Science.gov

Sample records for occult renal disease

  1. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  2. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is.

  3. Atheroembolic renal disease

    MedlinePlus

    Renal disease - atheroembolic; Cholesterol embolization syndrome; Atheroemboli - renal; Atherosclerotic disease - renal ... disorder of the arteries. It occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up in the walls ...

  4. Occult spondyloarthritis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Bandinelli, Francesca; Manetti, Mirko; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia

    2016-02-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a frequent extra-intestinal manifestation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), although its real diffusion is commonly considered underestimated. Abnormalities in the microbioma and genetic predisposition have been implicated in the link between bowel and joint inflammation. Otherwise, up to date, pathogenetic mechanisms are still largely unknown and the exact influence of the bowel activity on rheumatic manifestations is not clearly explained. Due to evidence-based results of clinical studies, the interest on clinically asymptomatic SpA in IBD patients increased in the last few years. Actually, occult enthesitis and sacroiliitis are discovered in high percentages of IBD patients by different imaging techniques, mainly enthesis ultrasound (US) and sacroiliac joint X-ray examinations. Several diagnostic approaches and biomarkers have been proposed in an attempt to correctly classify and diagnose clinically occult joint manifestations and to define clusters of risk for patient screening, although definitive results are still lacking. The correct recognition of occult SpA in IBD requires an integrated multidisciplinary approach in order to identify common diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The use of inexpensive and rapid imaging techniques, such as US and X-ray, should be routinely included in daily clinical practice and trials to correctly evaluate occult SpA, thus preventing future disability and worsening of quality of life in IBD patients.

  5. Nox and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Holterman, Chet E; Read, Naomi C; Kennedy, Chris R J

    2015-04-01

    Since the first demonstration of Nox enzyme expression in the kidney in the early 1990s and the subsequent identification of Nox4, or RENOX, a decade later, it has become apparent that the Nox family of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating enzymes plays an integral role in the normal physiological function of the kidney. As our knowledge of Nox expression patterns and functions in various structures and specialized cell types within the kidney grows, so does the realization that Nox-derived oxidative stress contributes significantly to a wide variety of renal pathologies through their ability to modify lipids and proteins, damage DNA and activate transcriptional programmes. Diverse studies demonstrate key roles for Nox-derived ROS in kidney fibrosis, particularly in settings of chronic renal disease such as diabetic nephropathy. As the most abundant Nox family member in the kidney, much emphasis has been placed on the role of Nox4 in this setting. However, an ever growing body of work continues to uncover key roles for other Nox family members, not only in diabetic kidney disease, but in a diverse array of renal pathological conditions. The objective of the present review is to highlight the latest novel developments in renal Nox biology with an emphasis not only on diabetic nephropathy but many of the other renal disease contexts where oxidative stress is implicated.

  6. Intragraft vascular occlusive sickle crisis with early renal allograft loss in occult sickle cell trait.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lisa; Garfinkel, Marc R; Chang, Anthony; Kadambi, Pradeep V; Meehan, Shane M

    2011-07-01

    Early renal allograft failure due to sickle cell trait is rare. We present clinical and pathologic findings in 2 cases of early renal allograft failure associated with renal vein thrombosis and extensive erythrocyte sickling. Hemoglobin AS was identified in retrospect. In case 1, a 41-year-old female recipient of a deceased donor renal transplant developed abdominal pain and acute allograft failure on day 16, necessitating immediate nephrectomy. In case 2, the transplanted kidney in a 58-year-old female recipient was noted to be mottled blue within minutes of reperfusion. At 24 hours, the patient was oliguric; and the graft was removed. Transplant nephrectomies had diffuse enlargement with diffuse, nonhemorrhagic, cortical, and medullary necrosis. Extensive sickle vascular occlusion was evident in renal vein branches; interlobar, interlobular, and arcuate veins; vasa recta; and peritubular capillaries. The renal arteries had sickle vascular occlusion in case 1. Glomeruli had only focal sickle vascular occlusion. The erythrocytes in sickle vascular occlusion had abundant cytoplasmic filaments by electron microscopy. Acute rejection was not identified in either case. Protein C and S levels, factor V Leiden, and lupus anticoagulant assays were within normal limits. Hemoglobin analysis revealed hemoglobin S of 21.8% and 25.6%, respectively. Renal allograft necrosis with intragraft sickle crisis, characterized by extensive vascular occlusive erythrocyte sickling and prominent renal vein thrombosis, was observed in 2 patients with sickle cell trait. Occult sickle cell trait may be a risk factor for early renal allograft loss.

  7. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease. PMID:17162422

  8. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease. PMID:27479950

  9. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  10. ["Occult" renal insufficiency due to evaluating renal function using only serum creatinine].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fresnedo, G; de Francisco, A L M; Rodrigo, E; Piñera, C; Herráez, I; Ruiz, J C; Arias, M

    2002-01-01

    Timely referral to nephrologists depends on identification of renal failure. Most primary care physicians and specialists rely on serum creatinine as the standard test for determination of renal function. Creatinine clearance requires 24 hours urine collection with many pitfalls and wrong results. We compare serum creatinine and the Cockcroft-Gault (C-G) equation as measure of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The study included 1,053 outpatients with serum creatinine lower than 2.5 mg/dl referred to our nephrological laboratory for serum creatinine and GFR determination using the C-G formula. Patients were grouped into two groups: normal renal function (serum creatinine < 1.3 mg/dl) and "incipient" abnormal renal function (serum creatinine 1.3-2.5 mg/dl). In the group of females with normal creatinine 22% (60-70 y), 35% (70-80 y) and 57% (> 80 y) had GFR values below 50 ml/min. In the group of males 11.3% (70-80 y) and 33.3% (> 80 y) also had GFR reduction in spite of normal serum creatinine. A severe renal insufficiency with creatinine clearance lower than 30 ml/min was observed in the group with "incipient" renal failure based on serum creatinine: 22.7%, 40% and 82.9% for females and 6%, 22.7% and 57% for male (60-70 y; 70-80 y; and > 80 y respectively). In order to improve management and prevention of renal failure appropriate measurements of renal function other than serum creatinine should be emphasize.

  11. Renal involvement in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Abensur, Hugo; Reis, Marlene Antônia Dos

    2016-06-01

    Every cell in the human body has globotriaosylceramide accumulation (Gb3) in Fabry disease due to the mutation in gene of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. It is a disease linked to sex. The main clinical features are: cutaneous angiokeratomas; acroparestesias and early strokes; decreased sweating and heat intolerance; ocular changes; myocardial hypertrophy, arrhythmias; gastrointestinal disorders and renal involvement. Renal involvement occurs due to Gb3 accumulation in all types of renal cells. Therefore, patients may present glomerular and tubular function disorders. Podocytes are particularly affected, with pedicels effacement and development of proteinuria. The diagnosis is made by detection of reduced plasma or leukocyte α-galactosidase activity and genetic study for detecting the α-galactosidase gene mutation. Treatment with enzyme replacement contributes to delay the progression of kidney disease, especially if initiated early. PMID:27438980

  12. Renal calculus disease.

    PubMed

    Schulsinger, D A; Sosa, R E

    1998-03-01

    We have seen an explosion in technical innovations for the management of urolithiasis. Today, the endourologist possesses an assortment of minimally invasive tools to treat renal stones. Most patients receive fast, safe and effective treatment in the outpatient setting. Despite the many technical advances, however, anatomical malformations and complex stones still provide significant challenges in diagnosis, access to a targeted stone, fragmentation, and clearance of the resulting fragments. This review examines a variety of urinary stone presentations and treatment strategies for cost-effective management.

  13. Pathophysiology and management of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Crowell, W A; Brown, C A; Barsanti, J A; Finco, D R

    1997-09-01

    Recently, the hypothesis that all renal diseases are inherently progressive and self-perpetuating has focused attention on adaptive changes in renal structure and function that occur whenever renal function is reduced. These glomerular adaptations to renal disease include increases in filtration rate, capillary pressure and size, and are referred to as glomerular hyperfiltration, glomerular hypertension and glomerular hypertrophy, respectively. Extrarenal changes, such as dietary phosphate excess, systemic hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, acidosis and hyperparathyroidism occur in animals with renal disease and may be contributors to progression of renal disease. Emphasis in the management of companion animals with renal disease has shifted to identifying, understanding and controlling those processes that play a role in the progression from early to end-stage renal failure. Advances made by veterinary nephrologists in the past 15 years permit resolution of old controversies, formulation of new hypotheses and discussion of unresolved issues about the nature of progressive renal disease in dogs and cats. PMID:9308397

  14. Early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lees, George E

    2004-07-01

    The main goal of early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure in dogs and cats is to enable timely application of therapeutic interventions that may slow or halt disease progression. Strategies for early diagnosis of renal disease use urine tests that detect proteinuria that is a manifestation of altered glomerular permselectivity or impaired urine-concentrating ability as well blood tests to evaluate plasma creatinine concentration. Animals with progressive renal disease should be carefully investigated and treated appropriately. Animals with mild, possibly nonprogressive, renal disease should be monitored adequately to detect any worsening trends,which should lead to further investigation and treatment even if the increments of change are small. PMID:15223206

  15. Statins and progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Buemi, Michele; Senatore, Massimino; Corica, Francesco; Aloisi, Carmela; Romeo, Adolfo; Cavallaro, Emanuela; Floccari, Fulvio; Tramontana, Domenico; Frisina, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Thanks to the administration of hypocholesterolemic drugs, important advances have been made in the treatment of patients with progressive renal disease. In vitro and in vivo findings demonstrate that statins, the inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, can provide protection against kidney diseases characterized by inflammation and/or enhanced proliferation of epithelial cells occurring in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, or by increased proliferation of mesangial cells occurring in IgA nephropathy. Many of the beneficial effects obtained occur independent of reduced cholesterol levels because statins can directly inhibit the proliferation of different cell types (e.g., mesangial, renal tubular, and vascular smooth muscle cells), and can also modulate the inflammatory response, thus inhibiting macrophage recruitment and activation, as well as fibrosis. The mechanisms underlying the action of statins are not yet well understood, although recent data in the literature indicate that they can directly affect the proliferation/apoptosis balance, the down-regulation of inflammatory chemokines, and the cytogenic messages mediated by the GTPases Ras superfamily. Therefore, as well as reducing serum lipids, statins and other lipid-lowering agents may directly influence intracellular signaling pathways involved in the prenylation of low molecular weight proteins that play a crucial role in cell signal transduction and cell activation. Statins appear to have important potential in the treatment of progressive renal disease, although further studies are required to confirm this in humans.

  16. [Atherosclerotic renal artery disease diagnosis update].

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Haesler, Erik; Teta, Daniel; Qanadli, Salah Dine; Burnier, Michel

    2009-02-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease represents a cause of which little is known but not a cause to be neglected for hypertension and renal insufficiency. Even though its occurrence remains badly defined, atherosclerotic renal artery disease is constantly on the rise due to the aging population, the never prevailing hypertension and diabetes mellitus. This review aims to give a clinical profile of patients presenting with atherosclerotic renal artery disease and to discuss, in the light of study results, which diagnostic evaluation should be used considering the sequence and the benefit and risk of each in order to initiate a personalized treatment. Patients affected by atherosclerotic renal artery disease are likely to have more complications and more extensive target-organ damage than patients without renal artery stenosis. The evolution of the atherosclerotic renal artery disease is in general slow and progressive. Nevertheless, certain clinical cases manifest themselves with the onset of acute renal failure bought upon by the administration of blockers of the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, or by some other causes responsible for a sudden drop in renal plasma flow (e.g., thrombosis of the renal artery). The relationship between atherosclerotic renal artery disease and atherosclerosis is complex, and mediators implicated in the pathophysiology of renovascular disease may also contribute to the progression of cardiovascular damage. An early assumption of the atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is warranted to determine the adapted treatment (i.e., medical treatment, revascularisation...) just as the assumption and the correction of the more general cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:18809367

  17. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  18. Sickle cell disease: renal manifestations and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Karl A.; Hebbel, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) substantially alters renal structure and function, and causes various renal syndromes and diseases. Such diverse renal outcomes reflect the uniquely complex vascular pathobiology of SCD and the propensity of red blood cells to sickle in the renal medulla because of its hypoxic, acidotic, and hyperosmolar conditions. Renal complications and involvement in sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) include altered haemodynamics, hypertrophy, assorted glomerulopathies, chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, impaired urinary concentrating ability, distal nephron dysfunction, haematuria, and increased risks of urinary tract infections and renal medullary carcinoma. SCN largely reflects an underlying vasculopathy characterized by cortical hyperperfusion, medullary hypoperfusion, and an increased, stress-induced vasoconstrictive response. Renal involvement is usually more severe in homozygous disease (sickle cell anaemia, HbSS) than in compound heterozygous types of SCD (for example HbSC and HbSβ+-thalassaemia), and is typically mild, albeit prevalent, in the heterozygous state (sickle cell trait, HbAS). Renal involvement contributes substantially to the diminished life expectancy of patients with SCD, accounting for 16–18% of mortality. As improved clinical care promotes survival into adulthood, SCN imposes a growing burden on both individual health and health system costs. This Review addresses the renal manifestations of SCD and focuses on their underlying mechanisms. PMID:25668001

  19. Pathology of renal diseases in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Boonpucknavig, Vijitr; Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh

    2003-01-01

    Renal diseases unique to the tropics are those that occur in association with infectious diseases including dengue hemorrhagic fever, typhoid fever, shigellosis, leptospirosis, lepromatous leprosy, malaria, opisthorchiasis, and schistosomiasis. These renal complications can be classified on the basis of their clinical and pathologic characteristics into acute transient reversible glomerulonephritis, chronic progressive irreversible glomerulonephritis, amyloidosis, and acute renal failure (ARF) resulting from acute tubular necrosis, acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, and thrombotic microangiopathy. Certain primary glomerular diseases including immunoglobulin (Ig) M nephropathy and focal segmental and global glomerulosclerosis are prevalent in some tropical countries. Renal complications of venomous snakebites also are common in the tropics. This article discusses and summarizes important works in the literature in respect to the clinical syndromes, pathologic features, and pathogenesis of tropical renal diseases both in humans and experimental animal models.

  20. CT findings in complications of acquired renal cystic disease.

    PubMed

    Soffer, O; Miller, L R; Lichtman, J B

    1987-01-01

    A 42-year-old man with end-stage renal disease developed acquired renal cystic disease. The left kidney underwent tumorous degeneration necessitating nephrectomy. Eight months later acute hemorrhagic renal cyst rupture culminated in right nephrectomy.

  1. Early origin of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Maringhini, Silvio; Corrado, Ciro; Maringhini, Guido; Cusumano, Rosa; Azzolina, Vitalba; Leone, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animals have clearly shown that renal failure may start early in life. 'Fetal programming' is regulated by adaptations occurring in uterus including maternal nutrition, placental blood supply, and epigenetic changes. Low birth weight predisposes to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, adverse postnatal events, wrong nutritional habits may produce renal damage that will become clinically relevant in adulthood. Prevention should start early in children at risk of renal disease. PMID:20822331

  2. Complement activation in progressive renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Fearn, Amy; Sheerin, Neil Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and the cause of significant morbidity and mortality. The replacement of functioning nephrons by fibrosis is characteristic of progressive disease. The pathways that lead to fibrosis are not fully understood, although chronic non-resolving inflammation in the kidney is likely to drive the fibrotic response that occurs. In patients with progressive CKD there is histological evidence of inflammation in the interstitium and strategies that reduce inflammation reduce renal injury in pre-clinical models of CKD. The complement system is an integral part of the innate immune system but also augments adaptive immune responses. Complement activation is known to occur in many diverse renal diseases, including glomerulonephritis, thrombotic microangiopathies and transplant rejection. In this review we discuss current evidence that complement activation contributes to progression of CKD, how complement could cause renal inflammation and whether complement inhibition would slow progression of renal disease. PMID:25664245

  3. Chronic granulomatous disease with renal stones.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, S H; Vyas, H

    1992-01-01

    A case of chronic granulomatous disease with hydronephrosis and renal calculi is presented. This is to our knowledge the first such case to be reported. The calculi were successfully ablated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

  4. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  5. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  6. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  7. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  8. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  9. Spectrum of pediatric renal diseases in dubai.

    PubMed

    Abou-Chaaban, M; Al Murbatty, B; Majid, M A

    1997-01-01

    A total of 712 patients with renal problems, aged 13 years or below (mean age 4.12 years) were seen in the Department of Health and Medical Services Hospitals in Dubai in the period from 1991 to 1996. The male to female ratio was 1:1.1. UAE citizens constituted 32% of the total, with a male to female ratio of 1:1.2. Nephrotic syndrome (26.3%) had the highest prevalence among the renal diseases seen, followed by urinary tract infection (19.1%), glomerulonephritis (GN) (9.7%), congenital renal anomalies (9.7%), and chronic renal failure (CRF) (7%). Congenital renal anomalies were the main cause of CRF in our patients followed by GN. Acute renal failure (ARF) occurred in 1.4% of the patients and was not an alarming problem; it had an uncomplicated course and good prognosis. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis was the mode of replacement therapy for patients with end-stage renal disease. Eight patients underwent renal transplantation; one cadaver donor, four living non-related donor (abroad) and three living related donor.

  10. Occult gastric bleeding demonstrated by bone scan and Tc-99m-DTPA renal scan

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Leiter, B.E.; Weitzman, F.; Shapiro, J.H.

    1981-10-01

    A patient is described who had coagulopathy and clinically intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding. The bleeding site was clearly shown on renal and bone imaging performed at a time when the patient was considered clinically to have stopped bleeding. A bleeding gastric ulcer was subsequently demonstrated by radionuclide and contrast angiography, and at surgery.

  11. Thrombosis in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Casserly, Liam F; Dember, Laura M

    2003-01-01

    Although renal failure has classically been associated with a bleeding tendency, thrombotic events are common among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A variety of thrombosis-favoring hematologic alterations have been demonstrated in these patients. In addition, "nontraditional" risk factors for thrombosis, such as hyperhomocysteinemia, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and malnutrition, are present in a significant proportion of chronic dialysis patients. Hemodialysis (HD) vascular access thrombosis, ischemic heart disease, and renal allograft thrombosis are well-recognized complications in these patients. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are viewed as rare in chronic dialysis patients, but recent studies suggest that this perception should be reconsidered. Several ESRD treatment factors such as recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) administration, dialyzer bioincompatibility, and calcineurin inhibitor administration may have prothrombotic effects. In this article we review the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombosis in ESRD and evaluate the evidence that chronic renal failure or its management predisposes to thrombotic events.

  12. [Acquired cystic renal disease. Association with hypernephroma].

    PubMed

    Comesaña, E; Pesqueira, D; Tardáguila, F; De la Fuente, A; Antón, I; Vidal, L; Zungri, E

    1992-02-01

    Emergence of multiple bilateral renal cysts observed in patients undergoing periodic haemodialysis is 40%. The pathology, known as Acquired Cystic Renal Disease (A.C.R.D.) presents a high association to renal cancer. Two cases of A.C.R.D. and their association with hypernephroma, one resulting in secondary retroperitoneal haemorrhage and the other in intracystic haemorrhage, are presented. Forms and diagnosis are analyzed, insisting upon the need of monitoring the patients in haemodialysis from the point of view of tumour emergence.

  13. [Atherosclerotic renal artery disease management update].

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Haesler, Erik; Teta, Daniel; Qanadli, Salah Dine; Burnier, Michel

    2009-02-01

    In the case of atherosclerotic renal artery disease, the best conclusive results lie principally not in the degree of the stenosis but rather in the degree the renal parenchymal disease beyond the stenosis itself. These determining factors involve the controlling of the patients blood pressure, the improvement in the renal function and the beneficial results to the cardiovascular system. Besides the indispensable medical treatment, a revascularisation by angioplasty may be indicated. This procedure with or without vascular stent often allows satisfactory angiographic results. A treatment by surgical revascularisation is only recommended in the case of extensive atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta, complex lesions of the latter or an abdominal aortic aneurism. Although the frequency of restenosis of angioplasty with stent remains extremely low, the risk of cholesterol emboli due to the diffuse atherosclerotic lesions of the abdominal aorta, must be considered at the time of each aortic catheterization. The therapeutic approach of atherosclerotic renal artery disease must be dictated by the whole cardiovascular risk factors and by the threat of target organs. The control of the blood pressure and the maintenance of the renal function must be integrated in the decisional algorithm as well as the possible risks in carrying out an eventual revascularisation procedure. Finally, the renal angioplasty should in numerous situations be integrated in the overall assumption of responsibility of the atherosclerotic vascular diseases, and should be part of the medical treatment. Several questions still do exist; at what moment an atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis should and e considered critical, and which procedure should be considered for which patient? The purpose of this review is to propose a decisional tool for individualized treatments in the light of results from randomized and controlled studies. PMID:18815087

  14. [Atherosclerotic renal artery disease management update].

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Haesler, Erik; Teta, Daniel; Qanadli, Salah Dine; Burnier, Michel

    2009-02-01

    In the case of atherosclerotic renal artery disease, the best conclusive results lie principally not in the degree of the stenosis but rather in the degree the renal parenchymal disease beyond the stenosis itself. These determining factors involve the controlling of the patients blood pressure, the improvement in the renal function and the beneficial results to the cardiovascular system. Besides the indispensable medical treatment, a revascularisation by angioplasty may be indicated. This procedure with or without vascular stent often allows satisfactory angiographic results. A treatment by surgical revascularisation is only recommended in the case of extensive atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta, complex lesions of the latter or an abdominal aortic aneurism. Although the frequency of restenosis of angioplasty with stent remains extremely low, the risk of cholesterol emboli due to the diffuse atherosclerotic lesions of the abdominal aorta, must be considered at the time of each aortic catheterization. The therapeutic approach of atherosclerotic renal artery disease must be dictated by the whole cardiovascular risk factors and by the threat of target organs. The control of the blood pressure and the maintenance of the renal function must be integrated in the decisional algorithm as well as the possible risks in carrying out an eventual revascularisation procedure. Finally, the renal angioplasty should in numerous situations be integrated in the overall assumption of responsibility of the atherosclerotic vascular diseases, and should be part of the medical treatment. Several questions still do exist; at what moment an atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis should and e considered critical, and which procedure should be considered for which patient? The purpose of this review is to propose a decisional tool for individualized treatments in the light of results from randomized and controlled studies.

  15. Defining Kidney Biology to Understand Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Little, Melissa H.; Brown, Dennis; Humphreys, Benjamin D.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Sands, Jeff M.; Weisz, Ora A.; Mullins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The Kidney Research National Dialogue represents a novel effort by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to solicit and prioritize research objectives from the renal research and clinical communities. The present commentary highlights selected scientific opportunities specific to the study of renal development, physiology, and cell biology. Describing such fundamental kidney biology serves as a necessary foundation for translational and clinical studies that will advance disease care and prevention. It is intended that these objectives foster and focus scientific efforts in these areas in the coming decade and beyond. PMID:24370769

  16. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  17. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  18. Mitochondrial Sirtuin 3 and Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Perico, Luca; Morigi, Marina; Benigni, Ariela

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose functions are tightly regulated at multiple levels to maintain proper cellular homeostasis. Mitochondrial Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), which belongs to an evolutionary conserved family of NAD+-dependent deacetylases, is a key regulator of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, ATP production, and fatty acid β-oxidation, and it exerts an antioxidant activity. Changes in SIRT3 expression are critical in the pathophysiology of several diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cancer, and aging. In experimental acute kidney injury (AKI), impairment of renal function and development of tubular injury are associated with SIRT3 reduction and mitochondrial dysfunction in proximal tubuli. SIRT3-deficient mice are more susceptible to AKI and die. Pharmacological manipulations able to increase SIRT3 preserve mitochondrial integrity, markedly limit renal injury, and accelerate functional recovery. This review highlights all the selective rescue mechanisms that point to the key role of SIRT3 as a new therapeutic target for curing renal diseases. PMID:27362524

  19. Interactions between chronic renal disease and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Craig, R G

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing and patients receiving renal replacement therapy including hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis or renal transplantation will comprise an enlarging segment of the dental patient population. Renal replacement therapy can affect periodontal tissues including gingival hyperplasia in immune suppressed renal transplantation patients and increased levels of plaque, calculus and gingival inflammation and possible increased prevalence and severity of destructive periodontal diseases in ESRD patients on dialysis maintenance therapy. Also, the presence of undiagnosed periodontitis may have significant effects on the medical management of the ESRD patient. Periodontitis has been found to contribute to systemic inflammatory burden including the elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the general population. Atherosclerotic complications including myocardial infarction and stroke are the primary causes of mortality in the ESRD population and, in contrast to that of the general population, the best predictor of all cause and cardiac death in this population is CRP. Consequently, periodontitis may be a covert but treatable source of systemic inflammation in the ESRD population. The objective of this review was to explore the interaction between chronic renal disease, renal replacement therapy and periodontal diseases based upon the results of studies published within the last decade.

  20. Hypertension in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Appleby, C; Foley, R N

    2002-03-01

    Chronic renal failure is common. Recent estimates from the United States suggest that one in 10 adults has an elevated serum creatinine. Hypertension and renal disease are intimately connected at many levels, and clearly accelerate each other s course. Hypertension is an almost universal feature of end-stage renal disease, a state of frightening cardiovascular risk. Surprisingly, most recent observational studies have shown an association between low blood pressure and increased mortality, a result that may engender therapeutic nihilism in the absence of large randomised trials. This observation may be due to reverse causality, as the age and cardiovascular comorbidity of patients reaching end-stage renal disease is considerable. When outcomes other than death are considered, especially progressive left ventricular hypertrophy, but also ischaemic heart disease and congestive heart failure, more predictable and expected associations are seen, with rising blood pressure appearing to be a deleterious parameter. Uraemia appears to be a state of premature senescence, and arterial rigidity, whose clinical corollary is wide pulse pressure, is a characteristic feature. Recent observational studies have focused on pulse pressure, rather than the traditional approach of analysing its components, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, in isolation. High pulse pressure appears to be a marker of short survival in dialysis patients, but disentangling this association from old age and pre-existing cardiovascular conditions is challenging. Remarkably, and regrettably, no large scale randomised controlled studies examining strategies that tackle the issue of hypertension in dialysis patients have yet to be initiated.

  1. Slowing progression along the renal disease continuum.

    PubMed

    Kopyt, Nelson P

    2005-04-01

    Patients in whom nephropathy develops as a result of hypertension or diabetes mellitus are more likely to die of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than of kidney disease. An early sign of impending nephropathy is microalbuminuria, defined as urinary excretion of albumin at a rate of 28.8 mg/24 h to 288 mg/24 h. Microalbuminuria is a marker of endothelial dysfunction, vascular injury, and renal disease and CVD, and it is associated with increased risk for myocardial infarction. Oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are unifying factors mediated by the renin-angiotensin system in renal disease and CVD. Clinical trials show reduced cardiovascular risk and a reversal of microalbuminuria with the use of agents that affect the renin-angiotensin system: angiotensin-receptor blockers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nephropathy, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  2. Protein intake in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Pollock, C A; Ibels, L S; Zhu, F Y; Warnant, M; Caterson, R J; Waugh, D A; Mahony, J F

    1997-05-01

    The dietary protein intake (DPI) of 766 patients (aged 7 to 88 yr) was determined from 24-h urinary urea and protein excretion by urea kinetic modelling. Five hundred sixty-five patients had a normal serum creatinine concentration, and of these 565, 385 patients had no dietary modification advised and 180 were advised to follow a low-protein diet. The remaining 201 patients had an increased serum creatinine concentration; 148 of these 201 patients had been advised to restrict their DPI. Patients with a normal serum creatinine concentration who had no dietary restriction had a significantly higher DPI than those advised to restrict their protein intake (1.08 +/- 0.01 versus 0.96 +/- 0.02 g/kg per day (mean +/- SEM), P < 0.01). Similarly, patients with abnormal renal function who were advised to follow a low-protein diet had a reduced DPI (0.93 +/- 0.01 versus 0.87 +/- 0.02 g/kg per day; P < 0.05). A lower DPI correlated with level of renal dysfunction, independent of dietary advice (P < 0.0001). In the overall population, DPI correlated with body mass index (BMI; P < 0.0001) and serum albumin (P < 0.0001), and inverse correlations were evident between age (P < 0.0001), blood glucose level (P < 0.01), serum cholesterol level (P < 0.0001), and triglyceride levels (P < 0.0001) independently of renal function. Fifty-two patients were assessed within the 3 months before the commencement of dialysis, and 47 were reassessed within 3 months after the commencement of dialysis. Despite advice regarding an increase in dietary protein after the commencement of dialysis, this increase failed to occur within the 3 months of commencement of dialytic therapy (0.79 +/- 0.04 versus 0.82 +/- 0.03 g/kg per day); P = 0.64). However, 6 to 9 months after the commencement of dialysis, a significant increase in protein intake was evident (1.04 +/- 0.04 g/kg per day; P < 0.005 versus both prior measurements). Hence a low DPI in renal impairment occurs independently of dietary advice, but

  3. Antioxidants in the prevention of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Wardle, E N

    1999-11-01

    In view of the role of oxidative processes in inflicting damage that leads to glomerulosclerosis and renal medullary interstitial fibrosis, more attention could be paid to the use of antioxidant food constituents and the usage of drugs with recognized antioxidant potential. In any case atherosclerosis is an important component of chronic renal diseases. There is a wide choice of foods and drugs that could confer benefit. Supplementation with vitamins E and C, use of soy protein diets and drinking green tea could be sufficient to confer remarkable improvements.

  4. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  5. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  6. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  7. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  8. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  9. Oxidant Mechanisms in Renal Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Brian B.; Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Pawar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A common link between all forms of acute and chronic kidney injuries, regardless of species, is enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during injury/disease progression. While low levels of ROS and RNS are required for prosurvival signaling, cell proliferation and growth, and vasoreactivity regulation, an imbalance of ROS and RNS generation and elimination leads to inflammation, cell death, tissue damage, and disease/injury progression. Recent Advances: Many aspects of renal oxidative stress still require investigation, including clarification of the mechanisms which prompt ROS/RNS generation and subsequent renal damage. However, we currently have a basic understanding of the major features of oxidative stress pathology and its link to kidney injury/disease, which this review summarizes. Critical Issues: The review summarizes the critical sources of oxidative stress in the kidney during injury/disease, including generation of ROS and RNS from mitochondria, NADPH oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The review next summarizes the renal antioxidant systems that protect against oxidative stress, including superoxide dismutase and catalase, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems, and others. Next, we describe how oxidative stress affects kidney function and promotes damage in every nephron segment, including the renal vessels, glomeruli, and tubules. Future Directions: Despite the limited success associated with the application of antioxidants for treatment of kidney injury/disease thus far, preventing the generation and accumulation of ROS and RNS provides an ideal target for potential therapeutic treatments. The review discusses the shortcomings of antioxidant treatments previously used and the potential promise of new ones. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 119–146. PMID:26906267

  10. Nephrolithiasis-induced end stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Ounissi, M; Gargueh, T; Mahfoudhi, M; Boubaker, K; Hedri, H; Goucha, R; Abderrahim, E; Ben Hamida, F; Ben Abdallah, T; El Younsi, F; Ben Maiz, H; Kheder, A

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Nephrolithiasis still remains a too frequent and underappreciated cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Methods and patients: Of the entire cohort of 7128 consecutive patients who started maintenance dialysis in our nephrology department between January 1992 and December 2006, a total of 45 patients (26 women, 19 men) had renal stone disease as the cause of ESRD. The type of nephrolithiasis was determined in 45 cases and etiology in 42. The treatment and evolution of stone disease and patient’s survival were studied. Results: The overall proportion of nephrolithiasis related ESRD was 0.63%. The mean age was 48.4 years. Infection stones (struvite) accounted for 40%, calcium stones, 26.67% (primary hyperparathyroidism:15.56%; familial hypercalciuria: 4.44%, unknown etiology: 6.66%), primary hyperoxaluria type 1, 17.78% and uric acid lithiasis in 15.56% of cases. The mean delay of the evolution of the stone renal disease to chronic renal failure was 85.8 months. The feminine gender, obesity and elevated alkaline phosphatases >128 IU/L were significantly correlated with fast evolution of ESRD. The median evolution to ESRD was 12 months. The normal body mass index (BMI), medical treatment of stone and primary hyperoxaluria type 1 were correlated with fast evolution to ESRD. All patients were treated by hemodialysis during a mean evolution of 60 months. Sixteen patients died. The patient's survival rate at 1, 3 and 5 years was 97.6, 92.8 and 69% respectively. Hypocalcemia, cardiopathy and normal calcium-phosphate product were significantly correlated with lower survival rate. Conclusion: Severe forms of nephrolithiasis remain an underestimated cause of ESRD. These findings highlight the crucial importance of accurate stone analysis and metabolic evaluation to provide early diagnosis and efficient treatment for conditions leading to ESRD. PMID:21694924

  11. Glomerulonephritis and managing the risks of chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurmeet R

    2009-12-01

    The rising global burden of chronic renal disease, the high cost of providing renal replacement therapies, and renal disease also being a risk factor for cardiovascular disease is increasing focus on renal disease prevention. This article focuses on the aspects of renal disease (specifically poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis [PSGN] and chronic kidney disease [CKD]) in Indigenous populations in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States that diverge from those typically seen in the general population of those countries. The spectrum of renal and many other diseases seen in Indigenous people in developed countries is similar to that seen in developing countries. Diseases like PSGN that have largely disappeared in developed countries still occur frequently in Indigenous people. CKD during the childhood years is due to congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract in up to 70% of cases and occurs later in polycystic kidney disease and childhood-onset diabetes. Several risk factors for CKD in adulthood are already present in childhood.

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease As a Potential Indication for Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Margreet F.; Blankestijn, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation is being used as a blood pressure lowering therapy for patients with apparent treatment resistant hypertension. However, this population does not represent a distinct disease condition in which benefit is predictable. In fact, the wide range in effectiveness of renal denervation could be a consequence of this heterogeneous pathogenesis of hypertension. Since renal denervation aims at disrupting sympathetic nerves surrounding the renal arteries, it seems obvious to focus on patients with increased afferent and/or efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity. In this review will be argued, from both a pathophysiological and a clinical point of view, that chronic kidney disease is particularly suited to renal denervation. PMID:27375498

  13. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    . Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide are modulators of myogenic and MD-TGF mechanisms. Attenuated renal autoregulation contributes to renal damage in many, but not all, models of renal, diabetic, and hypertensive diseases. This review provides a summary of our current knowledge regarding underlying mechanisms enabling renal autoregulation in health and disease and methods used for its study. PMID:25834230

  14. Renal autoregulation in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S; Arendshorst, William J

    2015-04-01

    -GF) mechanism. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide are modulators of myogenic and MD-TGF mechanisms. Attenuated renal autoregulation contributes to renal damage in many, but not all, models of renal, diabetic, and hypertensive diseases. This review provides a summary of our current knowledge regarding underlying mechanisms enabling renal autoregulation in health and disease and methods used for its study. PMID:25834230

  15. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  16. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  17. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Yes or no?

    PubMed Central

    Edipidis, K

    2011-01-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue pregnancy, are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Although advances in antenatal and neonatal care continue to improve these outcomes, the risks remain proportionate to the degree of underlying renal dysfunction. The aim of this article, is to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome, in women with chronic renal disease and to provide if possible, useful conclusions whether and when, a woman with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), should decide to get pregnant. This article, reviews briefly the normal physiological changes of renal function during pregnancy, and make an attempt to clarify the nature and severity of the risks, in the settings of chronic renal insufficiency and end stage renal disease, including dialysis patients and transplant recipients. PMID:21897751

  18. Renal co-morbidity in patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Renal co-morbidity is common in patients with rheumatic disease based on regular assessment of serum and urine parameters of renal function. When patients present with both arthritis and renal abnormalities the following questions have to be addressed. Is kidney disease a complication of rheumatic disease or its management, or are they both manifestations of a single systemic autoimmune disease? Is rheumatic disease a complication of kidney disease and its management? How do rheumatic disease and kidney disease affect each other even when they are unrelated? The present review provides an overview of how to address these questions in daily practice. PMID:21722341

  19. Ankle brachial index screening for occult vascular disease is not useful in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Johns, Kevin; Saeedi, Ramesh; Mancini, G B John; Bondy, Greg

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic complications common to the HIV-positive population may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. Asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) is a screening tool commonly used for the detection of asymptomatic PAD. The prevalence of asymptomatic PAD based on ABI in HIV-positive patients is unknown. This study was cross-sectional in design and assessed PAD by measuring the systolic ABI as determined by a handheld 8-MHz Doppler probe with the patient at rest in a supine position. A brief medical history including pertinent risk factors was obtained. One hundred and sixty-seven HIV-positive patients were evaluated (97.6% male; mean age 52.0 years; 31.2% current smokers, 29.4% former smokers, 26.3% diabetes mellitus). Asymptomatic PAD (ABI < or = 0.9) was found in four patients (2.4%, 95% CI: 0.3-4.5%). Smoking was a significant predictor of PAD. Patients with a positive test for PAD had at least two major risk factors for the disease including smoking, a history of disease in another vascular bed, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and hypertension. All patients with a positive test for PAD had a high risk (>20%) for cardiovascular disease according to the Framingham risk score. Three of the four patients with positive tests had previously diagnosed vascular disease (CAD, stroke). Three patients presenting with PAD were evaluated and all had a positive ABI. The prevalence of PAD compared to previous studies on PAD in HIV was low and identified only those patients with high cardiovascular risk based on other features. ABI was not useful in detecting occult vascular disease in HIV-positive patients and offers no additional information to that derived from cardiovascular risk stratification.

  20. The Renal History of Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Gaggl, Martina; El-Hadi, Sarah; Aigner, Christof; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2016-02-01

    In 1898 William Anderson and Johannes Fabry described the red-purple maculopapular skin lesions characteristic for Fabry disease and also mentioned the presence of proteinuria. Four decades later Maximiliaan Ruiter concluded that angiokeratoma corporis diffusum is the cutaneous manifestation of an inherited systemic internal disease. In 1947 autopsy findings of two cases who died from uraemia revealed sclerosis of glomeruli. At this time the presence of a thesaurismosis was also considered. The first renal needle biopsy in 1958 showed vacuolation and distension of the cells of the glomerular tufts and distal tubules suggestive of a storage disorder. The ability to concentrate the urine was also impaired in these patients. Sweely und Klionsky in 1963 demonstrated that the major storage component is a trihexoside. As of 1967 Roscoe Brady finally described the deficiency of the enzyme ceramidetrihexosidase/-galactosidase A characteristic in patients with Fabry disease. PMID:26913882

  1. Clinical and molecular insights into tuberous sclerosis complex renal disease.

    PubMed

    Siroky, Brian J; Yin, Hong; Bissler, John J

    2011-06-01

    Patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are at great risk of developing renal lesions as part of their disease. These lesions include renal cysts and tumors. Significant advances in understanding the cell biology of these renal lesions has already led to clinical trials demonstrating that pharmacological interventions are likely possible. This review focuses on the pathology of these renal lesions, their underlying cell biology, and the possible therapeutic strategies that may prove to significantly improve care for these patients.

  2. Spectrum of gallium-67 renal activity in patients with no evidence of renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.E.; Van Nostrand, D.; Howard, W.H. III; Kyle, R.W.

    1984-05-01

    Thirty-seven gallium-67 images were reviewed retrospectively to determine relative renal gallium activity (RGA) in patients with no evidence of renal disease. Twenty-four patients were classified as having no evidence of renal disease (NRD). RGA was identified in 50.0% (12/24) of patients in the NRD group. The authors conclude that the presence of RGA neither suggests nor rules out renal disease. Altered nonrenal biological factors (such as saturation of iron-binding capacity) may decrease soft-tissue gallium accumulation while activity in the kidney remains unchanged. The latter provides renal images with better signal-to-noise ratio. Current imaging equipment may allow renal visualization in these patients.

  3. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  4. Anti-GBM disease and renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Phillippa; Sarfraz, Farook; Ravanan, Rommel

    2011-11-15

    A 23-year-old female who presented with advanced renal failure was subsequently diagnosed with renal vein thrombosis and antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody disease. A previous case of renal vein thrombosis has been reported in association with anti-GBM disease, but to our knowledge, this is the first reported case in which the presentation of anti-GBM disease and renal vein thrombosis was concurrent. Further study is essential to understand if the association of anti-GBM disease and renal vein thrombosis as seen in our case was pure coincidence or is in fact occurs more frequently. It may be that the dual diagnosis is not made as establishing one sufficient diagnosis for renal failure may halt further investigations for additional diagnoses.

  5. Novel approaches to assessing renal function in cirrhotic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Portal, Andrew J; Austin, Mark; Heneghan, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Renal dysfunction is common in patients with end-stage liver disease. Etiological factors include conditions as diverse as acute tubular necrosis, immunoglobulin A nephropathy and hepatorenal syndrome. Current standard tests of renal function, such as measurement of serum urea and creatinine levels, are inaccurate as the synthesis of these markers is affected by the native liver pathology. This article reviews novel markers of renal function and their potential use in patients with liver disease.

  6. De Novo Glomerular Diseases after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Gabriella; Glassock, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Glomerular diseases developing in the kidney allograft are more often recurrences of the original disease affecting the native kidneys. However, in an undefined number of cases de novo, glomerular diseases unrelated to the original disease in the native kidneys can develop in the transplanted kidney. The clinical presentation and histologic features of de novo diseases are often similar to those features observed in patients with primary or secondary GN in the native kidneys. However, in transplanted kidneys, the glomerular, vascular, and tubulointerstitial changes are often intertwined with structural abnormalities already present at the time of transplant or caused by antibody- or cell-mediated allograft rejection, immunosuppressive drugs, or superimposed infection (most often of a viral nature). The pathophysiology of de novo glomerular diseases is quite variable. In rare cases of de novo minimal change disease, circulating factors increasing the glomerular permeability likely participate. Maladaptive hemodynamic changes and tissue fibrosis caused by calcineurin inhibitors or other factors may be involved in the pathogenesis of de novo FSGS. The exposure of cryptic podocyte antigens may favor the development of de novo membranous nephropathy. Many cases of de novo membranoproliferative GN are related to hepatitis C virus infection. Patients with Alport syndrome lacking antigenic epitopes in their glomerular basement membrane may develop antibodies against these glomerular basement membrane antigens expressed in the transplanted kidney. Infection may cause acute GN to have a heterogeneous clinical presentation and outcome. De novo pauci-immune GN in renal transplant is rare. Preexisting or acquired intolerance to glucose may, in the long term, cause diabetic nephropathy. The prognosis of de novo diseases depends on the type of GN, the severity of lesions caused by the alloimmune response, or the efficacy of immunosuppressive therapy. In most cases, the management

  7. End stage renal disease serum contains a specific renal cell growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, L.H.; Kulkarni, C.; Mills, G. )

    1991-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) kidneys display abnormal growth characterized by a continuum of cystic disease, adenoma and carcinoma. This study evaluates the hypothesis that serum of patients with ESRD contains increased amounts of a growth factor which specifically induces proliferation of renal cells. ESRD sera compared to sera from normal controls induced a two to three-fold increase in the proliferative rate of renal cell carcinoma cell lines and normal kidney explants compared to cell lines from other sites. The increased proliferative activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was paralleled by an increase in cytosolic free calcium. The growth factor activity was encoded by a polypeptide of between 15 and 30 kd. The activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was not mimicked or inhibited by epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet derived growth factor indicating that the renal cell specific growth factor activity in ESRD is different from these factors.

  8. Endothelin-a receptor antagonism after renal angioplasty enhances renal recovery in renovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chade, Alejandro R; Tullos, Nathan; Stewart, Nicholas J; Surles, Bret

    2015-05-01

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty/stenting (PTRAS) is frequently used to treat renal artery stenosis and renovascular disease (RVD); however, renal function is restored in less than one half of the cases. This study was designed to test a novel intervention that could refine PTRAS and enhance renal recovery in RVD. Renal function was quantified in pigs after 6 weeks of chronic RVD (induced by unilateral renal artery stenosis), established renal damage, and hypertension. Pigs with RVD then underwent PTRAS and were randomized into three groups: placebo (RVD+PTRAS), chronic endothelin-A receptor (ET-A) blockade (RVD+PTRAS+ET-A), and chronic dual ET-A/B blockade (RVD+PTRAS+ET-A/B) for 4 weeks. Renal function was again evaluated after treatments, and then, ex vivo studies were performed on the stented kidney. PTRAS resolved renal stenosis, attenuated hypertension, and improved renal function but did not resolve renal microvascular rarefaction, remodeling, or renal fibrosis. ET-A blocker therapy after PTRAS significantly improved hypertension, microvascular rarefaction, and renal injury and led to greater recovery of renal function. Conversely, combined ET-A/B blockade therapy blunted the therapeutic effects of PTRAS alone or PTRAS followed by ET-A blockade. These data suggest that ET-A receptor blockade therapy could serve as a coadjuvant intervention to enhance the outcomes of PTRAS in RVD. These results also suggest that ET-B receptors are important for renal function in RVD and may contribute to recovery after PTRAS. Using clinically available compounds and techniques, our results could contribute to both refinement and design of new therapeutic strategies in chronic RVD.

  9. Hyperphosphatemia in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Indridason, Olafur S; Quarles, L Darryl

    2002-07-01

    Hyperphosphatemia occurs universally in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) unless efforts are made to prevent positive phosphate balance. Positive phosphate balance results from the loss of renal elimination of phosphate and continued obligatory intestinal absorption of dietary phosphate. Increased efflux of phosphate from bone because of excess parathyroid hormone-mediated bone resorption can also contribute to increased serum phosphate concentrations in the setting of severe hyperparathyroidism. It is important to treat hyperphosphatemia because it contributes to the pathogenesis of hyperparathyroidism, vascular calcifications, and increased cardiovascular mortality in ESRD patients. Attaining a neutral phosphate balance, which is the key to the management of hyperphosphatemia in ESRD, is a challenge. Control of phosphorus depends on its removal during dialysis and the limitation of gastrointestinal absorption by dietary phosphate restriction and chelation of phosphate. Knowledge of the quantitative aspects of phosphate balance is useful in optimizing our use of phosphate binders, dialysis frequency, and vitamin D sterols. The development of new phosphate binders and efforts to find new ways to inhibit gastrointestinal absorption of phosphate will lead to improvements in the control of serum phosphate levels in ESRD. PMID:12203200

  10. Trace elements in renal disease and hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoshinori; Nakai, Keiko; Suwabe, Akira; Sera, Koichiro

    2002-04-01

    A number of considerations suggest that trace element disturbances might occur in patients with renal disease and in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Using particle induced X-ray emission, we demonstrated the relations between serum concentration, urinary excretion of the trace elements and creatinine clearance (Ccr) in randomized 50 patients. To estimate the effects of HD, we also observed the changes of these elements in serum and dialysis fluids during HD. Urinary silicon excretion decreased, and serum silicon concentration increased as Ccr decreased, with significant correlation ( r=0.702, p<0.001 and r=0.676, p<0.0001, respectively). We also observed the increase of serum silicon, and the decrease of silicon in dialysis fluids during HD. These results suggested that reduced renal function and also dialysis contributed to silicon accumulation. Although serum selenium decreased significantly according to Ccr decrease ( r=0.452, p<0.01), we could detect no change in urinary selenium excretion and no transfer during HD. Serum bromine and urinary excretion of bromine did not correlate to Ccr. However we observed a bromine transfer from the serum to the dialysis fluid that contributed to the serum bromine decrease in HD patients.

  11. Renal histology in polycystic kidney disease with incipient and advanced renal failure.

    PubMed

    Zeier, M; Fehrenbach, P; Geberth, S; Möhring, K; Waldherr, R; Ritz, E

    1992-11-01

    Renal specimens were obtained at surgery or postmortem from patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Patients had either serum creatinine (SCr) below 350 mumol/liter (N = 12) or terminal renal failure (N = 50). Specimens were examined by two independent observers using a carefully validated score system. Mean glomerular diameters were similar in ADPKD patients with early renal failure (176 +/- 38 microns) and in victims of traffic accidents (177 +/- 23 microns), while they were significantly greater in diabetics with comparable renal function (205 +/- 16 microns). Glomerular diameters in ADPKD patients with terminal renal failure (191 +/- 45 microns) and with early renal failure were not significantly different. On average, 29% of glomeruli (17 to 62) were globally sclerosed in early renal failure, and 49% (19 to 93) in terminal renal failure. The proportion of glomeruli with segmental sclerosis was less than 4% in both groups. Marked vascular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, and tubular atrophy were present in early renal failure, and even more so in terminal renal failure. Interstitial infiltrates were scarce and consisted mainly of CD4 positive lymphocytes and CD68 positive macrophages. Immunestaining with monoclonal renin antibodies showed an increased juxtaglomerular index and expression of renin by arterioles adjacent to cysts, as well as by cyst wall epithelia. The data show more severe vascular and interstitial, but not glomerular, changes in ADPKD with advanced as compared to early renal failure.

  12. Massive renal and retroperitoneal hemorrhage in a case of acquired renal cystic disease with atypical epithelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Verani, R; Wagner, E; Thompson, C

    1988-07-01

    We present a case of acquired renal cystic disease in a patient with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus who was dialysis dependent for 5 years. Renal hemorrhage and neoplastic transformation of the cyst epithelium are the two major complications of acquired renal cystic disease, and were present in this patient. The full clinical significance of the acquired renal cystic lesion is still unclear, although the possibility of renal tumors and massive renal and retroperitoneal hemorrhage should be considered in the long-term dialysis population.

  13. The natural history of occult or angiodysplastic gastrointestinal bleeding in von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Makris, M; Federici, A B; Mannucci, P M; Bolton-Maggs, P H B; Yee, T T; Abshire, T; Berntorp, E

    2015-05-01

    Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most challenging complications encountered in the management of patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD). The commonest cause is angiodysplasia, but often no cause is identified due to the difficulty in making the diagnosis. The optimal treatment to prevent recurrences remains unknown. We performed a retrospective study of VWD patients with occult or angiodysplastic bleeding within the setting of the von Willebrand Disease Prophylaxis Network (VWD PN) to describe diagnostic and treatment strategies. Centres participating in the VWD PN recruited subjects under their care with a history of congenital VWD and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding due to angiodysplasia, or cases in which the cause was not identified despite investigation. Patients with acquired von Willebrand syndrome or those for whom the GI bleeding was due to another cause were excluded. Forty-eight patients from 18 centres in 10 countries were recruited. Seven individuals had a family history of GI bleeding and all VWD types except 2N were represented. Angiodysplasia was confirmed in 38%, with video capsule endoscopy and GI tract endoscopies being the most common methods of making the diagnosis. Recurrent GI bleeding in VWD is associated with significant morbidity and required hospital admission on up to 30 occasions. Patients were treated with multiple pharmacological agents with prophylactic von Willebrand factor concentrate being the most efficient in preventing recurrence of the GI bleeding. The diagnosis and treatment of recurrent GI bleeding in congenital VWD remains challenging and is associated with significant morbidity. Prophylactic treatment with von Willebrand factor concentrate was the most effective method of preventing recurrent bleeding but its efficacy remains to be confirmed in a prospective study.

  14. The natural history of occult or angiodysplastic gastrointestinal bleeding in von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Makris, M; Federici, A B; Mannucci, P M; Bolton-Maggs, P H B; Yee, T T; Abshire, T; Berntorp, E

    2015-05-01

    Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most challenging complications encountered in the management of patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD). The commonest cause is angiodysplasia, but often no cause is identified due to the difficulty in making the diagnosis. The optimal treatment to prevent recurrences remains unknown. We performed a retrospective study of VWD patients with occult or angiodysplastic bleeding within the setting of the von Willebrand Disease Prophylaxis Network (VWD PN) to describe diagnostic and treatment strategies. Centres participating in the VWD PN recruited subjects under their care with a history of congenital VWD and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding due to angiodysplasia, or cases in which the cause was not identified despite investigation. Patients with acquired von Willebrand syndrome or those for whom the GI bleeding was due to another cause were excluded. Forty-eight patients from 18 centres in 10 countries were recruited. Seven individuals had a family history of GI bleeding and all VWD types except 2N were represented. Angiodysplasia was confirmed in 38%, with video capsule endoscopy and GI tract endoscopies being the most common methods of making the diagnosis. Recurrent GI bleeding in VWD is associated with significant morbidity and required hospital admission on up to 30 occasions. Patients were treated with multiple pharmacological agents with prophylactic von Willebrand factor concentrate being the most efficient in preventing recurrence of the GI bleeding. The diagnosis and treatment of recurrent GI bleeding in congenital VWD remains challenging and is associated with significant morbidity. Prophylactic treatment with von Willebrand factor concentrate was the most effective method of preventing recurrent bleeding but its efficacy remains to be confirmed in a prospective study. PMID:25381842

  15. Prevalence of colorectal diseases in immunological fecal occult blood test (I-FOBT) positive patients in a tertiary care hospital in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mollick, S H; Roy, P K; Bhuiyan, M R; Mia, A R; Alam, M S; Mollick, K A; Pervin, S; Hassan, M Q

    2014-10-01

    Bleeding lesion anywhere in the GI tract can cause positive reaction to Immunological Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT). Although any colonic lesion can cause occult lower GI bleeding, relative frequency of this lesion not known. Guaic based tests require prior preparation and dietary restriction and less sensitive and specific than IFOBT for detection of occult bleeding .IFOBT is specific for human hemoglobin and is more sensitive and specific for detection of occult bleeding from any colonic lesion. Aim of this study was to diagnose occult gastrointestinal bleeding with positive IFOBT and the prevalence of colorectal disease in IFOBT positive patients in a tertiary care hospital in Bangladesh. This was a prospective cross sectional study conducted in Department of gastroenterology in collaboration with clinical pathology, BSMMU, Dhaka during the period of January 2009 to December 2009. In this study 200 patients meeting the inclusion criteria were included. Detailed clinical history and physical findings were recorded; FOBT was done on single stool specimen. Positive occult bleeding was confirmed in 90 patients of whom 80 patients underwent colonoscopy. The mean age of study population was 36.73±13.64 (range 16 to 72) years. At colonoscopy lesion were identified in 46(57.50%) patients, of which colonic polyp in12 (15%), colorectal cancer in 11(13.7%), inflammatory bowel disease in 3(3.75%), hemorrhoids and anal fissure in 7(8.75%), tuberculosis in 5(6.25%), and proctitis in 1(1.25%) cases. A positive IFOBT is more sensitive and specific test than other FOBT for detection of occult lower GI bleeding of colonic origin. In this study colorectal diseases were detected in 57.50% of the IFOBT positive patients, so IOBT can be used as an important diagnostic tool for detection of occult lower GI bleeding.

  16. The Genetics of Ultra-Rare Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Muff-Luett, Melissa; Nester, Carla M

    2016-03-01

    The complement-mediated renal diseases are a group of ultra-rare renal diseases that disproportionately affect children and young adults and frequently lead to irreversible renal failure. Genetic mutations in alternate pathway of complement genes are pathomechanistically involved in a significant number of these unique diseases. Here, we review our current understanding of the role of genetics in the primary complement-mediated renal diseases affecting children, with a focus on atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathy. Also, included is a brief discussion of the related diseases whose relationship to complement abnormality has been suspected but not yet confirmed. Advances in genetics have transformed both treatment and outcomes in these historically difficult to treat, highly morbid diseases. PMID:27617140

  17. Imaging Manifestations of Hematologic Diseases with Renal and Perinephric Involvement.

    PubMed

    Purysko, Andrei S; Westphalen, Antonio C; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Leão Filho, Hilton M; Herts, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys and perinephric tissues can be affected by a variety of hematologic disorders, which usually occur in the setting of multisystem involvement. In many of these disorders, imaging is used to evaluate the extent of disease, guide biopsy, and/or monitor disease activity and patient response to therapy. Lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma commonly manifest as multiple parenchymal or perinephric lesions. Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease, rare forms of multisystemic histiocytosis, are often identified as perinephric and periureteral masses. Renal abnormalities depicted at imaging in patients with sickle cell disease include renal enlargement, papillary necrosis, and renal medullary carcinoma. Sickle cell disease, along with other causes of intravascular hemolysis, can also lead to hemosiderosis of the renal cortex. Thrombosis of renal veins is sometimes seen in patients with coagulation disorders but more often occurs in association with certain malignancies and nephrotic syndrome. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease is another multisystem process that often produces focal renal lesions, seen along with involvement of more characteristic organs such as the pancreas. Perinephric lesions with calcifications should raise the possibility of secondary amyloidosis, especially in patients with a history of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Although the imaging patterns of renal and perinephric involvement are usually not specific for a single entity, and the same entity can manifest with different or overlapping patterns, familiarity with these patterns and key clinical and histopathologic features may help to narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the next step of care. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27257766

  18. Gentamicin Nephrotoxicity in Subclinical Renal Disease.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Donita L.

