCD and should be routinely assessed, as comorbidity may affect help-seeking behaviour and response to treatment.

  19. Connectomics-based structural network alterations in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reess, T J; Rus, O G; Schmidt, R; de Reus, M A; Zaudig, M; Wagner, G; Zimmer, C; van den Heuvel, M P; Koch, K

    2016-01-01

    Given the strong involvement of affect in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and recent findings, the current cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) model of pathophysiology has repeatedly been questioned regarding the specific role of regions involved in emotion processing such as limbic areas. Employing a connectomics approach enables us to characterize structural connectivity on a whole-brain level, extending beyond the CSTC circuitry. Whole-brain structural networks of 41 patients and 42 matched healthy controls were analyzed based on 83 × 83 connectivity matrices derived from cortical and subcortical parcellation of structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance scans and deterministic fiber tracking based on diffusion tensor imaging data. To assess group differences in structural connectivity, the framework of network-based statistic (NBS) was applied. Graph theoretical measures were calculated to further assess local and global network characteristics. The NBS analysis revealed a single network consistently displaying decreased structural connectivity in patients comprising orbitofrontal, striatal, insula and temporo-limbic areas. In addition, graph theoretical measures indicated local alterations for amygdala and temporal pole while the overall topology of the network was preserved. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study combining the NBS with graph theoretical measures in OCD. Along with regions commonly described in the CSTC model of pathophysiology, our results indicate an involvement of mainly temporo-limbic regions typically associated with emotion processing supporting their importance for neurobiological alterations in OCD. PMID:27598966

  20. Connectomics-based structural network alterations in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Reess, T J; Rus, O G; Schmidt, R; de Reus, M A; Zaudig, M; Wagner, G; Zimmer, C; van den Heuvel, M P; Koch, K

    2016-01-01

    Given the strong involvement of affect in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and recent findings, the current cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) model of pathophysiology has repeatedly been questioned regarding the specific role of regions involved in emotion processing such as limbic areas. Employing a connectomics approach enables us to characterize structural connectivity on a whole-brain level, extending beyond the CSTC circuitry. Whole-brain structural networks of 41 patients and 42 matched healthy controls were analyzed based on 83 × 83 connectivity matrices derived from cortical and subcortical parcellation of structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance scans and deterministic fiber tracking based on diffusion tensor imaging data. To assess group differences in structural connectivity, the framework of network-based statistic (NBS) was applied. Graph theoretical measures were calculated to further assess local and global network characteristics. The NBS analysis revealed a single network consistently displaying decreased structural connectivity in patients comprising orbitofrontal, striatal, insula and temporo-limbic areas. In addition, graph theoretical measures indicated local alterations for amygdala and temporal pole while the overall topology of the network was preserved. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study combining the NBS with graph theoretical measures in OCD. Along with regions commonly described in the CSTC model of pathophysiology, our results indicate an involvement of mainly temporo-limbic regions typically associated with emotion processing supporting their importance for neurobiological alterations in OCD. PMID:27598966

  1. Vitamin D insufficiency in a boy with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Celik, Gonca; Tas, Didem Arslan; Varmıs, Dilek Altun; Tahiroglu, Aysegul; Avci, Ayse

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D deficiency not only causes low bone mass but also may lead to neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present case, vitamin D supplementation reduced obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms associated with streptococcal infection in a 7-year-old boy. Sudden onset of symptoms, including excessive hand washing and fear of touching anything, had occurred 1 month before presentation. Although there are few studies on a possible causal relationship between vitamin D and neuropsychiatric disorders, the present report; together with previous data, suggest an etiological role of vitamin D-related immune processes.

  2. Vitamin D insufficiency in a boy with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Celik, Gonca; Tas, Didem Arslan; Varmıs, Dilek Altun; Tahiroglu, Aysegul; Avci, Ayse

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D deficiency not only causes low bone mass but also may lead to neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present case, vitamin D supplementation reduced obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms associated with streptococcal infection in a 7-year-old boy. Sudden onset of symptoms, including excessive hand washing and fear of touching anything, had occurred 1 month before presentation. Although there are few studies on a possible causal relationship between vitamin D and neuropsychiatric disorders, the present report; together with previous data, suggest an etiological role of vitamin D-related immune processes. PMID:27388777

  3. Cross-Disorder Genetic Analysis of Tic Disorders, Obsessive-Compulsive, and Hoarding Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zilhão, Nuno R; Smit, Dirk J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cath, Danielle C

    2016-01-01

    Hoarding, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Tourette's disorder (TD) are psychiatric disorders that share symptom overlap, which might partly be the result of shared genetic variation. Population-based twin studies have found significant genetic correlations between hoarding and OCD symptoms, with genetic correlations varying between 0.1 and 0.45. For tic disorders, studies examining these correlations are lacking. Other lines of research, including clinical samples and GWAS or CNV data to explore genetic relationships between tic disorders and OCD, have only found very modest if any shared genetic variation. Our aim was to extend current knowledge on the genetic structure underlying hoarding, OC symptoms (OCS), and lifetime tic symptoms and, in a trivariate analysis, assess the degree of common and unique genetic factors contributing to the etiology of these disorders. Data have been gathered from participants in the Netherlands Twin Register comprising a total of 5293 individuals from a sample of adult monozygotic (n = 2460) and dizygotic (n = 2833) twin pairs (mean age 33.61 years). The data on Hoarding, OCS, and tic symptoms were simultaneously analyzed in Mplus. A liability threshold model was fitted to the twin data, analyzing heritability of phenotypes and of their comorbidity. Following the criteria for a probable clinical diagnosis in all phenotypes, 6.8% of participants had a diagnosis of probable hoarding disorder (HD), 6.3% of OCS, and 12.8% of any probable lifetime tic disorder. Genetic factors explained 50.4, 70.1, and 61.1% of the phenotypic covariance between hoarding-OCS, hoarding-tics, and OCS-tics, respectively. Substantial genetic correlations were observed between hoarding and OCS (0.41), hoarding and tics (0.35), and between OCS and tics (0.37). These results support the contribution of genetic factors in the development of these disorders and their comorbidity. Furthermore, tics were mostly influenced by specific

  4. Paroxetine Treatment in Children and Adolescents with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Randomized, Multicenter, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Daniel A.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Emslie, Graham; Murphy, Tanya; Carpenter, David J.; Wetherhold, Erica; Perera, Phil; Machin, Andrea; Gardiner, Christel

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of paroxetine for the treatment of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder.Method: Children (7-11 years of age) and adolescents (12-17 years of age) meeting DSM-IV criteria for obsessive-compulsive disorder were randomized to paroxetine (10-50 mg/day) or placebo for 10 weeks. The primary efficacy…

  5. Comorbidity between obsessive-compulsive disorder and body dysmorphic disorder: prevalence, explanatory theories, and clinical characterization

    PubMed Central

    Frías, Álvaro; Palma, Carol; Farriols, Núria; González, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background With the advent of the fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) has been subsumed into the obsessive-compulsive disorders and related disorders (OCDRD) category. Objective We aimed to determine the empirical evidence regarding the potential relationship between BDD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) based on the prevalence data, etiopathogenic pathways, and clinical characterization of patients with both disorders. Method A comprehensive search of databases (PubMed and PsycINFO) was performed. Published manuscripts between 1985 and May 2015 were identified. Overall, 53 studies fulfilled inclusion criteria. Results Lifetime comorbidity rates of BDD–OCD are almost three times higher in samples with a primary diagnosis of BDD than those with primary OCD (27.5% vs 10.4%). However, other mental disorders, such as social phobia or major mood depression, are more likely among both types of psychiatric samples. Empirical evidence regarding the etiopathogenic pathways for BDD–OCD comorbidity is still inconclusive, whether concerning common shared features or one disorder as a risk factor for the other. Specifically, current findings concerning third variables show more divergences than similarities when comparing both disorders. Preliminary data on the clinical characterization of the patients with BDD and OCD indicate that the deleterious clinical impact of BDD in OCD patients is greater than vice versa. Conclusion Despite the recent inclusion of BDD within the OCDRD, data from comparative studies between BDD and OCD need further evidence for supporting this nosological approach. To better define this issue, comparative studies between BDD, OCD, and social phobia should be carried out. PMID:26345330

  6. Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Complicated by Comorbid Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, H. Blair; Wetterneck, Chad T.; Cahill, Shawn P.; Steinglass, Joanna E.; Franklin, Martin E.; Leonard, Rachel C.; Weltzin, Theodore E.; Riemann, Bradley C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Eating disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) commonly co-occur, but there is little data for how to treat these complex cases. To address this gap, we examined the naturalistic outcome of 56 patients with both disorders, who received a multimodal treatment program designed to address both problems simultaneously. Methods A residential treatment program developed a cognitive-behavioral approach for patients with both OCD and an eating disorder by integrating exposure and response prevention (ERP) treatment for OCD with ERP strategies targeting eating pathology. Patients also received a supervised eating plan, medication management, and social support. At admission and discharge, patients completed validated measures of OCD severity (the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale—Self Report [Y-BOCS-SR]), eating disorder severity (the Eating Disorders Examination-Questionnaire), and depressive severity (the Beck Depression Inventory II [BDI-II]). Body mass index (BMI) was also measured. Paired-sample t-tests examined change on these measures. Main Results Between 2006 and 2011, 56 individuals completed all study measures at admission and discharge. Mean length of stay was 57 days (SD = 27). Most (89%) were on psychiatric medications. Significant decreases were observed in OCD severity, eating disorder severity, and depression. Those with bulimia nervosa showed more improvement than those with anorexia nervosa. BMI significantly increased, primarily among those underweight at admission. Conclusion Simultaneous treatment of OCD and eating disorders using a multimodal approach that emphasizes ERP techniques for both OCD and eating disorders can be an effective treatment strategy for these complex cases. PMID:23316878

  7. [Obsessive compulsive disorder and schizophrenia. An attempt at psychopathologic differentiation by focusing on the single phenomenon of obsession].

    PubMed

    Bürgy, M

    2005-11-01

    This paper follows the hypothesis that differentiation between obsessive compulsive disorder and schizophrenia is possible only by focusing on the single phenomenon of obsession. The declaration of a nosological specificity of obsession is set against the current view of ICD-10 and DSM-IV, of obsession as a ubiquitous nonspecific phenomenon appearing with comorbidities. The historic development of these two most different views of obsession and their combination is explained. The distinction between obsessive compulsive disorder and schizophrenia can be made at the psychopathologic dividing line between obsession and delusional thoughts. Examination of the literature on the transition from obsessive compulsive disorder into schizophrenia shows that there is no clear link between obsession and schizophrenia.

  8. [A Case with Multiple Comorbidities of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders].

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Ayako; Mito, Hironori; Motoyama, Mikuni; Yamanishi, Kyosuke; Hayashida, Kazuhisa; Maebayashi, Kensei; Matsunaga, Hisato

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs) have been introduced in a revision to DSM-5 as a novel category that is distinct from other anxiety disorders in DSM-IV. OCRDs consist of 5 primary disorders: obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), hoarding disorder (HD), skin picking disorder (SPD), and hair pulling disorder (HPD), which share core clinical features such as preoccupation or recurrent thoughts and/or repetitive behaviors. Repetitive behaviors in BDD and HD can be differentially characterized by the presence of cognitive components associated with preceding anxiety from those in SPD or HPD, which are only observed as motoric components that regulate emotions or alleviate tension. Thus, the validity of the OCRD category and specific interrelationships between each OCRD remain uncertain. In the present study, therefore, we presented a case of multiple comorbidities of OCRDs in order to discuss the nature of the OCRD category. Our patient was a 20-year-old female university student. At the age of 11 years old, she started picking at acne on her face. The psychopathological, and treatment features observed in this case indicated possible interrelationships among OCRDs, especially between cognitive and motoric OCRDs, which supported the clinical utility and continuous nature of this category. PMID:26901889

  9. Anxiety disorders and control related beliefs: the exemplar of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

    PubMed

    Moulding, Richard; Kyrios, Michael

    2006-09-01

    Beliefs about control have been postulated to be important to anxiety and mood disorders. In particular, the phenomenology of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) suggests that it may be an exemplar of an anxiety disorder where control issues related to the self (behavior and thoughts) and world (the external environment) are particularly important. However, only beliefs concerning the need to control thoughts have been incorporated into contemporary theories of OCD. This article summarizes the theoretical and empirical research relevant to control-related beliefs in OCD. It is suggested that discrepancies between an individual's desired level of control and their perceived level of control could contribute to OCD symptoms, and exacerbate the tendency for individuals with OCD to engage in magical ideation and superstitious rituals. Overall, this review demonstrates how consideration of control cognitions could enhance our understanding of OCD and further improve its treatment.

  10. Towards a post-traumatic subtype of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Cocchi, Luca; Harrison, Ben J; Shavitt, Roseli G; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Ferrão, Ygor A; de Mathis, Maria Alice; Cordioli, Aristides V; Yücel, Murat; Pantelis, Christos; Mari, Jair de Jesus; Miguel, Euripedes C; Torres, Albina R

    2012-03-01

    We evaluated whether traumatic events are associated with a distinctive pattern of socio-demographic and clinical features of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We compared socio-demographic and clinical features of 106 patients developing OCD after post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD; termed post-traumatic OCD), 41 patients developing OCD before PTSD (pre-traumatic OCD), and 810 OCD patients without any history of PTSD (non-traumatic OCD) using multinomial logistic regression analysis. A later age at onset of OCD, self-mutilation disorder, history of suicide plans, panic disorder with agoraphobia, and compulsive buying disorder were independently related to post-traumatic OCD. In contrast, earlier age at OCD onset, alcohol-related disorders, contamination-washing symptoms, and self-mutilation disorder were all independently associated with pre-traumatic OCD. In addition, patients with post-traumatic OCD without a previous history of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) showed lower educational levels, greater rates of contamination-washing symptoms, and more severe miscellaneous symptoms as compared to post-traumatic OCD patients with a history of OCS.

  11. OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER: IS IT A PROBLEM OF COMPLEX MOTOR PROGRAMMING?*

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Sumant; Mukundan, C.R.; Channabasavanna, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY 44 subjects with Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and 40 normals were compared using an experimental paradigm involving recording of the bereitschaftspotential. A decreased onset latency and increased amplitude was found in the OCD sample as compared to normals. A neurophysiological substrate for the bereitschaftspotential has been proposed. The implications of these findings in OCD as compared to Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, and for a focal neuro-physiological dysfunction have also been discussed. The findings of this study implicate a dysfunction in complex motor programming in OCD, with the possibility of this dysfunction being in the prefrontal area. PMID:21927207

  12. Prevalence and correlates of electroconvulsive therapy delivery in 1001 obsessive-compulsive disorder outpatients.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos-Ribeiro, Samara; Lins-Martins, Natália M; Frydman, Ilana; Conceição do Rosário, Maria; Ferrão, Ygor A; Shavitt, Roseli G; Yücel, Murat; Miguel, Euripedes C; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2016-05-30

    Individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) who sought treatment in seven different specialized centers (n=1001) were evaluated with a structured assessment battery. Thirteen OCD patients (1.3% of the sample) reported having been treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the past. They were older and exhibited higher global severity of OCD symptoms, but were less likely to display symmetry/ordering and contamination/washing symptoms. They also had greater suicidality and increased rates of psychosis. Finally, OCD patients exposed to ECT were more frequently treated with antipsychotics, although they did not differ in terms of responses to adequate trials with serotonin reuptake inhibitors. PMID:27137976

  13. Cross MFF—analysis in studying the obsessive-compulsive disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demin, S. A.; Panischev, O. Yu; Demina, N. Yu

    2016-08-01

    There were demonstrated capabilities of the Memory Function Formalism (MFF) in analyzing cross correlations in human brain bioelectric activity at obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). To extract the information about collective phenomena in (electroencephalogram) EEG brain activity we use the power spectra of memory functions and the memory quantifiers. We discover the pairs of the electrodes with the greatest differences in dynamic and stochastic parameters for patients with the different condition. The high OCD condition is characterized by the influence of the memory effects. The MFF cross correlation analysis allow to describe the collective phenomena in EEG dynamics at OCD including the dynamic, spectral and stochastic behavior.

  14. Ziprasidone Augmentation in an Adolescent with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Demirkaya, Sevcan Karakoç; Alyanak, Behiye

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by recurrent, unwanted thoughts (obsessions) and/or repetitive behaviors (compulsions). Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are widely used to treat OCD, only half of the patients respond well. Several potentiation strategies including off-label use of antipsychotics (mostly risperidone, quetiapine) have been tried. Ziprasidone is an atypical antipsychotic with the best affinity ratio of 5 HT 2A/D2 and 5HT2C/D2 receptors. There is a limited data on ziprasidone in pediatric groups. The case described in the following is an example for the augmentation with ziprasidone to treatment refractory OCD.

  15. Pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents: a qualitative review.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Alcázar, Ana I; Iniesta-Sepúlveda, Marina; Rosa-Alcázar, Angel

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic review on the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments for children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sixty-four studies fulfilled the selection criteria, being the most of them focused in SSRI and Clomipramine. The trials on augmentation strategies and third line monotherapies are scarce, being the majority open-trials and case series. Similarly, studies on combined treatment (psychological and pharmacological) are few; furthermore this is a relevant future research line. It is also remarkable the lack of quasi-experimental and experimental comparison studies and the long-term follow-up measures. PMID:23803803

  16. The Effect of Intravenous Citalopram on the Neural Substrates of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Bhikram, Tracy P; Farb, Norman A S; Ravindran, Lakshmi N; Papadopoulos, Yousef G; Conn, David K; Pollock, Bruce G; Ravindran, Arun V

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of an intravenous serotonin reuptake inhibitor on the neural substrates of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), as intravenous agents may be more effective in treating OCD than conventional oral pharmacotherapy. Eight OCD subjects and eight control subjects received alternate infusions of citalopram and placebo during functional magnetic resonance imaging, in a randomized, symptom-provocation, crossover design. Compared with baseline, OCD subjects displayed significant changes in prefrontal neural activity after the citalopram infusion relative to placebo, and these changes correlated with reductions in subjective anxiety. PMID:27019066

  17. Group behavioral therapy for adolescents with tic-related and non-tic-related obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Himle, Joseph A; Fischer, Daniel J; Van Etten, Michelle L; Janeck, Amy S; Hanna, Gregory L

    2003-01-01

    Prior research supports the distinction between tic-related and non-tic-related obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) based on phenomenologic, etiologic, and neurobehavioral data. The present study examines whether response to psychosocial treatment differs in adolescents, depending on the presence of comorbid tics. Nineteen adolescents, 12-17 years of age, participated in 7-week, uncontrolled trial of group cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for OCD. Eight of the patients had tic-related and eleven had non-tic-related OCD. The group CBT program included psycho-education, exposure and response prevention, cognitive strategies, and family involvement. Significant improvement was observed for all subjects on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale ratings of obsessions, compulsions, and total OCD symptoms. Outcomes were similar for subjects with tic-related and non-tic-related OCD. These preliminary results suggest that the presence of comorbid tic disorders may not attenuate response to behavioral group treatment among adolescents.

  18. Psychometric properties of the Family Accommodation Scale for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder-Patient Version.

    PubMed

    Wu, Monica S; Pinto, Anthony; Horng, Betty; Phares, Vicky; McGuire, Joseph F; Dedrick, Robert F; Van Noppen, Barbara; Calvocoressi, Lisa; Storch, Eric A

    2016-03-01

    In obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), family accommodation is a frequently occurring phenomenon that has been linked to attenuated treatment response, increased obsessive-compulsive symptom severity, and lower levels of functioning. No patient-report version of family accommodation exists, with available measures relying on relatives as informants. However, adult patients with OCD often present to clinical services alone, frequently making it impractical to obtain information from these informants. Consequently, a standardized patient-reported measure of family accommodation proves salient in clinical practice. The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Family Accommodation Scale for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder-Patient Version (FAS-PV). Sixty-one adults with OCD were administered clinician-rated measures of OCD symptom severity and self-report questionnaires examining functional impairment, family functioning, and emotional/behavioral difficulties. Fifty-four relatives completed self-report measures assessing family accommodation and family functioning. The majority of the adult OCD participants (89%) endorsed at least 1 type of accommodating behavior in the previous week. The FAS-PV total score demonstrated good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Convergent validity was evidenced by strong associations with scores on another measure of family accommodation, OCD symptom severity, OCD-related family functioning, anxiety, and functional impairment. Divergent validity was supported through nonsignificant correlations with depressive symptoms and impulsivity. The FAS-PV did not significantly differ from the relative-reported measure of family accommodation in terms of the internal consistency or mean of the total scores. Ultimately, the FAS-PV scores demonstrated sound psychometric properties and validity in assessing family accommodation from the patient's perspective, encouraging its use in research and clinical practice.

  19. The psychobiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder: how important is the role of disgust?

    PubMed

    Stein, D J; Liu, Y; Shapira, N A; Goodman, W K

    2001-08-01

    Psychobiologic models of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have focused on cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical (CTSC) circuits, noting normal function in cognitive and motoric procedural strategies. Such models have relied on the classification of OCD as an anxiety disorder, seldom exploring other relevant emotions. Based on the hypothesis that a central emotion in OCD is disgust, the authors review the literature on its psychobiology and its relevance to current models of OCD. There are important parallels between the psychobiology of OCD and that of disgust. Obsessive- compulsive disorder may be conceptualized in terms of a false contamination alarm in which disgust plays a crucial organizing or embodying role, not only at a basic brain level, but also in terms of the psychosocial aspects of the disorder. Just as psychobiologic models of panic disorder and post- traumatic stress disorder have been strengthened by the inclusion of preclinical work on amygdala-mediated fear conditioning, so findings on disgust and its mediating CSTC circuits may generate useful hypotheses for OCD research.

  20. Developmental Aspects of Error and High-Conflict-Related Brain Activity in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A FMRI Study with a Flanker Task before and after CBT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyser, Chaim; Veltman, Dick J.; Wolters, Lidewij H.; de Haan, Else; Boer, Frits

    2011-01-01

    Background: Heightened error and conflict monitoring are considered central mechanisms in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and are associated with anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) function. Pediatric obsessive-compulsive patients provide an opportunity to investigate the development of this area and its associations with psychopathology.…

  1. Data on the impact of SSRIs and depression symptoms on the neural activities in obsessive-compulsive disorder at rest.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunhui; Juhas, Michal; Greenshaw, Andrew J; Hu, Qiang; Meng, Xin; Cui, Hongsheng; Ding, Yongzhuo; Kang, Lu; Zhang, Yubo; Wang, Yuhua; Cui, Guangcheng; Li, Ping

    2016-09-01

    The data provided here related to our research article (Chen et al., 2016) [1]. We provide whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity patterns in obsessive-compulsive disorder at resting-state [1]. This article also provides supplementary information to our research article, i.e., between - group comparisons of the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and combined depression symptoms on resting-state neural activities in obsessive-compulsive disorder. The data presented here provide novel insights into the effect of SSRIs and combined depression symptoms on the neural activities at rest. PMID:27504477

  2. [Clinical features of obsessive-compulsive disorder with pervasive developmental disorder].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Recently, psychiatrists have been paying attention to the presence of PDD (Pervasive Developmental Disorder) in difficult cases of mental disorder. We have found that patients with treatment-resistant OCD (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder) are very likely to have PDD. If the presence of PDD can be recognized at an early stage based on the clinical features of patients with OCD, it would lead to effective treatment. However, there has been little research on the epidemiology of OCD patients with PDD, especially in adults. In this study, we investigated the percentage of PDD in adult OCD and the clinical characteristics of OC symptoms, comparing between OCD patients with or without diagnoses of PDD. The results showed that, in 48 patients with OCD, as many as 13 (27%) were diagnosed with PDD (PDD+). We identified several items in the Y-BOCS (Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) symptom checklist that showed significantly higher rates in PDD+. In the 'Obsession' checklist, the items were obsession with need for symmetry or exactness, needing to know or remember and bothered by certain sounds/noises and the fear of losing things. In the 'Compulsion' checklist, the items were checking, repetition, ordering/ arranging, and hoarding/collecting compulsions. Among these items, needing to know or remember, hoarding/collecting compulsion, and the fear of losing things seemed to be closely related. The need to know or remember was considered to be the core factor. This relationship was found only in PDD+, and so it may prove useful in clinical guides to identify PDD+ among patients with OCD. PMID:21077294

  3. Reduced Prefrontal Hemodynamic Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder as Measured by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ota, Toyosaku; Iida, Junzo; Sawada, Masayuki; Suehiro, Yuko; Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Matsuura, Hiroki; Tanaka, Shohei; Kishimoto, Naoko; Negoro, Hideki; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) have enabled non-invasive clarification of brain functions in psychiatric disorders. Functional neuroimaging studies of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have suggested that the frontal cortex and subcortical structures may play a role in the pathophysiology of the disorder.…

  4. Enhancing Exposure Therapy for Anxiety Disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Joseph F.; Lewin, Adam B.; Storch, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Translating findings from basic science, several compounds have been identified that may enhance therapeutic outcomes and/or expedite treatment gains when administered alongside exposure-based treatments. Four of these compounds (referred to as cognitive enhancers) have been evaluated in the context of randomized controlled trials for anxiety disorders (e.g., specific phobias, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). These cognitive enhancers include D-cycloserine, yohimbine hydrochloride, glucocorticoids and cortisol, and brain derived neurotrophic factor. There is consistent evidence that cognitive enhancers can enhance therapeutic outcomes and/or expedite treatment gains across anxiety disorders, OCD, and PTSD. Emerging evidence has highlighted the importance of within-session fear habituation and between-session fear learning, which can either enhance fear extinction or reconsolidate of fear responses. Although findings from these trials are promising, there are several considerations that warrant further evaluation prior to wide-spread use of cognitive enhancers in exposure-based treatments. Consistent trial design and large sample sizes are important in future studies of cognitive enhancers. PMID:24972729

  5. Early maladaptive schemas activated in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Hakan; Atalay, Figen; Karahan, Dilara; Caliskan, Mecit

    2008-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present article is to investigate the activation patterns of early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method. During the time between 1 January 2006 and 1 April 2006, 45 consecutive patients from an outpatient facility of a general hospital and 45 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects from the hospital staff were included in the study. They were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnosis of DSM-IV Mental Disorders (SCID-1), the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Personality Disorders (SCID-2), the Young Schema Questionnaire-Short Form (YSQ-SF), the Young Parenting Inventory (YPI) and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). The results were assessed using GraphPad Prisma V.3 statistical program. Results. The YSQ total score of the OCD group was significantly higher than the control group (t=3.62, P<0.0001). The average scores of the patients with OCD on certain schemas were significantly higher than the average scores of the control group, although the others did not make any difference between the OCD and control groups. Conclusion. The study demonstrates that, in the patients with OCD, most of the early maladaptive schemas including social isolation, vulnerability and pessimism, are prominently activated. PMID:24937713

  6. The relationship between insight and control in obsessive-compulsive disorder: implications for the insanity defense.

    PubMed

    Rotter, M; Goodman, W

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the authors examine the relationship between insight and control in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in an effort to better understand the concept of volitional control of behavior especially as it relates to changes in the insanity defense that were recommended by the American Psychiatric Association (APA), specifically that the volitional prong be dropped. Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale ratings in 56 subjects with OCD were reviewed with specific attention to items measuring the patients' subjective sense of decreased volitional control over their compulsions and their insight into their behavior. No statistically significant correlation was found between the control over compulsions item and the insight item. The authors conclude that the experience of volitional control in patients with OCD is not significantly related to the level of insight they have into the irrationality of their behavior. The authors then review cognitive therapy literature and show that though cognition and volition may appear to be dissociated in some disorders, even in the absence of insight, a relatively gross measure of legally relevant cognitive disturbance, subtle cognitive changes can be identified in patients with seemingly purely volitional disorders such as OCD.

  7. Early maladaptive schemas activated in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Hakan; Atalay, Figen; Karahan, Dilara; Caliskan, Mecit

    2008-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present article is to investigate the activation patterns of early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method. During the time between 1 January 2006 and 1 April 2006, 45 consecutive patients from an outpatient facility of a general hospital and 45 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects from the hospital staff were included in the study. They were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnosis of DSM-IV Mental Disorders (SCID-1), the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Personality Disorders (SCID-2), the Young Schema Questionnaire-Short Form (YSQ-SF), the Young Parenting Inventory (YPI) and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). The results were assessed using GraphPad Prisma V.3 statistical program. Results. The YSQ total score of the OCD group was significantly higher than the control group (t=3.62, P<0.0001). The average scores of the patients with OCD on certain schemas were significantly higher than the average scores of the control group, although the others did not make any difference between the OCD and control groups. Conclusion. The study demonstrates that, in the patients with OCD, most of the early maladaptive schemas including social isolation, vulnerability and pessimism, are prominently activated.

  8. Brief Report: Exposure and Response Prevention for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in a 12-Year-Old with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmkuhl, Heather D.; Storch, Eric A.; Bodfish, James W.; Geffken, Gary R.

    2008-01-01

    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) involves exaggerated or excessive worry about threatening and non-threatening stimuli coupled with impairing rituals believed to reduce anxiety. Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are characterized by impairment in social and communicative activities as well as restricted and repetitive behaviors. Approximately 2%…

  9. Motivation, Time Course, and Heterogeneity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Response to Taylor, McKay, and Abramowitz (2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Erik Z.; Szechtman, Henry

    2005-01-01

    In response to commentary by S. Taylor, D. McKay, and J. S. Abramowitz, the authors discuss the distinctive features of their theory of obsessive-compulsive disorder outlined in their original article, which explains the disorder as a dysfunction of a security-motivation system. The authors address issues of the interrelation of emotion,…

  10. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PANDAS-Related Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Findings From A Preliminary Waitlist Controlled Open Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Geffken, Gary R.; Mann, Giselle; Adkins, Jennifer; Merlo, Lisa J.; Duke, Danny; Munson, Melissa; Swaine, Zoe; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To provide preliminary estimates of the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in treating pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) of the pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus (PANDAS) subtype. Method: Seven children with OCD of the PANDAS subtype (range 9-13 years) were treated…

  11. No impact of deep brain stimulation on fear-potentiated startle in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Baas, Johanna M P; Klumpers, Floris; Mantione, Mariska H; Figee, Martijn; Vulink, Nienke C; Schuurman, P Richard; Mazaheri, Ali; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral internal capsule is effective in treating therapy refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Given the close proximity of the stimulation site to the stria terminalis (BNST), we hypothesized that the striking decrease in anxiety symptoms following DBS could be the result of the modulation of contextual anxiety. However, the effect of DBS in this region on contextual anxiety is as of yet unknown. Thus, the current study investigated the effect of DBS on contextual anxiety in an experimental threat of shock paradigm. Eight patients with DBS treatment for severe OCD were tested in a double-blind crossover design with randomly assigned 2-week periods of active and sham stimulation. DBS resulted in significant decrease of obsessive-compulsive symptoms, anxiety, and depression. However, even though the threat manipulation resulted in a clear context-potentiated startle effect, none of the parameters derived from the startle recordings was modulated by the DBS. This suggests that DBS in the ventral internal capsule is effective in treating anxiety symptoms of OCD without modulating the startle circuitry. We hypothesize that the anxiety symptoms present in OCD are likely distinct from the pathological brain circuits in defensive states of other anxiety disorders. PMID:25249953

  12. Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanqiu; Lang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Background Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a debilitating psychological anxiety disorder. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to be an effective therapy for OCD, but the evaluation results from various studies are inconsistent and incomprehensive. This meta-analysis examined the efficacy of CBT in treatment of OCD. Material/Methods A literature search identified 13 studies that met the inclusion criteria. The efficacy of CBT on OCD was evaluated by comparing post-treatment and pre-treatment Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) scores. Weighted mean difference (WMD) was generated for the statistical evaluation. Heterogeneity was evaluated by I2 index. Results A decrease in WMD and a statistical significance (p<0.0001) in both CY-BOCS and CGI scores between pre- and post-CBT treatment were observed in both overall database (−11.73) and USA subgroup (−11.371), which indicates a dramatic relief of OCD symptoms after CBT treatment. Heterogeneity was detected in overall database and USA subgroup, which resulted in an application of the random-effects model to both groups. Publication bias was examined by both Begg’s funnel plot and Egger’s test and no publication bias was detected. Conclusions We concluded that CBT is efficacious in treating children’s OCD. PMID:27182928

  13. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: Empirical review and clinical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Martin E; Kratz, Hilary E; Freeman, Jennifer B; Ivarsson, Tord; Heyman, Isobel; Sookman, Debbie; McKay, Dean; Storch, Eric A; March, John

    2015-05-30

    The efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been the subject of much study over the past fifteen years. Building on a foundation of case studies and open clinical trials, the literature now contains many methodologically sound studies that have compared full CBT protocols to waitlist controls, pill placebo, psychosocial comparison conditions, active medication, combined treatments, and brief CBT. This review is part of a series commissioned by The Canadian Institute for Obsessive Compulsive Disorders (CIOCD) in an effort to publish in one place what is known about the efficacy of treatments for OCD. A total of fourteen studies were identified; collectively their findings support the efficacy of CBT for youth with OCD. CBT protocols that emphasized either strictly behavioral or cognitive conceptualizations have each been found efficacious relative to waitlist controls. Efforts to enhance CBT׳s efficacy and reach have been undertaken. These trials provide guidance regarding next steps to be taken to maximize efficacy and treatment availability. Findings from studies in community clinics suggest that significant treatment benefits can be realized and are not reported only from within academic contexts. These findings bode well for broader dissemination efforts. Recommendations for future research directions are provided.

  14. Is impaired response inhibition independent of symptom dimensions in obsessive-compulsive disorder? Evidence from ERPs.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hui; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Fan, Jie; Dong, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Cheng; Zhang, Xiaocui; Zhong, Mingtian

    2015-01-01

    Impaired response inhibition has been consistently reported in patients diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This clinically heterogeneous disorder is characterized by several symptom dimensions that may have distinct, but partially overlapping, neural correlates. The present study examined whether alterations in response inhibition may be related to symptom severity and symptom dimensions. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in a group of 42 medication-free OCD patients as well as 42 healthy controls during a stop-signal task. Symptom dimension scores were obtained using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale symptom checklist. OCD patients showed longer stop-signal reaction times (SSRT, p < 0.01) and larger stop-N2 amplitudes (p < 0.01) compared to healthy controls. Neither the longer SSRT nor the larger stop-N2 scores were significantly correlated with symptom severity or present or lifetime OCD symptoms in OCD patients. These results indicate that deficient response inhibition is a common occurrence in OCD patients that is independent of global symptom severity and symptom dimensions. These data support the notion that impaired response inhibition may be a general attribute of patients with OCD. PMID:25990063

  15. Is impaired response inhibition independent of symptom dimensions in obsessive-compulsive disorder? Evidence from ERPs

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hui; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Fan, Jie; Dong, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Cheng; Zhang, Xiaocui; Zhong, Mingtian

    2015-01-01

    Impaired response inhibition has been consistently reported in patients diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This clinically heterogeneous disorder is characterized by several symptom dimensions that may have distinct, but partially overlapping, neural correlates. The present study examined whether alterations in response inhibition may be related to symptom severity and symptom dimensions. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in a group of 42 medication-free OCD patients as well as 42 healthy controls during a stop-signal task. Symptom dimension scores were obtained using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale symptom checklist. OCD patients showed longer stop-signal reaction times (SSRT, p < 0.01) and larger stop-N2 amplitudes (p < 0.01) compared to healthy controls. Neither the longer SSRT nor the larger stop-N2 scores were significantly correlated with symptom severity or present or lifetime OCD symptoms in OCD patients. These results indicate that deficient response inhibition is a common occurrence in OCD patients that is independent of global symptom severity and symptom dimensions. These data support the notion that impaired response inhibition may be a general attribute of patients with OCD. PMID:25990063

  16. Insight in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a study of an Italian sample.

    PubMed

    Marazziti, Donatella; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Di Nasso, Elena; Pfanner, Chiara; Presta, Silvio; Mungai, Francesco; Cassano, Giovanni B

    2002-11-01

    Insight is a complex phenomenon that can be interpreted according to a dimensional model. Given the controversial data of insight in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), our study aimed to investigate insight in an Italian sample of patients with OCD by means of the specific item on the Yale-Brown obsessive-compulsive scale (Y-BOCS) and to explore the possible correlations between it and clinical features. One hundred and seventeen out-patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of OCD and different comorbid psychiatric disorders were included in the study and assessed by means of the Y-BOCS, Hamilton rating scale for depression (HRSD) and the global clinical impression. The results showed that almost 50% of the patients had an excellent level of insight and 15% had a little or no insight. No correlation between levels of insight and clinical features was observed, except for a negative trend with the presence of somatic obsessions. In addition, a trend towards a lower level of insight was observed in those bipolar patients with a positive history of repeated manic or hypomanic episodes. Further studies seem to be necessary in order to establish whether or not OCD patients with poor insight represent a distinct sub-group of patients.

  17. Is impaired response inhibition independent of symptom dimensions in obsessive-compulsive disorder? Evidence from ERPs.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hui; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Fan, Jie; Dong, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Cheng; Zhang, Xiaocui; Zhong, Mingtian

    2015-05-20

    Impaired response inhibition has been consistently reported in patients diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This clinically heterogeneous disorder is characterized by several symptom dimensions that may have distinct, but partially overlapping, neural correlates. The present study examined whether alterations in response inhibition may be related to symptom severity and symptom dimensions. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in a group of 42 medication-free OCD patients as well as 42 healthy controls during a stop-signal task. Symptom dimension scores were obtained using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale symptom checklist. OCD patients showed longer stop-signal reaction times (SSRT, p < 0.01) and larger stop-N2 amplitudes (p < 0.01) compared to healthy controls. Neither the longer SSRT nor the larger stop-N2 scores were significantly correlated with symptom severity or present or lifetime OCD symptoms in OCD patients. These results indicate that deficient response inhibition is a common occurrence in OCD patients that is independent of global symptom severity and symptom dimensions. These data support the notion that impaired response inhibition may be a general attribute of patients with OCD.

  18. Obsessive-compulsive disorder in the postpartum period: diagnosis, differential diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Verinder; Sommerdyk, Christina

    2015-07-01

    Childbirth can trigger or exacerbate a variety of psychiatric disorders but the extant literature has focused primarily on mood disorders. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) after childbirth can occur alone or in combination with other psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder. Due to the general lack of awareness of the relationship between childbirth and OCD among clinicians as well as patients, the disorder may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed as major depressive disorder. This article describes the prevalence, clinical features, common psychiatric comorbidities, differential diagnosis and potential consequences of underdiagnosis or misdiagnosis. Using case vignettes strategies for its detection and clinical management are suggested. Finally, areas in need of further research are proposed. PMID:26246310

  19. Relationship between early maladaptive schemas and symptom dimensions in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Seung Jae

    2014-01-30

    The aims of this study were to evaluate early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and to clarify relationships between particular EMSs and the five factor-analyzed symptom dimensions and other clinical variables. Fifty-seven patients with OCD and 70 normal controls completed the Young Schema Questionnaire, the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), the Y-BOCS symptom checklist, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Patients with OCD had significantly higher scores for schema related to defectiveness/shame, social isolation/alienation, and failure than did normal controls. Among the five OCD symptom dimensions, the sexual/religious dimension was only significantly correlated with two schemas of vulnerability to harm or illness and enmeshment/undeveloped self. These two schemas were significant predictors of the sexual/religious dimension, accounting for 33% of the total variance in this dimension. Any EMSs in patients with OCD were not related to clinical variables such as severity of OCD and duration of illness. These findings may constitute evidence to improve our understandings of OCD from a perspective of schema theory. PMID:23962740

  20. Patient satisfaction with specialized mental health service for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is an important outcome variable that is increasingly used in mental health service evaluation. There are no results available for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) yet. Methods Using the Verona Service Satisfaction Scale, patient satisfaction with a specialized mental health service was examined in patients with OCD. Results OCD patients were overall satisfied with the professional help provided, whereas satisfaction with the professional involvement of relatives within the treatment and health care process was found to be quite low. Patients with more severe OCD, as measured by the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, as well as chronically ill and more disabled patients were more likely to be dissatisfied with the overall care they received. Patient satisfaction plays an important role in the long-term course of an illness such OCD. This seems to be decreased so longer illness is not or badly treated. There is a stronger need for involvement of family members in the treatment and health care of patients with OCD. Conclusions More OCD-specific treatment offers have to be established for patients with this long-term illness such as psychotherapy in groups. PMID:24341311

  1. Deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder is associated with cortisol changes.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Pelle P; Figee, Martijn; Endert, Erik; Storosum, Jitschak G; Fliers, Eric; Denys, Damiaan

    2013-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but its mechanism of action is largely unknown. Since DBS may induce rapid symptomatic changes and the pathophysiology of OCD has been linked to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, we set out to study whether DBS affects the HPA axis in OCD patients. We compared a stimulation ON and OFF condition with a one-week interval in 16 therapy-refractory OCD patients, treated with DBS for at least one year, targeted at the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We measured changes in 24-h urinary excretion of free cortisol (UFC), adrenaline and noradrenaline and changes in obsessive-compulsive (Y-BOCS), depressive (HAM-D) and anxiety (HAM-A) symptom scores. Median UFC levels increased with 53% in the OFF condition (from 93 to 143nmol/24h, p=0.12). There were no changes in urinary adrenaline or noradrenaline excretion. The increase in Y-BOCS (39%), and HAM-D (78%) scores correlated strongly with increased UFC levels in the OFF condition. Our findings indicate that symptom changes following DBS for OCD patients are associated with changes in UFC levels. PMID:23333254

  2. Designing and validation of a yoga-based intervention for obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Shubha; Varambally, Shivarama; Karmani, Sneha; Govindaraj, Ramajayam; Gangadhar, B N

    2016-06-01

    Some yoga-based practices have been found to be useful for patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). The authors could not find a validated yoga therapy module available for OCD. This study attempted to formulate a generic yoga-based intervention module for OCD. A yoga module was designed based on traditional and contemporary yoga literature. The module was sent to 10 yoga experts for content validation. The experts rated the usefulness of the practices on a scale of 1-5 (5 = extremely useful). The final version of the module was pilot-tested on patients with OCD (n = 17) for both feasibility and effect on symptoms. Eighty-eight per cent (22 out of 25) of the items in the initial module were retained, with modifications in the module as suggested by the experts along with patients' inputs and authors' experience. The module was found to be feasible and showed an improvement in symptoms of OCD on total Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (YBOCS) score (p = 0.001). A generic yoga therapy module for OCD was validated by experts in the field and found feasible to practice in patients. A decrease in the symptom scores was also found following yoga practice of 2 weeks. Further clinical validation is warranted to confirm efficacy. PMID:27117898

  3. Prediction of remission in obsessive compulsive disorder using a novel machine learning strategy.

    PubMed

    Askland, Kathleen D; Garnaat, Sarah; Sibrava, Nicholas J; Boisseau, Christina L; Strong, David; Mancebo, Maria; Greenberg, Benjamin; Rasmussen, Steve; Eisen, Jane

    2015-06-01

    The study objective was to apply machine learning methodologies to identify predictors of remission in a longitudinal sample of 296 adults with a primary diagnosis of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Random Forests is an ensemble machine learning algorithm that has been successfully applied to large-scale data analysis across vast biomedical disciplines, though rarely in psychiatric research or for application to longitudinal data. When provided with 795 raw and composite scores primarily from baseline measures, Random Forest regression prediction explained 50.8% (5000-run average, 95% bootstrap confidence interval [CI]: 50.3-51.3%) of the variance in proportion of time spent remitted. Machine performance improved when only the most predictive 24 items were used in a reduced analysis. Consistently high-ranked predictors of longitudinal remission included Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) items, NEO items and subscale scores, Y-BOCS symptom checklist cleaning/washing compulsion score, and several self-report items from social adjustment scales. Random Forest classification was able to distinguish participants according to binary remission outcomes with an error rate of 24.6% (95% bootstrap CI: 22.9-26.2%). Our results suggest that clinically-useful prediction of remission may not require an extensive battery of measures. Rather, a small set of assessment items may efficiently distinguish high- and lower-risk patients and inform clinical decision-making.

  4. A clinical case study of the use of ecological momentary assessment in obsessive compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, P. J. Matt; Rees, Clare S.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate assessment of obsessions and compulsions is a crucial step in treatment planning for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). In this clinical case study, we sought to determine if the use of Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) could provide additional symptom information beyond that captured during standard assessment of OCD. We studied three adults diagnosed with OCD and compared the number and types of obsessions and compulsions captured using the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) compared to EMA. Following completion of the Y-BOCS interview, participants then recorded their OCD symptoms into a digital voice recorder across a 12-h period in reply to randomly sent mobile phone SMS prompts. The EMA approach yielded a lower number of symptoms of obsessions and compulsions than the Y-BOCS but produced additional types of obsessions and compulsions not previously identified by the Y-BOCS. We conclude that the EMA-OCD procedure may represent a worthy addition to the suite of assessment tools used when working with clients who have OCD. Further research with larger samples is required to strengthen this conclusion. PMID:24860521

  5. A clinical case study of the use of ecological momentary assessment in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tilley, P J Matt; Rees, Clare S

    2014-01-01

    Accurate assessment of obsessions and compulsions is a crucial step in treatment planning for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). In this clinical case study, we sought to determine if the use of Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) could provide additional symptom information beyond that captured during standard assessment of OCD. We studied three adults diagnosed with OCD and compared the number and types of obsessions and compulsions captured using the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) compared to EMA. Following completion of the Y-BOCS interview, participants then recorded their OCD symptoms into a digital voice recorder across a 12-h period in reply to randomly sent mobile phone SMS prompts. The EMA approach yielded a lower number of symptoms of obsessions and compulsions than the Y-BOCS but produced additional types of obsessions and compulsions not previously identified by the Y-BOCS. We conclude that the EMA-OCD procedure may represent a worthy addition to the suite of assessment tools used when working with clients who have OCD. Further research with larger samples is required to strengthen this conclusion.

  6. Polarity-dependent effects of transcranial direct current stimulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    D'Urso, Giordano; Brunoni, Andre Russowsky; Anastasia, Annalisa; Micillo, Marco; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Mantovani, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    About one third of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) fail to experience significant clinical benefit from currently available treatments. Hyperactivity of the presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA) has been detected in OCD patients, but it is not clear whether it is the primary cause or a secondary compensatory mechanism in OCD pathophysiology. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique with polarity-dependent effects on motor cortical excitability. A 33-year-old woman with treatment-resistant OCD received 20 daily consecutive 2 mA/20 min tDCS sessions with the active electrode placed on the pre-SMA, according to the 10-20 EEG system, and the reference electrode on the right deltoid. The first 10 sessions were anodal, while the last 10 were cathodal. Symptoms severity was assessed using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) severity score. In the end of anodal stimulation, OCD symptoms had worsened. Subsequent cathodal stimulation induced a dramatic clinical improvement, which led to an overall 30% reduction in baseline symptoms severity score on the Y-BOCS. Our study supports the hypothesis that pre-SMA hyperfunction might be responsible for OCD symptoms and shows that cathodal inhibitory tDCS over this area might be an option when dealing with treatment-resistant OCD. PMID:25971992

  7. Cortical asymmetries in unaffected siblings of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ziwen; Li, Gang; Shi, Feng; Shi, Changzheng; Yang, Qiong; Chan, Raymond C K; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-12-30

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is considered to be associated with atypical brain asymmetry. However, no study has examined the asymmetry in OCD from the perspective of cortical morphometry. This study is aimed to describe the characteristics of cortical asymmetry in OCD patients, and to investigate whether these features exist in their unaffected siblings - a vital step in identifying putative endophenotypes for OCD. A total of 48 subjects (16 OCD patients, 16 unaffected siblings, and 16 matched controls) were recruited who had complete magnetic resonance imaging scans. Left-right hemispheric asymmetries of cortical thickness were measured using a surface-based threshold-free cluster enhancement method. OCD patients and siblings both showed leftward asymmetries of cortical thickness in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which showed a significant positive correlation with compulsive subscale scores. In addition, siblings and healthy controls showed significantly decreased leftward asymmetries in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and the decreased leftward bias in the OFC was accompanied by lower scales on the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale. To sum up, leftward asymmetries of cortical thickness in the ACC may represent an endophenotype of increased hereditary risk for OCD, while decreased leftward asymmetries of cortical thickness in the OFC may represent a protective factor. PMID:26522981

  8. A Voxel Based Morphometry Study of Brain Gray Matter Volumes in Juvenile Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jayarajan, Rajan Nishanth; Agarwal, Sri Mahavir; Viswanath, Biju; Kalmady, Sunil V.; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Srinath, Shoba; Chandrashekar, C.R.; Janardhan Reddy, Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Adult patients with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have been shown to have gray matter (GM) volume differences from healthy controls in multiple regions – the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), medial frontal gyri (MFG), striatum, thalamus, and superior parietal lobule. However, there is paucity of data with regard to juvenile OCD. Hence, we examined GM volume differences between juvenile OCD patients and matched healthy controls using voxel based morphometry (VBM) with the above apriori regions of interest. Method: Fifteen right handed juvenile patients with OCD and age- sex- handedness- matched healthy controls were recruited after administering the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview-KID and the Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, and scanned using a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. VBM methodology was followed. Results: In comparison with healthy controls, patients had significantly smaller GM volumes in left ACC. YBOCS total score (current) showed significant negative correlation with GM volumes in bilateral OFC, and left superior parietal lobule. Conclusion: These findings while reiterating the important role of the orbito-fronto-striatal circuitry, also implicate in the parietal lobe – especially the superior parietal lobule as an important structure involved in the pathogenesis of OCD. PMID:26379719

  9. Relationship between early maladaptive schemas and symptom dimensions in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Seung Jae

    2014-01-30

    The aims of this study were to evaluate early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and to clarify relationships between particular EMSs and the five factor-analyzed symptom dimensions and other clinical variables. Fifty-seven patients with OCD and 70 normal controls completed the Young Schema Questionnaire, the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), the Y-BOCS symptom checklist, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Patients with OCD had significantly higher scores for schema related to defectiveness/shame, social isolation/alienation, and failure than did normal controls. Among the five OCD symptom dimensions, the sexual/religious dimension was only significantly correlated with two schemas of vulnerability to harm or illness and enmeshment/undeveloped self. These two schemas were significant predictors of the sexual/religious dimension, accounting for 33% of the total variance in this dimension. Any EMSs in patients with OCD were not related to clinical variables such as severity of OCD and duration of illness. These findings may constitute evidence to improve our understandings of OCD from a perspective of schema theory.

  10. Perceptual properties of obsessive thoughts are associated with low insight in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Steffen; Claussen, Marike; Hauschildt, Marit; Kellner, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Obsessions are traditionally defined as bothersome and repetitive thoughts that the patient is unable to resist. Preliminary evidence suggests that in a subgroup of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), obsessions are experienced as partially perceptual. The present study explored the frequency of perceptually laden obsessions and their relationship with illness insight and depression. Twenty-six patients with OCD were administered the newly developed Sensory Properties of Obsessions Questionnaire. Participants were asked to endorse on a 5-point Likert scale whether their obsessions were associated with perceptual features. Participants showed moderate symptom severity. A total of 73% affirmed that their obsessions contained perceptual features. The predominant perceptual channels were visual, tactile, and somatic (i.e., bodily sensations). The extent of perceptual aspects associated with obsessions was strongly correlated with lack of insight (Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale item 11) but not depression severity. The present study suggests that obsessive thoughts are frequently accompanied by perceptual sensations, which concurs with models assuming a continuum between hallucinations and intrusions. Apparently, the more "real" or authentic the obsessive thought is experienced, the less the afflicted person is able to dismiss its content as fully irrational or absurd.

  11. Phenomenology and correlates of insight in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Storch, Eric A; De Nadai, Alessandro S; Jacob, Marni L; Lewin, Adam B; Muroff, Jordana; Eisen, Jane; Abramowitz, Jonathan S; Geller, Daniel A; Murphy, Tanya K

    2014-04-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is marked by the presence of obsessions and/or compulsions that cause significant interference in an individual's life. Insight regarding symptoms in youth with OCD may affect accurate assessment, acceptance and motivation for treatment, tolerance of negative valence states (i.e., fear) and treatment outcome, so assessment of this construct and associated clinical characteristics is important. Accordingly, the current study sought to expand the literature on symptom insight by examining multi-informant ratings of insight from children, parents, and clinicians simultaneously and its relationship to varied clinical characteristics. One-hundred and ten treatment-seeking youth with a primary diagnosis of OCD, aged 6-17, participated in the study along with a parent/guardian. The nature of symptom conviction, fixity of ideas, and perceptions about the cause of the problems were important indicators in assessing child insight and resulted in a comprehensive, psychometrically-sound measure of insight. Insight was generally not strongly associated with clinical characteristics. Poor insight was moderately associated with less resistance of obsessive-compulsive symptoms, increased externalizing symptoms, and ordering symptoms. Overall, this study contributes further information into the nature and correlates of insight in youth with OCD, and provides a psychometrically sound approach for its assessment.

  12. The overlap between anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Guy M

    2015-09-01

    The anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder. In addition to the specific symptoms of these disorders, there may be a common experience of anxiety and even dysphoria across the conditions, and of course recourse to the same drug or choice of drugs for treatment. This overlap probably occurs because of universal dimensions of distress or negative affectivity, a shared genetic predisposition, and a common neurobiology Evidence of shared genes is still based mainly on twin studies, but the shared neurobiology can be investigated directly by the investigation of emotional or cognitive bias either behaviorally or using functional brain imaging. This intermediate phenotype can then provide a substrate for understanding and developing medicines and psychological treatments. PMID:26487806

  13. The overlap between anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Guy M

    2015-09-01

    The anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder. In addition to the specific symptoms of these disorders, there may be a common experience of anxiety and even dysphoria across the conditions, and of course recourse to the same drug or choice of drugs for treatment. This overlap probably occurs because of universal dimensions of distress or negative affectivity, a shared genetic predisposition, and a common neurobiology Evidence of shared genes is still based mainly on twin studies, but the shared neurobiology can be investigated directly by the investigation of emotional or cognitive bias either behaviorally or using functional brain imaging. This intermediate phenotype can then provide a substrate for understanding and developing medicines and psychological treatments.

  14. The overlap between anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Guy M.

    2015-01-01

    The anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder. In addition to the specific symptoms of these disorders, there may be a common experience of anxiety and even dysphoria across the conditions, and of course recourse to the same drug or choice of drugs for treatment. This overlap probably occurs because of universal dimensions of distress or negative affectivity, a shared genetic predisposition, and a common neurobiology Evidence of shared genes is still based mainly on twin studies, but the shared neurobiology can be investigated directly by the investigation of emotional or cognitive bias either behaviorally or using functional brain imaging. This intermediate phenotype can then provide a substrate for understanding and developing medicines and psychological treatments. PMID:26487806

  15. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in a Child with Asperger Syndrome: A Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reaven, Judy; Hepburn, Susan

    2003-01-01

    This case report outlines the cognitive-behavioral treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder in a 7-year-old female with Asperger syndrome. Interventions were based upon the work of March and Mulle and were adapted in light of the patient's cognitive, social, and linguistic characteristics. Symptoms improved markedly after 6 months of treatment.…

  16. Psychosocial Stress Predicts Future Symptom Severities in Children and Adolescents with Tourette Syndrome and/or Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Haiqun; Katsovich, Liliya; Ghebremichael, Musie; Findley, Diane B.; Grantz, Heidi; Lombroso, Paul J.; King, Robert A.; Zhang, Heping; Leckman, James F.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The goals of this prospective longitudinal study were to monitor levels of psychosocial stress in children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome (TS) and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) compared to healthy control subjects and to examine the relationship between measures of psychosocial stress and fluctuations in tic,…

  17. Behavioral versus Cognitive Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An Examination of Outcome and Mediators of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Rosenfield, David; Tart, Candyce D.; Cottraux, Jean; Powers, Mark B.; Smits, Jasper A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine symptom change over time, the effect of attrition on treatment outcome, and the putative mediators of cognitive therapy (CT) versus behavior therapy (BT) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) using archival data. Method: Sixty-two adults with OCD were randomized to 20 sessions of CT (N = 30) or BT (N = 32) that consisted of…

  18. Moving beyond an Exclusive Focus on Harm Avoidance in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Considering the Role of Incompleteness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietrefesa, Ashley S.; Coles, Meredith E.

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral conceptualizations of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) have predominantly viewed compulsions as being motivated by harm avoidance. However, sensations of things being incomplete or not "just right" may also underlie compulsions in OCD. Preliminary research suggests that distinguishing between harm avoidance and…

  19. Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Versus Sertraline for the Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asbahr, Fernando Ramos; Castillo, Ana Regina; Ito, Ligia Montenegro; Latorre, Maria do Rosario Dias de Oliveira; Moreira, Michele Nunes; Lotufo-Neto, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy (GCBT) and of sertraline in treatment-naive children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Method: Between 2000 and 2002, 40 subjects between 9 and 17 years old were randomized to receive GCBT (n = 20) or sertraline (n = 20). GCBT consisted of a…

  20. Controlled Comparison of Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Psychoeducation/Relaxation Training for Child Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piacentini, John; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Chang, Susanna; Langley, Audra; Peris, Tara; Wood, Jeffrey J.; McCracken, James

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) plus a structured family intervention (FCBT) versus psychoeducation plus relaxation training (PRT) for reducing symptom severity, functional impairment, and family accommodation in youths with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: A total of 71…

  1. Family-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Comparison of Intensive and Weekly Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Geffken, Gary R.; Merlo, Lisa J.; Mann, Giselle; Duke, Danny; Munson, Melissa; Adkins, Jennifer; Grabill, Kristen M.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relative efficacy of intensive versus weekly cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Forty children and adolescents with OCD (range 7-17 years) were randomized to receive 14 sessions of weekly or intensive (daily psychotherapy sessions) family-based…

  2. The Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Tourette Syndrome: An Epidemiological and Pathway-Based Approach for Gene Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grados, Marco A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a contemporary perspective on genetic discovery methods applied to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS). Method: A review of research trends in genetics research in OCD and TS is conducted, with emphasis on novel approaches. Results: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now in progress in OCD…

  3. An Initial Investigation of the Orbitofrontal Cortex Hyperactivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Exaggerated Representations of Anticipated Aversive Events?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ursu, Stefan; Carter, Cameron S.

    2009-01-01

    Orbitofrontal cortical (OFC) dysfunction has been repeatedly involved in obsessive-compulsive disorder, but the precise significance of this abnormality is still unclear. Current neurocognitive models propose that specific areas of the OFC contribute to behavioral regulation by representing the anticipated affective value of future events. This…

  4. Directions in Specialized Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Theory and Practice of Two Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sookman, Debbie; Steketee, Gail

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses specialized approaches developed for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) who are resistant to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Following a review of theoretical and outcome research, two approaches developed to resolve persistent OCD are described and illustrated. Cognitive therapy (CT) designed to address…

  5. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging during Planning before and after Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyser, Chaim; Veltman, Dick J.; Wolters, Lidewij H.; de Haan, Else; Boer, Frits

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Pediatric obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) has been associated with cognitive abnormalities, in particular executive impairments, and dysfunction of frontal-striatal-thalamic circuitry. The aim of this study was to investigate if planning as an executive function is compromised in pediatric OCD and is associated with…

  6. Temper Outbursts in Paediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Their Association with Depressed Mood and Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Georgina; Bolhuis, Koen; Heyman, Isobel; Mataix-Cols, David; Turner, Cynthia; Stringaris, Argyris

    2013-01-01

    Background: Temper outbursts in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are a common source of concern, but remain poorly understood. This study examined a set of hypotheses related to: (a) the prevalence of temper outbursts in paediatric OCD, (b) the associations of temper outbursts with OCD severity and depressive symptoms; and (c) the…

  7. Adapting Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for the Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Sapana R.; Carmody, James; Simpson, H. Blair

    2007-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an illness characterized by intrusive and distressing thoughts, images, or impulses (i.e., obsessions) and by repetitive mental or behavioral acts (i.e., compulsions) performed to prevent or reduce distress. Efficacious treatments for OCD include psychotropic medications and exposure and response prevention…

  8. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy versus Progressive Relaxation Training for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twohig, Michael P.; Hayes, Steven C.; Plumb, Jennifer C.; Pruitt, Larry D.; Collins, Angela B.; Hazlett-Stevens, Holly; Woidneck, Michelle R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Effective treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) exist, but additional treatment options are needed. The effectiveness of 8 sessions of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for adult OCD was compared with progressive relaxation training (PRT). Method: Seventy-nine adults (61% female) diagnosed with OCD (mean age = 37…

  9. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Supplementary Motor Area in Refractory Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Treatment: a Sham-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Harika-Germaneau, Ghina; Rachid, Fady; Gaudeau-Bosma, Christian; Tanguy, Marie-Laure; BenAdhira, Rene; Bouaziz, Noomane; Popa, Traian; Wassouf, Issa; Saba, Ghassen; Januel, Dominique; Jaafari, Nematollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation has been explored in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, but with negative or conflicting results. This randomized double-blind study was designed to assess the efficacy of 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the presupplementary area. Methods: Forty medication-resistant patients were assigned to 4 weeks of either active or sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation targeting the presupplementary area with the help of a neuronavigation system. Results: According to the Yale-Brown obsessive-compulsive scale, the baseline-week 4 evolution showed no significant differences between groups. Responder rates at week 4 were not different between groups (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation 10.5% vs sham 20%; P=.63). Conclusion: Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to the presupplementary area seems ineffective for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder patients, at least in severe and drug-refractory cases such as those included in this study. Further research is required to determine profiles of responder patients and appropriate repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation parameters for obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:27207923

  10. Comparison of Perfectionism and Related Positive-Negative Dimension in People With High Traits on Obsessive Compulsive and Eating Disorder Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Yahghoubi, Hassan; Mohammadzadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychopathological perfectionism is often correlated with obsessive compulsive eating disorders. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate perfectionism in people with high traits of obsessive compulsive and eating disorder characteristics. Materials and Methods: This study was an expo fact research. The statistical population of the research comprised of male and female undergraduate students at Tabriz and Sarab branches of Payam- e- Noor University, Tabriz Islamic University and Azarbaijan Shahid Madani university in the academic year 2012 - 2013. A group of 640 university students, using the stratified random sampling method were screened by the obsessive compulsive inventory and the eating attitude test, then a group of 143 participants with high obsessive compulsive traits with another 137 participants with high eating disorder characteristics were selected and assessed with the Perfectionism Inventory. Data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance. Results: The results showed that perfectionism and related negative dimension are more commonly found in people with high obsessive-compulsive traits than eating disorder characteristics (P < 0.02). The results showed the highest contribution of maladaptive perfectionism in predicting obsessive-compulsive features and pathological eating attitude. Also, no difference was found between the two groups in terms of negative perfectionism. Conclusions: The greater association of perfectionism with symptoms of obsessive-compulsive is consistent with its phenomenological feature. Fear of failure may motivate the behavioral components of perfectionism that aim to focus on careful checking, reassurance seeking and excessive consideration before making a decision. PMID:26576174

  11. A comparison of intolerance of uncertainty in analogue obsessive-compulsive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Holaway, Robert M; Heimberg, Richard G; Coles, Meredith E

    2006-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty has been defined as the unwillingness to tolerate the possibility that negative events may occur in the future, no matter how low the probability [Personality Individual Differences 17 (1994), 791-802]. Previous research suggests that intolerance of uncertainty may be more specific to worry and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) than to other anxiety disorders [e.g., Dugas, M. J., Buhr, K., & Ladouceur, R. (2004). The role of intolerance of uncertainty in the etiology and maintenance of generalized anxiety disorder. In R. G. Heimberg, C. L. Turk, & D. S. Mennin (Eds.), Generalized anxiety disorder: Advances in research and practice (pp. 143-163). New York: Guilford Press]. However, Tolin et al. [J. Anxiety Disorders 17 (2003), 233-242] argued that intolerance of uncertainty may also play a central role in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Therefore, the current study compared intolerance of uncertainty in individuals with analogue GAD and/or OCD. Intolerance of uncertainty was strongly related to pathological worry, GAD symptoms, and OCD symptoms; however, neither worry nor GAD was found to be more strongly associated with intolerance of uncertainty than OCD. Further, individuals with analogue GAD or OCD reported more intolerance of uncertainty than controls, but they did not differ significantly from each other. These findings suggest that intolerance of uncertainty may be a central theme in a number of the anxiety disorders.

  12. [The Usefulness of Clonazepam as an Augmentative Treatment in a Case of Severe Childhood Onset Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder].

    PubMed

    Halayem, Soumeyya; Othman, Sami; Ben Youssef, Hajer; Belhaj, Ahlem; Bouasker, Anissa; Ghachem, Rym; Tabbane, Karim; Bouden, Asma

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to report on the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a chronic disabling condition that often presents during childhood and adolescence. Reports on adults using clonazepam for the treatment of OCD are more numerous than on children. Clonazepam as an augmentative treatment in OCD is still controversial. Our aim is to illustrate in a case report the efficacy of clonazepam as an augmentative treatment for severe childhood onset OCD. We report on the case of a young teenage girl with an extremely severe form of obsessive-compulsive disorder (score of 32 on the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale), who, after a mild improvement with a combination of serotonin recapture inhibitors and second generation antipsychotics at high doses, has responded to clonazepam (3mg/day) augmentation of sertraline (200mg/day) and olanzapine (15mg/day). Clonazepam was effective not only in reducing anxiety symptoms, but also in lowering compulsions and obsessions frequency within 6 weeks with a drop in the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale of 16 points. It may be asserted that clonazepam could be useful in the initial stage for severe OCD in young patients. PMID:26731026

  13. The anteromedial GPi as a new target for deep brain stimulation in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish; Evans, Andrew; Bear, Renee E; Velakoulis, Dennis; Bittar, Richard G

    2014-05-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is now well established in the treatment of intractable movement disorders. Over the past decade the clinical applications have expanded into the realm of psychosurgery, including depression and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). The optimal targets for electrode placement in psychosurgery remain unclear, with numerous anatomical targets reported for the treatment of OCD. We present four patients with Tourette's syndrome and prominent features of OCD who underwent DBS of the anteromedial globus pallidus internus (GPi) to treat their movement disorder. Their pre-operative and post-operative OCD symptoms were compared, and responded dramatically to surgery. On the basis of these results, we propose the anteromedial (limbic) GPi as a potential surgical target for the treatment of OCD, and furnish data supporting its further investigation as a DBS target for the treatment of psychiatric conditions. PMID:24524950

  14. [Obsessive-compulsive Disorder: Prevalence, Comorbidity and Remission from the Ages of 20 to 50].

    PubMed

    Angst, Jules; Rufer, Michael; Fineberg, Naomi; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Rössler, Wulf

    2015-11-25

    Individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) experience recurrent obsessive and/or compulsive thoughts and behaviours which cause them distress, and significantly impair their daily lives. The disorder is thought to have a chronic course and a low rate of remission, as evidenced by mainly clinical samples. Longitudinal psychiatric epidemiological studies are few and far between. This article presents the findings relating to OCD from one such study, the Zurich Study: OCD defined according to DSM-5 criteria had a high prevalence rate and frequently a chronic course but it had a long-term remission rate of almost 60%, which is higher than hitherto believed. OCD was generally highly comorbid with other disorders and particularly closely associated with social phobia.

  15. Pharmacogenetics of antidepressant treatment in obsessive-compulsive disorder: an update and implications for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Zai, Gwyneth; Brandl, Eva J; Müller, Daniel J; Richter, Margaret A; Kennedy, James L

    2014-06-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder with high genetic influence. Antidepressants such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors, are widely accepted as the first-line medications for OCD; however, approximately 50% of OCD patients show poor response. Personalized medicine utilizing genetic testing has recently received much attention because the variability of antidepressant response and tolerability are partly due to an individual's genetic variations. This has led to researchers investigating the role of specific genetic factors on antidepressant response and utility of testing in the clinical realm. Genetic test panels are showing promise for guiding antidepressant treatment to improve outcomes in depression. This article will review the most recent findings in the pharmacogenetics of OCD and its related disorders. Promising results have been reported for several serotonergic and glutamatergic system genes and the cytochrome CYP450 liver enzyme genes, which appear to play an important role in OCD and antidepressant response.

  16. Social performance and secret ritual: battling against obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Catherine Francis

    2011-02-01

    This autoethnography offers an account of my experience with mental illness and provides an analysis of the performative aspects of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). OCD is a genetic disorder triggered by environmental stressors involving a chemical imbalance in the brain. The resulting biologically altered state leaves individuals to steer themselves among and between "appropriate" performance and secret rituals. Analyzing my own communication practices through a performance lens highlights the importance of image management for people struggling with disability. In telling my own story, this article provides readers an in-depth look at OCD as a traumatic brain disorder whose sufferers rely on communicative performance to maintain their public and private identities, and as a disease that impedes social life for its sufferers. Implications of this account for those struggling with mental disability and for practitioners aiming to help them are discussed. PMID:20739588

  17. Frontal lobe dysfunction in schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder: a neuropsychological study.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzese, M; Bellodi, L; Ferri, S; Scarone, S

    1995-03-01

    Converging evidence suggests there is a specific role of dorso-lateral-prefrontal cortex (DLPC) in schizophrenic disorders and of orbito-frontal cortex (OFC) in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here, 25 schizophrenic and 25 OCD patients were evaluated with Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and Object Alternation Test; neuropsychological tools sensitive to DLPC and OFC damage, respectively; and compared with 25 subjects of a control group. Moreover, they all underwent Weigl's Sorting Test and the Word Fluency Test to assess global frontal functioning. The results indicated a DLPC deficit in schizophrenia and an OFC involvement in OCD. These data suggest that functional disorders of the central nervous system can be explored with neuropsychological instruments.

  18. Social performance and secret ritual: battling against obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Catherine Francis

    2011-02-01

    This autoethnography offers an account of my experience with mental illness and provides an analysis of the performative aspects of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). OCD is a genetic disorder triggered by environmental stressors involving a chemical imbalance in the brain. The resulting biologically altered state leaves individuals to steer themselves among and between "appropriate" performance and secret rituals. Analyzing my own communication practices through a performance lens highlights the importance of image management for people struggling with disability. In telling my own story, this article provides readers an in-depth look at OCD as a traumatic brain disorder whose sufferers rely on communicative performance to maintain their public and private identities, and as a disease that impedes social life for its sufferers. Implications of this account for those struggling with mental disability and for practitioners aiming to help them are discussed.

  19. Obsessive-compulsive disorders and anxiety disorders: A comparison of personality and emotionality patterns.

    PubMed

    Pelissolo, Antoine; Moukheiber, Albert; Mallet, Luc

    2015-10-30

    Even though obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) and anxiety disorders (AD) have been separated in the taxonomy adopted by the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, many issues remain concerning the physiopathological similarities and differences between those categories. Our objective was therefore to explore and compare their personality and emotional features, with the assumption that the distinction of two independent spectrums should imply the existence of two partially distinct temperamental profiles. We used the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI-R) and the Positive and Negative Emotionality (PNE) scale to compare two groups of patients with OCD (n=227) or AD (n=827). The latter group included patients with social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, agoraphobia, and generalized anxiety disorder. Most temperament, character and emotionality measures showed no significant differences between both groups. In the personality measures results, only the self-directedness score (TCI-R) was significantly lower in OCD patients but this difference was not significant when the comparison was adjusted for the depressive scale score and age. Only lower PNE positive affects scores were obtained in OCD patients in the adjusted comparisons. These findings suggest that OCD and AD are not really distinguishable from the point of view of associated personality traits. PMID:26292619

  20. Obsessive-compulsive disorders and anxiety disorders: A comparison of personality and emotionality patterns.

    PubMed

    Pelissolo, Antoine; Moukheiber, Albert; Mallet, Luc

    2015-10-30

    Even though obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) and anxiety disorders (AD) have been separated in the taxonomy adopted by the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, many issues remain concerning the physiopathological similarities and differences between those categories. Our objective was therefore to explore and compare their personality and emotional features, with the assumption that the distinction of two independent spectrums should imply the existence of two partially distinct temperamental profiles. We used the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI-R) and the Positive and Negative Emotionality (PNE) scale to compare two groups of patients with OCD (n=227) or AD (n=827). The latter group included patients with social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, agoraphobia, and generalized anxiety disorder. Most temperament, character and emotionality measures showed no significant differences between both groups. In the personality measures results, only the self-directedness score (TCI-R) was significantly lower in OCD patients but this difference was not significant when the comparison was adjusted for the depressive scale score and age. Only lower PNE positive affects scores were obtained in OCD patients in the adjusted comparisons. These findings suggest that OCD and AD are not really distinguishable from the point of view of associated personality traits.

  1. Mechanisms of deep brain stimulation for obsessive compulsive disorder: effects upon cells and circuits.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Sarah K; Eckhardt, Christine A; Sheth, Sameer A; Eskandar, Emad N

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a safe, effective, and reversible treatment for a number of movement disorders. This has prompted investigation of its use for other applications including psychiatric disorders. In recent years, DBS has been introduced for the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), which is characterized by recurrent unwanted thoughts or ideas (obsessions) and repetitive behaviors or mental acts performed in order to relieve these obsessions (compulsions). Abnormal activity in cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuits including the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), ventral striatum, and mediodorsal (MD) thalamus has been implicated in OCD. To this end a number of DBS targets including the anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC), ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS), ventral caudate nucleus, subthalamic nucleus (STN), and nucleus accumbens (NAc) have been investigated for the treatment of OCD. Despite its efficacy and widespread use in movement disorders, the mechanism of DBS is not fully understood, especially as it relates to psychiatric disorders. While initially thought to create a functional lesion akin to ablative procedures, it is increasingly clear that DBS may induce clinical benefit through activation of axonal fibers spanning the CSTC circuits, alteration of oscillatory activity within this network, and/or release of critical neurotransmitters. In this article we review how the use of DBS for OCD informs our understanding of both the mechanisms of DBS and the circuitry of OCD. We review the literature on DBS for OCD and discuss potential mechanisms of action at the neuronal level as well as the broader circuit level. PMID:22712007

  2. Perceived quality of life in obsessive-compulsive disorder: related factors

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Salgado, Beatriz; Dolengevich-Segal, Helen; Arrojo-Romero, Manuel; Castelli-Candia, Paola; Navio-Acosta, Mercedes; Perez-Rodriguez, Maria M; Saiz-Ruiz, Jeronimo; Baca-Garcia, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) affects young adults and has great impact on the social, emotional and work spheres. Methods We measured perceived quality of life (QOL) in OCD patients, in order to analyse socio-demographic and clinical factors that may be associated with QOL perception. 64 OCD outpatients were assessed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for DSM-IV, the Yale-Brown Obsessions and Compulsions scale (Y-BOCS), Hamilton's depression scale and the SF-36 self-administered global QOL perception scale. Results We found a correlation among Hamilton's scale scores and all SF-36 subscales. The severity of the obsessive-compulsive disorder was correlated with all SF-36 subscales and with the highest scores in Hamilton's scale. The obsessions subscale was correlated to all SF-36 subscales, while the compulsions subscale was correlated only to social functioning, emotional role, mental health and vitality. Compulsions were not related to general health perception. There were significant differences between OCD patients and the Spanish general population in all SF-36 subscales except those related to physical health and pain. Gender, age, age of onset of the disorder, years of evolution and marital status of the patients did not significantly affect quality of life perception. Being employed was related to better scores in the subscale of physical role. Patients with medical comorbidity scored lower in the subscales of general health, social functioning and mental health. Patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders had worse scores in the subscales of pain, general health, social functioning and mental health. Conclusion Quality of life perception was different in OCD patients and the general population. Quality of life perception was related to severity of the disorder, physical and psychiatric comorbidity and employment status. PMID:16684346

  3. Heredity in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    AMERIO, Andrea; TONNA, Matteo; ODONE, Anna; STUBBS, Brendon; GHAEMI, S. Nassir

    2015-01-01

    Summary Partly due to the overlap of symptom groupings in DSM, psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). However, the key nosological question about this condition – whether they are two distinct disorders or a subtype of one of the disorders – remains unresolved. In order to help address this unanswered question, we updated our recent systematic review, searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to specifically investigate the heredity in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 8 relevant papers, the majority of which found that, compared to non-BD-OCD patients, BD-OCD patients were more likely to have a family history for mood disorders and less likely to have a family history for OCD. These results support the view that the majority of cases of comorbid BD-OCD are, in fact, BD cases. If confirmed in larger, more focused studies, this conclusion would have important nosological and clinical implications. PMID:26977128

  4. Heredity in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, Andrea; Tonna, Matteo; Odone, Anna; Stubbs, Brendon; Ghaemi, S Nassir

    2015-10-01

    Partly due to the overlap of symptom groupings in DSM, psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). However, the key nosological question about this condition - whether they are two distinct disorders or a subtype of one of the disorders - remains unresolved. In order to help address this unanswered question, we updated our recent systematic review, searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to specifically investigate the heredity in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 8 relevant papers, the majority of which found that, compared to non-BD-OCD patients, BD-OCD patients were more likely to have a family history for mood disorders and less likely to have a family history for OCD. These results support the view that the majority of cases of comorbid BD-OCD are, in fact, BD cases. If confirmed in larger, more focused studies, this conclusion would have important nosological and clinical implications.

  5. What do we know about obsessive-compulsive disorder following traumatic brain injury?

    PubMed

    Rydon-Grange, Michelle; Coetzer, Rudi

    2015-10-01

    In addition to the well-known cognitive impairment following traumatic brain injury (TBI), neuropsychiatric sequelae are often reported as well. Although not the most common neuropsychiatric consequence of TBI, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been associated with TBI. However, diagnosing new onset OCD secondary to TBI is complicated by the potential for cognitive impairment secondary to TBI masquerading as OCD. In particular, memory difficulties and executive dysfunction may be confused as representing obsessions and compulsions. Research in this area, which could guide clinical practice, remains limited. In addition to using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V) criteria, neuropsychological testing and collateral interviews may help clinicians when considering differential diagnoses in this complex area of neuropsychiatry.

  6. Update on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder: different targets.

    PubMed

    Blom, Rianne M; Figee, Martijn; Vulink, Nienke; Denys, Damiaan

    2011-08-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic, disabling disorder. Ten percent of patients remain treatment refractory despite several treatments. For these severe, treatment-refractory patients, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been suggested as a treatment option. Since 1997, in published trials, a total of 110 OCD patients have been treated with rTMS. This review aims to provide an update on rTMS treatment in patients with OCD. First, the mechanism of action is discussed, followed by the efficacy and side effects of rTMS at various brain targets, and finally implications for the future. Due to the lack of studies with comparable stimulation or treatment parameters and with reliable designs, it is difficult to draw clear conclusions. In general, rTMS appears to be effective in open-label studies; however, this has not yet been replicated in randomized, sham-controlled trials. PMID:21547545

  7. Repetitive behaviour in children with high functioning autism and obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Zandt, Fiona; Prior, Margot; Kyrios, Michael

    2007-02-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and children with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) were compared on a range of repetitive behaviours. Parents reported similar levels of sameness behaviour and repetitive movements in the clinical groups, although children with OCD engaged in more repetitive behaviour focussed around routines and rituals. Children with OCD reported more compulsions and obsessions than children with ASD; both groups reported more compulsions and obsessions than a typically developing comparison group. Types of compulsions and obsessions tended to be less sophisticated in children with ASD than those with OCD. Sameness behaviour was more prevalent in younger children with OCD, but for children with ASD, age was not significantly related to sameness behaviour, repetitive movements, compulsions, or obsessions.