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the pharmacokinetic disposition of gentamicin and to define the mechanisms which predispose to nephrotoxicity in subclinical renal disease. Subtotally nephrectomized beagle dogs were used as a model for human beings with compromised renal function secondary to a reduced number of functional nephrons. Using ultrastructural morphometry, light microscopy and clinical chemistry data, the model was defined and the nephrotoxic responses of intact dogs administered recommended doses of drug were compared to the response of subtotally nephrectomized dogs administered reduced doses based on each animal's clearance of drug. Lysosomal and mitochondrial morphometric changes suggested mechanisms for increased sensitivity. To determine if increased sensitivity in this model was dependent on altered serum concentrations, variable rate infusions based on individual pharmacokinetic disposition of drug were administered using computer-driven infusion pumps. Identical serum concentration-time profiles were achieved in normal dogs and subtotally nephrectomized dogs, however, toxicity was significantly greater in nephrectomized dogs. The difference in the nephrotoxic response was characterized by administering supratherapeutic doses of drug to dogs. Nephrectomized dogs given a recommended dose of gentamicin became oliguric during the second week of treatment and increasingly uremic after withdrawal of drug. In contrast, intact dogs administered 2 times the recommended dose of gentamicin become only slightly polyuric during week 4 of treatment. The need to individualize dosage regimens based on drug clearance and not serum creatinine nor creatinine clearance alone was substantiated by describing the pharmacokinetic disposition of gentamicin in spontaneously occurring disease states. Four individualized dosage regimens with differing predicted efficacy were then administered to nephrectomized dogs to determine their relative nephrotoxic

  19. Occult Blood and Perianal Exam: Value Added in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Screening

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Christopher J.; Kaplan, Jess L.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often presents insidiously and standard blood tests are normal in 20% of patients. We hypothesize that fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and the perianal examination in addition to blood tests provide important information during the screening process for IBD. The goal of this study was to measure the diagnostic value of adding FOBT and perianal examination to standard screening labs in evaluating children and adolescents for IBD. METHODS The medical records of consecutive patients undergoing ileocolonoscopy for IBD were reviewed. Laboratory test results, FOBT, and perianal examination prior to the decision to perform the ileocolonoscopy were recorded. Standard limits of laboratory tests were used. Multivariate logistic regression was performed on a discovery cohort and applied to an independent validation cohort. RESULTS The discovery cohort included 335 patients (85 IBD and 250 non-IBD). 61.2% had FOBT and perianal examination performed prior to the decision to perform the ileocolonoscopy. 119 patients had complete blood testing, FOBT, and perianal exam available for full analysis. The sensitivity of the lab testing was 80.5% for IBD and the sensitivity of FOBT with perianal examination was 65.9%. However, the combined sensitivity of lab testing and FOBT with perianal examination was 97.6%. The most predictive model included CRP, platelets and FOBT with perianal examination and was superior to the lab value-only model (p<0.001) which was validated in a separate cohort. CONCLUSIONS Perianal examination and FOBT improves sensitivity in screening children for IBD. PMID:25651490

  20. Epigenetics in Kidney Development and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dressler, Gregory R.; Patel, Sanjeevkumar R.

    2014-01-01

    The study of Epigenetics is intimately linked and inseparable from developmental biology. Many of the genes that imprint epigenetic information on chromatin, function during the specification of cell lineages in the developing embryo. These include the histone methyltransferases and their co-factors of the Polycomb and Trithorax gene families. How histone methylation is established and what regulates the tissue and locus specificity of histone methylation is an emerging area of research. The embryonic kidney is used as a model to understand how DNA binding proteins can specify cell lineages and how such proteins interact directly with the histone methylation machinery to generate a unique epigenome for particular tissues and cell types. In adult tissues, histone methylation marks must be maintained for normal gene expression patterns. In chronic and acute renal disease, epigenetic marks are being characterized and correlated with the establishment of metabolic memory, in part to explain the persistence of pathologies even when optimal treatment modalities are utilized. Thus, the state of the epigenome in adult cells must be considered when attempting to alleviate or alter gene expression patterns in disease. PMID:24958601

  1. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    George, Sunil K.; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D.; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  2. Renal cystic disease: new insights for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Avner, Ellis D; Sweeney, William E

    2006-10-01

    This article cannot comprehensively cover the enormous strides made in defining the molecular and cellular basis of renal cystic diseases over the last decade. Therefore, it provides a brief overview and categorization of inherited, developmental, and acquired renal cystic diseases, providing a relevant, up-to-date bibliography as well as a useful list of informative Internet Web sites. Its major focus is the translational biology of polycystic kidney disease. It demonstrates how emerging molecular and cellular knowledge of the pathophysiology of particular diseases such as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) can translate into innovative therapeutic insights.

  3. Assessment of renal vascular resistance and blood pressure in dogs and cats with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Novellas, R; Ruiz de Gopegui, R; Espada, Y

    2010-05-15

    This study investigated the possible relationships between renal resistive index (RI) or pulsatility index (PI) and systolic blood pressure and biochemical and haematological parameters in dogs and cats with renal disease. The study included 50 dogs and 20 cats with renal disease. RI and PI were significantly higher in both dogs and cats with renal disease than in 27 healthy dogs and 10 healthy cats. In dogs, a significant negative correlation was found between RI and red blood cell count, and a positive correlation was found between PI and serum creatinine. In cats, a positive correlation was found between RI and serum urea, between PI and serum creatinine, and between PI and serum urea. No relationship could be found between either RI or PI and systolic blood pressure.

  4. Surgical management of renal cystic disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Hemal, Ashok K

    2011-02-01

    The kidney is one of the most common sites for cyst in the body (prevalence about 5%). Symptomatic or incidental cyst needs to be characterized further based on Bosniak classification as simple (Bosniak type I & II) or complex (Bosniak type III & IV) cysts with respect to risk of malignancy or other effects on the kidney. The management of simple cysts is entirely for its symptoms or complications (eg, hemorrhage, infection, hydronephrosis, and hypertension). Percutaneous aspiration alone or with sclerotherapy often is the first-line treatment. Surgical decortication generally is reserved for recurrent or very large symptomatic cysts. Laparoscopic surgery is highly efficacious and is associated with high satisfaction rates with minimal morbidity. Retroperitoneal approach is generally preferred, especially in infected or hydatid renal cyst to avoid spillage or contamination of virgin peritoneal cavity. Cyst decortication seems to be an appropriate indication for newer-emerging single-port laparoscopic approaches such as natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, single-incision laparoscopic surgery, or laparoendoscopic single-site surgery. Where available, robot-assisted surgical management can supplant pure laparoscopic management for complex cysts, hydatid cyst, peripelvic cyst, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease without any outstanding benefits, but with added cost, when robot is used.

  5. Utility of renal biopsy in the clinical management of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Dhaun, Neeraj; Bellamy, Christopher O; Cattran, Daniel C; Kluth, David C

    2014-05-01

    Characterizing chronic kidney disease (CKD) at all stages is an essential part of rational management and the renal biopsy plays a key role in defining the processes involved. There remain no global guidelines available to the renal community on indications for this important diagnostic, prognostic, and relatively safe test. Although most nephrologists recognize several clear indications for a renal biopsy, it is still underutilized. It not only helps the clinician to manage the patient with CKD, but it can also help clarify the epidemiology of CKD, and aid research into the pathobiology of disease with the aim of discovering new therapies. It may be useful for instance in elderly patients with CKD, those with diabetes and presumed 'hypertensive nephropathy', and in some patients with advanced CKD as part of the pretransplant work-up. In some populations (for example, immunoglobulin A nephropathy and ANCA vasculitis), renal biopsy allows disease classification that may predict CKD progression and response to therapy. For the individual, interval renal biopsy may be of use in providing ongoing therapeutic and prognostic information. Molecular advances will change the landscape of renal pathology and add a new dimension to the diagnostic precision of kidney biopsy. Organizing the multiplicity of information available in a renal biopsy to maximize benefits to the patient, as well as to the epidemiologist and researcher, is one of the challenges that face the nephrology community.

  6. Effect of alfacalcidol on natural course of renal bone disease in mild to moderate renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, N. A.; Kanis, J. A.; Beneton, M. N.; Brown, C. B.; Juttmann, J. R.; Jordans, J. G.; Josse, S.; Meyrier, A.; Lins, R. L.; Fairey, I. T.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether alfacalcidol--used in management of overt renal bone disease--may safely prevent renal bone disease when used earlier in course of renal failure. DESIGN--Double blind, prospective, randomised, placebo controlled study. SETTING--17 nephrology centres from Belgium, France, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. SUBJECTS--176 patients aged 18-81 with mild to moderate chronic renal failure (creatinine clearance 15-50 ml/min) and with no clinical, biochemical, or radiographic evidence of bone disease. INTERVENTIONS--Alfacalcidol 0.25 micrograms (titrated according to serum calcium concentration) or placebo given for two years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Quantitative histology of bone to assess efficacy of treatment and renal function to assess safety. RESULTS--132 patients had histological evidence of bone disease at start of study. Biochemical, radiographic, and histological indices of bone metabolism were similar for the 89 patients given alfacalcidol and the 87 controls given placebo. After treatment, mean serum alkaline phosphatase activity and intact parathyroid hormone concentration had increased by 13% and 126% respectively in controls but had not changed in patients given alfacalcidol (P < 0.001). Hypercalcaemic episodes occurred in 10 patients given alfacalcidol (but responded to decreases in drug dose) and in three controls. Histological indices of bone turnover significantly improved in patients given alfacalcidol and significantly deteriorated in controls: among patients with abnormal bone histology before treatment, bone disease resolved in 23 (42%) of those given alfacalcidol compared with two (4%) of the controls (P < 0.001). There was no difference in rate of progression of renal failure between the two groups. CONCLUSION--Early administration of alfacalcidol can safely and beneficially alter the natural course of renal bone disease in patients with mild to moderate renal failure. PMID:7677827

  7. Study on Assessment of Renal Function in Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nupur; Paria, Baishakhi; Sarkar, Sujoy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Renal dysfunction is common in chronic liver disease. The cause of this renal dysfunction is either multi-organ involvement in acute conditions or secondary to advanced liver disease. Objectives: The study was undertaken to assess the renal function in chronic liver diseases and find out the association of alteration of renal function with gradation of liver disease. (assessed by child-pugh criteria) and to find out the association of alteration of renal function among the cases of chronic liver disease of different aetiology. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, observational study was undertaken in Department of General Medicine, Calcutta National Medical College & Hospital, Kolkata during March 2012 to July 2013 with 50 admitted patients of chronic liver disease after considering the exclusion criteria. The patients were interviewed with a pre-designed and pre-tested schedule, examined clinically, followed by some laboratory investigations relevant to diagnose the aetiology of chronic liver disease, and to assess the severity of liver and renal dysfunction. Data was analysed by standard statistical method. Results: Eighty six percent of the patients were male and the mean age of study population was 43.58 y, 68% patients suffered from alcoholic liver disease, followed by 14% patients had chronic Hepatitis-B, 10% patients developed acute kidney injury, 20% had hepato renal syndrome and 14% had IgA deposition. The distribution of serum urea and creatinine across the categories of Child Pugh classification tested by Mann-Whitney test and the distribution was statistically significant. Conclusion: The present study has found significant association between severity of liver dysfunction and certain parameters of renal dysfunction. PMID:25954647

  8. [The renal pathology in light chain deposition disease].

    PubMed

    Giannakakis, K N; Faraggiana, T

    2005-01-01

    Light Chain Deposition Disease (LCDD) is a relatively frequent renal disease associated with dysproteinemia. Although the light chain deposits can be widespread, the kidney is the most frequently involved organ, and renal involvement can dominate the clinical condition. The morphological features of LCDD can be recognized by light microscopy; however, the diagnosis can be made certain only by immunofluorescence microscopy, using antisera to kappa and lambda chains, and by electron microscopy.

  9. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Pramod; Ahmad, Shiraz

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical intervention. The patient was mobilised on wheel chair one year after the fractures. The cause of the fracture and the literature review of the bilateral femoral neck fracture in renal disease are discussed.

  10. Renal histology of mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome (Kawasaki disease).

    PubMed

    Salcedo, J R; Greenberg, L; Kapur, S

    1988-01-01

    Renal involvement is well described in patients with mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome (MCLNS), or Kawasaki disease and is manifested by mild azotemia, hematuria, pyuria or cylinduria, and more often, proteinuria. Renal morphology during the acute stages of the illness has never been reported. In this paper we describe the renal histopathologic changes in a child with MCLNS. The glomerular histopathologic findings suggest immune complex damage to the kidney as a possible mechanism of nephrotoxicity in MCLNS. Presence of kidney lesions, which speak in favor of the injurious role of immune complexes in MLCNS may be relevant to the understanding of the pathogenesis of the vascular lesions that are characteristic of this disease.

  11. Renal erythropoietin-producing cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Souma, Tomokazu; Suzuki, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is an indispensable erythropoietic hormone primarily produced from renal Epo-producing cells (REPs). Epo production in REPs is tightly regulated in a hypoxia-inducible manner to maintain tissue oxygen homeostasis. Insufficient Epo production by REPs causes renal anemia and anemia associated with chronic disorders. Recent studies have broadened our understanding of REPs from prototypic hypoxia-responsive cells to dynamic fibrogenic cells. In chronic kidney disease, REPs are the major source of scar-forming myofibroblasts and actively produce fibrogenic molecules, including inflammatory cytokines. Notably, myofibroblast-transformed REPs (MF-REPs) recover their original physiological properties after resolution of the disease insults, suggesting that renal anemia and fibrosis could be reversible to some extent. Therefore, understanding the plasticity of REPs will lead to the development of novel targeted therapeutics for both renal fibrosis and anemia. This review summarizes the regulatory mechanisms how hypoxia-inducible Epo gene expression is attained in health and disease conditions. PMID:26089800

  12. Spectrum of Renal and Urinary Tract Diseases in Kashmiri Children

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Virender; Bano, Rifat Ara; Wani, Khursheed Ahmed; Ahmed, Javed; Ahmed, Kaisar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Definite paucity of data pertaining to spectrum of renal and urinary tract diseases in our state and in various parts of India forms the basis of this study. Available data has emphasized more on specific clinical syndromes and chronic renal diseases rather than over all spectrums of renal and urinary tract diseases, that too in adult population. Aim The present study a retrospective analysis, forms one of the basic data of paediatric nephrology and urology related disorders in our state. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of the case records of all the hospitalized patients with renal and urinary tract diseases between 2012 and 2013 were performed. Case records were analysed and categorized into various groups like; Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN), Nephrotic Syndrome (NS), haematuria, Polycystic Kidney Disease (PCKD), Posterior Urethral Valve (PUV), Vesicoureteric Reflux (VUR), Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Iract (CAKUT) and others. These groups were divided into subgroups to get more insight about the pattern of these diseases. Results Out of 28114 patients hospitalized between 2012 and 2013 years, 447 (232 males and 215 females) patients were diagnosed of renal and urinary tract diseases which forms 1.58% the total admitted patients. Among these patients 32.9% (147/447) were diagnosed Acute Kidney Injury (AKI); 24.1% (108/447): Urinary Tract Infection (UTI); 9.6% (43/447): Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN); 5.6% (25/447): bilateral hydronephrosis with UTI; 4.47% (20/447): nephrotic syndrome (NS); 3.5% (16/447): haematuria; and 4% (18/447) were having CAKUT (Congenital Anomalies Of Kidney And Urinary Tract). In addition to this there were 17 cases of Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA), 3 cases of Barter syndrome and one case of Liddle syndrome. Conclusion A substantial number of children are hospitalized with renal and urinary tract diseases with

  13. [Diagnostic strategies in kidney disease with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Pasquali, S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects large numbers of individuals in countries across the world. Recent reports from the United States indicate that 30% of the adult population has a mild or moderate degree of chronic renal failure and more than 600,000 patients are projected to have end-stage renal disease by the year 2010. Similar elevated rates have been reported in Europe, Asia and Australia. Optimal management of chronic renal failure is mandatory. It requires a correct diagnosis of the underlying nephropathy and specific strategies to slow the progression of renal damage and to prevent cardiovascular events. The differential diagnostic approach to chronic renal failure consists of serologic studies, renal biopsy, and urinary tract imaging, which, however, may exacerbate the pre-existing nephropathy or have severe adverse effects. The challenge for the nephrologist is to balance the need to correctly identify chronic nephropathy against the risks related to aggressive diagnostic procedures. In order to optimize the diagnostic strategies in patients with chronic renal disease, consensus guidelines will be needed. PMID:19048581

  14. Pharmacokinetics of iothalamate in endstage renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.R.; Cutler, R.E.; Forland, S.C.

    1988-09-01

    Some nephrologists make alterations in routine peritoneal and hemodialysis schedules after diagnostic studies that use radiographic contrast agents. A study to determine the pharmacokinetics of one contrast agent, iothalamate, is reported. The plasma (total body) clearance of iothalamate was measured in seven patients who had endstage renal disease (ESRD) and who received maintenance hemodialysis. During an interdialytic period, plasma clearance of iothalamate varied from 0.7 to 5.2 mL/min (3.1 +/- 1.8 mL/min, mean +/- SD) with an elimination rate constant (beta) of 0.0164 +/- 0.01 hr-1, a terminal half-life of 61 +/- 42 hours, and an estimated distribution volume of 11 +/- 3.9 L. Hemodialysis clearance of iothalamate was 104 +/- 54 mL/min. With the assumption that iothalamate is mainly distributed in the extracellular fluid (ECF) compartment, the theoretical fluid shift from the intracellular fluid (ICF) compartment to the ECF compartment was 323 mL after administration of the largest dose (2.1 mL/kg or 1.6 mmol/kg of body weight) of 60% meglumine iothalamate solution. The average maximum serum osmolarity change was less than expected, suggesting some type of internal buffering of meglumine iothalamate. In the first few hours after radiocontrast administration in four patients, the average change in serum osmolarity was 5 mmol/L; the average change in serum sodium concentration during this same time was a decrease of 0.5 mmol/L. The minor increase in ECF volume induced by hyperosmolar contrast agents does not require immediate dialysis in most patients. When needed, however, for contrast-related adverse effects, hemodialysis is efficient in rapidly removing iothalamate.

  15. Managing acute and chronic renal stone disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, Conor P; Courtney, Aisling E

    2016-02-01

    Nephrolithiasis, or renal stone disease, is common and the incidence is increasing globally. In the UK the lifetime risk is estimated to be 8-10%. On a population level, the increase in stone incidence, erosion of gender disparity, and younger age of onset is likely to reflect increasing prevalence of obesity and a Western diet with a high intake of animal protein and salt. Stones can be detected by a variety of imaging techniques. The gold standard is a non-contrast CT of kidneys, ureters and bladder (CT KUB) which can identify > 99% of stones. CT KUB should be the primary mode of imaging for all patients with colic unless contraindicated. In such instances, or if a CT KUB is not available, an ultrasound KUB is an alternative. This has advantages in terms of radiation exposure and cost, but is limited in sensitivity, particularly for ureteric stones. Once diagnosed, a plain film KUB can be used for follow-up of radiopaque stones. For most patients diclofenac is a reasonable first choice of analgesia, e.g. 50-100 mg rectally, or 75 mg IM. Opioid medication can worsen nausea and be less effective, but should be used if there is a contraindication to NSAIDs. A combination of diclofenac, paracetamol, and/or codeine regularly can provide adequate pain control in many cases. Failure of this analgesic combination should prompt consideration of secondary care support. If a ureteric stone < 5 mm in diameter is identified, the expectation is that this will pass without intervention. Initially medical management is still useful for stones between 5 and 10mm in diameter, but urology input is more likely to be necessary as up to 50% of these may require intervention. Stones that are >10 mm in diameter should be discussed with the urology service as they are unlikely to pass spontaneously.

  16. Inherited antithrombin deficiency and end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hara, Tomohiko; Naito, Katsusuke

    2005-11-01

    Antithrombin is a potent inhibitor of the coagulant effect of thrombin. In the latter half of 20th century, many families have been described in which an autosomaly dominant inherited antithrombin deficiency has caused severe venous thromboembolic disease in successive generations. The important complication is severe venoocclusive disease by deep venous thrombus. Some inherited antithrombin deficient patients developed renal failure because of fibrin deposition in the kidney glomeruli or renal vein thrombus, and therefore the need for replacement therapy for end stage renal disease (ESRD). Although an inherited antithrombin deficiency with renal failure is rare, prevention against renal failure in such patients, and their renal replacement therapy for ESRD are important. Proteinuria decreases plasma antithrombin level leading to more severe hyper-coagulation state. Therefore early in renal disease, it may be prudent for adaptation of anti-coagulation therapy even if recurrent thrombosis has not occurred. All replacement therapy (hemodialysis, transplantation or peritoneal dialysis) for ESRD are available for such thrombophilic disorders. Anticoagulation agents working without aggravation of antithrombin effects (Argatroban, Nafamostat mesilate etc.) are useful for hemodialysis. The renal allograft recipients with thrombophilia seem to be at risk of developing an acute rejection or other vascular event. Peritoneal dialysis is potentially a good adaptation for such thrombophilic disorders. However which therapy has the best mortality and morbidity outcomes is not clear. Physicians and Surgeons must pay attention to the coagulation state and thrombophilia in ESRD patients, give strong consideration for adequate anti-coagulation therapy and review the best renal replacement modality for each patient.

  17. BK polyoma virus infection and renal disease in non-renal solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kuppachi, Sarat; Kaur, Deepkamal; Holanda, Danniele G.; Thomas, Christie P.

    2016-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) is a non-enveloped DNA virus of the polyomaviridae family that causes an interstitial nephritis in immunosuppressed patients. BKV nephropathy is now a leading cause of chronic kidney disease and early allograft failure following kidney transplantation. It is also known to cause renal disease with a progressive decline in kidney function in non-renal solid organ transplant (NRSOT) recipients, although the disease may not be recognized nor its impact appreciated in this patient population. In this report, we review the existing literature to highlight our current understanding of its incidence in NRSOT populations, the approaches to diagnosis and the potential treatment options. PMID:26985385

  18. Transforming Growth Factor Beta and Excess Burden of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    August, Phyllis; Sharma, Vijay; Ding, Ruchuang; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2009-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is more frequent in African Americans (blacks) compared to whites. Because renal fibrosis is a correlate of progressive renal failure and a dominant feature of ESRD, and because transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) can induce fibrosis and renal insufficiency, we hypothesized that TGF-β1 hyperexpression is more frequent in blacks compared to whites. We measured circulating levels of TGF-β1 in black and white patients with ESRD, hypertension, and in normal patients. We demonstrated that circulating levels of TGF-β1 are higher in black ESRD patients, hypertensive patients, and normal control patients compared to their white counterparts. Our preliminary genetic analyses suggest that TGF-β1 DNA polymorphisms are different in blacks and whites. Our observations of hyperexpression of TGF-β1 in blacks suggest a mechanism for the increased prevalence of renal failure and hypertensive target organ damage in this population. PMID:19768163

  19. Epidemic renal disease of unknown etiology in the Zuni Indians

    SciTech Connect

    Hoy, W.E.; Megill, D.M.; Hughson, M.D.

    1987-06-01

    An epidemic of renal disease is occurring among the Zuni Indians in western New Mexico. In 1985, 1.6% of Zunis had clinically recognized renal disease and 1% had renal insufficiency. The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 1984 and 1985 was 14 times the rate for US whites, and three times the rates of other Indians in ESRD network 6. One third of the cases of renal disease and ESRD is due to type 2 diabetes, but the etiology of disease in most of the remainder is unknown. Affected subjects range from early childhood to old age. Early signs are hematuria, mild to moderate proteinuria, normal BP, and low total hemolytic complement, normal or low C3 and C4 levels, in about 40% of the cases. The clinical course varies from benign to rapidly progressive renal failure. Biopsies usually reflect an immune-complex mediated mesangiopathic glomerulonephritis, with IgA, IgG, IgM, and C3 variably present in the mesangium. In some cases, there is a very strong familial pattern suggesting autosomal dominant inheritance or a marked communal exposure effect. This may be a genetic disease educed by the consanguinity in the ethnically homogeneous Zuni population. Mesangiopathic renal disease is common in some Oriental populations, and this phenomenon may reflect the American Indians' Oriental ancestry. This disease may also be due to toxic exposures related to jewelry-making, potting, Zuni water, Zuni salt, or herbal or other products used for medicinal or religious purposes. This epidemic is causing much morbidity and generating huge costs for ESRD treatment. Further study is needed to better understand its etiology.

  20. Multiple facets of HIV-associated renal disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, D.R.; Gluz, I.C.; Kurz, J.; Thomé, G.G.; Zancan, R.; Bringhenti, R.N.; Schaefer, P.G.; dos Santos, M.; Barros, E.J.G.; Veronese, F.V.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection has a broad spectrum of renal manifestations. This study examined the clinical and histological manifestations of HIV-associated renal disease, and predictors of renal outcomes. Sixty-one (64% male, mean age 45 years) HIV patients were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical presentation and renal histopathology were assessed, as well as CD4 T-cell count and viral load. The predictive value of histological lesion, baseline CD4 cell count and viral load for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death were determined using the Cox regression model. The outcomes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and ESRD or death were evaluated by baseline CD4 cell count. The percent distribution at initial clinical presentation was non-nephrotic proteinuria (54%), acute kidney injury (28%), nephrotic syndrome (23%), and chronic kidney disease (22%). Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (28%), mainly the collapsing form (HIVAN), acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) (26%), and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) (25%) were the predominant renal histology. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was a protective factor against CKD (hazard ratio=0.997; 95%CI=0.994-0.999; P=0.012). At last follow-up, 64% of patients with baseline CD4 ≥200 cells/mm3 had eGFR >60 mL·min-1·(1.73 m2)-1 compared to the other 35% of patients who presented with CD4 <200 cells/mm3 (log rank=9.043, P=0.003). In conclusion, the main histological lesion of HIV-associated renal disease was HIVAN, followed by AIN and ICGN. These findings reinforce the need to biopsy HIV patients with kidney impairment and/or proteinuria. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was associated with better renal function after 2 years of follow-up. PMID:27007656

  1. Multiple facets of HIV-associated renal disease.

    PubMed

    da Silva, D R; Gluz, I C; Kurz, J; Thomé, G G; Zancan, R; Bringhenti, R N; Schaefer, P G; Dos Santos, M; Barros, E J G; Veronese, F V

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection has a broad spectrum of renal manifestations. This study examined the clinical and histological manifestations of HIV-associated renal disease, and predictors of renal outcomes. Sixty-one (64% male, mean age 45 years) HIV patients were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical presentation and renal histopathology were assessed, as well as CD4 T-cell count and viral load. The predictive value of histological lesion, baseline CD4 cell count and viral load for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death were determined using the Cox regression model. The outcomes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and ESRD or death were evaluated by baseline CD4 cell count. The percent distribution at initial clinical presentation was non-nephrotic proteinuria (54%), acute kidney injury (28%), nephrotic syndrome (23%), and chronic kidney disease (22%). Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (28%), mainly the collapsing form (HIVAN), acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) (26%), and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) (25%) were the predominant renal histology. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥ 200 cells/mm3 was a protective factor against CKD (hazard ratio=0.997; 95%CI=0.994-0.999; P=0.012). At last follow-up, 64% of patients with baseline CD4 ≥ 200 cells/mm3 had eGFR >60 mL·min-1·(1.73 m2)-1 compared to the other 35% of patients who presented with CD4 <200 cells/mm3 (log rank=9.043, P=0.003). In conclusion, the main histological lesion of HIV-associated renal disease was HIVAN, followed by AIN and ICGN. These findings reinforce the need to biopsy HIV patients with kidney impairment and/or proteinuria. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥ 200 cells/mm3 was associated with better renal function after 2 years of follow-up.

  2. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease: Associations with Renal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD) are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephropathological changes are commonly observed in the non-tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy (RN). In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy (PN) or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with RN. Despite emerging evidence that PN provides equivalent local tumor control to RN while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer. PMID:22649783

  3. Reversible renal impairment caused by thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Chakera, Aron; Paul, Hans-Joerg; O'Callaghan, Chris A

    2010-04-01

    Renal impairment is a common finding in clinical practice and is increasingly recognized with the routine reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rates. Clinical assessment is essential to determine which of the many possible investigations are appropriate. Thyroid hormones regulate many cellular functions, and abnormalities of the active thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T(4)) and tri-iodothyronine (T(3)), can influence serum creatinine levels. Evaluation of thyroid function is easily overlooked, but important in this context, as hypothyroidism is common and can cause renal impairment, which is typically reversible. Renal dysfunction may also be more frequent in hyperthyroidism than is recognized. This report describe how a dramatic elevation in serum creatinine paralleled the development of hyperthyroidism, with a return of the creatinine to normal following treatment of the hyperthyroid state. PMID:20199343

  4. Down syndrome with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kute, Vivek B; Vanikar, Aruna V; Shah, Pankaj R; Gumber, Manoj R; Patel, Himanshu V; Engineer, Divyesh P; Thakkar, Umang G; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2013-10-01

    Down syndrome is one of the most common genetic causes of learning disabilities in children. Although the incidence of renal and urological involvement in Down syndrome is not very common, monitoring of patients with Down syndrome for renal diseases should be done regularly as patient's age into the second and third decades. With increased survival, it appears that a growing number of these patients present with chronic renal failure. Down syndrome patients are apparently not suited for peritoneal dialysis because of lacking cooperation. This procedure can be prone to failure, mainly because of an increased risk of peritonitis. Handling such patients especially those on peritoneal dialysis is challenging. Here we report a case of Down syndrome with end-stage renal disease treated with hemodialysis for 6 months. To the best of our knowledge and current literature review this is the first case report of a patient with Down syndrome undergoing hemodialysis.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide in renal physiology, disease and transplantation--the smell of renal protection.

    PubMed

    Koning, Anne M; Frenay, Anne-Roos S; Leuvenink, Henri G D; van Goor, Harry

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gasotransmitter, next to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, is a key mediator in physiology and disease. It is involved in homeostatic functions, such as blood pressure control, electrolyte balance and apoptosis, and regulates pathological mechanisms, including oxidative stress and inflammation. Besides, it is believed to serve as an oxygen sensor under ischemic conditions. The kidney plays a decisive role in many of these processes, indicating an interplay between H2S and renal (patho)physiology. In this review we focus on the (protective) functions of H2S in the kidney. We first discuss endogenous renal H2S production and signaling and elaborate on its regulatory functions in renal physiology. Next, we present data on the role of aberrant H2S levels in the onset and progression of renal disease and suggest the use of H2S metabolites as biomarkers. Finally, we describe that exogenous H2S can protect the kidney against various forms of injury and conclude that modulation of renal H2S levels holds promise for renal patients in the future.

  6. Deaths from occlusive arterial disease in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Ibels, L S; Stewart, J H; Mahony, J F; Sheil, A G

    1974-08-31

    In a series of 325 recipients of cadaveric renal transplants sudden occlusive arterial disease was found to be responsible for 12% of deaths. Acute myocardial infarction (9%) occurred 25 times more than expected in the normal population and cerebral thrombosis (3%) 300 times more. The greatest loss was in the initial three-month period after transplantation. Patients with renal failure due to essential hypertension were especially at risk, accounting for six of the 12 deaths.

  7. Controversies in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bruggeman, Leslie A.; Nelson, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    The two most common HIV-associated renal diseases, HIV-associated nephropathy and HIV-immune-complex kidney disease, share the common pathologic finding of hyperplasia within the glomerulus. Podocyte injury is central to the pathogenesis of these diseases; however, the source of the proliferating glomerular epithelial cell remains a topic of debate. Parenchymal injury has been linked to direct infection of renal epithelial cells by HIV-1, although the mechanism of viral entry into this non-lymphoid compartment is unclear. Although transgenic rodent models have provided insight into viral proteins responsible for inducing renal disease, such models have important limitations. Rodent HIV-1 models, for instance, cannot replicate all aspects of immune activation, a process that could have an important role in the pathogenesis PMID:19776779

  8. The glycocalyx--linking albuminuria with renal and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rabelink, Ton J; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2015-11-01

    Albuminuria is commonly used as a marker of kidney disease progression, but some evidence suggests that albuminuria also contributes to disease progression by inducing renal injury in specific disease conditions. Studies have confirmed that in patients with cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes and hypertension, endothelial damage drives progression of kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. A key mechanism that contributes to this process is the loss of the glycocalyx--a polysaccharide gel that lines the luminal endothelial surface and that normally acts as a barrier against albumin filtration. Degradation of the glycocalyx in response to endothelial activation can lead to albuminuria and subsequent renal and vascular inflammation, thus providing a pathophysiological framework for the clinical association of albuminuria with renal and cardiovascular disease progression. In this Review, we examine the likely mechanisms by which glycocalyx dysfunction contributes to kidney injury and explains the link between cardiovascular disease and albuminuria. Evidence suggests that glycocalyx dysfunction is reversible, suggesting that these mechanisms could be considered as therapeutic targets to prevent the progression of renal and cardiovascular disease. This possibility enables the use of existing drugs in new ways, provides an opportunity to develop novel therapies, and indicates that albuminuria should be reconsidered as an end point in clinical trials.

  9. Pattern of renal diseases in children: A developing country experience.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shankar Prasad; Shah, Gauri Shankar; Mishra, Om Prakash; Baral, Nirmal

    2016-03-01

    Spectrum of renal disease varies in different ethnic population, geographical location, and by environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to find out the clinical spectrum and occurrence of different pediatric renal diseases at a teaching hospital in the Eastern part of Nepal. All cases of renal diseases from one month to 15 years of age, attending the pediatric renal outpatient department and/or were admitted to the wards during the period of February 2012 to January 2013, were included in the study. Detailed clinical and laboratory evaluations were performed on all patients. Diseases were categorized as per standard definitions and managed with hospital protocols. Renal diseases accounted to be 206 cases (6.9%) of total annual pediatric admissions, of which (58%) were male and (42%) female. Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) was the most common disorder (37.7%) followed by nephrotic syndrome (26.1%), urinary tract infection (21.3%), acute kidney injury (AKI) (17.9%), obstructive uropathy (1.9%), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (1.2%), and others. In AGN group, the most common cause was post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) (32.9%) followed by lupus nephritis (4%) and Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (0.8%). Urine culture was positive in (9.22%) and the most common organism was Escherichia coli (57.9%). The causes of AKI were urosepsis, septicemia, and AGN (18.9%) each, followed by dehydration (13.5%). Mortality was found in 5% of cases and the etiologies were AKI in (72.7%), PIGN (18.1%), and CKD (9%). Renal diseases are a significant problem among children and are one of the common causes of hospital admission. These patients need comprehensive services for early identification and management. PMID:26997393

  10. Pattern of renal diseases in children: A developing country experience.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shankar Prasad; Shah, Gauri Shankar; Mishra, Om Prakash; Baral, Nirmal

    2016-03-01

    Spectrum of renal disease varies in different ethnic population, geographical location, and by environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to find out the clinical spectrum and occurrence of different pediatric renal diseases at a teaching hospital in the Eastern part of Nepal. All cases of renal diseases from one month to 15 years of age, attending the pediatric renal outpatient department and/or were admitted to the wards during the period of February 2012 to January 2013, were included in the study. Detailed clinical and laboratory evaluations were performed on all patients. Diseases were categorized as per standard definitions and managed with hospital protocols. Renal diseases accounted to be 206 cases (6.9%) of total annual pediatric admissions, of which (58%) were male and (42%) female. Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) was the most common disorder (37.7%) followed by nephrotic syndrome (26.1%), urinary tract infection (21.3%), acute kidney injury (AKI) (17.9%), obstructive uropathy (1.9%), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (1.2%), and others. In AGN group, the most common cause was post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) (32.9%) followed by lupus nephritis (4%) and Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (0.8%). Urine culture was positive in (9.22%) and the most common organism was Escherichia coli (57.9%). The causes of AKI were urosepsis, septicemia, and AGN (18.9%) each, followed by dehydration (13.5%). Mortality was found in 5% of cases and the etiologies were AKI in (72.7%), PIGN (18.1%), and CKD (9%). Renal diseases are a significant problem among children and are one of the common causes of hospital admission. These patients need comprehensive services for early identification and management.

  11. Social networks and social support: living with chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Rounds, K A; Israel, B A

    1985-09-01

    Individuals with chronic renal disease who receive dialysis treatment are continually faced with major adjustments. These may include dealing with changes in work and economic status, social roles, activity levels, self-image, health status, and normal routines, as well as learning to live with uncertainty and loss. The individual's social network plays a key role as the individual experiences and moves through various stages of adjustment. Networks with certain characteristics (e.g. provision of affective support, reciprocal ties) may be more effective than others lacking these characteristics in meeting the individual's changing needs during the process of adjusting to chronic renal disease. This paper examines this relationship between the characteristics of an individual's social network and adjustment to chronic renal illness. The discussion focuses on the impact of chronic renal disease on the individual, the composition and characteristics of the social network, and on the relationships between network members. How the social network affects a person's adjustment to stages of adaptation to chronic renal disease is also addressed. Finally, suggestions are presented for how health care professionals can intervene at the individual, network, and organizational level to strengthen and enlarge social networks in order to enhance social support.

  12. Renal Primordia Activate Kidney Regenerative Events in a Rat Model of Progressive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  13. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration.

  14. Lithium-induced renal disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Jorkasky, D K; Amsterdam, J D; Oler, J; Braden, G; Alvis, R; Geheb, M; Cox, M

    1988-12-01

    Considerable controversy exists as to whether lithium maintenance therapy is associated with the development of renal insufficiency. In 1980 we initiated a prospective study of renal function in manic-depressive patients beginning lithium therapy. None of the patients had evidence of pre-existing renal disease. Sixty-five patients were entered, and 51 and 18 patients completed 1 and 3 years of follow-up, respectively. Lithium doses were titrated to the lowest level consistent with control of psychiatric symptoms; there were no episodes of overt lithium intoxication. Serum creatinine levels in all patients, and endogenous creatinine clearance in women, remained stable over the course of the study. In contrast, creatinine clearances (mean +/- SEM, ml/min/1.73 m2) in men significantly decreased over both 1 year (110 +/- 4 to 95 +/- 5, n = 21, p = 0.0126) and 3 years (107 +/- 4 to 80 +/- 11, n = 8, p = 0.0385) of evaluation. Although all patients demonstrated a mild reduction in renal concentrating ability after initiation of lithium, the decrease was not progressive over the course of the study. Quantitative urinary protein excretion did not change, and repeated urinalyses did not reveal any evidence of renal disease. Thus, lithium therapy appears to result in modestly reduced rates of glomerular filtration, as measured by endogenous creatinine clearance, in men receiving lithium maintenance therapy for manic-depressive illness. Whether this reduction is progressive and leads to clinically significant renal insufficiency requires further investigation. PMID:3243040

  15. The Renal Histopathology Spectrum of Elderly Patients with Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ping; Zhou, Fu-de; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The elderly population has significantly increased in China. However, data regarding renal histopathology in this population is lacking. The present study retrospectively analyzed renal disease spectrum of 430 elderly patients who had received renal biopsy at Peking University First Hospital between January 2003 and December 2012. Among 6049 patients receiving renal biopsies during the same period, 430 (7.10%) were elderly (≥65 years). The ratio of male (263 patients) to female (167 patients) was 1.57:1, with an age of 70.29 ± 3.99 (range 65–82) years at the time of biopsy. The most common indication for renal biopsy was nephrotic syndrome (59.53%), followed by acute kidney injury (AKI, 19.53%) and chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN, 16.05%). The most common renal histopathology in primary glomerular disease was idiopathic membranous nephropathy (iMN, 61.02%), followed by IgA nephropathy (18.22%), minimal change disease (MCD, 9.32%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (6.78%). ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV, 43.95%) was the leading secondary glomerular disease, followed by HBV-related glomerulonephritis (HBV-GN, 24.2%), and amyloidosis (14.01%). In patients with nephrotic syndrome, iMN (50%) was the leading cause, followed by HBV-GN (16.02%), MCD (7.81%), and amyloidosis (7.81%). In patients with iMN, 89.5% presented as nephrotic syndrome, 8.39% as CGN. In patients with AKI, the leading cause was AAV (48.12%), followed by acute interstitial nephritis (20.48%) and acute tubular necrosis (8.43%). In conclusion, in elderly Chinese patients, the most common renal histopathology pattern was iMN in patients with nephrotic syndrome, and AAV in patients with AKI. PMID:25526441

  16. Sulodexide and glycosaminoglycans in the progression of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Masola, Valentina; Zaza, Gianluigi; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    Experimental data in cell cultures and animal models suggest that sulodexide and glycosaminoglycans are potentially effective drugs to treat chronic kidney diseases and prevent progression to renal failure. However, no conclusive evidence support the use of them in human renal disease. In acute and chronic glomerulonephritis, only few studies have been performed. Sulodexide has been more intensely investigated in diabetic nephropathy (DN) where the body of data supports its effectiveness as an antialbuminuric agent in early stages. Unfortunately, there is no study in DN patients on the effect of sulodexide on clinical end points.

  17. Laparoscopic renal surgery for benign disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Joseph C; Breda, Alberto; Schulam, Peter G

    2007-01-01

    Fifteen years after the first report, laparoscopic nephrectomy has demonstrated proven efficacy and safety comparable with an open approach, with a significant advantage of a faster recovery. Wide dissemination of these surgical techniques and continued improvement in instrumentation has made laparoscopy the preferred approach for treating benign pathologic conditions of the kidney. In this review, the expanding indications of laparoscopic simple nephrectomy and the outcomes of the larger clinical series are examined. We discuss the technical aspects of both transperitoneal and retroperitoneal approaches. Finally, laparoscopic cyst decortication and some of the novel applications of laparoscopic renal surgery are highlighted.

  18. Organising care for people with diabetes and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Dean, John

    2012-02-01

    Diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are two of the commonest long-term conditions. One-fifth of patients with diabetes will have CKD, and diabetes is the commonest cause of advanced kidney disease. For most patients these comorbidities will be managed in primary care with the focus on cardiovascular prevention. Many patients with more advanced disease and complications require joint care from multidisciplinary specialist teams in diabetes and renal disease to ensure that care is consistent and coordinated. Models of joint speciality care, include joint registry management, parallel clinics, shared consulting and case discussion, but require more evaluation than has currently been performed. These underpin more informal interactions between the specialist teams. A local model of care for diabetes and renal disease that incorporates the roles of primary care, members of multidisciplinary teams and speciality care should be agreed, resourced appropriately and its effectiveness monitored.

  19. Renal structure and hypertension in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gabow, P A; Chapman, A B; Johnson, A M; Tangel, D J; Duley, I T; Kaehny, W D; Manco-Johnson, M; Schrier, R W

    1990-12-01

    Hypertension has been reported to occur in 50 to 75 percent of subjects with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) prior to the onset of marked renal insufficiency but concurrent with cystic deformation of the renal parenchyma. The present study was undertaken to examine whether the renal structural abnormalities are greater in hypertensive (HBP) versus normotensive (NBP) male and female patients with ADPKD who were matched within gender groups for age, body surface area, serum creatinine concentration (males HBP 1.2 +/- 0.02 vs. NBP 1.1 +/- 0.03 mg/dl. NS: females HBP 0.9 +/- 0.03 vs. NBP 0.9 +/- 0.02 mg/dl, NS) and creatinine clearance (males HBP 100 +/- 3 vs. NBP 108 +/- 3 ml/min/1.73 m2, NS: females HBP 97 +/- 3 vs. NBP 96 +/- 2 ml/min/1.73 m2, NS). Renal volume was significantly greater in the HBP compared to the NBP group (males HBP 624 +/- 47 vs. NBP 390 +/- 43 cm3, P less than 0.0005; females HBP 446 +/- 32 vs. NBP 338 +/- 24 cm3, P less than 0.002). Since increased renal volume is due to increased cysts, the results indicate that the early high incidence of hypertension in ADPKD correlates with the renal structural abnormalities in this disorder.

  20. Chronic renal disease in renal transplant patients: management of cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fresnedo, G; Gómez-Alamillo, C; Ruiz, J C; de Francisco, A L M; Arias, M

    2009-06-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal disease. Despite improvements in short-term patient and graft outcomes, there has been no major improvement in long-term outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and obesity, and the impact of their control among 526 stable renal transplant recipients according to the guidelines in the general population. Mean blood pressure was 133 +/- 16/81 +/- 9 mm Hg. The proportion of patients on antihypertensive therapy was 75%, and on ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers, 26%. The mean cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides were 195 +/- 41, 115 +/- 32, 51 +/- 17, and 137 +/- 75 mg/dL, respectively. The proportion of patients on statin treatment was 49.7%, and those with body mass indices between 25 and 30, 30 and 35, and >35 kg/m(2) were 35%, 15%, and 4%. We observed a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity among renal transplant patients. Suboptimal control was frequent and control of some of these complications was far below targets established for nontransplant patients despite progressive intensification of therapy with functional graft decline. The findings of this study may have an impact on the management of renal transplant recipients.

  1. Incidence of renal carcinoma in non-functioning kidney due to renal pelvic stone disease

    PubMed Central

    ZENGIN, KURSAD; TANIK, SERHAT; SENER, NEVZAT CAN; ALBAYRAK, SEBAHATTIN; EKICI, MUSA; BOZKURT, IBRAHIM HALIL; BAKIRTAS, HASAN; GURDAL, MESUT; IMAMOGLU, MUHAMMED ABDURRAHIM

    2015-01-01

    The objective of This study was to report our pathological findings in nephrectomy specimens from patients treated for non-functioning hydronephrotic kidney due to renal pelvic stone disease. A total of 97 patients who underwent nephrectomy for non-functioning hydronephrotic kidneys between January, 2011 and June, 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. A non-functioning kidney was defined as one having paper-thin parenchyma on urinary ultrasound or computed tomography, exhibiting no contrast visualization in the collecting duct system on intravenous urography and having a split renal function of <10% on nuclear renal function studies. Following pathological evaluation, 9 patients were diagnosed with xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis, 9 with malignant tumors and 79 with chronic pyelonephritis. Of the patients with chronic pyelonephritis, 2 also had renal adenomas. The malignant tumors included 3 transitional cell carcinomas (TCC), 2 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 3 renal cell carcinomas (RCC) (1 sarcomatoid, 1 papillary and 1 clear cell RCC), whereas 1 patient had concurrent RCC and TCC. In conclusion, non-functioning kidneys, particularly those with kidney stones, should be managed as possible malignancies, due to the higher incidence of malignant tumors in such patients compared with the normal population. PMID:26171211

  2. End State Renal Disease among Native Americans, 1983-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jeffrey M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Determines the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among Native Americans and Whites in the United States from 1983-86. Findings indicate 1,075 Native American cases represented an annual incidence 2.8 times the rate for Whites. Fifty-six percent of Native American cases and 27 percent of White cases were attributed to diabetes. (JS)

  3. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57 Section 79.57 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.57 Proof of chronic...

  4. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57 Section 79.57 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.57 Proof of chronic...

  5. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57 Section 79.57 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.57 Proof of chronic...

  6. Cystic renal cell carcinoma and acquired renal cystic disease associated with consumption of chaparral tea: a case report.

    PubMed

    Smith, A Y; Feddersen, R M; Gardner, K D; Davis, C J

    1994-12-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid is an antioxidant used experimentally to induce cystic renal disease in rats. It may be extracted from the leaves of the creosote bush, which are consumed as chaparral tea in the southwestern United States. We report a case of cystic renal disease and cystic adenocarcinoma of the kidney associated with a history of protracted consumption of chaparral tea.

  7. Use of antiepileptic drugs in hepatic and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Asconapé, Jorge J

    2014-01-01

    The use of antiepileptic drugs in patients with renal or hepatic disease is common in clinical practice. Since the liver and kidney are the main organs involved in the elimination of most drugs, their dysfunction can have important effects on the disposition of antiepileptic drugs. Renal or hepatic disease can prolong the elimination of the parent drug or an active metabolite leading to accumulation and clinical toxicity. It can also affect the protein binding, distribution, and metabolism of a drug. The protein binding of anionic acidic drugs, such as phenytoin and valproate, can be reduced significantly by renal failure, causing difficulties in the interpretation of total serum concentrations commonly used in clinical practice. Dialysis can further modify the pharmacokinetic parameters or result in significant removal of the antiepileptic drugs. Antiepileptic drugs that are eliminated unchanged by the kidneys or undergo minimal metabolism include gabapentin, pregabalin, vigabatrin, and topiramate when used as monotherapy. Drugs eliminated predominantly by biotransformation include phenytoin, valproate, carbamazepine, tiagabine, and rufinamide. Drugs eliminated by a combination of renal excretion and biotransformation include levetiracetam, lacosamide, zonisamide, primidone, phenobarbital, ezogabine/retigabine, oxcarbazepine, eslicarbazepine, ethosuximide, and felbamate. Drugs in the latter group can be used cautiously in patients with either renal or liver failure. Antiepileptic drugs that are at high risk of being extracted by hemodialysis include ethosuximide, gabapentin, lacosamide, levetiracetam, pregabalin and topiramate. The use of antiepileptic drugs in the presence of hepatic or renal disease is complex and requires great familiarity with the pharmacokinetics of these agents. Closer follow-up of the patients and more frequent monitoring of serum concentrations are required to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:24365310

  8. Renal biopsy and pathologic evaluation of glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Lees, George E; Cianciolo, Rachel E; Clubb, Fred J

    2011-08-01

    Presence of suspected primary glomerular disease is the most common and compelling reason to consider renal biopsy. Pathologic findings in samples from animals with nephritic or nephrotic glomerulopathies, as well as from animals with persistent subclinical glomerular proteinuria that is not associated with advanced chronic kidney disease, frequently guide treatment decisions and inform prognosis when suitable specimens are obtained and examined appropriately. Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy techniques generally are satisfactory; however, other methods of locating or approaching the kidney, such as manual palpation (e.g., in cats), laparoscopy, or open surgery, also can be used. Visual assessment of the tissue content of needle biopsy samples to verify that they are renal cortex (i.e., contain glomeruli) as they are obtained is a key step that minimizes the submission of uninformative samples for examination. Adequate planning for a renal biopsy also requires prior procurement of the fixatives and preservatives needed to process and submit samples that will be suitable for electron microscopic examination and immunostaining, as well as for light microscopic evaluation. Finally, to be optimally informative, renal biopsy specimens must be processed by laboratories that routinely perform the required specialized examinations and then be evaluated by experienced veterinary nephropathologists. The pathologic findings must be carefully integrated with one another and with information derived from the clinical investigation of the patient's illness to formulate the correct diagnosis and most informative guidance for therapeutic management of the animal's glomerular disease. PMID:21782145

  9. [Renal response to exercise in healthy and diseased patients].

    PubMed

    Poortmans, J R

    1995-01-01

    Exercise induces profound changes in the renal hemodynamics and protein excretion. Strenuous exercise provokes a major fall of the renal plasma flow and a reduction of the glomerular filtration rate. Despite these changes, the filtration fraction doubles at maximal exercise preserving the transfer of metabolites or substances through the glomerulus. A higher production of vasopressin and aldosterone enhances the tubular processes of water and electrolyte reabsorption, stabilising therefore the homeostasis during exercise. Urea, uric acid and lactate reabsorption are also increased. Postexercise proteinuria is directly related to the intensity of exercise rather than to its duration. This transient state may be explained by an increased glomerular membrane permeability and a partial inhibition of tubular reabsorption of plasma proteins. Postexercise proteinuria appears to be age-dependent. Exercise has an additional effect on protein excretion in patients with nephropathies (diabetes, renal diseases, kidney transplants). PMID:7630470

  10. Nutrition and renal stone disease in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Russian space program showing that humans exposed to the microgravity environment of space have a greater risk for developing renal stones. Increased bone resorption and the attendant hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia contribute significantly to raising the urinary state of saturation with respect to the calcium salts, namely calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. In addition, other environmental and dietary factors may adversely affect urine composition and increase stone formation risk during space flight. For example, reductions in urinary volume, pH, and citrate contribute to raising stone formation risk. In addition to raising the risk for calcium stone formation, this metabolic profile is conducive to the formation of uric acid stones. Although observations to date have suggested that there may actually be a reduced food intake during the early phase of flight, crew members on longer-duration flights may increase food intake and be at increased risk for stone formation. Taken together, these findings support the use of nutritional recommendations for crew members that would serve to reduce the stone-forming propensity of the urinary environment. Pharmacologic intervention should be directed at raising urinary volumes, diminishing bone losses, and preventing reductions in urinary pH and citrate. Success in reducing the risk for stone formation in astronauts would also be of potential major benefit to the estimated 20 million Americans with nephrolithiasis.

  11. Advances in the Urinary Exosomes in Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Pei; Qin, Yan; Li, Xue-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Cells secrete around 30-100 nm membrane-enclosed vesicles that are released into the extracellular spaceis termed exosomes(EXs). EXs widely present in body fluids and incorporated proteins,nucleic acids that reflect the physiological state of their cells of origin and they may play an important role in cell-to-cell communication in various physiological and disease processes. In this article we review the recent basic and clinical studies in urinary EXs in renal diseases,focusing on their biological characteristics and potential roles as new biological markers,intervention treatment goals,and targeted therapy vectors in renal diseases.However,some issues still exist;in particular,the clinical application of EXs as a liquid biopsy technique warrants further investigations. PMID:27594162

  12. Prognostic Indicators of Cardiovascular Risk in Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hildreth, Cara M.

    2011-01-01

    Although the annual mortality rate for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is decreasing, likely due to an increase in kidney transplantation rate, the survival probability for ESRD patients from day one of dialysis has not changed, and is still poor with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 34%. This is contributed to by a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death in ESRD patients. In order to improve survival outcomes, patients at high risk of cardiovascular related mortality need to be identified. Heart rate variability (HRV), baroreceptor sensitivity, and baroreceptor reflex effectiveness index can be used to assess heart rate control and may predict cardiovascular mortality. This paper will discuss how HRV, baroreceptor sensitivity, and baroreceptor reflex effectiveness index are altered in renal disease and the utility of these indices as markers of cardiac risk in this patient population. PMID:22294981

  13. The glomerulo-tubular junction: a target in renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Lindop, G B M; Gibson, I W; Downie, T T; Vass, D; Cohen, E P

    2002-05-01

    Both global and segmental glomerulopathies may damage specific areas of the renal glomerulus. Diseases associated with glomerular hyperperfusion cause lesions at the vascular pole, while diseases associated with proteinuria often damage the tubular pole. Atubular glomeruli are now known to be plentiful in a variety of common renal diseases. These glomeruli are disconnected from their tubule at the tubular pole and therefore cannot participate in the production of urine. It is widely believed that the disconnection is a result of external compression by periglomerular fibrosis. However, the variable anatomy and cell populations within both the glomerulus and the beginning of the proximal tubule at the glomerulo-tubular junction may also have important roles to play in the response to damage at this sensitive site of the nephron.

  14. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Neufeld, Edward B; Thacker, Seth G; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A; Brantner, Christine A; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O; Demosky, Stephen J; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis. PMID:26919698

  15. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Seth G.; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A.; Brantner, Christine A.; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis. PMID:26919698

  16. Some epidemiological aspects of patients with end stage renal diseases.

    PubMed

    El-Gaafary, M; Abou El-Fetouh, A; Zaki, M; Abdel-Kerim, A; Hafez, A S

    2000-01-01

    This study was carried out to describe End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) among Egyptian patients and to identify the possible risk factors of their disease. A case-control study was conducted with 2 control groups (patient or hospital control group and normal community control group) compared with ESRD cases on haemodialysis. The study revealed that hypertension, followed by obstructive uropathy, are the leading causes of ESRD. Conducting the multiple logistic regression analysis, the following factors were found to act independently as risk factors for ESRD, in that order of importance: past history of hypertension, family history of renal failure, past history of renal pain, smoking, urban origin of birth, past history of renal or urinary stones, past history of schistosomiasis, the presence of a near-by residential factory and past history of frequent hospitalization. A quality of life score has been invented. Women experienced a bad quality of life in relation to men and the score correlated positively with age. A number of recommendations have been generated.