  8. Metacognitive interpersonal therapy in a case of obsessive-compulsive and avoidant personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Donatella; Dimaggio, Giancarlo; Nicoló, Giuseppe; Semerari, Antonio; Carcione, Antonino

    2008-02-01

    Metacognitive interpersonal therapy (MIT) for personality disorders is aimed at both improving metacognition--the ability to understand mental statesand modulating problematic interpersonal representations while building new and adaptive ones. Attention to the therapeutic relationship is basic in MIT. Clinicians recognize any dysfunctional relationships with patients and work to achieve attunement to make the latter aware of their problematic interpersonal patterns. The authors illustrate here the case of a man suffering from obsessive-compulsive and avoidant personality disorders with dependent traits. He underwent combined individual and group therapies to (a) modulate his perfectionism, (b) prevent shifts towards avoiding responsibilities to protect himself from feared negative judgments, and (c) help him acknowledge suppressed desires. We show how treatment focused on the various dysfunctional personality aspects.

  9. What do we know about obsessive-compulsive disorder following traumatic brain injury?

    PubMed

    Rydon-Grange, Michelle; Coetzer, Rudi

    2015-10-01

    In addition to the well-known cognitive impairment following traumatic brain injury (TBI), neuropsychiatric sequelae are often reported as well. Although not the most common neuropsychiatric consequence of TBI, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been associated with TBI. However, diagnosing new onset OCD secondary to TBI is complicated by the potential for cognitive impairment secondary to TBI masquerading as OCD. In particular, memory difficulties and executive dysfunction may be confused as representing obsessions and compulsions. Research in this area, which could guide clinical practice, remains limited. In addition to using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V) criteria, neuropsychological testing and collateral interviews may help clinicians when considering differential diagnoses in this complex area of neuropsychiatry. PMID:26315768

  10. An empirical investigation of incompleteness in a large clinical sample of obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Sibrava, Nicholas J; Boisseau, Christina L; Eisen, Jane L; Mancebo, Maria C; Rasmussen, Steven A

    2016-08-01

    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a disorder with heterogeneous clinical presentations. To advance our understanding of this heterogeneity we investigated the prevalence and clinical features associated with incompleteness (INC), a putative underlying core feature of OCD. We predicted INC would be prominent in individuals with OCD and associated with greater severity and impairment. We examined the impact of INC in 307 adults with primary OCD. Participants with clinically significant INC (22.8% of the sample) had significantly greater OCD severity, greater rates of comorbidity, poorer ratings of functioning, lower quality of life, and higher rates of unemployment and disability. Participants with clinically significant INC were also more likely to be diagnosed with OCPD and to endorse symmetry/exactness obsessions and ordering/arranging compulsions than those who reported low INC. Our findings provide evidence that INC is associated with greater severity, comorbidity, and impairment, highlighting the need for improved assessment and treatment of INC in OCD. PMID:27268401

  11. Randomized controlled trial of yogic meditation techniques for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Shannahoff-Khalsa, D S; Ray, L E; Levine, S; Gallen, C C; Schwartz, B J; Sidorowich, J J

    1999-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of two meditation protocols for treating patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Patients were randomized to two groups-matched for sex, age, and medication status-and blinded to the comparison protocol. They were told the trial would last for 12 months, unless one protocol proved to be more efficacious. If so, groups would merge, and the group that received the less efficacious treatment would also be afforded 12 months of the more effective one. The study was conducted at Children's Hospital, San Diego, Calif. Patients were selected according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition-Revised (DSM-III-R) criteria and recruited by advertisements and referral. At baseline, Group 1 included 11 adults and 1 adolescent, and Group 2 included 10 adults. Group 1 employed a kundalini yoga meditation protocol and Group 2 employed the Relaxation Response plus Mindfulness Meditation technique. Baseline and 3-month interval testing was conducted using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), Symptoms Checklist-90-Revised Obsessive Compulsive (SCL-90-R OC) and Global Severity Index (SCL-90-R GSI) scales, Profile of Moods scale (POMS), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and Purpose in Life (PIL) test. Seven adults in each group completed 3 months of therapy. At 3 months, Group 1 demonstrated greater improvements (Student's independent groups t-test) on the Y-BOCS, SCL-90-R OC and GSI scales, and POMS, and greater but nonsignificant improvements on the PSS and PIL test. An intent-to-treat analysis (Y-BOCS) for the baseline and 3-month tests showed that only Group 1 improved. Within-group statistics (Student's paired t-tests) showed that Group 1 significantly improved on all six scales, but Group 2 had no improvements. Groups were merged for an additional year using Group 1 techniques. At 15 months, the final group (N=11) improved 71%, 62%, 66%, 74%, 39%, and 23%, respectively, on

  12. Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Meta-Analysis of Treatment Outcome and Predictors of Response

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Pino; Cuadras, Daniel; Gabriëls, Loes; Denys, Damiaan; Goodman, Wayne; Greenberg, Ben D.; Jimenez-Ponce, Fiacro; Kuhn, Jens; Lenartz, Doris; Mallet, Luc; Nuttin, Bart; Real, Eva; Segalas, Cinto; Schuurman, Rick; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Menchon, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as an alternative to ablative neurosurgery for severe treatment-resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), although with partially discrepant results probably related to differences in anatomical targetting and stimulation conditions. We sought to determine the efficacy and tolerability of DBS in OCD and the existence of clinical predictors of response using meta-analysis. Methods We searched the literature on DBS for OCD from 1999 through January 2014 using PubMed/MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We performed fixed and random-effect meta-analysis with score changes (pre-post DBS) on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) as the primary-outcome measure, and the number of responders to treatment, quality of life and acceptability as secondary measures. Findings Thirty-one studies involving 116 subjects were identified. Eighty-three subjects were implanted in striatal areas—anterior limb of the internal capsule, ventral capsule and ventral striatum, nucleus accumbens and ventral caudate—27 in the subthalamic nucleus and six in the inferior thalamic peduncle. Global percentage of Y-BOCS reduction was estimated at 45.1% and global percentage of responders at 60.0%. Better response was associated with older age at OCD onset and presence of sexual/religious obsessions and compulsions. No significant differences were detected in efficacy between targets. Five patients dropped out, but adverse effects were generally reported as mild, transient and reversible. Conclusions Our analysis confirms that DBS constitutes a valid alternative to lesional surgery for severe, therapy-refractory OCD patients. Well-controlled, randomized studies with larger samples are needed to establish the optimal targeting and stimulation conditions and to extend the analysis of clinical predictors of outcome. PMID:26208305

  13. Excessive nest building is a unique behavioural phenotype in the deer mouse model of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wolmarans, De Wet; Stein, Dan J; Harvey, Brian H

    2016-09-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a phenotypically heterogeneous condition characterised by time-consuming intrusive thoughts and/or compulsions. Irrespective of the symptom type diagnosed, the severity of OCD is characterised by heterogeneity in symptom presentation that complicates diagnosis and treatment. Heterogeneity of symptoms would be invaluable in an animal model. Nest building behaviour forms part of the normal behavioural repertoire of rodents and demonstrates profound between-species differences. However, it has been proposed that within-species differences in nest building behaviour (i.e. aberrant vs. normal nest building) may resemble obsessive-compulsive-like symptoms. In an attempt to investigate whether other obsessive-compulsive-like behaviours are present in an animal model of OCD, or if aberrant nest building behaviour may represent a unique obsessive-compulsive phenotype in such a model, the current study assessed nest building behaviour in high (H, viz obsessive-compulsive) and non (N, viz normal) stereotypical deer mice. Subsequently, 12 N and H animals, respectively, were provided with an excess of cotton wool daily for one week prior to and following four weeks of high-dose oral escitalopram treatment (50 mg/kg/day). Data from the current investigation demonstrate daily nesting activity to be highly variable in deer mice, with stereotypy and nest building being independent behaviours. However, we identified unique aberrant large nest building behaviour in 30% of animals from both cohorts that was attenuated by escitalopram to pre-treatment nesting scores of the larger group. In summary, behavioural and drug-treatment evidence confirms that deer mouse behaviour does indeed resemble symptom heterogeneity related to OCD, and as such expands its face and predictive validity for the disorder. PMID:27154874

  14. Excessive nest building is a unique behavioural phenotype in the deer mouse model of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wolmarans, De Wet; Stein, Dan J; Harvey, Brian H

    2016-09-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a phenotypically heterogeneous condition characterised by time-consuming intrusive thoughts and/or compulsions. Irrespective of the symptom type diagnosed, the severity of OCD is characterised by heterogeneity in symptom presentation that complicates diagnosis and treatment. Heterogeneity of symptoms would be invaluable in an animal model. Nest building behaviour forms part of the normal behavioural repertoire of rodents and demonstrates profound between-species differences. However, it has been proposed that within-species differences in nest building behaviour (i.e. aberrant vs. normal nest building) may resemble obsessive-compulsive-like symptoms. In an attempt to investigate whether other obsessive-compulsive-like behaviours are present in an animal model of OCD, or if aberrant nest building behaviour may represent a unique obsessive-compulsive phenotype in such a model, the current study assessed nest building behaviour in high (H, viz obsessive-compulsive) and non (N, viz normal) stereotypical deer mice. Subsequently, 12 N and H animals, respectively, were provided with an excess of cotton wool daily for one week prior to and following four weeks of high-dose oral escitalopram treatment (50 mg/kg/day). Data from the current investigation demonstrate daily nesting activity to be highly variable in deer mice, with stereotypy and nest building being independent behaviours. However, we identified unique aberrant large nest building behaviour in 30% of animals from both cohorts that was attenuated by escitalopram to pre-treatment nesting scores of the larger group. In summary, behavioural and drug-treatment evidence confirms that deer mouse behaviour does indeed resemble symptom heterogeneity related to OCD, and as such expands its face and predictive validity for the disorder.

  15. Moderators of Impairment Agreement among Parent-Child Dyads in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Eric A.; Rudy, Brittany M.; Wu, Monica S.; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2014-01-01

    Inter-rater agreement for symptom impairment associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) varies between parents and children. However, extraneous variables that may influence these agreement differences have scarcely been examined. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to examine moderators of parent and child agreement on ratings of overall OCD-related impairment and impairment across three domains (i.e., school, social, home) as measured by the Children’s OCD Impact Scale – Child and Parent versions (COIS-C/P). One hundred sixty-six children with OCD and their parents completed ratings of symptom severity, impairment, and demographics, among other measures, prior to psychosocial treatment initiation. Overall parent-child agreement of impairment was in the moderate range. Age, OCD symptom severity, resistance and control, obsession and compulsion severity, and insight emerged as moderator variables, with the direction of moderation varying by domain. Results, implications, and study limitations are discussed. PMID:26190901

  16. Mechanisms of Change in Cognitive Therapy for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Role of Maladaptive Beliefs and Schemas

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Sabine; Berman, Noah C.; Keshaviah, Aparna; Schwartz, Rachel A.; Steketee, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify mechanisms of change in individuals with moderately severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) receiving cognitive therapy (CT). Method Thirty-six adults with OCD received CT over 24 weeks. At weeks 0, 4/6, 12, 16/18, and 24, independent evaluators assessed OCD severity, along with obsessive beliefs and maladaptive schemas. To examine mechanisms of change, we utilized a time-varying lagged regression model with a random intercept and slope. Results Perfectionism and certainty obsessive beliefs and maladaptive schemas related to dependency and incompetence significantly mediated (improved) treatment response. Conclusions Cognitive changes in perfectionism/certainty beliefs and maladaptive schemas related to dependency/incompetence precede behavioral symptom reduction for OCD patients. Targeting these mechanisms in future OCD treatment trials will emphasize the most relevant processes and facilitate maximum improvement. PMID:25544403

  17. Neither saints nor wolves in disguise: ambivalent interpersonal attitudes and behaviors in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Steffen; Wahl, Karina; Ertle, Andrea; Jelinek, Lena; Hauschildt, Marit; Klinge, Ruth; Hand, Iver

    2009-03-01

    Inflated responsibility is ascribed a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The aim of the study was to assess interpersonal attitudes and behaviors contributing to enhanced responsibility in OCD. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that individuals diagnosed with OCD share stronger latent aggression toward others, resulting in a high degree of interpersonal ambivalence. A total of 176 participants with OCD, 42 participants with anxiety or depression as well as 42 healthy controls completed the Responsibility and Interpersonal Behaviors and Attitudes Questionnaire (RIBAQ). The factor analysis confirmed three factors: (1) inflated worry/responsibility, (2) latent aggression/calculating behavior and (3) suspiciousness/distrust. Whereas the psychiatric group displayed enhanced scores relative to healthy participants regarding responsibility and suspiciousness, OCD patients achieved significantly higher scores on the latent aggression dimension relative to both control groups. Results are consistent with the notion that participants with OCD show both inflated levels of (authentic) responsibility and latent aggression. PMID:19047487

  18. [Novel treatment strategies for refractory patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder].

    PubMed

    Nakamae, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are first-line treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), response rates to these therapies are 40-60%. There may be many treatment-refractory patients who do not respond to several SSRIs and intensive CBT treatment. The current treatment guidelines suggest various strategies for treatment-refractory cases, but there is no established evidence for most of them. Augmentation therapies with antipsychotics and glutamate modulator drugs have yielded some supporting evidence. When all drugs and CBT are ineffective, non-pharmacological treatment including deep brain stimulation (DBS) should be applied. However, it is necessary to establish criteria for treatment-refractory patients and standardize conventional treatment before neuromodulation treatment is applied in Japan. PMID:24228478

  19. Characteristics of Young Children with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Baseline Features from the POTS Jr. Sample.

    PubMed

    Skriner, L C; Freeman, J; Garcia, A; Benito, K; Sapyta, J; Franklin, M

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic and impairing condition that can emerge early in childhood and persist into adulthood. The primary aim of this paper is to examine the characteristics of a large sample of young children with OCD (age range from 5 to 8). The sample will be described with regard to: demographics, OCD symptoms/severity, family history and parental psychopathology, comorbidity, and global and family functioning. The sample includes 127 youth with a primary diagnosis of OCD who participated in a multi-site, randomized control clinical trial of family-based exposure with response prevention. Key findings include moderate to severe OCD symptoms, high rates of impairment, and significant comorbidity, despite the participants' young age. Discussion focuses on how the characteristics of young children compare with older youth and with the few other samples of young children with OCD. Considerations regarding generalizability of the sample and limitations of the study are discussed.

  20. Cerebral glucose metabolism in childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Swedo, S.E.; Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.L.; Cheslow, D.L.; Leonard, H.L.; Kumar, A.; Friedland, R.; Rapoport, S.I.; Rapoport, J.L.

    1989-06-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in 18 adults with childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and in age- and sex-matched controls using positron emission tomography and fludeoxyglucose F 18. Both groups were scanned during rest, with reduced auditory and visual stimulation. The group with OCD showed an increased glucose metabolism in the left orbital frontal, right sensorimotor, and bilateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate regions as compared with controls. Ratios of regional activity to mean cortical gray matter metabolism were increased for the right prefrontal and left anterior cingulate regions in the group with OCD as a whole. Correlations between glucose metabolism and clinical assessment measures showed a significant relationship between metabolic activity and both state and trait measurements of OCD and anxiety as well as the response to clomipramine hydrochloride therapy. These results are consistent with the suggestion that OCD may result from a functional disturbance in the frontal-limbic-basal ganglia system.

  1. Can Neuroimaging Provide Reliable Biomarkers for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder? A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Frydman, Ilana; de Salles Andrade, Juliana B; Vigne, Paula; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2016-10-01

    In this integrative review, we discuss findings supporting the use neuroimaging biomarkers in the diagnosis and treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). To do so, we have selected the most recent studies that attempted to identify the underlying pathogenic process associated with OCD and whether they provide useful information to predict clinical features, natural history or treatment responses. Studies using functional magnetic resonance (fMRI), voxel-based morphometry (VBM), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in OCD patients are generally supportive of an expanded version of the earlier cortico-striatal-thalamus-cortical (CSTC) model of OCD. Although it is still unclear whether this information will be incorporated into the daily clinical practice (due to current conceptual approaches to mental illness), statistical techniques, such as pattern recognition methods, appear promising in identifying OCD patients and predicting their outcomes. PMID:27549605

  2. Provoked arrangement symptoms in obsessive-compulsive disorder using a virtual environment: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanguk; Roh, Daeyoung; Kim, Sun I; Kim, Chan-Hyung

    2012-04-01

    The current study aims to explore the effectiveness of virtual environment (VE) in producing anxiety variations to arrangement in order to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder. Twenty-four participants completed and performed the virtual arrangement tasks three times with three-day intervals. The results showed that the levels of participants' anxiety decreased significantly from the first to the last day, but the levels of decrement were different depending on the type of tasks: the time limit task was most effective among the three tasks in evoking arrangement anxiety. Also, only the Symmetry, Ordering, and Arrangement Questionnaire (SOAQ) revealed significant positive correlations with anxieties. These VE profiles can serve as an adjunct for better diagnosis and treatment for people with arranging compulsion symptoms.

  3. Abnormal resting-state functional connectivity of the left caudate nucleus in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunhui; Juhás, Michal; Greenshaw, Andrew J; Hu, Qiang; Meng, Xin; Cui, Hongsheng; Ding, Yongzhuo; Kang, Lu; Zhang, Yubo; Wang, Yuhua; Cui, Guangcheng; Li, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Altered brain activities in the cortico-striato-thalamocortical (CSTC) circuitry are implicated in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, whether the underlying changes occur only within this circuitry or in large-scale networks is still not thoroughly understood. This study performed voxel-based functional connectivity analysis on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from thirty OCD patients and thirty healthy controls to investigate whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity patterns in OCD. Relative to the healthy controls, OCD patients showed decreased functional connectivity within the CSTC circuitry but increased functional connectivity in other brain regions. Furthermore, decreased left caudate nucleus-thalamus connectivity within the CSTC circuitry was positively correlated with the illness duration of OCD. This study provides additional evidence that CSTC circuitry may play an essential role and alteration of large-scale brain networks may be involved in the pathophysiology of OCD. PMID:27143323

  4. Response-inhibition deficits in obsessive-compulsive disorder: an indicator of dysfunction in frontostriatal circuits.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, D R; Dick, E L; O'Hearn, K M; Sweeney, J A

    1997-01-01

    Abnormalities in the orbital prefrontal cortex and its ventral striatal target fields are believed to be involved in causing obsessive and compulsive symptoms. Lesions to this brain circuitry result in a selective disturbance in suppressing responses to irrelevant stimuli. This disturbance might underlie the apparent inhibitory deficit suggested by the symptomatology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Oculomotor tests were administered to 12 medication-free, nondepressed patients with OCD aged 18 to 44 y and 12 matched healthy controls to assess the ability to suppress responses and to execute delayed responses volitionally. Patients with OCD had more response-suppression failures than controls when peripheral visual targets were presented close to central fixation. No significant case-control differences were observed on the delayed-response task. A basic disturbance of neurobehavioral inhibition in OCD may underlie the repetitive behavior that characterizes the illness and be related to abnormalities in orbital prefrontal ventral striatal circuits. PMID:9002390

  5. Augmenting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with clomipramine in obsessive-compulsive disorder: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2013-12-01

    A small body of literature suggests that clomipramine may usefully augment selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients who do not respond to SSRI monotherapy. The combination, however, is associated with the risk of clinically significant drug interactions. Clomipramine can raise the blood levels and hence the adverse effects of most SSRIs, and many SSRIs can raise the blood levels and hence the adverse effects of clomipramine. The latter situation is more important because certain dose-dependent adverse effects of clomipramine, such as seizures, can be life-threatening. This article presents an evidence-based discussion of the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic adverse effects of the SSRI-clomipramine combination along with suggestions for dosing and monitoring when the combination is used in OCD.

  6. [Twiddler's syndrome in a patient with obsessive-compulsive disorder treated with deep brain stimulation].

    PubMed

    Moliz, Nicolás; Katati, Majed J; Iañez, Benjamín; García, Asunción; Yagui, Eskandar; Horcajadas, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Twiddler's syndrome is a rare complication associated with implantable electrical stimulation devices. First described in a patient with a pacemaker, it is a known complication in the field of cardiology. However, it is not so recognised in the world of neurosurgery, in which it has been described in relation to deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices. Characterised by manipulating either consciously or unconsciously the generator of such devices, which causes it to rotate on itself, the syndrome causes the coiling of the wiring of these systems and can lead to their rupture or the displacement of intracranial electrodes. We describe a case of twiddler's syndrome in a patient treated with DBS for obsessive-compulsive disorder, in which clinical deterioration presented after a good initial response. Control radiographs revealed rotation of the wiring system and displacement of the intracranial electrodes.

  7. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is associated with broad impairments in executive function: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Hannah R.; Kaiser, Roselinde H.; Warren, Stacie L.; Heller, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a serious and often chronically disabling condition. The current dominant model of OCD focuses on abnormalities in prefrontal-striatal circuits that support executive function (EF). While there is growing evidence for EF impairments associated with OCD, results have been inconsistent, making the nature and magnitude of these impairments controversial. The current meta-analysis uses random-effects models to synthesize 110 previous studies that compared participants with OCD to healthy control participants on at least one neuropsychological measure of EF. The results indicate that individuals with OCD are impaired on tasks measuring most aspects of EF, consistent with broad impairment in EF. EF deficits were not explained by general motor slowness or depression. Effect sizes were largely stable across variation in demographic and clinical characteristics of samples, although medication use, age, and gender moderated some effects. PMID:25755918

  8. Fear of guilt from behaving irresponsibly in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Francesco; Gangemi, Amelia

    2004-06-01

    Previous cognitive models of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) propose that inflated responsibility plays a key role in the maintenance of symptoms (Behav.Res.Ther. 28 (1985) 571). In this manuscript, we propose that this thesis may be improved by emphasizing that instead, OCD may be characterized by a fear of guilt that would result from behaving irresponsibly and/or from not behaving responsibly. We believe that this concept provides a better explanation for the anxious and fearful nature of OCD than do more traditional conceptualizations of inflated responsibility. We support this idea with empirical evidence and propose that OCD symptoms are consistent with patients acting in a prudential mode because of their fears of guilt. PMID:15210373

  9. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of lenticular nuclei in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Ohara, K; Isoda, H; Suzuki, Y; Takehara, Y; Ochiai, M; Takeda, H; Igarashi, Y; Ohara, K

    1999-12-20

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a safe and non-invasive technique for the in vivo study of brain chemistry and metabolism. As such, it is highly applicable to the study of living brain tissue in psychiatric diseases. Several neuropathological and neuroimaging studies have suggested that abnormalities of the basal ganglia nuclei might be implicated in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In the present study, we performed proton [1H]MRS of the lenticular nuclei in 12 patients with OCD and 12 healthy normal comparison subjects. The peaks of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), and choline-containing compounds (Cho) were measured. No differences between OCD patients and normal subjects were found in the NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios. Our results suggest the normal viability of neuronal cells, as indicated by the quantification of NAA, Cr and Cho in the lenticular nuclei of patients with OCD.

  10. The neuropsychology of obsessive-compulsive disorder: a review and consideration of clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Tallis, F

    1997-02-01

    Clinicians have suspected that obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is associated with fundamental information-processing deficits beyond those attributable to mood disturbance alone. Neuropsychological investigations can be divided into four broad areas concerned with general intellectual functioning, an 'under-inclusive' thinking style, performance on tests sensitive to frontal lobe impairment and performance on tests of memory. This body of research is critically reviewed. It is suggested that there is modest evidence for the presence of non-verbal and praxic memory deficits in patients with OCD. These deficits are consistent with contemporary theories of fronto-striatal functioning and may represent the cognitive substrate of doubt-related phenomena such as checking. The demonstration of specific memory impairments in OCD may have significant implications for the revision of existing models of OCD and the development of novel treatment strategies that reduce doubt in compulsive checkers by increasing the distinctiveness of past actions.

  11. The Risk of Cancer in Patients With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cheng-Che; Hu, Li-Yu; Hu, Yu-Wen; Chang, Wen-Han; Tang, Pei-Ling; Chen, Pan-Ming; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Su, Tung-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies suggest a link between anxiety disorders and cancer. The aim of the study was to evaluate the risk of cancer among patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) using a nationwide population-based dataset. We recruited newly diagnosed OCD patients without antecedent cancer from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between 2002 and 2011. The standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated for 22 specific cancer types among OCD patients and we determined the SIRs for subgroups according to age and sex group. In addition, because of a potential detection bias, a subgroup analysis stratified with the duration of the OCD diagnosis was carried out. Among the 52,656 OCD patients, who were followed up for 259,945 person-years (median follow-up = 4.9 years), there were 718 cases of cancer. Patients with OCD did not exhibit an increased overall cancer risk relative to the general population (SIR 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.98–1.13). An increased SIR was observed among OCD patients only within the first year of OCD diagnosis (SIR 1.21, 95% CI 1.01–1.43). This study indicated that the overall cancer risk was not elevated among OCD patients. An increased SIR observed among OCD patients within the first year of OCD diagnosis may be caused by a surveillance bias, and because paraneoplastic manifestations presented with obsessive-compulsive behaviors. Prospective study is necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:26945419

  12. A comparative study of early maladaptive schemas in obsessive-compulsive disorder and panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Seung Jae

    2015-12-30

    Schema theory and therapy may be an additional therapeutic approach to identify and treat chronic psychological problems, namely early maladaptive schemas (EMSs), in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and panic disorder (PAD). In the current study, we investigated the characteristics in EMSs between patients with OCD and PAD. Fifty-one patients with OCD, 46 patients with PAD, and 70 normal controls participated in this study. EMSs and depressive symptoms were measured using the Young Schema Questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), respectively. Analysis of covariance was conducted with age, sex, BDI score, and education level as covariates to assess group differences. Direct comparisons among the three groups revealed that the defectiveness/shame and social isolation/alienation schemas were prominently activated in patients with OCD, whereas the vulnerability to harm or illness and self-sacrifice were activated in patients with PAD. In subgroup analysis, these differences were observed between subgroups with lower BDI scores, but not between the patient subgroups with higher BDI scores. However, the differences between the patient groups in the defectiveness/shame and vulnerability to harm or illness schemas almost reached significance. Patients with OCD and PAD differed in particular EMS characteristics, which could have potential therapeutic implications. PMID:26599390

  13. A comparative study of early maladaptive schemas in obsessive-compulsive disorder and panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Seung Jae

    2015-12-30

    Schema theory and therapy may be an additional therapeutic approach to identify and treat chronic psychological problems, namely early maladaptive schemas (EMSs), in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and panic disorder (PAD). In the current study, we investigated the characteristics in EMSs between patients with OCD and PAD. Fifty-one patients with OCD, 46 patients with PAD, and 70 normal controls participated in this study. EMSs and depressive symptoms were measured using the Young Schema Questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), respectively. Analysis of covariance was conducted with age, sex, BDI score, and education level as covariates to assess group differences. Direct comparisons among the three groups revealed that the defectiveness/shame and social isolation/alienation schemas were prominently activated in patients with OCD, whereas the vulnerability to harm or illness and self-sacrifice were activated in patients with PAD. In subgroup analysis, these differences were observed between subgroups with lower BDI scores, but not between the patient subgroups with higher BDI scores. However, the differences between the patient groups in the defectiveness/shame and vulnerability to harm or illness schemas almost reached significance. Patients with OCD and PAD differed in particular EMS characteristics, which could have potential therapeutic implications.

  14. Comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder with bipolar disorder: A distinct form?

    PubMed

    Ozdemiroglu, Filiz; Sevincok, Levent; Sen, Gulnur; Mersin, Sanem; Kocabas, Oktay; Karakus, Kadir; Vahapoglu, Fatih

    2015-12-30

    We examined whether the patients with Bipolar Disorder (BD) and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) comorbidity may represent a distinct form of BD. The subjects diagnosed with BD (n=48), OCD (n=61), and BD with OCD (n=32) were compared in terms of several socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Previous history of suicidal attempts was more likely to be higher in BD-OCD group compared to the other two groups. A more episodic course of OCD, higher rates of rapid cycling, and the seasonality were found in BD-OCD patients. The frequency of bipolar II and NOS subtypes was more prevalent in patients with BD-OCD than in OCD patients. The first diagnosed illness was BD in the majority of BD-OCD cases. It was found that first affective episode was major depression in half of BD-OCD patients. Age at onset of BD was found to be earlier in BD-OCD group compared to pure BD patients. Bipolarity may not have a specific effect on the phenomenology of OC symptoms. The episodic course of OCD, seasonality, rapid cycling, earlier onset of BD, and impulsivity in BD-OCD patients may be indicative for a distinct form of BD. PMID:26561371

  15. Comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder with bipolar disorder: A distinct form?

    PubMed

    Ozdemiroglu, Filiz; Sevincok, Levent; Sen, Gulnur; Mersin, Sanem; Kocabas, Oktay; Karakus, Kadir; Vahapoglu, Fatih

    2015-12-30

    We examined whether the patients with Bipolar Disorder (BD) and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) comorbidity may represent a distinct form of BD. The subjects diagnosed with BD (n=48), OCD (n=61), and BD with OCD (n=32) were compared in terms of several socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Previous history of suicidal attempts was more likely to be higher in BD-OCD group compared to the other two groups. A more episodic course of OCD, higher rates of rapid cycling, and the seasonality were found in BD-OCD patients. The frequency of bipolar II and NOS subtypes was more prevalent in patients with BD-OCD than in OCD patients. The first diagnosed illness was BD in the majority of BD-OCD cases. It was found that first affective episode was major depression in half of BD-OCD patients. Age at onset of BD was found to be earlier in BD-OCD group compared to pure BD patients. Bipolarity may not have a specific effect on the phenomenology of OC symptoms. The episodic course of OCD, seasonality, rapid cycling, earlier onset of BD, and impulsivity in BD-OCD patients may be indicative for a distinct form of BD.

  16. Disorder-specific genetic factors in obsessive-compulsive disorder: A comprehensive meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Much remains to be learned about the etiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Twin studies suggest that it arises from both disorder-specific and non-specific genetic factors. To understand the etiology of OCD per se, it is necessary to identify disorder-specific factors. Previous research shows that OCD is associated with serotonin-related polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR coded as triallelic and HTR2A rs6311/rs6313) and, in males, a polymorphism involved in catecholamine modulation; COMT (rs4680). The present study is the first comprehensive meta-analysis to investigate whether these polymorphisms are specific to OCD. A meta-analysis was conducted for genetic association studies of OCD or any other psychiatric disorder, published in any language, in any country. A total of 551 studies were examined, of which 290 were included, consisting of 47,358 cases and 68,942 controls from case control studies, and 2,443 trios from family based studies. The main meta-analysis was limited to those disorders in which there were at least five datasets (studies or sub-studies) per disorder. Results confirmed that OCD is associated with polymorphisms of 5-HTTLPR, HTR2A, and, in males only, COMT. These polymorphisms were not associated with almost all other forms of psychopathology, including unipolar mood disorders, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, schizophrenia, and alcohol dependence. OCD, compared to most other disorders, had a significantly stronger association with particular alleles of each of the polymorphisms. Results did not differ across ancestral groups (Asian vs. Caucasian), designs (case control vs. family based), or diagnostic systems. Results suggest that the polymorphisms investigated in this study are relatively specific to OCD.

  17. Deep brain stimulation versus anterior capsulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Joshua; Hariz, Marwan; Zrinzo, Ludvic

    2015-05-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic and debilitating psychiatric condition. Traditionally, anterior capsulotomy (AC) was an established procedure for treatment of patients with refractory OCD. Over recent decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has gained popularity. In this paper the authors review the published literature and compare the outcome of AC and DBS targeting of the area of the ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Patients in published cases were grouped according to whether they received AC or DBS and according to their preoperative scores on the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (YBOCS), and then separated according to outcome measures: remission (YBOCS score < 8); response (≥ 35% improvement in YBOCS score); nonresponse (< 35% improvement in YBOCS score); and unfavorable (i.e., worsening of the baseline YBOCS score). Twenty studies were identified reporting on 170 patients; 62 patients underwent DBS of the VC/VS or the NAcc (mean age 38 years, follow-up 19 months, baseline YBOCS score of 33), and 108 patients underwent AC (mean age 36 years, follow-up 61 months, baseline YBOCS score of 30). In patients treated with DBS there was a 40% decrease in YBOCS score, compared with a 51% decrease for those who underwent AC (p = 0.004). Patients who underwent AC were 9% more likely to go into remission than patients treated with DBS (p = 0.02). No difference in complication rates was noted. Anterior capsulotomy is an efficient procedure for refractory OCD. Deep brain stimulation in the VC/VS and NAcc area is an emerging and promising therapy. The current popularity of DBS over ablative surgery for OCD is not due to nonefficacy of AC, but possibly because DBS is perceived as more acceptable by clinicians and patients. PMID:25635480

  18. Deep brain stimulation versus anterior capsulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Joshua; Hariz, Marwan; Zrinzo, Ludvic

    2015-05-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic and debilitating psychiatric condition. Traditionally, anterior capsulotomy (AC) was an established procedure for treatment of patients with refractory OCD. Over recent decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has gained popularity. In this paper the authors review the published literature and compare the outcome of AC and DBS targeting of the area of the ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Patients in published cases were grouped according to whether they received AC or DBS and according to their preoperative scores on the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (YBOCS), and then separated according to outcome measures: remission (YBOCS score < 8); response (≥ 35% improvement in YBOCS score); nonresponse (< 35% improvement in YBOCS score); and unfavorable (i.e., worsening of the baseline YBOCS score). Twenty studies were identified reporting on 170 patients; 62 patients underwent DBS of the VC/VS or the NAcc (mean age 38 years, follow-up 19 months, baseline YBOCS score of 33), and 108 patients underwent AC (mean age 36 years, follow-up 61 months, baseline YBOCS score of 30). In patients treated with DBS there was a 40% decrease in YBOCS score, compared with a 51% decrease for those who underwent AC (p = 0.004). Patients who underwent AC were 9% more likely to go into remission than patients treated with DBS (p = 0.02). No difference in complication rates was noted. Anterior capsulotomy is an efficient procedure for refractory OCD. Deep brain stimulation in the VC/VS and NAcc area is an emerging and promising therapy. The current popularity of DBS over ablative surgery for OCD is not due to nonefficacy of AC, but possibly because DBS is perceived as more acceptable by clinicians and patients.

  19. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of anxiety, posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety and related disorders are among the most common mental disorders, with lifetime prevalence reportedly as high as 31%. Unfortunately, anxiety disorders are under-diagnosed and under-treated. Methods These guidelines were developed by Canadian experts in anxiety and related disorders through a consensus process. Data on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment (psychological and pharmacological) were obtained through MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and manual searches (1980–2012). Treatment strategies were rated on strength of evidence, and a clinical recommendation for each intervention was made, based on global impression of efficacy, effectiveness, and side effects, using a modified version of the periodic health examination guidelines. Results These guidelines are presented in 10 sections, including an introduction, principles of diagnosis and management, six sections (Sections 3 through 8) on the specific anxiety-related disorders (panic disorder, agoraphobia, specific phobia, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder), and two additional sections on special populations (children/adolescents, pregnant/lactating women, and the elderly) and clinical issues in patients with comorbid conditions. Conclusions Anxiety and related disorders are very common in clinical practice, and frequently comorbid with other psychiatric and medical conditions. Optimal management requires a good understanding of the efficacy and side effect profiles of pharmacological and psychological treatments. PMID:25081580

  20. Copy Number Variation in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Tourette Syndrome: A Cross-Disorder Study

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Lauren M.; Yu, Dongmei; Marshall, Christian; Davis, Lea K.; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Li, Bingbin; Cappi, Carolina; Gerber, Gloria; Wolf, Aaron; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Osiecki, Lisa; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Kirby, Andrew; Illmann, Cornelia; Haddad, Stephen; Gallagher, Patience; Fagerness, Jesen A.; Barr, Cathy L.; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Black, Donald W.; Bloch, Michael H.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Budman, Cathy L.; Camarena, Beatriz; Cath, Danielle C.; Cavallini, Maria C.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette; Delorme, Richard; Denys, Damiaan; Derks, Eske M.; Dion, Yves; Rosário, Maria C.; Eapen, Valsama; Evans, Patrick; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Grabe, Hans J.; Grados, Marco A.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Grünblatt, Edna; Heiman, Gary A.; Hemmings, Sian M.J.; Herrera, Luis D.; Hounie, Ana G.; Jankovic, Joseph; Kennedy, James L; King, Robert A.; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F.; Lennertz, Leonhard; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L.; Lyon, Gholson J.; Macciardi, Fabio; Maier, Wolfgang; McCracken, James T.; McMahon, William; Murphy, Dennis L.; Naarden, Allan L; Neale, Benjamin M; Nurmi, Erika; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Pato, Michele T.; Pato, Carlos N.; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Reus, Victor I.; Richter, Margaret A.; Riddle, Mark; Robertson, Mary M.; Rosenberg, David; Rouleau, Guy A.; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Sampaio, Aline S.; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S.; Smit, Jan H.; Stein, Dan J.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Vallada, Homero; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Wang, Ying; Wendland, Jens R.; Shugart, Yin Yao; Miguel, Euripedes C.; Nicolini, Humberto; Oostra, Ben A.; Moessner, Rainald; Wagner, Michael; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Heutink, Peter; Nestadt, Gerald; Freimer, Nelson; Petryshen, Tracey; Posthuma, Danielle; Jenike, Michael A.; Cox, Nancy J.; Hanna, Gregory L.; Brentani, Helena; Scherer, Stephen W.; Arnold, Paul D.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Mathews, Carol A.; Knowles, James A.; Cook, Edwin H.; Pauls, David L.; Wang, Kai; Scharf, Jeremiah M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) are heritable, neurodevelopmental disorders with a partially shared genetic etiology. This study represents the first genome-wide investigation of large (>500kb), rare (<1%) copy number variants (CNVs) in OCD and the largest genome-wide CNV analysis in TS to date. Method The primary analyses utilized a cross-disorder design for 2,699 patients (1,613 ascertained for OCD, 1,086 ascertained for TS) and 1,789 controls. Parental data facilitated a de novo analysis in 348 OCD trios. Results Although no global CNV burden was detected in the cross-disorder analysis or in secondary, disease-specific analyses, there was a 3.3-fold increased burden of large deletions previously associated with other neurodevelopmental disorders (p=.09). Half of these neurodevelopmental deletions were located in a single locus, 16p13.11 (5 patient deletions: 0 control deletions, p=0.08 in current study, p=0.025 compared to published controls). Three 16p13.11 deletions were confirmed de novo, providing further support to the etiological significance of this region. The overall OCD de novo rate was 1.4%, which is intermediate between published rates in controls (0.7%) and in autism or schizophrenia (2–4%). Conclusion Several converging lines of evidence implicate 16p13.11 deletions in OCD, with weaker evidence for a role in TS. The trend toward increased overall neurodevelopmental CNV burden in TS and OCD suggests that deletions previously associated with other neurodevelopmental disorders may also contribute to these phenotypes. PMID:25062598

  1. Meta-analysis and association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Zai, Gwyneth; Zai, Clement C; Arnold, Paul D; Freeman, Natalie; Burroughs, Eliza; Kennedy, James L; Richter, Margaret A

    2015-04-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a severe psychiatric condition with a clear genetic component (Nicolini et al., 2009) in which neurodevelopmental mechanisms may be etiologically important. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an interesting candidate for molecular analysis in OCD on the basis of potential functional relevance, positive association studies, and reported interaction between this gene and other neurotransmitters implicated in this disorder.

  2. Specificity of neuropsychological impairment in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a comparison with social phobic and normal control subjects.