  17. Inflammatory Cutaneous Diseases in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Paola; Cavaliere, Giovanni; Zavattaro, Elisa; Veronese, Federica; Fava, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplant recipients frequently suffer from skin infections and malignancies, possibly due to the effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. While the relationships between immunosuppression and these pathological conditions have been widely investigated, little is known about the relative incidence and characteristics of inflammatory skin diseases in this type of patient. In this study, we analyze the incidence of a number of inflammatory cutaneous diseases in a cohort of patients who underwent kidney transplantation. Although our study shows a relatively low incidence of these pathologies in transplanted patients—in agreement with the general action of immunosuppressant therapies in reducing inflammation—we scored a different efficacy of the various immunosuppressive regimens on inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. This information can be key for designing immunosuppressive regimens and devising accurate follow-up protocols. PMID:27548160

  18. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle; Fornoni, Alessia

    2016-03-15

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes.

  19. Medical imaging of renal diseases-suggested indication for different modalities.

    PubMed

    Bell, E G; McAfee, J G; Makhuli, Z N

    1981-04-01

    The diagnostic work-up of the urologic patient must be tailored to the presenting symptom complex, carefully selecting from the many modilities available, those most likely to establish the diagnosis and extent of the suspected lesions. Intravenous urography is the most rewarding initial procedure for many presenting symptoms, including suspected masses, pyuria, hematuria, and flank pain. Nuclear imaging is particularly effective in differentiating renal lobulations from true masses, in demonstrating parenchymal scarring in chronic pyelonephritis when the IVP is equivocal, and in assessing the decrease in perfusion and function in obstructive nephropathy when the IVP is indeterminate. It is the preferred procedure for acute renal infarction and acute tubular necrosis and has a greater sensitivity of detection for renal trauma than the IVP. Gallium-67 renal imaging appear helpful in the detection of occult pyelonephritis or interstitial nephritis. However, it cannot differentiate focal acute pyelonephritis from abscess or abscess from neoplasm. Ultrasoneography is the initial procedure of choice in the differentiation of cystic from solid renal masses and in anuria or oliguria. When a kidney fails to visualize by IVP or nuclear imaging, it can confirm or rule out obstruction. In upper tract infections, it may demonstrate renal or perirenal abscess. Although retrograde pyelography is performed less frequently in recent years, it remains extremely useful in confirming and relieving obstructive uropathy and in delineating tumors of the collecting system. Computed tomography effectively demonstrates hydronephrosis, renal abscess, tumors, and cysts and retroperitoneal involvement. More experience is needed to judge the efficiency of "dynamic" CT for the quantification of renal function. Renal angiography remains invaluable as a secondary procedure (as opposed to initial screening) in renal trauma, vascular anomalies, and in renal tumors to delineate the anatomy of the

  20. VEGF-121 preserves renal microvessel structure and ameliorates secondary renal disease following acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Ellen C.; Friedrich, Jessica L.; Basile, David P.

    2008-01-01

    Acute kidney injury induced by renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) compromises microvascular density and predisposes to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and sodium-dependent hypertension. VEGF-121 was administered to rats fed a standard (0.4%) sodium diet at various times following recovery from I/R injury for up to 35 days. VEGF-121 had no effect on the initial loss of renal function, as indicated by serum creatinine levels measured 24 h after injury. Serum creatinine levels declined thereafter, indicative of renal repair. Rats were then switched to an elevated (4.0%) sodium diet for an additional 28 days to induce CKD. The 4.0% sodium diet enhanced renal hypertrophy, interstitial volume, albuminuria, and cardiac hypertrophy relative to postischemic animals maintained on the 0.4% sodium diet. Administration of VEGF-121 from day 0 to 14, day 0 to 35, or day 3 to 35 after I/R suppressed the effects of sodium diet on CKD development, while delayed administration of VEGF-121 from day 21 to 35 had no effect. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein levels were upregulated in postischemic animals, and this effect was significantly increased by the 4.0% sodium diet but was not influenced by prior treatment with VEGF. Conversely, microvascular density was preserved in postischemic animals treated with VEGF-121 relative to vehicle-treated postischemic animals. These data suggest that early, but not delayed, treatment with VEGF-121 can preserve vascular structure after ischemia and influence chronic renal function in response to elevated sodium intake. PMID:18799550

  1. [Occult hepatitis B virus infection and hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Joon; Kwon, Oh Sang

    2013-09-01

    Many studies have suggested that occult HBV infection has a substantial clinical relevance to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Occult HBV infection is an important risk factor for the development of cirrhosis and HCC in patients without HBsAg. As a matter of fact, occult HBV infection is one of the most common causes of crytogenic HCC in endemic areas of HBV. However, there still are controversial issues about the association between occult HBV infection and HCC according to the underlying liver disease. In alcoholic cirrhosis, occult HBV infection may exert synergistic effect on the development of HCC. However, there is insufficient evidence to relate occult HBV infection to hepatocarcinogenesis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In cryptogenic HCC, occult HBV infection may play a direct role in the development of HCC. In order to elucidate the assocciation between occult HBV infection and HCC, underlying liver disease must be specified and larger number of cases must be included in future studies.

  2. Renal Resistive Index and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Clarisse; Thomas, George; Schold, Jesse D.; Arrigain, Susana; Gornik, Heather L.; Nally, Joseph V.; Navaneethan, Sankar D.

    2015-01-01

    Renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler ultrasonography is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in hypertensive, diabetic, and elderly patients. We studied the factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70) and its associations with mortality in CKD patients without renal artery stenosis. We included 1,962 patients with an eGFR 15-59 ml/min/1.73 m2 who also had RRI measured (January 1, 2005 - October 2011) from an existing CKD registry. Participants with renal artery stenosis (60-99% or renal artery occlusion) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to study factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70) and its association with mortality was studied using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards model. Hypertension was prevalent in >90% of the patients. In the multivariable logistic regression, older age, female gender, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, higher systolic blood pressure and use of beta blockers were associated with higher odds of having RRI ≥0.70. During a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 428 patients died. After adjusting for covariates, RRI ≥0.70 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted HR 1.29, 95% CI, 1.02- 1.65, P< 0.05). This association was more pronounced among younger patients and those with stage 3 CKD. Non-cardiovascular/non-malignancy related deaths were higher in those with RRI ≥0.70. RRI ≥0.70 is associated with higher mortality in hypertensive CKD patients without clinically significant renal artery stenosis after accounting for other significant risk factors. Its evaluation may allow early identification of those who are at risk thereby potentially preventing or delaying adverse outcomes. PMID:26077569

  3. Graves' disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient

    PubMed Central

    Nair, C. G.; Jacob, P.; Menon, R.; Babu, M. J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves' disease (GD) are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis. PMID:25484538

  4. A pedigree study of perinatally lethal renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bankier, A; de Campo, M; Newell, R; Rogers, J G; Danks, D M

    1985-01-01

    A family study of perinatally lethal renal disease (PLRD) was undertaken in the State of Victoria, Australia, for the years 1961 to 1980. A total of 221 cases was ascertained through hospital and necropsy records and confirmed by necropsy findings. There were 134 cases of bilateral renal agenesis (BRA), 34 cases of unilateral agenesis with dysplasia of the other kidney (URA/RD), 42 cases of bilateral renal dysplasia (BRD), and 11 cases of renal aplasia. Parents of 131 babies were interviewed and 153 parents from 82 families had a renal ultrasound examination. In the period of best ascertainment (1975 to 1980) the frequency of PLRD was 0.27 per 1000 and of BRA 0.16 per 1000. There were 10 cases of sirenomelia, a frequency of 0.008 per 1000. For all families of PLRD, 15 of 423 (3.6%) sibs and three of 1579 (0.2%) first cousins were affected. One family had three sibs with BRA and four had two sibs with BRA. One pair of sibs and two first cousins had BRA in one and URA/RD in the other affected. One baby had BRD with an affected first cousin. The nature of the renal lesion was not established. When the index case had BRA, 14 in 283 (5.6%) sibs had PLRD. Where the index case had BRA and urogenital defects, but no birth defects in other organs, 12 of 148 sibs (8%) were affected. None of the sibs had BRA when the index case had BRA as part of a multiple malformation complex. In the multiple malformation group, however, five of 40 (12.5%) sibs had similar patterns of malformations. Renal ultrasound abnormalities were no more frequent in parents of two affected babies (one of 18) than in the other parents (nine of 135). Our findings confirm that BRA and URA are genetically related. There are a number of conclusions which are important for genetic counselling. There is a high likelihood of recurrence (8%) in sibs when the index case has BRA and urogenital abnormalities alone. When BRA is part of a multiple malformation complex, the risk of recurrence of multiple

  5. End-stage renal disease in Indonesia: treatment development.

    PubMed

    Prodjosudjadi, Wiguno; Suhardjono, A

    2009-01-01

    The number of cases of chronic kidney disease is growing rapidly, especially in the developing world. At a certain level of renal function, progression of chronic kidney disease to endstage renal disease (ESRD) is inevitable. ESRD has become a major health problem because it is a devastating medical condition, and the cost of treatment is a huge economic burden. This article presents data collected from 13 nephrology centers in response to specifically designed questionnaires. These centers were divided into 7 groups on the basis of geographic location. Previous data had given the impression that the incidence and prevalence of ESRD had increased, and the results of this study support these previous data. Since a national registry of ESRD has just been developed for Indonesia and we can present only limited data in this study, the numbers in this article underestimate the true incidence and prevalence rates. Although hemodialysis facilities have been developed rapidly, further development is still required. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis as an alternative renal replacement therapy (RRT) is only now being introduced. Kidney transplantation programs expand very slowly. RRT still imposes a high cost of treatment for ESRD; therefore, these treatments are unaffordable for most patients. Recently, government health insurance has covered financially strained families requiring RRT. Since the cost of RRT for ESRD has significantly increased over time, the management approach should be shifted from treatment to prevention. PMID:19484872

  6. Lipotoxicity as a trigger factor of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Lahuerta, Adriana; Martínez-García, Cristina; Medina-Gómez, Gema

    2016-10-01

    In the last few decades, rapid changes in lifestyle have led to an alarming increase in the prevalence of obesity and obesity-associated complications. Obese patients are at increased risk of developing hypertension, heart disease, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes and kidney disease. The surplus of calories is normally stored as triglycerides in adipose tissue. However, excess lipids can also accumulate ectopically in other organs, including the kidney, contributing to their damage through toxic processes named lipotoxicity. The kidney is negatively affected by dyslipidemia, lipid accumulation and changes in circulating adipokines that bring about alterations in renal lipid metabolism and promote insulin resistance, generation of reactive oxygen species and endoplasmic reticulum stress, ultimately leading to alterations in the glomerular filtration barrier and renal failure. This review focuses on the pathogenic molecular mechanisms associated with renal lipotoxicity, and presents new insights about potential new therapeutic targets and biomarkers such as microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, of relevance for the early detection of lipid-associated kidney disease. PMID:26956132

  7. Renal diseases in haemophilic patients: pathogenesis and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Pasquale; Rampino, Teresa; Gregorini, Marilena; Fasoli, Gianluca; Gamba, Gabriella; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Haemophilia A and B are genetic X-linked bleeding disorders, caused by mutations in genes encoding factors VIII and IX, respectively. Clinical manifestations of haemophilia are spontaneous haemorrhage or acute bleeding caused by minor trauma, resulting in severe functional consequences that can culminate in a debilitating arthropathy. Life expectancy and quality of life of patients with haemophilia have dramatically improved over the last years, mainly for new therapeutic options and the awareness to the risk of HCV and HIV infections. Different clinical problems arise from this important change in history of patients with haemophilia. In particular, ageing-related diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension and cancer, and chronic viral infections are emerging as new challenges in this patient population. Among the different types of chronic illnesses, renal diseases are of special interest as they involve some difficult management issues. In fact, decisions regarding adequate preventive strategies and viral infection treatment, the choice of the dialytic modality, placement of vascular access and prescription of dialytic treatments are particularly complicated, because only few data are available. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis of renal damage in patients with haemophilia, especially in those with blood-transmitted viral infections, and the major issues about the management of renal diseases, including problems related to dialytic treatment and kidney transplantation, providing practical algorithms to guide the clinical decision-making process.

  8. Risk factors for lung diseases after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pencheva, Ventsislava P.; Petrova, Daniela S.; Genov, Diyan K.; Georgiev, Ognian B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung diseases are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. The aim of the study is to define the risk factors for infectious and noninfectious pulmonary complications in kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 267 patients after renal transplantation. The kidney recipients were followed-up for the development of pulmonary complications for a period of 7 years. Different noninvasive and invasive diagnostic tests were used in cases suspected of lung disease. Results: The risk factors associated with the development of pulmonary complications were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 4.60; P = 0.001), arterial hypertension (OR = 1.95; P = 0.015), living related donor (OR = 2.69; P = 0.004), therapy for acute graft rejection (OR = 2.06; P = 0.038), immunosuppressive regimens that includes mycophenolate (OR = 2.40; P = 0.011), azathioprine (OR = 2.25; P = 0.023), and tacrolimus (OR = 1.83; P = 0.041). The only factor associated with the lower risk of complications was a positive serology test for Cytomegalovirus of the recipient before transplantation (OR = 0.1412; P = 0.001). Conclusion: The risk factors can be used to identify patients at increased risk for posttransplant lung diseases. Monitoring of higher-risk patients allow timely diagnosis and early adequate treatment and can reduce the morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. PMID:26958045

  9. Bell palsy in lyme disease-endemic regions of canada: a cautionary case of occult bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Karen; Melanson, Michel; Desai, Jamsheed A

    2012-09-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is a multisystem disorder characterized by three clinical stages: dermatologic, neurologic, and rheumatologic. The number of known Lyme disease-endemic areas in Canada is increasing as the range of the vector Ixodes scapularis expands into the eastern and central provinces. Southern Ontario, Nova Scotia, southern Manitoba, New Brunswick, and southern Quebec are now considered Lyme disease-endemic regions in Canada. The use of field surveillance to map risk and endemic regions suggests that these geographic areas are growing, in part due to the effects of climate warming. Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the most common neurologic abnormality in the second stage of Lyme borreliosis, with up to 25% of Bell palsy (idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy) occurring due to Lyme disease. Here we present a case of occult bilateral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. In Lyme disease-endemic regions of Canada, patients presenting with unilateral or bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy should be evaluated for Lyme disease with serologic testing to avoid misdiagnosis. Serologic testing should not delay initiation of appropriate treatment for presumed Bell palsy.

  10. Non-diabetic renal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus: Study of renal - retinal relationship.

    PubMed

    Prakash, J; Gupta, T; Prakash, S; Bhushan, P; Usha; Sivasankar, M; Singh, S P

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) has become the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD), is known to occur in diabetic patients. The renal and retinal relationship in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with nephropathy is not uniform. This study was carried to study the histological spectrum of nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients with proteinuria and its relationship with diabetic retinopathy (DR). Total 31 (males - 26; females - 5) proteinuric type 2 diabetic patients were studied. Average age of patients was 50.7 years. Nephrotic syndrome was noted in 21 (67.7%) patients. Overall, isolated DN, NDRD and NDRD superimposed on DN (mixed lesion) were observed in 12 (38.7%), 13 (41.9%) and 6 (19.4%) cases, respectively. DR was absent in 21/31 (67.7%) cases. The spectrum of nephropathy in patients without DR included: DN in 6 (28.57%), NDRD in 12 (57.14%) and mixed lesion in 3 (14.29%). Kidney histology in patients with DR (n-10) revealed DN in 6 (60%), NDRD in 1 (10%) and mixed lesion in 3 (30%) patients. Thus, absence of DR favors NDRD but does not exclude DN because isolated DN was noted in 28.57% cases in absence of DR. Similarly biopsy proven NDRD (pure NDRD; 10% and mixed lesion; 30%) was noted in 40% of cases in presence of DR. In summary, patients with T2DM had higher incidence of NDRD. DR is less frequent (32.3%) in type 2 diabetes and is a poor predictor of type of nephropathy. Hence, renal biopsy is essential for precise diagnosis of nephropathy in patients with T2DM.

  11. Non-diabetic renal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus: Study of renal - retinal relationship

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, J.; Gupta, T.; Prakash, S.; Bhushan, P.; Usha; Sivasankar, M.; Singh, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) has become the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD), is known to occur in diabetic patients. The renal and retinal relationship in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with nephropathy is not uniform. This study was carried to study the histological spectrum of nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients with proteinuria and its relationship with diabetic retinopathy (DR). Total 31 (males - 26; females - 5) proteinuric type 2 diabetic patients were studied. Average age of patients was 50.7 years. Nephrotic syndrome was noted in 21 (67.7%) patients. Overall, isolated DN, NDRD and NDRD superimposed on DN (mixed lesion) were observed in 12 (38.7%), 13 (41.9%) and 6 (19.4%) cases, respectively. DR was absent in 21/31 (67.7%) cases. The spectrum of nephropathy in patients without DR included: DN in 6 (28.57%), NDRD in 12 (57.14%) and mixed lesion in 3 (14.29%). Kidney histology in patients with DR (n-10) revealed DN in 6 (60%), NDRD in 1 (10%) and mixed lesion in 3 (30%) patients. Thus, absence of DR favors NDRD but does not exclude DN because isolated DN was noted in 28.57% cases in absence of DR. Similarly biopsy proven NDRD (pure NDRD; 10% and mixed lesion; 30%) was noted in 40% of cases in presence of DR. In summary, patients with T2DM had higher incidence of NDRD. DR is less frequent (32.3%) in type 2 diabetes and is a poor predictor of type of nephropathy. Hence, renal biopsy is essential for precise diagnosis of nephropathy in patients with T2DM. PMID:26199473

  12. Drosophila provides rapid modeling of renal development, function, and disease.

    PubMed

    Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2010-12-01

    The evolution of specialized excretory cells is a cornerstone of the metazoan radiation, and the basic tasks performed by Drosophila and human renal systems are similar. The development of the Drosophila renal (Malpighian) tubule is a classic example of branched tubular morphogenesis, allowing study of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transitions, stem cell-mediated regeneration, and the evolution of a glomerular kidney. Tubule function employs conserved transport proteins, such as the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and V-ATPase, aquaporins, inward rectifier K(+) channels, and organic solute transporters, regulated by cAMP, cGMP, nitric oxide, and calcium. In addition to generation and selective reabsorption of primary urine, the tubule plays roles in metabolism and excretion of xenobiotics, and in innate immunity. The gene expression resource FlyAtlas.org shows that the tubule is an ideal tissue for the modeling of renal diseases, such as nephrolithiasis and Bartter syndrome, or for inborn errors of metabolism. Studies are assisted by uniquely powerful genetic and transgenic resources, the widespread availability of mutant stocks, and low-cost, rapid deployment of new transgenics to allow manipulation of renal function in an organotypic context.

  13. The occult urothelial cancer.

    PubMed

    Ragonese, Mauro; Racioppi, Marco; D'Agostino, Daniele; Di Gianfrancesco, Luca; Lenci, Niccolò; Bientinesi, Riccardo; Palermo, Giuseppe; Sacco, Emilio; Pinto, Francesco; Bassi, Pier Francesco

    2016-05-24

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the tumor that most frequently affects the urinary tract. The most common location is in the bladder; the diagnosis, as the follow-up, is based on urine cytology, endoscopic, and radiological examinations. Urinary cytology is an important non invasive tool used in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with TCC. A positive urine cytology result is highly predictive of the presence of TCC, even in the presence of normal cystoscopy, because malignant cells may appear in the urine long time before any cystoscopically visible lesion becomes apparent. The presence of a positive urinary cytology, in the absence of clinical or endoscopic evidence of a TCC, can identify an occult urothelial cancer, located in any site of the urinary tract (upper urinary tract, bladder, prostatic urethra). Most of the urothelial tumors of the renal pelvis and ureters are diagnosed by radiological examinations, but we can observe a high rate of false negatives. In order to improve the diagnostic role of urinary cytology and other conventional examinations, numerous molecular markers have been identified; however, the real clinical application remains unclear. Photodynamic diagnosis and narrow band imaging (NBI) cystoscopy increase the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic examinations in the presence of lesions not easily detectable. The aim of this review is to analyze the current diagnostic standards in the presence of occult urothelial cancer.

  14. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  15. Renal disease: environment, race, or genes?

    PubMed

    Adler, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is over-represented in people of color. This reflects both environmental and genetic factors. Numerous studies assess the effects of access to care and patient adherence in the development of kidney diseases. After correcting for these factors, genetic influences remain. Genetic approaches to discerning genes that predispose to diabetic nephropathy include candidate gene approaches, linkage analysis, mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium, and transmission disequilibrium testing. Numerous candidate genes have been identified, although few have been confirmed apart from those representing genes in the renin-angiotensin system. The results of linkage analysis studies have similarly resulted in genomic regions purported to show linkage in a variety of ethnic groups that have most often not been confirmed in other ethnic groups, and sometimes in other groups of similar ethnicity but different phenotype definitions. The chromosomal regions determining glomerular filtration rate do not appear to be localized to the same chromosome as those related to proteinuria. Large cohorts of subjects have now been amassed by numerous research groups, and genome-wide scanning results involving much larger cohorts are anticipated to be published in the next few years. It is hoped that these strategies will ultimately identify chromosomsal regions and/ or genes that confer risk for diabetic nephropathy, and in so doing, provide clues to new therapies.

  16. Amylase to creatine clearance ratio in renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Andriulli, A; Bergia, R; Masoero, G; Baiardi, P; Pellegrino, S; Tondolo, M

    1979-07-01

    In order to assess to what extent glomerular or tubular function is involved in the renal handling of amylase and the lysozyme to creatine clearance ratios (CAm/CCr and CLys/CCr) were evaluated in 22 healthy volunteers and in 71 patients with different renal diseases. In normal controls, the mean CAm/CCr was 2.55 +/-1.54 SD, with an upper normal limit of 5.56. A normal ratio was found in patients with glomerulonephritis, with or without a nephrotic syndrome, and in patients with pyelonephritis. A significantly elevated ratio (P less than 0.001) was instead found in patients with uremia and in patients with uremia and in patients with either chronic or acute tubular damage. The CLus/CCr ratio was elevated in all the groups, except in patients with glomerulonephritis and minimal proteinuria. These results show that in humans, as in animals, the amylase filtered load undergoes partial tubular reabsorption. In renal diseases, an increase of the CAm/CCr is caused by either a marked reduction of functioning nephrons or a severe tubular damage, while the glomerular permeability does not seem to be involved. Some other mechanism is probably involved in the elevation of the CAm/CCr during acute pancreatitis.

  17. Multiple Renal and Splenic Lesions in Cat Scratch Disease.

    PubMed

    Wakiguchi, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Matsunaga, Manaka; Kodama, Yuichi; Miyazono, Akinori; Seki, Shunji; Ikeda, Naohiro; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-09-21

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an infectious disease caused by Bartonella henselae. Atypical clinical presentations of CSD include prolonged fever and multiple hepatosplenic lesions. Furthermore, multiple renal lesions are extremely rare in CSD. An 11-year-old Japanese girl presented at our hospital with a prolonged fever of unknown cause after being scratched and bitten by a kitten. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple small, round hypodense lesions in both kidneys and the spleen. Based on her history and the CT results, her diagnosis was CSD. The diagnosis was confirmed by serological tests, which indicated antibodies against B. henselae. After treatment with azithromycin, her fever immediately improved. Careful history taking and imaging are essential for the diagnosis of atypical CSD. In CT images, not only hepatosplenic lesions but also renal lesions are important features indicative of a diagnosis of atypical CSD. Subsequently, a diagnosis of CSD can be confirmed by specific serological tests. This is the first reported Japanese case of multiple renal and splenic lesions in a patient with CSD. Although difficult to diagnose, an early diagnosis atypical CSD and appropriate treatment are important to prevent complications and the need for invasive examinations.

  18. Renal impairment in different phenotypes of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Honghao; Zhou, Zhihua; Hu, Jiyuan; Han, Yongzhu; Wang, Xun; Cheng, Nan; Wu, Yunfan; Yang, Renmin

    2015-11-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease resulting in the chronic deposition of copper in both liver and brain. This can lead to hepatic, neurologic, and psychiatric manifestations. Renal impairment can occur in any period of WD, but the mechanism is not yet known. In this study, we analyzed the clinical data of 691 newly diagnosed WD patients to investigate the blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), and uric acid (UA) levels in different subtypes of WD. This study included 691 newly diagnosed WD patients, 34 asymptomatic cases, and 127 healthy controls. The entire sample was assessed for serum levels of BUN, Cr, and UA. We found that the levels of BUN and Cr in WD patients who had neurological manifestations were higher (p < 0.001). In contrast, those patients presenting with a combined neurological and hepatic condition showed the lowest serum levels of UA (p = 0.026). There are differences in renal impairment between the endo-phenotypes of WD. Renal impairment can reflect differential copper deposition in organs other than the liver.

  19. Meaningful rehabilitation of the end-stage renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Thornton, T A; Hakim, R M

    1997-05-01

    In this highly technological age, health care providers are called to attend to the patient as a whole person, with dreams and goals and a desire for purpose and meaning in life. In this article, we propose a broadened definition of rehabilitation and a rehabilitation program designed to effect an improvement in the quality of life of each renal patient by aiming to restore meaningful existence in each of their lives. An individualized plan for rehabilitation can be constructed and implemented with far-reaching success when the focus is on the life goals of the patient, whether physical, social, psychological, or intellectual. These programs not only enhance the quality of life of the patient with end-stage renal disease, but are cost-effective, both at the societal level and at the level of the dialysis clinic. PMID:9165654

  20. Homocysteine as a predictive biomarker in early diagnosis of renal failure susceptibility and prognostic diagnosis for end stages renal disease.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hatem K; El-Sayed, Mohamed-I Kotb; Leheta, Ola F

    2016-09-01

    Glomerular filtration rate and/or creatinine are not accurate methods for renal failure prediction. This study tested homocysteine (Hcy) as a predictive and prognostic marker for end stage renal disease (ESRD). In total, 176 subjects were recruited and divided into: healthy normal group (108 subjects); mild-to-moderate impaired renal function group (21 patients); severe impaired renal function group (7 patients); and chronic renal failure group (40 patients) who were on regular hemodialysis. Blood samples were collected, and serum was separated for analysis of total Hcy, creatinine, high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP), serum albumin, and calcium. Data showed that Hcy level was significantly increased from normal-to-mild impairment then significantly decreases from mild impairment until the patient reaches severe impairment while showing significant elevation in the last stage of chronic renal disease. Creatinine level was increased in all stages of kidney impairment in comparison with control. CRP level was showing significant elevation in the last stage. A significant decrease in both albumin and calcium was occurred in all stages of renal impairment. We conclude Hcy in combination with CRP, creatinine, albumin, and calcium can be used as a prognostic marker for ESRD and an early diagnostic marker for the risk of renal failure.

  1. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Secondary nephropathies can be associated with disreactive immunological disorders or with a non-inflammatory glomerular damage. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis as in other connective tissue diseases, kidney volume and cortex echogenicity are the parameters that best correlate with clinical severity of the disease, even if the morphological aspect is generally non-specific. Doppler studies in SLE document the correlation between resistance indexes (RIs) values and renal function. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) causes different types of renal damage. At ultrasound (US), kidneys have almost a normal volume, while during superinfection they enlarge (coronal diameter >13 cm) and become globular, loosing their normal aspect. Cortex appears highly hyperechoic, uniform or patchy. Microcalcifications of renal cortex and medulla are a US sign that can suggest HIV. In amyloidosis, kidneys appear normal or increased in volume in the early stages of disease. Renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic and pyramids can show normal size and morphology, but more often they appear poorly defined and hyperechoic. RIs are very high since the early stages of the disease. Nephromegaly with normal kidney shape is the first sign of lymphoma or multiple myeloma. In systemic vasculitis, renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic, while pyramids appear hypoechoic and globular due to interstitial edema. When vasculitis determines advanced chronic kidney disease stages, kidneys show no specific signs. Microcirculation damage is highlighted by increased RIs values >0.70 in the chronic phase. PMID:27169551

  2. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  3. Renal stone disease in spinal-cord-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Welk, Blayne; Fuller, Andrew; Razvi, Hassan; Denstedt, John

    2012-08-01

    Renal stone disease is common among patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). They frequently have recurrent stones, staghorn calculi, and bilateral stone disease. The potential risk factors for stones in the SCI population are lesion level, bladder management strategy, specific metabolic changes, and frequent urinary tract infections. There has been a reduction in struvite stones among these patients, likely as a result of advances in their urologic care. The clinical presentation of stone disease in patients with SCI may involve frequent urinary infections or urosepsis, and at the time of presentation patients may need emergency renal drainage. The proportion of patients who have their stones treated with different modalities is largely unknown. Shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is commonly used to manage stones in patients with SCI, and there have been reports of stone-free rates of 50% to 70%. The literature suggests that the morbidity associated with percutaneous nephrolithotomy in these patients is considerable. Ureteroscopy is a common modality used in the general population to treat patients with upper tract stone disease. Traditional limitations of this procedure in patients with SCI have likely been overcome with new flexible scopes; however, the medical literature has not specifically reported on its use among patients with SCI.

  4. Inflammation in end-stage renal disease: the hidden enemy.

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter

    2006-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. As traditional risk factors cannot alone explain the unacceptable high prevalence and incidence of CVD in this high-risk population, inflammation (interrelated to insulin resistance, oxidative stress, wasting and endothelial dysfunction) has been suggested to be a significant contributor. Indeed, several different inflammatory biomarkers, such as high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), have been shown to independently predict mortality in ESRD patients. As CRP is so strongly associated with vascular disease it has been suggested that this hepatic-derived protein is not only a marker, but also a mediator, of vascular disease. Although in vitro data from studies on endothelial cells, monocytes-macrophages and smooth muscle cells support a direct role for CRP in atherogenesis, data from studies performed in vivo have been controversial. The causes of the highly prevalent state of inflammation in ESRD are multiple, including inflammatory signals associated with the dialysis procedure, decreased renal function, volume overload, comorbidity and intercurrent clinical events. As the prevalence of inflammation varies considerably between continents and races, dietary and/or genetic factors may have an impact on inflammation in ESRD. Elevated CRP in dialysis patients could be evaluated at three different levels: (i) national/regional level; (ii) dialysis unit level; and (iii) individual patient level.

  5. CUBN as a novel locus for end-stage renal disease: insights from renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reznichenko, Anna; Snieder, Harold; van den Born, Jacob; de Borst, Martin H; Damman, Jeffrey; van Dijk, Marcory C R F; van Goor, Harry; Hepkema, Bouke G; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Niesing, Jan; Bakker, Stephan J L; Seelen, Marc; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder. As genome-wide association studies identified cubilin gene CUBN as a locus for albuminuria, and urinary protein loss is a risk factor for progressive CKD, we tested the hypothesis that common genetic variants in CUBN are associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and proteinuria. First, a total of 1142 patients with ESRD, admitted for renal transplantation, and 1186 donors were genotyped for SNPs rs7918972 and rs1801239 (case-control study). The rs7918972 minor allele frequency (MAF) was higher in ESRD patients comparing to kidney donors, implicating an increased risk for ESRD (OR 1.39, p = 0.0004) in native kidneys. Second, after transplantation recipients were followed for 5.8 [3.8-9.2] years (longitudinal study) documenting ESRD in transplanted kidneys--graft failure (GF). During post-transplant follow-up 92 (9.6%) cases of death-censored GF occurred. Donor rs7918972 MAF, representing genotype of the transplanted kidney, was 16.3% in GF vs 10.7% in cases with functioning graft. Consistently, a multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that donor rs7918972 is a predictor of GF, although statistical significance was not reached (HR 1.53, p = 0.055). There was no association of recipient rs7918972 with GF. Rs1801239 was not associated with ESRD or GF. In line with an association with the outcome, donor rs7918972 was associated with elevated proteinuria levels cross-sectionally at 1 year after transplantation. Thus, we identified CUBN rs7918972 as a novel risk variant for renal function loss in two independent settings: ESRD in native kidneys and GF in transplanted kidneys. PMID:22574174

  6. Nephrology Update: End-Stage Renal Disease and Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Niraj; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, and increased health care use. Optimal management of patients with ESRD requires close collaboration among primary care physicians, nephrology subspecialists, and other subspecialists. Critical issues for the family physician include helping patients transition from chronic kidney disease to ESRD, recognizing and managing common issues in patients receiving dialysis or after kidney transplantation, and understanding palliative care for patients with ESRD. Dialysis typically is initiated for patients with a glomerular filtration rate less than 15 mL/min/1.73 m(2) if they are symptomatic due to uremia or if medical management of metabolic conditions is unsuccessful. Kidney transplantation is the optimal form of renal replacement therapy in suitable patients. The choice between hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis often is based on patient preference and coexisting conditions. Meticulous monitoring of volume status is necessary to achieve and maintain control of blood pressure. Sleep disorders and pruritus are common and can be managed by optimization of metabolic parameters, adequacy of dialysis, and drugs. PMID:27163762

  7. Treatment of HCV infected patients and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kershenobich, David

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C signifies a highly prevalent infection in patients with end stage renal disease. Most frequently it is associated to glomerulonephritis, patients on hemodialysis and renal transplants. The prevalence of HCV antibodies in hemodialysis patients varies between 5-70% depending on the geographical location of the patients. Factors associated with the prevalence of anti HCV in patients with hemodialysis include: age, blood transfusions, tattoos, use of illegal drugs, time in hemodialysis, more than two hospitalizations, treatment in multiple hemodialysis units or a kidney transplant. In some of the reported outbreaks of hepatitis in hemodialysis units, the phylogenetic analysis indicate that the transmission of HCV could relate to failures or breaches in general precautions in the management of these type of patients resulting in nosocomial transmission owed to sharing equipment or instruments employed in the hemodialysis or by transmission from professional members of the hemodialysis units. Antiviral treatment may be affected by a number of co-factors and co-morbidities, it consist mainly of non pegylated interferon or pegylated interferon. The treatment with interferon after a renal transplant is associated with an increase in the number of rejections; reason enough to recommended that treatment should be administered before the transplant.

  8. Renal alterations in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats: a natural model of lentivirus-induced renal disease changes.

    PubMed

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  9. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  10. Pulp Stone, Haemodialysis, End-stage Renal Disease, Carotid Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh; Sinha, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of pulp calcification and carotid artery calcification on the dental panoramic radiographs in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients who were on haemodialysis. Methods: A total of 112 End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients on who were haemodialysis participated in this study. The periapical and the panoramic radiographs for all the patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of the narrowing of the dental pulps and for pulp stones in the pulp chambers and the pulp canals. The panoramic radiographs were also evaluated to determine the carotid calcification. Results: Carotid calcifications were detected in none of the patients. 84 (74.99%) patients had dental pulp narrowing, and 38 (33.92%) patients had pulp stones. There was no statistical correlation between pulp narrowing and Carotid Artery Calcification (CAC) in the haemodialysis patient group. There was also no statistical correlation between pulp stones and CAC in the haemodialysis patients. Conclusion: However, the incidental finding of CAC on a panoramic radiograph can provide life-saving information for the vascular disease patients, but in the present study, no significant relationship was found between the presence of the pulpal calcification and CAC in the ESRD patients who were on haemodialysis. Therefore, the presence of pulp calcification does not seem to serve as a diagnostic marker for carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:23905147

  11. Psychiatric disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Martiny, Camila; e Silva, Adriana Cardoso de Oliveira; Neto, José Pedro Simões; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2012-09-01

    Psychiatric disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease are associated with poor prognosis and quality of life. The goal of this study is to investigate the association between psychiatric disorders and renal disease in patients undergoing dialysis treatment, compared with other chronic diseases, appreciating the demographic status of these patients. Sixty-nine patients participated in a diagnostic interview and gave socio-demographic data. The population was composed of 55% men aged 19-77 years with an average age of 50 years (95% CI = 47-54 years). The prevalence of psychiatric disorders found in this study (46.6%) was compared with that found in patients with asthma, polycystic ovary syndrome and HIV-positive. Moreover, the prevalence of the four most common psychiatric disorders which were identified among patients on dialysis were also the subject of comparison between them and others. These results demonstrate the relationship between the various psychiatric disorders and are compatible with other research studies.

  12. The Risk of Peripheral Arterial Disease after Parathyroidectomy in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The changes of the risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with end-stage renal disease after parathyroidectomy are scant. Methods We used a nationwide health insurance claims database to select all dialysis-dependent patients with end-stage renal disease aged 18 years and older for the study population in 2000 to 2006. Of the patients with end-stage renal disease, we selected 947 patients who had undergone parathyroidectomy as the parathyroidectomy group and frequency matched 3746 patients with end-stage renal disease by sex, age, years since the disease diagnosis, and the year of index date as the non-parathyroidectomy group. We used a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis with the use of a robust sandwich covariance matrix estimate, accounting for the intra-cluster dependence of hospitals or clinics, to measure the risk of peripheral arterial disease for the parathyroidectomy group compared with the non-parathyroidectomy group after adjusting for sex, age, premium-based income, urbanization, and comorbidity. Results The mean post-op follow-up periods were 5.08 and 4.52 years for the parathyroidectomy and non-parathyroidectomy groups, respectively; the incidence density rate of PAD in the PTX group was 12.26 per 1000 person-years, significantly lower than the data in the non-PTX group (24.09 per 1000 person-years, adjusted HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.46–0.94). Conclusion Parathyroidectomy is associated with reduced risk of peripheral arterial disease in patients with end-stage renal disease complicated with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:27284924

  13. Association between renal iron accumulation and renal interstitial fibrosis in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yoshiro; Fujii, Aya; Sawada, Hisashi; Oboshi, Makiko; Iwasaku, Toshihiro; Okuhara, Yoshitaka; Morisawa, Daisuke; Eguchi, Akiyo; Hirotani, Shinichi; Masuyama, Tohru

    2015-07-01

    Iron accumulation is associated with the pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Renal fibrosis is a final common feature that contributes to the progression of CKD; however, little is known about the association between renal iron accumulation and renal interstitial fibrosis in CKD. Here we investigate the effects of iron chelation on renal interstitial fibrosis in a rat model of CKD. CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 8 weeks after operation, 5/6 nephrectomized rats were administered an oral iron chelator, deferasirox (DFX), in chow for 8 weeks. Other CKD rats were given a normal diet. Sham-operative rats given a normal diet served as a control. CKD rats exhibited hypertension, glomerulosclerosis and renal interstitial fibrosis. Iron chelation with DFX did not change hypertension and glomerulosclerosis; however, renal interstitial fibrosis was attenuated in CKD rats. Consistent with these findings, renal gene expression of collagen type III and transforming growth factor-β was increased in CKD rats compared with the controls, while iron chelation suppressed these increments. In addition, a decrease in vimentin along an increase in E-cadherin in renal gene expression was observed in CKD rats with iron chelation. CKD rats also showed increased CD68-positive cells in the kidney, whereas its increase was attenuated by iron deprivation. Similarly, increased renal gene expression of CD68, tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 was suppressed in CKD rats with iron chelation. Renal iron accumulation seems to be associated with renal interstitial fibrosis in a rat model of CKD.

  14. New imaging applications in the evaluation of pediatric renal disease.

    PubMed

    Norton, Karen I

    2003-04-01

    Continued improvements in imaging technology have changed many of the traditional diagnostic algorithms for evaluating pediatric renal disease. Newer imaging modalities offer more accurate, specific, and early diagnoses, but can be time consuming and costly. Less invasive modalities, such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging have widespread applications in pediatric practice. The risks of radiation exposure, contrast toxicity, and sedation or anesthesia versus the potential benefits of obtaining precise diagnostic information should always be considerations before electing any imaging procedure in children.

  15. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  16. UAB HRFD Core Center: Core A: The Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Diseases Translational Resource

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Disease; Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease; Joubert Syndrome; Bardet Biedl Syndrome; Meckel-Gruber Syndrome; Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis; Caroli Syndrome; Oro-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type I; Nephronophthisis; Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease

  17. 78 FR 8535 - Medicare Program: Comprehensive End-Stage Renal Disease Care Model Announcement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Disease Care Model Announcement AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION... the testing of the Comprehensive End- Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Care Model, a new initiative from the... populations. One population is beneficiaries with end- stage renal disease (ESRD). This population has...

  18. Biophysical properties of normal and diseased renal glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, Hans M.; Henderson, Joel M.; Byfield, Fitzroy J.; Bruggeman, Leslie A.; Ding, Yaxian; Huang, Chunfa; Suh, Jung Hee; Franke, Thomas; Mele, Elisa; Pollak, Martin R.; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Janmey, Paul A.; Weitz, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tissues and cells including renal glomeruli are important determinants of their differentiated state, function, and responses to injury but are not well characterized or understood. Understanding glomerular mechanics is important for understanding renal diseases attributable to abnormal expression or assembly of structural proteins and abnormal hemodynamics. We use atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a new technique, capillary micromechanics, to measure the elastic properties of rat glomeruli. The Young's modulus of glomeruli was 2,500 Pa, and it was reduced to 1,100 Pa by cytochalasin and latunculin, and to 1,400 Pa by blebbistatin. Cytochalasin or latrunculin reduced the F/G actin ratios of glomeruli but did not disrupt their architecture. To assess glomerular biomechanics in disease, we measured the Young's moduli of glomeruli from two mouse models of primary glomerular disease, Col4a3−/− mice (Alport model) and Tg26HIV/nl mice (HIV-associated nephropathy model), at stages where glomerular injury was minimal by histopathology. Col4a3−/− mice express abnormal glomerular basement membrane proteins, and Tg26HIV/nl mouse podocytes have multiple abnormalities in morphology, adhesion, and cytoskeletal structure. In both models, the Young's modulus of the glomeruli was reduced by 30%. We find that glomeruli have specific and quantifiable biomechanical properties that are dependent on the state of the actin cytoskeleton and nonmuscle myosins. These properties may be altered early in disease and represent an important early component of disease. This increased deformability of glomeruli could directly contribute to disease by permitting increased distension with hemodynamic force or represent a mechanically inhospitable environment for glomerular cells. PMID:21123730

  19. Oral Manifestations of Chronic Kidney Disease and Renal Secondary Hyperparathyroidism: A Comparative Review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that significant associations exist between oral disease and diseases involving non-oral tissues. Occasionally, the roles may be reversed and the oral cavity can be severely affected by systemic disease originating in another part of the body. Renal secondary hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrinopathy that occurs as a consequence of chronic azotemic kidney disease. Renal osteodystrophy, the most dramatic clinical consequence of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism is uncommon, but can result in demineralization of maxillofacial bones, loosening of teeth, and pathological jaw fractures. The purpose of this report is to update the current understanding of the pathophysiology of this endocrine disease and to compare the oral manifestations of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism in humans and companion animals. A 50-year review of the veterinary literature was undertaken to examine the clinical presentation of renal osteodystrophy in dogs, and to determine what clinical consequences of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism have been reported in domestic cats. PMID:26415385

  20. Awareness of Kidney Disease and Relationship to End-Stage Renal Disease and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Whaley-Connell, Adam; Shlipak, Micheal G; Inker, Lesley A; Tamura, Manjula Kurella; Bomback, Andrew S; Saab, Georges; Szpunar, Susanna M.; McFarlane, Samy I.; Li, Suying; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Norris, Keith; Bakris, George L.; McCullough, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic kidney disease are often reported to be unaware. We prospectively evaluated the association between awareness of kidney disease to end-stage renal disease and mortality. Methods We utilized 2000–2009 data from the National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP™). Mortality was determined by cross reference to the Social Security Administration Death Master File, and development of end-stage by cross reference with the United States Renal Data System. Results Of 109,285 participants, 28,244 (26%) had chronic kidney disease defined by albuminuria or eGFR <60ml/min/1.73m2. Only 9% (n=2660) reported being aware of kidney disease. Compared to those who were not aware, participants aware of chronic kidney disease had lower eGFR (49 vs 62ml/min/1.73m2) and a higher prevalence of albuminuria (52 vs 46%), diabetes (47 vs 42%), cardiovascular disease (43 vs 28%) and cancer (23 vs 14%). Over 8.5 years of follow-up, aware participants compared to those unaware had a lower rate of survival for end-stage (83% and 96%) and mortality (78 vs 81%), p<0.001 respectively. After adjustment for demographics, socioeconomic factors, comorbidity, and severity of kidney disease, aware participants continued to demonstrate an increased risk for end-stage renal disease [hazard ratio (95% CI) 1.37(1.07–1.75); p<0.0123] and mortality [1.27(1.07–1.52); p<0.0077] relative to unaware participants with chronic kidney disease. Conclusions Among persons identified as having chronic kidney disease at a health screening, only a small proportion had been made aware of their diagnosis previously by clinicians. This subgroup was at a disproportionately high risk for mortality and end-stage renal disease. PMID:22626510

  1. Testing for Occult Heartworm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stogdale, L.

    1984-01-01

    Heartworm infection in dogs is endemic in southern Ontario but occurs only sporadically throughout the remainder of Canada. The disease may either be associated with microfilariae in the patient's blood, a patent infection, or it may be occult. This paper describes a case of occult dirofilariasis in a dog, with emphasis on the diagnosis. A patent infection could be missed if the clinician tests an insufficient amount of blood. He should perform multiple concentration tests using either the modified Knott's technique or a filtration method. Occult infections occur in prepatent or unisexual infections, when the worms become sterile following therapy, or when the host produces antibodies that result in the destruction of the microfilariae. The recent release of a kit which detects the presence of antibodies to the adult heartworms now enables veterinarians to make an accurate diagnosis in the vast majority of dogs. PMID:17422386

  2. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  3. Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

    1997-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

  4. End-stage renal disease prevention strategies in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel

    2005-09-01

    Latin America (LA), defined here as the countries in the Western hemisphere located south of the United States, is a region with a total population of nearly 520,000,000 that increases 1.5% annually and has a human development index of 0.77. The countries that form this region present extreme contrasts. These contrasts are first and foremost within the countries themselves, because extremes of wealth and poverty are present in their social and economic fabric. In addition, in LA a vast variety of government modalities and political systems are represented. Therefore, in order for prevention strategies to be effective, they need to be tailored to the specific characteristics and idiosyncrasies of individual nations. This article will address the following aspects: first, a broad outline of the basic health statistics in LA, with focus on treatment of end-stage renal disease and its derived economic burden. Data from LA countries will be contrasted with 95% confidence interval of corresponding data from 10 industrialized countries (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, United States, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland). Second, we will discuss the prevalence of some risk factors for end-stage renal disease in the nations of the region. For this reason, we will focus on data that provide reliable information. Finally, we will consider general guidelines for the implementation of prevention strategies that may have common applicability in LA countries.

  5. In vivo bone aluminum measurements in patients with renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.; Kelleher, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    Contamination of the dialysis solution with trace amounts of aluminum and long-term use of aluminum-based phosphate binders have led to increased body burden of aluminum in patients with end-stage renal disease. A significant clinical problem associated with aluminum-overload is the early diagnosis of aluminum-induced dialysis dementia and osteomalacic osteodystrophy. There are few, if any, blood or urine indices that provide an early monitor of this bone disease, especially in the asymptomatic patient. Although a bone biopsy is usually the basis for the final clinical diagnosis, this procedure is not recommended for routine monitoring of patients. The present technique demonstrates the direct in vivo measurement of bone aluminum levels in patients with renal failure. The interference normally present from activation of bone phosphorus is eliminated by using a thermal/epithermal neutron beam. For the clinical management of the patients, the Al/Ca ratio for the hand may be more useful than an absolute measurement of the total body or skeletal aluminum burden. The relationship between the increased serum Al levels following disferrioxamine infusion and the direct in vivo measurement of bone aluminum using the Al/Ca ratio are currently under investigation. The neutron activation procedure presented in this pilot study is a promising new technique with an immediate clinical application. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The Occult Today: Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Gary E.

    1975-01-01

    Author offered some reflections on the "why" of the contemporary interest in the occult. He attempted to convince the reader that, if he or she has been surprised by the recent rise of occultism, sober reflection will dispell some fears and, perhaps, even convince him or her that occultism is not merely superstition. (Author/RK)

  7. Renal replacement therapy in Latin American end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Marinovich, Sergio; Fernandez, Sdenka; Lugon, Jocemir; Poblete-Badal, Hugo; Elgueta-Miranda, Susana; Gomez, Rafael; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Almaguer-Lopez, Miguel; Freire, Nelly; Leiva-Merino, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Gaspar; Luna-Guerra, Jorge; Bochicchio, Tomasso; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Cano, Nuria; Iron, Norman; Cuero, Cesar; Cuevas, Dario; Tapia, Carlos; Cangiano, Jose; Rodriguez, Sandra; Gonzalez, Haydee; Duro-Garcia, Valter

    2014-08-01

    The Latin American Dialysis and Renal Transplant Registry (RLADTR) was founded in 1991; it collects data from 20 countries which are members of Sociedad Latinoamericana de Nefrología e Hipertension. This paper presents the results corresponding to the year 2010. This study is an annual survey requesting data on incident and prevalent patients undergoing renal replacement treatment (RRT) in all modalities: hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and living with a functioning graft (LFG), etc. Prevalence and incidence were compared with previous years. The type of renal replacement therapy was analyzed, with special emphasis on PD and transplant (Tx). These variables were correlated with the gross national income (GNI) and the life expectancy at birth. Twenty countries participed in the surveys, covering 99% of the Latin American. The prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) under RRT in Latin America (LA) increased from 119 patients per million population (pmp) in 1991 to 660 pmp in 2010 (HD 413 pmp, PD 135 pmp and LFG 111 pmp). HD proportionally increased more than PD, and Tx HD continues to be the treatment of choice in the region (75%). The kidney Tx rate increased from 3.7 pmp in 1987 to 6.9 pmp in 1991 and to 19.1 in 2010. The total number of Tx's in 2010 was 10 397, with 58% deceased donors. The total RRT prevalence correlated positively with GNI (r(2) 0.86; P < 0.05) and life expectancy at birth (r(2) 0.58; P < 0.05). The HD prevalence and the kidney Tx rate correlated significantly with the same indexes, whereas the PD rate showed no correlation with these variables. A tendency to rate stabilization/little growth was reported in the most regional countries. As in previous reports, the global incidence rate correlated significantly only with GNI (r(2) 0.63; P < 0.05). Diabetes remained the leading cause of ESRD. The most frequent causes of death were cardiovascular (45%) and infections (22%). Neoplasms accounted for 10% of the causes of death. The

  8. Renal replacement therapy in Latin American end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Marinovich, Sergio; Fernandez, Sdenka; Lugon, Jocemir; Poblete-Badal, Hugo; Elgueta-Miranda, Susana; Gomez, Rafael; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Almaguer-Lopez, Miguel; Freire, Nelly; Leiva-Merino, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Gaspar; Luna-Guerra, Jorge; Bochicchio, Tomasso; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Cano, Nuria; Iron, Norman; Cuero, Cesar; Cuevas, Dario; Tapia, Carlos; Cangiano, Jose; Rodriguez, Sandra; Gonzalez, Haydee; Duro-Garcia, Valter

    2014-01-01

    The Latin American Dialysis and Renal Transplant Registry (RLADTR) was founded in 1991; it collects data from 20 countries which are members of Sociedad Latinoamericana de Nefrología e Hipertension. This paper presents the results corresponding to the year 2010. This study is an annual survey requesting data on incident and prevalent patients undergoing renal replacement treatment (RRT) in all modalities: hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and living with a functioning graft (LFG), etc. Prevalence and incidence were compared with previous years. The type of renal replacement therapy was analyzed, with special emphasis on PD and transplant (Tx). These variables were correlated with the gross national income (GNI) and the life expectancy at birth. Twenty countries participed in the surveys, covering 99% of the Latin American. The prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) under RRT in Latin America (LA) increased from 119 patients per million population (pmp) in 1991 to 660 pmp in 2010 (HD 413 pmp, PD 135 pmp and LFG 111 pmp). HD proportionally increased more than PD, and Tx HD continues to be the treatment of choice in the region (75%). The kidney Tx rate increased from 3.7 pmp in 1987 to 6.9 pmp in 1991 and to 19.1 in 2010. The total number of Tx's in 2010 was 10 397, with 58% deceased donors. The total RRT prevalence correlated positively with GNI (r2 0.86; P < 0.05) and life expectancy at birth (r2 0.58; P < 0.05). The HD prevalence and the kidney Tx rate correlated significantly with the same indexes, whereas the PD rate showed no correlation with these variables. A tendency to rate stabilization/little growth was reported in the most regional countries. As in previous reports, the global incidence rate correlated significantly only with GNI (r2 0.63; P < 0.05). Diabetes remained the leading cause of ESRD. The most frequent causes of death were cardiovascular (45%) and infections (22%). Neoplasms accounted for 10% of the causes of death. The

  9. Should Peripheral Vascular Disease- or Diabetes-related Amputation Contraindicate Renal Transplant?

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Nalani L

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates whether end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with amputation secondary to peripheral vascular disease (PVD) or diabetes mellitus (DM) are appropriate candidates for renal transplant. Limb- or digit- amputees with ESRD on the renal transplant list from 1993–2008 were included. Comorbidities, amputation type, duration on the waitlist, and current transplant status were analyzed. Additionally, US renal transplant centers were surveyed regarding their views about amputees' transplant candidacy. Thirty-eight ESRD patients with amputations were identified; 3 patients underwent renal transplant, 14 expired on the waitlist, and 14 were removed for medical reasons. The survey indicated that centers generally don't consider amputation a contraindication to transplant listing. Few ESRD patients with amputations who are placed on the transplant list undergo renal transplant; most die or are removed for medical reasons. Amputation should be considered an indicator of severe PVD and possibly a relative contraindication to listing for renal transplant. PMID:22787569

  10. Obesity end stage renal disease and survival in an elderly cohort with cardiovascular disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is highly prevalent in African-Americans and is associated with increased risk of end stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. It is not known if the effect of obesity is similar among Blacks and whites. The aim of this study is to examine racial differences in the association of obesity with E...

  11. Renal Relevant Radiology: Radiologic Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:24370765

  12. End-stage renal disease associated with prophylactic lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Aiff, Harald; Attman, Per-Ola; Aurell, Mattias; Bendz, Hans; Schön, Staffan; Svedlund, Jan

    2014-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of lithium associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to compare the relative risk of ESRD in lithium users versus non-lithium users. Second, the role of lithium in the pathogenesis of ESRD was evaluated. We used the Swedish Renal Registry to search for lithium-treated patients with ESRD among 2644 patients with chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT)-either dialysis or transplantation, within two defined geographical areas in Sweden with 2.8 million inhabitants. The prevalence date was December 31, 2010. We found 30 ESRD patients with a history of lithium treatment. ESRD with RRT was significantly more prevalent among lithium users than among non-lithium users (p<0.001). The prevalence of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population was 15.0‰ (95% CI 9.7-20.3), and close to two percent of the RRT population were lithium users. The relative risk of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population compared with the general population was 7.8 (95% CI 5.4-11.1). Out of those 30 patients, lithium use was classified, based on chart reviews, as being the sole (n=14) or main (n=10) cause of ESRD in 24 cases. Their mean age at the start of RRT was 66 years (46-82), their mean time on lithium 27 years (12-39), and 22 of them had been on lithium for 15 years or more. We conclude that lithium-associated ESRD is an uncommon but not rare complication of lithium treatment.

  13. Reversible dialysis-dependent renal failure due to undiagnosed renovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Jha, R.; Gude, D.; Narayan, G.; Mandal, S. N.; Gupta, P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Renovascular disease (RVD) can present with resistant hypertension, acute or rapidly progressive renal failure and occasionally nephrotic proteinuria. Revascularization plays an important role in controlling blood pressure and preserving renal function. It is widely believed that delay in revascularization would result in irreversible loss of renal function. However, we report a favorable outcome despite delayed revascularization in two patients of RVD- one presenting with recurrent flash pulmonary edema and other with progressive renal failure. The former's serum creatinine returned to normal despite 3 months of anuria and the latter became dialysis-independent despite 2 months of progressive decline in renal function. Both remain dialysis-free 3 years after surgery. PMID:23162281

  14. Care of the Patient with Renal Disease: Peritoneal Dialysis and Transplants, Nursing 321A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulburd, Kimberly

    A description is provided of a course, "Care of the Patient with Renal Disease," offered at the community college level to prepare licensed registered nurses to care for patients with renal disease, including instruction in performing the treatments of peritoneal dialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The first sections of…

  15. Renal disease in patients infected with hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Jaryal, Ajay; Kumar, Vivek; Sharma, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can result in hepatic diseases which may include an asymptomatic non-replicative carrier state, immunotolerant phase characterized by high DNA levels without significant hepatic injury, immune-reactive phase characterized by occurrence of chronic hepatitis and fibrosis in the liver, or complications like cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Extrahepatic manifestations may also accompany HBV infection. These may include serum sickness syndrome, polyarthralgia, polyarthritis, dermatologic manifestations like pitted keratolysis, urticaria, purpura, oral lichen planus or Gianotti-Crosti syndrome-a childhood papular eruption. Renal involvement may occur with HBV infection and usually involves glomerular or vascular injury. Various morphologic forms of renal injury have been reported with HBV infection, the commonest being membranous glomerulonephritis. The manifestations may include swelling over face and body, pedal edema, and urinary abnormalities. Evaluation may detect proteinuria, hematuria and reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The management options include use of antiviral drugs targeting HBV infection with or without concomitant immunosuppressive medication. With availability of newer drugs like entecavir and tenofovir, these have become the first line agents as they have a high barrier to resistance. Sole use of immunosuppression is not recommended for lack of clear benefit and the possible risk of HBV reactivation or flare. PMID:27509699

  16. Agalsidase benefits renal histology in young patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Tøndel, Camilla; Bostad, Leif; Larsen, Kristin Kampevold; Hirth, Asle; Vikse, Bjørn Egil; Houge, Gunnar; Svarstad, Einar

    2013-01-01

    The effect of early-onset enzyme replacement therapy on renal morphologic features in Fabry disease is largely unknown. Here, we evaluated the effect of 5 years of treatment with agalsidase alfa or agalsidase beta in 12 consecutive patients age 7-33 years (median age, 16.5 years). We performed renal biopsies at baseline and after 5 years of enzyme replacement therapy; 7 patients had additional biopsies after 1 and 3 years. After a median of 65 months, biopsy findings from all patients showed total clearance of glomerular endothelial and mesangial cell inclusions, and findings from 2 patients showed complete clearance of inclusions from epithelial cells of the distal tubule. The 4 patients who received the highest dose of agalsidase exhibited substantial clearance of podocyte inclusions, and the youngest patient had nearly complete clearance of these inclusions. Linear regression analysis showed a highly significant correlation between podocyte globotriaocylceramide clearance and cumulative agalsidase dose (r=0.804; P=0.002). Microalbuminuria normalized in five patients. In summary, long-term enzyme replacement therapy in young patients can result in complete globotriaocylceramide clearance of mesangial and glomerular endothelial cells across all dosage regimens, and clearance of podocyte inclusions is dose-dependent.

  17. Renal papillary necrosis in haemophilia and christmas disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G M; Evans, K T; Bloom, A L; Al-Gailani, F

    1983-03-01

    Haematuria is common in haemophilia and Christmas disease. A variety of radiological abnormalities in the urinary tract has been described in the literature, the commonest being hydronephrosis and obstructive uropathy. The findings in 26 cases seen in this centre were reported by Beck and Evans in 1972; although urinary-tract obstruction was relatively common, it was noted that signs suggestive of renal papillary necrosis (RPN) were present in some cases. In the present study, 20 of these patients were reinvestigated up to 10 years after the original radiological studies; a total number of 46 past and present intravenous urograms were examined. There was evidence of RPN in 11 of the 20 patients, and in five of these the signs had changed over the intervening period. The relevance of these findings is discussed; none of the patients showed evidence of renal failure. It is suggested that episodes of urinary-tract obstruction could be related to papillary sloughing, in some cases, rather than clot obstruction or obstruction due to retroperitoneal bleeding.

  18. Microvascular disease precedes the decline in renal function in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat

    PubMed Central

    Maric-Bilkan, Christine; Flynn, Elizabeth R.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a progressive and generalized vasculopathic condition associated with abnormal angiogenesis. We aim to determine whether changes in renal microvascular (MV) density correlate with and play a role in the progressive deterioration of renal function in diabetes. We hypothesize that MV changes represent the early steps of renal injury that worsen as diabetes progresses, initiating a vicious circle that leads to irreversible renal injury. Male nondiabetic (ND) or streptozotocin-induced diabetic (D) Sprague-Dawley rats were followed for 4 or 12 wk. Renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured by PAH and 125I-[iothalamate], respectively. Renal MV density was quantified ex vivo using three-dimensional micro computed tomography and JG-12 immunoreactivity. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels (ELISA) and expression of VEGF receptors and factors involved in MV remodeling were quantified in renal tissue by Western blotting. Finally, renal morphology was investigated by histology. Four weeks of diabetes was associated with increased GFR, accompanied by a 34% reduction in renal MV density and augmented renal VEGF levels. However, at 12 wk, while GFR remained similarly elevated, reduction of MV density was more pronounced (75%) and associated with increased MV remodeling, renal fibrosis, but unchanged renal VEGF compared with ND at 12 wk. The damage, loss, and subsequent remodeling of the renal MV architecture in the diabetic kidney may represent the initiating events of progressive renal injury. This study suggests a novel concept of MV disease as an early instigator of diabetic kidney disease that may precede and likely promote the decline in renal function. PMID:22031855

  19. Baseline predictors of renal disease progression in the African American Study of Hypertension and Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Norris, Keith C; Greene, Tom; Kopple, Joel; Lea, Janice; Lewis, Julia; Lipkowitz, Mike; Miller, Pete; Richardson, Annie; Rostand, Stephen; Wang, Xuelei; Appel, Lawrence J

    2006-10-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased risk for progression to ESRD. The purpose of this study was to examine factors that predict increased risk for adverse renal outcomes. Cox regression was performed to assess the potential of 38 baseline risk factors to predict the clinical renal composite outcome of 50% or 25-ml/min per 1.73 m(2) GFR decline or ESRD among 1094 black patients with hypertensive nephrosclerosis (GFR 20 to 65 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)). Patients were trial participants who had been randomly assigned to one of two BP goals and to one of three antihypertensive regimens and followed for a range of 3 to 6.4 yr. In unadjusted and adjusted analyses, baseline proteinuria was consistently associated with an increased risk for adverse renal outcomes, even at low levels of proteinuria. The relationship of proteinuria with adverse renal outcomes also was evident in analyses that were stratified by level of GFR, which itself was associated with adverse renal outcomes but only at levels <40 ml/min. Other factors that were significantly associated with increased renal events after adjustment for baseline GFR, age, and gender, both with and without adjustment for baseline proteinuria, included serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, and phosphorus. In black patients with hypertensive nephrosclerosis, increased proteinuria, reduced GFR, and elevated levels of serum creatinine, urea nitrogen and phosphorus were directly associated with adverse clinical renal events. These findings identify a subset of this high-risk population that might benefit from even more aggressive treatment.

  20. Developments in renal pharmacogenomics and applications in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Padullés, Ariadna; Rama, Inés; Llaudó, Inés; Lloberas, Núria

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has shown an increasing prevalence in the last century. CKD encompasses a poor prognosis related to a remarkable number of comorbidities, and many patients suffer from this disease progression. Once the factors linked with CKD evolution are distinguished, it will be possible to provide and enhance a more intensive treatment to high-risk patients. In this review, we focus on the emerging markers that might be predictive or related to CKD progression physiopathology as well as those related to a different pattern of response to treatment, such as inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers; the vitamin D receptor agonist; salt sensitivity hypertension; and progressive kidney-disease markers with identified genetic polymorphisms). Candidate-gene association studies and genome-wide association studies have analyzed the genetic basis for common renal diseases, including CKD and related factors such as diabetes and hypertension. This review will, in brief, consider genotype-based pharmacotherapy, risk prediction, drug target recognition, and personalized treatments, and will mainly focus on findings in CKD patients. An improved understanding will smooth the progress of switching from classical clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. PMID:25206311

  1. Renal parenchymal histopathology predicts life-threatening chronic kidney disease as a result of radical nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Sejima, Takehiro; Honda, Masashi; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The preoperative prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency plays an important role in the decision-making process regarding renal surgery options. Furthermore, the prediction of both postoperative renal insufficiency and postoperative cardiovascular disease occurrence, which is suggested to be an adverse consequence caused by renal insufficiency, contributes to the preoperative policy decision as well as the precise informed consent for a renal cell carcinoma patient. Preoperative nomograms for the prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, calculated using patient backgrounds, are advocated. The use of these nomograms together with other types of nomograms predicting oncological outcome is beneficial. Post-radical nephrectomy attending physicians can predict renal insufficiency based on the normal renal parenchymal pathology in addition to preoperative patient characteristics. It is suggested that a high level of global glomerulosclerosis in nephrectomized normal renal parenchyma is closely associated with severe renal insufficiency. Some studies showed that post-radical nephrectomy severe renal insufficiency might have an association with increased mortality as a result of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, such pathophysiology should be recognized as life-threatening, surgically-related chronic kidney disease. On the contrary, the investigation of the prediction of mild post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, which is not related to adverse consequences in the postoperative long-term period, is also promising because the prediction of mild renal insufficiency might be the basis for the substitution of radical nephrectomy for nephron-sparing surgery in technically difficult or compromised cases. The deterioration of quality of life caused by post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency should be investigated in conjunction with life-threatening matters.

  2. Developmental abnormalities, blood pressure variability and renal disease in Riley Day syndrome.

    PubMed

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, L; Axelrod, F B; Kaufmann, H

    2013-01-01

    Riley Day syndrome, commonly referred to as familial dysautonomia (FD), is a genetic disease with extremely labile blood pressure owing to baroreflex deafferenation. Chronic renal disease is very frequent in these patients and was attributed to recurrent arterial hypotension and renal hypoperfusion. Aggressive treatment of hypotension, however, has not reduced its prevalence. We evaluated the frequency of kidney malformations as well as the impact of hypertension, hypotension and blood pressure variability on the severity of renal impairment. We also investigated the effect of fludrocortisone treatment on the progression of renal disease. Patients with FD appeared to have an increased incidence of hydronephrosis/reflux and patterning defects. Patients <4 years old had hypertension and normal estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR). Patients with more severe hypertension and greater variability in their blood pressure had worse renal function (both, P<0.01). In contrast, there was no relationship between eGFR and the lowest blood pressure recorded during upright tilt. The progression of renal disease was faster in patients receiving fludrocortisone (P<0.02). Hypertension precedes kidney disease in these patients. Moreover, increased blood pressure variability as well as mineralocorticoid treatment accelerate the progression of renal disease. No association was found between hypotension and renal disease in patients with FD.

  3. The Risk of Septicemia in End-Stage Renal Disease With and Without Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Wang, I-Kuan; Wei, Chang-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Tsai, Chia-Ta; Hsia, Te-Chun; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a well-known risk factor for septicemia. Renal transplantation (RTx) is the treatment of choice for ESRD. However, RTx recipients should undergo long-term immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of septicemia in ESRD patients with and without RTx. This cohort study used the National Health Insurance (NHI) data of Taiwan from 2000 to 2010. The RTx group consisted of 3286 RTx recipients. The non-RTx comparison group also consisted of 3286 subjects with ESRD matched by propensity scores for age, sex, index date, comorbidities, and medications. The subjects were followed until the end of 2011 to evaluate the septicemia risk. The risk of septicemia was lower in the RTx group than the non-RTx group, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.73 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.64–0.84, P < 0.001]. In addition, we observed insignificantly lower intensive care unit (ICU) admission rate (35.8% vs. 39.8%) and lower 30-day all-cause mortality rate (17.2% vs. 18.5%) in the RTx group than the non-RTx group. However, the mean cost for septicemia in the RTx group was insignificantly higher than the non-RTx group (7175 vs. 6421 USD, P = 0.39). RTx recipients had a significantly reduced risk of developing septicemia compared to the propensity-matched non-RTx ESRD patients. The ICU admission and 30-day all-cause mortality rates also slightly decreased in RTx recipients but without statistical significance. PMID:26313801

  4. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Kidneys' Structural Changes in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are the most important manifestations of end-stage kidneys' structural changes. ACKD is caused by kidney damage or scarring and it is characterized by the presence of small, multiple cortical and medullary cysts filled with a fluid similar to preurine. ACKD prevalence varies according to predialysis and dialysis age and its pathogenesis is unknown, although it is stated that progressive destruction of renal tissue induces hypertrophy/compensatory hyperplasia of residual nephrons and may trigger the degenerative process. ACKD is almost asymptomatic, but it can lead to several complications (bleeding, rupture, infections, RCC). Ultrasound (US) is the first level imaging technique in ACKD, because of its sensitivity and reliability. The most serious complication of ACKD is RCC, which is stimulated by the same growth factors and proto-oncogenes that lead to the genesis of cysts. Two different histological types of RCC have been identified: (1) RCC associated with ACKD and (2) papillary renal clear cell carcinoma. Tumors in end-stage kidneys are mainly small, multifocal and bilateral, with a papillary structure and a low degree of malignancy. At US, RCC appears as a small inhomogeneous nodule (<3 cm), clearly outlined from the renal profile and hypoechoic if compared with sclerotic parenchyma. In some cases, tumor appears as a homogeneous and hyperechoic multifocal mass. The most specific US sign of a small tumor in end-stage kidney is the important arterial vascularization, in contrast with renal parenchymal vascular sclerosis. PMID:27169876

  5. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Kidneys' Structural Changes in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are the most important manifestations of end-stage kidneys' structural changes. ACKD is caused by kidney damage or scarring and it is characterized by the presence of small, multiple cortical and medullary cysts filled with a fluid similar to preurine. ACKD prevalence varies according to predialysis and dialysis age and its pathogenesis is unknown, although it is stated that progressive destruction of renal tissue induces hypertrophy/compensatory hyperplasia of residual nephrons and may trigger the degenerative process. ACKD is almost asymptomatic, but it can lead to several complications (bleeding, rupture, infections, RCC). Ultrasound (US) is the first level imaging technique in ACKD, because of its sensitivity and reliability. The most serious complication of ACKD is RCC, which is stimulated by the same growth factors and proto-oncogenes that lead to the genesis of cysts. Two different histological types of RCC have been identified: (1) RCC associated with ACKD and (2) papillary renal clear cell carcinoma. Tumors in end-stage kidneys are mainly small, multifocal and bilateral, with a papillary structure and a low degree of malignancy. At US, RCC appears as a small inhomogeneous nodule (<3 cm), clearly outlined from the renal profile and hypoechoic if compared with sclerotic parenchyma. In some cases, tumor appears as a homogeneous and hyperechoic multifocal mass. The most specific US sign of a small tumor in end-stage kidney is the important arterial vascularization, in contrast with renal parenchymal vascular sclerosis.

  6. Renal disease in scleroderma: an update on evaluation, risk stratification, pathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Victoria K.; Steen, Virginia D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Renal disease remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in scleroderma. The spectrum of renal complications in systemic sclerosis includes scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), normotensive renal crisis, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated glomerulonephritis, penacillamine-associated renal disease, and reduced renal functional reserves manifested by proteinuria, microalbuminuria, or isolated reduction in glomerular filtration rate. The purpose of this review is to provide a concise and up-to-date review of the evaluation, risk stratification, pathogenesis, and management of scleroderma-associated renal disease. Recent findings Although SRC survival has significantly improved, mortality of this complication remains high outside of specialized centers. Recent data demonstrate strong associations between anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies and SRC. Subclinical renal impairment affects approximately 50% of scleroderma patients and may be associated with other vascular manifestations. Subclinical renal involvement rarely progresses to end-stage renal failure; however, recent studies suggest it may predict mortality in patients with other vasculopathic manifestations. Summary Testing for anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies should be incorporated into clinical care to identify patients at high risk for SRC. Recommendations from European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research, and the Scleroderma Clinical Trials Consortium confirm angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as first-line therapy for SRC, and give recommendations for second-line agents. PMID:22955019

  7. CT appearance of acute inflammatory disease of the renal interstitium

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.P.; McClennan, B.L.; Rottenberg, R.R.

    1983-08-01

    Today, infection remains the most common disease of the urinary tract and constitutes almost 75% of patient problems requiring urologic evaluation. There have been several major factors responsible for our better understanding of the nature and pathophysiology of urinary tract infection. One has been quantitated urine bacteriology and another, the discovery that a significant part of the apparently healthy adult female population has asymptomatic bacteriuria. Abnormal conditions such as neurogenic bladder, bladder malignancy, prolonged catheter drainage and reflux, altered host resistance, diabetes mellitus, and urinary tract obstruction, as well as pregnancy, may either predispose to or be implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. There is a wide range of conditions that result in acute renal inflammation and those under discussion affect primarily the interstitium. This term refers to the connective tissue elements separating the tubules in the cortex and medulla. Hence, the interstitial nephritides are to be distinguished from the glomerulonephritides and fall into two general etiologic categories: infectious and noninfectious.

  8. Pax genes in renal development, disease and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Sanchez-Ferras, Oraly; Bouchard, Maxime

    2015-08-01

    The execution of developmental programs entails specific spatio-temporal expression of transcriptional regulators that ultimately control tissue morphogenesis and embryo patterning. Pax transcription factors are sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins exerting such regulatory activity in several tissues. In the urogenital system, Pax2 and Pax8 have emerged as crucial players at multiple steps of kidney and urinary tract development. They are involved in important processes such as cell survival, cell lineage decisions and tissue interactions through the regulation of sophisticated gene regulatory networks. Pax2/8 have additionally been directly associated with Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) and renal cancers in human. In this review, we provide an overview of landmark contributions to the understanding of Pax gene function in urinary tract development and disease with an emphasis on recent advances in the field. PMID:26410163

  9. Clinicopathologic findings associated with chronic renal disease in cats: 74 cases (1973-1984).

    PubMed

    DiBartola, S P; Rutgers, H C; Zack, P M; Tarr, M J

    1987-05-01

    The historic, physical, laboratory, and histologic findings for 74 cats with chronic renal disease were reviewed. Most cats were older, and no breed or sex predilection was detected. This most common clinical signs detected by owners were lethargy, anorexia, and weight loss. Dehydration and emaciation were common physical examination findings. Common laboratory findings were nonregenerative anemia, lymphopenia, azotemia, hypercholesterolemia, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, and isosthenuria. The most common morphologic diagnosis was chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis of unknown cause. The other pathologic diagnoses were renal lymphosarcoma, renal amyloidosis, chronic pyelonephritis, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic renal disease, and pyogranulomatous nephritis secondary to feline infectious peritonitis. PMID:3583899

  10. Primary hyperaldosteronism, a mediator of progressive renal disease in cats.

    PubMed

    Javadi, S; Djajadiningrat-Laanen, S C; Kooistra, H S; van Dongen, A M; Voorhout, G; van Sluijs, F J; van den Ingh, T S G A M; Boer, W H; Rijnberk, A

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in primary hyperaldosteronism, particularly because of its possible role in the progression of kidney disease. While most studies have concerned humans and experimental animal models, we here report on the occurrence of a spontaneous form of (non-tumorous) primary hyperaldosteronism in cats. At presentation, the main physical features of 11 elderly cats were hypokalemic paroxysmal flaccid paresis and loss of vision due to retinal detachment with hemorrhages. Primary hyperaldosteronism was diagnosed on the basis of plasma concentrations of aldosterone (PAC) and plasma renin activity (PRA), and the calculation of the PAC:PRA ratio. In all animals, PACs were at the upper end or higher than the reference range. The PRAs were at the lower end of the reference range, and the PAC:PRA ratios exceeded the reference range. Diagnostic imaging by ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed no or only very minor changes in the adrenals compatible with nodular hyperplasia. Adrenal gland histopathology revealed extensive micronodular hyperplasia extending from zona glomerulosa into the zona fasciculata and reticularis. In three cats, plasma urea and creatinine concentrations were normal when hyperaldosteronism was diagnosed but thereafter increased to above the upper limit of the respective reference range. In the other eight cats, urea and creatinine concentrations were raised at first examination and gradually further increased. Even in end-stage renal insufficiency, there was a tendency to hypophosphatemia rather than to hyperphosphatemia. The histopathological changes in the kidneys mimicked those of humans with hyperaldosteronism: hyaline arteriolar sclerosis, glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. The non-tumorous form of primary hyperaldosteronism in cats has many similarities with "idiopathic" primary hyperaldosteronism in humans. The condition is associated with progressive renal disease

  11. TWEAK and the progression of renal disease: clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Ana B; Izquierdo, M Concepcion; Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Ucero, Alvaro C; Egido, Jesus; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ramos, Adrián Mario; Putterman, Chaim; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) activates the fibroblast growth factor-inducible-14 (Fn14) receptor. TWEAK has actions on intrinsic kidney cells and on inflammatory cells of potential pathophysiological relevance. The effects of TWEAK in tubular cells have been explored in most detail. In cultured murine tubular cells TWEAK induces the expression of inflammatory cytokines, downregulates the expression of Klotho, is mitogenic, and in the presence of sensitizing agents promotes apoptosis. Similar actions were observed on glomerular mesangial cells. In vivo TWEAK actions on healthy kidneys mimic cell culture observations. Increased expression of TWEAK and Fn14 was reported in human and experimental acute and chronic kidney injury. The role of TWEAK/Fn14 in kidney injury has been demonstrated in non-inflammatory compensatory renal growth, acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease of immune and non-immune origin, including hyperlipidaemic nephropathy, lupus nephritis (LN) and anti-GBM nephritis. The nephroprotective effect of TWEAK or Fn14 targeting in immune-mediated kidney injury is the result of protection from TWEAK-induced injury of renal intrinsic cells, not from interference with the immune response. A phase I dose-ranging clinical trial demonstrated the safety of anti-TWEAK antibodies in humans. A phase II randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial exploring the efficacy, safety and tolerability of neutralizing anti-TWEAK antibodies as a tissue protection strategy in LN is ongoing. The eventual success of this trial may expand the range of kidney diseases in which TWEAK targeting should be explored.

  12. Sevelamer therapy for pediatric end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Storms, Lara E; Chicella, Michael F; Dice, James E

    2006-03-01

    Sevelamer, a non-calcium-containing, non-aluminum-containing phosphate binder, is frequently prescribed for treatment in adults with hyperphosphatemia secondary to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, published information regarding sevelamer use in children younger than 11 years is lacking. We report the use of sevelamer as a phosphate binder in a 19-month-old girl with ESRD who was receiving calcium carbonate 1250 mg 3 times/day for hyperphosphatemia. The patient's initial serum phosphorus concentration was 8.6 mg/dl, and the calcium-phosphorus product was 75 mg(2)/dl(2). This was well above the level that places patients at risk for complications such as joint, vessel, and soft-tissue calcification. An aluminum-containing phosphate binder was not an option given the patient's renal disease and the concern for neurotoxicity. Sevelamer was considered, but a MEDLINE search revealed no pediatric dosing information. An initial dosage of 100 mg/kg/day divided every 8 hours was administered, as extrapolated from adult data, and then titrated to 130 mg/kg/day divided every 8 hours based on the patient's response. The child's dietary phosphorus intake remained constant throughout her hospital stay. During sevelamer therapy, her serum phosphorus concentration dropped as low as 5.2 mg/dl; at discharge it was 6.5 mg/dl, with a corresponding calcium-phosphorus product in the upper 50s. No adverse effects associated with sevelamer were observed. In the dosages we used, sevelamer resulted in an acceptable calcium-phosphorus product and returned the patient's serum phosphorus concentration to near normal. Sevelamer appears to be a viable option as a phosphate binder in children with ESRD.

  13. The Urine Urokinase Concentration in End Stage Renal Disease with Acquired Renal Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sae Yong; Yang, Dong Ho; Lee, Byoung Ho; Ki, Eun Kyong; Chung, Kwang Hoe

    1991-01-01

    To see whether there was any difference in the urine urokinase concentration between acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) group and control (non cyst) group in end stage renal disease patients (ESRD), we evaluated fifty ESRD patients who had been maintained on chronic hemodialysis for various period. The urine urokinase concentration was higher in the ACKD group (17.5±14.7 unit/ml, range 13.5–47.0 unit/ml, n=9) than the control group (4.1±3.4 unit/ml, range 0.5–12.0 unit/ml, n=36) (p<0.001), and polycyst group (2.6±1.8 unit/ml, range 1.0–5.1 unit/ml, n=5) (p<0.01). But there was no difference between the control group and polycyst group. In the control group and the ACKD group, there was a direct relation between the dialysis duration and the urokinase concentration and the longer the dialysis duration, the higher the urine urokinase concentration (r squared=0.424, p=0.0001). The hemodialysis duration was longer in the ACKD group (42±17.0 months) than the control group (20.0±12.5 months) (p<0.005). These findings suggest that urokinase may be responsible for cystogenic degeneration in ESRD. PMID:1807367

  14. Comparative study on the National Renal Disease Registry in America, England and Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Askarianzadeh, Mahdi; Saghaeiannejad-Isfahani, Sakineh; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Ehteshami, Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Context: A disease registry is a database that includes information about people diagnosed with specific types of diseases. The registry collects information that can be used for capturing, managing, and organizing specific information for patients. Aims: The aim of this study was to identify and compare the National Renal Disease Registry (NRDR) in selected countries including the United States, United Kingdom, and Iran. Settings and Design: Retrieval of data of the NRDR performed through scholars responsible in related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and Renal Disease charity, and data registries in the United States, United Kingdom, and Iran. Materials and Methods: This research was an applied and descriptive, comparative study. The study population consisted of the National Renal Disease Registry of the selected countries including the United States, United Kingdom, and Iran, from which data were collected using forms that were designed according to the study objectives. Sources of data were researchers, scholars responsible in related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and Renal Disease charity, data registries, articles, books, journals, databases, websites, and related documents. Data were gathered through phone, e-mail, study, observation, and interview. Statistical Analysis Used: The researchers collected data for each country based on the study objectives and then put them in comparative tables. Data were analyzed by descriptive, comparative, and theoretical methods. Results: There is no NRDR in Iran to report the short- and long-term results of renal disease. Most of the renal transplant teams report their own results as single-center experiences. America and Britain have pre-eminent national registry of renal disease, compared to other countries. Conclusions: The Iranian Society of Nephrology should be actively involved to create a National Renal Registry in Iran. The registry should have

  15. Chronic renal failure in an English bull terrier with polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, C A; Turner, S

    2004-11-01

    An entire female English bull terrier, aged five years and one month, was diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease by renal ultrasonography. It had thickening and abnormal motion of the mitral valve on 2D and M mode echocardiography, and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, characterised by turbulence in the left ventricular outflow tract and elevated aortic blood flow velocity, detected by colour flow and spectral Doppler echocardiography, respectively. Two years later, haematology, serum biochemistry and urinalysis data suggested the presence of compensated renal failure. The dog was euthanased at 10 years and eight months of age, with haematology, serum biochemistry and urinalysis data Indicating decompensated chronic renal failure. Postmortem examination confirmed polycystic kidney disease, chronic renal disease, mitral and aortic valvular myxomatous degeneration, and mixed mammary neoplasia. This case demonstrates that bull terriers with polycystic kidney disease may develop associated chronic renal failure.

  16. Nutrition in the critical care settings of renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Moore, L W; Acchiardo, S R; Smith, S O; Gaber, A O

    1996-07-01

    Acute catabolic events during the course of renal dysfunction lead to exacerbation of nutritional abnormalities often present in these patients. Whether the renal failure is acute or chronic, the nutritional management of these patients is extremely challenging. Traditional methods of nutritional assessment must be extrapolated to include the effects of the renal dysfunction and renal replacement therapy being used. Cases of patients with acute renal failure, chronic renal failure with an acute insult, pancreas-kidney transplant recipient with delayed graft function, and a liver transplant recipient who developed renal failure are reviewed with emphasis on the nutritional management during the course of illness. Monitoring techniques are reviewed, and comparisons are made to other nutrition support protocols. PMID:8827206

  17. The knowledge, awareness, and acceptability of renal transplantation among patients with end-stage renal disease in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Takure, A O; Jinadu, Y O; Adebayo, S A; Shittu, O B; Salako, B L; Kadiri, S

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is well established in the USA, Europe, India, and South Africa. However, it is still in its infancy in Nigeria. The objective of our study is to determine the knowledge, awareness, and acceptability of renal transplant among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the factors which are responsible for the low level of transplantation in Ibadan, Nigeria. A 15-item pilot-tested questionnaire was administered to willing patients with ESRD seen at the medical outpatient clinic of the University Teaching Hospital, from January to December 2011. There was 81% participation rate of the respondents. Exactly 90.1% had formal education and 44% earned <50,000 naira per month. Seventy-nine percent of respondents was aware of renal transplantation, 70.4% would recommend it to others, and 66.7% accepted renal transplantation; 77.8% would maintain a close relationship with their donors. About 61.7% considered it very expensive, while 33.3% did not know the cost for transplantation. Of the reason for the low level of kidney transplantation in Nigeria, 39.5% had no idea and in 27.2% of the respondents, the fear of death by potential donors may be responsible. Eleven percent of responded that recipients had no money for kidney transplantation and another 11% thought the potential donors would like to be paid for donating their kidneys. Most of the respondents with ESRD were knowledgeable, aware of, and accepted renal transplantation as the next step to treat chronic renal failure. However, majority of these patients could not afford the cost for renal transplantation. PMID:27424696

  18. Changes in Renal Function and Blood Pressure in Patients with Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worcester, Elaine M.

    2007-04-01

    Stone disease is a rare cause of renal failure, but a history of kidney stones is associated with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease, particularly in overweight patients. Loss of renal function seems especially notable for patients with stones associated with cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, and renal tubular acidosis, in whom the renal pathology shows deposits of mineral obstructing inner medullary collecting ducts, often diffusely. However, even idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers have a mild but significant decrease in renal function, compared to age, sex and weight-matched normals, and appear to lose renal function with age at a slightly faster rate than non-stone formers. There is also an increased incidence of hypertension among stone formers, although women are more likely to be affected than men.

  19. Pregnancy outcomes in a patient with Sjögren's disease with renal involvement

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Abhishek; O'Donoghue, Keelin; Mahmood, Uzma; Banerjee, Debasish

    2013-01-01

    Background: Maternal and fetal outcome in pregnancy with renal failure is unpredictable, where each condition can adversely affect the other. We present a case of steroid sensitive Sjögren's nephritis worsened by pregnancy, demonstrated over the course of multiple pregnancies and investigated the aetiology. Case: A 28-year-old nullipara with a diagnosis of primary Sjögren's syndrome presented with a deterioration of renal function. A diagnosis of secondary tubulo-interstitial nephritis was made on renal biopsy. Her first pregnancy ended in the second trimester with a decision to deliver a female infant at 27 weeks due to worsening maternal renal function. Renal function improved immediately. A second pregnancy ended in a first trimester miscarriage. The third and fourth pregnancies delivered male infants at 35 and 34 weeks, with worsening renal function in each pregnancy, reaching end stage. Repeat biopsy showed extensive glomerulosclerosis and male cells were identified. Conclusions: This case of Sjögren's syndrome with renal disease demonstrated the increased risk of fetal and maternal adverse pregnancy outcomes. Renal function worsened in each pregnancy and progressed to end-stage renal disease. Fetal microchimerism offers an interesting mechanism for our patient's renal failure and its apparent relationship to her pregnancies.

  20. Renal histology before and after effective enzyme replacement therapy in a patient with classical Fabry's disease.

    PubMed

    Hirashio, S; Taguchi, T; Naito, T; Maki, K; Ogata, S; Taniyama, K; Taniguchi, Y; Yorioka, N

    2009-05-01

    A 38-year-old man underwent renal biopsy because of proteinuria. It revealed swelling and vacuolation of glomerular epithelial cells, as well as myelin-like structures characteristic of Fabry's disease. Detection of decreased plasma activity of alpha-galactosidase A confirmed the diagnosis. Enzyme replacement therapy was provided with recombinant agalsidase-beta, resulting in improvement of his symptoms. When renal biopsy was repeated, specific staining for globotriaosylceramide showed that renal deposits were decreased by enzyme therapy.

  1. The risk of cardiovascular disease associated with proteinuria in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fresnedo, Gema; Escallada, Rafael; Rodrigo, Emilio; De Francisco, Angel L M; Cotorruelo, Julio G; Sanz De Castro, Saturnino; Zubimendi, Jose A; Ruiz, J C; Arias, Manuel

    2002-04-27

    Proteinuria in the general population has been shown to be associated with cardiovascular disease, which is the main cause of death in renal transplantation. We investigated the effect of proteinuria on cardiovascular disease after renal transplantation in 532 renal transplant patients with functioning grafts for more than 1 year. Patients were classified into two groups depending on the presence of persistent proteinuria. We analyzed graft and patient survival, posttransplantation cardiovascular disease, and main causes of graft loss and death. Five- and 10-year graft and patient survival rates were lower in the group with proteinuria. The main cause of death was vascular disease in both groups. The presence of posttransplantation cardiovascular disease was higher in the group with proteinuria. Persistent proteinuria was associated with graft loss (RR=4.18), patient death (RR=1.92), and cardiovascular disease (RR=2.45). In conclusion, persistent proteinuria was an independent risk factor for increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in renal transplant patients.

  2. Economic evaluation of end stage renal disease patients undergoing hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Suja, A.; Anju, R.; Anju, V.; Neethu, J.; Peeyush, P.; Saraswathy, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In India the incidence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing day by day and the option for the treatment of ESRD is dialysis or transplantation. In the present scenario, due to the cost of treatment normal people can afford only hemodialysis rather than transplantation. Since the cost of hemodialysis differs across the country, research is needed to evaluate its exact cost. Aim: This study is to analyze the healthcare cost of hemodialysis in a private hospital of South India. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective, observational study carried out in a tertiary care hospital. Patients who are undergoing routine hemodialysis in this hospital were selected for the study. Patient data as well as cost details were collected for a period of six months. Thirty patients were selected for the study and a total of 2160 dialysis sessions were studied. Patient perspective was taken for the analysis of cost. Both direct and indirect costs were analyzed. This includes cost of dialysis, investigations, erythropoietin, food, transportation, lost wages etc. Socioeconomic status of the patient was also studied. Result: The total cost per session was found to be around Rs. 4500. Fifty six percent contributes direct medical cost whereas 20% contributes direct non medical cost. Twenty four percent cost was due to indirect costs. Since the patients are paying from their own pocket, only the upper or upper middle class patient can undergo hemodialysis regularly. Conclusion: These findings are important to find out the impact of cost of hemodialysis on patients suffering from ESRD. Further studies related to costs and outcome, otherwise known as pharmacoeconomic studies, are needed to analyze the pros and cons of renal replacement therapy and to improve the quality of life of ESRD patients. Thus pharmacoeconomical studies are needed to realize that government has to take initiative to provide insurance or reimbursement for the common people. PMID:22557920

  3. Ramadan fasting and patients with renal diseases: A mini review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Emami-Naini, Afsoon; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Baradaran, Azar; Abedini, Amin; Abtahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. During this month, adult Muslims are obligated to refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to dusk. Although based on Islamic principles patients are exempted from fasting, each year, many Muslim patients express their willingness to observe the fast in Ramadan month to respect the cultural customs. There are concerns about the impact of fluid restriction and dehydration during Ramadan fasting for patients with renal diseases. In this study, we reviewed the PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, SCIRUS, Embase, and DOAJ data sources to identify the published studies on the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with renal diseases. Our review on published reports on renal transplant recipients revealed no injurious effect of Ramadan fasting for the renal graft function. Nearly all studies on this topic suggest that Ramadan fasting is safe when the function of the renal graft is acceptable and stable. Regarding the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with chronic kidney disease, there is concern about the role of renal hypoperfusion in developing tubular cell injury. Finally, there is controversy between studies about the risk of dehydration in Ramadan in developing renal stones. There are uncertainties about the change in the incidence of renal colic in Ramadan month compared with the other periods of the year. Despite such discrepancies, nearly all studies are in agreement on consuming adequate amounts of water from dusk to dawn to reduce the risk of renal stone formation. PMID:24379850

  4. Ramadan fasting and patients with renal diseases: A mini review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Emami-Naini, Afsoon; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Baradaran, Azar; Abedini, Amin; Abtahi, Mohammad

    2013-08-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. During this month, adult Muslims are obligated to refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to dusk. Although based on Islamic principles patients are exempted from fasting, each year, many Muslim patients express their willingness to observe the fast in Ramadan month to respect the cultural customs. There are concerns about the impact of fluid restriction and dehydration during Ramadan fasting for patients with renal diseases. In this study, we reviewed the PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, SCIRUS, Embase, and DOAJ data sources to identify the published studies on the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with renal diseases. Our review on published reports on renal transplant recipients revealed no injurious effect of Ramadan fasting for the renal graft function. Nearly all studies on this topic suggest that Ramadan fasting is safe when the function of the renal graft is acceptable and stable. Regarding the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with chronic kidney disease, there is concern about the role of renal hypoperfusion in developing tubular cell injury. Finally, there is controversy between studies about the risk of dehydration in Ramadan in developing renal stones. There are uncertainties about the change in the incidence of renal colic in Ramadan month compared with the other periods of the year. Despite such discrepancies, nearly all studies are in agreement on consuming adequate amounts of water from dusk to dawn to reduce the risk of renal stone formation. PMID:24379850

  5. [Role of immunity and tolerance in renal diseases].

    PubMed

    Ranieri, E

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) have been recognized as the most efficient antigen presenting cells that have the capacity to initiate naive T-cell response in vitro and in vivo. During their differentiation and maturation pathways, DC can efficiently capture, process and present antigens for T-cell activation. These characteristics make DC an attractive choice as the cellular adjuvant for can-cer vaccines. In humans, two DC subsets, myeloid DC (mDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC), have been characterized and have distinct origins and functions: mDC are involved in the induction of the Th1 response, while pDC regulate immunity and initiate adaptive antiviral immune responses. Advances in DC generation, loading and maturation methodologies have made it possible to generate clinical grade vaccines for various human trials. Several studies have shown that tumor antigen-loaded DC vaccination is safe and promising for the treatment of cancer. We are investigating the use of autologous tumor lysate-pulsed mature DC in renal cancer patients with metastasis. DC can play a central role in the development of T-cell tolerance, and its maintenance in the periphery is critical for the prevention of autoimmunity. DC are likely to have a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and are, to date, the only APC capable of provoking autoimmune disease. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a systemic autoimmune disease with multi-organ involvement with autoreactive T and B cells, could be due to DC alterations, and pDC have a potential role in this disease. Given their pivotal role in controlling immunity, DC are logical targets for treating both cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  6. Trace elements in sera from patients with renal disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoshinori; Nakai, Keiko; Sera, Kouichiro; Sato, Michirou

    1999-04-01

    In hemodialysis (HD) patients, an accumulation of trace elements such as aluminum, copper, silicon and vanadium has been reported. Aluminum-caused encephalopathy and aluminum-related bone diseases are important trace element-related complications. Using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) we determined concentrations of aluminum, silicon, copper, zinc, selenium and bromine in sera of 29 patients with HD, 14 nondialysis patients with renal disease (RD) and 27 normal controls. The concentration of serum silicon of the patients with HD was 107.4 ± 61.3 μmol/l, which is markedly higher than that of normal controls (48.3 ± 25.8 μmol/l, p < 0.0001). The serum concentrations of zinc and bromine in patients with HD were 11.9 ± 1.7 and 21.3 ± 3.0 μmol/l, respectively. Both were markedly lower than those of normal controls (15.6 ± 2.6, 69.2 ± 8.3 μmol/l, p < 0.0001). The concentrations of aluminium and bromine in the serum of patients with RD were 171.9 ± 64.3 and 81.9 ± 11.6 μmol/l, which were markedly higher than those of normal controls ( p < 0.0001, p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in the concentration of copper and selenium among three groups.

  7. C-reactive protein and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Lacson, Eduardo; Levin, Nathan W

    2004-01-01

    The significance of CRP and inflammation has increased over time, especially in the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) population. From a simple marker it now appears that CRP is an active participant in pro-atherosclerotic phenomenon including local pro-inflammatory and thrombotic events. Studies in the general population indicate the usefulness of CRP in prognostication and in monitoring response to therapy. The clinical usefulness of CRP monitoring in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and especially in ESRD deserves closer study. In the meantime, the utility of CRP measurements for monitoring and treatment is on a case-by-case basis. Management of traditional cardiovascular risk factors should be considered. In the interest of optimizing therapy it is prudent to use biocompatible membranes and ultrapure water. A careful search for infectious processes in dialysis patients is recommended, with special attention to vascular access sites, periodontitis, gastritis, and other potentially chronic or covert infections. ACE-inhibitor use should be maximized in all eligible CKD patients. The data on the use of statins in ESRD have been generally positive but await further validation. Individualized use for selected patients is probably beneficial.

  8. Aspects of Immune Dysfunction in End-stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Sawako; Chmielewski, Michal; Honda, Hirokazu; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Matsuo, Seiichi; Yuzawa, Yukio; Tranaeus, Anders; Stenvinkel, Peter; Lindholm, Bengt

    2008-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality resulting from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections, accounting for 50% and 20%, respectively, of the total mortality in ESRD patients. It is possible that these two complications are linked to alterations in the immune system in ESRD, as uremia is associated with a state of immune dysfunction characterized by immunodepression that contributes to the high prevalence of infections among these patients, as well as by immunoactivation resulting in inflammation that may contribute to CVD. This review describes disorders of the innate and adaptive immune systems in ESRD, underlining the specific role of ESRD-associated disturbances of Toll-like receptors. Finally, based on the emerging links between the alterations of immune system, CVD, and infections in ESRD patients, it emphasizes the potential role of the immune dysfunction in ESRD as an underlying cause for the high mortality in this patient population and the need for more studies in this area. PMID:18701615

  9. Distal, intermediate, and proximal mediators of racial disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kidney failure and associated mortality is one of the major components of racial disparities in the United States. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the role of distal (socioeconomic status, SES), intermediate (chronic medical diseases), and proximal (health behaviors) factors that may explain Black-White disparities in mortality due to renal diseases. Patients and Methods: This is a nationally representative prospective cohort with 25 years of follow up. Data came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL) study, 1986 to 2011. The study included 3361 Black (n = 1156) or White (n = 2205) adults who were followed for up to 25 years. Race was the main predictor and death due to renal disease was the outcome. SES, chronic medical disease (diabetes, hypertension, obesity), and health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise) at baseline were potential mediators. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. Results: In age and gender adjusted models, Blacks had higher risk of death due to renal disease over the follow up period. Separate models suggested that SES, health behaviors and chronic medical disease fully explained the effect of race on renal disease mortality. Conclusions: Black-White disparities in rate of death due to renal diseases in the United States are not genuine but secondary to racial differences in income, health behaviors, hypertension, and diabetes. As distal, intermediate, and proximal factors contribute to racial disparities in renal disease mortality, elimination of such disparities requires a wide range of policies and programs that target income, medical conditions, and health behaviors. PMID:27047811

  10. Deep shadow occulter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for occulting light. The occulter shape suppresses diffraction at any given size or angle and is practical to build because it can be made binary to avoid scatter. Binary structures may be fully opaque or fully transmitting at specific points. The diffraction suppression is spectrally broad so that it may be used with incoherent white light. An occulter may also include substantially opaque inner portion and an at least partially transparent outer portion. Such occulters may be used on the ground to create a deep shadow in a short distance, or may be used in space to suppress starlight and reveal exoplanets.

  11. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  12. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  13. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  14. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  15. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  16. Renal Artery Embolization Controls Intractable Pain in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Seong Tai; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon-Yul; Chang, Yoon Sik

    1999-09-15

    A 65-year-old man with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and chronic renal failure suffered from intractable abdominal pain and distension for 2 weeks. Meperidine infusion did not alleviate his pain. However, pain and abdominal distension were successfully controlled by embolization of both renal arteries.

  17. Associations between proteinuria, systemic hypertension and glomerular filtration rate in dogs with renal and non-renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Wehner, A; Hartmann, K; Hirschberger, J

    2008-02-01

    Proteinuria and systemic hypertension are well recognised risk factors in chronic renal failure (CRF). They are consequences of renal disease but also lead to a further loss of functional kidney tissue. The objectives of this study were to investigate the associations between proteinuria, systemic hypertension and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in dogs with naturally occurring renal and non-renal diseases, and to determine whether proteinuria and hypertension were associated with shorter survival times in dogs with CRF. Measurements of exogenous creatinine plasma clearance (ECPC), urine protein:creatinine ratio (UPC), and Doppler sonographic measurements of systolic blood pressure (SBP) were made in 60 dogs with various diseases. There was a weak but significant inverse correlation between UPC and ECPC, a significant inverse correlation between SBP and ECPC and a weak but significant positive correlation between UPC and SBP. Some of the dogs with CRF were proteinuric and almost all were hypertensive. Neoplasia was commonly associated with proteinuria in the dogs with a normal ECPC. CRF was the most common cause leading to hypertension. In the dogs with CRF, hypertension and marked proteinuria were associated with significantly shorter survival times.

  18. Distribution of primary renal diseases leading to end-stage renal failure in the United States, Europe, and Australia/New Zealand: results from an international comparative study.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, P; Agodoa, L; Gellert, R; Stewart, J H; Buccianti, G; Lowenfels, A B; Wolfe, R A; Jones, E; Disney, A P; Briggs, D; McCredie, M; Boyle, P

    2000-01-01

    This report notes the differences in the classification of the primary renal disease (PRD) used in different renal dialysis and transplant registries worldwide. The heterogeneity of coding systems complicates the comparative analysis of end-stage renal disease from different regions. Using data collected over two decades in the United States, Europe, and Australia/New Zealand, we present a method for reorganization of the classes of PRD that allows a straightforward comparison of retrospective data from these registries.

  19. Isolated localization of Rosai Dorfman disease as renal mass: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    El Majdoub, Aziz; El Houari, Aziza; Chbani, Laila; El Fatemi, Hinde; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of an elderly woman presented with right renal mass with invasion of renal vein and several small lymphadenopathy in the hilar area. The diagnosis of kidney cancer is suspected and the patient underwent open radical nephrectomy, surrenalectomy and lymphadenectomy dissection. The pathologic examinations find a rosai dorfman disease. This unusual benign entity is uncommon in the kidney, but in medical imaging, it may simulate an infiltrative renal neoplasm, especially a lymphoma or leukemia or even renal cell carcinoma. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken to summarize the clinical and pathologic features of this disorder. PMID:27642405

  20. Renal artery stenosis and hypertension after abdominal irradiation for Hodgkin disease. Successful treatment with nephrectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Salvi, S.; Green, D.M.; Brecher, M.L.; Magoos, I.; Gamboa, L.N.; Fisher, J.E.; Baliah, T.; Afshani, E.

    1983-06-01

    Hypertension secondary to stenosis of the left renal artery developed in a thirteen-year-old male six years after completion of inverted Y irradiation (3,600 rad) for abdominal Hodgkin disease. Surgical treatment with nephrectomy resulted in control of the hypertension without the use of antihypertensive agents. We review the literature for this unusual complication of abdominal irradiation, and recommend that a 99mTc-DMSA renal scan, selective renal vein sampling for renin determinations, and renal arteriography be performed on any patient in whom hypertension develops following abdominal irradiation in childhood.

  1. CT of acquired cystic kidney disease and renal tumors in long-term dialysis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Grantham, J.J.; Slusher, S.L.; Greathouse, J.L.; Krohn, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    The kidneys of long term dialysis patients frequently demonstrate multiple small acquired cysts and renal cell tumors on pathologic examination. The original kidneys of 30 long-term dialysis patients and six renal transplant patients were evaluated by computed tomography to determine the incidence of these abnormalities. Among dialysis patients, 43.3% had diffuse bilateral cysts, while 16.7% had occasional cysts (fewer than five per kidney), and 40% showed no renal cysts. Seven solid renal tumors were detected in four dialysis patients with renal cysts. Acquired cystic kidney disease tends to result in renal enlargement, is more common in patients who have been maintained on dialysis for prolonged periods, and may lead to spontaneous renal hemorrhage. The six transplant patients showed no evidence of renal cysts, and all had markedly shrunken kidneys. Acquired cystic disease and renal cell tumors in the original kidneys of dialysis patients may be due to biologically active substances that are not cleared effectively by dialysis but that are removed by normally functioning transplant kidneys.

  2. Diabetes, Renal and Cardiovascular Disease in p47phox−/− Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leiding, Jennifer W.; Marciano, Beatriz E.; Zerbe, Christa S.; DeRavin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is a rare immunodeficiency due to defects in the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. The X-linked form (gp91phox deficiency) accounts for about 70 % of cases; autosomal recessive p47phox deficiency accounts for about 25 % of cases. We identified a 10 % incidence of diabetes in p47phox deficient CGD, but none in X-linked CGD. Renal and cardiovascular diseases were also higher in p47phox deficiency. p47phox deficient CGD has noninfectious morbidities distinct from those in X-linked CGD. PMID:23386289

  3. Increased renal versican expression is associated with progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rudnicki, Michael; Perco, Paul; Neuwirt, Hannes; Noppert, Susie-Jane; Leierer, Johannes; Sunzenauer, Judith; Eder, Susanne; Zoja, Carlamaria; Eller, Kathrin; Rosenkranz, Alexander R; Müller, Gerhard A; Mayer, Bernd; Mayer, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Novel prognostic markers for progression of kidney disease are needed to distinguish patients who might benefit from a more aggressive nephroprotective therapy. Expression of the proteoglycan versican was evaluated in renal transcriptomics profiles and in an independent set of 74 renal biopsies. Versican levels were correlated to histologic damage scores and to renal outcome, and versican expression and regulation was evaluated in vitro. In transcriptomics profiles of renal tissue versican was positively correlated with (i) histological parameters in kidney biopsies, (ii) progressive decline of renal function in proteinuric kidney diseases, and (iii) impaired renal function and histology scores in diabetic nephropathy. In an independent cohort of 74 biopsies of glomerular diseases renal RNA levels of versican isoforms V0 and V1, but not V2 and V3 correlated significantly with creatinine after a mean follow up time of 53 months. Versican isoforms V0 and V1 together with serum creatinine at time of biopsy and the degree of glomerulosclerosis predicted 20% and 24% of the variability of creatinine at follow up, which was significantly more than serum creatinine and histological parameters alone (16%). However, when patients with acute kidney failure at time of biopsy (n = 5) were excluded, the additive predictive value of versican V1 was only marginally higher (35%) than creatinine and glomerulosclerosis alone (34%). Versican isoforms V0 and V1 were primarily expressed in vitro in proximal tubule cells and in fibroblasts. The results in humans were confirmed in three rodent models of kidney disease, in which renal versican expression was significantly upregulated as compared to corresponding controls. These data show for the first time an association of renal versican isoform V0 and V1 expression with progressive renal disease.

  4. In vivo vascular wall shear rate and circumferential strain of renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J; Weitzel, William F

    2013-02-01

    This study measures the vascular wall shear rate at the vessel edge using decorrelation based ultrasound speckle tracking. Results for nine healthy and eight renal disease subjects are presented. Additionally, the vascular wall shear rate and circumferential strain during physiologic pressure, pressure equalization and hyperemia are compared for five healthy and three renal disease subjects. The mean and maximum wall shear rates were measured during the cardiac cycle at the top and bottom wall edges. The healthy subjects had significantly higher mean and maximum vascular wall shear rate than the renal disease subjects. The key findings of this research were that the mean vascular wall shear rates and circumferential strain changes between physiologic pressure and hyperemia that was significantly different between healthy and renal disease subjects.

  5. The many faces of Merlin: IgG4-associated pulmonary-renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, Ben; Lioen, Pieter; Meijers, Björn; Lerut, Evelyne; Meersschaert, Joke; Blockmans, Daniel; Claes, Kathleen

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary-renal syndrome is a common and serious disorder with a broad differential diagnosis. We describe a case of a middle-aged man presenting with interstitial pulmonary disease and severe renal impairment caused by a hypocomplementemic immune-complex-mediated interstitial nephritis. Serum levels of IgG4 were elevated, and renal biopsy specimens revealed the presence of interstitial IgG4(+) plasma cells. There was a rapid improvement of both pulmonary and renal abnormalities after the initiation of corticosteroids. To our knowledge, this report is the first to show interstitial pulmonary disease in association with interstitial kidney disease as the predominant and presenting symptoms of IgG4-related disease. PMID:21896524

  6. Progression to calcific mitral stenosis in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, I A; Madu, E C

    1995-12-01

    A 59-year-old man with end-stage renal disease and on hemodialysis had neither mitral stenosis nor mitral calcification on echo-Doppler examination in 1989, but had extensive mitral calcification and definite mitral stenosis on conventional and transesophageal echocardiography in 1994. The left ventricle had marked concentric hypertrophy. To our knowledge this is the first documentation of the development of calcific mitral stenosis in end-stage renal disease revealed by serial echo-Doppler studies.