    PubMed

    Cohen, L J; Hollander, E; DeCaria, C M; Stein, D J; Simeon, D; Liebowitz, M R; Aronowitz, B R

    1996-01-01

    Specificity of neuropsychological dysfunction in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was assessed by comparing neuropsychological performance in 65 OCD patients, 17 social phobic patients, and 32 normal control subjects. Although both patient groups showed visual constructional impairment relative to normal subjects, only patients with social phobia showed executive dysfunction. Nonconcurrent state anxiety did not correlate with neuropsychological performance. Among anxiety disorders, neuropsychological dysfunction may not be specific to OCD, but the functions implicated may differ across patient groups.

  3. Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Reduces Symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in a Single Patient

    PubMed Central

    Langguth, Berthold; Sturm, Kornelia; Wetter, Thomas C.; Lange, Max; Gabriels, Loes; Mayer, Emeran A.; Schlaier, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a frequent gastrointestinal disorder that is difficult to treat. We describe findings from evaluation of a woman (55 years old) with obsessive compulsive disorder, which was treated with bilateral deep brain stimulation in the anterior limb of the internal capsule, and IBS. After the brain stimulation treatment she reported substantial relief of her IBS symptoms. This reduction depended on specific stimulation parameters, was reproducible over time, and was not directly associated with improvements in obsessive compulsive disorder symptoms. These observations indicate a specific effect of deep brain stimulation on IBS. This observation confirms involvement of specific brain structures in the pathophysiology of IBS and shows that symptoms can be reduced through modulation of neuronal activity in the central nervous system. Further studies of the effects of brain stimulation on IBS are required. PMID:25638586

  4. [Schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder--some considerations based on a case].

    PubMed

    Sümeg, Szilvia; Herold, Róbert; Tényi, Tamás

    2005-01-01

    The authors report the case of a male patient whose illness started with obsessive-compulsive symptoms and later developed into undifferentiated type schizophrenia. They explore the changes in the symptomatology of the young male and the treatment interventions used. The authors emphasize the common appearance of obsessive-compulsive symptoms with schizophrenia and present data on the epidemiology and psychopathology of the recently published schizo-obsessive subtype of schizophrenia. They point at the importance of early detection and complex treatment approaches.

  5. The Future of D-Cycloserine and Other Cognitive Modifiers in Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sulkowski, Michael L.; Geller, Daniel A.; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Mittelman, Andrew; Brown, Ashley; Storch, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Variants of exposure therapy are effective for treating obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs). However, significant numbers of patients do not respond adequately to exposure therapy resulting in continued distress and functional impairment. Therefore, novel approaches to augmenting exposure therapy are needed to adequately treat non- and partial-responders. Emerging research suggests that interventions that augment learning and memory processes associated with exposure therapy (i.e., extinction training) may display promise in enhancing treatment response in OCRDs. As the most studied example, d-cycloserine (DCS) is a relatively safe cognitive enhancer that appears to accelerate treatment gains associated with exposure therapy. This article reviews research on the use of DCS and other putative cognitive modifiers as they relate to the treatment (or prospective treatment) of obsessive-compulsive disorder and other OCRDs. PMID:25383074

  6. Disentangling chronological age from age of onset in children and adolescents with obsessive--compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Geller, D A; Biederman, J; Faraone, S V; Bellordre, C A; Kim, G S; Hagermoser, L; Cradock, K; Frazier, J; Coffey, B J

    2001-06-01

    Although paediatric obsessive--compulsive disorder (OCD) is increasingly recognized as a putative developmental subtype of the disorder, it remains uncertain as to whether additional subtyping by age at onset in childhood or adolescence is warranted. Subjects included children and adolescents meeting DSM-III-R and DSM-IV criteria for OCD referred to a specialized OCD clinic. All youth were systematically evaluated with structured diagnostic interviews and clinical assessment by an OCD expert. Irrespective of current age, an earlier age at onset predicted increased risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, simple phobia, agoraphobia and multiple anxiety disorders. In contrast, mood and psychotic disorders were associated with chronological age and were more prevalent in older subjects. Tourette's disorder showed associations with both chronological age and age at onset. Chronological age and age at onset predicted different patterns of comorbidity and dysfunction in children and adolescents with OCD. Considering the heterogeneity of OCD, age at onset may help identify meaningful developmental subtypes of the disorder beyond chronological age.

  7. Neuronal activity correlated with checking behaviour in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Burbaud, Pierre; Clair, Anne-Hélène; Langbour, Nicolas; Fernandez-Vidal, Sara; Goillandeau, Michel; Michelet, Thomas; Bardinet, Eric; Chéreau, Isabelle; Durif, Franck; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stephan; Fontaine, Denys; Magnié-Mauro, Marie-Noelle; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Bataille, Benoît; Millet, Bruno; Vérin, Marc; Baup, Nicolas; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Cornu, Philippe; Pelissolo, Antoine; Arbus, Christophe; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion; Yelnik, Jérôme; Welter, Marie-Laure; Mallet, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Doubt, and its behavioural correlate, checking, is a normal phenomenon of human cognition that is dramatically exacerbated in obsessive-compulsive disorder. We recently showed that deep brain stimulation in the associative-limbic area of the subthalamic nucleus, a central core of the basal ganglia, improved obsessive-compulsive disorder. To understand the physiological bases of symptoms in such patients, we recorded the activity of individual neurons in the therapeutic target during surgery while subjects performed a cognitive task that gave them the possibility of unrestricted repetitive checking after they had made a choice. We postulated that the activity of neurons in this region could be influenced by doubt and checking behaviour. Among the 63/87 task-related neurons recorded in 10 patients, 60% responded to various combinations of instructions, delay, movement or feedback, thus highlighting their role in the integration of different types of information. In addition, task-related activity directed towards decision-making increased during trials with checking in comparison with those without checking. These results suggest that the associative-limbic subthalamic nucleus plays a role in doubt-related repetitive thoughts. Overall, our results not only provide new insight into the role of the subthalamic nucleus in human cognition but also support the fact that subthalamic nucleus modulation by deep brain stimulation reduced compulsive behaviour in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  8. Lack of Association between Oxytocin Receptor (OXTR) Gene Polymorphisms and Alexithymia: Evidence from Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Min Jung; Kim, Wonji; Kang, Jee In; Namkoong, Kee; Kim, Se Joo

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin receptor gene single nucleotide polymorphisms have been associated with structural and functional alterations in brain regions, which involve social-emotional processing. Therefore, oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms may contribute to individual differences in alexithymia, which is considered to be a dysfunction of emotional processing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between oxytocin receptor gene single nucleotide polymorphisms or haplotypes and alexithymia in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. We recruited 355 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (234 men, 121 women). Alexithymia was measured by using the Toronto Alexithymia Scale. We performed single-marker and haplotype association analyses with eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs237885, rs237887, rs2268490, rs4686301, rs2254298, rs13316193, rs53576, and rs2268498) in the oxytocin receptor gene. There were no significant associations between any of the eight single nucleotide polymorphism of the oxytocin receptor gene and alexithymia. In addition, a six-locus haplotype block (rs237885-rs237887-rs2268490-rs4686301-rs2254298-rs13316193) was not significantly associated with alexithymia. These findings suggest that genetic variations in the oxytocin receptor gene may not explain a significant part of alexithymia in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:26599592

  9. Neuronal activity correlated with checking behaviour in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Burbaud, Pierre; Clair, Anne-Hélène; Langbour, Nicolas; Fernandez-Vidal, Sara; Goillandeau, Michel; Michelet, Thomas; Bardinet, Eric; Chéreau, Isabelle; Durif, Franck; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stephan; Fontaine, Denys; Magnié-Mauro, Marie-Noelle; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Bataille, Benoît; Millet, Bruno; Vérin, Marc; Baup, Nicolas; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Cornu, Philippe; Pelissolo, Antoine; Arbus, Christophe; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion; Yelnik, Jérôme; Welter, Marie-Laure; Mallet, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Doubt, and its behavioural correlate, checking, is a normal phenomenon of human cognition that is dramatically exacerbated in obsessive-compulsive disorder. We recently showed that deep brain stimulation in the associative-limbic area of the subthalamic nucleus, a central core of the basal ganglia, improved obsessive-compulsive disorder. To understand the physiological bases of symptoms in such patients, we recorded the activity of individual neurons in the therapeutic target during surgery while subjects performed a cognitive task that gave them the possibility of unrestricted repetitive checking after they had made a choice. We postulated that the activity of neurons in this region could be influenced by doubt and checking behaviour. Among the 63/87 task-related neurons recorded in 10 patients, 60% responded to various combinations of instructions, delay, movement or feedback, thus highlighting their role in the integration of different types of information. In addition, task-related activity directed towards decision-making increased during trials with checking in comparison with those without checking. These results suggest that the associative-limbic subthalamic nucleus plays a role in doubt-related repetitive thoughts. Overall, our results not only provide new insight into the role of the subthalamic nucleus in human cognition but also support the fact that subthalamic nucleus modulation by deep brain stimulation reduced compulsive behaviour in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:23365104

  10. Obsession in the strict sense: A helpful psychopathological phenomenon in the differential diagnosis between obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bürgy, M

    2007-01-01

    The paper presented follows the hypothesis that differentiation between obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia is possible only by focusing on the single phenomenon of obsession. The statement of a nosological specificity of obsession, called obsession in the strict sense, is set against the current views of ICD-10 and DSM-IV of obsession as a ubiquitous, non-specific phenomenon appearing in comorbidities. In the succession of the paper, the historical development of these two very different views and their clinically mixing is reconstructed. The phenomenological clarification of the structure of the obsessive phenomena leads to the term of obsession in the strict sense. The distinction between obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia can take place at the psychopathological interface between obsession in the strict sense and delusional idea. The examination of the literature on the connection between obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia shows that there is no definitive connection between obsession in the strict sense and schizophrenia. Finally, some case reports are presented to sharpen clinical suspicion for other possibly wrong diagnoses.

  11. Should OCD leave the anxiety disorders in DSM-V? The case for obsessive compulsive-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Eric; Braun, Ashley; Simeon, Daphne

    2008-01-01

    Recently in 2006, a group of experts in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and obsessive compulsive-related disorders (OCRDs) convened in Washington, DC, to review existing data on the relationships between these various disorders, and to suggest approaches to address the gaps in our knowledge, in preparation for the upcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (Fifth Edition) (DSM-V). As a result of this meeting, the Research Planning Agenda for DSM-V: OCRD Work Group suggested removing OCD from the anxiety disorders, where it is currently found. This proposal is in accordance with the current International Classification of Mental Disorders (ICD-10) classification of OCD as a separate category from the anxiety disorders. Although the ICD-10 places both OCD and the anxiety disorders under the umbrella category of "neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform disorders," they are two separate categories, distinct from one another. As OCD and other putative OCRDs share aspects of phenomenology, comorbidity, neurotransmitter/peptide systems, neurocircuitry, familial and genetic factors, and treatment response, it was proposed to create a new category in DSM-V entitled OCRDs. Alternatively, the OCRDs might be conceptualized as a new category within the broader category of anxiety disorders. Future studies are needed to better define the relationships among these disorders, and to study boundary issues for this proposed category. There are both advantages and disadvantages in creating a new diagnostic category in DSM-V, and these are discussed in this article.

  12. Cigarette smoking in obsessive-compulsive disorder and unaffected parents of OCD patients

    PubMed Central

    Abramovitch, Amitai; Pizzagalli, Diego A.; Geller, Daniel A.; Reuman, Lillian; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is more prevalent among individuals with psychiatric disorders than the general population. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may be an intriguing exception, although no recent study has investigated this hypothesis in OCD patients. Moreover, it is unknown whether reduced smoking rates are present in unaffected first-degree relatives of OCD patients. Methods We assessed smoking prevalence in adults with OCD and unaffected parents of youth with OCD (PYOCD). To this end, 113 adults with OCD completed online questionnaires assessing symptom severity and smoking status. Smoking status was obtained from an independent sample of 210 PYOCD assessed for psychiatric diagnoses. Results Smoking prevalence rates in adults with OCD (13.3%; n = 15) and PYOCD (9.5%; n = 20) samples were significantly lower than those found in representative samples of the general population (19-24%, all p < .001) and Axis I disorders (36-64%; p < .001). There were no smokers in the adult OCD subset without clinically significant depressive symptoms (n = 54). Conclusion Low prevalence of smoking in OCD may be familial and unique among psychiatric disorders, and might represent a possible state-independent OCD marker. Hypotheses concerning the uncharacteristically low prevalence rates are discussed with relation to OCD phenomenology and pathophysiology. PMID:24637253

  13. Brain structural correlates of obsessive-compulsive disorder with and without preceding stressful life events.

    PubMed

    Real, E; Subirà, M; Alonso, P; Segalàs, C; Labad, J; Orfila, C; López-Solà, C; Martínez-Zalacaín, I; Via, E; Cardoner, N; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Soriano-Mas, C; Menchón, J M

    2016-08-01

    Objectives There is growing evidence supporting a role for stressful life events (SLEs) at obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) onset, but neurobiological correlates of such effect are not known. We evaluated regional grey matter (GM) changes associated with the presence/absence of SLEs at OCD onset. Methods One hundred and twenty-four OCD patients and 112 healthy controls were recruited. Patients were split into two groups according to the presence (n = 56) or absence (n = 68) of SLEs at disorder's onset. A structural magnetic resonance image was acquired for each participant and pre-processed with Statistical Parametric Mapping software (SPM8) to obtain a volume-modulated GM map. Between-group differences in sociodemographic, clinical and whole-brain regional GM volumes were assessed. Results SLEs were associated with female sex, later age at disorder's onset, more contamination/cleaning and less hoarding symptoms. In comparison with controls, patients without SLEs showed GM volume increases in bilateral dorsal putamen and the central tegmental tract of the brainstem. By contrast, patients with SLEs showed specific GM volume increases in the right anterior cerebellum. Conclusions Our findings support the idea that neuroanatomical alterations of OCD patients partially depend on the presence of SLEs at disorder's onset. PMID:26784523

  14. Facial discrimination in body dysmorphic, obsessive-compulsive and social anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Claudia; Wiesendahl, Wiebke; Kleinstäuber, Maria; Stangier, Ulrich; Kathmann, Norbert; Buhlmann, Ulrike

    2016-02-28

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by preoccupation with perceived flaws in one's own appearance. Several risk factors such as aesthetic perceptual sensitivity have been proposed to explain BDD's unique symptomatology. Although research on facial discrimination is limited so far, the few existing studies have produced mixed results. Thus, the purpose of this study was to further examine facial discrimination in BDD. We administered a facial discrimination paradigm, which allows to assess the ability to identify slight to strong facial changes (e.g., hair loss, acne) when presented with an original (unmodified) facial image, relative to a changed (modified) facial image. The experiment was administered in individuals with BDD, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and mentally healthy controls (32 per group, respectively). Overall, groups did not differ with respect to their ability to correctly identify facial aberrations when presented with other people's faces. Our findings do not support the hypothesis of enhanced general aesthetic perceptual sensitivity in individuals with (vs. without) BDD.

  15. Facial discrimination in body dysmorphic, obsessive-compulsive and social anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Claudia; Wiesendahl, Wiebke; Kleinstäuber, Maria; Stangier, Ulrich; Kathmann, Norbert; Buhlmann, Ulrike

    2016-02-28

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by preoccupation with perceived flaws in one's own appearance. Several risk factors such as aesthetic perceptual sensitivity have been proposed to explain BDD's unique symptomatology. Although research on facial discrimination is limited so far, the few existing studies have produced mixed results. Thus, the purpose of this study was to further examine facial discrimination in BDD. We administered a facial discrimination paradigm, which allows to assess the ability to identify slight to strong facial changes (e.g., hair loss, acne) when presented with an original (unmodified) facial image, relative to a changed (modified) facial image. The experiment was administered in individuals with BDD, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and mentally healthy controls (32 per group, respectively). Overall, groups did not differ with respect to their ability to correctly identify facial aberrations when presented with other people's faces. Our findings do not support the hypothesis of enhanced general aesthetic perceptual sensitivity in individuals with (vs. without) BDD. PMID:26774187

  16. Differentiating among singular and comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder and social phobia symptomology.

    PubMed

    Rudy, Brittany M; May, Anna C; Whiting, Sara E; Davis, Thompson E; Jenkins, Whitney S; Reuther, Erin T

    2014-01-01

    Social phobia is a frequent co-occurring diagnosis with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); however, co-occurring OCD in those with social phobia is less common. Genetic, environmental, and cognitive traits are common risk factors for anxiety disorders broadly. It is plausible that shared variables related to OCD and/or social phobia could provide insight into the co-occurrence of these two disorders. The current study explored differences in fear of negative evaluation (FNE) and perfectionism among four groups: those with (1) elevated social phobia symptoms, (2) elevated OCD symptoms, (3) elevated symptoms of OCD and social phobia, and those who were (4) asymptomatic as a control group. A non-clinical sample of 196 participants completed several online questionnaires about social phobia and OCD symptomology. Results identified three cognitive variables (i.e., FNE, total perfectionism, and concern over mistakes) as differential variables in comorbid symptom presentation of OCD and social phobia. A fourth variable (i.e., doubts about actions) was identified as a potential dual risk factor, and four subsequent variables (i.e., parental criticism, personal standards, parental expectations, and organization) were not implicated in differential symptom presentation. Given the different rates of OCD and social phobia co-occurrence, identification of differentiating variables could aid in better understanding of potential risk factors, which may enhance preventative and therapeutic techniques. Study implications, limitations, and future recommendations are discussed.

  17. Animal behavior as a conceptual framework for the study of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

    PubMed

    Eilam, David; Zor, Rama; Fineberg, Naomi; Hermesh, Haggai

    2012-06-01

    Research on affective disorders may benefit from the methodology of studying animal behavior, in which tools are available for qualitatively and quantitatively measuring and assessing behavior with as much sophistication and attention to detail as in the analysis of the brain. To illustrate this, we first briefly review the characteristics of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and then demonstrate how the quinpirole rat model is used as a conceptual model in studying human OCD patients. Like the rat model, the study of OCD in humans is based on video-telemetry, whereby observable, measurable, and relatively objective characteristics of OCD behavior may be extracted. In this process, OCD rituals are defined in terms of the space in which they are executed and the movements (acts) that are performed at each location or object in this space. Accordingly, OCD behavior is conceived of as comprising three hierarchical components: (i) rituals (as defined by the patients); (ii) visits to objects/locations in the environment at which the patient stops during the ritual; and (iii) acts performed at each object/location during visits. Scoring these structural components (behavioral units) is conveniently possible with readily available tools for behavioral description and analysis, providing quantitative and qualitative measures of the OCD hallmarks of repetition and addition, as well as the reduced functionality in OCD behavior. Altogether, the concept that was developed in the context of an animal model provides a useful tool that may facilitate OCD diagnosis, assessment and treatment, and may be similarly applied for other psychiatric disorders.

  18. The role of early maladaptive schemas in predicting exposure and response prevention outcome for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Haaland, Aashild Tellefsen; Vogel, Patrick A; Launes, Gunvor; Haaland, Vegard Øksendal; Hansen, Bjarne; Solem, Stian; Himle, Joseph A

    2011-11-01

    This is the first study that explores whether early maladaptive schemas are related to treatment outcome for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The sample consisted of 88 outpatients with a diagnosis of OCD who completed exposure and response prevention treatment. The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), the Beck Depression Inventory and Young Schema Questionnaire - Short Form were administered before and after treatment. Regression analyses using post-treatment Y-BOCS as the dependent variable indicated that higher scores on the abandonment schema at pre-treatment were related to poor outcome and explained 7% of the variance in symptoms at post-treatment. Higher scores on the self-sacrifice schema at pre-treatment were related to good outcome and explained 6% of the variance in obsessive-compulsive symptoms at post-treatment. During treatment, only changes in the failure schema were significantly related to good outcome and explained 18% of the variance in symptoms at post-treatment. PMID:21920500

  19. Patient Rating of Therapeutic Factors and Response to Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy in Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Behenck, Andressa S; Gomes, Juliana Braga; Heldt, Elizeth

    2016-06-01

    Group therapy involves complex mechanisms that rely on certain therapeutic factors to promote improvement. The objective of this study was to assess patient rating of therapeutic factors during cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT) and to investigate the correlation between patient rating and outcome of CBGT for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In the present clinical trial, 15 patients participated in a 12-session CBGT protocol. Severity of symptoms was assessed before and after CBGT with the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), Clinical Global Impression (CGI), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Yalom's Curative Factors Questionnaire was administered at the end of each session for patient rating of the usefulness of 12 therapeutic factors to treat OCD. There was a significant interaction between improvement in obsessive-compulsive symptoms and patient rating of altruism, universality, interpersonal learning input and output, family re-enactment, self-understanding, and existential factors over time. The results show that group therapeutic factors positively influence the response to CBGT in OCD patients. PMID:27105227

  20. The role of early maladaptive schemas in predicting exposure and response prevention outcome for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Haaland, Aashild Tellefsen; Vogel, Patrick A; Launes, Gunvor; Haaland, Vegard Øksendal; Hansen, Bjarne; Solem, Stian; Himle, Joseph A

    2011-11-01

    This is the first study that explores whether early maladaptive schemas are related to treatment outcome for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The sample consisted of 88 outpatients with a diagnosis of OCD who completed exposure and response prevention treatment. The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), the Beck Depression Inventory and Young Schema Questionnaire - Short Form were administered before and after treatment. Regression analyses using post-treatment Y-BOCS as the dependent variable indicated that higher scores on the abandonment schema at pre-treatment were related to poor outcome and explained 7% of the variance in symptoms at post-treatment. Higher scores on the self-sacrifice schema at pre-treatment were related to good outcome and explained 6% of the variance in obsessive-compulsive symptoms at post-treatment. During treatment, only changes in the failure schema were significantly related to good outcome and explained 18% of the variance in symptoms at post-treatment.

  1. D-cycloserine augmentation in behavioral therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Du, Yanqiu; Han, Jiyang; Liu, Guo; Wang, Xumei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the overall effect of D-cycloserine (DCS) augmentation on exposure and response prevention (ERP) therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Methods Clinical studies on the effect of DCS augmentation on ERP therapy for OCD compared to placebo were included for meta analysis. The primary outcome was the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). Meta-analyses were performed with a random-effect model or a fixed-effect model using the Cochrane Review Manager (RevMan, version 5.2) to calculate the odds ratio and the mean difference, with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Results A total of six studies was included in the current meta-analyses, and their data were extracted. Among them, four were for analyses of DCS and Y-BOCS at midtreatment, six for analysis at posttreatment, and four at 3-month follow-up. Besides, three of the six eligible studies were included in the meta-analysis of the DCS and Clinical Global Impression–Severity Scale at posttreatment, and three in the meta-analysis of DCS and proportions of treatment responders and of subjects attaining clinical remission status criteria at posttreatment. Our meta-analyses do not reveal a significant effect of DCS augmentation in ERP therapy for OCD patients, except when measured at midtreatment. Compared to the placebo group, DCS augmentation did show a trend toward significantly lower/decreased Y-BOCS; when measured at posttreatment and in the subpopulation of DCS taken before some of the ERP sessions, DCS augmentation showed a trend toward significantly lower/decreased Y-BOCS. Conclusion Our result suggested that with the careful optimization of DCS-augmented ERP therapy by fine-tuning timing and dosing of DCS administration and number and frequency of ERP sessions, DCS may enhance the efficacy of ERP therapy in reducing the symptomatic severity of OCD patients, especially at early stage of the treatment; therefore, DCS augmentation could possibly reduce treatment

  2. Dimensional structure of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Steffen; Meier, Beat; Hand, Iver; Schick, Mildred; Jahn, Holger

    2004-02-15

    Comorbid depression is frequent in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and is acknowledged as a major confound in biological and neurocognitive investigations in OCD. The aim of the present study was to assess the distribution of depressive symptoms in a large OCD sample (n=162) and to analyze the dimensional structure of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) in OCD. Major depressive disorder according to DSM-IV criteria was apparent in approximately one third of the patients. Frequent symptoms were depressed mood, reduced ability to work, anxiety symptoms and guilt feelings. HDRS scores were submitted to a varimax-rotated factor analysis. In accordance with studies conducted with depressed samples, multi-dimensional solutions suggesting three to six factors emerged. Subsequent confirmatory factor analysis revealed satisfactory fit indices for a four-factorial solution comprising core depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anxiety and gastrointestinal problems. Aggression-related obsessions as well as the overall severity of obsessions were related to core depressive symptoms. Anxiety symptoms were associated with excessive rituals. Greater recognition of depressive sub-components may help to raise the replicability of empirical findings in OCD research as there is evidence from both depression and OCD samples that distinct depressive syndromes have different biological correlates.

  3. Subcortical and cortical morphological anomalies as an endophenotype in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Shaw, P; Sharp, W; Sudre, G; Wharton, A; Greenstein, D; Raznahan, A; Evans, A; Chakravarty, M M; Lerch, J P; Rapoport, J

    2015-02-01

    Endophentoypes, quantifiable traits lying on the causal chain between a clinical phenotype and etiology, can be used to accelerate genomic discovery in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we identify the neuroanatomic changes that are shared by 22 OCD adult and adolescent patients and 25 of their unaffected siblings who are at genetic risk for the disorder. Comparisons were made against 47 age and sex matched healthy controls. We defined the surface morphology of the striatum, globus pallidus and thalamus, and thickness of the cerebral cortex. Patients with OCD show significant surface expansion compared with healthy controls, following adjustment for multiple comparisons, in interconnected regions of the caudate, thalamus and right orbitofrontal cortex. Their unaffected siblings show similar, significant expansion, most marked in the ventromedial caudate bilaterally, the right pulvinar thalamic nucleus and the right orbitofrontal cortex. These regions define a network that has been consistently implicated in OCD. In addition, both patients with OCD and unaffected siblings showed similar increased thickness of the right precuneus, which receives rich input from the thalamic pulvinar nuclei and the left medial temporal cortex. Anatomic change within the orbitofrontostriatal and posterior brain circuitry thus emerges as a promising endophenotype for OCD.

  4. Deep brain stimulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder: neurocircuitry and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Lipsman, Nir; Giacobbe, Peter; Lozano, Andres M

    2013-01-01

    The last decade has seen a significant rise in interest in the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the management of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), one of psychiatry's most challenging conditions. The prominent role of both thought (obsessions) and motor (compulsions) dysfunction in OCD place the condition at the border between the neurological and the psychiatric. This is supported by a growing body of literature that implicates structures in decision-making, reward, and action-selection circuits in the disorder. Here, we provide an overview of the neurocircuitry of OCD while reviewing the DBS literature to date for the condition. Results of DBS trials in treatment- resistant OCD have been remarkably similar, with clinical response rates in the range of 40-60%, despite the use of a diverse range of targets. These results imply that a common underlying circuit is being modulated, and moreover that there is room for improvement, and debate, in the development of an evidence-driven DBS treatment for this chronic, debilitating illness. PMID:24112898

  5. An interrogation of cognitive findings in pediatric obsessive-compulsive and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Elle; Flessner, Christopher

    2015-06-30

    Current findings in the field of psychology have led to increased interest and a new conceptualization of disorders characterized by repetitive behaviors, namely the obsessive compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs). Scant research, however, has sought to collect and categorize the extant research on pediatric OCRDs. Particularly, no adequate review of the pediatric cognitive literature existed until now, despite the clear implication of abnormalities in neuroanatomical structures and cognitive functioning in adult samples. While evidence for cognitive dysfunction in pediatric samples is presented, this paper also suggests that differences in cognitive dysfunction may indeed exist between adults and youth with OCRDs. Specifically, those irregularities present in said youth at varying developmental stages may impact the origination and maintenance of OCRDs across time. Finally, this paper seeks to formulate potential future goals for the research field, particularly through transdiagnostic approaches to processes linked with symptom presentations. This is of particular importance as an improved understanding of the interaction of cognitive function and growth is key to further comprehension of the OCRDs. PMID:25912428

  6. Incompleteness and not just right experiences in the explanation of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Belloch, Amparo; Fornés, Gertrudis; Carrasco, Angel; López-Solá, Clara; Alonso, Pino; Menchón, Jose M

    2016-02-28

    In the past decade, not just right experiences (NJRE) and incompleteness (INC) have attracted renewed interest as putative motivators of symptoms in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), beyond harm avoidance (HA). This study examines, in 267 non-clinical undergraduates and 47 OCD patients, the differential contributions of HA, INC, and NJRE to the different OCD symptom dimensions and the propensity to have the disorder. The results indicate that although both the NJRE and INC range from normality to OCD, their number and intensity significantly increase as the obsessional tendencies increase, which suggests that they are vulnerability markers for OCD. Although they cannot be considered fully specific to OCD, they are more important in explaining OCD symptoms than general distress and harm-related beliefs, and they are also better indicators of OCD severity than HA. In light of the operationalization of both NJRE and INC across the items on their respective questionnaires, the two constructs seem to capture different aspects of the same complex underlying construct: whereas INC might refer to a relatively stable disposition or trait of engaging in compulsive rituals, NJRE resemble obsessions more, and the appraisals that individuals ascribe to the experience would motivate the compulsions.

  7. Integrating Genetic, Neuropsychological and Neuroimaging Data to Model Early-Onset Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Severity.

    PubMed

    Mas, Sergi; Gassó, Patricia; Morer, Astrid; Calvo, Anna; Bargalló, Nuria; Lafuente, Amalia; Lázaro, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an integrative approach that combines structural magnetic resonance imaging data (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging data (DTI), neuropsychological data, and genetic data to predict early-onset obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) severity. From a cohort of 87 patients, 56 with complete information were used in the present analysis. First, we performed a multivariate genetic association analysis of OCD severity with 266 genetic polymorphisms. This association analysis was used to select and prioritize the SNPs that would be included in the model. Second, we split the sample into a training set (N = 38) and a validation set (N = 18). Third, entropy-based measures of information gain were used for feature selection with the training subset. Fourth, the selected features were fed into two supervised methods of class prediction based on machine learning, using the leave-one-out procedure with the training set. Finally, the resulting model was validated with the validation set. Nine variables were used for the creation of the OCD severity predictor, including six genetic polymorphisms and three variables from the neuropsychological data. The developed model classified child and adolescent patients with OCD by disease severity with an accuracy of 0.90 in the testing set and 0.70 in the validation sample. Above its clinical applicability, the combination of particular neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and genetic characteristics could enhance our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder. PMID:27093171

  8. What do low-dysfunctional beliefs obsessive-compulsive disorder subgroups believe?

    PubMed

    Chik, Heather M; Calamari, John E; Rector, Neil A; Riemann, Bradley C

    2010-12-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) heterogeneity research identified a patient subgroup that endorsed few of the dysfunctional beliefs posited to be important to development of obsessional disorders. Because of the clinical and theoretical importance of such heterogeneity, we attempted to elucidate the concerns of a low-beliefs OCD subgroup. We evaluated specific metacognitive beliefs and monitoring tendencies assessed on the Metacognitions Questionnaire (MCQ-30; Wells & Cartwright-Hatton, 2004), and feelings of incompleteness ("not just right experiences" [NJREs]) believed to reflect an inability to use emotional experience and sensory feedback to guide behavior (Summerfeldt, 2007). Low (OCD-L) and high dysfunctional beliefs (OCD-H) OCD patient subgroups, and anxious and student comparison groups, completed measures. Scoring on the MCQ-30 differentiated OCD subgroups, although evaluations of differences and correlations with OCD symptom measures indicated that these metacognitive beliefs more so characterized the thinking of the OCD-H subgroup. Scoring on NJREs measures also differentiated OCD subgroups. NJREs scores were consistently related to OCD symptoms only for the OCD-L subgroup. Results are congruent with theoretical formulations positing that harm avoidance and feelings of incompleteness are important and distinct motivations that underlie specific variants of OCD. PMID:20621440

  9. Integrating Genetic, Neuropsychological and Neuroimaging Data to Model Early-Onset Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Severity

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Sergi; Gassó, Patricia; Morer, Astrid; Calvo, Anna; Bargalló, Nuria; Lafuente, Amalia; Lázaro, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an integrative approach that combines structural magnetic resonance imaging data (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging data (DTI), neuropsychological data, and genetic data to predict early-onset obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) severity. From a cohort of 87 patients, 56 with complete information were used in the present analysis. First, we performed a multivariate genetic association analysis of OCD severity with 266 genetic polymorphisms. This association analysis was used to select and prioritize the SNPs that would be included in the model. Second, we split the sample into a training set (N = 38) and a validation set (N = 18). Third, entropy-based measures of information gain were used for feature selection with the training subset. Fourth, the selected features were fed into two supervised methods of class prediction based on machine learning, using the leave-one-out procedure with the training set. Finally, the resulting model was validated with the validation set. Nine variables were used for the creation of the OCD severity predictor, including six genetic polymorphisms and three variables from the neuropsychological data. The developed model classified child and adolescent patients with OCD by disease severity with an accuracy of 0.90 in the testing set and 0.70 in the validation sample. Above its clinical applicability, the combination of particular neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and genetic characteristics could enhance our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder. PMID:27093171

  10. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Symptoms in Huntington’s Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Molano-Eslava, Juan Carlos; Iragorri-Cucalón, Ángela; Ucrós-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Bonilla-Jácome, Carolina; Tovar-Perdomo, Santiago; Herin, David V.; Orozco-Cabal, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Few cases of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms preceding the clinical onset of Huntington Disease (HD) or during later stages of the disease have been reported in the literature, but the nature of this association and its neurobiological mechanisms have not been well-investigated. Objectives To review the scientific literature regarding OCD symptoms in patients with HD and describe a case study from our clinic. Methods Extensive literature searches were performed to identify reports of patients with concurrent HD and OCD symptoms. Results Recent studies and the current case report suggest that OCD symptoms may predate or coincide with motor, affective or behavioral symptoms in patients with HD. The development of OCD and HD symptoms may involve structural and functional changes affecting the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex, ventromedial caudate nucleus, and pallidal sites. Conclusions Some patients with HD develop symptoms associated with OCD. Progressive and differential neuropathological changes in the ventromedial caudate nucleus and related neural circuits may underlie this association. No specific treatment strategy has been developed to treat these patients; however some medications attenuate associated symptoms. Further testing is needed to determine the neurobiological mechanisms of these disorders. PMID:19966930

  11. Family accommodation of obsessional symptoms and naturalistic outcome of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Anish V; Pandian, Dhanasekhara; Bada Math, Suresh; Kandavel, Thennarasu; Janardhan Reddy, Y C

    2014-02-28

    Accommodation of symptoms by families and expressed emotion (EE) may have a negative impact on the outcome of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The study examines the effect of family accommodation (FA) and EE on the 1-year naturalistic outcome of OCD. Patients with OCD who met the criteria for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV, text revision (DSM-IV TR; N=94) were followed up for 1 year and assessed every 3 months. Assessments included measurement of symptom severity, FA, EE and family burden. By the 12th month, the cumulative probability of remission was 58%. Non-remitters compared with remitters had a significantly higher FA, EE and family burden at the baseline and did not report significant reductions on any of the family variables over the year. In a Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, a higher FA at the baseline significantly predicted time to remission. FA of symptoms has a significant negative impact on the naturalistic outcome of OCD. This emphasises the need to design specific interventions to reduce FA for a better outcome.

  12. Technological advances in psychotherapy: implications for the assessment and treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Lind, Christian; Boschen, Mark J; Morrissey, Shirley

    2013-01-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a prevalent and costly condition that causes significant functional impairment and reduced quality of life. Although treatments with demonstrated efficacy for OCD, such as cognitive behavior therapy and antidepressants, have existed for over three decades, many patients remain inadequately treated or untreated. Challenges encountered in the treatment of OCD include problems with homework compliance, frequent relapse, difficulties in simulating the spontaneous nature of intrusive thoughts, and infrequent treatment sessions. Accumulated research now indicates that computerized assessment and therapy tools can significantly improve the cost/time-effectiveness of conventional psychotherapeutic interventions for anxiety disorders such as OCD without impairing therapeutic progress and outcome. In this paper we examine the potential of such technology, address current challenges in the assessment and treatment of OCD, and provide a rationale for future research in the field. We outline the general utility of computer technology in psychotherapeutic interventions, critically evaluate the existing literature on computer-assisted assessment and treatment specific to OCD, as well as discuss potential implications of portable technology for OCD treatment delivery and outcomes.

  13. Obsessive-compulsive disorder, impulse control disorders and drug addiction: common features and potential treatments.

    PubMed

    Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Oostermeijer, Sanne; Harrison, Ben J; Pantelis, Christos; Yücel, Murat

    2011-05-01

    The basic concepts underlying compulsive, impulsive and addictive behaviours overlap, which may help explain why laymen use these expressions interchangeably. Although there has been a large research effort to better characterize and disentangle these behaviours, clinicians and scientists are still unable to clearly differentiate them. Accordingly, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), impulse control disorders (ICD) and substance-related disorders (SUD) overlap on different levels, including phenomenology, co-morbidity, neurocircuitry, neurocognition, neurochemistry and family history. In this review we summarize these issues with particular emphasis on the role of the opioid system in the pathophysiology and treatment of OCD, ICD and SUD. We postulate that with progression and chronicity of OCD, the proportion of the OCD-related behaviours (e.g. checking, washing, ordering and hoarding, among others) that are driven by impulsive 'rash' processes increase as involvement of more ventral striatal circuits becomes prominent. In contrast, as SUD and ICD progress, the proportion of the SUD- and ICD-related behaviours that are driven by compulsive 'habitual' processes increase as involvement of more dorsal striatal circuits become prominent. We are not arguing that, with time, ICD becomes OCD or vice versa. Instead, we are proposing that these disorders may acquire qualities of the other with time. In other words, while patients with ICD/SUD may develop 'compulsive impulsions', patients with OCD may exhibit 'impulsive compulsions'. There are many potential implications of our model. Theoretically, OCD patients exhibiting impulsive or addictive features could be managed with drugs that address the quality of the underlying drives and the involvement of neural systems. For example, agents for the reduction or prevention of relapse of addiction (e.g. heavy drinking), which modulate the cortico-mesolimbic dopamine system through the opioid (e.g. buprenorphine and naltrexone

  14. Familiality of Tourette Syndrome, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Heritability Analysis in a Large Sib-Pair Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Carol A.; Grados, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a genetic component that is highly comorbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic relations between these disorders have not been clearly elucidated. This study examined the familial relations among TS,…

  15. Bipolar co-morbidity in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: clinical and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Masi, Gabriele; Perugi, Giulio; Millepiedi, Stefania; Toni, Cristina; Mucci, Maria; Pfanner, Chiara; Berloffa, Stefano; Pari, Cinzia; Akiskal, Hagop S

    2007-08-01

    This paper reports on implications of bipolar disorder (BD) co-morbidity in 120 children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (84 males, 36 females, age 13.7 +/- 2.8 years), diagnosed using a clinical interview according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) criteria, and naturalistically followed-up for 12 +/- 6 months. The aim of this naturalistic, retrospective study was to explore the effect of BD co-morbidity, disentangling it from other co-occurring variables, namely the co-morbidity with disruptive behavior disorders. Forty three patients (35.8%) had a bipolar co-morbidity. Compared with OCD patients without BD, they had an earlier onset of OCD, a greater severity and functional impairment, more frequent hoarding obsessions and compulsions, and a poorer response to treatments. They had a higher co-morbidity with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD), and a lower co-morbidity with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Finally, they received more mood stabilizers, and 30.2% of them did not receive serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) because of pharmacological (hypo)mania. When all the OCD responders and nonresponders were compared, nonresponders (n = 42, 35%) were more severe at baseline and at end of the follow-up, had more frequently hoarding obsessions and compulsions, and had more frequent BD, ODD, and conduct disorder (CD) and less GAD and panic disorder. In the final regression model, hoarding obsessions and compulsions, co-morbidity with ODD, and CD were negative predictors of treatment outcome. This study suggests that even though bipolar co-morbidity is frequent and affects phenomenology and co-morbidity in pediatric OCD, its effect on treatment response seems prevalently accounted for by co-morbidity with disruptive behavior disorders. The significance of the hoarding subtype deserves further research on larger samples of

  16. Recruitment of a hidden population: African Americans with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Williams, Monnica T; Proetto, Dante; Casiano, Delane; Franklin, Martin E

    2012-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide, however for reasons that are poorly understood ethnic minority groups are not well represented in clinical research studies. Thus, although African Americans experience equivalent rates of OCD according to epidemiological surveys, the generalizability of findings from clinical trials remains unknown. Research designed to improve identification, assessment and treatment of OCD is an important public health priority. The purpose of this study is to report outreach methods used to recruit African American adults for participation in an OCD research study. A variety of methods were employed, including radio advertisements, public transportation advertising, community outreach, and online advertising. A total of 83 African American adult participants were recruited over a 9.5 month period at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and given comprehensive psychiatric assessments. African Americans with OCD symptoms were reliably identified and assessed, for a total of 75 with lifetime OCD (4 past and 71 current diagnoses). There was variability in the success and cost effectiveness of study recruitment methods. Radio ads were the most expensive means of recruitment, newspaper ads accounted for the largest number of eligible participants, and no cost methods such as Craig's List and word of mouth were also effective. The authors conclude that, with focused efforts, there are many effective methods for recruiting African Americans with OCD. Guidelines for recruitment are discussed, with a focus on cultural considerations. PMID:21983626

  17. Extinction retention and fear renewal in a lifetime obsessive-compulsive disorder sample.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, N C R; Strong, D; Abrantes, A; Garnaat, S; Cerny, A; O'Connell, C; Fadok, R; Spofford, C; Rasmussen, S A; Milad, M R; Greenberg, B D

    2015-03-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), like other illnesses with prominent anxiety, may involve abnormal fear regulation and consolidation of safety memories. Impaired fear extinction memory (extinction recall, ER) has been shown in individuals with current symptoms of OCD [1]. However, contrary to expectations, the only previous study investigating this phenomenon showed a positive correlation between extinction recall abilities and OCD symptomology (i.e., as OCD symptoms worsened, extinction memory improved). The purpose of the current study was to determine if patients with a lifetime diagnosis of OCD (not necessarily currently symptomatic) also demonstrate impairments in extinction memory, and the relationship between OCD symptomology and extinction memory in this type of sample. In addition, we also examined fear renewal, which has never been investigated in an OCD sample. We enrolled 37 patients with OCD, the majority of whom were on serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and 18 healthy control participants in a 2-day paradigm assessing fear conditioning and extinction (Day 1) and extinction retention and renewal (Day 2). Skin conductance responses (SCRs) were the dependent measure. Results, as in the prior study, indicated that the only between-group difference was impaired ER in OCD patients relative to controls. Contrary to our prediction, OCD symptom severity was not correlated with the magnitude of extinction recall. There were no differences in fear renewal between OCD patients and controls.