  7. Pregnancy in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: how to achieve a successful delivery

    PubMed Central

    Manisco, Gianfranco; Potì’, Marcello; Maggiulli, Giuseppe; Di Tullio, Massimo; Losappio, Vincenzo; Vernaglione, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic kidney disease has always been considered as a challenging event both for the mother and the fetus. Over the years, several improvements have been achieved in the outcome of pregnant chronic renal patients with increasing rates of successful deliveries. To date, evidence suggests that the stage of renal failure is the main predictive factor of worsening residual kidney function and complications in pregnant women. Moreover, the possibility of success of the pregnancy depends on adequate depurative and pharmacological strategies in patients with end-stage renal disease. In this paper, we propose a review of the current literature about this topic presenting our experience as well. PMID:26034591

  8. Screening for occult lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, T. H.; MacIntosh, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    A pilot screening program for the early detection of lung cancer was carried out in Saskatchewan in 1968 using chest roentgenography and cytologic examination of sputum samples. The yield from 23 000 men aged 40 years and over was only 10 cases. Nine of the men had advanced disease. One had occult lung cancer. A period of 31 months elapsed between the discovery of malignant cells in this patient's sputum and roentgenographic localization of the tumour. Following pneumonectomy he has survived with no discernible residual or metastatic tumour for 12 years. The morphologic changes in the resected lung provided a basis for discussing the preclinical phase of squamous cancer of the lung, the treatment of occult cancer and multicentric primary pulmonary tumours. The survey would have been more successful with a narrower target group and more frequent examination. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:6299495

  9. Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease. Diagnosis and prevalence in an hypertensive and/or uremic elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Giorgio; Calabria, Santo; Lai, Silvia; Moscaritolo, Eleonora; Nofroni, Italo; Ronga, Giuseppe; Rossi, Michele; Ventroni, Guido; Sardella, Daniela; Ferrannini, Michele; Zaccaria, Alvaro; Cianci, Rosario

    2003-01-01

    Background Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease is a frequent cause of end-stage renal failure leading to dialysis among the elderly; Its prevalence is inferred from autopsy or retrospective arteriographic studies. This study has been conducted on 269 subjects over 50 with hypertension and/or CRF, unrelated to other known causes of renal disease. Methods All 269 patients were studied either by color-flow duplex sonography (n = 238) or by renal scintigraphy (n = 224), and 199 of the 269 patients were evaluated using both of these techniques. 40 patients, found to have renal artery stenosis (RAS), were subjected to 3D-contrast enhancement Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) and/or Selective Angiography (SA). An additional 23 cases, negative both to scintigraphy and to ultrasound study, underwent renal angiography (MRA and/or SA). Results Color-duplex sonography, carried out in 238 patients, revealed 49 cases of RAS. MR or SA was carried out in 35 of these 49 patients, and confirmed the diagnosis in 33. Color-duplex sonography showed a PPV value of 94.3% and NPV of 87.0% while renal scintigraphy, carried out in 224 patients, had a PPV of 72.2% and a NPV of 29.4%. Patients with RAS showed a higher degree of renal insufficiency compared to non stenotic patients while there were no differences in proteinuria. RAS, based on color-duplex sonography studies, was present in 11% of patients in the age group 50–59, 18% in the 60–69 and 23% at age 70 and above. Conclusions A relatively large percentage of the elderly population with renal insufficiency and/or hypertension is affected by RAS and is at risk of developing end-stage renal failure. Color-duplex ultrasonography is a valid routine method of investigation of population at risk for renal artery stenosis. PMID:12622875

  10. Acceptance and effects of a therapeutic renal food in pet cats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Dale A; Jewell, Dennis E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal foods are used to manage chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dogs and cats, but their effectiveness may be limited by the ability to transition animals to them. Material and Methods In a prospective study, pet cats with previously undiagnosed kidney disease (20 International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) 1, 61 IRIS 2, 14 IRIS 3/4, 33 at risk for CKD) were transitioned to a renal food. Markers of renal function were measured and owners answered questionnaires about their pet over one year. Results All but eight cats (120/128; 94 per cent) successfully transitioned to the renal food. Most of the time, cats moderately or extremely liked the food (89 per cent), ate at least half (73 per cent) and were moderately or extremely enthusiastic while eating (68 per cent). Cats rarely disliked the food (2 per cent) or refused to eat it (1 per cent). Markers of renal function were unchanged in IRIS 1 and 2 cats and changed little in IRIS 3/4 cats. In all groups, owner-assessed quality of life improved initially and then remained stable. Mean bodyweight did not change in cats with CKD. Conclusions Most cats with CKD successfully transitioned to the renal food. The results also support previous studies that the renal food can help stabilise cats with CKD. PMID:26587240

  11. Prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection in hemodialysis patients in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Hamid; Ferdowsi, Faezeh; Yaran, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background: The absence of a detectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) with or without hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) or hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) in the presence of hepatitis B virus-DNA (HBV-DNA) is defined as occult HBV infection. This study was aimed to evaluate the prevalence of occult HBV infection in patients receiving hemodialysis (HD) in Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was done on 400 patients without acute or chronic HBV infection with end-stage renal disease undergoing regular HD. Blood samples were collected prior to the HD session, and serological markers of viral hepatitis B included HBsAg, anti-HBs and anti-HBc were measured using standard third generation commercially available enzyme immunoassays kit, then samples of positive anti-HBc and negative anti-HBs were tested for HBV DNA using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction techniques. Data were analyzed by SPSS using t-test and Chi-square test. Results: The mean age of patients was 51.6 ± 11.2 years. Anti-HBc positive was observed in 32 (8%) of 400 studied patients with negative HBsAg. Of 32 patients with anti-HBc positive, 15 were males and 17 were females with mean age of 49.7 ± 12.6 years. Among 32 patients with anti-HBc positive, 10 patients were negative for anti-HBs. All of 10 patients were negative for HBV DNA. The prevalence of occult HBV infection was 0%. Conclusions: The prevalence of occult HBV infection in HBsAg negative patients undergoing HD was 0% and look to be among the lowest worldwide. So, occult HBV infection is not a significant health problem in HD patients in this region. PMID:27713872

  12. How to differentiate renal senescence from chronic kidney disease in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Jauregui, Jose R

    2016-09-01

    Renal aging is frequently confused with chronic nephropathy in clinical practice, since there are some similarities between them, particularly regarding reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, there are many differences between these two entities which can help any practitioner to distinguish between them, such as: GFR deterioration rate, hematocrit, renal handling of urea, creatinine and some electrolytes, tubular acidification, urinalysis, and renal imaging. Differentiation between renal aging and chronic renal disease is crucial in order to avoid unnecessary medicalization of what is a physiological change associated with the healthy aging process, and the potential harmful consequences of such overdiagnosis. A recently described equation (HUGE), as well as an adequate nephrological evaluation and follow up can help physicians to distinguish both entities. PMID:27383288

  13. Role of NADPH Oxidase in Metabolic Disease-Related Renal Injury: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The underlying pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury remains obscure. Accumulating evidence has shown that NADPH oxidase is a major source of intrarenal oxidative stress and is upregulated by metabolic factors leading to overproduction of ROS in podocytes, endothelial cells, and mesangial cells in glomeruli, which is closely associated with the initiation and progression of glomerular diseases. This review focuses on the role of NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury. Understanding of the mechanism may help find potential therapeutic strategies.

  14. Role of NADPH Oxidase in Metabolic Disease-Related Renal Injury: An Update.

    PubMed

    Wan, Cheng; Su, Hua; Zhang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The underlying pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury remains obscure. Accumulating evidence has shown that NADPH oxidase is a major source of intrarenal oxidative stress and is upregulated by metabolic factors leading to overproduction of ROS in podocytes, endothelial cells, and mesangial cells in glomeruli, which is closely associated with the initiation and progression of glomerular diseases. This review focuses on the role of NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury. Understanding of the mechanism may help find potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27597884

  15. Role of NADPH Oxidase in Metabolic Disease-Related Renal Injury: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The underlying pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury remains obscure. Accumulating evidence has shown that NADPH oxidase is a major source of intrarenal oxidative stress and is upregulated by metabolic factors leading to overproduction of ROS in podocytes, endothelial cells, and mesangial cells in glomeruli, which is closely associated with the initiation and progression of glomerular diseases. This review focuses on the role of NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury. Understanding of the mechanism may help find potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27597884

  16. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression –but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26880216

  17. Measures of renal function in patients with cisplatin-related chronic renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, E.; Jacob, J.; Brawley, O.

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with advanced stage refractory ovarian cancer were studied to determine if chronic stable cisplatin-related renal dysfunction was present. Medical histories were examined to determine the types of therapy previously received as well as the total previous platinum doses received that ranged from 200 to 2,100 mg/m2. Standard assessments of renal function were made prior to administering current chemotherapy or immunotherapy to the patient, which included 24-hour creatinine clearance, serum creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). For patients with a 24-hour creatinine clearance of less than 60 mL/minute, serum creatinine was highly variable (range: 0.9 to 2.0 mg/dL) and was not related to the degree of diminution in the 24-hour creatinine clearance value. Conversely, for patients with a serum creatinine of less than 1.5, the 24-hour creatinine clearance values varied by almost three-fold, ranging between 46 and 120 mL/minute. Two patients with serum creatinines of less than 1 had creatinine clearances of less than 50 mL per minute. Similarly, BUN measurements did not correlate with 24-hour creatinine clearance values, and the 24-hour creatinine clearance value was not related to the total cumulative platinum dose. We conclude that patients who receive substantive doses of cisplatin may experience chronic stable cisplatin-related renal dysfunction and that serum creatinine cannot be relied on to assess the degree of renal compromise. In such patients, we recommended that the 24-hour creatinine clearance value should be used when medical management is influenced by renal function. PMID:1865503

  18. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Huang, Kuo-How; Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-04-19

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26942460

  19. Roles of mTOR complexes in the kidney: implications for renal disease and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fantus, Daniel; Rogers, Natasha M; Grahammer, Florian; Huber, Tobias B; Thomson, Angus W

    2016-10-01

    The mTOR pathway has a central role in the regulation of cell metabolism, growth and proliferation. Studies involving selective gene targeting of mTOR complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2) in renal cell populations and/or pharmacologic mTOR inhibition have revealed important roles of mTOR in podocyte homeostasis and tubular transport. Important advances have also been made in understanding the role of mTOR in renal injury, polycystic kidney disease and glomerular diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Novel insights into the roles of mTORC1 and mTORC2 in the regulation of immune cell homeostasis and function are helping to improve understanding of the complex effects of mTOR targeting on immune responses, including those that impact both de novo renal disease and renal allograft outcomes. Extensive experience in clinical renal transplantation has resulted in successful conversion of patients from calcineurin inhibitors to mTOR inhibitors at various times post-transplantation, with excellent long-term graft function. Widespread use of this practice has, however, been limited owing to mTOR-inhibitor- related toxicities. Unique attributes of mTOR inhibitors include reduced rates of squamous cell carcinoma and cytomegalovirus infection compared to other regimens. As understanding of the mechanisms by which mTORC1 and mTORC2 drive the pathogenesis of renal disease progresses, clinical studies of mTOR pathway targeting will enable testing of evolving hypotheses. PMID:27477490

  20. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Huang, Kuo-How; Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-04-19

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease.

  1. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26942460

  2. Pattern of biopsy proven renal diseases at PNS SHIFA, Karachi: A cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Sohail; Mubarak, Muhammed; Ul-Haq, Irfan; Bibi, Aisha

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Percutaneous renal biopsy (RB) is an invaluable diagnostic procedure in patients with medical renal diseases.Objectives: To determine the pattern of biopsy proven renal disease (BPRD) from a tertiary care naval hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods and Materials: All the renal biopsies in adult patients (≥18 years) performed at our hospital from 2008 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The biopsies were evaluated by light microscopy and immunofluorescence. Results: A total 60 cases were analyzed. The mean age was 33.3±12.9 years (range: 18 to 72 years).The male to female ratio was 3:1. The most common indication of renal biopsy was nephrotic syndrome (43.3%), followed by renal failure (26.6%) and non-nephrotic proteinuria (23.3%). Primary glomerulonephritides (PGN) were predominant overall lesions, found in 46 (76.6%) of the total biopsies. Among PGN, the most common lesion was focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), followed by membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN), IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and chronic sclerosing glomerulonephritis (CSGN) and a variety of rare lesions. Secondary glomerulonephritides (SGN) were found in only three (5%) cases. There were two cases of amyloidosis and one of lupus nephritis (LN). Tubulointerstitial disease (TID) and vascular disease were rare. Conclusion: This study provides information about the epidemiology of BPRD in a large tertiary care naval center in Southern Pakistan. PMID:25340152

  3. Role of Positron Emission Tomography in the Treatment of Occult Disease in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark H.; Smith, Wade P.; Parvathaneni, Upendra; Laramore, George E.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To determine under what conditions positron emission tomography (PET) imaging will be useful in decisions regarding the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of clinically occult lymph node metastases in head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: A decision model of PET imaging and its downstream effects on radiotherapy outcomes was constructed using an influence diagram. This model included the sensitivity and specificity of PET, as well as the type and stage of the primary tumor. These parameters were varied to determine the optimal strategy for imaging and therapy for different clinical situations. Maximum expected utility was the metric by which different actions were ranked. Results: For primary tumors with a low probability of lymph node metastases, the sensitivity of PET should be maximized, and 50 Gy should be delivered if PET is positive and 0 Gy if negative. As the probability for lymph node metastases increases, PET imaging becomes unnecessary in some situations, and the optimal dose to the lymph nodes increases. The model needed to include the causes of certain health states to predict current clinical practice. Conclusion: The model demonstrated the ability to reproduce expected outcomes for a range of tumors and provided recommendations for different clinical situations. The differences between the optimal policies and current clinical practice are likely due to a disparity between stated clinical decision processes and actual decision making by clinicians.

  4. Network analysis of genes regulated in renal diseases: implications for a molecular-based classification

    PubMed Central

    Bhavnani, Suresh K; Eichinger, Felix; Martini, Sebastian; Saxman, Paul; Jagadish, HV; Kretzler, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic renal diseases are currently classified based on morphological similarities such as whether they produce predominantly inflammatory or non-inflammatory responses. However, such classifications do not reliably predict the course of the disease and its response to therapy. In contrast, recent studies in diseases such as breast cancer suggest that a classification which includes molecular information could lead to more accurate diagnoses and prediction of treatment response. This article describes how we extracted gene expression profiles from biopsies of patients with chronic renal diseases, and used network visualizations and associated quantitative measures to rapidly analyze similarities and differences between the diseases. Results The analysis revealed three main regularities: (1) Many genes associated with a single disease, and fewer genes associated with many diseases. (2) Unexpected combinations of renal diseases that share relatively large numbers of genes. (3) Uniform concordance in the regulation of all genes in the network. Conclusion The overall results suggest the need to define a molecular-based classification of renal diseases, in addition to hypotheses for the unexpected patterns of shared genes and the uniformity in gene concordance. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the utility of network analyses to rapidly understand complex relationships between diseases and regulated genes. PMID:19761573

  5. Histopathological retrospective study of canine renal disease in Korea, 2003~2008

    PubMed Central

    Yhee, Ji-Young; Yu, Chi-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hyuk; Im, Keum-Soon; Chon, Seung-Ki

    2010-01-01

    Renal disease includes conditions affecting the glomeruli, tubules, interstitium, pelvis, and vasculature. Diseases of the kidney include glomerular diseases, diseases of the tubules and interstitium, diseases of renal pelvis, and developmental abnormalities. Renal tissue samples (n = 70) submitted to the Department of Veterinary Pathology of Konkuk University from 2003 to 2008 were included in this study. Tissue histopathology was performed using light microscopy with hematoxylin and eosin stains. Masson's trichrome, Congo Red, and Warthin starry silver staining were applied in several individual cases. Glomerular diseases (22.9%), tubulointerstitial diseases (8.6%), neoplastic diseases (8.6%), conditions secondary to urinary obstruction (24.3%), and other diseases (35.7%) were identified. Glomerulonephritis (GN) cases were classified as acute proliferative GN (5.7%), membranous GN (4.3%), membranoproliferative GN (4.3%), focal segmental GN (2.9%), and other GN (4.2%). The proportion of canine GN cases presently identified was not as high as the proportions identified in human studies. Conversely, urinary obstruction and end-stage renal disease cases were relatively higher in dogs than in human populations. PMID:21113095

  6. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Tokiko; Kotani, Hirokazu; Miyao, Masashi; Kawai, Chihiro; Jemail, Leila; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy), autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet–fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the pathophysiological mechanisms

  7. Use of /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid for assessment of renal function in dogs with suspected renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, D.R.; Twardock, A.R.; Badertscher, R.R. II; Daniel, G.B.; Dugan, S.J.

    1988-04-15

    The effectiveness of technetium /sup 99m/-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (/sup 99m/Tc DTPA) to assess renal function in 13 dogs with suspected renal disease was evaluated. Glomerular filtration rates (actual GFR) were determined on the basis of endogenous creatinine clearance. Predicted GFR were determined by using /sup 99m/Tc DTPA within 72 hours after the determination of creatinine clearance. The percentage of an IV administered dose of /sup 99m/Tc DTPA in the kidneys (percentage dose) was determined. Two equations were used to calculate predicted GFR, which were derived from previously reported linear regression analysis of inulin (In) and creatinine (Cr) GFR vs percentage dose /sup 99m/Tc DTPA in dog kidneys. The correlations of actual GFR vs predicted GFR (In) and actual GFR vs predicted GFR (Cr) were both r = 0.92. The dogs' mean actual GFR was 1.73 +/- 1.35 ml/min/kg. Their mean predicted GFR (In) and predicted GFR (Cr) were 1.92 +/- 1.42 ml/min/kg and 1.85 +/- 1.27 ml/min/kg, respectively. Therefore, /sup 99m/Tc DTPA can be used with high accuracy as an agent to predict GFR in dogs with suspected renal disease. The procedure for determining GFR by use of nuclear medicine was rapid and noninvasive and appeared to induce little stress in the animals evaluated.

  8. Survival of childhood polycystic kidney disease following renal transplantation: the impact of advanced hepatobiliary disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ira D; Ho, Martin; Hupertz, Vera; Avner, Ellis D

    2003-10-01

    Childhood PKD encompasses the diagnoses of AR and ADPKD, glomerulocystic disease, and syndromes such as tuberous sclerosis or Jeune's syndrome. Given the fact that a majority of PKD children with ESRD carry the diagnosis of ARPKD, natural history studies assessing the long-term prognosis of PKD patients following renal transplantation must focus on morbidity and mortality issues related to complications from congenital hepatic fibrosis. Using the NAPRTCS registry, we analyzed the patient and graft survival rates of 203 PKD patients and 7044 non-PKD patients undergoing renal transplantation between 1987 and 2001. Deceased PKD patients, all with a diagnosis of ARPKD, were further identified and characterized using a special questionnaire submitted to the principal investigators. Overall graft and patient survival rates were not significantly different between PKD and non-PKD patients. No differences in rates of acute rejection or time to first rejection were noted between PKD and non-PKD patients. The relative risk of living longer than 3 yr in the PKD patients was not significantly different from non-PKD patients (RR = 0.70, p = 0.28). Sepsis was identified as a likely factor in the cause of death in nine (64%) ARPKD patients and was comfirmed with a positive blood culture in four patients. Despite similar graft and patient survival rates among PKD and non-PKD children following renal transplantation, our results suggest that ARPKD transplant recipients appear to be at increased risk for sepsis that may be related to hepatic fibrosis and ascending cholangitis. The utility of early liver transplantation in ARPKD patients with significant hepatobiliary disease is discussed.

  9. Crossed Renal Ectopia and Aorto-Occlusive Disease: A Management Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Eugene; Campbell, Ian; Choong, Andrew MTL; Dunglison, Nigel; Aziz, Maged

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of a patient with aortoiliac occlusive disease on the background of type A crossed renal ectopia, for whom open surgical intervention was required. Aortic exposure in patients with concomitant crossed renal ectopia can present technical challenges to the vascular surgeon. The knowledge of variations in the ectopic renal blood supply is of paramount importance when performing surgery to treat this condition and affects the choice of surgical exposure. We present and discuss the operative details of our patient and outline an approach to this subset of patients. PMID:26509134

  10. [Occult hepatitis B virus infection in chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Young; Park, Eui Ju

    2013-09-01

    Occult HBV infection is defined as the presence of HBV DNA in the liver (with or without detectable or undetectable HBV DNA in the serum) of individuals testing negative for HBsAg. Studies on occult HBV infection in hepatitis C patients have reported highly variable prevalence, because the prevalence of occult HBV infection varies depending on the hepatitis B risk factors and methodological approaches. The most reliable diagnostic approach for detecting occult HBV detection is through examination of liver DNA extracts. HCV has been suspected to strongly suppress HBV replication up to the point where it may be directly responsible for occult HBV infection development. However, more data are needed to arrive at a definitive conclusion regarding the role of HCV in inducing occult HBV infection. Occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C patients is a complex biological entity with possible relevant clinical implications. Influence of occult HBV infection on the clinical outcomes of chronic hepatitis C may be considered negative. However, recent studies have shown that occult HBV infection could be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma and contribute to the worsening of the course of chronic liver disease over time in chronic hepatitis C patients. Nevertheless, the possible role of occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C is still unresolved and no firm conclusion has been made up until now. It still remains unclear how occult HBV infection affects the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Therefore, in order to resolve current controversies and understand the pathogenic role and clinical impacts of occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C patients, well-designed clinical studies are needed.

  11. Occulter Starshade Technology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisman, P. D.; Thomson, M.; Kissil, A.; Walkemeyer, P.; Polanco, O.

    2010-10-01

    Imaging Earth-like exoplanets with a free flying occulter requires developing a large, lightweight, flower-shaped, deployable structure with precisely controlled edge position and profile. In-plane tolerance requirements are considerably tighter than heritage antenna systems, but the more difficult to control out-of-plane tolerances are actually much looser. This paper presents a novel occulter mechanical design that delivers the required performance with a highly reliable deployment scheme. A very compact stowed volume is an added benefit that enables launching the occulter together with a 1 to 2m class telescope, using a single, currently available launch vehicle. Demonstrating the petal deployment function and compliance with key tolerance specifications is the focus of current technology efforts. A series of prototype models of increasing fidelity are planned, starting with a proof of concept model that is currently in fabrication. The occulter design and current development status is presented herein.

  12. The effects of liver and renal disease on stereoselective serum binding of flurbiprofen.

    PubMed Central

    Blouin, R; Chaudhary, I; Nishihara, K; Cox, S

    1993-01-01

    Stereoselectivity in the serum binding of flurbiprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which is highly bound to albumin, was studied in patients with liver and renal disease. Subjects with renal disease or liver disease with ascites had significantly lower serum albumin concentrations than normals, resulting in higher free fractions of both the R(-) and S(+) enantiomers of flurbiprofen as determined by equilibrium dialysis. The ratio (+/- s.d.) of R/S-flurbiprofen free fractions was lower in the subjects with ascites (0.714 +/- 0.298) than in those without ascites (0.796 +/- 0.090) (P < 0.05). PMID:8448071

  13. Impact of feline AIM on the susceptibility of cats to renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugisawa, Ryoichi; Hiramoto, Emiri; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Iwai, Satomi; Takai, Ryosuke; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Mori, Nobuko; Okada, Yuki; Takeda, Naoki; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Arai, Toshiro; Arai, Satoko; Miyazaki, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure is one of the most important social problems for its incurability and high costs for patients’ health care. Through clarification of the underlying mechanism for the high susceptibility of cats to renal disease, we here demonstrates that the effective dissociation of serum AIM protein from IgM is necessary for the recovery from acute kidney injury (AKI). In cats, the AIM-IgM binding affinity is 1000-fold higher than that in mice, which is caused by the unique positively-charged amino-acid cluster present in feline AIM. Hence, feline AIM does not dissociate from IgM during AKI, abolishing its translocation into urine. This results in inefficient clearance of lumen-obstructing necrotic cell debris at proximal tubules, thereby impairing AKI recovery. Accordingly, mice whose AIM is replaced by feline AIM exhibit higher mortality by AKI than in wild-type mice. Recombinant AIM administration into the mice improves their renal function and survival. As insufficient recovery from AKI predisposes patients to chronic, end-stage renal disease, feline AIM may be involved crucially in the high mortality of cats due to renal disease. Our findings could be the basis of the development of novel AKI therapies targeting AIM-IgM dissociation, and may support renal function in cats and prolong their lives. PMID:27731392

  14. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  15. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  16. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  17. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  18. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  19. Natural progression of renal function in the elderly: analysis of poor prognosis factors associated with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Heras, Manuel; García-Cosmes, Pedro; Fernández-Reyes, María J; Sánchez, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years a debate has emerged on the range of normal renal function and the rate at which renal disease progresses in the elderly. In this review we analysed, on the basis of the results of the study Ancianos con enfermedad renal crónica del Hospital General de Segovia (Elderly people with chronic kidney disease of the Hospital General de Segovia), the poor prognosis factors associated with this disease: proteinuria, episodes of acute renal failure and heart failure, and the role of uric acid. Elderly people with chronic kidney disease who present these poor prognosis factors may benefit from follow-up by Nephrology. PMID:23897177

  20. [HYPERURICEMIA AND POTENTIAL RISK OF CARDIOVASCULAR AND RENAL DISEASES].

    PubMed

    Schils, R; Krzesinski, J M

    2016-05-01

    Besides the well accepted need to treat hyperuricemia associated with gout, some large observational studies and small prospective therapeutic trials have suggested that treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia, especially by xanthine oxidase inhibition, the enzyme producing uric acid, could be beneficial for cardiovascular and renal risk prevention. This article discusses the literature about this promising approach, which, however, requests prospective validation.

  1. [HYPERURICEMIA AND POTENTIAL RISK OF CARDIOVASCULAR AND RENAL DISEASES].

    PubMed

    Schils, R; Krzesinski, J M

    2016-05-01

    Besides the well accepted need to treat hyperuricemia associated with gout, some large observational studies and small prospective therapeutic trials have suggested that treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia, especially by xanthine oxidase inhibition, the enzyme producing uric acid, could be beneficial for cardiovascular and renal risk prevention. This article discusses the literature about this promising approach, which, however, requests prospective validation. PMID:27337847

  2. Hypertension, End-Stage Renal Disease and Rehabilitation: A Look at Black Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Ivor Lensworth; Ackah, Samuel

    1992-01-01

    Reviews the important relationship between end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and hypertension for African Americans; and considers issues associated with ESRD and the subsequent need for kidney transplants, including organ availability. Individual and societal implications of these diseases are discussed. (SLD)

  3. Marriage and End-Stage Renal Disease: Implications for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortridge, Emily F.; James, Cara V.

    2010-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately represented among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD is managed with a strict routine that might include regular dialysis as well as dietary, fluid intake, and other lifestyle changes. In a disease such as this, with such disruptive treatment modalities, marriage, specifically, and its ties…

  4. Iniquities in the access to renal transplant for patients with end-stage chronic renal disease in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, Elaine Leandro; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira; César, Cibele Comini; Gomes, Isabel Cristina; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Acúrcio, Francisco de Assis; Cherchiglia, Mariangela Leal

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this present study is to analyze individual and contextual factors associated with access to renal transplant in Brazil. An observational, prospective and non-concurrent study was carried out, based on data from the National Database on renal replacement therapies in Brazil. Patients undergoing dialysis between 01/Jan/2000 and 31/Dec/2000 were included and monitored up to the point of transplant, death or until the end of the study period. Variables that were analyzed included: individual variables (age, sex, region of residence, primary renal disease, hospitalizations); and context variables concerning both the dialysis unit (level of complexity, juridical nature, hemodialysis machines and location) and the city (geographic region, location and HDI). Proportional hazard models were adjusted with hierarchical entry to identify factors associated with the risk of transplant. The results point to differentials in access according to socio-demographic, clinical, geographic and social factors, indicating that the organ allocation system has not eliminated avoidable disparities for those who compete for an organ in the nationwide waiting list.

  5. Vitamin-K-Dependent Protection of the Renal Microvasculature: Histopathological Studies in Normal and Diseased Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fang-Fei; Drummen, Nadja E.A.; Thijs, Lutgarde; Jacobs, Lotte; Herfs, Marjolein; van't Hoofd, Cynthia; Vermeer, Cees; Staessen, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin-K-dependent carboxylation of matrix Gla protein (MGP) protects the macrocirculation against calcification. We recently reported in a multiethnic population study that the estimated glomerular filtration rate, a microvascular trait, decreased and the risk of chronic kidney disease increased with higher circulating levels of inactive dephospho-uncarboxylated MGP, a marker of vitamin K deficiency. These findings highlighted the possibility that vitamin K might have a beneficial effect on the renal microcirculation. To substantiate these epidemiological findings, we undertook a pilot study, in which we stained renal tissue samples obtained by biopsy from 2 healthy kidney donors and 4 patients with nephropathy for carboxylated and uncarboxylated MGP and calcium deposits. Three patients had renal calcifications, which were consistently associated with carboxylated and uncarboxylated MGP. Normal renal tissue was devoid of microcalcifications and staining for carboxylated and uncarboxylated MGP. Pending confirmation in a larger study covering a wider range of renal pathologies, these histopathological findings suggest that MGP might inhibit calcification not only in large arteries, as was known before, but in renal tissue as well, thereby highlighting potentially new avenues for promoting renal health, for instance by vitamin K supplementation. PMID:27752480

  6. End-Stage Renal Disease in an Infant With Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Battelino, Nina; Writzl, Karin; Bratanič, Nevenka; Irving, Melita D; Novljan, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HJCYS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, skeletal disorder caused by mutations in the NOTCH2 signaling pathway for which genetic testing has recently become available. Renal abnormalities are associated in at least 10% of cases. We present an 8-year-old Caucasian boy, born with multiple dysmorphic features consistent with HJCYS. Imaging of the urinary tract revealed bilateral cystic dysplastic kidneys with associated vesicoureteral reflux. Renal function has been impaired since birth and deteriorated progressively to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by the age of two and a half years, when peritoneal dialysis was initiated and only recently renal transplantation was performed. Additional congenital abnormalities and multisystem involvement in HJCYS further complicated management, and he developed refractory anemia. Molecular diagnosis was confirmed by identification of a truncating mutation in exon 34 of NOTCH2. Although, renal abnormalities are considered an integral part of the HJCYS, published reports on ESRD are scarce. In those few published cases, where ESRD was recognized, renal failure developed either in late adolescence or adulthood. This is the first report of early ESRD occurring in a child. Patients with HJCYS may need chronic renal replacement therapy even in early childhood. The management of these children can be challenging given the multisystemic manifestations of HJCYS. PMID:27312922

  7. Renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus - Not just HIV-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Vali, P S; Ismal, K; Gowrishankar, S; Sahay, M

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the various histopathological lesions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients with renal dysfunction and to establish clinicopathological correlation. Over a period of two years from January 2008 to March 2010, 27 HIV positive patients with renal dysfunction were subjected to renal biopsy. Of the 27 patients, 23 were males and four were females (85.2% males, 14.8% females). Mean age was 38.2 ± 10.36 (range 20 - 60) years. The probable mode of acquisition of HIV infection was sexual in 22 patients (81.5%). Thirteen patients (48%) had nephrotic proteinuria. The CD4 count ranged from 77 to 633/microliter. The kidneys were of normal size in 19 (70.4%) and bulky in eight (29.6%) patients. Thirteen patients required renal replacement therapy. Eleven patients had acute tubule-interstitial lesions (40.7%) while 15 (55.5%) had glomerular lesions. The various glomerular lesions were, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in five, amyloidosis in three, diffuse proliferative GN in two, and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (GN), membranous GN, minimal change disease, diabetic nephropathy, crescentic GN, and thrombotic microangiopathy were seen in one each. None of the clinical or laboratory variables, except hypertension, was found to predict glomerular versus non-glomerular lesions on biopsy. In conclusion we show that a variety of glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions can be seen on renal histology. Hence, renal biopsy is indicated in renal dysfunction associated with HIV for making proper diagnosis and therapy.

  8. Survival of patients treated for end-stage renal disease by dialysis and transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, M. R.; Grace, M.; Dossetor, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    The results of treatment in 213 patients with end-stage renal disease who underwent hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis or transplantation, or a combination, between 1962 and 1975 were analysed. Comparison by censored survival analysis showed significantly better (P less than 0.01) patient survival with the integrated therapy of dialysis and transplantation than with either form of dialysis alone. There was no significant difference in survival of males and females but survival at the extremes of age was poorer. Analysis of survival by major cause of renal failure indicated best survival in patients with congenital renal disease. Graft and patient survival rates at 1 year after the first transplantation were 42% and 69%. The major cause of death in this series was vascular disease but infection was responsible for 50% of deaths after transplantation. While integration of dialysis with transplantation produces best patient survival, this course is possible only when sufficient cadaver kidneys are available. PMID:334354

  9. Anti-GBM Disease in Pregnancy: Acute Renal Failure Resolved After Plasma Exchange, Hemodialysis, and Steroids.

    PubMed

    Adnan, Mohammed Muqeet; Morton, Jordan; Hashmi, Syed; Abdul Mujeeb, Sufyan; Kern, William; Cowley, Benjamin D

    2016-01-01

    Antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease presenting during pregnancy is uncommon. We present a case of a pregnant female who presented with acute renal failure requiring dialysis due to anti-GBM disease. She responded well to plasma exchange, high-dose steroids, and hemodialysis. Cyclophosphamide was discussed but not given at the patient's request due to concerns for the well-being of the fetus. Unfortunately, she suffered a spontaneous abortion in her eighth week of pregnancy. Subsequently, she had progressive improvement in her renal function and became hemodialysis independent at 2 weeks after diagnosis. Her renal function returned to baseline 3 months after diagnosis. We present this case in detail and review the literature regarding anti-GBM disease in pregnancy. PMID:26788531

  10. Stem cells and progenitor cells in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Haller, Hermann; de Groot, Kirsten; Bahlmann, Ferdinand; Elger, Marlies; Fliser, Danilo

    2005-11-01

    Stem cells and progenitor cells are necessary for repair and regeneration of injured renal tissue. Infiltrating or resident stem cells can contribute to the replacement of lost or damaged tissue. However, the regulation of circulating progenitor cells is not well understood. We have analyzed the effects of erythropoietin on circulating progenitor cells and found that low levels of erythropoietin induce mobilization and differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells. In an animal model of 5/6 nephrectomy we could demonstrate that erythropoietin ameliorates tissue injury. Full regeneration of renal tissue demands the existence of stem cells and an adequate local "milieu," a so-called stem cell niche. We have previously described a stem cell niche in the kidneys of the dogfish, Squalus acanthus. Further analysis revealed that in the regenerating zone of the shark kidney, stem cells exist that can be induced by loss of renal tissue to form new glomeruli. Such animal models improve our understanding of stem cell behavior in the kidney and may eventually contribute to novel therapies. PMID:16221168

  11. Determinants of renal tissue hypoxia in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ow, Connie P C; Abdelkader, Amany; Hilliard, Lucinda M; Phillips, Jacqueline K; Evans, Roger G

    2014-11-15

    Renal tissue oxygen tension (PO2) and its determinants have not been quantified in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Therefore, we measured kidney tissue PO2 in the Lewis rat model of PKD (LPK) and in Lewis control rats. We also determined the relative contributions of altered renal oxygen delivery and consumption to renal tissue hypoxia in LPK rats. PO2 of the superficial cortex of 11- to 13-wk-old LPK rats, measured by Clark electrode with the rat under anesthesia, was higher within the cysts (32.8 ± 4.0 mmHg) than the superficial cortical parenchyma (18.3 ± 3.5 mmHg). PO2 in the superficial cortical parenchyma of Lewis rats was 2.5-fold greater (46.0 ± 3.1 mmHg) than in LPK rats. At each depth below the cortical surface, tissue PO2 in LPK rats was approximately half that in Lewis rats. Renal blood flow was 60% less in LPK than in Lewis rats, and arterial hemoglobin concentration was 57% less, so renal oxygen delivery was 78% less. Renal venous PO2 was 38% less in LPK than Lewis rats. Sodium reabsorption was 98% less in LPK than Lewis rats, but renal oxygen consumption did not significantly differ between the two groups. Thus, in this model of PKD, kidney tissue is severely hypoxic, at least partly because of deficient renal oxygen delivery. Nevertheless, the observation of similar renal oxygen consumption, despite markedly less sodium reabsorption, in the kidneys of LPK compared with Lewis rats, indicates the presence of inappropriately high oxygen consumption in the polycystic kidney.

  12. SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling preserves microvascular integrity and renal function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hao; Advani, Suzanne L; Thai, Kerri; Kabir, M Golam; Sood, Manish M; Gibson, Ian W; Yuen, Darren A; Connelly, Kim A; Marsden, Philip A; Kelly, Darren J; Gilbert, Richard E; Advani, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The progressive decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by both disruption of the microvascular architecture and the accumulation of fibrotic matrix. One angiogenic pathway recently identified as playing an essential role in renal vascular development is the stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1)/CXCR4 pathway. Because similar developmental processes may be recapitulated in the disease setting, we hypothesized that the SDF-1/CXCR4 system would regulate microvascular health in CKD. Expression of CXCR4 was observed to be increased in the kidneys of subtotally nephrectomized (SNx) rats and in biopsies from patients with secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a rodent model and human correlate both characterized by aberration of the renal microvessels. A reno-protective role for local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling was indicated by i) CXCR4-dependent glomerular eNOS activation following acute SDF-1 administration; and ii) acceleration of renal function decline, capillary loss and fibrosis in SNx rats treated with chronic CXCR4 blockade. In contrast to the upregulation of CXCR4, SDF-1 transcript levels were decreased in SNx rat kidneys as well as in renal fibroblasts exposed to the pro-fibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), the latter effect being attenuated by histone deacetylase inhibition. Increased renal SDF-1 expression was, however, observed following the treatment of SNx rats with the ACE inhibitor, perindopril. Collectively, these observations indicate that local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling functions to preserve microvascular integrity and prevent renal fibrosis. Augmentation of this pathway, either purposefully or serendipitously with either novel or existing therapies, may attenuate renal decline in CKD. PMID:24637920

  13. Increased Blood Pressure Variability Prior to Chronic Kidney Disease Exacerbates Renal Dysfunction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Frederico F. C. T.; Araujo, Gilberto; Porto, Marcella L.; Freitas, Flavia P. S.; Graceli, Jones B.; Balarini, Camille M.; Vasquez, Elisardo C.; Meyrelles, Silvana S.; Gava, Agata L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased blood pressure variability (BPV), which can be experimentally induced by sinoaortic denervation (SAD), has emerged as a new marker of the prognosis of cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Considering that increased BPV can lead to organ-damage, the goal of the present study was to evaluate the effects of SAD on renal function in an experimental model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). SAD was performed in male Wistar rats 2 weeks before 5/6 nephrectomy and the animals were evaluated 4 weeks after the induction of CKD. Our data demonstrated that BPV was increased in SAD and CKD animals and that the combination of both conditions (SAD+CKD) exacerbated BPV. The baroreflex sensitivity index was diminished in the SAD and CKD groups; this reduction was more pronounced when SAD and CKD were performed together. 5/6 nephrectomy led to hypertension, which was higher in SAD+CKD animals. Regarding renal function, the combination of SAD and CKD resulted in reduced renal plasma and blood flow, increased renal vascular resistance and augmented uraemia when compared to CKD animals. Glomerular filtration rate and BPV were negatively correlated in SAD, CKD, and SAD+CKD animals. Moreover, SAD+CKD animals presented a higher level of glomerulosclerosis when compared to all other groups. Cardiac and renal hypertrophy, as well as oxidative stress, was also further increased when SAD and CKD were combined. These results show that SAD prior to 5/6 nephrectomy exacerbates renal dysfunction, suggesting that previous augmented BPV should be considered as an important factor to the progression of renal diseases. PMID:27721797

  14. Chronic renal disease in a captive two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with concurrent hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salas, Elisa; Wolf, Tiffany; Harris, Seth

    2014-06-01

    A 13-yr-old female two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with a prolonged history of worsening azotemia was necropsied shortly after euthanasia. On necropsy, the sloth had poor body condition, bilaterally shrunken kidneys, and a large neoplastic mass replacing the right liver lobe. Histologic examination demonstrated chronic renal disease with metastatic mineralization as the cause of morbidity. The liver mass was not associated with any known clinical signs and was diagnosed as a solitary and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed in a sloth and the first detailed description of chronic renal disease in this species.

  15. Chronic renal disease in a captive two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with concurrent hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salas, Elisa; Wolf, Tiffany; Harris, Seth

    2014-06-01

    A 13-yr-old female two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with a prolonged history of worsening azotemia was necropsied shortly after euthanasia. On necropsy, the sloth had poor body condition, bilaterally shrunken kidneys, and a large neoplastic mass replacing the right liver lobe. Histologic examination demonstrated chronic renal disease with metastatic mineralization as the cause of morbidity. The liver mass was not associated with any known clinical signs and was diagnosed as a solitary and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed in a sloth and the first detailed description of chronic renal disease in this species. PMID:25000707

  16. New perspectives in occult hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Carreño, Vicente; Bartolomé, Javier; Castillo, Inmaculada; Quiroga, Juan Antonio

    2012-06-21

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, defined as the presence of HCV RNA in liver and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in the absence of detectable viral RNA in serum by standard assays, can be found in anti-HCV positive patients with normal serum levels of liver enzymes and in anti-HCV negative patients with persistently elevated liver enzymes of unknown etiology. Occult HCV infection is distributed worldwide and all HCV genotypes seem to be involved in this infection. Occult hepatitis C has been found not only in anti-HCV positive subjects with normal values of liver enzymes or in chronic hepatitis of unknown origin but also in several groups at risk for HCV infection such as hemodialysis patients or family members of patients with occult HCV. This occult infection has been reported also in healthy populations without evidence of liver disease. Occult HCV infection seems to be less aggressive than chronic hepatitis C although patients affected by occult HCV may develop liver cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, anti-HCV negative patients with occult HCV may benefit from antiviral therapy with pegylated-interferon plus ribavirin. The persistence of very low levels of HCV RNA in serum and in PBMCs, along with the maintenance of specific T-cell responses against HCV-antigens observed during a long-term follow-up of patients with occult hepatitis C, indicate that occult HCV is a persistent infection that is not spontaneously eradicated. This is an updated report on diagnosis, epidemiology and clinical implications of occult HCV with special emphasis on anti-HCV negative cases.

  17. Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to study renal development and disease: sexy cilia.

    PubMed

    Barr, Maureen M

    2005-02-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has no kidney per se, yet "the worm" has proved to be an excellent model to study renal-related issues, including tubulogenesis of the excretory canal, membrane transport and ion channel function, and human genetic diseases including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The goal of this review is to explain how C. elegans has provided insight into cilia development, cilia function, and human cystic kidney diseases.

  18. Renal stone disease and obesity: what is important for urologists and nephrologists?

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed H; Ahmed, Hassan T; Khalil, Atif A

    2012-01-01

    Currently, obesity has reached an epidemic stage and represents a challenge for health authorities across the globe. Certainly, with emergence of obesity epidemic, we started to see an increase in the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and nephrolithiasis. Interestingly, epidemiologic studies have shown that the incident stone risk increases with body mass index (BMI), and no further increase in risk is noticed when the BMI > 30 kg/m(2). Furthermore, metabolic syndrome and diabetes are also associated with an increase in the incidence of renal stones disease. The shared links between these metabolic disorders are insulin resistance. Furthermore, insulin resistance is thought to alter renal acid-base metabolism, resulting in a lower urine pH and increased risk of uric acid stone disease. Obesity is also associated with excess nutritional intake of lithogenic substances such as refined sugars, low fluid intake, calcium, oxalate, and purine-rich foods. Obesity is also associated with an increase in incidence of urinary tract infection. Recent reports suggested that renal stone disease carries risk of myocardial infarction, progression of CKD, and diabetes. Alarmingly, orlistat (obesity medication) and bariatric surgery are associated with hyperoxaluria and associated stone formation and even oxalate nephropathy. Certainly, the many health risks of obesity, including nephrolithiasis, will add more burden on urologists and nephrologists. Shockwave lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, and ureteroscopy are all safe procedures in obese individuals. Further research is urgently needed to address the pathophysiology and management of obesity-induced renal stones disease.

  19. Stability and Species Specificity of Renal VEGF-A Splicing Patterns in Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Turner, R J; Eikmans, M; Bajema, I M; Bruijn, J A; Baelde, H J

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is essential for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier. Absolute renal levels of VEGF-A change in patients with diabetic nephropathy and inflammatory kidney diseases, but whether changes in the renal splicing patterns of VEGF-A play a role remains unclear. In this study, we investigated mRNA splicing patterns of pro-angiogenic isoforms of VEGF-A in glomeruli and whole kidney samples from human patients with kidney disease and from mouse models of kidney disease. Kidney biopsies were obtained from patients with acute rejection following kidney transplantation, patients with diabetic nephropathy, and control subjects. In addition, kidney samples were obtained from mice with lupus nephritis, mice with diabetes mellitus, and control mice. The relative expression of each VEGF-A splice variant was measured using RT-PCR followed by quantitative fragment analysis. The pattern of renal VEGF-A splice variants was unchanged in diabetic nephropathy and lupus nephritis and was stable throughout disease progression in acute transplant rejection and diabetic nephropathy; these results suggest renal VEGF-A splicing stability during kidney disease. The splicing patterns were species-specific; in the control human kidney samples, VEGF-A 121 was the dominant isoform, whereas VEGF-A 164 was the dominant isoform measured in the mouse kidney samples. PMID:27598902

  20. Renal outcomes of bariatric surgery in obese adults with diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rao, Bhavana B; Bhattacharya, Abhik; Agrawal, Varun

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is a pandemic with several significant adverse health outcomes. Chronic kidney disease has been an overlooked consequence of obesity. Among diabetics, obesity is known to amplify the risk for kidney disease. Although bariatric surgery promises significant and sustained weight reduction with favorable impact on metabolic parameters such as glycemic control, hypertension and dyslipidemia, its impact on the renal complications of diabetes is poorly understood. This paper aims to comprehensively evaluate the evidence in the published literature on the impact of bariatric surgery on renal outcomes in obese adults with diabetic kidney disease. While many observational studies have demonstrated significant reduction in proteinuria after bariatric surgery, there is paucity of data regarding changes in renal filtration function such as doubling of serum creatinine or progression to end stage kidney disease. No randomized controlled trials comparing medical vs. surgical therapy in obese adults with diabetic kidney disease exist, hence assessing the metabolic benefits vs. the surgical risks is important before recommending bariatric surgery to this growing patient population. Future studies require a collaborative effort between bariatric surgeons and nephrologists to measure long-term effects of bariatric surgery on renal outcomes incorporating evolving markers of kidney injury to advance this field.

  1. Stability and Species Specificity of Renal VEGF-A Splicing Patterns in Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Turner, R. J.; Eikmans, M.; Bajema, I. M.; Bruijn, J. A.; Baelde, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is essential for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier. Absolute renal levels of VEGF-A change in patients with diabetic nephropathy and inflammatory kidney diseases, but whether changes in the renal splicing patterns of VEGF-A play a role remains unclear. In this study, we investigated mRNA splicing patterns of pro-angiogenic isoforms of VEGF-A in glomeruli and whole kidney samples from human patients with kidney disease and from mouse models of kidney disease. Kidney biopsies were obtained from patients with acute rejection following kidney transplantation, patients with diabetic nephropathy, and control subjects. In addition, kidney samples were obtained from mice with lupus nephritis, mice with diabetes mellitus, and control mice. The relative expression of each VEGF-A splice variant was measured using RT-PCR followed by quantitative fragment analysis. The pattern of renal VEGF-A splice variants was unchanged in diabetic nephropathy and lupus nephritis and was stable throughout disease progression in acute transplant rejection and diabetic nephropathy; these results suggest renal VEGF-A splicing stability during kidney disease. The splicing patterns were species-specific; in the control human kidney samples, VEGF-A 121 was the dominant isoform, whereas VEGF-A 164 was the dominant isoform measured in the mouse kidney samples. PMID:27598902

  2. Renal disease in the elderly: distinctive disorders, tailored treatments.

    PubMed

    Ali, H

    1996-12-01

    Many 40-year-olds would be surprised to learn that, as far as their kidneys are concerned, the aging process is already under way. The decreased blood flow and diminished regulatory capacity that come with age are not necessarily problems. However, when another factor is added (eg, fluid loss from diarrhea, depressed thirst mechanism from sedative use), serious fluid and electrolyte imbalances can result. Dr Ali discusses renal disorders for which older people are at risk, and he provides safety tips on drug choices and doses.

  3. Renal histology in two adult patients with type I glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Obara, K; Saito, T; Sato, H; Ogawa, M; Igarashi, Y; Yoshinaga, K

    1993-02-01

    Two adult patients with type I glycogen storage disease (I-GSD) had chronic renal disease with heavy proteinuria. Renal biopsies showed focal glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, tubular atrophy or vacuolation, and prominent arteriosclerosis. Marked glomerular hypertrophy was demonstrated histometrically. Oil red O staining in one patient revealed numerous lipid deposits in the glomerular mesangium, tubular epithelial cells and interstitium. Electron microscopy in the other patient revealed diffuse thickening of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and lipid droplets within the mesangium. The glomerular hypertrophy, thickening of the GBM, and subsequent sclerosis were similar to those in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. These findings may explain the similarities between the natural histories of renal involvement in the two disorders. Particularly, glomerular hypertrophy may be a key step leading to glomerular sclerosis, which is the predominant finding I-GSD. Hyperlipidemia, which is commonly seen in I-GSD, may also accelerate the glomerular sclerosing process.

  4. l-Carnitine improves cognitive and renal functions in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abu Ahmad, Nur; Armaly, Zaher; Berman, Sylvia; Jabour, Adel; Aga-Mizrachi, Shlomit; Mosenego-Ornan, Efrat; Avital, Avi

    2016-10-01

    Over the past decade, the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has reached epidemic proportions. The search for novel pharmacological treatment for CKD has become an area of intensive clinical research. l-Carnitine, considered as the "gatekeeper" responsible for admitting long chain fatty acids into cell mitochondria. l-Carnitine synthesis and turnover are regulated mainly by the kidney and its levels inversely correlate with serum creatinine of normal subjects and CKD patients. Previous studies showed that l-carnitine administration to elderly people is improving and preserving cognitive function. As yet, there are no clinical intervention studies that investigated the effect of l-carnitine administration on cognitive impairment evidenced in CKD patients. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effects of l-carnitine treatment on renal function and on the cognitive performance in a rat model of progressive CKD. To assess the role of l-carnitine on CKD condition, we estimated the renal function and cognitive abilities in a CKD rat model. We found that all CKD animals exhibited renal function deterioration, as indicated by elevated serum creatinine, BUN, and ample histopathological abnormalities. l-Carnitine treatment of CKD rats significantly reduced serum creatinine and BUN, attenuated renal hypertrophy and decreased renal tissue damage. In addition, in the two way shuttle avoidance learning, CKD animals showed cognitive impairment which recovered by the administration of l-carnitine. We conclude that in a rat model of CKD, l-carnitine administration significantly improved cognitive and renal functions.

  5. Diagnosis of cardiac disease in pediatric end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Chavers, Blanche M.; Solid, Craig A.; Sinaiko, Alan; Daniels, Frank X.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.; Frankenfield, Diane L.; Herzog, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Cardiac disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This study aimed to report the frequency of cardiac disease diagnostic methods used in US pediatric maintenance hemodialysis patients. Methods. A cross-sectional analysis of all US pediatric (ages 0.7–18 years, n = 656) maintenance hemodialysis patients was performed using data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ESRD Clinical Performance Measures Project. Clinical and laboratory information was collected in 2001. Results were analysed by age, sex, race, Hispanic ethnicity, dialysis duration, body mass index (BMI), primary ESRD cause and laboratory data. Results. Ninety-two percent of the patients had a cardiovascular risk factor (63% hypertension, 38% anemia, 11% BMI > 94th percentile, 63% serum phosphorus > 5.5 mg/dL and 55% calcium–phosphorus product ≥ 55 mg2/dL2). A diagnosis of cardiac disease was reported in 24% (n = 155) of all patients: left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement 17%, congestive heart failure/pulmonary edema 8%, cardiomyopathy 2% and decreased left ventricular function 2%. Thirty-one percent of patients were not tested. Of those tested, the diagnostic methods used were chest X-rays in 60%, echocardiograms in 35% and electrocardiograms in 33%; left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement was diagnosed using echocardiogram (72%), chest X-ray (20%) and electrocardiogram (15%). Conclusions. Although 92% of patients had cardiovascular risk factors, an echocardiography was performed in only one-third of the patients. Our study raises the question of why echocardiography, considered the gold standard for cardiac disease diagnosis, has been infrequently used in pediatric maintenance dialysis patients, a high-risk patient population. PMID:20861193

  6. Effect of chronic antioxidant therapy with superoxide dismutase-mimetic drug, tempol, on progression of renal disease in rats with renal mass reduction.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Yasmir; Ferrebuz, Atilio; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play a major role in the progression of renal damage and antioxidants are potentially useful therapeutic options in chronic renal disease. We investigated if treatment with tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic that has beneficial effects in several experimental models of hypertension and acute kidney injury, ameliorates the chronic renal damage resulting in renal mass reduction. Rats with surgical 5/6 nephrectomy were randomly assigned to receive no treatment (CRF group, n = 10) or tempol, 1 mmol/l in the drinking water (CRF-tempol group, n = 10). Sham-operated rats (n = 10) served as controls. All rats were followed for 12 weeks post-nephrectomy. Tempol treatment reduced plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and halved the number of superoxide-positive cells in the remnant kidney; however, the number of hydrogen peroxide-positive cells increased and the overall renal oxidative stress (MDA and nitrotyrosine abundance) and inflammation (interstitial p65 NF-kappaB, macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration) were unchanged. Proteinuria, renal function and glomerular and tubulointerstitial damage in the remnant kidney were similar in the CRF and CRF-tempol groups. In conclusion, tempol administration, at the dose used in these studies, decreased plasma MDA and heightened superoxide dismutation in the kidney, but was incapable of reducing renal oxidative stress or improving renal function or structure in the remnant kidney model.