  18. Extinction retention and fear renewal in a lifetime obsessive-compulsive disorder sample.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, N C R; Strong, D; Abrantes, A; Garnaat, S; Cerny, A; O'Connell, C; Fadok, R; Spofford, C; Rasmussen, S A; Milad, M R; Greenberg, B D

    2015-03-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), like other illnesses with prominent anxiety, may involve abnormal fear regulation and consolidation of safety memories. Impaired fear extinction memory (extinction recall, ER) has been shown in individuals with current symptoms of OCD [1]. However, contrary to expectations, the only previous study investigating this phenomenon showed a positive correlation between extinction recall abilities and OCD symptomology (i.e., as OCD symptoms worsened, extinction memory improved). The purpose of the current study was to determine if patients with a lifetime diagnosis of OCD (not necessarily currently symptomatic) also demonstrate impairments in extinction memory, and the relationship between OCD symptomology and extinction memory in this type of sample. In addition, we also examined fear renewal, which has never been investigated in an OCD sample. We enrolled 37 patients with OCD, the majority of whom were on serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and 18 healthy control participants in a 2-day paradigm assessing fear conditioning and extinction (Day 1) and extinction retention and renewal (Day 2). Skin conductance responses (SCRs) were the dependent measure. Results, as in the prior study, indicated that the only between-group difference was impaired ER in OCD patients relative to controls. Contrary to our prediction, OCD symptom severity was not correlated with the magnitude of extinction recall. There were no differences in fear renewal between OCD patients and controls. PMID:25446749

  19. BDNF Val66Met modifies the risk of childhood trauma on obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hemmings, Sian Megan Joanna; Lochner, Christine; van der Merwe, Lize; Cath, Danielle C; Seedat, Soraya; Stein, Dan J

    2013-12-01

    Childhood trauma has been linked to the development of later psychopathology, including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Although evidence exists to suggest that genetic and environmental factors are involved in the aetiology of OCD, little attention has been paid to the interactions that exist between genes and environment. The aim of this study was to investigate gene-by-environment interactions between childhood trauma and the BDNF Val66Met variant in patients with OCD. Childhood trauma was assessed in 134 OCD patients and 188 controls using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Linear regression models were used for statistical analyses. Gene-environment interactions were estimated by including a combined genotype and CTQ score in the models as interaction terms. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, CTQ minimisation-denial score and home language by including them in the logistic regression models as covariates. Childhood trauma, specifically emotional abuse and neglect, increased the odds of having OCD significantly (p < 0.001). Although no significant association was observed between BDNF Val66Met and the development of OCD, interaction analysis indicated that the BDNF Met-allele interacted with childhood emotional abuse to increase the risk of OCD significantly in a dose-dependent manner (p = 0.024). To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to investigate gene-environment interactions in OCD, and the findings indicate the importance of collating genetic and environmental variables in future studies.

  20. Magnetoencephalography reveals altered auditory information processing in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Korostenskaja, Milena; Harris, Elana; Giovanetti, Cathy; Horn, Paul; Wang, Yingying; Rose, Douglas; Fujiwara, Hisako; Xiang, Jing

    2013-05-30

    Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often report sensory intolerances which may lead to significant functional impairment. This study used auditory evoked fields (AEFs) to address the question of whether neural correlates of sensory auditory information processing differ in youth with OCD compared with healthy comparison subjects (HCS). AEFs, recorded with a whole head 275-channel magnetoencephalography system, were elicited in response to binaural auditory stimuli from 10 pediatric subjects with OCD (ages 8-13, mean 11 years, 6 males) and 10 age- and gender-matched HCS. Three major neuromagnetic responses were studied: M70 (60-80 ms), M100 (90-120 ms), and M150 (130-190 ms). When compared with HCS, subjects with OCD demonstrated delayed latency of the M100 response. In subjects with OCD the amplitude of the M100 and M150 responses was significantly greater in the right hemisphere compared with the left hemisphere. Current results suggest that when compared with HCS, subjects with OCD have altered auditory information processing, evident from the delayed latency of the M100 response, which is thought to be associated with the encoding of physical stimulus characteristics. Interhemispheric asymmetry with increased M100 and M150 amplitudes over the right hemisphere compared with the left hemisphere was found in young OCD subjects. These results should be interpreted with caution due to the high variability rate of responses in both HCS and OCD subjects, as well as the possible effect of medication in OCD subjects.

  1. Multimodal assessment of disgust in contamination-related obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Lohr, Jeffrey M; Sawchuk, Craig N; Tolin, David F

    2007-02-01

    The present study utilizes multiple methods to examine the relationship between disgust and contamination-related obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms in an analogue sample. Questionnaire findings revealed that participants with high OCD contamination concerns showed stronger disgust sensitivity than did participants with low OCD contamination symptoms after controlling for negative affect. High OCD participants (N=30) also reported significantly more disgust than did low OCD participants (N=30) when exposed to a disgust-inducing video, whereas no significant between-group differences were detected on other negative emotional dimensions. Results from a series of disgust-specific behavioral avoidance tasks (BATs) revealed that high OCD participants demonstrated both less compliance and less approach behavior. Subsequent analysis also revealed that disgust sensitivity generally mediated avoidance on the BATs among high OCD subjects. High OCD participants also rated the BATs as more fearful and disgusting than did low OCD participants, with disgust generally emerging as the dominant emotional response. The results are consistent with a disgust-based, disease-avoidance approach in understanding contamination-related OCD themes. PMID:16697976

  2. Cognitive deficits of executive functions and decision-making in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Winand H; Johansen, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The nature of cognitive deficits in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by contradictory findings in terms of specific neuropsychological deficits. Selective impairments have been suggested to involve visuospatial memory, set shifting, decision-making and response inhibition. The aim of this study was to investigate cognitive deficits in decision-making and executive functioning in OCD. It was hypothesized that the OCD patients would be less accurate in their responses compared to the healthy controls in rational decision-making on a version of the Cambridge gambling task (CGT) and on the color-word interference test and on a version of the Tower of Hanoi test (tower test) of executive functioning. Thirteen participants with OCD were compared to a group of healthy controls (n = 13) matched for age, gender, education and verbal IQ. Results revealed significant differences between the OCD group and the healthy control group on quality of decision-making on the CGT and for achievement score on the tower test. On these two tasks the OCD group performed worse than the healthy control group. The symptom-dimension analysis revealed performance differences where safety checking patients were impaired on the tower test compared to contamination patients. Results are discussed in the framework of cognition and emotion processing and findings implicate that OCD models should address, specifically, the interaction between cognition and emotion. Here the emotional disruption hypothesis is forwarded to account for the dysfunctional behaviors in OCD. Further implications regarding methodological and inhibitory factors affecting cognitive information processing are highlighted.

  3. Integrative Medicine Approach to Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Anxiety: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Couture, Danielle Chung; Chung, Myung Kyu; Shinnick, Phillip; Curzon, Jonathan; McClure, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is prevalent in 1% to 2% of the population. Emerging studies have correlated non-celiac gluten sensitivity with psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, depression, mania, and anxiety. This case study is the first reported case of OCD associated with non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The objectives of this case report are to (1) identify gluten sensitivity as a possible contributing factor to OCD in some patients; and (2) point out the possible benefit of an integrative medicine approach to the management of OCD in a patient with suboptimal benefit from a standard treatment regime. A 7-year-old male treated at a multi-physician integrative medicine practice in the United States had marked reduction of OCD symptoms and anxiety along with marked improvement of social behavior and school work after treatment consisting of gluten avoidance and other integrative medicine modalities. The patient's rapid response without side effects behooves the medical research community to further investigate the association of non-celiac gluten sensitivity and pediatric OCD. PMID:26937323

  4. Doubt in the Insula: Risk Processing in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Luigjes, Judy; Figee, Martijn; Tobler, Philippe N; van den Brink, Wim; de Kwaasteniet, Bart; van Wingen, Guido; Denys, Damiaan

    2016-01-01

    Extensive cleaning or checking of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are often interpreted as strategies to avoid harm and as an expression of the widespread belief that OCD patients are more risk-averse. However, despite its clinical significance, the neural basis of risk attitude in OCD is unknown. Here, we investigated neural activity during risk processing using functional magnetic resonance imaging and simultaneously assessed risk attitude using a separate behavioral paradigm in OCD patients with different symptoms versus healthy controls (HCs). We found opposite insula responses to high versus low risk in OCD patients compared to HCs: a positive correlation between insula activity and risk-aversion in patients versus a negative correlation in controls. Although OCD patients overall were not more risk-averse than controls, there were differences between subgroups of OCD patients: patients with doubt/checking symptoms were more risk-averse than other patients. Taken together, OCD patients show a reversed pattern of risk processing by the insula compared to HCs. Moreover, the data suggest that increased activation of the insula signals an abnormal urge to avoid risks in the subpopulation of OCD patients with doubt and checking symptoms. These results indicate a role for the insula in excessive risk-avoidance relevant to OCD. PMID:27378883

  5. Deep brain stimulation and ablation for obsessive compulsive disorder: evolution of contemporary indications, targets and techniques.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Travis S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Stanford, Arielle D; Foote, Kelly D; Okun, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    Surgical therapy for treatment-resistant obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) remains an effective option for well-selected patients managed within a multidisciplinary setting. Historically, lesions within the limbic system have been used to control both obsessive thoughts and repetitive compulsions associated with this disease. We discuss classical targets as well as contemporary neuromodulatory approaches that have been shown to provide symptomatic relief. Recently, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the anterior limb of the internal capsule/ventral striatum received Conformité Européene (CE) mark and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approvals for treatment of intractable OCD. Remarkably, this is the first such approval for neurosurgical intervention in a strictly psychiatric indication in modern times. This target is discussed in detail along with alternative targets currently being proposed. We close with a discussion of gamma knife capsulotomy, a modality with deep historical roots. Further directions in the surgical treatment of OCD will require better preoperative predictors of postoperative responses, optimal selection of individualized targets, and rigorous reporting of adverse events and standardized outcomes. To meet these challenges, centers must be equipped with a multidisciplinary team and patient-centered approach to ensure adequate screening and follow up of patients with this difficult-to-treat condition. PMID:24099662

  6. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD): Practical strategies for pharmacological and somatic treatment in adults.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Naomi A; Reghunandanan, Samar; Simpson, Helen B; Phillips, Katharine A; Richter, Margaret A; Matthews, Keith; Stein, Dan J; Sareen, Jitender; Brown, Angus; Sookman, Debbie

    2015-05-30

    This narrative review gathers together a range of international experts to critically appraise the existing trial-based evidence relating to the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacotherapy for obsessive compulsive disorder in adults. We discuss the diagnostic evaluation and clinical characteristics followed by treatment options suitable for the clinician working from primary through to specialist psychiatric care. Robust data supports the effectiveness of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and clomipramine in the short-term and the longer-term treatment and for relapse prevention. Owing to better tolerability, SSRIs are acknowledged as the first-line pharmacological treatment of choice. For those patients for whom first line treatments have been ineffective, evidence supports the use of adjunctive antipsychotic medication, and some evidence supports the use of high-dose SSRIs. Novel compounds are also the subject of active investigation. Neurosurgical treatments, including ablative lesion neurosurgery and deep brain stimulation, are reserved for severely symptomatic individuals who have not experienced sustained response to both pharmacological and cognitive behavior therapies.

  7. Efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    McKay, Dean; Sookman, Debbie; Neziroglu, Fugen; Wilhelm, Sabine; Stein, Dan J; Kyrios, Michael; Matthews, Keith; Veale, David

    2015-05-30

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), which encompasses exposure with response prevention (ERP) and cognitive therapy (CT), has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, the samples studied (reflecting the heterogeneity of OCD), the interventions examined (reflecting the heterogeneity of CBT), and the definitions of treatment response vary considerably across studies. This review examined the meta-analyses conducted on ERP and cognitive therapy (CT) for OCD. Also examined was the available research on long-term outcome associated with ERP and CT. The available research indicates that ERP is the first line evidence based psychotherapeutic treatment for OCD and that concurrent administration of cognitive therapy that targets specific symptom-related difficulties characteristic of OCD may improve tolerance of distress, symptom-related dysfunctional beliefs, adherence to treatment, and reduce drop out. Recommendations are provided for treatment delivery for OCD in general practice and other service delivery settings. The literature suggests that ERP and CT may be delivered in a wide range of clinical settings. Although the data are not extensive, the available research suggests that treatment gains following ERP are durable. Suggestions for future research to refine therapeutic outcome are also considered.

  8. Neural correlates of emotional response inhibition in obsessive-compulsive disorder: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Heather A; Schulz, Kurt P; Zhang, Sam; Turetzky, Rachel; Rosenthal, David; Goodman, Wayne

    2015-11-30

    Failure to inhibit recurrent anxiety-provoking thoughts is a central symptom of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Neuroimaging studies suggest inhibitory control and disgust processing abnormalities in patients with OCD. However, the emotional modulation of response inhibition deficits in OCD and their neural correlates remain to be elucidated. For this preliminary study we administered an adapted affective response inhibition paradigm, an emotional go/no-go task, during fMRI to characterize the neural systems underlying disgust-related and fear-related inhibition in nine adults with contamination-type OCD compared to ten matched healthy controls. Participants with OCD had significantly greater anterior insula cortex activation when inhibiting responses to both disgusting (bilateral), and fearful (right-sided) images, compared to healthy controls. They also had increased activation in several frontal, temporal, and parietal regions, but there was no evidence of amygdala activation in OCD or healthy participants and no significant between-group differences in performance on the emotion go/no-go task. The anterior insula appears to play a central role in the emotional modulation of response inhibition in contamination-type OCD to both fearful and disgusting images. The insula may serve as a potential treatment target for contamination-type OCD.

  9. Clinical Feedback About Empirically Supported Treatments for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Nicholas C; Newman, Michelle G; Goldfried, Marvin R

    2016-01-01

    Previous evidence for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been derived principally from randomized controlled trials. As such, evidence about the treatment of OCD has unilaterally flowed from researchers to clinicians. Despite often having decades of experience treating OCD, clinicians' feedback on their clinical observations in using these treatments has not been solicited. The current study contacted clinicians for their clinical observations on empirically supported treatments for OCD to identify commonly used cognitive-behavioral techniques and their limitations in their practices. One hundred eighty-one psychotherapists completed an online survey. The average participant practiced psychotherapy for 15 years, worked in private practice, held a doctorate, and treated an average of 25 clients with OCD in their lifetime. In regard to the most common techniques, behavioral strategies involving exposure to a feared outcome and prevention of a compulsive ritual were the most frequent group of interventions, followed by techniques that attempted to identify and challenge irrational thoughts. However, the majority of participants also reported incorporating mindfulness or acceptance-based methods. Based on therapists' reports, the most common barriers to the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral interventions included limited premorbid functioning, chaotic lifestyles, controlling and critical families, OCD symptom severity, OCD symptom chronicity, and comorbidities. This study provides insight into common practices and limitations in clinical practice to inform future clinically relevant treatment research.

  10. Integrative Medicine Approach to Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Anxiety: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Couture, Danielle Chung; Chung, Myung Kyu; Shinnick, Phillip; Curzon, Jonathan; McClure, Mark J; LaRiccia, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is prevalent in 1% to 2% of the population. Emerging studies have correlated non-celiac gluten sensitivity with psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, depression, mania, and anxiety. This case study is the first reported case of OCD associated with non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The objectives of this case report are to (1) identify gluten sensitivity as a possible contributing factor to OCD in some patients; and (2) point out the possible benefit of an integrative medicine approach to the management of OCD in a patient with suboptimal benefit from a standard treatment regime. A 7-year-old male treated at a multi-physician integrative medicine practice in the United States had marked reduction of OCD symptoms and anxiety along with marked improvement of social behavior and school work after treatment consisting of gluten avoidance and other integrative medicine modalities. The patient's rapid response without side effects behooves the medical research community to further investigate the association of non-celiac gluten sensitivity and pediatric OCD.

  11. Impairment of source memory in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder: equivalent current dipole analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Youn; Roh, Ah Young; Yoo, So Young; Kang, Do-Hyung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2009-01-30

    We examined memory performance and cortical source localization of old/new effects in a source memory task in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients by employing an equivalent current dipole (ECD) model using EEG and a realistic head model. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while 14 OCD patients and 14 age-, sex-, handedness-, and educational level-matched healthy control subjects performed recognition tasks for spoken words (items) or for the voice of the speaker of spoken words (sources). In the item memory task, both groups showed ERP old/new effects at 300-700 ms. In the source memory task, the controls showed ERP old/new effects at 400-700 ms, whereas the OCD patients did not. Compared with the controls, the OCD patients showed significantly lower source accuracy and prolonged reaction times to the old words with accurate voice judgments. There were no differences between the OCD and control groups with regard to the locations of the ERP generators elicited by source correct and correct rejection conditions. The OCD patients showed significantly altered hemispheric asymmetry of ECD power in the frontal lobe during source memory retrieval, compared with the controls. These results indicate that OCD patients have preserved item memory about content, but impaired source memory about context.

  12. Evidence Base Update for Psychosocial Treatments for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jennifer; Garcia, Abbe; Frank, Hannah; Benito, Kristen; Conelea, Christine; Walther, Michael; Edmunds, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Objective Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a chronic and impairing condition that often persists into adulthood. Barrett and colleagues (2008), in this journal, provided a detailed review of evidence based psychosocial treatments for youth with OCD. The current review provides an evidence base update of the pediatric OCD psychosocial treatment literature with particular attention to advances in the field as well as to the methodological challenges inherent in evaluating such findings. Method Psychosocial treatment studies conducted since the last review are described and evaluated according to methodological rigor and evidence-based classification using the JCCAP evidence based treatment (EBT) evaluation criteria (Southam-Gerow and Prinstein, this issue). Results Findings from this review clearly converge in support of CBT as an effective and appropriate first line treatment for youth with OCD (either alone or in combination with medication). Although no treatment for pediatric OCD has yet to be designated as “well established”, both individual and individual family based treatments have been shown to be “probably efficacious.” Conclusions Moderators and predictors of treatment outcome are discussed as are the areas where we have advanced the field and the areas where we have room to grow. The methodological and clinical challenges inherent in a review of the evidence base are reviewed. Finally, future research directions are outlined. PMID:23746138

  13. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: The Process of Parental Adaptation and Implications for Genetic Counseling.

    PubMed

    Andrighetti, Heather; Semaka, Alicia; Stewart, S Evelyn; Shuman, Cheryl; Hayeems, Robin; Austin, Jehannine

    2016-10-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has primarily pediatric onset and well-documented unique impacts on family functioning. Limited research has assessed the understanding that parents of children with OCD have of the etiology of the condition, and there are no data regarding potential applications of genetic counseling for this population. We recruited 13 parents of 13 children diagnosed with OCD from the OCD Registry at British Columbia Children's Hospital, and conducted qualitative semi-structured telephone interviews to explore participants' experiences with their child's OCD, causal attributions of OCD, and perceptions of two genetic counseling vignettes. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using elements of grounded theory qualitative methodology. Analysis revealed key components and contextual elements of the process through which parents adapt to their child's OCD. This adaptation process involved conceptualizing the meaning of OCD, navigating its impact on family dynamics, and developing effective illness management strategies. Adaptation took place against a backdrop of stigmatization and was shaped by participants' family history of mental illness and their child's specific manifestations of OCD. Parents perceived genetic counseling, as described in the vignettes, as being empowering, alleviating guilt and blame, and positively impacting treatment orientation. These data provide insight into the process of parental adaptation to pediatric OCD, and suggest that genetic counseling services for families affected by OCD may help facilitate adaptation to this illness.

  14. Magnetoencephalography reveals altered auditory information processing in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Korostenskaja, Milena; Harris, Elana; Giovanetti, Cathy; Horn, Paul; Wang, Yingying; Rose, Douglas; Fujiwara, Hisako; Xiang, Jing

    2013-05-30

    Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often report sensory intolerances which may lead to significant functional impairment. This study used auditory evoked fields (AEFs) to address the question of whether neural correlates of sensory auditory information processing differ in youth with OCD compared with healthy comparison subjects (HCS). AEFs, recorded with a whole head 275-channel magnetoencephalography system, were elicited in response to binaural auditory stimuli from 10 pediatric subjects with OCD (ages 8-13, mean 11 years, 6 males) and 10 age- and gender-matched HCS. Three major neuromagnetic responses were studied: M70 (60-80 ms), M100 (90-120 ms), and M150 (130-190 ms). When compared with HCS, subjects with OCD demonstrated delayed latency of the M100 response. In subjects with OCD the amplitude of the M100 and M150 responses was significantly greater in the right hemisphere compared with the left hemisphere. Current results suggest that when compared with HCS, subjects with OCD have altered auditory information processing, evident from the delayed latency of the M100 response, which is thought to be associated with the encoding of physical stimulus characteristics. Interhemispheric asymmetry with increased M100 and M150 amplitudes over the right hemisphere compared with the left hemisphere was found in young OCD subjects. These results should be interpreted with caution due to the high variability rate of responses in both HCS and OCD subjects, as well as the possible effect of medication in OCD subjects. PMID:23545237

  15. A structural equation analysis of family accommodation in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Caporino, Nicole E; Morgan, Jessica; Beckstead, Jason; Phares, Vicky; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    Family accommodation of symptoms is counter to the primary goals of cognitive-behavioral therapy for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and can pose an obstacle to positive treatment outcomes. Although increased attention has been given to family accommodation in pediatric OCD, relatively little is known about associated child and parent characteristics, and their mediating/moderating effects. This study examined a structural equation model of parent and child variables related to parent reports of family accommodation. Sixty-one children with OCD (ages 6-17 years, 39% female) and their parents were recruited from a university-based clinic. They were administered clinician- and parent-rated measures of child OCD symptom severity, OCD-specific impairment, internalizing problems, and externalizing problems as well as parent anxiety, depression, empathy, consideration of future consequences, and accommodation. Results generally supported the hypothesized model. Family accommodation mediated the relationship between OCD symptom severity and parent-rated functional impairment; child internalizing problems mediated the relationship between parent anxiety and family accommodation; and parent empathy and consideration of future consequences interacted to predict family accommodation. Child externalizing problems were significantly associated with family accommodation but neither of these two variables was associated with parent depression. Findings suggest that reductions in family accommodation might be maximized by routinely screening for comorbid psychopathology in children with OCD and their parents, and using prescriptive or modular approaches to intervention. Directions for future research are discussed. PMID:21842196

  16. Disgust and fear responding in contamination-based obsessive-compulsive disorder during pictorial exposure.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Joshua; Grisham, Jessica R; Weidemann, Gabrielle

    2013-03-01

    The emotion of disgust has been implicated in the development and maintenance of contamination-based obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In the present study nonclinical participants with high (n=26) and low (n=28) levels of OCD contamination symptoms were exposed to 2 categories of disgust stimuli (blood injury and body waste) across 4 blocks using standardized disgust images. Self-report disgust and fear were recorded, as well as cardiovascular heart rate. In both groups, an initial primary disgust reaction was observed. Self-report disgust and fear, but not heart rate deceleration, was greater in the high symptom group. The high symptom group showed reductions in heart rate deceleration, whereas the low symptom group did not. Significant differences in self-report changes across time were observed between the groups, with fear increasing to a greater extent for high contamination fearful individuals when viewing body waste images. The implications of these findings for theoretical models and clinical treatment of OCD with prominent contamination symptoms are discussed. PMID:23312424

  17. Cognitive Mediation of Symptom Change in Exposure and Response Prevention for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Su, Yi-Jen; Carpenter, Joseph K; Zandberg, Laurie J; Simpson, Helen Blair; Foa, Edna B

    2016-07-01

    This study examined cognitive mediators of symptom change during exposure and response prevention (EX/RP) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Based on cognitive models of OCD, obsessive beliefs were hypothesized as a mediator of symptom change. Participants were 70 patients with primary OCD receiving EX/RP either as part of a randomized controlled trial (n=38) or in open treatment following nonresponse to risperidone or placebo in the same trial (n=32). Blinded evaluations of OCD severity and self-report assessments of three domains of obsessive beliefs (i.e., responsibility/threat of harm, importance/control of thoughts, and perfectionism/intolerance of uncertainty) were administered during acute (Weeks 0, 4 and 8) and maintenance treatment (Weeks 12 and 24). Study hypotheses were examined using cross-lagged multilevel modeling. Contrary to predictions, the obsessive beliefs domains investigated did not mediate subsequent OCD symptom reduction. In addition, OCD symptoms did not significantly mediate subsequent change in obsessive beliefs. The present study did not find evidence of cognitive mediation during EX/RP for OCD, highlighting the need to investigate other plausible mediators of symptom improvement.

  18. Neural correlates of emotional response inhibition in obsessive-compulsive disorder: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Heather A; Schulz, Kurt P; Zhang, Sam; Turetzky, Rachel; Rosenthal, David; Goodman, Wayne

    2015-11-30

    Failure to inhibit recurrent anxiety-provoking thoughts is a central symptom of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Neuroimaging studies suggest inhibitory control and disgust processing abnormalities in patients with OCD. However, the emotional modulation of response inhibition deficits in OCD and their neural correlates remain to be elucidated. For this preliminary study we administered an adapted affective response inhibition paradigm, an emotional go/no-go task, during fMRI to characterize the neural systems underlying disgust-related and fear-related inhibition in nine adults with contamination-type OCD compared to ten matched healthy controls. Participants with OCD had significantly greater anterior insula cortex activation when inhibiting responses to both disgusting (bilateral), and fearful (right-sided) images, compared to healthy controls. They also had increased activation in several frontal, temporal, and parietal regions, but there was no evidence of amygdala activation in OCD or healthy participants and no significant between-group differences in performance on the emotion go/no-go task. The anterior insula appears to play a central role in the emotional modulation of response inhibition in contamination-type OCD to both fearful and disgusting images. The insula may serve as a potential treatment target for contamination-type OCD. PMID:26456416

  19. Orbito-frontal cortex and thalamus volumes in obsessive-compulsive disorder before and after pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Atmaca, Murad; Mermi, Osman; Yildirim, Hanefi; Gurok, M Gurkan

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we focused on the key brain regions, OFC and thalamus, to investigate the roles of antiobsessional agents on volume changes of these brain regions after 12 weeks of anti-obsessional treatment in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Fourteen patients with OCD and the same number of healthy controls were included in the study. At baseline, the volumes of the OFC and thalamus were compared by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between groups. The volumes of OFC and thalamus were evaluated before and after the anti-obsessional drug treatment solely in the patient group. Our study revealed that thalamus volumes were reduced statistically significantly throughout the treatment period. However, we found that OFC volumes did not change statistically significantly throughout the treatment period. In summary, our study found that anti-obsessional drug treatment had an effect on thalamus volumes throughout the treatment period for both sides but not on OFC volumes. However, future studies with larger sample are required. PMID:26311393

  20. Cerebellar volume deficits in medication-naïve obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Jose, Dania; Kalmady, Sunil V; Agarwal, Sri Mahavir; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Janardhan Reddy, Y C

    2016-08-30

    Even though conventional neurobiological models of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) commonly demonstrate abnormalities involving fronto-striatal circuits, there is emerging evidence regarding the role of posterior brain structures such as cerebellum. In this study, we examined the cerebellar regional volume in a large sample of medication-naïve OCD patients compared to matched healthy controls (HC). In 49 medication naïve right handed OCD patients and 39 age and sex matched HC, sub-region wise volume of cerebellum was extracted from the T1 weighted images using Spatially Unbiased Infra tentorial Template (SUIT) toolbox and compared using hypothesis driven, region of interest approach after clinical assessment with standard scales. After controlling for age, sex and ICV, the subjects with OCD had significantly smaller cerebellum compared to HC, especially in the posterior lobe sub-regions - lobule VI and left crus 1. This study gives preliminary evidence for region specific cerebellar volumetric deficits in the pathophysiological of OCD. Regional cerebellar volume deficits conform to the abnormal connectivity of cerebellum to specific cortical regions and it is indicative of involvement of regions outside the conventional fronto-striatal circuitry. This might be important in the context of cognitive deficits seen in OCD. PMID:27454206

  1. Transcranial cortical stimulation in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorders: efficacy studies.

    PubMed

    Saba, Ghassen; Moukheiber, Albert; Pelissolo, Antoine

    2015-05-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are non-invasive brain stimulation methods that became widely used as therapeutic tools during the past two decades especially in cases of depression and schizophrenia. Low frequency rTMS and cathodal effect of tDCS inhibits cortical functioning while high frequency and anodal effect of tDCS have the opposite effect. Prolonged and repetitive application of either methods leads to changes in excitability of the human cortex that outlast the period of stimulation. Both rTMS and tDCS induce functional changes in the brain-modulating neural activity at cortical level. This paper reviews rTMS and tDCS effects in clinical trials for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Low frequency rTMS, particularly targeting the supplementary motor area and the orbital frontal cortex, seems to be the most promising in terms of therapeutic efficacy while older studies targeting the prefrontal dorsal cortex were not as successful. tDCS clearly needs to be investigated in large scale and sufficiently powered randomized control studies. From a general point of view, these non-invasive techniques hold promise as novel therapeutic tools for OCD patients. PMID:25825002

  2. Abnormal striatal resting-state functional connectivity in adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Gail A; Mueller, Bryon A; Schreiner, Melinda Westlund; Campbell, Sarah M; Regan, Emily K; Nelson, Peter M; Houri, Alaa K; Lee, Susanne S; Zagoloff, Alexandra D; Lim, Kelvin O; Yacoub, Essa S; Cullen, Kathryn R

    2016-01-30

    Neuroimaging research has implicated abnormalities in cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical (CSTC) circuitry in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In this study, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) was used to investigate functional connectivity in the CSTC circuitry in adolescents with OCD. Imaging was obtained with the Human Connectome Project (HCP) scanner using newly developed pulse sequences which allow for higher spatial and temporal resolution. Fifteen adolescents with OCD and 13 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (ages 12-19) underwent R-fMRI on the 3T HCP scanner. Twenty-four minutes of resting-state scans (two consecutive 12-min scans) were acquired. We investigated functional connectivity of the striatum using a seed-based, whole brain approach with anatomically-defined seeds placed in the bilateral caudate, putamen, and nucleus accumbens. Adolescents with OCD compared with controls exhibited significantly lower functional connectivity between the left putamen and a single cluster of right-sided cortical areas including parts of the orbitofrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and operculum. Preliminary findings suggest that impaired striatal connectivity in adolescents with OCD in part falls within the predicted CSTC network, and also involves impaired connections between a key CSTC network region (i.e., putamen) and key regions in the salience network (i.e., insula/operculum). The relevance of impaired putamen-insula/operculum connectivity in OCD is discussed. PMID:26674413

  3. Neuroimaging of psychotherapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Anders Lillevik; van den Heuvel, Odile A; Hansen, Bjarne; Kvale, Gerd

    2015-09-30

    The symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) include intrusive thoughts, compulsive behavior, anxiety, and cognitive inflexibility, which are associated with dysfunction in dorsal and ventral corticostriato-thalamocortical (CSTC) circuits. Psychotherapy involving exposure and response prevention has been established as an effective treatment for the affective symptoms, but the impact on the underlying neural circuits is not clear. This systematic review used the Medline, Embase, and PsychINFO databases to investigate how successful therapy may affect neural substrates of OCD. Sixteen studies measuring neural changes after therapy were included in the review. The studies indicate that dysfunctions in neural function and structure are partly reversible and state-dependent for affective symptoms, which may also apply to cognitive symptoms. This is supported by post-treatment decreases of symptoms and activity in the ventral circuits during symptom provocation, as well as mainly increased activity in dorsal circuits during cognitive processing. These effects appear to be common to both psychotherapy and medication approaches. Although neural findings were not consistent across all studies, these findings indicate that people with OCD may experience functional, symptomatic, and neural recovery after successful treatment. PMID:26228566

  4. Sleep in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Román, Amparo; Perestelo-Pérez, Lilisbeth; Buela-Casal, Gualberto

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences in sleep between people with and without obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and, if so, whether such differences are associated with comorbid depressive symptoms or other conditioning factors. We conducted a search for articles published until March 2013 in PubMed, Web of Knowledge, PsycINFO, Scopus, Trip Database, Dissertation Abstracts, and OpenSIGLE. We retrieved 9658 records, which were assessed against the inclusion and quality criteria. Six studies were included in the review and four were included in the meta-analysis. They were all cross-sectional studies with medium methodological quality. All studies except one were polysomnographic. The total sample of the meta-analysis consisted of 111 patients with OCD and 141 controls. The synthesis of results showed differences in sleep between people with and without OCD. The presence of comorbid depression was a key issue in the amount and type of differences found. Nevertheless, in order to support these results, longitudinal studies should be conducted with larger sample sizes and different age ranges. PMID:26298778

  5. Spontaneous neuronal activity in insula predicts symptom severity of unmedicated obsessive compulsive disorder adults.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Fan, Q; Zhang, Z; Zhang, H; Tong, S; Li, Y

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested that the pathophysiology of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) might involve widely distributed large-scale brain systems. The dysfunction within salience network, which is comprised of dorsal anterior cingulated cortex (dACC) and bilateral insular areas, has been proposed to contribute to OCD onset. The mechanism underlying salience network abnormality remains unclear and it is worthwhile to investigate its clinical relevance using functional neuroimaging approaches. In this study, we performed the spontaneous brain activity measurement using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on unmedicated OCD patients (n=23). Specifically, the amplitude of low frequency (0.01-0.08 Hz) fluctuations (ALFF) was calculated for regions in salience network. The voxel-based Pearson's correlative analysis was conducted to explore the relationship beween ALFF measures and symptom severity for OCD patients. The results showed that the spontaneous neuronal activity in insula was significantly correlated to OCD clinical symptoms, especially compulsive behaviors. Our findings consolidated that the salience network played an important role in the pathogenesis of OCD and the intensity of intrinsic brain activity in insula provided a predictive biomarker for OCD symptom severity. PMID:26737523

  6. Inferior frontal gyrus white matter abnormalities in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Óscar F; Sousa, Sónia; Maia, Liliana; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Ganho, Ana; Fernandes-Gonçalves, Ana; Frank, Brandon; Pocinho, Fernando; Carracedo, Angel; Sampaio, Adriana

    2015-06-17

    The aim of the present study is to explore obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)-related abnormalities in white matter connectivity in OCD for a core region associated with inhibitory control [i.e. inferior frontal gyrus (IFG)]. Fifteen patients with OCD (11 men) and 15 healthy controls (nine men) underwent diffusion tensor imaging scanning to study four diffusivity indexes of white matter integrity [fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity (RD)]. The results showed that persons with OCD manifested significantly lower fractional anisotropy levels in the bilateral IFG as well as its parcellations in the pars opercularis, pars triangularis, and pars orbitalis. Significantly higher levels of MD, RD were evident for the OCD group in the IFG as a whole as well as in the bilateral subregions of the pars triangularis and pars opercularis (for MD and RD), the right side of the pars orbitalis (for RD), and the left side of the pars triangularis and right side pars opercularis (for axial diffusivity). Overall, the results suggest significant alterations in structural connectivity, probably associated with myelination and axonal abnormalities in the IFG of OCD patients. PMID:25945482

  7. Assessment and Management of Treatment-Refractory Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Michael H.; Storch, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the assessment and treatment of treatment-refractory pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). METHOD A PubMed search was conducted to identify controlled trials in pediatric OCD. Additionally, practice guidelines for the treatment of adults and children were further reviewed for references in treatment-refractory OCD across the lifespan. RESULTS Pharmacotherapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and cognitive-behavioral therapy are effective treatments for pediatric OCD. Evidence suggests that CBT is additionally effective even in pediatric patients with refractory OCD symptoms. Antipsychotic augmentation, raising SSRI dosage, and several glutamate-modulating agents have some evidence of efficacy in adults with treatment-refractory OCD but have not been studied in pediatric populations. CONCLUSION Several pharmacological treatment options exist for children with refractory OCD symptoms. However, little evidence-based data exist to guide treatment for our most challenging pediatric OCD patients. Further research is needed to evaluate the efficacy/side-effect profile of commonly used interventions in treatment-refractory pediatric OCD. PMID:25791142

  8. Ondansetron augmentation of serotonin reuptake inhibitors as a treatment strategy in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are the mainstay in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Patients who do not respond adequately to SRIs commonly receive augmentation therapy with another agent, usually an atypical antipsychotic drug. Atypical antipsychotics, however, may not be appropriate for or acceptable to all patients. Ondansetron is an experimental alternative for such patients. There have been at least 6 trials that have examined a short-term (8-12 weeks) role for ondansetron in patients with OCD. These include 1 placebo-controlled crossover trial (N = 11); 1 uncontrolled monotherapy trial (N = 8); 2 low-dose (0.5-1.0 mg/d), uncontrolled augmentation trials in patients who did not respond adequately to ongoing or earlier treatments (pooled N = 35); and 2 moderate- to high-dose (4-8 mg/d) randomized, placebo-controlled augmentation trials in patients with undocumented past treatment history (pooled N = 88). Ondansetron was modestly effective in the uncontrolled trials and strikingly effective in the controlled trials. Ondansetron was also very well tolerated in all of the studies. These enthusiastic observations must be tempered by the limitations of the reviewed data, such as small sample sizes, short study durations, lack of data on the effects of blinded ondansetron discontinuation, lack of long-term data, and study-specific limitations. At best, ondansetron (1-8 mg/d) may be considered an experimental SRI augmentation agent in OCD patients for whom augmentation with an atypical antipsychotic drug is problematic.

  9. Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Soon-Ho; Kwon, Jun Soo; Kim, Yang Yeol; Kim, Sung Nyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is regarded as one of the most effective intervention for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, many patients remain untreated or inadequately treated due to time or geographical constraints. The purpose of this study was to develop an internet-based CBT (ICBT) for OCD, and to examine its efficacy in the Korean clinical setting. Methods The ICBT program ('COT') was developed from the same OCD manual in the standard CBT intervention. Twenty-seven participants of the total 42 patients completed all training sessions of the ICBT and the remainder (n=15) were classified as non-completers. Self-report measures of OCD, depression, anxiety, and work/social functioning, in addition to a neurocognitive test battery, were administered by face-to-face before and after treatment. Results The participants showed significant improvements in OCD and depressive symptoms, and in work/social functioning after ICBT completion. The presence of combined medication had no significant impact on treatment effect. The non-completers displayed more severe depressive and anxiety symptoms, and ICBT responders were younger and performed better in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Conclusion ICBT was found to be as effective for patients with moderate OC symptoms and little treatment experience. Considering the high accessibility and convenience of ICBT, it could be a helpful first treatment step for OCD patients when face-to-face treatment is unavailable. In the future a randomized controlled study will be necessary for verification and generalization of these results. PMID:27482237

  10. Developmental alterations of frontal-striatal-thalamic connectivity in obsessive compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Kate Dimond; Welsh, Robert C.; Stern, Emily R.; Angstadt, Mike; Hanna, Gregory L.; Abelson, James L.; Taylor, Stephan F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterized by abnormalities of frontal-striatalthalamic circuitry that appear near illness onset and persist over its course. Distinct frontal-striatal-thalamic loops through cortical centers for cognitive control (anterior cingulate cortex) and emotion processing (ventral medial frontal cortex) follow unique maturational trajectories, and altered connectivity within distinct loops may be differentially associated with OCD at specific stages of development. Method Altered development of striatal and thalamic connectivity to medial frontal cortex was tested in 60 OCD patients compared to 61 healthy controls at child, adolescent and adult stages of development, using resting state functional connectivity MRI. Results OCD in the youngest patients was associated with reduced connectivity of dorsal striatum and medial dorsal thalamus to rostral and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, respectively. Increased connectivity of dorsal striatum to ventral medial frontal cortex was observed in patients at all developmental stages. In child patients, reduced connectivity between dorsal striatum and rostral anterior cingulate cortex correlated with OCD severity. Conclusions Frontal-striatal-thalamic loops involved in cognitive control are hypoconnected in young patients near illness onset, while loops implicated in emotion-processing are hyperconnected throughout the illness. PMID:21871375

  11. Multidimensional Measures of Impulsivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Cannot Wait and Stop

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sung Yun; Kang, Jee In; Namkoong, Kee; Kim, Se Joo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although the relationship between obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and impulsivity has long been debated, impulsivity has not been systematically examined in clinical samples of OCD. Meanwhile, recent findings suggest that impulsivity is multi-dimensional construct that can be examined through several constructs. Therefore, this study is aimed to evaluate multiple facets of impulsivity in OCD. Method The recruitment includes 80 OCD and 76 healthy control participants. Participants completed a test battery comprising three behavioral tasks of stop signal task (SST), delay discounting task (DDT) and balloon analog risk test (BART), and one self-report measure of the Barratt Impulsiveness scale (BIS-11). Results OCD subjects showed significantly lower stop signal reaction time of SST reflecting higher action impulsivity and higher delay discounting parameter of DDT suggesting increased choice impulsivity but significantly lower adjusted mean pump of BART implying lower risk taking propensity of BART than healthy control. Conclusion Increased Action and choice impulsivity, and decreased risk taking propensities were found in OCD. These findings seem to be consistent with clinical characteristics of OCD such as greater preference for or avoid risky situations (avoidance), inability to wait tension relief may provoke safety behaviors (compulsion) and inability to stop already started behaviors (repetition). PMID:25372136

  12. Low-resolution electromagnetic tomography and treatment response in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Mendlowicz, Mauro V; Ribeiro, Pedro; Piedade, Roberto A; Versiani, Marcio

    2006-02-01

    We investigated whether findings from pretreatment low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) predicted response to drug treatment in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The 3D intra-cerebral distribution of neuronal electrical activity from the scalp-recorded potential distribution of 17 drug-free patients with OCD was assessed with LORETA. They were treated with antidepressants in the maximum tolerated doses for at least 12 wk. Individuals were considered to be treatment responders if they displayed a reduction of at least 35% on the initial YBOCS scores and had a final CGI score of 1 or 2. The SPM-99 t test for independent samples was employed to compare, voxel-by-voxel, the brain electrical activities of responders (n = 10) and non-responders (n = 7). Responders exhibited significantly lower activities in beta band in the rostral anterior cingulate [Brodmann's area (BA) 24 and 32] (p = 0.002) and the medial frontal gyrus (BA 10) (p = 0.002), suggesting that a distinctive pattern of activity within the medial surface of the frontal lobe predicts therapeutic response in OCD.

  13. Patients With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Check Excessively in Response to Mild Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Toffolo, Marieke B J; van den Hout, Marcel A; Engelhard, Iris M; Hooge, Ignace T C; Cath, Daniëlle C

    2016-07-01

    Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) not only respond to obsessions with perseverative checking, but also engage in more general checking, irrespective of their obsessive concerns. This study investigated whether general checking is specific to OCD and exacerbated when only mild uncertainty is induced. Thirty-one patients with OCD, 26 anxiety- and 31 healthy controls performed a visual search task with eye-tracking and indicated in 50 search displays whether a target was "present" or "absent". Target-present trials were unambiguous, whereas target-absent trials induced mild uncertainty, because participants had to rely on not overlooking the target. Checking behavior was measured by assessing search time and the number of fixations, measured with an eye-tracker. Results showed that in both target-present and target-absent trials patients with OCD searched longer and made more fixations than healthy and anxiety controls. However, the difference in checking behavior between patients with OCD and the control groups was larger in target-absent trials (where mild uncertainty was induced). Anxiety and healthy controls did not differ in checking behavior. Thus, mild uncertainty appears to specifically promote checking in patients with OCD, which has implications for treatment. PMID:27423170

  14. Soft Neurological Signs and Cognitive Function in Obsessive-compulsive Disorder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhuri, Chetali Vijay; Parkar, Shubhangi R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Modern research on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) indicates that the primary cause of OCD, which was earlier explained only on basis of psychoanalytical theories, is biological. Our study attempts to investigate the neurobiological signs in form of soft neurological signs and cognitive function in OCD. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted at psychiatric facility of Seth G.S. Medical College and KEM Hospital. Materials and Method: 50 OCD patients and age- and education-matched controls were selected for the study. Established instruments were used to assess the neurological soft signs (NSS) and the cognitive deficits. Results: OCD patients had significant more NSS in tests for motor coordination, sensory integration, complex motor tasks, hard signs, and right/left and spatial orientation. Cognitive deficits in the domains of visuospatial ability, executive function, attention, and working memory were significantly more in OCD patients compared to controls. Conclusion: Our study highlights the role of biological factors in form of soft neurological signs and cognitive dysfunction in the development of the OCD. PMID:27570338

  15. Schedule-induced polydipsia: a rat model of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Platt, Brian; Beyer, Chad E; Schechter, Lee E; Rosenzweig-Lipson, Sharon

    2008-04-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is difficult to model in animals due to the involvement of both mental (obsessions) and physical (compulsions) symptoms. Due to limitations of using animals to evaluate obsessions, OCD models are limited to evaluation of the compulsive and repetitive behaviors of animals. Of these, models of adjunctive behaviors offer the most value in regard to predicting efficacy of anti-OCD drugs in the clinic. Adjunctive behaviors are those that are maintained indirectly by the variables that control another behavior, rather than directly by their own typical controlling variables. Schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) is an adjunctive model in which rats exhibit exaggerated drinking behavior (polydipsia) when presented with food pellets under a fixed-time schedule. The polydipsic response is an excessive manifestation of a normal behavior (drinking), providing face validity to the model. Furthermore, clinically effective drugs for the treatment of OCD decrease SIP. This protocol describes a rat SIP model of OCD and provides preclinical data for drugs that decrease polydipsia and are clinically effective in the treatment of OCD.

  16. Differences between early and late drop-outs from treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Aderka, Idan M; Anholt, Gideon E; van Balkom, Anton J L M; Smit, Johannes H; Hermesh, Haggai; Hofmann, Stefan G; van Oppen, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    To examine characteristics of drop-outs from treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), we studied 121 participants who underwent exposure or cognitive treatment, either alone or with fluvoxamine. OCD symptoms were assessed at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at every session. No differences in attrition were found between treatment conditions. Drop-outs from treatment (n=31) were divided into early (before session 6) and late (session 6 or after) drop-outs. We found that early drop-outs had more severe OCD symptoms at termination compared to completers, whereas late drop-outs did not differ from treatment completers. Higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with early drop-outs, and lower levels with completers. These findings suggest that individuals with high levels of pretreatment depression are at risk for early drop-out with elevated OCD symptoms. Conversly, late drop-outs may be treatment responders who drop out after experiencing substantial improvement. Implications for allocation of resources for attrition prevention are discussed.

  17. Dissociation of decisions in ambiguous and risky situations in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Starcke, Katrin; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Markowitsch, Hans Joachim; Brand, Matthias

    2010-01-30

    Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often show deficits in everyday decision-making, a phenomenon which is leading to a growing research interest in neuropsychological aspects of decision-making in OCD. Previous investigations of OCD patients demonstrated deficits in the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), a decision-making task with implicit rules. Results were interpreted as reflecting orbitofrontal cortex dysfunctions observed in OCD. The aim of the present study is to investigate OCD patients' performance on the Game of Dice Task (GDT), a decision-making task with explicit and stable rules. For this purpose, 23 patients with OCD and 22 healthy comparison subjects were examined with the GDT and the IGT as well as with tests of executive functioning. While patients performed worse than comparison subjects on the IGT, they were unimpaired on the GDT and executive functioning tasks. Results further emphasize dysfunctions of the orbitofrontal cortex, but indicate intact functioning of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in patients with OCD.

  18. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Gene Polymorphisms in Specific Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Patients' Subgroups.

    PubMed

    Melo-Felippe, Fernanda Brito; de Salles Andrade, Juliana Braga; Giori, Isabele Gomes; Vieira-Fonseca, Tamiris; Fontenelle, Leonardo Franklin; Kohlrausch, Fabiana Barzotti

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological data and animal models support the hypothesis that the dopaminergic (DA) system is implicated in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Therefore, this case-control study assessed whether genetics variations in catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT) could influence susceptibility to OCD and OCD features in a Brazilian sample. A sample of 199 patients with OCD and 200 healthy individuals was genotyped for -287A > G (rs2075507) and Val158Met (rs4680) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by TaqMan(®) or restriction mapping. We observed a statistically significant predominance of the Met low-activity allele in the male patient group as compared to the male healthy control group. The -287A > G polymorphism's genotypes and alleles were significantly overrepresented among male individuals with ordering and female subjects with washing symptoms. We also found female hoarders to exhibit a significant higher frequency of the low activity Met/Met genotype of Val158Met polymorphism compared to female patients who did not express this dimension. Our data suggest an influence of COMT polymorphisms on OCD and OCD patients' features, such as gender, and ordering, washing, and hoarding symptom dimensions. Further studies to confirm the clinical importance of COMT SNPs in OCD are warranted.

  19. Paternal overprotection in obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression with obsessive traits.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takafumi; Taga, Chiaki; Matsumoto, Yoshitake; Fukui, Kenji

    2005-10-01

    Previous studies have indicated that a parental rearing style showing a low level of care on the parental bonding instrument (PBI) is a risk factor for depression, and that there is a relationship between the overprotective rearing style on the PBI and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, there is no study on the parental rearing attitudes in depressive patients divided into two groups based on their obsessive traits. In this study, we evaluated the parental rearing attitudes and examined the differences among four groups: depressive patients with severe obsessive traits, depressive patients with mild obsessive traits, OCD patients, and healthy volunteers. We divided the depressive patients into severe and mild groups based on their obsessive traits on the Mausdley Obsessional-Compulsive Inventory (MOCI). We compared PBI scores among four groups of 50 subjects matched for age and sex: depressive patients with severe obsessive traits, depressive patients with mild obsessive traits, OCD patients, and healthy volunteers. The paternal protection scores in the depressive patients with severely obsessive traits and the OCD patients were significantly higher than those in the depressive patients with mildly obsessive traits and healthy volunteers. This study indicated that the depressive patients with severe obsessive traits and the OCD patients have similar paternal controlling and interfering rearing attitudes. We conclude that the paternal controlling and interfering rearing attitudes are linked to the development of OCD and depression with obsessive traits, and are not linked to the development of depression itself. PMID:16194254

  20. The Cost of Illness Associated with Stepped Care for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Tolin, David F.

    2013-01-01

    Stepped care for obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) is a promising approach for improving the accessibility and cost-effectiveness of exposure and response prevention (ERP). Previous research has shown that stepped care is less costly compared with standard, therapist-directed ERP, owing largely to the roughly one-third of patients who respond to lower intensity guided self-help (GSH). The aim of this study was to recalculate the costs of treatment in stepped versus standard care when also including the cost of illness; defined as costs related to functional disability in work, school, and home functioning attributed to OCD symptoms. It was found that the cost savings of stepped care was reduced to a moderate effect (d = 0.66) when the cost of illness was included. Data also indicated substantial potential cost savings if patient-to-treatment matching variables are identified. Exploratory analyses suggested that problems with attention may be an important variable to investigate as a potential treatment moderator in future GSH treatment outcome research. These data highlight the importance of including the cost of illness in cost-effectiveness analyses, and of identifying predictors that will facilitate matched care and prevent unnecessary treatment delay for the roughly two-thirds of patients who will not respond to GSH for OCD. PMID:23525502

  1. Differential neural network of checking versus washing symptoms in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Keitaro; Nakao, Tomohiro; Sanematsu, Hirokuni; Okada, Kayo; Yoshiura, Takashi; Tomita, Mayumi; Masuda, Yusuke; Isomura, Kayoko; Nakagawa, Akiko; Kanba, Shigenobu

    2013-01-10

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is clinically heterogeneous. The aim of this study was to investigate differential neural responses to a symptom provocation task in drug-free patients who have predominantly aggression/checking symptoms (Checkers) and patients with contamination/washing symptoms (Washers). We compared the Checkers (n=10) and the Washers (n=12) separately to normal controls during the symptom provocation tasks using fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Moreover, we performed correlative analysis in each OCD group between brain activation and symptom severity. The Checkers showed hypoactivation in the left caudate and left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) compared to the normal controls and a positive correlation between activated brain areas and symptom severity in the left ACC. The Washers showed hyperactivation in several bilateral cortico-cerebellar regions and a positive correlation between symptom severity and the bilateral fronto-temporal gyrus. We suggest that the caudate and ACC are associated with checking rituals and that large cortical brain regions are related to washing rituals.

  2. The potential application of obsessions to reduce compulsions in individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Scarff, Jonathan R

    2010-02-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterized by obsessions that cause distress and compulsions that temporarily alleviate that distress. Despite numerous pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches available for treating obsessions and compulsions, their effectiveness is limited. Exploring the etiologies of obsessions reveals how obsessions develop to cause distress. It is hypothesized that the strength of obsessions can be used in a self-talk technique to reduce the frequency of compulsions. The patient would incorporate the self-talk technique while engaged in a compulsion meant to lessen the distress caused by an obsession. While performing the compulsive behavior, he or she then identifies a separate obsession, and applies a limit to stop the compulsive ritual while telling himself or herself that the second obsession will occur unless the limit is met. Although the technique has potential as a flexible tool that may be incorporated into other treatments to reduce compulsions, the therapist who chooses to use it should closely monitor its effectiveness and discontinue the technique in case of adverse effects.

  3. Brain structural alterations in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients with autogenous and reactive obsessions.

    PubMed

    Subirà, Marta; Alonso, Pino; Segalàs, Cinto; Real, Eva; López-Solà, Clara; Pujol, Jesús; Martínez-Zalacaín, Ignacio; Harrison, Ben J; Menchón, José M; Cardoner, Narcís; Soriano-Mas, Carles

    2013-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a clinically heterogeneous condition. Although structural brain alterations have been consistently reported in OCD, their interaction with particular clinical subtypes deserves further examination. Among other approaches, a two-group classification in patients with autogenous and reactive obsessions has been proposed. The purpose of the present study was to assess, by means of a voxel-based morphometry analysis, the putative brain structural correlates of this classification scheme in OCD patients. Ninety-five OCD patients and 95 healthy controls were recruited. Patients were divided into autogenous (n = 30) and reactive (n = 65) sub-groups. A structural magnetic resonance image was acquired for each participant and pre-processed with SPM8 software to obtain a volume-modulated gray matter map. Whole-brain and voxel-wise comparisons between the study groups were then performed. In comparison to the autogenous group, reactive patients showed larger gray matter volumes in the right Rolandic operculum. When compared to healthy controls, reactive patients showed larger volumes in the putamen (bilaterally), while autogenous patients showed a smaller left anterior temporal lobe. Also in comparison to healthy controls, the right middle temporal gyrus was smaller in both patient subgroups. Our results suggest that autogenous and reactive obsessions depend on partially dissimilar neural substrates. Our findings provide some neurobiological support for this classification scheme and contribute to unraveling the neurobiological basis of clinical heterogeneity in OCD.

  4. Multimodal voxel-based meta-analysis of white matter abnormalities in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Radua, Joaquim; Grau, Mar; van den Heuvel, Odile A; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Stein, Dan J; Canales-Rodríguez, Erick J; Catani, Marco; Mataix-Cols, David

    2014-06-01

    White matter (WM) abnormalities have long been suspected in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) but the available evidence has been inconsistent. We conducted the first multimodal meta-analysis of WM volume (WMV) and fractional anisotropy (FA) studies in OCD. All voxel-wise studies comparing WMV or FA between patients with OCD and healthy controls in the PubMed, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Web of Knowledge and Scopus databases were retrieved. Manual searches were also conducted and authors were contacted soliciting additional data. Thirty-four data sets were identified, of which 22 met inclusion criteria (five of them unpublished; comprising 537 adult and pediatric patients with OCD and 575 matched healthy controls). Whenever possible, raw statistical parametric maps were also obtained from the authors. Peak and raw WMV and FA data were combined using novel multimodal meta-analytic methods implemented in effect-size signed differential mapping. Patients with OCD showed widespread WM abnormalities, but findings were particularly robust in the anterior midline tracts (crossing between anterior parts of cingulum bundle and body of corpus callosum), which showed both increased WMV and decreased FA, possibly suggesting an increase of fiber crossing in these regions. This finding was also observed when the analysis was limited to adult participants, and especially pronounced in samples with a higher proportion of medicated patients. Therefore, patients with OCD may have widespread WM abnormalities, particularly evident in anterior midline tracts, although these changes might be, at least in part, attributable to the effects of therapeutic drugs.

  5. Doubt in the Insula: Risk Processing in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Luigjes, Judy; Figee, Martijn; Tobler, Philippe N.; van den Brink, Wim; de Kwaasteniet, Bart; van Wingen, Guido; Denys, Damiaan

    2016-01-01

    Extensive cleaning or checking of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are often interpreted as strategies to avoid harm and as an expression of the widespread belief that OCD patients are more risk-averse. However, despite its clinical significance, the neural basis of risk attitude in OCD is unknown. Here, we investigated neural activity during risk processing using functional magnetic resonance imaging and simultaneously assessed risk attitude using a separate behavioral paradigm in OCD patients with different symptoms versus healthy controls (HCs). We found opposite insula responses to high versus low risk in OCD patients compared to HCs: a positive correlation between insula activity and risk-aversion in patients versus a negative correlation in controls. Although OCD patients overall were not more risk-averse than controls, there were differences between subgroups of OCD patients: patients with doubt/checking symptoms were more risk-averse than other patients. Taken together, OCD patients show a reversed pattern of risk processing by the insula compared to HCs. Moreover, the data suggest that increased activation of the insula signals an abnormal urge to avoid risks in the subpopulation of OCD patients with doubt and checking symptoms. These results indicate a role for the insula in excessive risk-avoidance relevant to OCD. PMID:27378883

  6. Neurobehavioural treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder in an adult with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Arco, Lucius

    2008-01-01

    Although obsessive-compulsive disorder has been reported as one of many anxiety-related sequelae of brain injury, few empirical data of its responsiveness to psychological intervention are available. In this study, a single participant changing criterion experimental design was used to evaluate a neurobehavioural intervention for compulsive behaviour of an adult with severe traumatic brain injury. The participant, a man aged 24 years, had sustained frontal-temporal lobe brain trauma 12 months earlier, and presented with compulsive counting and voiding of bladder. The neurobehavioural intervention consisted of regular in-home consultations, self-regulation procedures including self-recording of compulsive behaviour, stress-coping strategies, errorless remediation, social reinforcement, and gradual fading of intervention. Baseline showed counting occurred on average 80% of daily hourly intervals, and voiding 12 times per day. Intervention produced elimination of compulsive counting, acceptable voiding at 8 times per day, and reports of the participant's satisfaction with intervention methods and outcomes. At 6 months follow-up, counting remained at zero levels, and voiding had decreased further to 7 times per day.

  7. A comparative study of obsessive beliefs in obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety disorder patients and a normal group.

    PubMed

    Shams, Giti; Milosevic, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive models of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) posit that specific kinds of dysfunctional beliefs underlie the development of this disorder. The aim of present study was to determine whether these beliefs are endorsed more strongly by OCD patients than by those with other anxiety disorders and by community samples. A battery of questionnaires, including the OBQ-44, MOCI, BDI-II, BAI, STAI, used to assess obsessive-compulsive symptoms, depression and anxiety in 39 OCD patients (OC), 46 anxious patients (AC) and 41 community controls (CC). Compared to CCs and ACs, OC patients more strongly endorsed beliefs related to importance and control of thoughts. Both OC and AC patients scored higher than CC participants did on belief domains about responsibility/threat estimation and perfectionism/certainty. Therefore, the domain that seems to be specific to OCD is a set of beliefs that revolves around the contention that it is possible and necessary to control one's thoughts. Results regarding group differences on particular items of the OBQ-44 indicated that 21 items discriminated between the OC and CC groups and 7 items discriminated between the OC and AC groups, suggesting that these items are more specific to the OC group. Additional research warranted because it is plausible that these cognitive factors relate differently to OCD phenomena across different cultures.

  8. Paediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Depressive Symptoms: Clinical Correlates and CBT Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brown, H M; Lester, K J; Jassi, A; Heyman, I; Krebs, G

    2015-07-01

    Depression frequently co-occurs with paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), yet the clinical correlates and impact of depression on CBT outcomes remain unclear. The prevalence and clinical correlates of depression were examined in a paediatric specialist OCD-clinic sample (N = 295; Mean = 15 [7 - 18] years, 42 % female), using both dimensional (Beck Depression Inventory-youth; n = 261) and diagnostic (Development and Wellbeing Assessment; n = 127) measures of depression. The impact of depressive symptoms and suspected disorders on post-treatment OCD severity was examined in a sub-sample who received CBT, with or without SSRI medication (N = 100). Fifty-one per-cent of patients reported moderately or extremely elevated depressive symptoms and 26 % (95 % CI: 18 - 34) met criteria for a suspected depressive disorder. Depressive symptoms and depressive disorders were associated with worse OCD symptom severity and global functioning prior to CBT. Individuals with depression were more likely to be female, have had a psychiatric inpatient admission and less likely to be attending school (ps < 0.01). OCD and depressive symptom severity significantly decreased after CBT. Depressive symptoms and depressive disorders predicted worse post-treatment OCD severity (βs = 0.19 and 0.26, ps < 0.05) but became non-significant when controlling for pre-treatment OCD severity (βs = 0.05 and 0.13, ns). Depression is common in paediatric OCD and is associated with more severe OCD and poorer functioning. However, depression severity decreases over the course of CBT for OCD and is not independently associated with worse outcomes, supporting the recommendation for treatment as usual in the presence of depressive symptoms.

  9. Partitioning the Heritability of Tourette Syndrome and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Reveals Differences in Genetic Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lea K.; Yu, Dongmei; Keenan, Clare L.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Konkashbaev, Anuar I.; Derks, Eske M.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Yang, Jian; Lee, S. Hong; Evans, Patrick; Barr, Cathy L.; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Berrio, Gabriel Bedoya; Bienvenu, Oscar J.; Bloch, Michael H.; Blom, Rianne M.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Budman, Cathy L.; Camarena, Beatriz; Campbell, Desmond; Cappi, Carolina; Cardona Silgado, Julio C.; Cath, Danielle C.; Cavallini, Maria C.; Chavira, Denise A.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Conti, David V.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette A.; Deforce, Dieter; Delorme, Richard; Dion, Yves; Edlund, Christopher K.; Egberts, Karin; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Gallagher, Patience J.; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Girard, Simon L.; Grabe, Hans J.; Grados, Marco A.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Haddad, Stephen; Heiman, Gary A.; Hemmings, Sian M. J.; Hounie, Ana G.; Illmann, Cornelia; Jankovic, Joseph; Jenike, Michael A.; Kennedy, James L.; King, Robert A.; Kremeyer, Barbara; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F.; Lennertz, Leonhard; Liu, Chunyu; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L.; Macciardi, Fabio; McCracken, James T.; McGrath, Lauren M.; Mesa Restrepo, Sandra C.; Moessner, Rainald; Morgan, Jubel; Muller, Heike; Murphy, Dennis L.; Naarden, Allan L.; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Ophoff, Roel A.; Osiecki, Lisa; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Pato, Michele T.; Pato, Carlos N.; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Rauch, Scott L.; Renner, Tobias J.; Reus, Victor I.; Richter, Margaret A.; Riddle, Mark A.; Robertson, Mary M.; Romero, Roxana; Rosàrio, Maria C.; Rosenberg, David; Rouleau, Guy A.; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Sampaio, Aline S.; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S.; Smit, Jan H.; Stein, Dan J.; Strengman, E.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Valencia Duarte, Ana V.; Vallada, Homero; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Wang, Ying; Wendland, Jens R.; Westenberg, Herman G. M.; Shugart, Yin Yao; Miguel, Euripedes C.; McMahon, William; Wagner, Michael; Nicolini, Humberto; Posthuma, Danielle; Hanna, Gregory L.; Heutink, Peter; Denys, Damiaan; Arnold, Paul D.; Oostra, Ben A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Freimer, Nelson B.; Pauls, David L.; Wray, Naomi R.

    2013-01-01

    The direct estimation of heritability from genome-wide common variant data as implemented in the program Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis (GCTA) has provided a means to quantify heritability attributable to all interrogated variants. We have quantified the variance in liability to disease explained by all SNPs for two phenotypically-related neurobehavioral disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette Syndrome (TS), using GCTA. Our analysis yielded a heritability point estimate of 0.58 (se = 0.09, p = 5.64e-12) for TS, and 0.37 (se = 0.07, p = 1.5e-07) for OCD. In addition, we conducted multiple genomic partitioning analyses to identify genomic elements that concentrate this heritability. We examined genomic architectures of TS and OCD by chromosome, MAF bin, and functional annotations. In addition, we assessed heritability for early onset and adult onset OCD. Among other notable results, we found that SNPs with a minor allele frequency of less than 5% accounted for 21% of the TS heritability and 0% of the OCD heritability. Additionally, we identified a significant contribution to TS and OCD heritability by variants significantly associated with gene expression in two regions of the brain (parietal cortex and cerebellum) for which we had available expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). Finally we analyzed the genetic correlation between TS and OCD, revealing a genetic correlation of 0.41 (se = 0.15, p = 0.002). These results are very close to previous heritability estimates for TS and OCD based on twin and family studies, suggesting that very little, if any, heritability is truly missing (i.e., unassayed) from TS and OCD GWAS studies of common variation. The results also indicate that there is some genetic overlap between these two phenotypically-related neuropsychiatric disorders, but suggest that the two disorders have distinct genetic architectures. PMID:24204291

  10. Similarities and Differences between Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Those with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Executive Functioning and Repetitive Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zandt, Fiona; Prior, Margot; Kyrios, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In order to examine hypothesized underlying neurocognitive processes in repetitive behaviour, children and adolescents (7-16 years) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) were compared on a range of executive function (EF) measures. Performance on neuropsychological tests assessing executive functioning showed…

  11. Classification of obsessive compulsive disorder by EEG complexity and hemispheric dependency measurements.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Serap; Arica, Nafiz; Ergul, Emrah; Tan, Oğuz

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, both single channel electroencephalography (EEG) complexity and two channel interhemispheric dependency measurements have newly been examined for classification of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and controls by using support vector machine classifiers. Three embedding entropy measurements (approximate entropy, sample entropy, permutation entropy (PermEn)) are used to estimate single channel EEG complexity for 19-channel eyes closed cortical measurements. Mean coherence and mutual information are examined to measure the level of interhemispheric dependency in frequency and statistical domain, respectively for eight distinct electrode pairs placed on the scalp with respect to the international 10-20 electrode placement system. All methods are applied to short EEG segments of 2 s. The classification performance is measured 20 times with different 2-fold cross-validation data for both single channel complexity features (19 features) and interhemispheric dependency features (eight features). The highest classification accuracy of 85 ±5.2% is provided by PermEn at prefrontal regions of the brain. Even if the classification success do not provided by other methods as high as PermEn, the clear differences between patients and controls at prefrontal regions can also be obtained by using other methods except coherence. In conclusion, OCD, defined as illness of orbitofronto-striatal structures [Beucke et al., JAMA Psychiatry70 (2013) 619-629; Cavedini et al., Psychiatry Res.78 (1998) 21-28; Menzies et al., Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev.32(3) (2008) 525-549], is caused by functional abnormalities in the pre-frontal regions. Particularly, patients are characterized by lower EEG complexity at both pre-frontal regions and right fronto-temporal locations. Our results are compatible with imaging studies that define OCD as a sub group of anxiety disorders exhibited a decreased complexity (such as anorexia nervosa [Toth et al., Int. J

  12. Candidate genes and functional noncoding variants identified in a canine model of obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a severe mental disease manifested in time-consuming repetition of behaviors, affects 1 to 3% of the human population. While highly heritable, complex genetics has hampered attempts to elucidate OCD etiology. Dogs suffer from naturally occurring compulsive disorders that closely model human OCD, manifested as an excessive repetition of normal canine behaviors that only partially responds to drug therapy. The limited diversity within dog breeds makes identifying underlying genetic factors easier. Results We use genome-wide association of 87 Doberman Pinscher cases and 63 controls to identify genomic loci associated with OCD and sequence these regions in 8 affected dogs from high-risk breeds and 8 breed-matched controls. We find 119 variants in evolutionarily conserved sites that are specific to dogs with OCD. These case-only variants are significantly more common in high OCD risk breeds compared to breeds with no known psychiatric problems. Four genes, all with synaptic function, have the most case-only variation: neuronal cadherin (CDH2), catenin alpha2 (CTNNA2), ataxin-1 (ATXN1), and plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase (PGCP). In the 2 Mb gene desert between the cadherin genes CDH2 and DSC3, we find two different variants found only in dogs with OCD that disrupt the same highly conserved regulatory element. These variants cause significant changes in gene expression in a human neuroblastoma cell line, likely due to disrupted transcription factor binding. Conclusions The limited genetic diversity of dog breeds facilitates identification of genes, functional variants and regulatory pathways underlying complex psychiatric disorders that are mechanistically similar in dogs and humans. PMID:24995881

  13. Classification of obsessive compulsive disorder by EEG complexity and hemispheric dependency measurements.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Serap; Arica, Nafiz; Ergul, Emrah; Tan, Oğuz

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, both single channel electroencephalography (EEG) complexity and two channel interhemispheric dependency measurements have newly been examined for classification of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and controls by using support vector machine classifiers. Three embedding entropy measurements (approximate entropy, sample entropy, permutation entropy (PermEn)) are used to estimate single channel EEG complexity for 19-channel eyes closed cortical measurements. Mean coherence and mutual information are examined to measure the level of interhemispheric dependency in frequency and statistical domain, respectively for eight distinct electrode pairs placed on the scalp with respect to the international 10-20 electrode placement system. All methods are applied to short EEG segments of 2 s. The classification performance is measured 20 times with different 2-fold cross-validation data for both single channel complexity features (19 features) and interhemispheric dependency features (eight features). The highest classification accuracy of 85 ±5.2% is provided by PermEn at prefrontal regions of the brain. Even if the classification success do not provided by other methods as high as PermEn, the clear differences between patients and controls at prefrontal regions can also be obtained by using other methods except coherence. In conclusion, OCD, defined as illness of orbitofronto-striatal structures [Beucke et al., JAMA Psychiatry70 (2013) 619-629; Cavedini et al., Psychiatry Res.78 (1998) 21-28; Menzies et al., Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev.32(3) (2008) 525-549], is caused by functional abnormalities in the pre-frontal regions. Particularly, patients are characterized by lower EEG complexity at both pre-frontal regions and right fronto-temporal locations. Our results are compatible with imaging studies that define OCD as a sub group of anxiety disorders exhibited a decreased complexity (such as anorexia nervosa [Toth et al., Int. J

  14. "WHAT'S BUGGING THE GUT IN OCD?" A REVIEW OF THE GUT MICROBIOME IN OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER.

    PubMed

    Turna, Jasmine; Grosman Kaplan, Keren; Anglin, Rebecca; Van Ameringen, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The gut microbiome has become a topic of major interest as of late, with a new focus specifically on psychiatric disorders. Recent studies have revealed that variations in the composition of the gut microbiota may influence anxiety and mood and vice versa. Keeping the concept of this bidirectional "microbiota-gut-brain" axis in mind, this review aims to shed light on how these findings may also be implicated in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); potentially outlining a novel etiological pathway of interest for future research in the field. PMID:26629974

  15. Translational approaches to obsessive-compulsive disorder: from animal models to clinical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fineberg, NA; Chamberlain, SR; Hollander, E; Boulougouris, V; Robbins, TW

    2011-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by obsessions (intrusive thoughts) and compulsions (repetitive ritualistic behaviours) leading to functional impairment. Accumulating evidence links these conditions with underlying dysregulation of fronto-striatal circuitry and monoamine systems. These abnormalities represent key targets for existing and novel treatment interventions. However, the brain bases of these conditions and treatment mechanisms are still not fully elucidated. Animal models simulating the behavioural and clinical manifestations of the disorder show great potential for augmenting our understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of OCD. This paper provides an overview of what is known about OCD from several perspectives. We begin by describing the clinical features of OCD and the criteria used to assess the validity of animal models of symptomatology; namely, face validity (phenomenological similarity between inducing conditions and specific symptoms of the human phenomenon), predictive validity (similarity in response to treatment) and construct validity (similarity in underlying physiological or psychological mechanisms). We then survey animal models of OC spectrum conditions within this framework, focusing on (i) ethological models; (ii) genetic and pharmacological models; and (iii) neurobehavioural models. We also discuss their advantages and shortcomings in relation to their capacity to identify potentially efficacious new compounds. It is of interest that there has been rather little evidence of ‘false alarms’ for therapeutic drug effects in OCD models which actually fail in the clinic. While it is more difficult to model obsessive cognition than compulsive behaviour in experimental animals, it is feasible to infer cognitive inflexibility in certain animal paradigms. Finally, key future neurobiological and treatment research areas are highlighted. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Translational

  16. Association study between BDNF gene variants and Mexican patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Lidia; Camarena, Beatriz; Hernández, Sandra; Lóyzaga, Cristina; Vargas, Luis; Nicolini, Humberto

    2013-11-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric disorder whose etiology is not yet known. We investigate the role of three variants of the BDNF gene (rs6265, rs1519480 and rs7124442) by single SNP and haplotype analysis in OCD Mexican patients using a case-control and family-based association design. BDNF gene variants were genotyped in 283 control subjects, 232 OCD patients and first degree relatives of 111 OCD subjects. Single SNP analysis in case-control study showed an association between rs6265 and OCD with a high frequency of Val/Val genotype and Val allele (p=0.0001 and p=0.0001, respectively). Also, genotype and allele analysis of rs1519480 showed significant differences (p=0.0001, p=0.0001; respectively) between OCD and control groups. Haplotype analysis showed a high frequency of A-T (rs6265-rs1519480) in OCD patients compared with the control group (OR=2.06 [1.18-3.59], p=0.0093) and a low frequency of haplotype A-C in the OCD patients (OR=0.04 [0.01-0.16], p=0.000002). The family-based association study showed no significant differences in the transmission of any variant. Our study replicated the association between BDNF Val66Met gene polymorphism and OCD. Also, we found a significant association of rs1519480 in OCD patients compared with a control group, region that has never been analyzed in OCD. In conclusion, our findings suggest that BDNF gene could be related to the development of OCD.

  17. Specialized psychological and pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder throughout the lifespan: a special series by the Accreditation Task Force (ATF) of The Canadian Institute for Obsessive Compulsive Disorders (CIOCD, www.ciocd.ca).

    PubMed

    Sookman, Debbie; Fineberg, Naomi A

    2015-05-30

    The World Health Organization ranks obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) among the leading causes of worldwide medical disability. Affecting approximately 3% of the population, OCD, with its damaging effect on psychosocial function, is among the most severe and impairing of mental disorders. In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5), OCD and related disorders form a separate classification, consistent with convergent research that indicates OCD is distinct from anxiety disorders in psychopathology and treatment requirements. Although evidence-based treatments have been developed for OCD, these are not accessible to many sufferers. Timely evidence-based treatment is recommended to avoid unnecessary progression to chronicity, disability, and intransigence of symptoms. Improvement in existing training models is needed to disseminate advanced specialty clinical skills to optimize illness recovery. This special series by The Canadian Institute for Obsessive Compulsive Disorders (CIOCD) Accreditation Task Force (ATF) critically reviews evidence-based psychological and pharmacological treatments for OCD throughout the lifespan. The ATF mandate is to establish specialty OCD certification/accreditation standards and competencies. This pioneering initiative aims to achieve transformational change in accessibility to evidence-based clinical care so urgently needed for young people and adults suffering from OCD.