  7. Markers of Renal Disease and Function Are Associated with Systemic Inflammation in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Samir K; Kitch, Douglas; Tierney, Camlin; Melbourne, Kathleen; Ha, Belinda; McComsey, Grace A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Both renal disease and systemic inflammation predict non-AIDS events and overall mortality in HIV-infected patients. Here we sought to determine the relationships between renal disease and circulating inflammation markers. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5224s to determine if markers of renal disease [urine protein/creatinine (uPCR); urine albumin/creatinine (uACR); estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR, using CKD-EPI creatinine and cystatin C-creatinine] were associated with markers of systemic inflammation [high sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, soluble receptors of TNF-α (sTNFRI and II), soluble vascular cellular and intercellular adhesion molecules]. We correlated these renal and inflammatory markers prior to antiretroviral initiation and at 96 weeks of therapy. Results We found that estimated eGFR (using CKD-EPI cystatin C-creatinine), uPCR, and uACR were significantly correlated with most assessed markers of systemic inflammation prior to antiretroviral initiation. uPCR and eGFR (using CKD-EPI cystatin C-creatinine), but not uACR, remained significantly correlated with most of the assessed inflammatory markers after 96 weeks of ART. Most of these correlations, although statistically significant, were under 0.50. eGFR using CKD-EPI creatinine was much less frequently associated with inflammation markers and only significantly correlated with sTNFR1 at Week 0 and with sTNFRI and II at Week 96. Conclusions Renal disease and function are associated with systemic inflammation in HIV both before and after ART. Systemic inflammation may partially explain the relationships between proteinuria, albuminuria, and reduced renal function and future adverse outcomes. PMID:25990642

  8. Analysis of the New Zealand Black contribution to lupus-like renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, C.G.; Rozzo, S.J.; Hirschfeld, H.F.; Smarnworawong, N.P.; Palmer, E.; Kotzin, B.L. |

    1995-03-01

    F{sub 1} progeny of New Zealand Black (NZB) and New Zealand White (NZW) mice spontaneously develop an autoimmune process remarkably similar to human systemic lupus erythematosus. Previous studies have implicated major genetic contributions from the NZW MHC and from a dominant NZB gene on chromosome 4. To identify additional NZB contributions to lupus-like disease, (NZB x SM/J)F{sub 1} x NZW backcross mice were followed for the development of severe renal disease and were comprehensively genotyped. Despite a 50% incidence of disease significant associations between the presence of the NZB genotype and disease were noted on chromosomes 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, and 19. The data indicated that multiple NZB genes, in different combinations, contribute to severe renal disease, and that no single gene is required. To further investigate this NZB contribution, NZB x SM/J (NXSM) recombinant inbred (RI) strains were crossed with NZW mice, and F{sub 1} progeny were analyzed for the presence of lupus-like renal disease. Interestingly, nearly all of the (RI x NZW)F{sub 1} cohorts studies expressed some level of disease. Five RI strains generated a high incidence of disease, similar to (NZB x NZW)F{sub 1} mice, and nearly one-half of the cohorts developed disease at intermediate levels. Only two cohorts demonstrated very little disease, supporting the conclusion that multiple genes are capable of disease induction. Experiments correlating the genotypes of these RI strains with their ability to generate disease revealed that none of the disease-associated loci defined by the backcross analysis were present in all five RI strains that generated disease at high levels. Overall, both the backcross data and RI analysis provide additional support for the genetic complexity of lupus nephritis and uphold the conclusion that heterogeneous combinations of contributing NZB genes seem to operate in a threshold manner to generate the disease phenotype. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Specific MAPK inhibitors prevent hyperglycemia-induced renal diseases in type 1 diabetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhe; Hong, Zongyuan; Wu, Denglong; Nie, Hezhongrong

    2016-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) play critical roles in the process of renal diseases, but their interaction has not been comprehensively discussed. In the present studies, we investigated the renoprotective effects of MPAK inhibitors on renal diseases in type 1 diabetic mouse model, and clarify the crosstalk among MAPK signaling. Type 1 diabetic mouse model was established in male C57BL/6 J mice, and treated with or without 10 mg/kg MAPK blockers, including ERK inhibitor PD98059, p38 inhibitor SB203850, and JNK inhibitor SP600125 for four weeks. Hyperglycemia induced renal injuries, but treating them with MAPK inhibitors significantly decreased glomerular volume and glycogen in renal tissues. Although slightly changed body weight and fasting blood glucose levels, MAPK inhibitors attenuated blood urea nitrogen, urea protein, and microalbuminuria. Administration also reduced the diabetes-induced RAS activation, including angiotensin II converting enzyme (c) and Ang II, which contributed to its renal protective effects in the diabetic mice. In addition, the anti-RAS of MAPK inhibitor treatment markedly reduced gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, fibrotic accumulation, and transforming growth factor-β1 levels in renal tissues. Furthermore, chemical inhibitors and genetic siRNA results identified the crosstalk among the three MAPK signaling, and proved JNK signaling played a critical role in MAPK-mediated ACE pathway in hyperglycemia state. Collectively, these results support the therapeutic effects of MAPK-specific inhibitors, especially JNK inactivation, on hyperglycemia-induced renal damages. PMID:27389030

  10. TLR4 mutant mice are protected from renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ana C P; Tsuji, Takayuki; Baranova, Irina N; Bocharov, Alexander V; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Street, Jonathan M; Alvarez-Prats, Alejandro; Hu, Xuzhen; Eggerman, Thomas; Yuen, Peter S T; Star, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with persistent low-grade inflammation and immunosuppression. In this study we tested the role of Toll-like receptor 4, the main receptor for endotoxin (LPS), in a mouse model of renal fibrosis and in a model of progressive CKD that better resembles the human disease. C3HeJ (TLR4 mutant) mice have a missense point mutation in the TLR4 gene, rendering the receptor nonfunctional. In a model of renal fibrosis after folic acid injection, TLR4 mutant mice developed less interstititial fibrosis in comparison to wild-type (WT) mice. Furthermore, 4 weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy with continuous low-dose angiotensin II infusion, C3HeOuJ (TLR4 WT) mice developed progressive CKD with albuminuria, increased serum levels of BUN and creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, and interstitial fibrosis, whereas TLR4 mutant mice were significantly protected from CKD progression. TLR4 WT mice also developed low-grade systemic inflammation, splenocyte apoptosis and increased expression of the immune inhibitory receptor PD-1 in the spleen, which were not observed in TLR4 mutant mice. In vitro, endotoxin (LPS) directly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome expression in renal epithelial cells via TLR4. In summary, TLR4 contributes to renal fibrosis and CKD progression, at least in part, via inflammasome activation in renal epithelial cells, and may also participate in the dysregulated immune response that is associated with CKD. PMID:26416975

  11. Akt1-mediated fast/glycolytic skeletal muscle growth attenuates renal damage in experimental kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hanatani, Shinsuke; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Araki, Satoshi; Rokutanda, Taku; Kimura, Yuichi; Walsh, Kenneth; Ogawa, Hisao

    2014-12-01

    Muscle wasting is frequently observed in patients with kidney disease, and low muscle strength is associated with poor outcomes in these patients. However, little is known about the effects of skeletal muscle growth per se on kidney diseases. In this study, we utilized a skeletal muscle-specific, inducible Akt1 transgenic (Akt1 TG) mouse model that promotes the growth of functional skeletal muscle independent of exercise to investigate the effects of muscle growth on kidney diseases. Seven days after Akt1 activation in skeletal muscle, renal injury was induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in Akt1 TG and wild-type (WT) control mice. The expression of atrogin-1, an atrophy-inducing gene in skeletal muscle, was upregulated 7 days after UUO in WT mice but not in Akt1 TG mice. UUO-induced renal interstitial fibrosis, tubular injury, apoptosis, and increased expression of inflammatory, fibrosis-related, and adhesion molecule genes were significantly diminished in Akt1 TG mice compared with WT mice. An increase in the activating phosphorylation of eNOS in the kidney accompanied the attenuation of renal damage by myogenic Akt1 activation. Treatment with the NOS inhibitor L-NAME abolished the protective effect of skeletal muscle Akt activation on obstructive kidney disease. In conclusion, Akt1-mediated muscle growth reduces renal damage in a model of obstructive kidney disease. This improvement appears to be mediated by an increase in eNOS signaling in the kidney. Our data support the concept that loss of muscle mass during kidney disease can contribute to renal failure, and maintaining muscle mass may improve clinical outcome. PMID:25012168

  12. Akt1-mediated fast/glycolytic skeletal muscle growth attenuates renal damage in experimental kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hanatani, Shinsuke; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Araki, Satoshi; Rokutanda, Taku; Kimura, Yuichi; Walsh, Kenneth; Ogawa, Hisao

    2014-12-01

    Muscle wasting is frequently observed in patients with kidney disease, and low muscle strength is associated with poor outcomes in these patients. However, little is known about the effects of skeletal muscle growth per se on kidney diseases. In this study, we utilized a skeletal muscle-specific, inducible Akt1 transgenic (Akt1 TG) mouse model that promotes the growth of functional skeletal muscle independent of exercise to investigate the effects of muscle growth on kidney diseases. Seven days after Akt1 activation in skeletal muscle, renal injury was induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in Akt1 TG and wild-type (WT) control mice. The expression of atrogin-1, an atrophy-inducing gene in skeletal muscle, was upregulated 7 days after UUO in WT mice but not in Akt1 TG mice. UUO-induced renal interstitial fibrosis, tubular injury, apoptosis, and increased expression of inflammatory, fibrosis-related, and adhesion molecule genes were significantly diminished in Akt1 TG mice compared with WT mice. An increase in the activating phosphorylation of eNOS in the kidney accompanied the attenuation of renal damage by myogenic Akt1 activation. Treatment with the NOS inhibitor L-NAME abolished the protective effect of skeletal muscle Akt activation on obstructive kidney disease. In conclusion, Akt1-mediated muscle growth reduces renal damage in a model of obstructive kidney disease. This improvement appears to be mediated by an increase in eNOS signaling in the kidney. Our data support the concept that loss of muscle mass during kidney disease can contribute to renal failure, and maintaining muscle mass may improve clinical outcome.

  13. Renal disease disparities in Asian and Pacific-based populations in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Mau, Marjorie K; West, Margaret; Sugihara, Jared; Kamaka, Martina; Mikami, Judy; Cheng, Shiuh-Feng

    2003-10-01

    The prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States is expected to double over the next 10 years. The identification of ethnic differences in the prevalence, treatment, morbidity, and mortality related to chronic kidney disease (CKD) is of great concern. Asian Americans comprise a rapidly expanding sector of the U.S. population and are reported to have ESRD growth rates that are approximately 50% higher than caucasians. Hawai'i has a large, well-established Asian and Pacific-based population that facilitates the examination of disparities in renal disease among the state's diverse ethnic groups. The prevalence of ESRD in Hawai'i has continued to rise due, in part, to high rates of diabetes, glomerulonephritis, and hypertension reported in Asian Americans and Pacific-based populations. ESRD patients in Hawai'i have a two-fold higher prevalence of glomerulonephritis, compared with the general ESRD population in the United States. Other potential sources of renal disparities-such as cultural factors, language barriers, and health access factors-among Hawaii's major ethnic groups are assessed. However, few studies have examined the relative contribution of these potential factors. Consequently, efforts to reduce and eventually eliminate renal disease disparities will require a better understanding of the major sources of health disparities, such as timely medical care, a diverse health workforce, and cultural/social barriers, that affect optimal health care practices in Asian and Pacific-based populations. PMID:14620708

  14. How End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Manage the Medicare Part D Coverage Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Pamela J.; Perkins, Nathan; Nuschke, Elizabeth; Carroll, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Medicare Part D was enacted to help elderly and disabled individuals pay for prescription drugs, but it was structured with a gap providing no coverage in 2010 between $2,830 and $6,440. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are especially likely to be affected due to high costs of dialysis-related drugs and the importance of adherence for…

  15. Alterations in renal cytosolic phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenases in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Harold M; Adolphe, Jennifer; Mishra, Suparna; Jiang, Jieyuan; Cuozzo, Francis P; Ogborn, Malcolm R

    2003-02-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) regulate the formation of physiologically active prostaglandins, the production of which is known to be elevated in several renal disorders. We studied the relevance of these enzymes in polycystic kidney disease (PKD) by using two models of the disease: a model in which decline in renal function begins in adulthood (CD1-pcy/pcy mouse) and one in which it occurs early, during growth (Han:SPRD-cy rat). Immunoblotting analyses of cytosolic and particulate kidney fractions revealed that cPLA2 levels are significantly higher (by 34-131%) in the latter stages of the disease in both models. Renal COX enzymes were found only in the particulate fractions, with COX-1 87% higher in 6-month-old CD1-pcy/pcy mice compared with normal controls, and 110% higher in male 70-day-old Han:SPRD-cy rats with cystic kidneys compared with controls. Renal COX-2 was detected only in the rats and was 58% lower in diseased kidneys of 70-day-old male Han:SPRD-cy rats, indicating that cPLA2 is coupled to COX-1 in the kidney. The altered levels of these eicosanoid-regulating enzymes has implications for the use of NSAIDS and specific COX inhibitors in individuals with this disorder. PMID:12490538

  16. Hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and renal pathology in a child with hermansky-pudlak syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, Roberto; Del Rio, Marcela; Thomas, David B; Flynn, Joseph T; Woroniecki, Robert P

    2011-01-01

    We report a child with Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS) and chronic kidney disease (stage II) with histological diagnosis of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). A 15-year-old male of Puerto Rico ancestry with history of HPS, hypertension (HTN), asthma, obesity, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage II presented with new-onset proteinuria without edema. His blood pressure had been controlled, serum creatinine had been 0.9-1.4 mg/dL, and first morning urine protein/creatinine ratio (UPC) ranged from 0.2 to 0.38. Due to persistent nonorthostatic proteinuria with CKD, renal biopsy was performed and FSGS (not otherwise specified) with chronic diffuse tubulopathy (tubular cytoplasmic droplets) and acute tubular injury was reported. Ceroid-like material is known to infiltrate tissues (i.e., lungs, colon, and kidney) in HPS, but the reason for the renal insufficiency is unknown. Nonspecific kidney disease and in one adult case IgA nephropathy with ANCA-positive glomerulonephritis have previously been reported in patients with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. To our knowledge, we report the first pediatric renal pathology case of HPS associated with CKD. This paper discusses presentation and management of renal disease in HPS.

  17. Mild systemic thermal therapy ameliorates renal dysfunction in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Yoshihiro; Kuwabara, Takashige; Hayata, Manabu; Kakizoe, Yutaka; Izumi, Yuichiro; Iiyama, Junichi; Kitamura, Kenichiro; Mukoyama, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    Thermal therapy has become a nonpharmacological therapy in clinical settings, especially for cardiovascular diseases. However, the practical role of thermal therapy on chronic kidney disease remains elusive. We performed the present study to investigate whether a modified thermal protocol, repeated mild thermal stimulation (MTS), could affect renal damages in chronic kidney disease using a mouse renal ablation model. Mice were subjected to MTS or room temperature (RT) treatment once daily for 4 wk after subtotal nephrectomy (Nx) or sham operation (Sh). We revealed that MTS alleviated renal impairment as indicated by serum creatinine and albuminuria in Nx groups. In addition, the Nx + MTS group showed attenuated tubular histological changes and reduced urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin excretion approximately by half compared with the Nx + RT group. Increased apoptotic signaling, such as TUNEL-positive cell count and cleavage of caspase 3, as well as enhanced oxidative stress were significantly reduced in the Nx + MTS group compared with the Nx + RT group. These changes were accompanied with the restoration of kidney Mn-SOD levels by MTS. Heat shock protein 27, a key molecular chaperone, was phosphorylated by MTS only in Nx kidneys rather than in Sh kidneys. MTS also tended to increase the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Akt in Nx kidneys, possibly associated with the activation of heat shock protein 27. Taken together, these results suggest that modified MTS can protect against renal injury in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease.

  18. Renal disease disparities in Asian and Pacific-based populations in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Mau, Marjorie K; West, Margaret; Sugihara, Jared; Kamaka, Martina; Mikami, Judy; Cheng, Shiuh-Feng

    2003-10-01

    The prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States is expected to double over the next 10 years. The identification of ethnic differences in the prevalence, treatment, morbidity, and mortality related to chronic kidney disease (CKD) is of great concern. Asian Americans comprise a rapidly expanding sector of the U.S. population and are reported to have ESRD growth rates that are approximately 50% higher than caucasians. Hawai'i has a large, well-established Asian and Pacific-based population that facilitates the examination of disparities in renal disease among the state's diverse ethnic groups. The prevalence of ESRD in Hawai'i has continued to rise due, in part, to high rates of diabetes, glomerulonephritis, and hypertension reported in Asian Americans and Pacific-based populations. ESRD patients in Hawai'i have a two-fold higher prevalence of glomerulonephritis, compared with the general ESRD population in the United States. Other potential sources of renal disparities-such as cultural factors, language barriers, and health access factors-among Hawaii's major ethnic groups are assessed. However, few studies have examined the relative contribution of these potential factors. Consequently, efforts to reduce and eventually eliminate renal disease disparities will require a better understanding of the major sources of health disparities, such as timely medical care, a diverse health workforce, and cultural/social barriers, that affect optimal health care practices in Asian and Pacific-based populations.

  19. Con: Nutritional vitamin D replacement in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Georgianos, Panagiotis I

    2016-05-01

    Insufficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is highly prevalent among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and is a critical component in the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Accordingly, current National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend the correction of hypovitaminosis D through nutritional vitamin D replacement as a first-step therapeutic approach targeting secondary hyperparathyroidism. In this Polar Views debate, we summarize the existing evidence, aiming to defend the position that nutritional vitamin D replacement is not evidence-based and should not be applied to patients with CKD. This position is supported by the following: (i) our meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials shows that whereas nutritional vitamin D significantly increases serum 25(OH)D levels relative to placebo, there is no evidence either in predialysis CKD or in ESRD that parathyroid hormone (PTH) is lowered; (ii) on the other hand, in randomized head-to-head comparisons, nutritional vitamin D is shown to be inferior to activated vitamin D analogs in reducing PTH levels; (iii) nutritional vitamin D is reported to exert minimal to no beneficial actions in a series of surrogate risk factors, including aortic stiffness, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), epoetin utilization and immune function among others; and (iv) there is no evidence to support a benefit of nutritional vitamin D on survival and other 'hard' clinical outcomes. Whereas nutritional vitamin D replacement may restore 25(OH)D concentration to near normal, the real target of treating vitamin D insufficiency is to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism, which is untouched by nutritional vitamin D. Furthermore, the pleotropic benefits of nutritional vitamin D remain to be proven. Thus, there is little, if any, benefit of nutritional vitamin D replacement in CKD. PMID:27190392

  20. HIV and HCV Medications in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Keiko I; Perazella, Mark A; Atta, Mohamed G

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affect populations worldwide. With the availability of over 35 Food and Drug Administration approved medications for treatment of HIV, the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV has greatly improved. On the other hand, treatment options for HCV have been limited until very recently. While the use of protease inhibitors (such as boceprevir and telaprevir) has become standard of care for treatment of hepatitis C in the general population, data for individuals with impaired kidney function, particularly those on dialysis, are extremely limited. Use of medications in dialysis patients can be challenging given the dose adjustments that must be made for renally cleared molecules, and potentially increased impact of adverse effects such as anemia. Recommendations for dosing of marketed therapies for HIV and HCV are reviewed.

  1. [End stage renal disease lymphopenia; characterization and clinical correlation].

    PubMed

    Lepe-Zúñiga, José Luis; Morales-Molina, Pedro; García-Nandayapa, Gabriela Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: los pacientes con insuficiencia renal crónica en etapa terminal (ERET), presentan alteraciones inmunológicas diversas que los hacen más susceptibles a infecciones. Entre las alteraciones reportadas se encuentra la linfopenia. Se han realizado pocos estudios en nuestro medio que muestren la frecuencia y características de esta alteración así como su trascendencia clínica, relacionada con las infecciones que afectan a estos pacientes. Métodos: se analizó una serie de variables, incluyendo los valores de linfocitos y la presencia de infecciones, en un grupo de 190 pacientes con ERET de febrero 2008 a noviembre 2012. Se correlacionan y comparan los valores obtenidos entre ellos en dos momentos de su evolución: antes y durante su tratamiento dialítico. Resultados: en los pacientes con ERET, se obtuvo un perfil hematológico característico, caracterizado por anemia crónica severa, leucocitos totales normales o por arriba de lo normal y linfocitos normales o por debajo de lo normal (linfopenia). El grado de alteración hematológica correlacionó con el grado de afección renal y se corrigió en la medida que se corrigieron las alteraciones bioquímicas relacionadas con la ERET mediante diálisis peritoneal. Conclusiones: la linfopenia se encontró en cerca de la mitad de los pacientes con ERET y se asoció con el incremento de infecciones; el tipo de infecciones fue similar a lo observado en pacientes sin linfopenia y diferente al observado en pacientes con inmunodeficiencias primarias o adquiridas que afectan a los linfocitos.

  2. All about Occultation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2001-01-01

    Describes occultation events involving the moon, when the moon blocks the view of planets or stars. Describes other events such as a partial solar eclipse, a penumbral lunar eclipse, meteor showers, and moon phases. Provides a list of internet resources related to these events. (DLH)

  3. Membranous nephropathy as a rare renal manifestation of IgG4-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Kurien, A. A.; Raychaudhury, A.; Walker, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    IgG4-related disease, a newly described immune-mediated disorder with tissue infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells, has been reported in nearly every organ. In the kidney, it manifests as IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) but may also present as membranous nephropathy. We report a patient with IgG4 renal disease who had membranous nephropathy as well as TIN. PMID:26060366

  4. [Legionnaire's disease complicated by acute renal failure due to rhabdomyolosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Labidi, J; Fdhila, W; Battikh, R; Ellouze, S; Ben Abdelhafidh, N; Louzir, B; M'sadek, F; Othmani, S

    2006-09-01

    The infectious origin of non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is rare (5% of cases). An elevated muscle enzyme level is often reported in the legionnaire's disease. We report the case of a 39-year-old male, with no previous medical history, admitted for renal failure (creatininemia=977 micromol/l) secondary to rhabdomyolysis and a twelve-day history of infectious syndrome with pneumonia in the left base. Legionella pneumophila was considered responsible for these symptoms because of a positive serology. The other microbial assessments were negative. After rehydration and three weeks of antibiotics, the outcome was favorable: the renal failure resolved completely and the muscle enzyme level returned to normal.

  5. Urinary fibrinogen and renal tubulointerstitial fibrinogen deposition: Discriminating between primary FSGS and minimal change disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Zheng, Chunxia; Xu, Feng; Liu, Zhihong

    2016-09-23

    Primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and minimal change disease (MCD) are common types of primary glomerular disease; they share numerous clinical and pathological similarities but have different treatment regimens and prognoses. It is therefore necessary to distinguish between them and to explore the mechanism underlying their differences. Fibrinogen is reportedly involved in podocyte damage and in renal fibrosis in vitro and in animal models of kidney disease. We thus tested urinary fibrinogen, serum fibrinogen, and renal fibrinogen deposition levels in a cohort comprising 50 patients with FSGS and 40 patients with MCD. Our results suggested that urinary fibrinogen and renal interstitial fibrinogen deposition levels were significantly higher in the FSGS patients than in the MCD patients, while serum fibrinogen levels did not differ between the groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed an excellent diagnostic ability for urinary fibrinogen and a fair diagnostic ability for tubulointerstitial fibrinogen deposition in differentiating FSGS from MCD. Additionally, we found that urinary fibrinogen levels were positively correlated with the 24-h urine protein levels in patients with FSGS but not in patients with MCD. In conclusion, urinary fibrinogen and renal interstitial fibrinogen deposition is elevated in primary FSGS compared to MCD, which may be relevant to both diagnosis and pathogenesis.

  6. IgG4-related renal disease: clinical and pathological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Nao, Tomoya; Fukuhara, Hideo; Karashima, Takashi; Inoue, Keiji; Taniguchi, Yoshinori; Takeuchi, Mai; Zen, Yoh; Sato, Yasuharu; Notohara, Kenji; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a recently established systemic condition. Tubulointerstitial nephritis is the most common renal manifestation. Glomerular lesions, particularly membranous glomerulonephritis, can develop simultaneously. Some patients present with serological renal dysfunction associated with elevated IgG or IgE levels and hypocomplementemia, while others are incidentally found to have abnormalities in kidneys on imaging. A majority of patients with IgG4-related kidney disease have similar lesions at other anatomical sites, which help us to suspect this condition. Serum IgG4 elevation (>135 mg/dL) is the most, although not entirely, specific marker for the diagnosis. Imaging findings varies from small nodules to bilateral diffuse abnormalities. In addition to the renal parenchyma, the renal pelvis and perirenal adipose tissue can be affected. Histological features include dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, storiform or "bird's eye" fibrosis (highlighted by PAM stain), and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration (>10 cells/high-power field and IgG4/IgG-positive cell ratio >40%). Immune complex deposition is detectable in the tubular basement membrane by immunofluorescence and/or electron microscopy. Patients usually respond well to corticosteroids, but highly active diseases may require other immunosuppressive therapies. Further investigations will be required to fully understand pathophysiology underlying this emerging condition. PMID:25337295

  7. Histomorphometry of feline chronic kidney disease and correlation with markers of renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Syme, H M; Brown, C A; Elliott, J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common in geriatric cats, but most cases have nonspecific renal lesions, and few studies have correlated these lesions with clinicopathological markers of renal dysfunction. The aim of this study was to identify the lesions best correlated with renal function and likely mediators of disease progression in cats with chronic kidney disease. Cats were recruited through 2 first-opinion practices between 1992 and 2010. When postmortem examinations were authorized, renal tissues were preserved in formalin. Sections were evaluated by a pathologist masked to all clinicopathological data. They were scored semiquantitatively for the severity of glomerulosclerosis, interstitial inflammation, and fibrosis. Glomerular volume was measured using image analysis; the percentage of glomeruli that were obsolescent was recorded. Sections were assessed for hyperplastic arteriolosclerosis and tubular mineralization. Kidneys from 80 cats with plasma biochemical data from the last 2 months of life were included in the study. Multivariable linear regression (P < .05) was used to assess the association of lesions with clinicopathological data obtained close to death. Interstitial fibrosis was the lesion best correlated with the severity of azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, and anemia. Proteinuria was associated with interstitial fibrosis and glomerular hypertrophy, whereas higher time-averaged systolic blood pressure was associated with glomerulosclerosis and hyperplastic arteriolosclerosis. PMID:22773469

  8. Risk Factors of End Stage Renal Disease in Peshawar, Pakistan: Odds Ratio Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Salahuddin; Hussain, Tariq; Salahuddin, Najma; Mehreen, Salahuddin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The basic aim of this study was to discover the association of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) with various risk factors. End Stage Renal Failure is the last stage of the chronic renal failure in which kidneys become completely fail to function. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The data were collected from the patients of renal diseases from three major hospitals in Peshawar, Pakistan. Odds ratio analysis was performed to examine the relationship of ESRD (a binary response variable) with various risk factors: Gender, Diabetic, Hypertension, Glomerulonephritis, Obstructive Nephropathy, Polycystic kidney disease, Myeloma, SLE Nephritis, Heredity, Hepatitis, Excess use of Drugs, heart problem and Anemia. RESULTS: Using odds ratio analysis, the authors found that the ESRD in diabetic patients was 11.04 times more than non-diabetic patients and the ESRD were 7.29 times less in non-hypertensive patients as compared to hypertensive patients. Similarly, glomerulonephritis patients had 3.115 times more risk of having ESRD than non-glomerulonephritis. Other risk factors may also, to some extent, were causes of ESRD but turned out insignificant due to stochastic sample. CONCLUSION: The authors concluded that there is a strong association between ESRD and three risk factors, namely diabetes, hypertension and glomerulonephritis. PMID:27703559

  9. Effect of urinary stone disease and its treatment on renal function.

    PubMed

    Mehmet, Necmettin Mercimek; Ender, Ozden

    2015-05-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease that affects urinary tract in all age groups. Both in adults and in children, stone size, location, renal anatomy, and other factors, can influence the success of treatment modalities. Recently, there has been a great advancement in technology for minimally invasive management of urinary stones. The epoch of open treatment modalities has passed and currently there are much less invasive treatment approaches, such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureteroscopy, shockwave lithotripsy, and retrograde internal Surgery. Furthermore, advancement in imaging technics ensures substantial knowledge that permit physician to decide the most convenient treatment method for the patient. Thus, effective and rapid treatment of urinary tract stones is substantial for the preservation of the renal function. In this review, the effects of the treatment options for urinary stones on renal function have been reviewed.

  10. [Molecular biology of renal cancer: bases for genetic directed therapy in advanced disease].

    PubMed

    Maroto Rey, José Pablo; Cillán Narvaez, Elena

    2013-06-01

    There has been expansion of therapeutic options in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to a better knowledge of the molecular biology of kidney cancers. There are different tumors grouped under the term renal cell carcinoma, being clear cell cancer the most frequent and accounting for 80% of kidney tumors. Mutations in the Von Hippel-Lindau gene can be identified in up to 80% of sporadic clear cell cancer, linking a genetically inheritable disease where vascular tumors are frequent, with renal cell cancer. Other histologic types present specific alterations in molecular pathways, like c-MET in papillary type I tumors, and Fumarase Hydratase in papillary type II tumors. Identification of the molecular alteration for a specific tumor may offer an opportunity for treatment selection based on biomarkers, and, in the future, for developing an engineering designed genetic treatment.

  11. Treatment for end-stage renal disease: an organogenesis/tissue engineering odyssey.

    PubMed

    Hammerman, Marc R

    2004-04-01

    The means by which kidney function can be replaced in humans with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) include dialytic therapies and renal allotransplantation. Dialysis, is lifesaving, but often poorly tolerated. Transplantation of human kidneys is limited by the availability of donor organs. During the past decades, several different approaches have been applied towards new means to replace renal function through organogenesis and tissue engineering. These include: (1) incorporation of new nephrons into the kidney; (2) growing new kidneys in situ; (3) use of stem cells; (4) generation of histocompatible tissues using nuclear transplantation; and (5) bioengineering of an artificial kidney. The development of these approaches has depended upon understanding and integrating discoveries made in a diversity of scientific disciplines. The means by which such integration has driven advances in the treatment of ESRD provides a generic roadmap for the successful application of organogenesis and tissue engineering to organ replacement therapy.

  12. Constitutive renal Rel/nuclear factor-κB expression in Lewis polycystic kidney disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Michelle H T; Schwensen, Kristina G; Liuwantara, David; Huso, David L; Watnick, Terry; Rangan, Gopala K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the temporal expression and pattern of Rel/nuclear factor (NF)-κB proteins in renal tissue in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). METHODS: The renal expression of Rel/NF-κB proteins was determined by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis in Lewis polycystic kidney rats (LPK, a genetic ortholog of human nephronopthsis-9) from postnatal weeks 3 to 20. At each timepoint, renal disease progression and the mRNA expression of NF-κB-dependent genes (TNFα and CCL2) were determined. NF-κB was also histologically assessed in human PKD tissue. RESULTS: Progressive kidney enlargement in LPK rats was accompanied by increased renal cell proliferation and interstitial monocyte accumulation (peaking at weeks 3 and 10 respectively), and progressive interstitial fibrosis (with α smooth muscle actin and Sirius Red deposition significantly increased compared to Lewis kidneys from weeks 3 to 6 onwards). Rel/NF-κB proteins (phosphorylated-p105, p65, p50, c-Rel and RelB) were expressed in cystic epithelial cells (CECs) of LPK kidneys as early as postnatal week 3 and sustained until late-stage disease at week 20. From weeks 10 to 20, nuclear p65, p50, RelB and cytoplasmic IκBα protein levels, and TNFα and CCL2 expression, were upregulated in LPK compared to Lewis kidneys. NF-κB proteins were consistently expressed in CECs of human PKD. The DNA damage marker γ-H2AX was also identified in the CECs of LPK and human polycystic kidneys. CONCLUSION: Several NF-κB proteins are consistently expressed in CECs in human and experimental PKD. These data suggest that the upregulation of both the canonical and non-canonical pathways of NF-κB signaling may be a constitutive and early pathological feature of cystic renal diseases. PMID:27458563

  13. Renal disease in adults with TSC2/PKD1 contiguous gene syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martignoni, Guido; Bonetti, Franco; Pea, Maurizio; Tardanico, Regina; Brunelli, Matteo; Eble, John N

    2002-02-01

    The most common renal lesions of tuberous sclerosis complex, an autosomal-dominant syndrome resulting from losses of TSC1 (9q34) or TSC2 (16p13.3), are renal cysts and angiomyolipomas. Epithelial neoplasms are less common. The TSC2 gene lies adjacent to PKD1, the major gene responsible for autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease. Recently, a deletion mutation disrupting both TSC2 and PKD1 has been described in young children with tuberous sclerosis complex with severe renal cystic disease. This disease has been termed the TSC2/PKD1 contiguous gene syndrome. We describe the lesions in the resected kidneys of two adults with TSC2/PDK1 contiguous gene syndrome, at the time of the nephrectomies: a 31-year-old man and his 44-year-old mother. The four kidneys were enlarged reniform masses composed of cysts lined by flattened, cuboidal, or, infrequently, large deeply eosinophilic epithelial cells. The kidneys also contained numerous classic angiomyolipomas and rare intraglomerular microlesions. In the son the largest tumor was a monotypic epithelioid angiomyolipoma. In the wall of his left renal pelvis there was a plaque-shaped, HMB-45-positive localized lesion of lymphangioleiomyomatosis. This is the first description of the renal lesions in adults with genetically confirmed TSC2/PDK1 contiguous gene syndrome. The pathologic findings highlight the importance of thorough sampling for histology in polycystic kidney diseases and indicate that the observation of an angiomyolipoma in biopsy material from patients with enlarged cystic kidneys should suggest the diagnosis of TSC2/PKD1 contiguous gene syndrome, even in cases without ultrasonographic and macroscopic evidence of angiomyolipoma.

  14. Doppler assessment of renal hemodynamic alterations in homozygous sickle cell disease and sickle Beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Saif, Aasem; Soliman, Neveen; Abdelhamid, Alaa

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the renal vascular indices in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD) using Doppler ultrasonography. We also assessed the renal hemodynamics alterations in patients with homozygous SCD and sickle beta-thalassemia (sickle β-thalassemia). We studied 75 patients (age range = 3-20 years; M = 9.95 ± 4.15) with SCD: 42 patients suffering from homozygous SCD and 33 patients diagnosed with sickle β-thalassemia. Thirty, age- and sex-matched, normal subjects were also included as a control group. Both patients and control groups had Doppler assessment of pulsatility (PI) and resistivity (RI) indices of main renal, segmental, interlobar, and arcuate arteries. Both PIs and RIs were significantly higher in SCD patients, compared with the control group. Among patients, PIs and RIs in the main renal, segmental, interlobar, and arcuate arteries were significantly higher in patients with homozygous SCD as compared with those with sickle β-thalassemia (p values <0.01, <0.001, <0.001, and <0.001 for PIs and <0.001, <0.001, <0.001, and <0.01 for RIs, respectively). We concluded that renal vascular resistance is raised in children and adolescents with SCD. This is more pronounced in patients with homozygous SCD as compared with those with sickle β-thalassemia.

  15. Renal histopathological findings in relation to ambulatory blood pressure in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Haruhara, Kotaro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Koike, Kentaro; Fukui, Akira; Miyazaki, Yoichi; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Ogura, Makoto; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is useful for predicting the long-term renal prognosis and future cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease patients. Currently, however, information is limited regarding the relationships between individual renal histopathological findings and abnormalities in ambulatory blood pressure. This retrospective cross-sectional study included a total of 138 patients, in whom both renal biopsies and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring were performed during the same admission period. Renal histopathological findings, including global glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy and the presence of arterial lesions and arteriole lesions, were scored and analyzed in relation to the ambulatory blood pressure values. Among these histopathological characteristics, only the severity of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy exhibited a significant association with an increased mean value of daytime and nighttime blood pressure. However, the remaining histopathological features showed only trends or weak relationships with these values. In addition, a moderately advanced grade of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy was found to be significantly associated with both daytime and nighttime hypertension, independent of the kidney function, overt proteinuria and the use of antihypertensive medications, according to multivariate analyses. Furthermore, the night-to-day ratio of the mean blood pressure displayed a significant increasing trend according to the grade of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy. These results suggest that interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy is the most relevant renal histopathological parameter associated with abnormalities in ambulatory blood pressure, including nocturnal hypertension, in this population.

  16. Renal distribution of Vasohibin-1 in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hinamoto, Norikazu; Maeshima, Yohei; Saito, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Hiroko; Tanabe, Katsuyuki; Nasu, Tatsuyo; Watatani, Hiroyuki; Ujike, Haruyo; Kinomura, Masaru; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Sonoda, Hikaru; Kanomata, Naoki; Sato, Yasufumi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). There have so far been no reports investigating the distribution and clinical roles of Vasohibin-1 (VASH-1), a negative feedback regulator of angiogenesis, in CKD. We recruited 54 Japanese CKD patients and 6 patients who had normal renal tissues excised due to localized renal cell carcinoma. We evaluated the correlations between the renal expression level of VASH-1 and the clinical/histological parameters. VASH-1 was observed in renal endothelial/mesangial cells, crescentic lesions and interstitial inflammatory cells. Significant positive correlations were observed between 1) crescent formation and the number of VASH-1+ cells in the glomerulus (r=0.48, p=0.001) or cortex (r=0.64, p<0.0001), 2) interstitial cell infiltration and the number of VASH-1+ cells in the cortex (r=0.34, p=0.02), 3) the glomerular VEGFR-2+ area and the number of VASH-1+ cells in the glomerulus (r=0.44, p=0.01) or medulla (r=0.63, p=0.01). These results suggest that the renal levels of VASH-1 may be affected by local inflammation, crescentic lesions and VEGFR-2.

  17. Endogenous ouabain in renal Na(+) handling and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Manunta, Paolo; Messaggio, Elisabetta; Casamassima, Nunzia; Gatti, Guido; Carpini, Simona Delli; Zagato, Laura; Hamlyn, John M

    2010-12-01

    The Na(+) pump and its Endogenous modulator Ouabain (EO) can be considered as an ancestral enzymatic system, conserved among species ranging from Drosophila to humans, related to Na handling. In this review, we examine how EO is linked with vascular function in hypertension and if it impacts the pathogenesis of heart and renal failure. Moreover, the molecular mechanism of endogenous ouabain-linked hypertension involves the sodium pump/sodium-calcium exchanger duet. Biosynthesis of EO occurs in adrenal glands and is under the control of angiotensin II, ACTH and epinephrine. Elevated concentrations of EO and in the sub-nanomolar concentration range were found to stimulate proliferation and differentiation of cardiac and smooth muscle cells. They may have a primary role in the development of cardiac dysfunction and failure. Experimental data suggest that the Na/K-ATPase α(2)-catalytic subunit causes EO-induced vasoconstriction. Finally, maneuvers that promote Na depletion, as diuretic therapy or reduced Na intake, raise the EO levels. Taken together, these findings suggest a key role for EO in body Na homeostasis.

  18. APOL1 renal-risk genotypes associate with longer hemodialysis survival in prevalent nondiabetic African American patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D; Comeau, Mary E; Bonomo, Jason A; Rocco, Michael V; Burkart, John M; Divers, Jasmin; Palmer, Nicholette D; Hicks, Pamela J; Bowden, Donald W; Lea, Janice P; Krisher, Jenna O; Clay, Margo J; Freedman, Barry I

    2016-08-01

    Relative to European Americans, evidence supports that African Americans with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) survive longer on dialysis. Renal-risk variants in the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1), associated with nondiabetic nephropathy and less subclinical atherosclerosis, may contribute to dialysis outcomes. Here, APOL1 renal-risk variants were assessed for association with dialytic survival in 450 diabetic and 275 nondiabetic African American hemodialysis patients from Wake Forest and Emory School of Medicine outpatient facilities. Outcomes were provided by the ESRD Network 6-Southeastern Kidney Council Standardized Information Management System. Dates of death, receipt of a kidney transplant, and loss to follow-up were recorded. Outcomes were censored at the date of transplantation or through 1 July 2015. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were computed separately in patients with nondiabetic and diabetic ESRD, adjusting for the covariates age, gender, comorbidities, ancestry, and presence of an arteriovenous fistula or graft at dialysis initiation. In nondiabetic ESRD, patients with 2 (vs. 0/1) APOL1 renal-risk variants had significantly longer dialysis survival (hazard ratio 0.57), a pattern not observed in patients with diabetes-associated ESRD (hazard ratio 1.29). Thus, 2 APOL1 renal-risk variants are associated with longer dialysis survival in African Americans without diabetes, potentially relating to presence of renal-limited disease or less atherosclerosis. PMID:27157696

  19. The perinephric space and renal fascia: review of normal anatomy, pathology, and pathways of disease spread.

    PubMed

    Aizenstein, R I; Owens, C; Sabnis, S; Wilbur, A C; Hibbeln, J F; O'Neil, H K

    1997-08-01

    The perinephric space is a cone-shaped retroperitoneal compartment containing the kidney, adrenal gland, perinephric fat, fibrous bridging septa, and a rich network of perirenal vessel and lymphatics. Perinephric space pathology may originate from within or outside the confines of the perirenal fascia. Most intrinsic perinephric space disease arises from the kidney or adrenal gland, and secondarily involves the perinephric space. Disease originating outside the cone of renal fascia may spread to the perinephric space via lymphatics (i.e., metastatic spread) or by directly transgressing perirenal fascial planes (e.g., invasive tumor or infections). Additionally, infiltrating soft tissue or rapidly accumulating retroperitoneal fluid may travel into or out of the perinephric space via perinephric bridging septa and renal fascia. In this article, we review the normal anatomy of the perinephric space and renal fascia, emphasizing the significance of retroperitoneal interfascial planes and perinephric bridging septa as a potential conduit for retroperitoneal disease spread. This review of normal anatomy and pathways of disease spread serves as background for a discussion of a variety of specific pathologic conditions that may involve the perinephric space and retroperitoneal fascia, including pancreatitis, retroperitoneal hematoma, urinoma, metastatic disease, and perirenal varices.

  20. Pulse pressure is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fresnedo, G; Escallada, R; Rodrigo, E; de Francisco, A L M; Sanz de Castro, S; Ruiz, J C; Piñera, C; Cotorruelo, J G; Arias, M

    2003-08-01

    Elevated pulse pressure in the general population has been shown to be associated with cardiovascular disease, which is the main cause of death in renal transplant patients. We investigated the effects that a wide pulse pressure has on cardiovascular disease after renal transplantation in a cohort of 532 transplant patients with functioning grafts for more than one year. Patients were classified into two groups depending on whether the one-year pulse pressure was less than or greater than 65 mm Hg. We analyzed patient survival, posttransplant cardiovascular disease and principle causes of death. Five- and ten-year patient survival were lower among the group with higher pulse pressures. The main cause of death was vascular disease in both groups. The presence of posttransplant cardiovascular disease was higher among the group with higher pulse pressures (RR=1.73). In addition, the incidence of an elevated pulse pressure was directly associated with recipient age and posttransplant diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, pulse pressure represents an independent risk factor for increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in renal transplant patients.

  1. Obesity, end-stage renal disease, and survival in an elderly cohort with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lea, Janice P; Crenshaw, Daryl O; Onufrak, Stephen J; Newsome, Britt B; McClellan, William M

    2009-12-01

    Obesity is highly prevalent in African Americans and is associated with increased risk of End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) and death. It is not known if the effect of obesity is similar among blacks and whites. The aim of this study is to examine racial differences in the association of obesity with ESRD and survival in elderly patients (age >65). Data were obtained for 74,167 Medicare patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) between February 1994 and July 1995. BMI was calculated as weight (kg) divided by height (m(2)). We evaluated the association of BMI class with ESRD incidence and death using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, testing for race-BMI interactions. Compared to whites, African Americans had higher BMI (26.9 vs. 26.0, P < 0.0001) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (72.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2) vs. 66.6 ml/min/1.73 m(2), P < 0.0001). Crude ESRD rates increased with increasing obesity among whites but not among blacks. However, after adjusting for age, sex, and other comorbidities, obesity was not associated with increased ESRD rate among blacks or whites and the interaction between race and BMI was not significant. Furthermore, for both races, patients classified as overweight, class 1 obese, or class 2 obese had similar, significantly better survival abilities compared to normal weight patients and the race BMI interaction was not significant. In conclusion, obesity does not increase risk of ESRD among black or white elderly subjects with cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, both obese blacks and whites, in this population, experience a survival benefit. Further studies need to explore this obesity paradox. PMID:19325542

  2. Serum potassium, end stage renal disease and mortality in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakhoul, Georges N.; Huang, Haiquan; Arrigain, Susana; Jolly, Stacey E; Schold, Jesse D.; Nally, Joseph V.; Navaneethan, Sankar D.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Hypokalemia and hyperkalemia are often noted in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients but their impact on mortality and end stage renal disease (ESRD) is less well understood. We aimed to study the associations between potassium disorders, and mortality and progression to ESRD in a CKD population. Methods Using our Electronic Health Record-based CKD registry, 36,359 patients with eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2 and potassium levels measured from January 1, 2005 to September 15, 2009 were identified. We examined factors associated with hypokalemia (<3.5 mmol/l) and hyperkalemia (>5.0 mmol/l) using logistic regression models and associations between serum potassium levels (both as continuous and categorical variables) and all-cause mortality or ESRD using Cox-proportional hazards models. Results Serum potassium <3.5 mmol/l was noted among 3% and >5.0 mmol/l among 11% of the study population. In the multivariable logistic regression analysis, lower eGFR, diabetes and use of ACE inhibitors or Angiotensin-Receptor Blockers were associated with higher odds of having hyperkalemia. Heart failure and African American race were associated with higher odds of hypokalemia. After adjustment for covariates including kidney function, serum potassium <4.0 mmol/l and >5.0 mmol/l were significantly associated with increased mortality risk but there was no increased risk for progression to ESRD. Time-dependent repeated measures analysis confirmed these findings. When potassium was examined as a continuous variable, there was a U-shaped association between serum potassium levels and mortality. Conclusion In patients with stage 3–4 CKD, serum potassium level <4.0 mmol/l and >5.0 mmol/l are associated with higher mortality but not with ESRD. PMID:26228532

  3. Hypertensive Retinopathy as the First Manifestation of Advanced Renal Disease in a Young Patient: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Arriozola-Rodríguez, Karen Janeth; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Hernández, Virginia Alejandra; Rodríguez-Loaiza, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to report the case of a 23-year-old patient suffering from bilateral acute visual loss who received the diagnosis of hypertensive retinopathy. After systemic evaluation, he was diagnosed with bilateral renal disease and chronic renal failure, requiring a kidney transplantation to manage the systemic illness, followed by gradual improvement of his visual acuity. PMID:26955342

  4. Benefits and limitations of plasmapheresis in renal diseases: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Sanjeev; Wiggins, Kate; Lee, Darren; Blair, Susan; Fraenkel, Margaret; McMahon, Lawrence P

    2011-03-01

    In use for over 50 years, the rationale for plasmapheresis remains based largely on case series and retrospective studies. Recently, results from several randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and prospective studies have shown plasmapheresis may be of benefit in various renal diseases, and have provided insights into more rational use of this therapy. A multicenter trial by the European Vasculitis Study Group has shown it is the preferred additional form of therapy for patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated glomerulonephritis and severe renal failure. A recent study conducted at Mayo Clinic also found it effective at reversing renal failure from myeloma-related cast nephropathy if serum free light chain levels were reduced by at least 50%. In addition, a Cochrane review has analyzed the available evidence for its use in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic uremic syndrome. The objective of this article is to review recent and past evidence and, thereby, the current indications for treatment in renal disease.

  5. Anemia and end-stage renal disease in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Maïz, Hédi Ben; Abderrahim, Ezzeddine; Zouaghi, Karim

    2002-09-01

    In developing countries, multiple comorbidities such as malnutrition, parasitoses, and hemoglobinopathies contribute to the aggravation of anemia observed in patients with end-stage renal diseases. We analyze here the results of a retrospective evaluation of red-cells indices and iron parameters conducted at the end of December 2000 in 304 prevalent Tunisian patients (sex ratio, 1.05; mean age, 53.7 years) receiving chronic hemodialysis for a median duration of 49.6 months (range, 1.6 to 278). Anemia, observed in 87.8% of patients, was normochromic and normocytic in 73% of cases. Only 2% of patients had microcytic and hypochromic anemia. Iron deficiency was observed in 21.6% of anemic patients. The mean rate of hemoglobin was significantly higher in men and in patients with polycystic kidney disease as the cause of renal failure. There was a positive correlation between hemoglobin values and the quality of dialysis. Only 10.8% of patients were on recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) and 38% required regular transfusions. We conclude that anemia observed in our patients had, in most cases, the characteristics of renal anemia and could be attributed to a deficit of renal production of erythropoietin. However, for financial reasons, prescription of rHuEPO is rather restrictive and blood transfusion remains largely used. The nephrology community and dialysis providers should increase their efforts to improve the anemia care of dialyzed patients in developing countries.

  6. Fiberglass or silica exposure and increased nephritis or ESRD (end-stage renal disease).

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J R; Goldsmith, D F

    1993-06-01

    The U.S. multiplant cohort mortality study of workers producing manufactured mineral fibers is finding increasing mortality from nephritis and/or nephrosis. We examine other data sets to see if similar effects can be identified. In a case-referent study among Michigan patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), men with exposures to silica have elevated odds ratio for ESRD. In a California occupational mortality study based on 1979-81 data, a number of the construction trades, farmers, and farm laborers show excess mortality for renal disease. The highest mortality ratio is found in the category including insulation workers. This ratio remains significantly elevated when adjusted for estimated exposures to smoking, alcohol, and for socio-economic status. California mortality data from 20 years earlier (1959-61) fail to show much excess renal disease in construction workers, but do for farmers. In Singapore, granite workers with a long-term exposure to silica have excess excretion of albumin and similar compounds compared to less exposed controls, leading to the presumption that silica exposure can lead to silica nephrotoxicity. Balkan nephropathy has been associated with consumption of well water high in silica. In the Negev of Israel, dust storms are a vehicle for increasing respiratory uptake of silica. The Beduin, thought to be a population with maximal exposures, have higher rates of ESRD than do Jews in the age groups over 60 years. Although high blood concentrations of silica are found in persons with renal failure, the close association with elevated creatinine has been interpreted as evidence that the buildup of silica is due to renal failure, rather than vice-versa.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Segmentation of Individual Renal Cysts from MR Images in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyungsoo; Park, Bumwoo; Sun, Hongliang; Wang, Jinhong; Tao, Cheng; Chapman, Arlene B.; Torres, Vicente E.; Grantham, Jared J.; Mrug, Michal; Bennett, William M.; Flessner, Michael F.; Landsittel, Doug P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective To evaluate the performance of a semi-automated method for the segmentation of individual renal cysts from magnetic resonance (MR) images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Design, setting, participants, & measurements This semi-automated method was based on a morphologic watershed technique with shape-detection level set for segmentation of renal cysts from MR images. T2-weighted MR image sets of 40 kidneys were selected from 20 patients with mild to moderate renal cyst burden (kidney volume < 1500 ml) in the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP). The performance of the semi-automated method was assessed in terms of two reference metrics in each kidney: the total number of cysts measured by manual counting and the total volume of cysts measured with a region-based thresholding method. The proposed and reference measurements were compared using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Results Individual renal cysts were successfully segmented with the semi-automated method in all 20 cases. The total number of cysts in each kidney measured with the two methods correlated well (ICC, 0.99), with a very small relative bias (0.3% increase with the semi-automated method; limits of agreement, 15.2% reduction to 17.2% increase). The total volume of cysts measured using both methods also correlated well (ICC, 1.00), with a small relative bias of <10% (9.0% decrease in the semi-automated method; limits of agreement, 17.1% increase to 43.3% decrease). Conclusion This semi-automated method to segment individual renal cysts in ADPKD kidneys provides a quantitative indicator of severity in early and moderate stages of the disease. PMID:23520042

  8. Franz Volhard and Theodor Fahr: achievements and controversies in their research in renal disease and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Heidland, A; Gerabek, W; Sebekova, K

    2001-01-01

    The clinician, Franz Volhard, and the pathologist, Theodor Fahr, worked closely together in Mannheim from 1909 until 1915 and introduced a novel classification of renal diseases. In the monograph entitled 'Die Bright'sche Nierenkrankheit, Klinik, Pathologie und Atlas' (1914) they differentiated between degenerative (nephroses), inflammatory (nephritides) and arteriosclerotic (scleroses) diseases. Nephrosclerosis was divided into the benign and malignant form, of which the latter stood the test of time as a new disease entity. Fahr further divided benign nephrosclerosis into the compensated and decompensated form--depending on the presence or absence of glomerular injury. In the pathogenesis of malignant nephrosclerosis, Volhard stressed the decisive role of severe blood pressure elevation, while Fahr postulated an inflammatory mechanism, a concept later confirmed by Adalbert Bohle for at least a minority of patients. A very far reaching concept of Franz Volhard was his idea that pale (renal) hypertension results from a pressor substance released from ischaemic kidney(s) contributing--via a vicious circle--to a further rise in blood pressure with subsequent renovascular injury and aggravation of hypertension. This hypothesis was supported in 1930 by initial experiments of his collaborator, Hartwich (demonstrating in dogs a mild rise in blood pressure after ligation of branches of the renal artery) and definitively proven by Goldblatt (1934) in dogs by induction of severe and persistent hypertension after clamping of both renal arteries. The consequent detection of the renin angiotensin system was the final confirmation of Volhard's postulated renal pressor substance. In the pathogenesis of red (essential) hypertension, Volhard stressed the role of hereditary factors, age, obesity and potentially of severe alcoholism. He emphasised a premature reduction of vascular distensibility (due to elastosis of the prearterioles), a high cardiac output as well as a dampening of

  9. Genetic spectrum of Saudi Arabian patients with antenatal cystic kidney disease and ciliopathy phenotypes using a targeted renal gene panel

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamed, Mohamed H; Kurdi, Wesam; Alsahan, Nada; Alabdullah, Zainab; Abudraz, Rania; Tulbah, Maha; Alnemer, Maha; Khan, Rubina; Al-Jurayb, Haya; Alahmed, Ahmed; Tahir, Asma I; Khalil, Dania; Edwards, Noel; Al Abdulaziz, Basma; Binhumaid, Faisal S; Majid, Salma; Faquih, Tariq; El-Kalioby, Mohamed; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Altassan, Nada; Monies, Dorota; Meyer, Brian; Sayer, John A; Albaqumi, Mamdouh

    2016-01-01

    Background Inherited cystic kidney disorders are a common cause of end-stage renal disease. Over 50 ciliopathy genes, which encode proteins that influence the structure and function of the primary cilia, are implicated in cystic kidney disease. Methods To define the phenotype and genotype of cystic kidney disease in fetuses and neonates, we correlated antenatal ultrasound examination and postnatal renal ultrasound examination with targeted exon sequencing, using a renal gene panel. A cohort of 44 families in whom antenatal renal ultrasound scanning findings in affected cases included bilateral cystic kidney disease, echogenic kidneys or enlarged kidneys was investigated. Results In this cohort, disease phenotypes were severe with 36 cases of stillbirth or perinatal death. Extra renal malformations, including encephalocele, polydactyly and heart malformations, consistent with ciliopathy phenotypes, were frequently detected. Renal gene panel testing identified causative mutations in 21 out of 34 families (62%), where patient and parental DNA was available. In the remaining 10 families, where only parental DNA was available, 7 inferred causative mutations were found. Together, mutations were found in 12 different genes with a total of 13 novel pathogenic variants, including an inferred novel variant in NEK8. Mutations in CC2D2A were the most common cause of an antenatal cystic kidney disease and a suspected ciliopathy in our cohort. Conclusions In families with ciliopathy phenotypes, mutational analysis using a targeted renal gene panel allows a rapid molecular diagnosis and provides important information for patients, parents and their physicians. PMID:26862157

  10. Rare diseases with renal involvement in the Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Tasic, V; Lozanovski, V J; Danilovski, D; Laban, N; Pop-Jordanova, N; Polenakovic, M; Gucev, Z S

    2011-01-01

    Rare diseases (RDs) pose a significant set of problems for patients, since their disease and general social and health situation are often not recognized by the medical community and shunned by health insurance. The sheer number of RDs (5000-8000) and the number of patients (6-8% of the population) are challenging for every society. We wanted to get a better understanding of the rare diseases affecting the kidneys and urinary tract (RDAKUT) in the Republic of Macedonia and we investigated principally the PubMed Central articles of Macedonian medical professionals dealing with RDAKUT, but we also used information on RDAKUT from local sources. A significant number of RDs have been published, demonstrating the awareness and skill of Macedonian medical professionals despite pretty limited diagnostic facilities. We still feel that RDAKUT are underdiagnosed (e.g. Fabry's disease has not yet been reported), and that many patients with RDs have a long way to go before an accurate diagnosis. Increased awareness and ameliorated education are needed by the physicians; while health insurance must include RDAKUT covering their diagnosis and treatment costs. Neonatal screening for ~30 diseases (instead of just hypothyroidism) is also required. Patients' organizations exist and they are active in promoting their interests before of the health authorities. PMID:21822178

  11. Serial monitoring of circulating tumor DNA in patients with primary breast cancer for detection of occult metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Eleonor; Winter, Christof; George, Anthony; Chen, Yilun; Howlin, Jillian; Tang, Man-Hung Eric; Dahlgren, Malin; Schulz, Ralph; Grabau, Dorthe; van Westen, Danielle; Fernö, Mårten; Ingvar, Christian; Rose, Carsten; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Rydén, Lisa; Borg, Åke; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia K; Jernström, Helena; Saal, Lao H

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is usually diagnosed after becoming symptomatic, at which point it is rarely curable. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) contains tumor-specific chromosomal rearrangements that may be interrogated in blood plasma. We evaluated serial monitoring of ctDNA for earlier detection of metastasis in a retrospective study of 20 patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer and long follow-up. Using an approach combining low-coverage whole-genome sequencing of primary tumors and quantification of tumor-specific rearrangements in plasma by droplet digital PCR, we identify for the first time that ctDNA monitoring is highly accurate for postsurgical discrimination between patients with (93%) and without (100%) eventual clinically detected recurrence. ctDNA-based detection preceded clinical detection of metastasis in 86% of patients with an average lead time of 11 months (range 0–37 months), whereas patients with long-term disease-free survival had undetectable ctDNA postoperatively. ctDNA quantity was predictive of poor survival. These findings establish the rationale for larger validation studies in early breast cancer to evaluate ctDNA as a monitoring tool for early metastasis detection, therapy modification, and to aid in avoidance of overtreatment. PMID:25987569

  12. Marked increase of asymmetric dimethylarginine in patients with incipient primary chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kielstein, Jan T; Böger, Rainer H; Bode-Böger, Stefanie M; Frölich, Jürgen C; Haller, Hermann; Ritz, Eberhard; Fliser, Danilo

    2002-01-01

    In patients with uremia, increased blood concentrations of the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) have been linked to the severity of atherosclerosis and to excess cardiovascular mortality. The ADMA levels and several traditional cardiovascular risk factors were assessed in 44 untreated nonsmoking patients with confirmed primary chronic renal disease at different stages of renal disease. True GFR was assessed by means of the inulin-clearance technique. For comparison, nonsmoking subjects matched with respect to age, gender, and body-mass index were examined. Mean plasma ADMA concentration was markedly higher (P < 0.0001) in all patients combined (4.2 +/- 0.9 micromol/L) than in control subjects (n = 16; age 45 +/- 10 yr; serum creatinine 1.0 +/- 0.1 mg/dl; ADMA 1.4 +/- 0.7 micromol/L). However, mean ADMA levels were similar in patients with normal renal function (n = 16; age 41 +/- 9 yr; serum creatinine 1.1 +/- 0.1 mg/dl; GFR 120 +/- 14 ml x min(-1) x 1.73 m2; ADMA 4.0 +/- 0.7 micromol/L), in patients with moderate renal failure (n = 15; 47 +/- 7 yr; 1.8 +/- 0.3 mg/dl; 65 +/- 10 ml x min(-1) x 1.73 m2; 3.8 +/- 0.6 micromol/L) and in patients with advanced renal failure (n = 13; 46 +/- 9 yr; 4.2 +/- 0.9 mg/dl; 25 +/- 4 ml x min(-1) x 1.73 m2; 4.7 +/- 1.2 micromol/L). Furthermore, ADMA levels were increased to the same extent in normotensive (n = 17; 4.0 +/- 0.8 micromol/L) and in hypertensive (n = 27; 4.2 +/- 0.9 micromol/L) patients. In contrast to ADMA, mean total plasma homocysteine concentration were similar in control subjects (10.6 +/- 2.9 micromol/L) and in patients with normal GFR (11.0 +/- 2.9 micromol/L), but were significantly higher in patients with moderate renal failure (17.7 +/- 4.1 micromol/L) and particularly in patients with advanced renal failure (28.2 +/- 10.6 micromol/L). Finally, mean total serum cholesterol concentrations were comparable in the control group and in the three groups of patients with

  13. Occult Macular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sayman Muslubaş, Işıl; Arf, Serra; Hocaoğlu, Mümin; Özdemir, Hakan; Karaçorlu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Occult macular dystrophy is an inherited macular dystrophy characterized by a progressive decline of bilateral visual acuity with normal fundus appearance, fluorescein angiogram and full-field electroretinogram. This case report presents a 20-year-old female patient with bilateral progressive decline of visual acuity for six years. Her visual acuity was 3-4/10 in both eyes. Anterior segment and fundus examination, fluorescein angiogram and full-field electroretinogram were normal. She could read all Ishihara pseudoisochromatic plates. Fundus autofluorescence imaging was normal. There was a mild central hyporeflectance on fundus infrared reflectance imaging in both eyes. Reduced foveal thickness and alterations of the photoreceptor inner and outer segment junction were observed by optical coherence tomography in both eyes. Central scotoma was also found by microperimetry and reduced central response was revealed by multifocal electroretinogram in both eyes. These findings are consistent with the clinical characteristics of occult macular dystrophy. PMID:27800268

  14. Temporal Profile of the Renal Transcriptome of HIV-1 Transgenic Mice during Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ying; Wei, Chengguo; Xiao, Wenzhen; Zhang, Weijia; Wang, Niansong; Chuang, Peter Y.; He, John Cijiang

    2014-01-01

    Profiling of temporal changes of gene expression in the same kidney over the course of renal disease progression is challenging because repeat renal biopsies are rarely indicated in clinical practice. Here, we profiled the temporal change in renal transcriptome of HIV-1 transgenic mice (Tg26), an animal model for human HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN), and their littermates at three different time points (4, 8, and 12 weeks of age) representing early, middle, and late stages of renal disease by serial kidney biopsy. We analyzed both static levels of gene expression at three stages of disease and dynamic changes in gene expression between different stages. Analysis of static and dynamic changes in gene expression revealed that up-regulated genes at the early and middle stages are mostly involved in immune response and inflammation, whereas down-regulated genes mostly related to fatty acid and retinoid metabolisms. We validated the expression of a selected panel of genes that are up-regulated at the early stage (CCL2, CCL5, CXCL11, Ubd, Anxa1, and Spon1) by real-time PCR. Among these up-regulated genes, Spon1, which is a previously identified candidate gene for hypertension, was found to be up-regulated in kidney of human with diabetic nephropathy. Immunostaining of human biopsy samples demonstrated that protein expression of Spon1 was also markedly increased in kidneys of patients with both early and late HIVAN and diabetic nephropathy. Our studies suggest that analysis of both static and dynamic changes of gene expression profiles in disease progression avails another layer of information that could be utilized to gain a more comprehensive understanding of disease progression and identify potential biomarkers and drug targets. PMID:24667548

  15. Renal Gene and Protein Expression Signatures for Prediction of Kidney Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Wenjun; Eichinger, Felix; Bitzer, Markus; Oh, Jun; McWeeney, Shannon; Berthier, Celine C.; Shedden, Kerby; Cohen, Clemens D.; Henger, Anna; Krick, Stefanie; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Dikman, Steven; Schröppel, Bernd; Thomas, David B.; Schlondorff, Detlef; Kretzler, Matthias; Böttinger, Erwin P.