  18. Effects of deep brain stimulation on prepulse inhibition in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, S; Gruendler, T O J; Huys, D; Sildatke, E; Dembek, T A; Hellmich, M; Vorderwulbecke, M; Timmermann, L; Ahmari, S E; Klosterkoetter, J; Jessen, F; Sturm, V; Visser-Vandewalle, V; Kuhn, J

    2015-01-01

    Owing to a high response rate, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral striatal area has been approved for treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (tr-OCD). Many basic issues regarding DBS for tr-OCD are still not understood, in particular, the mechanisms of action and the origin of side effects. We measured prepulse inhibition (PPI) in treatment-refractory OCD patients undergoing DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and matched controls. As PPI has been used in animal DBS studies, it is highly suitable for translational research. Eight patients receiving DBS, eight patients with pharmacological treatment and eight age-matched healthy controls participated in our study. PPI was measured twice in the DBS group: one session with the stimulator switched on and one session with the stimulator switched off. OCD patients in the pharmacologic group took part in a single session. Controls were tested twice, to ensure stability of data. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between controls and (1) patients with pharmacological treatment and (2) OCD DBS patients when the stimulation was switched off. Switching the stimulator on led to an increase in PPI at a stimulus-onset asynchrony of 200 ms. There was no significant difference in PPI between OCD patients being stimulated and the control group. This study shows that NAcc-DBS leads to an increase in PPI in tr-OCD patients towards a level seen in healthy controls. Assuming that PPI impairments partially reflect the neurobiological substrates of OCD, our results show that DBS of the NAcc may improve sensorimotor gating via correction of dysfunctional neural substrates. Bearing in mind that PPI is based on a complex and multilayered network, our data confirm that DBS most likely takes effect via network modulation. PMID:26556284

  19. Optimizing Treatment for Complex Cases of Childhood Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: A Preliminary Trial

    PubMed Central

    Peris, Tara S.; Piacentini, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective Family factors such as conflict, blame, and poor cohesion have been found to attenuate response to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for pediatric obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a brief, personalized intervention for cases of pediatric OCD complicated by these family features. Method Twenty youth with a primary DSM-IV diagnosis of OCD (mean age = 12.50 years; 55% male; 60% Caucasian) and their families participated. To be included in the study, families were required to evidence poor functioning on measures of blame, conflict, and/or cohesion. Eligible families were randomly assigned to either standard treatment (ST) with 12 weeks of individual child CBT that included weekly parent check ins and psychoeducation or to Positive Family Interaction Therapy (PFIT), which consisted of 12 weeks of individual child CBT plus an additional six sessions of family treatment aimed at shifting family dynamics. Clinical outcomes were determined by blind independent evaluators using the Clinician's Global Impressions-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. Results All families completed the study. High levels of satisfaction were reported among participants in both arms of the study, despite the added burden of attending the PFIT sessions. Both mothers and fathers attended 95% of the PFIT family sessions. Families in the ST condition demonstrated a 40% response rate on the CGI-I; families in the PFIT condition demonstrated a 70% response rate. Treatment gains were maintained in both conditions at 3-month follow-up. Conclusions Preliminary data suggest that PFIT is acceptable and feasible. Further testing and treatment development are needed to optimize outcomes for complicated cases of pediatric OCD. PMID:22548378

  20. Comparison of Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn. with fluoxetine in the treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sayyah, Mehdi; Boostani, Hatam; Pakseresht, Siroos; Malayeri, Alireza

    2010-03-17

    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a common neuropsychiatric condition. Although a variety of pharmaceutical agents is available for the treatment of OCD, psychiatrists often find that many patients cannot tolerate the side effects of these medications; do not respond properly to the treatment; or the medications lose their effectiveness after a period of treatment. Herbal medicine can be a solution to some of these problems. In fact many herbs with psychotropic effects exist which can have fewer side effects. They can provide an alternative treatment or be used to enhance the effectiveness of conventional anti-obsessive and compulsive symptoms. Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn. is a well-known medicinal plant with a long history of usage in Iran. This plant is reported to be safe on humans. Our objective in this study was to compare the efficacy of the extract of S.marianum (L.) with fluoxetine in the treatment of OCD. The study was an 8-week pilot double-blind randomized trial. Thirty five adult outpatients who met the DSM-IV-TR criteria for OCD based on the structured clinical interview participated in the trial. The minimum score of Yale-Brown Scale for OCD was 21 for all patients. In this double-blind and randomized trial, patients were randomly assigned to receive either capsule of the extract (600 mg/day) or fluoxetine (30 mg/day) for 8 weeks. The results showed no significant difference between the extract and fluoxetine in the treatment of OCD. There was also no significant difference between the two groups in terms of observed side effects.

  1. Altered Fronto-Striatal Fiber Topography and Connectivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nakamae, Takashi; Sakai, Yuki; Abe, Yoshinari; Nishida, Seiji; Fukui, Kenji; Yamada, Kei; Kubota, Manabu; Denys, Damiaan; Narumoto, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Fronto-striatal circuits are hypothesized to be involved in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Within this circuitry, ventral frontal regions project fibers to the ventral striatum (VS) and dorsal frontal regions to the dorsal striatum. Resting state fMRI research has shown higher functional connectivity between the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and the dorsal part of the VS in OCD patients compared to healthy controls (HC). Therefore, we hypothesized that in OCD the OFC predominantly project fibers to the more dorsal part of the VS, and that the structural connectivity between the OFC and VS is higher compared to HC. A total of 20 non-medicated OCD patients and 20 HC underwent diffusion-weighted imaging. Connectivity-based parcellation analyses were performed with the striatum as seed region and the OFC, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex as target regions. Obtained connectivity maps for each frontal region of interest (ROI) were normalized into standard space, and Z-component (dorsal–ventral) coordinate of center-of-gravity (COG) were compared between two groups. Probabilistic tractography was performed to investigate diffusion indices of fibers between the striatum and frontal ROIs. COG Z-component coordinates of connectivity maps for OFC ROI were located in the more dorsal part of the VS in OCD patients compared to HC. Fractional anisotropy of fibers between the OFC and the striatum was higher in OCD patients compared to HC. Part of the pathophysiology of OCD might be understood by altered topography and structural connectivity of fibers between the OFC and the striatum. PMID:25375933

  2. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Yue, Weihua; Cheng, Weiqiu; Liu, Zhaorui; Tang, Yi; Lu, Tianlan; Zhang, Dai; Tang, Muni; Huang, Yueqin

    2016-01-01

    Literatures have suggested that not only genetic but also environmental factors, interactively accounted for susceptibility of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). DNA methylation may regulate expression of genes as the heritable epigenetic modification. The examination for genome-wide DNA methylation was performed on blood samples from 65 patients with OCD, as well as 96 healthy control subjects. The DNA methylation was examined at over 485,000 CpG sites using the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChip. As a result, 8,417 probes corresponding to 2,190 unique genes were found to be differentially methylated between OCD and healthy control subjects. Of those genes, 4,013 loci were located in CpG islands and 2,478 were in promoter regions. These included BCYRN1, BCOR, FGF13, HLA-DRB1, ARX, etc., which have previously been reported to be associated with OCD. Pathway analyses indicated that regulation of actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), actin binding, transcription regulator activity, and other pathways might be further associated with risk of OCD. Unsupervised clustering analysis of the top 3,000 most variable probes revealed two distinct groups with significantly more people with OCD in cluster one compared with controls (67.74% of cases v.s. 27.13% of controls, Chi-square = 26.011, df = 1, P = 3.41E-07). These results strongly suggested that differential DNA methylation might play an important role in etiology of OCD. PMID:27527274

  3. Pharmacoepidemiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder: A Swedish nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Isomura, Kayoko; Nordsletten, Ashley E; Rück, Christian; Ljung, Rickard; Ivarsson, Tord; Larsson, Henrik; Mataix-Cols, David

    2016-04-01

    The extent to which clinicians adhere to international guidelines for the pharmacological management of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is unknown. We aimed to comprehensively map the patterns of prescription of psychotropic drugs for OCD patients (adults and children) at the Swedish national level and to compare these prescription patterns to best-practice recommendations in international guidelines. We linked the Swedish National Patient Register and the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, which includes a record for all medications prescribed and dispensed in Sweden since July 2005. Of all active OCD cases in the Swedish National Patient Register between July 1st, 2005, and December 31st 2008 (N=10,523), 85% received at least one psychotropic drug. Most of the medicated adults and children with OCD (88%) received serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs). Of all adults and children prescribed SRIs, 16% received sub-optimal doses. An additional 12% of all medicated patients were prescribed drugs that never included an SRI. Approximately 75% of the patients on SRIs received additional drugs (67% anxiolytics/hypnotics, 27% antipsychotics, 17% serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, 24% other antidepressants). Twelve percent of all medicated patients were at least 'regular' users, and 3% 'heavy' users of benzodiazepines. We also observed important variations in prescription practices according to patient's gender, age, and comorbidity status. We conclude that a substantial number of OCD patients might benefit from changes in their prescriptions. Dissemination of best-practice prescription guidelines for OCD is a major educational goal for the future. Monitoring of these prescription patterns over time is warranted.

  4. Genome-wide association study in obsessive-compulsive disorder: results from the OCGAS.

    PubMed

    Mattheisen, M; Samuels, J F; Wang, Y; Greenberg, B D; Fyer, A J; McCracken, J T; Geller, D A; Murphy, D L; Knowles, J A; Grados, M A; Riddle, M A; Rasmussen, S A; McLaughlin, N C; Nurmi, E L; Askland, K D; Qin, H-D; Cullen, B A; Piacentini, J; Pauls, D L; Bienvenu, O J; Stewart, S E; Liang, K-Y; Goes, F S; Maher, B; Pulver, A E; Shugart, Y Y; Valle, D; Lange, C; Nestadt, G

    2015-03-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive thoughts and urges and repetitive, intentional behaviors that cause significant distress and impair functioning. The OCD Collaborative Genetics Association Study (OCGAS) is comprised of comprehensively assessed OCD patients with an early age of OCD onset. After application of a stringent quality control protocol, a total of 1065 families (containing 1406 patients with OCD), combined with population-based samples (resulting in a total sample of 5061 individuals), were studied. An integrative analyses pipeline was utilized, involving association testing at single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and gene levels (via a hybrid approach that allowed for combined analyses of the family- and population-based data). The smallest P-value was observed for a marker on chromosome 9 (near PTPRD, P=4.13 × 10(-)(7)). Pre-synaptic PTPRD promotes the differentiation of glutamatergic synapses and interacts with SLITRK3. Together, both proteins selectively regulate the development of inhibitory GABAergic synapses. Although no SNPs were identified as associated with OCD at genome-wide significance level, follow-up analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals from a previously published OCD study identified significant enrichment (P=0.0176). Secondary analyses of high-confidence interaction partners of DLGAP1 and GRIK2 (both showing evidence for association in our follow-up and the original GWAS study) revealed a trend of association (P=0.075) for a set of genes such as NEUROD6, SV2A, GRIA4, SLC1A2 and PTPRD. Analyses at the gene level revealed association of IQCK and C16orf88 (both P<1 × 10(-)(6), experiment-wide significant), as well as OFCC1 (P=6.29 × 10(-)(5)). The suggestive findings in this study await replication in larger samples.

  5. Obsessions of child murder: underrecognized manifestations of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Booth, Bradley D; Friedman, Susan Hatters; Curry, Susan; Ward, Helen; Stewart, S Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common illness that remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. Distressing obsessions of violence are a frequent manifestation of OCD, related to overattribution of meaning to passing thoughts, a sense of overresponsibility, and concurrent confessing rituals to decrease related anxiety. These intrusive thoughts can include infanticidal or filicidal obsessions in new parents. There is little to no evidence to suggest that these thoughts pose a significant risk of harm, which is reflected in related professional treatment guidelines. In this study, we sought to examine the recognition and risk management preferences among psychiatry professionals and trainees regarding a case example description of filicide obsessions as a manifestation of OCD. A questionnaire regarding a case marked by filicide obsessions was emailed to psychiatrists and psychiatry residents. Respondents provided their preferred and differential diagnoses, reporting their perceptions of risk and optimal case management. Of the 43 respondents, only 62 percent considered OCD in the differential diagnosis. Those considering OCD in the differential diagnosis assessed risk of harm as being lower than did those who did not consider it (3.7 versus 6.6; F(1,36) = 12.18; p < .005). Despite this result, the majority of respondents included involuntary admission (60%) and reports to child welfare authorities (68%) among their preferred management strategies. This survey supports our contention that greater awareness of OCD and understanding of management strategies is needed among psychiatrists and trainees. As well, a greater awareness of the low risk of violence associated with this population is necessary to avoid penalizing individuals with OCD-related aggressive and infanticidal obsessions. PMID:24618521

  6. Decreased limbic and increased fronto-parietal connectivity in unmedicated patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Göttlich, Martin; Krämer, Ulrike M; Kordon, Andreas; Hohagen, Fritz; Zurowski, Bartosz

    2014-11-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by recurrent intrusive thoughts and ritualized, repetitive behaviors, or mental acts. Convergent experimental evidence from neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies supports an orbitofronto-striato-thalamo-cortical dysfunction in OCD. Moreover, an over excitability of the amygdala and over monitoring of thoughts and actions involving the anterior cingulate, frontal and parietal cortex has been proposed as aspects of pathophysiology in OCD. We chose a data driven, graph theoretical approach to investigate brain network organization in 17 unmedicated OCD patients and 19 controls using resting-state fMRI. OCD patients showed a decreased connectivity of the limbic network to several other brain networks: the basal ganglia network, the default mode network, and the executive/attention network. The connectivity within the limbic network was also found to be decreased in OCD patients compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, we found a stronger connectivity of brain regions within the executive/attention network in OCD patients. This effect was positively correlated with disease severity. The decreased connectivity of limbic regions (amygdala, hippocampus) may be related to several neurocognitive deficits observed in OCD patients involving implicit learning, emotion processing and expectation, and processing of reward and punishment. Limbic disconnection from fronto-parietal regions relevant for (re)-appraisal may explain why intrusive thoughts become and/or remain threatening to patients but not to healthy subjects. Hyperconnectivity within the executive/attention network might be related to OCD symptoms such as excessive monitoring of thoughts and behavior as a dysfunctional strategy to cope with threat and uncertainty. PMID:25044747

  7. Whole genome association analysis of treatment response in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Qin, H; Samuels, JF; Wang, Y; Zhu, Y; Grados, MA; Riddle, MA; Greenberg, BD; Knowles, JA; Fyer, AJ; McCracken, JT; Murphy, DL; Rasmussen, SA; Cullen, BA; Piacentini, J; Geller, D; Stewart, SE; Pauls, D; Bienvenu, OJ; Goes, FS; Maher, B; Pulver, AE; Valle, D; Lange, C; Mattheisen, M; McLaughlin, NC; Liang, K-Y; Nurmi, EL; Askland, KD; Nestadt, G; Shugart, YY

    2015-01-01

    Up to 30% of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) exhibit an inadequate response to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs). To date, genetic predictors of OCD treatment response have not been systematically investigated using genome-wide association study (GWAS). To identify specific genetic variations potentially influencing SRI response, we conducted a GWAS study in 804 OCD patients with information on SRI response. SRI response was classified as “response” (n = 514) or “non-response” (n = 290), based on self-report. We used the more powerful Quasi-Likelihood Score Test (the MQLS test) to conduct a genome-wide association test correcting for relatedness, and then used an adjusted logistic model to evaluate the effect size of the variants in probands. The top SNP was rs17162912 (P = 1.76×10−8) which is near the DISP1 gene on 1q41-q42, a microdeletion region implicated in neurological development. The other six SNPs showing suggestive evidence of association (P <10−5) were rs9303380, rs12437601, rs16988159, rs7676822, rs1911877, and rs723815. Among them, two SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium, rs7676822 and rs1911877, located near the PCDH10 gene, gave p-values of 2.86×10−6 and 8.41×10−6, respectively. The other 35 variations with signals of potential significance (P <10−4) involve multiple genes expressed in the brain, including GRIN2B, PCDH10, and GPC6. Our enrichment analysis indicated suggestive roles of genes in the glutamatergic neurotransmission system (FDR = 0.0097) and the serotonergic system (FDR = 0.0213). While the results presented may provide new insights into genetic mechanisms underlying treatment response in OCD, studies with larger sample sizes and detailed information on drug dosage and treatment duration are needed. PMID:25824302

  8. Altered source memory retrieval is associated with pathological doubt in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Olson, Christy A; Hale, Lisa R; Hamilton, Nancy; Powell, Joshua N; Martin, Laura E; Savage, Cary R

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often complain of doubt related to memory. As neuropsychological research has demonstrated that individuals with OCD tend to focus on details and miss the larger context, the construct of source (contextual) memory may be particularly relevant to memory complaints in OCD. Memory for object versus contextual information relies on partially distinct regions within the prefrontal cortex, parietal and medial temporal lobe, and may be differentially impacted by OCD. In the present study, we sought to test the hypothesis that individuals with OCD exhibit impaired source memory retrieval using a novel memory paradigm - The Memory for Rooms Test (MFRT) - a four-room memory task in which participants walk through four rooms and attempt to encode and remember objects. Demographically matched individuals with OCD and healthy controls studied objects in the context of four rooms, and then completed a memory retrieval test while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). While no differences were observed in source memory accuracy, individuals with OCD exhibited greater task related activation in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) relative to healthy controls during correct source memory retrieval. During correct object recognition, individuals with OCD failed to recruit the dorsolateral prefrontal(DLPFC)/premotor, left mPFC, and right parietal regions to the same extent as healthy controls. Our results suggest abnormal recruitment of frontal-parietal and PCC regions during source verses object memory retrieval in OCD. Within the OCD group, activation in the PCC and the premotor/DLPFC was associated with greater pathological doubt. This finding is consistent with the observation that OCD patients often experience extreme doubt, even when memory performance is intact. PMID:26315458

  9. Whole-genome association analysis of treatment response in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Qin, H; Samuels, J F; Wang, Y; Zhu, Y; Grados, M A; Riddle, M A; Greenberg, B D; Knowles, J A; Fyer, A J; McCracken, J T; Murphy, D L; Rasmussen, S A; Cullen, B A; Piacentini, J; Geller, D; Stewart, S E; Pauls, D; Bienvenu, O J; Goes, F S; Maher, B; Pulver, A E; Valle, D; Lange, C; Mattheisen, M; McLaughlin, N C; Liang, K-Y; Nurmi, E L; Askland, K D; Nestadt, G; Shugart, Y Y

    2016-02-01

    Up to 30% of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) exhibit an inadequate response to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs). To date, genetic predictors of OCD treatment response have not been systematically investigated using genome-wide association study (GWAS). To identify specific genetic variations potentially influencing SRI response, we conducted a GWAS study in 804 OCD patients with information on SRI response. SRI response was classified as 'response' (n=514) or 'non-response' (n=290), based on self-report. We used the more powerful Quasi-Likelihood Score Test (the MQLS test) to conduct a genome-wide association test correcting for relatedness, and then used an adjusted logistic model to evaluate the effect size of the variants in probands. The top single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was rs17162912 (P=1.76 × 10(-8)), which is near the DISP1 gene on 1q41-q42, a microdeletion region implicated in neurological development. The other six SNPs showing suggestive evidence of association (P<10(-5)) were rs9303380, rs12437601, rs16988159, rs7676822, rs1911877 and rs723815. Among them, two SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium, rs7676822 and rs1911877, located near the PCDH10 gene, gave P-values of 2.86 × 10(-6) and 8.41 × 10(-6), respectively. The other 35 variations with signals of potential significance (P<10(-4)) involve multiple genes expressed in the brain, including GRIN2B, PCDH10 and GPC6. Our enrichment analysis indicated suggestive roles of genes in the glutamatergic neurotransmission system (false discovery rate (FDR)=0.0097) and the serotonergic system (FDR=0.0213). Although the results presented may provide new insights into genetic mechanisms underlying treatment response in OCD, studies with larger sample sizes and detailed information on drug dosage and treatment duration are needed. PMID:25824302

  10. Modulation of hyperactive error signals in obsessive-compulsive disorder by dual-task demands.

    PubMed

    Klawohn, Julia; Endrass, Tanja; Preuss, Julia; Riesel, Anja; Kathmann, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    Brain correlates of performance-monitoring have been shown to be hyperactive in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), indexed by enhanced amplitudes of the error-related negativity (ERN) in the event-related potential (ERP). This hyperactivity was found to be temporally stable, independent of symptom remission, and could not be further increased by punishing committed errors. The current study examined whether the ERN in OCD is generally insensitive to modulatory influences or can be decreased by manipulation of task demands. Twenty-two OCD patients and 22 control participants performed a flanker task alone or with a concurrent n-back task to manipulate attentional resource allocation. Response-related ERP data were examined. OCD patients showed enhanced ERN-amplitudes in the standard flanker (ηp2 = .13). In both groups a significant decrease in ERN was found under dual-task conditions (ηp2 = .72) that was larger in the OCD group (ηp2 = .14), resulting in a nonsignificant ERN group difference in dual-task conditions. The current study replicated enhanced performance-monitoring in OCD as indexed by higher ERN-amplitudes. Importantly, it further showed a larger ERN-reduction with dual-task demands in patients compared to healthy participants. These results suggest that overactive performance-monitoring was normalized in patients with OCD by experimental conditions. Changing the attentional focus appears to be an effective strategy in modifying hyperactive error-signals in OCD and might be a target for innovative interventions. PMID:26692121

  11. Effects of deep brain stimulation on prepulse inhibition in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kohl, S; Gruendler, T O J; Huys, D; Sildatke, E; Dembek, T A; Hellmich, M; Vorderwulbecke, M; Timmermann, L; Ahmari, S E; Klosterkoetter, J; Jessen, F; Sturm, V; Visser-Vandewalle, V; Kuhn, J

    2015-01-01

    Owing to a high response rate, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral striatal area has been approved for treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (tr-OCD). Many basic issues regarding DBS for tr-OCD are still not understood, in particular, the mechanisms of action and the origin of side effects. We measured prepulse inhibition (PPI) in treatment-refractory OCD patients undergoing DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and matched controls. As PPI has been used in animal DBS studies, it is highly suitable for translational research. Eight patients receiving DBS, eight patients with pharmacological treatment and eight age-matched healthy controls participated in our study. PPI was measured twice in the DBS group: one session with the stimulator switched on and one session with the stimulator switched off. OCD patients in the pharmacologic group took part in a single session. Controls were tested twice, to ensure stability of data. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between controls and (1) patients with pharmacological treatment and (2) OCD DBS patients when the stimulation was switched off. Switching the stimulator on led to an increase in PPI at a stimulus-onset asynchrony of 200 ms. There was no significant difference in PPI between OCD patients being stimulated and the control group. This study shows that NAcc-DBS leads to an increase in PPI in tr-OCD patients towards a level seen in healthy controls. Assuming that PPI impairments partially reflect the neurobiological substrates of OCD, our results show that DBS of the NAcc may improve sensorimotor gating via correction of dysfunctional neural substrates. Bearing in mind that PPI is based on a complex and multilayered network, our data confirm that DBS most likely takes effect via network modulation. PMID:26556284

  12. Multivariate pattern analysis of obsessive-compulsive disorder using structural neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyu; Liu, Qi; Li, Bin; Tang, Wanjie; Sun, Huaiqiang; Li, Fei; Yang, Yanchun; Gong, Qiyong; Huang, Xiaoqi

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have revealed brain structural abnormalities in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients, involving both gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM). However, the results of previous publications were based on average differences between groups, which limited their usages in clinical practice. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether the application of multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) to high-dimensional structural images would allow accurate discrimination between OCD patients and healthy control subjects (HCS). High-resolution T1-weighted images were acquired from 33 OCD patients and 33 demographically matched HCS in a 3.0 T scanner. Differences in GM and WM volume between OCD and HCS were examined using two types of well-established MVPA techniques: support vector machine (SVM) and Gaussian process classifier (GPC). We also drew a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to evaluate the performance of each classifier. The classification accuracies for both classifiers using GM and WM anatomy were all above 75%. The highest classification accuracy (81.82%, P<0.001) was achieved with the SVM classifier using WM information. Regional brain anomalies with high discriminative power were based on three distributed networks including the fronto-striatal circuit, the temporo-parieto-occipital junction and the cerebellum. Our study illustrated that both GM and WM anatomical features may be useful in differentiating OCD patients from HCS. WM volume using the SVM approach showed the highest accuracy in our population for revealing group differences, which suggested its potential diagnostic role in detecting highly enriched OCD patients at the level of the individual. PMID:26708318

  13. Effects of gender and executive function on visuospatial working memory in adult obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Martoni, Riccardo Maria; Salgari, Giulia; Galimberti, Elisa; Cavallini, Maria Cristina; O'Neill, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Visuospatial working memory (VSWM) is the ability of the brain to transiently store and manipulate visual information. VSWM deficiencies have been reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but not consistently, perhaps due to variability in task design and clinical patient factors. To explore this variability, this study assessed effects of the design factors task difficulty and executive organizational strategy and of the clinical factors gender, OCD symptom dimension, and duration of illness on VSWM in OCD. The CANTAB spatial working memory, spatial recognition memory, delayed matching to sample, and stop signal tasks were administered to 42 adult OCD patients and 42 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Aims were to detect a possible VSWM deficit in the OCD sample, to evaluate influences of the above task and patient factors, to determine the specificity of the deficit to the visuospatial subdomain, and to examine effects of sustained attention as potential neurocognitive confound. We confirmed previous findings of a VSWM deficit in OCD that was more severe for greater memory load (task difficulty) and that was affected by task strategy (executive function). We failed to demonstrate significant deficits in neighboring or confounding neurocognitive subdomains (visual object recognition or visual object short-term memory, sustained attention). Notably, the VSWM deficit was only significant for female patients, adding to evidence for sexual dimorphism in OCD. Again as in prior work, more severe OCD symptoms in the symmetry dimension (but no other dimension) significantly negatively impacted VSWM. Duration of illness had no significant effect on VSWM. VSWM deficits in OCD appear more severe with higher task load and may be mediated through poor task strategy. Such deficits may present mainly in female patients and in (male and female) patients with symmetry symptoms. PMID:25972085

  14. Hyper-influence of the orbitofrontal cortex over the ventral striatum in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshinari; Sakai, Yuki; Nishida, Seiji; Nakamae, Takashi; Yamada, Kei; Fukui, Kenji; Narumoto, Jin

    2015-11-01

    Dysfunction of the fronto-striato-thalamic circuit routing through the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is thought to play the main role in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Repetitious stimulation of the OFC-ventral striatum (VS) projections in mice has been shown to increase the firing of the postsynaptic VS cells and the frequency of OCD-like symptoms. Moreover, increased functional connectivity (FC) between the OFC and the VS has been reported in patients with OCD. While FC is a synchronous, non-directed correlation, the directed influence between these brain regions remains unclear in patients with OCD. We obtained resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans from 37 non-medicated patients with OCD and 38 matched healthy volunteers, and calculated bivariative voxel-wise Granger Causality (GC) to and from three striatal regions of interest (ROI) using a blind deconvolution procedure. Additionally, we conducted multivariative GC analysis to determine if the effect revealed by the bivariative voxel-wise GCA is mediated by another seed ROI. We found a significant hyper-influence of the OFC over the VS of subjects with OCD (p<.05, corrected). Multivariative GC analysis confirmed this effect (p<.05, corrected) and that it was not mediated by another brain area within the striatum. This is the first study investigating the directed influence of the fronto-striato-thalamic loop in non-medicated patients with OCD. We confirmed the hyperactive connection from the OFC to the VS that is consistent with previous animal studies. These findings provide evidence for the more detailed pathophysiology of OCD. PMID:26395293

  15. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Weihua; Cheng, Weiqiu; Liu, Zhaorui; Tang, Yi; Lu, Tianlan; Zhang, Dai; Tang, Muni; Huang, Yueqin

    2016-01-01

    Literatures have suggested that not only genetic but also environmental factors, interactively accounted for susceptibility of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). DNA methylation may regulate expression of genes as the heritable epigenetic modification. The examination for genome-wide DNA methylation was performed on blood samples from 65 patients with OCD, as well as 96 healthy control subjects. The DNA methylation was examined at over 485,000 CpG sites using the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChip. As a result, 8,417 probes corresponding to 2,190 unique genes were found to be differentially methylated between OCD and healthy control subjects. Of those genes, 4,013 loci were located in CpG islands and 2,478 were in promoter regions. These included BCYRN1, BCOR, FGF13, HLA-DRB1, ARX, etc., which have previously been reported to be associated with OCD. Pathway analyses indicated that regulation of actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), actin binding, transcription regulator activity, and other pathways might be further associated with risk of OCD. Unsupervised clustering analysis of the top 3,000 most variable probes revealed two distinct groups with significantly more people with OCD in cluster one compared with controls (67.74% of cases v.s. 27.13% of controls, Chi-square = 26.011, df = 1, P = 3.41E-07). These results strongly suggested that differential DNA methylation might play an important role in etiology of OCD. PMID:27527274

  16. Tactile processing in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Güçlü, Burak; Tanıdır, Canan; Çanayaz, Emre; Güner, Bora; İpek Toz, Hamiyet; Üneri, Özden Ş; Tommerdahl, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Many obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients experience sensory phenomena, such as bodily sensations and "just-right" perceptions accompanying compulsions. We studied tactile processing in OCD by psychophysical experiments targeting the somatosensory cortex. Thirty-two children and adolescents with OCD (8 tic-related, 19 with sensory phenomena (SP)) and their sex- and age-matched controls participated in the study. After clinical assessments, two questionnaires were completed for sensory problems (Sensory Profile and Touch Inventory for Elementary-School-Aged Children). The psychophysical experiments consisted of five tasks: simple reaction time, choice reaction time, dynamic (detection) threshold, amplitude discrimination, and amplitude discrimination with single-site adaptation. The tactile stimuli were sinusoidal mechanical vibrations (frequency: 25 Hz) applied on the fingertips. Just-noticeable differences (JNDs) were found in amplitude discrimination tasks. There was no difference between the OCD group and controls in detection thresholds. However, the OCD group (especially young males) had worse amplitude discrimination (i.e., higher JNDs) than controls. Young OCD participants had reduced adaptation than young controls. Tic-related OCD participants and those with SP had higher detection thresholds than those without. Additionally, the OCD group reported more problems than controls in the Emotional/Social subset of the Sensory Profile questionnaire. The discrimination results show altered tactile processing in OCD at suprathreshold levels. This can be explained by a scaling factor modifying the sensory signal with decreasing slope at higher input levels to achieve normal Weber fractions internally. Quadratic discriminant analysis gave the best positive (76%) and negative (60%) predictive values for classifying individuals (into "OCD" or "control" groups) based on psychophysical data alone. PMID:26053790

  17. Cognitive deficits of executive functions and decision-making in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Winand H; Johansen, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The nature of cognitive deficits in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by contradictory findings in terms of specific neuropsychological deficits. Selective impairments have been suggested to involve visuospatial memory, set shifting, decision-making and response inhibition. The aim of this study was to investigate cognitive deficits in decision-making and executive functioning in OCD. It was hypothesized that the OCD patients would be less accurate in their responses compared to the healthy controls in rational decision-making on a version of the Cambridge gambling task (CGT) and on the color-word interference test and on a version of the Tower of Hanoi test (tower test) of executive functioning. Thirteen participants with OCD were compared to a group of healthy controls (n = 13) matched for age, gender, education and verbal IQ. Results revealed significant differences between the OCD group and the healthy control group on quality of decision-making on the CGT and for achievement score on the tower test. On these two tasks the OCD group performed worse than the healthy control group. The symptom-dimension analysis revealed performance differences where safety checking patients were impaired on the tower test compared to contamination patients. Results are discussed in the framework of cognition and emotion processing and findings implicate that OCD models should address, specifically, the interaction between cognition and emotion. Here the emotional disruption hypothesis is forwarded to account for the dysfunctional behaviors in OCD. Further implications regarding methodological and inhibitory factors affecting cognitive information processing are highlighted. PMID:23841985

  18. Riluzole augmentation in treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder: a pilot placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pittenger, Christopher; Bloch, Michael H.; Wasylink, Suzanne; Billingslea, Eileen; Simpson, Ryan; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Kelmendi, Ben; Sanacora, Gerard; Coric, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Objective Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) affects approximately 2.5% of the population and is associated with significant morbidity. Many patients receive little benefit from the best available treatments, and even those who do respond often suffer from significant residual symptoms. Convergent evidence suggests that abnormalities in glutamate homeostasis and neurotransmission may contribute to OCD and that glutamate-modulating medications may be of benefit in patients whose symptoms are refractory to standard interventions. Small open-label trials of augmentation of SSRI pharmacotherapy with the glutamate modulator riluzole have suggested benefit in adults with refractory symptoms. We report a pilot placebo-control trial of riluzole augmentation of ongoing SRI treatment in SRI-refractory patients. Method Outpatients (n = 27) and inpatients (n = 12) with DSM-IV OCD on stable SSRI pharmacotherapy were randomized between 11/2006 and 12/2012 to receive riluzole 50 mg bid or placebo and followed for 12 weeks, after a 2-week placebo lead-in. Results Riluzole was well tolerated; one patient experienced moderate nausea, but none discontinued treatment due to side effects. While there was nominally greater Y-BOCS improvement in the riluzole group (our primary outcome), it did not reach significance in a mixed model random effects analysis, in the overall analysis or in the outpatient subsample. In the outpatient subsample there was a trend suggesting benefit from riluzole augmentation for obsessions (p = 0.056, 2-tailed, uncorrected), in a secondary analysis. Among outpatients, more achieved at least a partial response (>25% improvement) with riluzole than with placebo (p = 0.02 in a secondary analysis). Conclusions Riluzole may be of benefit to a subset of patients. Larger samples would be required to detect effects of the order suggested by the nominal improvement in our outpatient subsample. PMID:26214725

  19. Decreased limbic and increased fronto-parietal connectivity in unmedicated patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Göttlich, Martin; Krämer, Ulrike M; Kordon, Andreas; Hohagen, Fritz; Zurowski, Bartosz

    2014-11-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by recurrent intrusive thoughts and ritualized, repetitive behaviors, or mental acts. Convergent experimental evidence from neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies supports an orbitofronto-striato-thalamo-cortical dysfunction in OCD. Moreover, an over excitability of the amygdala and over monitoring of thoughts and actions involving the anterior cingulate, frontal and parietal cortex has been proposed as aspects of pathophysiology in OCD. We chose a data driven, graph theoretical approach to investigate brain network organization in 17 unmedicated OCD patients and 19 controls using resting-state fMRI. OCD patients showed a decreased connectivity of the limbic network to several other brain networks: the basal ganglia network, the default mode network, and the executive/attention network. The connectivity within the limbic network was also found to be decreased in OCD patients compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, we found a stronger connectivity of brain regions within the executive/attention network in OCD patients. This effect was positively correlated with disease severity. The decreased connectivity of limbic regions (amygdala, hippocampus) may be related to several neurocognitive deficits observed in OCD patients involving implicit learning, emotion processing and expectation, and processing of reward and punishment. Limbic disconnection from fronto-parietal regions relevant for (re)-appraisal may explain why intrusive thoughts become and/or remain threatening to patients but not to healthy subjects. Hyperconnectivity within the executive/attention network might be related to OCD symptoms such as excessive monitoring of thoughts and behavior as a dysfunctional strategy to cope with threat and uncertainty.

  20. Telephone Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Non-inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Cynthia M.; Mataix-Cols, David; Lovell, Karina; Krebs, Georgina; Lang, Katie; Byford, Sarah; Heyman, Isobel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Many adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) do not have access to evidence-based treatment. A randomized controlled non-inferiority trial was conducted in a specialist OCD clinic to evaluate the effectiveness of telephone cognitive-behavioral therapy (TCBT) for adolescents with OCD compared to standard clinic-based, face-to-face CBT. Method Seventy-two adolescents, aged 11 through 18 years with primary OCD, and their parents were randomized to receive specialist TCBT or CBT. The intervention provided differed only in the method of treatment delivery. All participants received up to 14 sessions of CBT, incorporating exposure with response prevention (E/RP), provided by experienced therapists. The primary outcome measure was the Children’s Yale–Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS). Blind assessor ratings were obtained at midtreatment, posttreatment, 3-month, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up. Results Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that TCBT was not inferior to face-to-face CBT at posttreatment, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up. At 12-month follow-up, there were no significant between-group differences on the CY-BOCS, but the confidence intervals exceeded the non-inferiority threshold. All secondary measures confirmed non-inferiority at all assessment points. Improvements made during treatment were maintained through to 12-month follow-up. Participants in each condition reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention received. Conclusion TCBT is an effective treatment and is not inferior to standard clinic-based CBT, at least in the midterm. This approach provides a means of making a specialized treatment more accessible to many adolescents with OCD. Clinical trial registration information–Evaluation of telephone-administered cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) for young people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); http://www.controlled-trials.com; ISRCTN27070832. PMID:25457928

  1. The relationship between impulse control disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder: a current understanding and future research directions

    PubMed Central

    Potenza, Marc Nicholas; Koran, Lorrin Michael; Pallanti, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) constitute a heterogeneous group of conditions linked diagnostically by difficulties in resisting “the impulse, drive, or temptation to perform an act that is harmful to the person or to others.” Specific ICDs share clinical, phenomenological and biological features with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) that have suggested that these disorders might be categorized together. However, other data suggest significant differences between OCD and ICDs. In this article, clinical, phenomenological and biological features of the formal ICDs are reviewed and compared and contrasted with those of OCD. Available data indicate substantial differences between ICDs and OCD that suggest independent categorizations. Existing research gaps are identified and avenues for future research suggested. PMID:19811840

  2. Dissociative experiences in obsessive-compulsive disorder and trichotillomania: clinical and genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Christine; Seedat, Soraya; Hemmings, Sian M J; Kinnear, Craig J; Corfield, Valerie A; Niehaus, Dana J H; Moolman-Smook, Johanna C; Stein, Dan J

    2004-01-01

    A link between dissociation proneness in adulthood and self-reports of childhood traumatic events (including familial loss in childhood, sexual/physical abuse and neglect) has been documented. Several studies have also provided evidence for an association between dissociative experiences and trauma in patients with various psychiatric disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder, borderline personality, dissociative identity and eating disorders. Based on the relative paucity of data on dissociation and trauma in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and trichotillomania (TTM), the primary objective of this study was to examine the relationship between trauma and dissociative experiences (DE) in these two diagnostic groups. Furthermore, the availability of clinical and genetic data on this sample allowed us to explore clinical and genetic factors relevant to this association. A total of 110 OCD and 32 TTM patients were compared with respect to the degree of dissociation (using the Dissociative Experiences Scale [DES]) and childhood trauma (using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire [CTQ]). Patients were classified on the DES as either "high" (mean DES score >/= 30) or "low" (mean DES score < 30) dissociators. Additional clinical and genetic factors were also explored with chi-square and t tests as appropriate. A total of 15.8% of OCD patients and 18.8% of TTM patients were high dissociators. OCD and TTM groups were comparable on DES and CTQ total scores, and in both OCD and TTM groups, significant positive correlations were found between mean DES scores and mean CTQ subscores of emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, and physical neglect. In the OCD group, high dissociators were significantly younger than low dissociators, and significantly more high dissociators than low dissociators reported a lifetime (current and past) history of tics (P <.001), Tourette's syndrome (P =.019), bulimia nervosa (P =.003), and borderline personality disorder (P =.027

  3. Early Alliance, Alliance Ruptures, and Symptom Change in a Nonrandomized Trial of Cognitive Therapy for Avoidant and Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Jennifer L.; Hayes, Adele M.; Johnson, Sheri L.; Newman, Cory F.; Brown, Gregory K.; Barber, Jaques P.; Lawrenceau, Jean-Philippe; Beck, Aaron T.