    2009-01-01

    Although chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common, only a fraction of CKD patients progress to end-stage renal disease. Molecular predictors to stratify CKD populations according to their risk of progression remain undiscovered. Here we applied transcriptional profiling of kidneys from transforming growth factor-β1 transgenic (Tg) mice, characterized by heterogeneity of kidney disease progression, to identify 43 genes that discriminate kidneys by severity of glomerular apoptosis before the onset of tubulointerstitial fibrosis in 2-week-old animals. Among the genes examined, 19 showed significant correlation between mRNA expression in uninephrectomized left kidneys at 2 weeks of age and renal disease severity in right kidneys of Tg mice at 4 weeks of age. Gene expression profiles of human orthologs of the 43 genes in kidney biopsies were highly significantly related (R2 = 0.53; P < 0.001) to the estimated glomerular filtration rates in patients with CKD stages I to V, and discriminated groups of CKD stages I/II and III/IV/V with positive and negative predictive values of 0.8 and 0.83, respectively. Protein expression patterns for selected genes were successfully validated by immunohistochemistry in kidneys of Tg mice and kidney biopsies of patients with IgA nephropathy and CKD stages I to V, respectively. In conclusion, we developed novel mRNA and protein expression signatures that predict progressive renal fibrosis in mice and may be useful molecular predictors of CKD progression in humans. PMID:19465643

  16. Renal Cell Protection of Erythropoietin beyond Correcting The Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Currently many patients with chronic renal failure have profited from the use of erythropoietin to correct anemia (1,2). In chronic kidney disease, anemia is believed to be a surrogate index for tissue hypoxia that continues preexisting renal tissue injury (1-3). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and facilitates erythropoiesis. It is a 30.4 kD glycoprotein and class I cytokine containing 165 amino acids (3,4). Approximately 90% of systemic erythropoietin in adults is produced by peritubular interstitial fibroblasts in the renal cortex and outer medulla of the kidney (3-5). A feedback mechanism involving oxygen delivery to the tissues seems to regulate erythropoietin production. Hypoxia-inducible factor regulates transcription of the erythropoietin gene in the kidney, which determines erythropoietin synthesis (3-5). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and mediates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow (4-6). Kidney fibrosis is the last common pathway in chronic renal failure irrespective of the initial etiology (5,6). Constant inflammatory cell infiltration and pericyte-myofibroblast transition lead to renal fibrosis and insufficiency which result in decreased production of erythropoietin (4-7). Thus far, therapeutic efforts to treat patients with chronic renal failure by administering erythropoietin have been made only to correct anemia and putative hypoxic tissue damage. The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin has marked a significant advance in the management of anemia associated with chronic renal failure (6-9). With an increasing number of patients with chronic renal failure receiving erythropoietin treatment, emerging evidence suggests that erythropoietin not only has an erythropoietic function, but also has renoprotective potential. In fact, in recent years, the additional non

  17. [Legionnaires' disease complicated by rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure: about a case].

    PubMed

    Bac, Arnaud; Ramadan, Ahmed Sabry; Youatou, Pierre; Mols, Pierre; Cerf, Dominique; Ngatchou, William

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a bacterial disease of the respiratory system caused by a gram-negative germ whose clinical manifestation can be benign limiting to flu-like syndrome or can be more severe being characterized by pneumonia which may be complicated by multisystem disease that can lead to death. We report the case of a 48 year-old patient with rhabdomyolysis complicated by acute renal failure following Legionella pneumophila pneumonia. We here highlight the pathophysiological aspects and treatment of this rare complication during Legionella infection. PMID:27642464

  18. Independent Role of Underlying Kidney Disease on Renal Prognosis of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease under Nephrology Care

    PubMed Central

    De Nicola, Luca; Provenzano, Michele; Chiodini, Paolo; Borrelli, Silvio; Garofalo, Carlo; Pacilio, Mario; Liberti, Maria Elena; Sagliocca, Adelia; Conte, Giuseppe; Minutolo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Primary kidney disease is suggested to affect renal prognosis of CKD patients; however, whether nephrology care modifies this association is unknown. We studied patients with CKD stage I-IV treated in a renal clinic and with established diagnosis of CKD cause to evaluate whether the risk of renal event (composite of end-stage renal disease and eGFR decline ≥40%) linked to the specific diagnosis is modified by the achievement or maintenance in the first year of nephrology care of therapeutic goals for hypertension (BP ≤130/80 mmHg in patients with proteinuria ≥150 mg/24h and/or diabetes and ≤140/90 in those with proteinuria <150 mg/24h and without diabetes) anemia (hemoglobin, Hb ≥11 g/dL), and proteinuria (≤0.5 g/24h). Survival analysis started after first year of nephrology care. We studied 729 patients (age 64±15 y; males 59.1%; diabetes 34.7%; cardiovascular disease (CVD) 44.9%; hypertensive nephropathy, HTN 53.8%; glomerulonephritis, GN 17.3%; diabetic nephropathy, DN 15.9%; tubule-interstitial nephropathy, TIN 9.5%; polycystic kidney disease, PKD 3.6%). During first year of Nephrology care, therapy was overall intensified in most patients and prevalence of main therapeutic goals generally improved. During subsequent follow up (median 3.3 years, IQR 1.9-5.1), 163 renal events occurred. Cox analysis disclosed a higher risk for PKD (Hazard Ratio 5.46, 95% Confidence Intervals 2.28–10.6) and DN (1.28,2.99–3.05), versus HTN (reference), independently of age, gender, CVD, BMI, eGFR or CKD stage, use of RAS inhibitors and achievement or maintenance in the first year of nephrology care of each of the three main therapeutic goals. No interaction was found on the risk of CKD progression between diagnostic categories and month-12 eGFR (P=0.737), as with control of BP (P=0.374), Hb (P=0.248) or proteinuria (P=0.590). Therefore, in CKD patients under nephrology care, diagnosis of kidney disease should be considered in conjunction with the main risk factors

  19. A complex case of congenital cystic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Cordiner, David S; Evans, Clair A; Brundler, Marie-Anne; McPhillips, Maeve; Murio, Enric; Darling, Mark; Taheri, Sepideh

    2012-01-01

    This case outlines the potential complexity of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). It highlights the challenges involved in managing this condition, some of the complications faced and areas of uncertainty in the decision making process. With a paucity of published paediatric cases on this subject, this should add to the pool of information currently available. PMID:22605879

  20. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  1. Renal manifestations of human brucellosis: First report of minimal change disease.

    PubMed

    Sabanis, Nikolaos; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Paschou, Eleni; Tsotsiou, Eleni; Kalaitzoglou, Asterios; Kavlakoudis, Christos; Vasileiou, Sotirios

    2016-05-01

    Human brucellosis is considered a great example of the complexity of clinical manifestations possibly affecting multiple organs or systems. Renal manifestations of human brucellosis have been documented in few case reports and one case series. Herein, we present a case of Nephrotic syndrome (NS) due to minimal change disease in the course of acute brucellosis. A 53-year-old male farmer was admitted to our department with acute brucellosis and NS. Renal biopsy revealed minimal change disease. Combined treatment with prednisone (1 mg/kg), rifampicin (600 mg/day), and doxycycline (200 mg/day) was initiated. Complete remission of NS was achieved at the end of the fourth week. One year later, the patient remained in complete remission of NS without any sign of relapse of brucellosis.

  2. Severe gastrointestinal cytomegalovirus disease in two patients with renal vasculitis after immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kian-Guan; Teo, Su-Hooi; Lim, Cynthia; Loh, Alwin; Chidambaram, Viswanath; Choo, Jason

    2016-09-01

    Although the use of current immunosuppressive regimens has significantly improved the outcomes of autoimmune renal diseases, infectious complications remain an important clinical concern. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection has been shown to be one of the major causes of mortality in this group of patients. We report two cases of renal vasculitis (Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA)) that developed into severe gastrointestinal CMV disease and manifested with massive small bowel bleeding, resulting in an eventual fatal outcome for one of the patients. Risk factors, pathogenesis, role of immunosuppression in the development of CMV infection, and antiviral treatment are discussed in this review. These cases highlight the need for further research to evaluate the complex mechanisms between immunosuppression and CMV occurrence as well as the role of antiviral prophylaxis in high-risk patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapies.
. PMID:27443566

  3. Diseases and histological normality of the renal glomerulus: a clinicopathological study.

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, W; Tarpey, P; Williams, G; Acheson, E J; Mallick, N P

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-seven percutaneous renal biopsies showing no significant abnormalities on light microscopy were studied electron optically and by immunofluorescence when available. Assessment of the pathological material was followed by analysis of the patients' clinical notes, and a clinicopathological correlation was carried out. Twenty-three patients fulfilled the clinical criteria of minimal change disease; 10 did not behave clinically as minimal change and showed immune complex deposition; two had benign recurrent haematuria; and two had myelomatosis. Our study shows that if diagnosis is based solely on the light microscope appearances of renal biopsy, diseases other than minimal change are likely to be overlooked. Accuracy of diagnosis in structural terms requires additional immunofluorescence and electron microscopic study; final clinical diagnosis also requires careful follow-up, and repeat biopsy may be necessary. Images PMID:132460

  4. Management of cardiovascular disease in the renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Rigatto, Claudio

    2005-08-01

    RTRs are at high risk for ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Although some differences pertain, most of the major risk factors are similar to those in the general population. It is highly probable that interventions of proven benefit in the general population will also be of benefit in RTRs. A combination of lifestyle modifications (smoking cessation, maintenance of ideal bodyweight, healthy diet), aggressive blood pressure control (<130/80 mm Hg), use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs, lipid lowering with statins, antiplatelet therapy for diabetics and those with established coronary disease, and beta blockers for CHF or after myocardial infarction is likely to have a major benefit on patient survival and cardiac morbidity among transplant recipients. Coronary revascularization should be considered for the same indications as in the general population.

  5. Metabolic bone disease in chronic renal failure. I. Dialyzed uremics.

    PubMed Central

    Huffer, W. E.; Kuzela, D.; Popovtzer, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Garner and ball's point counting technic was used to compare metabolic bone disease in dialyzed and nondialyzed uremic patients. Histologic measurements of bone from dialyzed and nondialyzed uremic patients dying between 1966 and 1971 showed that dialyzed patients have quantitatively more severe bone resorption, distortion of trabecular architecture and mineralization defects. Mineralization defects become more severe as the duration of dialysis increases but are not related to serum calcium and phosphorus levels. Bone volume in both groups is normal or increased and in dialysis patients increases in proportion to the elevation of serum phosphorus. Mean serum phosphorus and calcium levels, bone volume, and volume: surface ratios all decreased in dialysis patients between 1966 and 1971, while bone resorption and mineralization defects did not change. These results suggest that lowering of serum phosphorus without increasing serum calcium may aggrevate the uremic bone disease by reducing bone volume without improvement of mineralization and resorption defects. Images Fig 1 PMID:1119535

  6. The Pinhole/Occulter Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E. A. (Editor); Hudson, H. S. (Editor); Dabbs, J. R. (Editor); Baity, W. A. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Scientific objectives and requirements are discussed for solar X-ray observations, coronagraph observations, studies of coronal particle acceleration, and cosmic X-ray observations. Improved sensitivity and resolution can be provided for these studies using the pinhole/occulter facility which consists of a self-deployed boom of 50 m length separating an occulter plane from a detector plane. The X-ray detectors and coronagraphic optics mounted on the detector plane are analogous to the focal plane instrumentation of an ordinary telescope except that they use the occulter only for providing a shadow pattern. The occulter plane is passive and has no electrical interface with the rest of the facility.

  7. Cat Scratch Disease in a Renal Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Yalin, Serkan Feyyaz; Sahin, Serdar; Yemisen, Mucahit; Tuzuner, Nukhet; Altiparmak, Mehmet Riza; Seyahi, Nurhan

    2016-09-01

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is a disorder characterized by self-limited regional lymphadenopathy and fever. We reported a case of CSD in a kidney transplant recipient who presented with fever and lymphadenopathy. Lymph node biopsy demonstrated bacterial histiocytic lymphadenitis. The patient was diagnosed with CSD. Patient had good clinical improvement after treatment. Therefore, CSD should also be borne in mind for kidney recipients though CSD had been infrequently reported in this group.

  8. [Determinants of vascular wall stiffness in patients with chronic renal disease undergoing hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Kharlamova, U V; Il'icheva, O E

    2012-01-01

    Examination of 109 patients with chronic renal disease undergoing hemodialysis revealed significant impairment of arterial wall distensibility (accordingly, decreased Peterson's and Young's elastic moduli, distensibility coefficient). The relative thickness of the common carotid artery and pulse wave velocity were significantly greater than in practically healthy subjects. Independent factors influencing arterial wall rigidity included age, arterial pressure, total cholesterol and homocystein, stable metabolites of nitric oxide, creatinine, calcium, phosphorus levels, calcium x phosphorus product, duration of hemodialysis, interdialytic weight gain. PMID:23516853

  9. The kinetics of urinary shedding of BK virus in children with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Ihira, Masaru; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2015-01-01

    Children with renal diseases are typically treated with immunosuppressive drugs, which place them at high risk of reactivation of the BK virus (BKV). Currently, little is known about the impact of immunosuppressive drugs on the kinetics of urinary shedding of BKV and viral reactivation in pediatric patients with renal diseases. Urine samples were collected monthly for 1 year from 20 children (median age, 9 years; range, 4-15 years) with renal diseases and subjected to real-time PCR. Urinary shedding of BKV was detected in 35% (7/20) of the patients, three of these patients having persistent viral DNA excretion (two cases, twelve times; one case, four times) and four having intermittent viral DNA excretion. Thirty-four of the 240 urine samples contained BKV DNA (median copy numbers, 5.66 log copies/mL; range, 2.45-7.69 log copies/mL). In two of the cases with persistent viral shedding, high copy numbers (range, 4.57-7.69 log copies/mL) of BKV DNA were detected in all 12 urine samples collected. In the other case with persistent viral excretion, a range of 2.45-3.98 log copies/mL of BKV DNA was detected in the four urine samples collected between the 9th and 12th sampling time points. Additionally, high copy numbers (range, 3.12-4.36 log copies/mL) of BKV DNA were detected intermittently in the urine samples of the other four cases. No remarkable correlations were found between the kinetics of BKV DNA loads and urinary findings such as proteinuria and hematuria. The present data demonstrate the kinetics of urinary BKV shedding in pediatric patients with renal diseases. Additionally, no pathogenic role for BKV infection was identified.

  10. Renal infarction resulting from traumatic renal artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Kim, Won; Jin, Gong Yong; Na, Ki Ryang; Yun, Il Yong; Park, Sung Kwang

    2008-06-01

    Renal artery dissection may be caused by iatrogenic injury, trauma, underlying arterial diseases such as fibromuscular disease, atherosclerotic disease, or connective tissue disease. Radiological imaging may be helpful in detecting renal artery pathology, such as renal artery dissection. For patients with acute, isolated renal artery dissection, surgical treatment, endovascular management, or medical treatment have been considered effective measures to preserve renal function. We report a case of renal infarction that came about as a consequence of renal artery dissection.

  11. Hirschsprung disease associated with polydactyly, unilateral renal agenesis, hypertelorism, and congenital deafness: a new autosomal recessive syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, H; Mateus, J; Leal, M J

    1988-01-01

    An association of Hirschsprung disease with polydactyly, unilateral renal agenesis, hypertelorism, and congenital deafness is described in sibs (brother and sister) of consanguineous parents. It is suggested that this might represent a new autosomal recessive syndrome. Images PMID:3351909

  12. Genetic contribution and associated pathophysiology in end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Suraksha; Agarwal, SS; Naik, Sita

    2010-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) or chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the terminal state of the kidney when its function has been permanently and irreversibly damaged. A wide variety of etiologies and pathological processes culminate in ESRD, and both environmental and genetic factors contribute to its development and progression. Various reports suggest that susceptibility to develop ESRD has a significant genetic component. These studies include familial aggregation studies, comparisons of incidence rates between different racial or ethnic populations, and segregation analysis. Genetic approaches have been used to identify genes that contribute to genetic susceptibility. Many studies have now been carried out assessing the contribution of specific “candidate genes”, which correlate with different functions that are involved in the renal pathogenesis. Independent studies for specific associated genes have frequently provided contradictory results. This may be due, in part, to the modest contribution to genetic susceptibility which these genes impart. With the availability of different genomewide association studies, chromosomal regions harboring novel, previously unrecognized, genes that may contribute to renal diseases have been recently reported. We have focused on different genetic studies conducted on ESRD and have discussed the strength and weaknesses of these studies. The nonmuscle myosin heavy chain 9 gene (MYH9) and renin–angiotensin system (RAS) have been discussed in detail. PMID:23776353

  13. Role of the endothelin system in sexual dimorphism in cardiovascular and renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Eman Y; Giachini, Fernanda R; Pollock, David M; Tostes, Rita C

    2016-08-15

    Epidemiological studies of blood pressure in men and women and in experimental animal models point to substantial sex differences in the occurrence of arterial hypertension as well as in the various manifestations of arterial hypertension, including myocardial infarction, stroke, retinopathy, chronic kidney failure, as well as hypertension-associated diseases (e.g. diabetes mellitus). Increasing evidence demonstrates that the endothelin (ET) system is a major player in the genesis of sex differences in cardiovascular and renal physiology and diseases. Sex differences in the ET system have been described in the vasculature, heart and kidney of humans and experimental animals. In the current review, we briefly describe the role of the ET system in the cardiovascular and renal systems. We also update information on sex differences at different levels of the ET system including synthesis, circulating and tissue levels, receptors, signaling pathways, ET actions, and responses to antagonists in different organs that contribute to blood pressure regulation. Knowledge of the mechanisms underlying sex differences in arterial hypertension can impact therapeutic strategies. Sex-targeted and/or sex-tailored approaches may improve treatment of cardiovascular and renal diseases.

  14. 20-HETE mediates proliferation of renal epithelial cells in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Frank; Sweeney, William E; Jia, Guangfu; Roman, Richard J; Avner, Ellis D

    2008-10-01

    Polycystic kidney diseases are characterized by abnormal proliferation of renal epithelial cells. In this study, the role of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), an endogenous cytochrome P450 metabolite of arachidonic acid with mitogenic properties, was evaluated in cystic renal disease. Daily administration of HET-0016, an inhibitor of 20-HETE synthesis, significantly reduced kidney size by half in the BPK mouse model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. In addition, compared with untreated BPK mice, this treatment significantly reduced collecting tubule cystic indices and approximately doubled survival. For evaluation of the role of 20-HETE as a mediator of epithelial cell proliferation, principal cells isolated from cystic BPK and noncystic Balb/c mice were genetically modified using lentiviral vectors. Noncystic Balb/c cells overproducing Cyp4a12 exhibited a four- to five-fold increase in cell proliferation compared with control Balb/c cells, and this increase was completely abolished when 20-HETE synthesis was inhibited; therefore, this study suggests that 20-HETE mediates proliferation of epithelial cells in the formation of renal cysts.

  15. Epidemiology and Predictors of End-stage Renal Disease in Taiwanese Children With Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jei-Wen; Tsai, Hsin-Lin; Yang, Ling-Yu; Chen, Tzeng-Ji

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) varies among countries, with Asia reporting a higher incidence in comparison with Western countries. We investigated the epidemiologic features of INS and attempted to identify factors that predispose individuals to develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Methods Claims data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance program from 1996 to 2008 were used to investigate the epidemiologic features and clinical variables of INS (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code, 581) in children younger than 18 years. Results We enrolled 4083 children (male-female ratio, 1.91:1). During the 13 years of observation, annual incidence decreased from 9.91 to 3.36 per 100 000 children. Annual number of hospital admissions progressively decreased during the first 3 years after diagnosis. At 3.14 ± 2.77 years after INS onset, ESRD had developed in 145 (3.6%) children. Independent predictors of ESRD included older age at onset, acute renal failure (ARF), hypertensive encephalopathy, and a histologic subtype with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Conclusions Pediatric INS in Taiwan was more frequent in boys. Unlike India, the current incidence of pediatric INS in Taiwan is very similar to that reported in Western studies. Older age at disease onset, ARF, hypertensive encephalopathy, and FSGS on biopsy are important predictors of poor renal outcome. PMID:22971550

  16. Evaluation of circulating levels and renal clearance of natural amino acids in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Faggiano, A; Pivonello, R; Melis, D; Alfieri, R; Filippella, M; Spagnuolo, G; Salvatore, F; Lombardi, G; Colao, A

    2002-02-01

    Although the hypercortisolism-induced impairment of protein homeostasis is object of several studies, a detailed evaluation of the complete amino acid profile of patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) has never been performed. The aim of the current open transversal controlled study was to evaluate serum and urinary concentrations as well as renal clearance of the complete series of natural amino acids and their relationship with glucose tolerance in patients with Cushing's disease (CD). Twenty patients with CD (10 active and 10 cured) and 20 sex- and age-matched healthy controls entered the study. Measurement of serum and urinary levels of the complete series of natural amino acids was performed in all patients analyzed by cationic exchange high performance liquid cromatography (HPLC) after 2 weeks of a standardized protein intake regimen. The renal clearance (renal excretion rate) of each amino acid was calculated on the basis of the serum and urinary concentrations of creatinine and the specific amino acid. Fasting glucose and insulin levels, glucose and insulin response to standard glucose load, insulinogenic and homeostasis model insulin resistance (Homa-R) indexes were also evaluated and correlated to the circulating levels and renal clearances of each amino acid. Significantly higher serum (p<0.01) and urinary (p<0.05) levels of alanine and cystine, lower serum and higher urinary levels of leucine, isoleucine and valine (p<0.05) and higher renal excretion rates of leucine, isoleucine and valine (p<0.01) were found in patients with active CD than in patients cured from the disease and in controls. No difference was found between cured patients and controls. Creatinine clearance was similar in active and cured patients and in controls. In patients with active CD, urinary cortisol levels were significantly correlated to urinary cystine levels (r=0.85; p<0.01) and renal excretion rate of leucine (r=-0.76; p<0.05), isoleucine (r=-0.76; p<0.05) and valine (r=-0

  17. FTY720 prevents progression of renal fibrosis by inhibiting renal microvasculature endothelial dysfunction in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ni, Haifeng; Chen, Junfeng; Pan, Mingming; Zhang, Minghui; Zhang, Jiandong; Chen, Pingsheng; Liu, Bicheng

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that chronic endothelial dysfunction can impair multiple aspects of renal physiology and, in turn, contribute to renal fibrosis. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) has been highlighted as an endothelial barrier-stabilizing mediator. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of FTY720, an S1P analog, on the progression of renal fibrosis by inhibiting renal microvasculature endothelial dysfunction in a rat model of chronic kidney disease. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Seven days after surgery, we placed the animals into three groups: sham surgery; 5/6 nephrectomized (Nx) rats; and 5/6Nx + FTY720 (1 mg/kg/day). All of the animals were sacrificed 12 weeks after surgery. We obtained and analyzed blood and kidney tissue samples from all of the groups. Glomerular capillary density and peritubular capillary (PTC) density were determined by CD31 immunostaining. The expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), collagen IV, fibronectin, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The 5/6Nx group exhibited increased blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, visible renal histological changes, pro-fibrotic molecule (TGF-β1) and production of extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen IV and fibronectin and decreased glomerular and PTC density, compared to the sham controls (P < 0.01). We observed that treatment with FTY720 reduced these abnormalities. Furthermore, the level of NO, the expression levels of eNOS and VEGF were downregulated in the kidney tissue in 5/6Nx rats, FTY720 treatment significantly attenuated this decrease. FTY720 prevents the progression of renal fibrosis by inhibiting renal microvasculature endothelial dysfunction in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

  18. The Effects of Simvastatin on Proteinuria and Renal Function in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Promrattanakun, Anan; Supasyndh, Ouppatham; Choovichian, Panbuppa

    2015-01-01

    Current data suggests that statins might have beneficial effects on renal outcomes. Beneficial effects of statin treatment on renal progression in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) are obviously controversial. In a retrospective, controlled study, the authors have evaluated the effects of 53-week treatment with simvastatin, versus no treatment on proteinuria and renal function among 51 patients with CKD stages III-IV. By the end of the 53-week treatment, urine protein excretion decreased from 0.96 (IQR 0.54, 2.9) to 0.48 (IQR 0.18, 0.79) g/g creatinine (P < 0.001) in patients treated with simvastatin in addition to ACEI and ARBs, while no change was observed among the untreated patients. Moreover, a significantly greater decrease in urine protein excretion was observed in the simvastatin group as compared with the untreated group. The mean changes of serum creatinine and eGFR did not significantly differ in both groups. A significantly greater decrease in total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol was found in the simvastatin group than in the untreated group. In summary, apart from lipid lowering among CKD patients, ingesting simvastatin was associated with a decrease in proteinuria. These statin effects may become important for supportive therapy in renal damage in the future. PMID:26543646

  19. Management of renal stone disease in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Vujovic, Aleksandra; Keoghane, Stephen

    2007-12-01

    Obesity represents an increasing burden to health care resources. Nephrolithiasis is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes and the consumption of diets rich in protein, fat and carbohydrates; this article addresses some of the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with stone formation in these patients. Management of stone disease can be more difficult in obese patients; even diagnosis can be problematic because imaging techniques are less sensitive in these patients. Treatment with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and surgery in obese patients can be challenging, and outcome data for the different treatments are discussed in this Review.

  20. Acute deterioration of renal function induced by star fruit ingestion in a patient with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Niticharoenpong, Kannika; Chalermsanyakorn, Panas; Panvichian, Ravat; Kitiyakara, Chagriya

    2006-01-01

    Star fruit (carambola) is a popular tropical fruit, usually consumed as fresh fruit or as fruit juice. In patients on dialysis, consumption of star fruits can lead to alterations of consciousness. In this case report, we describe a patient with underlying chronic kidney disease, who developed a rapid increase in serum creatinine and oxalate nephropathy after chronic ingestion of star fruit juice without overt neurotoxicity. The decline in renal function was not fully reversible after stoppage. This case demonstrates that star fruit consumption should be considered as a cause of rapid deterioration in renal function in patients with underlying chronic kidney disease that may result in permanent renal injury.

  1. The association between renal stone disease and cholesterol gallstones: the easy to believe and not hard to retrieve theory of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed H; Barakat, Salma; Almobarak, Ahmed O

    2014-07-01

    Renal stone disease and gallstone disease are widely prevalent and costly disease across the globe. Both renal stone disease and gallstone disease are associated with a variety of diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance diabetes and gout. Importantly, the presence of either renal stone disease or gallstone disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. In a recent study of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC), individuals with a history of gallstones were 54% more likely to report a history of nephrolithiasis after adjusting for age, gender, body size and other factors. Furthermore, in three large cohorts including over 240,000 subjects: the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS) I and II and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS), showed that gallstone disease is independently associated with nephrolithiasis. The mechanisms linking gallstone disease and renal stone disease are complex and not yet established. Insulin resistance, lithogenic diets, alterations of transporters in gallbladder and urinary system, and pH are possible potential mechanisms for future exploration. How the liver communicates with kidney in individuals with renal stone disease and gallstone disease is not well known and whether this communication is similar as in hepto-renal syndrome is subject for future research. Further research is needed to determine: (i) the underlying mechanisms of renal stone disease and gallstone disease; (ii) the potential treatment of renal stone disease and gallstone disease.

  2. World Small Animal Veterinary Association Renal Pathology Initiative: Classification of Glomerular Diseases in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, R E; Mohr, F C; Aresu, L; Brown, C A; James, C; Jansen, J H; Spangler, W L; van der Lugt, J J; Kass, P H; Brovida, C; Cowgill, L D; Heiene, R; Polzin, D J; Syme, H; Vaden, S L; van Dongen, A M; Lees, G E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of canine renal biopsy tissue has generally relied on light microscopic (LM) evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections ranging in thickness from 3 to 5 µm. Advanced modalities, such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunofluorescence (IF), have been used sporadically or retrospectively. Diagnostic algorithms of glomerular diseases have been extrapolated from the World Health Organization classification scheme for human glomerular disease. With the recent establishment of 2 veterinary nephropathology services that evaluate 3-µm sections with a panel of histochemical stains and routinely perform TEM and IF, a standardized objective species-specific approach for the diagnosis of canine glomerular disease was needed. Eight veterinary pathologists evaluated 114 parameters (lesions) in renal biopsy specimens from 89 dogs. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the data revealed 2 large categories of glomerular disease based on the presence or absence of immune complex deposition: The immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) category included cases with histologic lesions of membranoproliferative or membranous patterns. The second category included control dogs and dogs with non-ICGN (glomerular amyloidosis or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). Cluster analysis performed on only the LM parameters led to misdiagnosis of 22 of the 89 cases-that is, ICGN cases moved to the non-ICGN branch of the dendrogram or vice versa, thereby emphasizing the importance of advanced diagnostic modalities in the evaluation of canine glomerular disease. Salient LM, TEM, and IF features for each pattern of disease were identified, and a preliminary investigation of related clinicopathologic data was performed. PMID:25957358

  3. World Small Animal Veterinary Association Renal Pathology Initiative: Classification of Glomerular Diseases in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, R E; Mohr, F C; Aresu, L; Brown, C A; James, C; Jansen, J H; Spangler, W L; van der Lugt, J J; Kass, P H; Brovida, C; Cowgill, L D; Heiene, R; Polzin, D J; Syme, H; Vaden, S L; van Dongen, A M; Lees, G E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of canine renal biopsy tissue has generally relied on light microscopic (LM) evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections ranging in thickness from 3 to 5 µm. Advanced modalities, such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunofluorescence (IF), have been used sporadically or retrospectively. Diagnostic algorithms of glomerular diseases have been extrapolated from the World Health Organization classification scheme for human glomerular disease. With the recent establishment of 2 veterinary nephropathology services that evaluate 3-µm sections with a panel of histochemical stains and routinely perform TEM and IF, a standardized objective species-specific approach for the diagnosis of canine glomerular disease was needed. Eight veterinary pathologists evaluated 114 parameters (lesions) in renal biopsy specimens from 89 dogs. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the data revealed 2 large categories of glomerular disease based on the presence or absence of immune complex deposition: The immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) category included cases with histologic lesions of membranoproliferative or membranous patterns. The second category included control dogs and dogs with non-ICGN (glomerular amyloidosis or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). Cluster analysis performed on only the LM parameters led to misdiagnosis of 22 of the 89 cases-that is, ICGN cases moved to the non-ICGN branch of the dendrogram or vice versa, thereby emphasizing the importance of advanced diagnostic modalities in the evaluation of canine glomerular disease. Salient LM, TEM, and IF features for each pattern of disease were identified, and a preliminary investigation of related clinicopathologic data was performed.

  4. Discovering hidden relationships between renal diseases and regulated genes through 3D network visualizations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In a recent study, two-dimensional (2D) network layouts were used to visualize and quantitatively analyze the relationship between chronic renal diseases and regulated genes. The results revealed complex relationships between disease type, gene specificity, and gene regulation type, which led to important insights about the underlying biological pathways. Here we describe an attempt to extend our understanding of these complex relationships by reanalyzing the data using three-dimensional (3D) network layouts, displayed through 2D and 3D viewing methods. Findings The 3D network layout (displayed through the 3D viewing method) revealed that genes implicated in many diseases (non-specific genes) tended to be predominantly down-regulated, whereas genes regulated in a few diseases (disease-specific genes) tended to be up-regulated. This new global relationship was quantitatively validated through comparison to 1000 random permutations of networks of the same size and distribution. Our new finding appeared to be the result of using specific features of the 3D viewing method to analyze the 3D renal network. Conclusions The global relationship between gene regulation and gene specificity is the first clue from human studies that there exist common mechanisms across several renal diseases, which suggest hypotheses for the underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, the study suggests hypotheses for why the 3D visualization helped to make salient a new regularity that was difficult to detect in 2D. Future research that tests these hypotheses should enable a more systematic understanding of when and how to use 3D network visualizations to reveal complex regularities in biological networks. PMID:21070623

  5. Altered Nitric Oxide System in Cardiovascular and Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kim, Soo Wan

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized by a family of NO synthases (NOS), including neuronal, inducible, and endothelial NOS (n/i/eNOS). NO-mediated effects can be beneficial or harmful depending on the specific risk factors affecting the disease. In hypertension, the vascular relaxation response to acetylcholine is blunted, and that to direct NO donors is maintained. A reduction in the activity of eNOS is mainly responsible for the elevation of blood pressure, and an abnormal expression of iNOS is likely to be related to the progression of vascular dysfunction. While eNOS/nNOS-derived NO is protective against the development of atherosclerosis, iNOS-derived NO may be proatherogenic. eNOS-derived NO may prevent the progression of myocardial infarction. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury is significantly enhanced in eNOS-deficient animals. An important component of heart failure is the loss of coronary vascular eNOS activity. A pressure-overload may cause severer left ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction in eNOS null mice than in wild-type mice. iNOS-derived NO has detrimental effects on the myocardium. NO plays an important role in regulating the angiogenesis and slowing the interstitial fibrosis of the obstructed kidney. In unilateral ureteral obstruction, the expression of eNOS was decreased in the affected kidney. In triply n/i/eNOS null mice, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus developed along with reduced aquaporin-2 abundance. In chronic kidney disease model of subtotal-nephrectomized rats, treatment with NOS inhibitors decreased systemic NO production and induced left ventricular systolic dysfunction (renocardiac syndrome). PMID:27231671

  6. Large kidneys predict poor renal outcome in subjects with diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal hypertrophy occurs early in diabetic nephropathy, its later value is unknown. Do large kidneys still predict poor outcome in patients with diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)? Methods Seventy-five patients with diabetes and CKD according to a Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR, by 51Cr-EDTA clearance) below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or an Albumin Excretion Rate above 30 mg/24 H, had an ultrasound imaging of the kidneys and were cooperatively followed during five years by the Diabetology and Nephrology departments of the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux. Results The patients were mainly men (44/75), aged 62 ± 13 yrs, with long-standing diabetes (duration:17 ± 9 yrs, 55/75 type 2), and CKD: initial GFR: 56.5 (8.5-209) mL/min/1.73 m2, AER: 196 (20-2358) mg/24 H. Their mean kidney lenght (108 ± 13 mm, 67-147) was correlated to the GFR (r = 0.23, p < 0.05). During the follow-up, 9/11 of the patients who had to start dialysis came from the half with the largest kidneys (LogRank: p < 0.05), despite a 40% higher initial isotopic GFR. Serum creatinine were initially lower (Small kidneys: 125 (79-320) μmol/L, Large: 103 (50-371), p < 0.05), but significantly increased in the "large kidneys" group at the end of the follow-up (Small kidneys: 129 (69-283) μmol/L, Large: 140 (50-952), p < 0.005 vs initial). The difference persisted in the patients with severe renal failure (KDOQI stages 4,5). Conclusions Large kidneys still predict progression in advanced CKD complicating diabetes. In these patients, ultrasound imaging not only excludes obstructive renal disease, but also provides information on the progression of the renal disease. PMID:20199663

  7. Tolvaptan delays the onset of end-stage renal disease in a polycystic kidney disease model by suppressing increases in kidney volume and renal injury.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Miki; Fujiki, Hiroyuki; Mizuguchi, Hiroshi; Hattori, Katsuji; Ohmoto, Koji; Ishikawa, Makoto; Nagano, Keisuke; Yamamura, Yoshitaka

    2014-05-01

    Tolvaptan, a selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist, slows the increase in total kidney volume and the decline in kidney function in patients with the results of the Tolvaptan Efficacy and Safety in Management of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease and Outcome (TEMPO) 3:4 trial. However, it was unclear which dose of tolvaptan was optimal or whether tolvaptan was able to delay progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Here we examined the relationship with aquaresis and the inhibitory effect on cyst development in short-term treatment and mortality as an index of ESRD in long-term treatment with tolvaptan using DBA/2FG-pcy mice, an animal model of nephronophthisis. With short-term treatment from 5 to 15 weeks of age, tolvaptan (0.01-0.3% via diet) dose-dependently enhanced aquaresis, prevented increases in kidney weight and cyst volume, and was associated with significant reductions in kidney cAMP levels and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity. Maximal effects of tolvaptan on aquaresis and the prevention of development of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) were obtained at 0.1%. Interestingly, tolvaptan also dose-dependently reduced urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels in correlation with the kidney volume. With long-term treatment from 5 to 29 weeks of age, tolvaptan significantly attenuated the increase in kidney volume by up to 50% and reduced urinary albumin excretion. Furthermore, tolvaptan significantly reduced the mortality rate to 20%, compared with 60% in the control group. These data indicate that tolvaptan may delay the onset of ESRD in PKD by suppressing the increases in kidney volume and renal injury, providing a promising treatment for PKD. PMID:24570071

  8. Tolvaptan delays the onset of end-stage renal disease in a polycystic kidney disease model by suppressing increases in kidney volume and renal injury.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Miki; Fujiki, Hiroyuki; Mizuguchi, Hiroshi; Hattori, Katsuji; Ohmoto, Koji; Ishikawa, Makoto; Nagano, Keisuke; Yamamura, Yoshitaka

    2014-05-01

    Tolvaptan, a selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist, slows the increase in total kidney volume and the decline in kidney function in patients with the results of the Tolvaptan Efficacy and Safety in Management of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease and Outcome (TEMPO) 3:4 trial. However, it was unclear which dose of tolvaptan was optimal or whether tolvaptan was able to delay progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Here we examined the relationship with aquaresis and the inhibitory effect on cyst development in short-term treatment and mortality as an index of ESRD in long-term treatment with tolvaptan using DBA/2FG-pcy mice, an animal model of nephronophthisis. With short-term treatment from 5 to 15 weeks of age, tolvaptan (0.01-0.3% via diet) dose-dependently enhanced aquaresis, prevented increases in kidney weight and cyst volume, and was associated with significant reductions in kidney cAMP levels and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity. Maximal effects of tolvaptan on aquaresis and the prevention of development of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) were obtained at 0.1%. Interestingly, tolvaptan also dose-dependently reduced urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels in correlation with the kidney volume. With long-term treatment from 5 to 29 weeks of age, tolvaptan significantly attenuated the increase in kidney volume by up to 50% and reduced urinary albumin excretion. Furthermore, tolvaptan significantly reduced the mortality rate to 20%, compared with 60% in the control group. These data indicate that tolvaptan may delay the onset of ESRD in PKD by suppressing the increases in kidney volume and renal injury, providing a promising treatment for PKD.

  9. Genes, Exomes, Genomes, Copy Number: What is Their Future in Pediatric Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Matthew G.; Jüppner, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The influence of genetic variation on the pathogenesis of pediatric kidney disease extends from the earliest stages of kidney development in utero to conditions arising throughout a child’s life. Major advances in genomic technologies, computing power, and bioinformatics analyses have resulted in the accelerated discovery of novel genes and risk loci associated with both inherited and sporadic forms of pediatric kidney disease. In this review, we will highlight studies over the past year that used diverse approaches to discover novel genes and loci associated with pediatric renal disease. We will also discuss reports that investigate the association with disease of previously discovered risk variants in novel populations, different phenotypes, or in model systems. Finally, we will discuss how we believe genomic inquiry will evolve in pediatric kidney disease in the future. Together, these studies illustrate that almost every child with a kidney condition could participate in some form of genomic investigation.

  10. Severe maxillofacial renal osteodystrophy in two patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Maria Luiza Diniz de Sousa; Albuquerque, Assis Filipe Medeiros; Germano, Adriano Rocha; Queiroz, Lélia Maria Guedes; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa; da Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas

    2015-09-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is the bone pathology that occurs as an uncommon complication related to the several alterations in mineral metabolism present in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This paper describes two cases of severe ROD affecting the maxilla and mandible and causing facial disfigurement of a young and a middle-aged female patient with CKD. Both patients had a history of secondary hyperparathyroidism, previously treated by surgery. The pathogenesis of the disease, as well as its clinical, imaging, and histopathological features, and management of the patient are discussed. PMID:25784153

  11. End-stage renal disease in sub-Saharan and South Africa.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Saraladevi

    2003-02-01

    The major health problems in Africa are AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, gastroenteritis and hypertension; hypertension affects about 20% of the adult population. Renal disease, especially glomerular disease, is more prevalent in Africa and seems to be of a more severe form than that found in Western countries. The most common mode of presentation is the nephrotic syndrome, with the age of onset at five to eight years. It is estimated that 2 to 3% of medical admissions in tropical countries are due to renal-related complaints, the majority being the glomerulonephritides. There are no reliable statistics for ESRD in all African countries. Statistics of the South African Dialysis and Transplant Registry (SADTR) reflect the patients selected for renal replacement therapy (RRT) and do not accurately reflect the etiology of chronic renal failure (CRF), where public sector state facilities will offer RRT only to patients who are eligible for a transplant. In 1994, glomerulonephritis was recorded as the cause of ESRD in 1771 (52.1%) and hypertension in 1549 (45.6%) of patients by the SADTR. In a six-year study of 3632 patients with ESRD, based on SADTR statistics, hypertension was reported to be the cause of ESRD in 4.3% of whites, 34.6% of blacks, 20.9% mixed race group and 13.8% of Indians. Malignant hypertension is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among urban black South Africans, with hypertension accounting for 16% of all hospital admissions. In a ten-year study of 368 patients with chronic renal failure in Nigeria, the etiology of renal failure was undetermined in 62%. Of the remaining patients whose etiology was ascertained, hypertension accounted for 61%, diabetes mellitus for 11% and chronic glomerulonephritis for 5.9%. Patients with CRF constituted 10% of all medical admissions in this center. Chronic glomerulonephritis and hypertension are principal causes of CRF in tropical Africa and East Africa, together with diabetes mellitus and obstructive

  12. The Nrf2 pathway in the progression of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Zoja, Carlamaria; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2014-02-01

    The Nrf2/Keap1 system regulates the transcription of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes through direct Nrf2 binding to responsive elements in the promoter region of target genes or via Keap1-induced NF-kB inhibition. The association between oxidative stress and inflammation with progression of chronic kidney diseases (CKDs) directed attention towards bardoxolone methyl and its analogues, potent Nrf2/Keap1 inducers, as a potential modality of renoprotective intervention. In a phase II clinical trial (BEAM), bardoxolone methyl was shown to increase the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in patients with CKD associated with type 2 diabetes. The study generated great interest but raised concerns as well, on the adverse event profile of the drug. Experiments in rats with type 2 diabetic nephropathy treated with bardoxolone methyl analogues reproduced some drawbacks of bardoxolone methyl therapy in humans. Despite these warnings, a long-term phase III trial (BEACON) was started that was prematurely terminated because of an excess serious adverse events and mortality. Lessons from the above studies suggest that before jumping into use in clinical practice, adequately designed experiments in animal models are needed to provide insights into pathogenetic mechanisms as well as unexpected side effects.

  13. Clinical and experimental use of probiotic formulations for management of end-stage renal disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Pezzuto, Federica; Palmieri, Lucia; Rottigni, Valentina; Iannitti, Tommaso; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays kidney transplantation and dialysis are the only available therapies for end-stage renal disease management. They imply a considerable increase in plasma concentration of uremic wastes including creatinine, urea and uric acid. These invasive procedures impose high social costs that prevent many low-income countries from adequately treating the patients affected by renal insufficiency. For years, many studies on uremic waste removal through the gut lumen have been published with conflicting results. More recently, microencapsulation of probiotic bacteria has been performed by different research groups. This evidence has opened a new perspective on therapeutic modification of gut bacterial flora in the context of renal disease. This review gives an overview of the experimental and clinical use of probiotic formulations in the context of end-stage renal disease. PMID:23584675

  14. Retinopathy and the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study).

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Juan E; Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker-Ostroff, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Lo, Joan C; Townsend, Raymond R; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W; Xie, Dawei

    2015-11-15

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience other diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess whether retinopathy predicts future CVD events in a subgroup of the participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. In this ancillary investigation, 2,605 participants of the CRIC study were invited to participate, and nonmydriatic fundus photographs were obtained in 1,936 subjects. Using standard protocols, presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive, or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed at a central photograph reading center by trained graders masked to study participant's information. Patients with a self-reported history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. Incident CVD events were adjudicated using medical records. Kidney function measurements, traditional and nontraditional risk factors, for CVD were obtained. Presence and severity of retinopathy were associated with increased risk of development of any CVD in this population of CKD patients, and these associations persisted after adjustment for traditional risk factors for CVD. We also found a direct relation between increased venular diameter and risk of development of CVD; however, the relation was not statistically significant after adjustment for traditional risk factors. In conclusion, the presence of retinopathy was associated with future CVD events, suggesting that retinovascular pathology may be indicative of macrovascular disease even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. Assessment of retinal morphology may be valuable in assessing risk of CVD in patients with CKD, both clinically and in research settings.

  15. Inhibition of lysosomal protease cathepsin D reduces renal fibrosis in murine chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Christopher; Cocchiaro, Pasquale; Oakley, Fiona; Howarth, Rachel; Callaghan, Krystena; Leslie, Jack; Luli, Saimir; Wood, Katrina M.; Genovese, Federica; Sheerin, Neil S.; Moles, Anna

    2016-01-01

    During chronic kidney disease (CKD) there is a dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis leading to renal fibrosis. Lysosomal proteases such as cathepsins (Cts) regulate this process in other organs, however, their role in CKD is still unknown. Here we describe a novel role for cathepsins in CKD. CtsD and B were located in distal and proximal tubular cells respectively in human disease. Administration of CtsD (Pepstatin A) but not B inhibitor (Ca074-Me), in two mouse CKD models, UUO and chronic ischemia reperfusion injury, led to a reduction in fibrosis. No changes in collagen transcription or myofibroblasts numbers were observed. Pepstatin A administration resulted in increased extracellular urokinase and collagen degradation. In vitro and in vivo administration of chloroquine, an endo/lysosomal inhibitor, mimicked Pepstatin A effect on renal fibrosis. Therefore, we propose a mechanism by which CtsD inhibition leads to increased collagenolytic activity due to an impairment in lysosomal recycling. This results in increased extracellular activity of enzymes such as urokinase, triggering a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in more ECM degradation. Taken together these results suggest that inhibition of lysosomal proteases, such as CtsD, could be a new therapeutic approach to reduce renal fibrosis and slow progression of CKD. PMID:26831567

  16. Responses of proximal tubular cells to injury in congenital renal disease: fight or flight.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Robert L; Forbes, Michael S; Galarreta, Carolina I; Thornhill, Barbara A

    2014-04-01

    Most chronic kidney disease in children results from congenital or inherited disorders, which can be studied in mouse models. Following 2 weeks of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in the adult mouse, nephron loss is due to proximal tubular mitochondrial injury and cell death. In neonatal mice, proximal tubular cell death is delayed beyond 2 weeks of complete UUO, and release of partial UUO allows remodeling of remaining nephrons. Progressive cyst expansion develops in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), a common inherited renal disorder. The polycystic kidney and fibrosis (pcy)-mutant mouse (which develops late-onset PKD) develops thinning of the glomerulotubular junction in parallel with growth of cysts in adulthood. Renal insufficiency in nephropathic cystinosis, a rare inherited renal disorder, results from progressive tubular cystine accumulation. In the Ctns knockout mouse (a model of cystinosis), proximal tubular cells become flattened, with loss of mitochondria and thickening of tubular basement membrane. In each model, persistent obstructive or metabolic stress leads ultimately to the formation of atubular glomeruli. The initial "fight" response (proximal tubular survival) switches to a "flight" response (proximal tubular cell death) with ongoing oxidative injury and mitochondrial damage. Therapies should be directed at reducing proximal tubular mitochondrial oxidative injury to enhance repair and regeneration.

  17. Inhibition of lysosomal protease cathepsin D reduces renal fibrosis in murine chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher; Cocchiaro, Pasquale; Oakley, Fiona; Howarth, Rachel; Callaghan, Krystena; Leslie, Jack; Luli, Saimir; Wood, Katrina M; Genovese, Federica; Sheerin, Neil S; Moles, Anna

    2016-01-01

    During chronic kidney disease (CKD) there is a dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis leading to renal fibrosis. Lysosomal proteases such as cathepsins (Cts) regulate this process in other organs, however, their role in CKD is still unknown. Here we describe a novel role for cathepsins in CKD. CtsD and B were located in distal and proximal tubular cells respectively in human disease. Administration of CtsD (Pepstatin A) but not B inhibitor (Ca074-Me), in two mouse CKD models, UUO and chronic ischemia reperfusion injury, led to a reduction in fibrosis. No changes in collagen transcription or myofibroblasts numbers were observed. Pepstatin A administration resulted in increased extracellular urokinase and collagen degradation. In vitro and in vivo administration of chloroquine, an endo/lysosomal inhibitor, mimicked Pepstatin A effect on renal fibrosis. Therefore, we propose a mechanism by which CtsD inhibition leads to increased collagenolytic activity due to an impairment in lysosomal recycling. This results in increased extracellular activity of enzymes such as urokinase, triggering a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in more ECM degradation. Taken together these results suggest that inhibition of lysosomal proteases, such as CtsD, could be a new therapeutic approach to reduce renal fibrosis and slow progression of CKD. PMID:26831567

  18. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma: further characterization of the morphologic and immunopathologic features.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Soomin; Kwon, Ghee Young; Cho, Yong Mee; Jun, Sun-Young; Choi, Chan; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yong Wook; Park, Weon Seo; Shim, Jung Won

    2013-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma (ACD-RCC) is a subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with unique morphologic features found exclusively in the background of end-stage renal disease. We analyzed the clinicopathologic features and immumoreactive profiles of 12 cases of ACD-RCC to further characterize this recently recognized entity. Review of histologic slides was performed in conjunction with immunohistochemical staining directed to the contemporary diagnostic antibodies and the putative target therapy-related markers. Histologically, the tumors showed characteristic inter-or intracellular microlumens and eosinophilic tumor cells. Intratumoral hemosiderin deposition and degenerating foamy tumor cells were consistent findings which were not previously described. Immunohistochemically, all the tumors were positive for alpha-methylacyl-CoA-racemase, CD10, pan-cytokeratin, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and c-met, while negative for carbonic anhydrase-9, CD57, CD68, c-kit, pax-2, platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-α or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2. Heterogenous staining was found for CK7 and kidney-specific cadherin. Positive reaction to c-met suggests its utility as a plausible therapeutic target in ACD-RCC. Thus, we present the unique morphologic and immunopathologic features of ACD-RCC, which may be helpful in both diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. PMID:23471757

  19. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Progression of Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in Individuals Without Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ticiana C.; Maahs, David M.; Johnson, Richard J.; Jalal, Diana I.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Rivard, Christopher; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine uric acid (UA) as a possible predictor of the progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) using data from the prospective Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS CAC was measured by electron beam tomography at the baseline and at a follow-up 6.0 ± 0.5 years later. The study population included 443 participants with type 1 diabetes and 526 control subjects who were free of diagnosed coronary artery disease at baseline. The presence of renal disease was defined by the presence of albuminuria and/or low glomerular filtration rate. RESULTS In subjects without renal disease, serum UA predicted CAC progression (odds ratio 1.30 [95% CI 1.07–1.58], P = 0.007) independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes and the presence of metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS Serum UA levels predict the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and may be useful in identifying who is at risk for vascular disease in the absence of significant chronic kidney disease. PMID:20798338

  20. Diabetes treatment in patients with renal disease: Is the landscape clear enough?

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is the most important risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD). The risk of CKD attributable to diabetes continues to rise worldwide. Diabetic patients with CKD need complicated treatment for their metabolic disorders as well as for related comorbidities. They have to treat, often intensively, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, bone disease, anaemia, and frequently established cardiovascular disease. The treatment of hypoglycaemia in diabetic persons with CKD must tie their individual goals of glycaemia (usually less tight glycaemic control) and knowledge on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs available to a person with kidney disease. The problem is complicated from the fact that in many efficacy studies patients with CKD are excluded so data of safety and efficacy for these patients are missing. This results in fear of use by lack of evidence. Metformin is globally accepted as the first choice in practically all therapeutic algorithms for diabetic subjects. The advantages of metformin are low risk of hypoglycaemia, modest weight loss, effectiveness and low cost. Data of UKPDS indicate that treatment based on metformin results in less total as well cardiovascular mortality. Metformin remains the drug of choice for patients with diabetes and CKD provided that their estimate Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) remains above 30 mL/min per square meter. For diabetic patients with eGFR between 30-60 mL/min per square meter more frequent monitoring of renal function and dose reduction of metformin is needed. The use of sulfonylureas, glinides and insulin carry a higher risk of hypoglycemia in these patients and must be very careful. Lower doses and slower titration of the dose is needed. Is better to avoid sulfonylureas with active hepatic metabolites, which are renally excreted. Very useful drugs for this group of patients emerge dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors. These drugs do not cause hypoglycemia and most of them (linagliptin is an exception

  1. [Executive summary of the recommendations on the evaluation and management of renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Gorriz, José L; Gutiérrez, Félix; Trullàs, Joan C; Arazo, Piedad; Arribas, Jose R; Barril, Guillermina; Cervero, Miguel; Cofán, Frederic; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Fulladosa, Xavier; Galindo, María J; Gràcia, Sílvia; Iribarren, José A; Knobel, Hernando; López-Aldeguer, José; Lozano, Fernando; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Martínez, Esteban; Mazuecos, Maria A; Miralles, Celia; Montañés, Rosario; Negredo, Eugenia; Palacios, Rosario; Pérez-Elías, María J; Portilla, Joaquín; Praga, Manuel; Quereda, Carlos; Rivero, Antonio; Santamaría, Juan M; Sanz, José; Sanz, Jesús; Miró, José M

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this article is to update the 2010 recommendations on the evaluation and management of renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Renal function should be monitored in all HIV-infected patients. The basic renal work-up should include measurements of serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate by CKD-EPI, urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, and urinary sediment. Tubular function tests should include determination of serum phosphate levels and urine dipstick for glycosuria. In the absence of abnormal values, renal screening should be performed annually. In patients treated with tenofovir, or with risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD), more frequent renal screening is recommended. In order to prevent disease progression, potentially nephrotoxic antiretroviral drugs are not recommended in patients with CKD or risk factors for CKD. The document provides indications for renal biopsy and advises on the optimal time for referral of a patient to the nephrologist. The indications for and evaluation and management of dialysis and renal transplantation are also addressed.