    2006-01-01

    Participants were 30 adult outpatients diagnosed with avoidant personality disorder or obsessive-compulsive personality disorder who enrolled in an open trial of cognitive therapy for personality disorders. Treatment consisted of up to 52 weekly sessions. Symptom evaluations were conducted at intake, at Sessions 17 and 34, and at the last…

  4. Placebo effect after prefrontal magnetic stimulation in the treatment of resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Carlos Gustavo; Myczkowki, Martin Luiz; de Barros Cabral, Sergio; Sartorelli, Maria do Carmo Breda; Bellini, Bianca Boura; Dias, Alvaro Machado; Bernik, Marcio Antonini; Marcolin, Marco Antonio

    2011-11-01

    Many patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) do not achieve satisfactory symptom improvement with conventional treatments. Here, we evaluate the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (rDLPFC) in patients with treatment-resistant OCD. This was a double-blind randomized trial involving 30 treatment-resistant OCD outpatients, allocated to have either sham or active high-frequency rTMS (over the rDLPFC) added to their treatment regimens for 6 wk, with 6 wk of follow-up. Active rTMS consisted of 30 applications (figure-of-eight coil; 10 Hz at 110% of motor threshold; 1 session/d; 40 trains/session; 5 s/train; 25-s intertrain interval). At weeks 0, 2, 6, 8, and 12, we applied the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (YBOCS), Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale, 14-item Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA-14), 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), and 36-item Short-form Health Survey. The primary outcome measure was a positive response (≥ 30% improvement in YBOCS score, together with a 'much improved' or 'very much improved' CGI - Improvement scale rating). One patient in each group showed a positive response (p=1.00). For YBOCS score, there was significant effect of time (F=7.33, p=0.002) but no significant group effect or group×time interaction. In treatment-resistant OCD, active rTMS over the rDLPFC does not appear to be superior to sham rTMS in relieving obsessive-compulsive symptoms, reducing clinical severity, or improving treatment response, although there is evidence of a placebo effect. PMID:21557884

  5. Escitalopram in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder: an open-label, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Stryjer, Rafael; Dambinsky, Yael; Timinsky, Igor; Green, Tamar; Kotler, Moshe; Weizman, Abraham; Spivak, Baruch

    2013-03-01

    The current data suggest that up to 50% of patients with schizophrenia have obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms coexisting with psychosis and between 7.8 and 46% of schizophrenia patients also have full-blown obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of the most selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram in the management of OCD in schizophrenia patients. The study was an open-label prospective trial of 12 weeks' duration in which escitalopram at a dose of up to 20 mg/day was added to the existing antipsychotic drug regimen in schizophrenia patients with OCD. Fifteen patients (10 men/five women) with the diagnosis of schizophrenia and OCD were recruited for the study (mean age: 39±14, range 21-61 years) and received escitalopram according to the study design. A significant improvement was observed in the total Yale Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) scores and in the scores of both the Y-BOCS-Obsession and the Y-BOCS-Compulsion subscale at the end point. In addition, a significant improvement was observed in the total scores of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and particularly in scores of anxiety, tension, depression, and preoccupation items. No adverse effects of escitalopram were reported by patients during the trial. In our prospective 12-week open-label study, escitalopram 20 mg/day was well tolerated and improved OC symptoms in schizophrenia patients. Our preliminary results are encouraging and a double-blind randomized study is required to confirm our results.

  6. High-Dose Glycine Treatment of Refractory Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Body Dysmorphic Disorder in a 5-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, W. Louis; DeLaPaz, Robert L.; Fawwaz, Rashid A.; Challop, Roger S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an individual who was diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) at age 17 when education was discontinued. By age 19, he was housebound without social contacts except for parents. Adequate trials of three selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, two with atypical neuroleptics, were ineffective. Major exacerbations following ear infections involving Group A β-hemolytic streptococcus at ages 19 and 20 led to intravenous immune globulin therapy, which was also ineffective. At age 22, another severe exacerbation followed antibiotic treatment for H. pylori. This led to a hypothesis that postulates deficient signal transduction by the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Treatment with glycine, an NMDAR coagonist, over 5 years led to robust reduction of OCD/BDD signs and symptoms except for partial relapses during treatment cessation. Education and social life were resumed and evidence suggests improved cognition. Our findings motivate further study of glycine treatment of OCD and BDD. PMID:20182547

  7. Methamphetamine and fluoxetine treatment of a child with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bussing, R; Levin, G M

    1993-01-01

    ABSTRACT An 11-year-old child with obsessive-compulsive disorder, major depression, and attentiondeficit hyperactivity disorder was successfully treated with a combination of fluoxetine (mean 30 mg daily) and methamphetamine (sustained release 10 mg daily). Methamphetamine was selected because of the desirability of avoiding stimulants whose commercial formulations contain food dyes (this child appeared sensitive to tartrazine in dextroamphetamine and other agents), whose effects on hepatic metabolism were minimal (unlike methylphenidate) and whose mechanism of action is reliably rapid (unlike pemoline). Although methamphetamine carries the stigma of an abusable drug and has been implicated in neurotoxicity in animals when used at extremely high doses, methamphetamine may have certain advantages over other psychostimulants in some clinical situations. The combined use of fluoxetine and methamphetamine did not appear to be associated with significant adverse effects.

  8. Neurological soft signs in early stage of schizophrenia associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Focseneanu, BE; Dobrescu, I; Marian, G; Rusanu, V

    2015-01-01

    Background. Given that the obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) occurs with a much higher frequency in schizophrenia than in the general population, and, both schizophrenia and OCD are presumed to be neurodevelopmental disorders, the hypothesis of a distinct subtype of schizophrenia, the “schizo-obsessive” one, was raised. Aim. Considering the neurological soft signs as neurobiological markers in schizophrenia, the aim of this study was to verify the hypothesis of the existence of this “schizo-obsessive” endophenotype of schizophrenia, by using the Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES) in patients with schizophrenia. Method. The study was conducted in a transversal manner and consisted of the assessment of 64 patients with the maximum age of 26 years, who fulfilled the DSM IV-TR criteria of schizophrenia and/ or OCD, the assessment performed both from the social-demographic view, as well as neurologic, by means of the NES scale. Results. Patients with schizophrenia and OCD proved to have, a significant family history from a static point of view, more loaded by affective disorders, but also by schizophrenia and OCD spectrum disorders, compared to pure schizophrenics. They also proved to have a significant higher educational level and a better occupational functioning than those schizophrenic patients without OCD, despite the similarity of the number of hospitalizations episodes or the disease duration to date. Ratings on the NES scale differentiate the group of patients with schizophrenia and OCD as having the highest scores on all subscales, scores much closer to those obtained by the group of patients with schizophrenia only, the only difference with statistical significance being recorded on the sequencing subscale of complex motor acts. The analysis of cluster through linear discriminant analysis allowed the classification of patients in the 3 groups with a probability of 89.06% and 76.56% for cross-validation. Discussion. The results regarding neurological

  9. Event-related potentials in drug-naïve pediatric patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Ota, Toyosaku; Nakanishi, Yoko; Matsuura, Hiroki; Okazaki, Kosuke; Kishimoto, Naoko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Iwasaka, Hidemi; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2015-12-15

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is one of the most common mental health disorders, characterized by obsessive thoughts and/or compulsive behaviors, which may involve specific disorders in cognition and/or information processing. Event-related potentials (ERPs) are commonly used as physiological measures of cognitive function as they are easily measured and noninvasive. In the present study, 20 drug-naïve pediatric patients with OCD were compared with 20 healthy control participants who were age- and sex-matched to perform the ERP. Based on the guidelines for evoked potential measurement, the P300 and mismatch negativity (MMN) were obtained by auditory odd-ball tasks. We found that the amplitudes of the P300 components in the Fz, Cz, Pz, C3, and C4 regions were significantly smaller in the OCD group compared with the control group. There were no between-group differences in P300 latency, MMN amplitude, or MMN latency. Moreover, we found significant correlations between scores on the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) and P300 amplitudes at Cz, Pz, and C3. The present study is the first to report smaller P300s and the associations between P300 abnormalities and CY-BOCS scores.

  10. OCDB: a database collecting genes, miRNAs and drugs for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Privitera, Anna P.; Distefano, Rosario; Wefer, Hugo A.; Ferro, Alfredo; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive and unwilling thoughts (obsessions) giving rise to anxiety. The patients feel obliged to perform a behavior (compulsions) induced by the obsessions. The World Health Organization ranks OCD as one of the 10 most disabling medical conditions. In the class of Anxiety Disorders, OCD is a pathology that shows an hereditary component. Consequently, an online resource collecting and integrating scientific discoveries and genetic evidence about OCD would be helpful to improve the current knowledge on this disorder. We have developed a manually curated database, OCD Database (OCDB), collecting the relations between candidate genes in OCD, microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in the pathophysiology of OCD and drugs used in its treatments. We have screened articles from PubMed and MEDLINE. For each gene, the bibliographic references with a brief description of the gene and the experimental conditions are shown. The database also lists the polymorphisms within genes and its chromosomal regions. OCDB data is enriched with both validated and predicted miRNA-target and drug-target information. The transcription factors regulations, which are also included, are taken from David and TransmiR. Moreover, a scoring function ranks the relevance of data in the OCDB context. The database is also integrated with the main online resources (PubMed, Entrez-gene, HGNC, dbSNP, DrugBank, miRBase, PubChem, Kegg, Disease-ontology and ChEBI). The web interface has been developed using phpMyAdmin and Bootstrap software. This allows (i) to browse data by category and (ii) to navigate in the database by searching genes, miRNAs, drugs, SNPs, regions, drug targets and articles. The data can be exported in textual format as well as the whole database in.sql or tabular format. OCDB is an essential resource to support genome-wide analysis, genetic and pharmacological studies. It also facilitates the evaluation of genetic data

  11. OCDB: a database collecting genes, miRNAs and drugs for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Privitera, Anna P; Distefano, Rosario; Wefer, Hugo A; Ferro, Alfredo; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive and unwilling thoughts (obsessions) giving rise to anxiety. The patients feel obliged to perform a behavior (compulsions) induced by the obsessions. The World Health Organization ranks OCD as one of the 10 most disabling medical conditions. In the class of Anxiety Disorders, OCD is a pathology that shows an hereditary component. Consequently, an online resource collecting and integrating scientific discoveries and genetic evidence about OCD would be helpful to improve the current knowledge on this disorder. We have developed a manually curated database, OCD Database (OCDB), collecting the relations between candidate genes in OCD, microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in the pathophysiology of OCD and drugs used in its treatments. We have screened articles from PubMed and MEDLINE. For each gene, the bibliographic references with a brief description of the gene and the experimental conditions are shown. The database also lists the polymorphisms within genes and its chromosomal regions. OCDB data is enriched with both validated and predicted miRNA-target and drug-target information. The transcription factors regulations, which are also included, are taken from David and TransmiR. Moreover, a scoring function ranks the relevance of data in the OCDB context. The database is also integrated with the main online resources (PubMed, Entrez-gene, HGNC, dbSNP, DrugBank, miRBase, PubChem, Kegg, Disease-ontology and ChEBI). The web interface has been developed using phpMyAdmin and Bootstrap software. This allows (i) to browse data by category and (ii) to navigate in the database by searching genes, miRNAs, drugs, SNPs, regions, drug targets and articles. The data can be exported in textual format as well as the whole database in.sql or tabular format. OCDB is an essential resource to support genome-wide analysis, genetic and pharmacological studies. It also facilitates the evaluation of genetic data

  12. OCDB: a database collecting genes, miRNAs and drugs for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Privitera, Anna P; Distefano, Rosario; Wefer, Hugo A; Ferro, Alfredo; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive and unwilling thoughts (obsessions) giving rise to anxiety. The patients feel obliged to perform a behavior (compulsions) induced by the obsessions. The World Health Organization ranks OCD as one of the 10 most disabling medical conditions. In the class of Anxiety Disorders, OCD is a pathology that shows an hereditary component. Consequently, an online resource collecting and integrating scientific discoveries and genetic evidence about OCD would be helpful to improve the current knowledge on this disorder. We have developed a manually curated database, OCD Database (OCDB), collecting the relations between candidate genes in OCD, microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in the pathophysiology of OCD and drugs used in its treatments. We have screened articles from PubMed and MEDLINE. For each gene, the bibliographic references with a brief description of the gene and the experimental conditions are shown. The database also lists the polymorphisms within genes and its chromosomal regions. OCDB data is enriched with both validated and predicted miRNA-target and drug-target information. The transcription factors regulations, which are also included, are taken from David and TransmiR. Moreover, a scoring function ranks the relevance of data in the OCDB context. The database is also integrated with the main online resources (PubMed, Entrez-gene, HGNC, dbSNP, DrugBank, miRBase, PubChem, Kegg, Disease-ontology and ChEBI). The web interface has been developed using phpMyAdmin and Bootstrap software. This allows (i) to browse data by category and (ii) to navigate in the database by searching genes, miRNAs, drugs, SNPs, regions, drug targets and articles. The data can be exported in textual format as well as the whole database in.sql or tabular format. OCDB is an essential resource to support genome-wide analysis, genetic and pharmacological studies. It also facilitates the evaluation of genetic data

  13. A longitudinal, event-related potential pilot study of adult obsessive-compulsive disorder with 1-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Okada, Koji; Kishimoto, Naoko; Ota, Toyosaku; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Aim Earlier brain imaging research studies have suggested that brain abnormalities in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) normalize as clinical symptoms improve. However, although many studies have investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) in patients with OCD compared with healthy control subjects, it is currently unknown whether ERP changes reflect pharmacological and psychotherapeutic effects. As such, the current study examined the neurocognitive components of OCD to elucidate the pathophysiological abnormalities involved in the disorder, including the frontal-subcortical circuits. Methods The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale was used to evaluate 14 adult patients with OCD. The present study also included ten age-, sex-, and IQ-matched controls. The P300 and mismatch negativity (MMN) components during an auditory oddball task at baseline for both groups and after 1 year of treatment for patients with OCD were measured. Results Compared with controls, P300 amplitude was attenuated in the OCD group at Cz and C4 at baseline. Pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy treatment for 1 year reduced OCD symptomology. P300 amplitude after 1 year of treatment was significantly increased, indicating normalization compared with baseline at Fz, Cz, C3, and C4. We found no differences in P300 latency, MMN amplitude, or MMN latency between baseline and after one year of treatment. Conclusion ERPs may be a useful tool for evaluating pharmacological and cognitive behavioral therapy in adult patients with OCD. PMID:27713631

  14. Gray Matter Alterations in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bochao; Huang, Xiaoqi; Li, Shiguang; Hu, Xinyu; Luo, Ya; Wang, Xiuli; Yang, Xun; Qiu, Changjian; Yang, Yanchun; Zhang, Wei; Bi, Feng; Roberts, Neil; Gong, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and social anxiety disorder (SAD) all bear the core symptom of anxiety and are separately classified in the new DSM-5 system. The aim of the present study is to obtain evidence for neuroanatomical difference for these disorders. We applied voxel-based morphometry (VBM) with Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie to compare gray matter volume (GMV) in magnetic resonance images obtained for 30 patients with PTSD, 29 patients with OCD, 20 patients with SAD, and 30 healthy controls. GMV across all four groups differed in left hypothalamus and left inferior parietal lobule and post hoc analyses revealed that this difference is primarily due to reduced GMV in the PTSD group relative to the other groups. Further analysis revealed that the PTSD group also showed reduced GMV in frontal lobe, temporal lobe, and cerebellum compared to the OCD group, and reduced GMV in frontal lobes bilaterally compared to SAD group. A significant negative correlation with anxiety symptoms is observed for GMV in left hypothalamus in three disorder groups. We have thus found evidence for brain structure differences that in future could provide biomarkers to potentially support classification of these disorders using MRI. PMID:26347628

  15. Comorbid psychopathology and clinical symptomatology in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, D C; Korlou, S; Sakellariou, K; Kondyli, V; Sarafidou, J; Tsakanikos, E; Giannakopoulos, G; Liakopoulou, M

    2016-01-01

    Comorbid psychopathology in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been investigated in a number of studies over the last twenty years. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenomenology of illness and broader psychopathology in a group of Greek children and adolescents with OCD. The investigation of parental psychopathology in children and adolescents with OCD was a secondary aim of the present study. We studied 31 children and adolescents with OCD (n=31, age range 8-15 years) and their parents (n=62, age range 43-48 years) and compared to children and adolescents with specific reading and written expression learning disorders (n=30, age range 7-16 years) and their parents (n=58, age range 40-46 years). Appropriate testing showed specific reading and learning disorders, which were of mild to moderate severity for the 85% of this latter group. The diagnosis of learning disorder of reading and written expression was made through the use of standardized reading material, appropriate for ages 10-15 years. Reading comprehension and narration were tested. The written expression (spelling, syntax, content) was examined by a written text, in which the subject developed a certain theme from the reading material. Based on their level of education and occupation, the index families were classified as high (29%), average (45%) and low (26%) socioeconomic status, whereas 6.7% of control families belonged to high, 63.3% to average, and 30% to low status. In order to investigate psychopathology, the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Aged Children, Present and Life-time version was administered to children and their parents, as well as the Child Behavior Checklist 4/18 (CBCL) to both parents and adolescents (Youth Self-Report). Also the Yale- Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) was rated for both children and parents. Moreover, the children were given the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and the

  16. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the orbitofrontal cortex for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a double-blind, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Nauczyciel, C; Le Jeune, F; Naudet, F; Douabin, S; Esquevin, A; Vérin, M; Dondaine, T; Robert, G; Drapier, D; Millet, B

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to assess the efficacy of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) by means of a double-cone coil in patients suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder. We hypothesized that low-frequency stimulation of the OFC would lead to a reduction in clinical symptoms, as measured on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). A randomized, double-blind, crossover design was implemented with two 1-week treatment periods (active stimulation versus sham stimulation) separated by a 1-month washout period. Concomitantly, a subgroup of patients underwent a positron emission tomography (PET) scan after each stimulation sequence. Statistical analyses compared the Y-BOCS scores at the end of each period. At day 7, we observed a significant decrease from baseline in the Y-BOCS scores, after both active (P<0.01) and sham stimulation (P=0.02). This decrease tended to be larger after active stimulation than after sham stimulation: −6 (−29, 0) points versus −2 (−20, 4) points (P=0.07). Active versus sham PET scan contrasts showed that stimulation was related to a bilateral decrease in the metabolism of the OFC. The OFC should definitely be regarded as a key neuroanatomical target for rTMS, as it is easier to reach than either the striatum or the subthalamic nucleus, structures favored in neurosurgical approaches. PMID:25203167

  17. Changes of oscillatory activity in the subthalamic nucleus during obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Bastin, Julien; Polosan, Mircea; Piallat, Brigitte; Krack, Paul; Bougerol, Thierry; Chabardès, Stéphan; David, Olivier

    2014-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has positive and negative effects on mood and cognition, as shown in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) and severe obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD). Such behavioural and clinical effects suggest that the STN has an important function in limbic circuitry, which still needs to be clarified from electrophysiological recordings. Here we report two exceptional cases of OCD patients in whom local field potentials (LFP) of the anterior STN were directly recorded during acute obsessive-compulsive symptoms. We found significant symptom-related changes in different frequency bands, with no clear preferential oscillatory pattern. The overall modified STN activity during OCD symptoms suggests a mixture of both pathological and compensatory mechanisms that would reflect the maintenance of an over stable motor/cognitive/emotional set. Whether this activity propagates throughout the entire cognitive-limbic loops that are impaired in OCD is an interesting question for future research in larger series of patients. PMID:24552693

  18. Microstructural Abnormality in Left Nucleus Accumbens Predicts Dysfunctional Beliefs in Treatment-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongchun; Ji, Weidong; Li, Deqiang; Li, Xujuan; Feng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine whether dysfunctional beliefs might predict treatment-resistance and to examine the relationship between fractional anisotropy (FA) in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and cognitive biases for optimal treatment choice. Material/Methods We recruited 11 non-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients, 11 resistant OCD patients, and 11 healthy subjects. Results OCD patients had higher Obsessive Beliefs Questionnaire (OBQ-87) subscale scores than subjects in non-resistant and resistant groups. A significant difference was found between non-resistant and resistant OCD patients in R-Scale and I-Scale. A significant decrease in FA was found in left dorsal frontal gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule in the non-resistant group as compared to the control group. FA also decreased significantly in left anterior cingulate cortex, putamen, and nucleus accumbens in the resistant group as compared to the control group. There was a significant decrease in FA in nucleus accumbens in the resistant group as compared to the non-resistant group. Reduced FA in left nucleus accumbens was negatively associated with OBQ-87 factor R and I and the total Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). Conclusions Abnormalities in cortical-striatal white matter networks may contribute to the dysfunctional beliefs in patients with treatment-resistant OCD, and the left nucleus accumbens may be an important and promising target for the treatment of OCD. PMID:25393961

  19. The Impact of Symptom Dimensions on Outcome for Exposure and Ritual Prevention Therapy in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Monnica T.; Farris, Samantha G.; Turkheimer, Eric N.; Franklin, Martin E.; Simpson, H. Blair; Liebowitz, Michael; Foa, Edna B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a severe condition with varied symptom presentations. The behavioral treatment with the most empirical support is exposure and ritual prevention (EX/RP). This study examined the impact of symptom dimensions on EX/RP outcomes in OCD patients. Method The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) was used to determine primary symptoms for each participant. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of 238 patients identified five dimensions: contamination/cleaning, doubts about harm/checking, hoarding, symmetry/ordering, and unacceptable/taboo thoughts (including religious/moral and somatic obsessions among others). A linear regression was conducted on those who had received EX/RP (n = 87) to examine whether scores on the five symptom dimensions predicted post-treatment Y-BOCS scores, accounting for pre-treatment Y-BOCS scores. Results The average reduction in Y-BOCS score was 43.0%, however the regression indicated that unacceptable/taboo thoughts (β = .27, p = .02) and hoarding dimensions (β = .23, p = .04) were associated with significantly poorer EX/RP treatment outcomes. Specifically, patients endorsing religious/moral obsessions, somatic concerns, and hoarding obsessions showed significantly smaller reductions in Y-BOCS severity scores. Conclusions EX/RP was effective for all symptom dimensions, however it was less effective for unacceptable/taboo thoughts and hoarding than for other dimensions. Clinical implications and directions for research are discussed. PMID:24983796

  20. Differential efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy and pharmacological treatments for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Meca, Julio; Rosa-Alcázar, Ana I; Iniesta-Sepúlveda, Marina; Rosa-Alcázar, Angel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a meta-analysis about the differential efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), pharmacological and combined treatment for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The literature research and the application of the inclusion criteria enabled us to locate 18 studies, yielding a total of 24 independent comparisons between a treated (10 pharmacological, 11 CBT, and 3 combined interventions) and a control group. All types of interventions were efficacious in reducing obsessive-compulsive symptoms, with effect sizes adjusted by the type of control group of d=1.203 for CBT, d=0.745 for pharmacological treatments, and d=1.704 for mixed treatments. Depression, anxiety and other secondary responses were also improved, especially with CBT interventions. The analysis of moderator variables showed that the CBT protocol and the total of intervention hours exhibited a significant influence on the effect size. Within pharmacological treatment, clomipramine (d=1.305) was more efficacious than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (d=0.644), but its adverse effects were more severe. Finally, the clinical implications of the results are discussed.

  1. Salivary alpha-amylase and cortisol responsiveness following electrical stimulation stress in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Aimi; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Ishitobi, Yoshinobu; Maruyama, Yoshihiro; Ando, Tomoko; Inoue, Ayako; Okamoto, Shizuko; Imanaga, Junko; Kanehisa, Masayuki; Higuma, Haruka; Ninomiya, Taiga; Tsuru, Jusen; Akiyoshi, Jotaro

    2013-08-30

    Salivary α-amylase (sAA) serves as a marker of sympathoadrenal medullary system (SAM) activity. Salivary AA has not been extensively studied in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients. In the current study, 45 OCD patients and 75 healthy volunteers were assessed with the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), the Profile of Mood State (POMS), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Measures of heart rate variability (HRV), sAA, and salivary cortisol were also obtained following the application of electrical stimulation stress. The Y-BOCS and POMS Tension-Anxiety, Depression-Dejection, Anger-Hostility, Fatigue, and Confusion scores were significantly increased in patients with OCD compared with healthy controls. In contrast, Vigor scores were significantly decreased in patients with OCD relative to scores in healthy controls. There was no difference in HRV between the patients and the controls. Salivary AA levels in female and male OCD patients were significantly elevated relative to controls both before and after electrical stimulation. In contrast, there were no differences in salivary cortisol levels between OCD patients and controls. The elevated secretion of sAA before and after stimulation may suggest an increased responsiveness to novel and uncontrollable situations in patients with OCD. An increase in sAA might be a characteristic change of OCD. PMID:23266021

  2. Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate Effects on Binge Eating Behaviour and Obsessive-Compulsive and Impulsive Features in Adults with Binge Eating Disorder.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Susan L; Mitchell, James E; Wilfley, Denise; Gasior, Maria; Ferreira-Cornwell, M Celeste; McKay, Michael; Wang, Jiannong; Whitaker, Timothy; Hudson, James I

    2016-05-01

    In a published 11-week, placebo-controlled trial, 50 and 70 mg/d lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX), but not 30 mg/d LDX, significantly reduced binge eating days (primary endpoint) in adults with binge eating disorder (BED). This report provides descriptions of LDX effects on secondary endpoints (Binge Eating Scale [BES]; Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire [TFEQ]; Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale modified for Binge Eating [Y-BOCS-BE]; and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, version 11 [BIS-11]) from that study. Week 11 least squares mean treatment differences favoured all LDX doses over placebo on the BES (p ≤ 0.03), TFEQ Disinhibition and Hunger subscales (all p < 0.05), and Y-BOCS-BE total, obsessive, and compulsive scales (all p ≤ 0.02) and on BIS-11 total score at 70 mg/d LDX (p = 0.015) and the TFEQ Cognitive Restraint subscale at 30 and 70 mg/d LDX (both p < 0.05). These findings indicate that LDX decreased global binge eating severity and obsessive-compulsive and impulsive features of BED in addition to binge eating days. PMID:26621156

  3. A Preliminary Study on the Effects of Attachment-based Intervention on Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rezvan, Shiva; Bahrami, Fatemeh; Abedi, Mohamadreza; Macleod, Colin; Doost, Hamid Taher Neshat; Ghasemi, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research on attachment has shed new light on understanding one of the underlying mechanisms of psychopathology in children. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of attachment-based intervention in a pediatric sample with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Methods: Twelve participants, 10-12 years of age, were treated across an eight-week period. They had not been treated with either pharmacotherapy or psychotherapy previously and remained medication-free during the attachment-based therapy. This study comprised two groups of children: The experimental group, who received attachment-based intervention, and the control group, who did not receive treatment. All participants were assessed in terms of severity of OCD symptoms by administrating the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale before and after the experimental group had received the therapeutic sessions. The children were assessed again one month later. The level of children's depression, and attachment insecurity, as well as their mothers’ depression, OCD symptoms, and attachment insecurity, were statistically controlled in this study. Results: Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) indicated that the OCD symptoms in children decreased significantly over the course of the therapy, and this gain was maintained at follow-up. The results of this study demonstrated that the attachment-based intervention was efficacious in alleviating the OCD symptoms. Conclusion: It is suggested that parental instruction in attachment-based relationships may help prevent young children from developing OCD symptoms in middle-childhood and adulthood. PMID:23413047

  4. Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate Effects on Binge Eating Behaviour and Obsessive-Compulsive and Impulsive Features in Adults with Binge Eating Disorder.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Susan L; Mitchell, James E; Wilfley, Denise; Gasior, Maria; Ferreira-Cornwell, M Celeste; McKay, Michael; Wang, Jiannong; Whitaker, Timothy; Hudson, James I

    2016-05-01

    In a published 11-week, placebo-controlled trial, 50 and 70 mg/d lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX), but not 30 mg/d LDX, significantly reduced binge eating days (primary endpoint) in adults with binge eating disorder (BED). This report provides descriptions of LDX effects on secondary endpoints (Binge Eating Scale [BES]; Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire [TFEQ]; Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale modified for Binge Eating [Y-BOCS-BE]; and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, version 11 [BIS-11]) from that study. Week 11 least squares mean treatment differences favoured all LDX doses over placebo on the BES (p ≤ 0.03), TFEQ Disinhibition and Hunger subscales (all p < 0.05), and Y-BOCS-BE total, obsessive, and compulsive scales (all p ≤ 0.02) and on BIS-11 total score at 70 mg/d LDX (p = 0.015) and the TFEQ Cognitive Restraint subscale at 30 and 70 mg/d LDX (both p < 0.05). These findings indicate that LDX decreased global binge eating severity and obsessive-compulsive and impulsive features of BED in addition to binge eating days.

  5. Group and Individual Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Using Cognitive Therapy and Exposure Plus Response Prevention: A 2-Year Follow-Up of Two Randomized Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittal, Maureen L.; Robichaud, Melisa; Thordarson, Dana S.; McLean, Peter D.

    2008-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the long-term durability of group treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and contemporary cognitive treatments. The current study investigated the 2-year follow-up results for participants who completed randomized trials of group or individual treatment and received either cognitive therapy (CT) or…

  6. Intensive Family-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Applications for Treatment of Medication Partial- or Nonresponders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marien, Wendi E.; Storch, Eric A.; Geffken, Gary R.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) are both effective treatments for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Despite recommendations that youth with OCD be treated with CBT alone or together with serotonin reuptake inhibitor medication, many youth are treated with medication alone or with non-CBT…

  7. The Development of the Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder School Impact Scale: An Investigation Using the Accuracy-Reliability Paradigm for Scale Validation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Johnston, Hugh; Racine, Caroline N.

    This report describes the development of a rating scale and direct observation measure to monitor the treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) in the home or school setting. The study applied an accuracy-reliability paradigm to validate the newly created rating scale and observation measure. An incontrovertible index using a scripted…

  8. Do the Traits of Autism-Spectrum Overlap with Those of Schizophrenia or Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in the General Population?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Akio; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Ashwin, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Social and communicative deficits, restricted interests and repetitive behaviors are diagnostic features of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The present study examined the relationship between autistic characteristics and schizophrenia-spectrum traits as well as between autistic characteristics and obsessive-compulsive traits in typically…

  9. An Open Trial of Intensive Family Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Youth with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Who Are Medication Partial Responders or Nonresponders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Lehmkuhl, Heather D.; Ricketts, Emily; Geffken, Gary R.; Marien, Wendi; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2010-01-01

    This study reports an open-trial of family-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Thirty primarily Caucasian youth with OCD (range = 7-19 years; 15 girls) who were partial responders or nonresponders to two or more medication trials that were delivered either serially or…

  10. Association of Autism Spectrum Disorder with Obsessive-Compulsive and Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Traits and Response Inhibition in a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Plas, Ellen; Dupuis, Annie; Arnold, Paul; Crosbie, Jennifer; Schachar, Russell

    2016-01-01

    We examined co-occurrence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with (traits of) attention-deficit/hyperactivity (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive (OCD) and inhibition deficits in a community sample (n = 16,676) and tested whether having a sibling with ASD manifested in increased features of ADHD, OCD or inhibition deficits. Individuals with ASD had…

  11. Randomized Controlled Trial of Full and Brief Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy and Wait-List for Paediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Derek; Williams, Tim; Perrin, Sean; Atkinson, Linda; Gallop, Catherine; Waite, Polly; Salkovskis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: Reviews and practice guidelines for paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) recommend cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) as the psychological treatment of choice, but note that it has not been sufficiently evaluated for children and adolescents and that more randomized controlled trials are needed. The aim of this trial was to…

  12. Reduced prefrontal hemodynamic response in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ota, Toyosaku; Iida, Junzo; Sawada, Masayuki; Suehiro, Yuko; Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Matsuura, Hiroki; Tanaka, Shohei; Kishimoto, Naoko; Negoro, Hideki; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2013-04-01

    Recent developments in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) have enabled non-invasive clarification of brain functions in psychiatric disorders. Functional neuroimaging studies of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have suggested that the frontal cortex and subcortical structures may play a role in the pathophysiology of the disorder. Twelve treatment-naïve children with OCD and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects participated in the present study after giving consent. The relative concentrations of oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) were measured with prefrontal probes every 0.1 s during the Stroop color-word task, using 24-channel NIRS machines. During the Stroop color-word task, the oxy-Hb changes in the OCD group were significantly smaller than those in the control group in the prefrontal cortex, especially in the frontopolar cortex. The present study suggests that children with OCD have reduced prefrontal hemodynamic response as measured by NIRS.

  13. A case study in treating chronic comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression with behavioral activation and pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Arco, Lucius

    2015-06-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is difficult to treat, and more so when comorbid with major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of the present case study was to examine effects of behavioral activation (BA) and pharmacotherapy with an adult with chronic comorbid OCD and MDD. BA aimed at increasing approach behaviors in life activities and decreasing avoidant and inactive behaviors. After 21 months of treatment at a community mental health clinic, OCD and MDD symptoms, including compulsive checking behaviors, were no longer at clinical levels. Symptom alleviation and psychological health improved in line with increases in activities of living such as self-care, domestic, social, and studying, and decreases in medications from a regimen of mood stabilizers and anxiolytics to a sole antidepressant. The participant was satisfied with treatment procedures and outcome. The results add to growing evidence of effective BA treatments for comorbid disorders that include depression.

  14. Information Processing and Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Comorbidity of Delusions, Overvalued Ideas, and Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Dean; McKiernan, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Schizophrenia, in conjunction with obsessive-compulsive symptoms, presents significant barriers to treatment. This is true even if the obsessive-compulsive symptoms would ordinarily be considered straightforward for cognitive-behavioral treatment. These many limitations in treatment are considered here in light of the information processing…

  15. Basal Ganglia MR Relaxometry in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: T2 Depends Upon Age of Symptom Onset

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Emily; Hassenstab, Jason; Yip, Agustin; Vymazal, Josef; Herynek, Vit; Giedd, Jay; Murphy, Dennis L.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.

    2010-01-01

    Dysfunction in circuits linking frontal cortex and basal ganglia (BG) is strongly implicated in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). On MRI studies, neuropsychiatric disorders with known BG pathology have abnormally short T2 relaxation values (a putative biomarker of elevated iron) in this region. We asked if BG T2 values are abnormal in OCD. We measured volume and T2 and T1 relaxation rates in BG of 32 adults with OCD and 33 matched controls. There were no group differences in volume or T1 values in caudate, putamen, or globus pallidus (GP). The OCD group had lower T2 values (suggesting higher iron content) in the right GP, with a trend in the same direction for the left GP. This effect was driven by patients whose OCD symptoms began from around adolescence to early adulthood. The results suggest a possible relationship between age of OCD onset and iron deposition in the basal ganglia. PMID:20503112

  16. Response to Cognitive impulsivity and the behavioral addiction model of obsessive-compulsive disorder: Abramovitch and McKay (2016).

    PubMed

    Grassi, Giacomo; Figee, Martjin; Stratta, Paolo; Rossi, Alessandro; Pallanti, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    In our recently published article, we investigated the behavioral addiction model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), by assessing three core dimensions of addiction in patients with OCD healthy participants. Similar to the common findings in addiction, OCD patients demonstrated increased impulsivity, risky decision-making, and biased probabilistic reasoning compared to healthy controls. Thus, we concluded that these results support the conceptualization of OCD as a disorder of behavioral addiction. Here, we answer to Abramovitch and McKay (2016) commentary on our paper and we support our conclusions by explaining how cognitive impulsivity is also a typical feature of addiction and how our results on decision-making and probabilistic reasoning tasks reflect cognitive impulsivity facets that are consistently replicated in OCD and addiction. PMID:27677325

  17. [Distinguishing normal identity formation process for sexual minorities from obsessive compulsive disorder with sexual orientation obsessions].

    PubMed

    Igartua, Karine J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In synthesizing a homosexual or bisexual identity, an individual may go through different stages before coming to a positive healthy identity. It is likely that there will be a period in which homosexual yearnings will be unwanted. Sometimes this distress leads the person to consult a health professional. Conversion therapy has been proven both ineffective and harmful and therefore has been ethically prohibited by all major psychiatric and psychological associations. The responsible clinician will attempt to assist the individual in his acceptance of his sexual minority. Occasionally individuals without homoeroticism consult because of distress related to sexual identity questioning which poses a different problem for clinicians especially if the situation goes unrecognized. The objective of this paper is to describe homosexual obsessive compulsive disorder (HOCD) and distinguish it clinically from the normal process of sexual minority identity formation in western culture.Methods A literature review yielded very few descriptions of homosexual OCD. A retrospective chart review of all patients seen in the last 3 years at the McGill University Sexual Identity Centre was conducted to identify all the cases of OCD. Six cases were found, 4 of which were of HOCD and are presented. Similarities between cases are highlighted.Results All cases were young men with relatively little relationship and sexual experience. Most were rather shy and had some other obsessional history in the past though often at a sub-clinical threshold. Obsessional doubt about their orientation was very distressing and did not abate over time as would normally occur with a homoerotic individual. The four patients who had an obsession of being gay despite little or no homoerotism are presented in detail. They all presented mental compulsions, avoidance and physiological monitoring. Continuous internal debate trying to prove or disprove sexual orientation was a ubiquitous mental

  18. [Present contribution of neurosciences to a new clinical reading of obsessive-compulsive disorder].

    PubMed

    Aouizerate, B; Rotgé, J Y; Bioulac, B; Tignol, J

    2007-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), that affects 2 to 3% of the general population, is characterized by recurrent intrusive thoughts and repetitive, time-consuming behaviors. It is a severely incapacitating mental illness that causes profound impairment in psychosocial functioning and quality of life. Although the physiopathology of OCD is still far from resolved, the existence of a biological basis for OCD is now clearly established and should be interpreted from phenomenological considerations, on the one hand, and in the light of our increasing knowledge of the physiology of cortico-subcortical functional loops, on the other. In a phenomenological view, the heart of the obsessional process is the subject's underlying impression that "something is wrong". In other words, obsessions may be thought of as the permanent perception of a mistake and/or error in certain behavioral situations. Compulsions occur as behavioral responses aimed at relieving the tensions or anxiety generated by the situation. If obtained, this relief may be felt to be a form of reward. Nevertheless, it is only transient, thereby creating a feeling of considerable anxiety. This contributes to immediately reproducing the behavior in a cyclic manner, on the basis of an internal motivational state through an expectation of the reward. Therefore, it can be assumed that several malfunctioning processes are altered within the OCD: 1) error recognition; and, 2) emotion and motivation. This suggests that there is a dysfunction of the brain regions mediating these cognitive and emotional functions. Experimental neurophysiology in laboratory animals indicates the central role of the fronto-subcortical circuits originating in the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortices, respectively. The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and ventromedial areas are involved in appraisal of the emotional and motivational values of environmental information, and in integrating the subject's prior experience, which is

  19. Different patterns of local field potentials from limbic DBS targets in patients with major depressive and obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Neumann, W-J; Huebl, J; Brücke, C; Gabriëls, L; Bajbouj, M; Merkl, A; Schneider, G-H; Nuttin, B; Brown, P; Kühn, A A

    2014-11-01

    The role of distinct limbic areas in emotion regulation has been largely inferred from neuroimaging studies. Recently, the opportunity for intracranial recordings from limbic areas has arisen in patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) for neuropsychiatric disorders including major depressive disorder (MDD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we test the hypothesis that distinct temporal patterns of local field potential (LFP) activity in the human limbic system reflect disease state and symptom severity in MDD and OCD patients. To this end, we recorded LFPs via implanted DBS electrodes from the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST area) in 12 patients (5 OCD, 7 MDD) and from the subgenual cingulate cortex in 7 MDD patients (CG25 area). We found a distinct pattern of oscillatory activity with significantly higher α-power in MDD compared with OCD in the BNST area (broad α-band 8-14 Hz; P<0.01) and a similar level of α-activity in the CG25 area as in the BNST area in MDD patients. The mean α-power correlated with severity of depressive symptoms as assessed by the Beck depression inventory in MDD (n=14, r=0.55, P=0.042) but not with severity of obsessive compulsive symptoms in OCD. Here we show larger α-band activity in MDD patients compared with OCD recorded from intracranial DBS targets. Our results suggest that α-activity in the limbic system may be a signature of symptom severity in MDD and may serve as a potential state biomarker for closed loop DBS in MDD. PMID:24514569

  20. Lack of association between obsessive-compulsive disorder and the dopamine D{sub 3} receptor gene: Some preliminary considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Catalano, M.; Sciuto, G.; Di Bella, D.

    1994-09-15

    Controversial results possibly suggesting an association between Tourette`s syndrome (TS) and excess of homozygosity at an Msc I polymorphism in the Dopamine D{sub 3} receptor (DRD{sub 3}) gene have recently been reported. Since a relationship between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette`s syndrome (TS) has been suggested, in this study we assessed the frequency of this 2-allele polymorphism in a sample of 97 OCD patients and in 97 control subjects. No statistically significant differences in allele or genotype frequencies were found. Thus this mutation in the coding sequence of the DRD{sub 3} gene is unlikely to confer susceptibility to OCD. 28 refs., 21 tabs.