  2. Executive summary of the consensus document on the management of renal disease in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Górriz, José Luis; Gutiérrez, Félix; Trullas, Joan Carles; Arazo, Piedad; Arribas, Jose Ramón; Barril, Guillermina; Cervero, Miguel; Cofan, Frederic; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Fulladosa, Xavier; Galindo, Maria José; Gracia, Silvia; Iribarren, Jose Antonio; Knobel, Hernando; Lopez-Aldeguer, Jose; Lozano, Fernando; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Martinez, Esteban; Mazuecos, Maria A; Miralles, Celia; Montañes, Rosario; Negredo, Eugenia; Palacios, Rosario; Pérez-Elías, María Jesús; Portilla, Joaquin; Praga, Manuel; Quereda, Carlos; Rivero, Antonio; Santamaria, Juan M; Sanz, Jose; Sanz, Jesús; Miró, José María

    2014-11-17

    The aim of this article is to update the 2010 recommendations on the evaluation and management of renal disease in HIV-infected patients. Renal function should be monitored in all HIV-infected patients. The basic renal work-up should include measurements of serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate by CKD-EPI, urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, and urinary sediment. Tubular function tests should include determination of serum phosphate levels and urine dipstick for glucosuria. In the absence of abnormal values, renal screening should be performed annually. In patients treated with tenofovir or with risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD), more frequent renal screening is recommended. In order to prevent disease progression, potentially nephrotoxic antiretroviral drugs are not recommended in patients with CKD or risk factors for CKD. The document provides indications for renal biopsy and advises on the optimal time for referral of a patient to the nephrologist. The indications for and evaluation and management of dialysis and renal transplantation are also addressed.

  3. A novel LMX1B mutation in a family with end-stage renal disease of ‘unknown cause’

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Noel; Rice, Sarah J.; Raman, Shreya; Hynes, Ann Marie; Srivastava, Shalabh; Moore, Iain; Al-Hamed, Mohamed; Xu, Yaobo; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Thwaites, David T.; Gale, Daniel P.; Sayer, John A.

    2015-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) presenting in a familial autosomal dominant pattern points to an underlying monogenic cause. Nail-patella syndrome (NPS) is an autosomal dominant disorder that may lead to ESRD caused by mutations in the transcription factor LMX1B. Renal-limited forms of this disease, termed nail-patella-like renal disease (NPLRD), and LMX1B nephropathy have recently been described. We report a large family, from the North East of England, with seven affected members with varying phenotypes of renal disease, ranging from ESRD at 28 years of age to microscopic haematuria and proteinuria and relatively preserved renal function. In this family, there were no extra-renal manifestations to suggest NPS. Genome-wide linkage studies and inheritance by descent (IBD) suggested disease loci on Chromosome 1 and 9. Whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis identified a novel sequence variant (p.R249Q) in the LMX1B gene in each of the three samples submitted, which was confirmed using Sanger sequencing. The variant segregated with the disease in all affected individuals. In silico modelling revealed that R249 is putatively located in close proximity to the DNA phosphoskeleton, supporting a role for this residue in the interaction between the LMX1B homeodomain and its target DNA. WES and analysis of potential target genes, including CD2AP, NPHS2, COL4A3, COL4A4 and COL4A5, did not reveal any co-inherited pathogenic variants. In conclusion, we confirm a novel LMX1B mutation in a large family with an autosomal dominant pattern of nephropathy. This report confirms that LMX1B mutations may cause a glomerulopathy without extra-renal manifestations. A molecular genetic diagnosis of LMX1B nephropathy thus provides a definitive diagnosis, prevents the need for renal biopsies and allows at risk family members to be screened. PMID:25713721

  4. Regulation of mRNA translation in renal physiology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Feliers, Denis; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Ghosh Choudhury, Goutam; Lee, Myung Ja; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M.

    2009-01-01

    Translation, a process of generating a peptide from the codons present in messenger RNA, can be a site of independent regulation of protein synthesis; it has not been well studied in the kidney. Translation occurs in three stages (initiation, elongation, and termination), each with its own set of regulatory factors. Mechanisms controlling translation include small inhibitory RNAs such as microRNAs, binding proteins, and signaling reactions. Role of translation in renal injury in diabetes, endoplasmic reticulum stress, acute kidney injury, and, in physiological adaptation to loss of nephrons is reviewed here. Contribution of mRNA translation to physiology and disease is not well understood. Because it is involved in such diverse areas as development and cancer, it should prove a fertile field for investigation in renal science. PMID:19535566

  5. Point of care creatinine measurement for diagnosis of renal disease using a disposable microchip.

    PubMed

    Ávila, Mónica; Floris, Arjan; Staal, Steven; Ríos, Ángel; Eijkel, Jan; van den Berg, Albert

    2013-11-01

    A point-of-care device for the determination of elevated creatinine levels in blood is reported. This device potentially offers a new and simple clinical regime for the determination of creatinine that will give huge time savings and removal of several steps of determination. The test employs a disposable prefilled microchip and the handheld Medimate Multireader®. By optimizing the analytical conditions it was found that the LOD of the proposed method was 87 μM creatinine, close to the normal human serum levels that are in the range of 60 to 100 μM. A statistical analysis of the residual shows a normal distribution, indicating the absence of systematic errors in the proposed method. The test can be used to distinguish patients with renal insufficiency (creatinine levels >100 μM) from healthy persons. Long-term monitoring could furthermore distinguish between acute renal failure and chronic kidney disease by the rate of creatinine concentration rise.

  6. Kyrle's disease in a patient of diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Pragya A.; Jivani, Nidhi B.; Diwan, Nilofar G.

    2015-01-01

    Kyrle's disease (KD) is an acquired perforating dermatosis associated with an underlying disorder such as diabetes mellitus or chronic renal failure. It presents as multiple discrete, eruptive papules with a central crust or plug, often on the lower extremities. A keratotic plug is seen histologically in an atrophic epidermis and may penetrate the papillary dermis with transepidermal elimination of keratotic debris without collagen or elastic fibers. Various therapies have been reported that include cryotherapy, laser therapy, narrow-band ultraviolet B and use of topical or systemic retinoids. Hereby a case of 64-year-old male, a known case of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and chronic renal failure who developed KD is presented. PMID:25949985

  7. Immunofluorescence staining for the detection of immunoglobulins and complement (C3) in dogs with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Aresu, L; Pregel, P; Bollo, E; Palmerini, D; Sereno, A; Valenza, F

    2008-12-01

    Renal cortical biopsies from 74 dogs with different degrees of renal failure were studied by immunofluorescence to assess the frequency and extent of the deposition of immunoglobulins G, M and A (IgG, IgM, IgA) and complement C3. The dogs were divided into two groups on the basis of their clinical signs, and standard histological and electron microscopical examinations, according to whether their disease was an immune-mediated nephropathy (IMN) or a non-immune-mediated nephropathy (NIMN). In the dogs with an imn there was strong immunofluorescence due to IgG in the mesangium and the glomerular basement membrane and to IgM in the mesangium. The mechanism of immune complex trapping in the glomerulus also resulted in positive reactions to IgM in the dogs with an NIMN.

  8. [SIMS REIN: a multi-source information system for end-stage renal disease].

    PubMed

    Landais, Paul; Simonet, Ana; Guillon, Didier; Jacquelinet, Christian; Ben Saïd, Mohamed; Mugnier, Claude; Simonet, Michel

    2002-04-01

    In France, the prevalence of End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) is not precisely known. The sources of information are scattered and not coordinated. Consequently, care is ill adapted to meet the demand. The Multi-Source Information System is the basis of the Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (REIN). It is dedicated to improve and organise our medical and epidemiological knowledge of ESRD and to aid public health decision-making in this area. The proposed approach is based on the datawarehouses. This model allows a unified vision of scattered data into distinct databases, for a better management, be it particular (patient follow-up) or global (regional follow-up), with a finality of aid in decision-making. Several categories of problems were considered: the global conception of the information system, the organisation of the datawarehouse, which offers different viewpoints of the data, the integration of heterogeneous data coming from different sources, data exchange and definition of a specific ontology.

  9. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Cristina; Izquierdo, Adriana; Velagapudi, Vidya; Vivas, Yurena; Velasco, Ismael; Campbell, Mark; Burling, Keith; Cava, Fernando; Ros, Manuel; Oresic, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2012-09-01

    Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) knockout (KO) mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27(Kip1) expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice. PMID

  10. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Cristina; Izquierdo, Adriana; Velagapudi, Vidya; Vivas, Yurena; Velasco, Ismael; Campbell, Mark; Burling, Keith; Cava, Fernando; Ros, Manuel; Orešič, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) knockout (KO) mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27Kip1 expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice

  11. Comparison of the Development Diabetic Induced Renal Disease in Strains of Goto-Kakizaki Rats.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Naoki; Slaughter, Tiffani N; Paige, Adrienne; Kato, Sota; Roman, Richard J; Williams, Jan M

    2013-05-30

    This study compared temporal changes in renal hemodynamics, proteinuria and the development of renal disease in Goto-Kakizaki (GK) type II diabetic rats that are resistant to the development of diabetic nephropathy and a genetically modified GK substrain (T2DN) carrying the mitochondrial genome and other alleles from Fawn hooded-hypertensive (FHH) rats is more susceptible to the development of renal injury. Both GK and T2DN rats were diabetic (>250 mg/ dL) and blood glucose levels were not significantly different at 3, 6 and 18 months of age. Blood pressure was also similar in both strains at all 3 ages. Renal blood flow (RBF) was 45% higher in 3 month old T2DN rats than GK rats but glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was similar. T2DN rats exhibited a progressive increase in proteinuria from 41 ± 2 to 524 ± 50 mg/day and 57% fall in GFR as they aged from 3 to 18 months of age. In contrast, proteinuria only increased to 162 ± 31 mg/day in GK rats and GFR remained unaltered. The kidneys from 18 month old T2DN rats exhibited severe glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis and tubular necrosis while kidneys from GK rats did not. Plasma creatinine levels were 2.4 fold higher in 18 month old T2DN than in GK rats. These data demonstrate that T2DN rats develop most of the features of diabetic nephropathy including progressive proteinuria and chronic kidney disease whereas the closely related GK strain does not, even though blood pressure and the level of hyperglycemia are similar. PMID:24319624

  12. Treatment of Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism in Post Renal Transplant Recipients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-23

    Chronic Allograft Nephropathy; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Disordered Mineral Metabolism; End Stage Renal Disease; Hyperparathyroidism; Hypophosphatemia; Kidney Disease; Kidney Transplantation; Post Renal Transplantation

  13. Budd-chiari syndrome and renal arterial neurysms due to behcet disease: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Batur, Abdussamet; Dorum, Meltem; Yüksekkaya, Hasan Ali; Koc, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis of unknown etiology with a chronic relapsing course. Vasculitis in Behcet's disease with predominant vascular involvement is the only vasculitis that affects both arteries and veins of any size. Involvement of the renal artery and inferior vena cava is rare among the arteries and veins, respectively. When disease affect the veins, it is in the form of thrombosis. Arterial complications include aneurysms, stenosis and occlusions. Both rupture of arterial aneurysm and occlusion of suprahepatic veins, causing Budd-Chiari syndrome, are associated with a high mortality rate. Vascular involvement is more common in male patients than in female patients. Men and patients with a younger age of onset present with a more severe prognosis. In this case report, we describe a very rare cause of intrarenal arterial aneurysm's rupture with previous Budd-Chiari syndrome due to Behcet's disease and successful angiographic embolization of actively bleeding aneurysm. PMID:26491527

  14. The Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, James M., III; Gordley, Larry L.; Park, Jae H.; Drayson, S. R.; Hesketh, W. D.; Cicerone, Ralph J.; Tuck, Adrian F.; Frederick, John E.; Harries, John E.; Crutzen, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) uses solar occultation to measure vertical profiles of O3, HCl, HF, CH4, H2O, NO, NO2, aerosol extinction, and temperature versus pressure with an instantaneous vertical field of view of 1.6 km at the earth limb. Latitudinal coverage is from 80 deg S to 80 deg N over the course of 1 year and includes extensive observations of the Antarctic region during spring. The altitude range of the measurements extends from about 15 km to about 60-130 km, depending on channel. Experiment operations have been essentially flawless, and all performance criteria either meet or exceed specifications. Internal data consistency checks, comparisons with correlative measurements, and qualitative comparisons with 1985 atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) results are in good agreement. Examples of pressure versus latitude cross sections and a global orthographic projection for the September 21 to October 15, 1992, period show the utility of CH4, HF, and H2O as tracers, the occurrence of dehydration in the Antarctic lower stratosphere, the presence of the water vapor hygropause in the tropics, evidence of Antarctic air in the tropics, the influence of Hadley tropical upwelling, and the first global distribution of HCl, HF, and NO throughout the stratosphere. Nitric oxide measurements extend through the lower thermosphere.

  15. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase: A Crucial Player and Potential Therapeutic Target in Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Terry King-Wing; McAdoo, Stephen P; Tam, Frederick Wai-Keung

    2016-01-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a 72 kDa cytoplasmic non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, plays an important role in signal transduction in a variety of cell types. Ever since its discovery in the early 1990s, there has been accumulating evidence to suggest a pathogenic role of Syk in various allergic disorders, autoimmune diseases and malignancies. Additionally, there is emerging data from both pre-clinical and clinical studies that Syk is implicated in the pathogenesis of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN), including anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated GN, lupus nephritis and immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN). Moreover, recent animal studies have shed light on the importance of Syk in mediating acute renal allograft rejection, Epstein Barr virus-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and kidney fibrosis. Fostamatinib, an oral Syk inhibitor, has undergone clinical testing in rheumatoid arthritis, refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura, leukemia and lymphoma. The recent STOP-IgAN trial showed that the addition of non-selective immunosuppressive therapy to intensive supportive care did not improve clinical outcomes in high-risk IgAN patients. A Syk-targeted approach may be beneficial and is currently being evaluated in a phase II randomized controlled trial. In this review, we will discuss the pathogenic role of Syk and potential use of Syk inhibitor in a variety of renal diseases. PMID:27476075

  16. Genetics, Environment, and Diabetes-Related End-Stage Renal Disease in the Canary Islands

    PubMed Central

    González, Ana M.; Maceira, Benito M.; Pérez, Estefanía; Cabrera, Vicente M.; López, Alfonso J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Type 1 and type 2 diabetes, complicated with renal disease, have a significantly higher incidence in the Canary Islands than in mainland Spain and other European countries. Present-day Canarian inhabitants consist of a mixed population with North African indigenous and European colonizer ancestors who have rapidly evolved from a rural to an urban life style. The aim of this work was to assess the possible role of genetic and environmental factors on diabetes-related end-stage renal disease incidence in the Canary Islands. Results: For both types of diabetes there is an ethnic susceptibility increased by diabetes family history. Whereas the Y-chromosome does not play a significant role, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup differences point to a maternal origin for this ethnic predisposition, confirming susceptible and protective effects for haplogroups J and T, respectively. In addition, urban life style seems to be an additional risk factor for type 1 diabetes. Conclusions: The maternal ethnic predisposition to diabetes complicated with kidney disease detected in the Canary Islands signals mtDNA and X-chromosome markers as the best candidates to uncover the genetic predisposition to this disease. PMID:22480375

  17. Inflammation in end-stage renal disease--a fire that burns within.

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. As traditional risk factors cannot alone explain the unacceptable high prevalence and incidence of CVD in this population, inflammation (which is interrelated to insulin resistance, oxidative stress, wasting and endothelial dysfunction) has been suggested to be a significant contributor. Indeed, several different inflammatory biomarkers, such as high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), have been shown to independently predict mortality in ESRD patients. As CRP is so strongly associated with vascular disease it has been suggested that this hepatic-derived protein is not only a marker, but also a mediator of vascular disease. Indeed, recent in vitro data from studies on endothelial cells, monocytes-macrophages and smooth muscle cells support a direct role for CRP in atherogenesis. The causes of the highly prevalent state of inflammation in ESRD are multiple, including decreased renal function, volume overload, comorbidity and intercurrent clinical events, factors associated with the dialysis procedure and genetic factors. Recent evidence suggests that several cytokine DNA polymorphisms may affect the inflammatory state as well as outcome in ESRD patients. As interventions directed towards traditional risk factors have, so far, not proven to be very effective, controlled studies are needed to evaluate if various pharmacological as well as non-pharmacological anti-inflammatory treatment strategies, alone or in combination, may be an option to affect the unacceptable high cardiovascular mortality rate in this patient group.

  18. Predicting Renal Failure Progression in Chronic Kidney Disease Using Integrated Intelligent Fuzzy Expert System

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Jamshid; Mirbagheri, Seyed Ahmad; Mazdeh, Mitra Mahdavi; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a covert disease. Accurate prediction of CKD progression over time is necessary for reducing its costs and mortality rates. The present study proposes an adaptive neurofuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for predicting the renal failure timeframe of CKD based on real clinical data. Methods. This study used 10-year clinical records of newly diagnosed CKD patients. The threshold value of 15 cc/kg/min/1.73 m2 of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was used as the marker of renal failure. A Takagi-Sugeno type ANFIS model was used to predict GFR values. Variables of age, sex, weight, underlying diseases, diastolic blood pressure, creatinine, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, and GFR were initially selected for the predicting model. Results. Weight, diastolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus as underlying disease, and current GFR(t) showed significant correlation with GFRs and were selected as the inputs of model. The comparisons of the predicted values with the real data showed that the ANFIS model could accurately estimate GFR variations in all sequential periods (Normalized Mean Absolute Error lower than 5%). Conclusions. Despite the high uncertainties of human body and dynamic nature of CKD progression, our model can accurately predict the GFR variations at long future periods. PMID:27022406

  19. A Pilot Trial of a Computerized Renal Template Note to Improve Resident Knowledge and Documentation of Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shirazian, S; Wang, R.; Moledina, D.; Liberman, V.; Zeidan, J.; Strand, D.; Mattana, J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Kidney disease is under-documented in physician notes. The use of template-guided notes may improve physician recognition of kidney disease early in training. Objective The objective of this study was to determine whether a computerized inpatient renal template note with clinical decision support improves resident knowledge and documentation of kidney disease. Methods In this prospective study, first year medical residents were encouraged to use the renal template note for documentation over a one-month period. The renal template note included an option for classification of acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) categories with a link to standard classifications. Pre- and post-knowledge of AKI and CKD categories was tested with a quiz and surveys of resident experience with the intervention were conducted. Appropriate AKI and/or CKD classification was determined in 100 renal template notes and 112 comparable historical internal medicine resident progress notes from approximately one year prior. Results 2,435 inpatient encounters amongst 15 residents who participated were documented using the renal template note. A significantly higher percent of residents correctly staged earlier stage CKD (CKD3) using the renal template note compared to historical notes (9/46 vs. 0/33, p<0.01). Documentation of AKI and more advanced CKD stages (CKD4 and 5) did not improve. Knowledge based on quiz scores increased modestly but was not significant. The renal template note was well received by residents and was perceived as helping improve knowledge and documentation of kidney disease. Conclusion The renal template note significantly improved staging of earlier stage CKD (CKD3) with a modest but non-significant improvement in resident knowledge. Given the importance of early recognition and treatment of CKD, future studies should focus on teaching early recognition using template notes with supplemental educational interventions. PMID:24454580

  20. Utility of Iron Staining in Identifying the Cause of Renal Allograft Dysfunction in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingchun; Doshi, Mona; Khan, Salman; Li, Wei; Zhang, Ping L

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) is associated with iron/heme deposition in proximal renal tubules and related acute tubular injury (ATI). Here we report the utility of iron staining in differentiating causes of renal allograft dysfunction in patients with a history of sickle cell disease. Case 1: the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction two years after renal transplant. Her renal biopsy showed ATI, supported by patchy loss of brush border and positive staining of kidney injury molecule-1 in proximal tubular epithelial cells, where diffuse increase in iron staining (2+) was present. This indicated that ATI likely resulted from iron/heme toxicity to proximal tubules. Electron microscope confirmed aggregated sickle RBCs in glomeruli, indicating a recurrent SCN. Case 2: four years after renal transplant, the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction and became positive for serum donor-specific antibody. His renal biopsy revealed thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and diffuse positive C4d stain in peritubular capillaries. Iron staining was negative in the renal tubules, implying that TMA was likely associated with acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR, type 2) rather than recurrent SCN. These case reports imply that iron staining is an inexpensive but effective method in distinguishing SCN-associated renal injury in allograft kidney from other etiologies. PMID:26697257

  1. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma-like tumors in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease are unrelated to sporadic clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Zhang, Shaobo; Eble, John N; Grignon, David J; Martignoni, Guido; Brunelli, Matteo; Wang, Mingsheng; Gobbo, Stefano; Baldridge, Lee Ann; Cheng, Liang

    2013-08-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) shares morphologic overlap with clear cell renal cell carcinoma, although it lacks chromosome 3p and VHL gene abnormalities. Rare cases have been reported in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) patients (germline mutation of the VHL gene), the significance of which is uncertain. We analyzed morphologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features in 14 CCPRCC-like tumors and 13 clear cell renal cell carcinomas from 12 patients with VHL disease. Gross appearance of CCPRCC-like tumors ranged from yellow-orange to tan, red-brown, or extensively cystic. Histologic features included: small papillary tufts (79%), branched tubules (71%), branched papillae (64%), flattened peripheral cysts (64%), and apically aligned nuclei (43%). Almost all CCPRCC-like tumors (82%) lacked the characteristic immunoprofile of sporadic CCPRCC (CK7, CAIX, CD10, AMACR), often showing diffuse CD10 labeling (64%), negative or focal CK7 reactivity (55%), or both (18%). Three tumors (27%) showed strong AMACR staining. Chromosome 3p deletion was often present (82%), similar to that observed in clear cell renal cell carcinomas (80%); no CCPRCC-like tumor had chromosome 7 or 17 abnormalities. In summary, tumors that histologically resemble CCPRCC sometimes occur in patients with VHL disease but usually lack the characteristic immunohistochemical and molecular profile, suggesting that they do not share the same pathogenesis. PMID:23648463

  2. Technology insight: Innovative options for end-stage renal disease--from kidney refurbishment to artificial kidney.

    PubMed

    Braam, Branko; Verhaar, Marianne C; Blankestijn, Peter; Boer, Walther H; Joles, Jaap A

    2007-10-01

    The steadily growing number of patients with chronic kidney disease who will eventually develop end-stage renal disease, together with the qualitative limitations of currently available renal replacement therapies, have triggered the exploration of innovative strategies for renal replacement therapy and for salvage of renal function. Currently, new hemodialysis modalities and membranes are being used with the aim of increasing clearance of uremic toxins to afford better metabolic control. In addition to these conventional approaches, there are four innovative potential solutions to the problem of replacing renal function when kidneys fail. The first is a small, implantable device with the potential to be supplemented with human cells ('artificial kidney'). The second involves restoration of the damaged kidney by harnessing recent advances in stem-cell technology and knowledge of developmental programing ('refurbished kidney'). The third is (partially) growing a kidney in vitro with the use of therapeutic cloning ('cultured kidney'). The fourth innovative solution involves the use of other organs to replace various renal functions ('distributed kidney'). In this article we review the efforts that have been made to improve renal replacement therapies, and explore innovative approaches. We will not cover all potential solutions in detail. Rather, we aim to indicate directions of future endeavor and arouse enthusiasm in clinicians and scientists for exploration of these exciting avenues.

  3. Anemia, chronic renal disease and congestive heart failure--the cardio renal anemia syndrome: the need for cooperation between cardiologists and nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Donald S; Wexler, Dov; Iaina, Adrian; Steinbruch, Shoshana; Wollman, Y; Schwartz, Doron

    2006-01-01

    Many patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) fail to respond to maximal CHF therapy and progress to end stage CHF with many hospitalizations, poor quality of life (QoL), progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) which can lead to end stage kidney disease (ESKD), or die of cardiovascular complications within a short time. One factor that has generally been ignored in many of these people is the fact that they are often anemic. The anemia in CHF is due mainly to the frequently-associated CKD but also to the inhibitory effects of cytokines on erythropoietin production and on bone marrow activity, as well as to their interference with iron absorption from the gut and their inhibiting effect on the release of iron from iron stores. Anemia itself may further worsen cardiac and renal function and make the patients resistant to standard CHF therapy. Indeed anemia in CHF has been associated with increased severity of CHF, increased hospitalization, worse cardiac function and functional class, the need for higher doses of diuretics, progressive worsening of renal function and reduced QoL. In both controlled and uncontrolled studies of CHF, the correction of the anemia with erythropoietin (EPO) and oral or intravenous (IV) iron has been associated with improvement in many cardiac and renal parameters and an increased QoL. EPO itself may also play a direct role in improving the heart unrelated to the improvement of the anemia--by reducing apoptosis of cardiac and endothelial cells, increasing the number of endothelial progenitor cells, and improving endothelial cell function and neovascularization of the heart. Anemia may also play a role in the worsening of acute myocardial infarction and chronic coronary heart disease (CHD) and in the cardiovascular complications of renal transplantation. Anemia, CHF and CKD interact as a vicious circle so as to cause or worsen each other- the so-called cardio renal anemia syndrome. Only adequate treatment of all three conditions can

  4. IgG4-related Disease: A Mass Lesion in the Intrarenal Sinus near the Renal Pelvis.

    PubMed

    Inenaga, Jun-Ichi; Ueno, Toshiharu; Kawada, Masahiro; Imafuku, Aya; Mise, Koki; Sumida, Keiichi; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Hasegawa, Eiko; Hayami, Noriko; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Junichi; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Okaneya, Toshikazu; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital with the renal pelvic mass lesion detected on a health screening examination. The surgical specimen contained a mass exhibiting the histological features of immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-related disease, including lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and sclerosis with numerous IgG4-producing plasma cells. Postoperatively, an elevation of the serum IgG4 level was confirmed at 403 mg/dL; however, there was no evidence of tubulointerstitial nephritis or glomerulopathy, including membranous nephropathy, and the urothelium of the renal pelvis was intact without inflammation. We herein report this case in which IgG4-related disease of the renal pelvic region presented with a mass lesion in the intrarenal sinus near the renal pelvis, not 'pyelitis' (as described by Stone). PMID:26234232

  5. Beethoven's renal disease based on his autopsy: a case of papillary necrosis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, A

    1993-06-01

    The autopsy report of Ludwig van Beethoven written by Dr Johann Wagner in 1827 reveals that he had renal calculi that had not been diagnosed during his lifetime, together with perirenal fibrosis. The most comprehensive interpretation of this autopsy finding is that the regular calcareous deposits in every one of his renal calices represented calcified necrotic papillae. Severe urinary obstruction or diabetes as possible causes of papillary necrosis were not present. Analgesic abuse because of headaches, back pain, and attacks of rheumatism or gout may be presumed on the basis of Beethoven's uncontrolled way of taking medication. Salicin, a commonly used analgesic substance of that time (dried and powdered willow bark), is able to cause papillary necrosis. Perirenal fibrosis may be due to chronic infection or drug intake. Beethoven's other well-known diseases are deafness caused by otosclerosis of the inner ear, relapsing attacks of diarrhea as the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, and liver cirrhosis following viral hepatitis and chronic alcohol consumption. Liver cirrhosis also may cause papillary necrosis. In Beethoven's case, renal papillary necrosis was most probably the consequence of analgesic abuse together with decompensated liver cirrhosis. The autopsy report of Beethoven is the first case of papillary necrosis recorded in the literature.

  6. Beethoven's renal disease based on his autopsy: a case of papillary necrosis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, A

    1993-06-01

    The autopsy report of Ludwig van Beethoven written by Dr Johann Wagner in 1827 reveals that he had renal calculi that had not been diagnosed during his lifetime, together with perirenal fibrosis. The most comprehensive interpretation of this autopsy finding is that the regular calcareous deposits in every one of his renal calices represented calcified necrotic papillae. Severe urinary obstruction or diabetes as possible causes of papillary necrosis were not present. Analgesic abuse because of headaches, back pain, and attacks of rheumatism or gout may be presumed on the basis of Beethoven's uncontrolled way of taking medication. Salicin, a commonly used analgesic substance of that time (dried and powdered willow bark), is able to cause papillary necrosis. Perirenal fibrosis may be due to chronic infection or drug intake. Beethoven's other well-known diseases are deafness caused by otosclerosis of the inner ear, relapsing attacks of diarrhea as the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, and liver cirrhosis following viral hepatitis and chronic alcohol consumption. Liver cirrhosis also may cause papillary necrosis. In Beethoven's case, renal papillary necrosis was most probably the consequence of analgesic abuse together with decompensated liver cirrhosis. The autopsy report of Beethoven is the first case of papillary necrosis recorded in the literature. PMID:8503419

  7. The future of end-stage renal disease care: nephrology enters a new millennium.

    PubMed

    Hoffart, N; Nissenson, A R

    1998-10-01

    There are many challenges facing the discipline of nephrology as we enter the next millennium. There will be a continuing increase in the number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy, with older, sicker patients predominating. At the same time the available workforce to provide care to these patients is not growing quickly enough to keep up with the demand. In the broader health care delivery system, consolidation of services, vertical and horizontal integration, a continued move to for-profit entities, and constant pressure on cost containment will increasingly characterize the immediate future. The rapidity with which health care delivery and financing are changing will make it difficult for patients and health care professionals alike, but it will also offer opportunities. In nephrology, development of a collaborative model of care has already begun and will be an important part of the response to this changing care environment. Collaborative care and the application of the principles of chronic disease management to renal patients will provide the best opportunities to capitalize on new technologies and treatments as they become available and to streamline and improve the care delivery process. This should lead to improved quality of care for renal patients, while constraining costs and providing for continued professional growth and satisfaction.

  8. Multicentric Castleman’s disease with renal amyloidosis and mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhicheng; Wang, Lihua; Wang, Chen; Gao, Lifang; Yang, Yanrong

    2015-01-01

    Renal involvement is a significant complication of multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD) and various glomerular involvements have been reported. A 56-year-old Chinese woman presented with proteinuria and skin rash, with lymphadenopathy and hypergammaglobulinemia. Lymph nodes and skin biopsy proven the case was multicentric CD with plasma cell pathological pattern. The renal biopsy was performed and six glomeruli were observed and two of these showed global sclerosis. Moderate increasing of mesangial matrix with mesangial cell proliferation were seen in every glomerulus. In addition, one-segmental sclerosis accompanied by adhesion of the Bowman’s capsule was revealed. Two of the glomeruli had crescents formation. Under immunofluorescence microscopy, immunofluorescence for anti-IgA, IgM, C3, C1q and FRA showed coarse and fine granular depositions along capillary walls and sparsely in the mesangium. Staining for anti-IgG was negative. Under electron microscopy revealed indiscriminate amyloidal deposits in glomerular basement membrane. The foot process of glomerular podocytes was fusion. Moderate increasing of mesangial matrix and mesangial cell proliferation were found. Subsequently, she was successfully treated with prednisone combined with cyclophosphamide therapy not only for proteinuria but also for renal function. PMID:25932265

  9. Acute renal failure in obstructive diseases of the extrahepatic biliary ducts.

    PubMed

    Acalovschi, I; Chirileanu, T

    1984-01-01

    A series of 46 patients with obstructive disease of the bile ducts complicated by acute renal failure (ARF) is presented. The patients exhibited obstructive jaundice with prevalence of conjugated bilirubine. In 80% of the cases biliary obstruction was associated with cholangitis. Disturbances of the liver function (from mild cholestasis to biliary cirrhosis) were also present. The renal damage was due to biliary disorders and was either present on admission (33 cases) or developed postoperatively (13 cases). Most of the patients presented nonoliguric ARF as well as poor perfusion resulting from decreased circulating blood volume (dehydration and electrolyte loss). Among the criteria used to determine the type of ARF, the urinary/plasma creatinine ratio less than 10 and urinary/plasma osmolarity ratio less than 1.1 were the most valuable. Management of ARF by dialysis alone was not satisfactory. Attention is called to the surgical treatment of the biliary disorder as being essential to prognosis. Patients not treated by radical surgery died in proportion of 87 to 100%. From the rest of 18 patients in whom the operation provided an adequate biliary drainage, in 15 the renal function was restored and 12 survived. Better prognosis in these patients was dependent not only on the ability to cure the cholestasis and infection, but on the early surgical treatment. The ultimate prognosis depends on the improvement of the liver function.

  10. Relevance of chronic kidney disease classification (K/DOQI) in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fresnedo, G; de Francisco, A; Ruiz, J C; Cotorruelo, J G; Alamillo, C G; Valero, R; Castañeda, O; Zalduendo, B; Izquierdo, M J; Arias, M

    2006-10-01

    The National Kidney Foundation has developed guidelines for diagnosis and classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) but it is not known whether they are applicable to renal transplant patients. This study analyzed the prevalence, the complications, and the influence of the CKD stage on the presence of complications in 506 stable transplant recipients. The mean age of the patients was 52.9 +/- 12 years, 34% were men, and the mean time after transplantation was 9.56 +/- 6.18 years. CKD was present in 90.3% with 9.9% were in CKD stages 4 or 5 with glomerular filtration rates lower than 30 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). The prevalence of anemia, phospho-calcium metabolism disorders, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension increased with the stage of CKD. We concluded that CKD and the complications of CKD were highly prevalent in renal transplant recipients. The classification of renal transplant patients by CKD stage may help clinicians to identify patients at increased risk and to target appropriate therapy to improve outcomes.

  11. Efficacy of loop diuretics in the management of undocumented patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salman; Guffey, Danielle; Minard, Charles; Workeneh, Biruh

    2016-08-01

    An estimated 6000 patients who are undocumented immigrants have end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and routinely present to public safety-net hospitals for life-saving emergent dialysis treatments. Because these patients lack a dialysis unit, they often do not have access to medication management consistently coordinated by a nephrologist, and this can result in more frequent emergency department (ED) utilization and cost of care. We hypothesized that patients who were taking loop diuretics had fewer ED visits for emergency dialysis. Loop diuretics can potentially take advantage of residual renal function and mitigate excess fluid gain that can induce heart failure and high potassium, the two most common indications for emergency dialysis. In our univariable analysis, patients on furosemide had 3.1 fewer ED visits on average compared with patients who are not on furosemide. After adjusting for vintage and serum potassium measures, the average number of ED visits was about 1.1 visits less in furosemide-treated patients compared with patients not receiving furosemide (95% confidence interval, -4.4 to 2.1). These results suggest that loop diuretics may have an important role in undocumented patients with ESRD with residual renal function. Further study to develop practical approaches to the care of undocumented patients with ESRD is greatly needed.

  12. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world’s population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs. PMID:27648403

  13. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-09-01

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world's population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs. PMID:27648403

  14. [Urine osmotic pressure and deficiency-excess syndrome of renal disease: analysis of 428 cases].

    PubMed

    Zhang, S

    1990-05-01

    By means of TCM differentiation of symptom-complexes, the authors tested and analysed the urine osmotic pressure (UOP) and the urine and plasma osmotic ratio (UPOR) for 428 cases of renal disease, with the conclusion that the UOP and the UPOR were within the normal value range for not only the 36 cases lack of clinical symptoms so as to be unable to have TCM classification identified, but also for 24 cases of Wind edema excess syndrome mainly caused by pathogenic Wind's invasion to the Lung. But for 74 cases of damp-heat Kidney impairment and 294 cases with the main symptom being Kidney deficiency [including weakness of Qi of Kidney, Yang deficiency of Spleen and Kidney, Yin deficiency of Liver and Kidney], the value of their UOP and the UPOR had the tendency of reduction (P less than 0.01), among which the value of the patients of Kidney Yang deficiency reduced most obviously. The further observation showed that, for the nocturia patients caused by renal disease, the value of UOP and the UPOR reduced more obviously than usual. Therefore the authors assert that the test on UOP and UPOR will offer an objective index to patients' nocturia and Kidney-Qi weakness. 60 cases with renal disease of Kidney deficiency syndrome and 27 cases of damp-heat Kidney impairment syndrome under the diagnosis and treatment based on an overall analysis of symptoms and signs leads to the following conclusion: With the elimination of pathogenic factors and recovery of kidney, the damp-heat Kidney impairment patients' UOP will be increased. The low UOP of patients caused simply by Kidney deficiency, however, will recover slower.

  15. Evidence of hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid abnormalities in children with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, T; Zantleifer, D; Balzaretti, M; Granillo, E; Fainstein-Day, P; Ramirez, J; Ruiz, S; Gutman, R; Ferraris, J

    1991-06-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease may have abnormalities of growth and of gonadal and thyroid hormones, so we attempted to determine the mechanisms that may be involved in the altered thyroid function. We evaluated serum thyroid hormone levels, their changes immediately after hemodialysis, the serum thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) response to thyrotropin releasing hormone, and the circadian pattern of serum TSH in nine children with end-stage renal disease who were between 7 1/2 years and 17 years 1 month of age. Seven patients had been receiving hemodialysis for a median of 3.3 years; the other two were receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Four patients had low serum total thyroxine (T4) values, and all nine had low free T4 values. Mean concentrations of total T4, free T4, and total triiodothyronine (T3), which were significantly less than normal before hemodialysis, returned to normal levels immediately after dialysis. Postdialysis thyroid hormone increases did not correlate with the decrease in weight or the increase in hematocrit observed immediately after dialysis. All but one patient had basal TSH levels within the normal range. Three patients had a deficient TSH response to thyrotropin releasing hormone, and the TSH response was prolonged in all of them. The mean (+/- SD) nocturnal TSH surge was 50 +/- 68%. Five of the eight patients studied had a nocturnal TSH surge below the normal range (95% confidence limits 47% to 300%). Serum free T4 values correlated with the TSH nocturnal surge (r, 0.73; p less than 0.05). Our findings support the hypothesis that some patients with end-stage renal disease have central hypothyroidism.

  16. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-09-01

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world's population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs.

  17. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world’s population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs.

  18. Inhibition of the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway attenuates renal disease in nephrotoxic serum nephritis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Campbell, Sean R; Broder, Anna; Herlitz, Leal; Abadi, Maria; Wu, Ping; Michaelson, Jennifer S; Burkly, Linda C; Putterman, Chaim

    2012-11-01

    Previously it was shown that the TNF superfamily member TWEAK (TNFSF12) acts through its receptor, Fn14, to promote proinflammatory responses in kidney cells, including the production of MCP-1, RANTES, IP-10 and KC. In addition, the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway promotes mesangial cell proliferation, vascular cell activation, and renal cell death. To study the relevance of the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway in the pathogenesis of antibody-induced nephritis using the mouse model of nephrotoxic serum nephritis (NTN), we induced NTN by passive transfer of rabbit anti-glomerular antibodies into Fn14 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. Severe proteinuria as well as renal histopathology were induced in WT but not in Fn14 KO mice. Similarly, a pharmacologic approach of anti-TWEAK mAb administration into WT mice in the NTN model significantly ameliorated proteinuria and improved kidney histology. Anti-TWEAK treatment did not affect the generation of mouse anti-rabbit antibodies; however, within the kidney there was a significant decrease in glomerular immunoglobulin deposition, as well as macrophage infiltrates and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The mechanism of action is most likely due to reductions in downstream targets of TWEAK/Fn14 signaling, including reduced renal expression of MCP-1, VCAM-1, IP-10, RANTES as well as Fn14 itself, and other molecular pathways associated with fibrosis in anti-TWEAK treated mice. Thus, TWEAK/Fn14 interactions are instrumental in the pathogenesis of nephritis in the NTN model, apparently mediating a cascade of pathologic events locally in the kidney rather than by impacting the systemic immune response. Disrupting TWEAK/Fn14 interactions may be an innovative kidney-protective approach for the treatment of lupus nephritis and other antibody-induced renal diseases.

  19. Regan isoenzyme of alkaline phosphatase as a tumour marker for renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowczan, J; Pattman, S; Jenkinson, F; Quinton, R

    2014-09-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme present in all tissues of the human body. Several isoforms of this enzyme have been described with different catalytic nature, stability and antigenic structure. Rises in the activity of alkaline phosphatase are recognised in various states including bone diseases, liver disease, pregnancy, hyperthyroidism and malignant processes. The Regan isoenzyme, a rare variant of placental alkaline phosphatase, has been identified circulating in association with various tumours. The reported case describes a rising Regan isoform of alkaline phosphatase concentrations that led to a new diagnosis of occult renal cell carcinoma and persistently elevated activity postoperatively signposting persistent or recurrent disease.

  20. Legionnaire's disease and acute renal failure: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Boucree, M C

    1988-10-01

    A case report is presented of a young man admitted to a general hospital with leukocytosis, elevated temperature, right lower lobe infiltrate, and confusion. A diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure, and Legionnaire's disease was made. The patient subsequently had a respiratory arrest and died on the 29th hospital day. This triad is currently an enigma in the field of internal medicine. The diagnosis of each entity is elusive, and in many cases must be made by the astute clinician. Diagnostic features along with early intervention measures and their expected outcomes are discussed. Recognition of the interrelationship of these diseases, risk factors, and vague clinical presentations might allow further prospective intervention methods and diagnostic procedures to be undertaken to avoid the fatal consequences seen in this disease triad.

  1. Deaths from chronic renal disease in US battery and lead production workers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.C.

    1988-06-01

    This report is based on an analysis of deaths in 4519 battery plant workers and 2300 lead production or smelter workers during the years 1947 to 1980. Causes were coded to the seventh (1955) revision of the International Classification of Diseases. There were significant excess deaths for other hypertensive disease (444-447) and chronic nephritis (592-594) in both cohorts, the standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) being 320 and 475, respectively, for the former causes and 222 and 265 for the latter. Proportionate mortality analysis, which adjusted for race, also showed elevated ratios, 241 and 388 for the former causes and 296 and 186 for the latter. Deaths from other hypertension-related diseases did not show comparable excesses. Renal cancer deaths were fewer than expected, SMRs being 41 and 74, respectively.

  2. The burden of hyperkalemia in patients with cardiovascular and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jeffrey D; Benton, Wade W; Orozco-Torrentera, Ernesto; Adamson, Robert T

    2015-11-01

    Hyperkalemia is a potentially serious condition that can result in life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias and is associated with an increased mortality risk. Patients older than 65 years who have an advanced stage of chronic kidney disease (stage 3 or higher), diabetes, and/or chronic heart failure are at higher risk for hyperkalemia. To reduce disease progression and improve outcomes in these groups of patients, modulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is recommended by guidelines. One limiting factor of RAAS inhibitors at proven doses is the increased risk for hyperkalemia associated with their use. Although there are effective therapeutic options for the short-term, acute management of hyperkalemia, the available strategies for chronic control of high potassium levels have limited effectiveness. The management of high potassium in the long term often requires withdrawing or reducing the doses of drugs proven to reduce cardiovascular and renal outcomes (eg, RAAS inhibitors) or implementing excessive and often intolerable dietary restrictions. Furthermore, withholding RAAS inhibitors may lead to incremental healthcare costs associated with poor outcomes, such as end-stage renal disease, hospitalizations due to cardiovascular causes, and cardiovascular mortality. As such, there is an important unmet need for novel therapeutic options for the chronic management of patients at risk for hyperkalemia. Potential therapies in development may change the treatment landscape in the near future.

  3. Novel Biomarkers for Renal Diseases? None for the Moment (but One).

    PubMed

    Gentile, Giorgio; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Recent years have witnessed the unprecedented development and integration of genomics, epigenetics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, as well as a growing interest in novel single biomarkers and process-specific biomarker panels in human renal diseases. In a scenario currently dominated by kidney biopsy and established biomarkers such as serum creatinine, albuminuria, and proteinuria, novel biomarkers could potentially provide vital diagnostic and prognostic information and help to predict response to treatment in several clinical settings, including acute kidney injury, renal transplant, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and glomerulopathies. However, it is still uncertain whether and to what extent novel biomarkers will succeed in this difficult task. To date, they have generally failed to provide relevant information over and above what is already granted by established, cheap, and easily available biomarkers such as proteinuria, while the complexity and costs of these technology platforms are an important obstacle to their wide adoption. On the other hand, the successful implementation of anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibodies as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker of membranous nephropathy, as well as the huge number of ongoing collaborative efforts worldwide, should induce the nephrology community to be rather optimistic about a potential breakthrough in the management of kidney diseases over the next few decades. PMID:26950928

  4. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Najafabadi, Mojgan Mortazavi; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED), renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake of patients was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. DED (in kcal/g) was calculated with the use of energy content and weight of solid foods and energy yielding beverages. Renal function was measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Cr), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results. Patients in the first tertile of DED consumed more amounts of carbohydrate, dietary fiber, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, calcium, folate, vitamin C, and vitamin B2. After adjusting for confounders, we could not find any significant trend for BUN and Cr across tertiles of DED. In multivariate model, an increased risk of being in the higher stage of CKD was found among those in the last tertile of DED (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 1.30, 7.63; P = 0.01). Conclusion. We observed that lower DED was associated with better nutrient intake and lower risk of CKD progression.

  5. End state renal disease among Native Americans, 1983-86.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, J M; Marfin, A A; Eggers, P W; Helgerson, S D

    1990-01-01

    We used data reported to Medicare from 1983 through 1986 to determine the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among Native Americans and Whites in the United States. The 1,075 Native American cases represented an annual incidence, age-adjusted to the White population, of 269 per million, 2.8 times the rate for Whites. Fifty-six percent of Native American cases and 27 percent of the White cases were attributed to diabetes, indicating that ESRD is a major problem. Diabetes control provides the greatest opportunity for prevention. PMID:2305914

  6. Understanding renal replacement therapy and dosing of drugs in pediatric patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zuppa, Athena F

    2012-01-01

    Multifaceted factors need to be considered when prescribing renal replacement therapy (RRT) and dosing of drugs in pediatric patients with kidney disease. RRTs in pediatrics such as intermittent hemodialysis, continuous venovenous hemofiltration, continuous venovenous hemodialysis, and continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration affect solute and drug clearance. Drug properties such as molecular weight, molecular charge, volume of distribution, and protein binding affect drug clearance. RRT prescription parameters such as blood flow rate, ultrafiltration rate, membrane size, and pore size can also influence drug clearance. Furthermore, the pediatric patient presents additional concerns because of developmental factors in children that affect both pharmacokinetics of drugs.

  7. Institutionalized racism and end-stage renal disease: is its impact real or illusionary?

    PubMed

    Callender, Clive O; Miles, Patrice V

    2004-01-01

    Racism is the subjugation of one group (superior) over another (inferior) and may be divided into two categories: overt (gross) and covert. Covert racism (subconscious) is categorized as institutionalized racism. Although institutionalized racism is a more tolerant and restrained practice of this superior/inferior ethnic construct in which African Americans or other people of color are treated as inferiors, it has led to important health disparities between blacks and whites. One area where its mark is most indelible is in the treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

  8. Removal of Dolutegravir by Hemodialysis in HIV-Infected Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Graterol, Fredzzia; Miranda, Cristina; Khoo, Saye; Bancu, Ioana; Amara, Alieu; Bonjoch, Anna; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2016-01-01

    Data on dolutegravir removal by hemodialysis are lacking. To study this, we measured dolutegravir plasma concentrations in samples of blood entering and leaving the dialyzer and of the resulting dialysate from 5 HIV-infected patients with end-stage renal disease. The median dolutegravir hemodialysis extraction ratio was 7%. The dolutegravir concentrations after the dialysis session remained far above the protein-binding-adjusted inhibitory concentration. Our results show minimal dolutegravir removal by hemodialysis, with no specific dolutegravir dosage adjustments required in this setting. (This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT02487706.) PMID:26856824

  9. Removal of Dolutegravir by Hemodialysis in HIV-Infected Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Moltó, José; Graterol, Fredzzia; Miranda, Cristina; Khoo, Saye; Bancu, Ioana; Amara, Alieu; Bonjoch, Anna; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2016-04-01

    Data on dolutegravir removal by hemodialysis are lacking. To study this, we measured dolutegravir plasma concentrations in samples of blood entering and leaving the dialyzer and of the resulting dialysate from 5 HIV-infected patients with end-stage renal disease. The median dolutegravir hemodialysis extraction ratio was 7%. The dolutegravir concentrations after the dialysis session remained far above the protein-binding-adjusted inhibitory concentration. Our results show minimal dolutegravir removal by hemodialysis, with no specific dolutegravir dosage adjustments required in this setting. (This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT02487706.).

  10. Six-Digit CPK and Mildly Affected Renal Function in McArdle Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mcinnes, Andrew D.; DeGroote, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    A previously healthy, white 12-year-old girl presented with diffuse body aches and poor perfusion. She developed severe respiratory failure and marked rhabdomyolysis and was mechanically ventilated. Although her CPK peaked at 500,000 IU/L, her renal function was mildly affected and her creatinine did not exceed the 0.8 mg/dL. The rhabdomyolysis was gradually resolved following aggressive fluid hydration. The patient did not require dialysis and made a complete recovery. Genetic studies revealed the diagnosis of McArdle disease. PMID:25371840

  11. Improvement of Erdheim-Chester disease-related renal failure after treatment with anakinra

    PubMed Central

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Graziani, Giorgio; Reggiani, Francesco; Buemi, Michele; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis characterized by infiltrates of lipid-laden CD68+/CD1a− histiocytes, affecting heart, lungs, central nervous system, and bones. Kidney and adjacent structures can also be affected, leading to renal failure in about 30% of cases. The diagnosis is challenging, and treatment is generally based on administration of interferon-alpha (IFNα), but preliminary results also showed the therapeutic efficacy of anakinra, an antagonist of the receptor of interleukin-1 (IL-1). We report the case of an elderly patient with ECD and severe involvement of the heart and kidneys who was successfully treated with anakinra. PMID:26877969

  12. Improvement of Erdheim-Chester disease-related renal failure after treatment with anakinra.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Graziani, Giorgio; Reggiani, Francesco; Buemi, Michele; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2014-09-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis characterized by infiltrates of lipid-laden CD68(+)/CD1a(-) histiocytes, affecting heart, lungs, central nervous system, and bones. Kidney and adjacent structures can also be affected, leading to renal failure in about 30% of cases. The diagnosis is challenging, and treatment is generally based on administration of interferon-alpha (IFNα), but preliminary results also showed the therapeutic efficacy of anakinra, an antagonist of the receptor of interleukin-1 (IL-1). We report the case of an elderly patient with ECD and severe involvement of the heart and kidneys who was successfully treated with anakinra.

  13. Japan Renal Biopsy Registry and Japan Kidney Disease Registry: Committee Report for 2009 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Saito, Takao; Kohda, Yukimasa; Nishi, Shinichi; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Iida, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Tamaki; Higuchi, Makoto; Hattori, Motoshi; Oka, Kazumasa; Kagami, Shoji; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Tetsuro; Hataya, Hiroshi; Fukasawa, Yuichiro; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Morozumi, Kunio; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Shimizu, Akira; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yuzawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Seiichi; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Joh, Kensuke; Nagata, Michio; Taguchi, Takashi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2013-04-01

    The Japan Renal Biopsy Registry (J-RBR) was started in 2007 and the Japan Kidney Disease Registry (J-KDR) was then started in 2009 by the Committee for Standardization of Renal Pathological Diagnosis and the Committee for the Kidney Disease Registry of the Japanese Society of Nephrology. The purpose of this report is to describe and summarize the registered data from 2009 and 2010. For the J-KDR, data were collected from 4,016 cases, including 3,336 (83.1 %) by the J-RBR and 680 (16.9 %) other cases from 59 centers in 2009, and from 4,681 cases including 4,106 J-RBR cases (87.7 %) and 575 other cases (12.3 %) from 94 centers in 2010, including the affiliate hospitals. In the J-RBR, 3,165 native kidneys (94.9 %) and 171 renal grafts (5.1 %) and 3,869 native kidneys (94.2 %) and 237 renal grafts (5.8 %) were registered in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Patients younger than 20 years of age comprised 12.1 % of the registered cases, and those 65 years and over comprised 24.5 % of the cases with native kidneys in 2009 and 2010. The most common clinical diagnosis was chronic nephritic syndrome (55.4 % and 50.0 % in 2009 and 2010, respectively), followed by nephrotic syndrome (22.4 % and 27.0 %); the most frequent pathological diagnosis as classified by the pathogenesis was IgA nephropathy (31.6 % and 30.4 %), followed by primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) (27.2 % and 28.1 %). Among the primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) in the patients with nephrotic syndrome, membranous nephropathy was the most common histopathology in 2009 (40.3 %) and minor glomerular abnormalities (50.0 %) were the most common in 2010 in native kidneys in the J-RBR. Five new secondary and longitudinal research studies by the J-KDR were started in 2009 and one was started in 2010.

  14. Uranus occults SAO158687. [stellar occultation and planetary parametric observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Veverka, J.; Millis, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Experience gained in obtaining atmospheric parameters, oblatenesses, and diameters of Jupiter and Mars from recent stellar occultations by these planets is used to predict what can be learned from the March 1977 occultation of the star SAO158687 by Uranus. The spectra of this star and Uranus are compared to indicate the relative instrument intensities of the two objects, the four passbands where the relative intensities are most nearly equal are listed, and expected photon fluxes from the star are computed on the assumption that it has UBVRI colors appropriate for a K5 main-sequence object. It is shown that low photon noise errors can be achieved by choosing appropriate passbands for observation, and the rms error expected for the Uranus temperature profiles obtained from the occultation light curves is calculated. It is suggested that observers of this occultation should record their data digitally for optimum time resolution.

  15. Brown Norway Chromosome 1 Congenic Reduces Symptoms of Renal Disease in Fatty Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Craig H.; Slupsky, Carolyn; Griffey, Stephen M.; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Min, Esther; Le, Anh; Fisler, Janis S.; Hansen, Susan; Haj, Fawaz; Stern, Judith S.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that a congenic rat with Brown Norway (BN) alleles on chromosome 1 reduces renal disease of 15-week old fatty Zucker rats (ZUC). Development of renal disease in fatty BN congenic and fatty ZUC rats from 9 through 28 weeks is now examined. Analysis of urine metabolites by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed a significantly increased urinary loss of glucose, myo-inositol, urea, creatine, and valine in ZUC. Food intake was lower in the BN congenic rats at weeks 9–24, but they weighed significantly more at 28 weeks compared with the ZUC group. Fasting glucose was significantly higher in ZUC than congenic and adiponectin levels were significantly lower in ZUC, but there was no significant genotype effect on Insulin levels. Glucose tolerance tests exhibited no significant differences between ZUC and congenic when values were normalized to basal glucose levels. Quantitative PCR on livers revealed evidence for higher gluconeogenesis in congenics than ZUC at 9 weeks. Plasma urea nitrogen and creatinine were more than 2-fold higher in 28-week ZUC. Twelve urine protein markers of glomerular, proximal and distal tubule disease were assayed at three ages. Several proteins that indicate glomerular and proximal tubular disease increased with age in both congenic and ZUC. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) level, a marker whose levels decrease with distal tubule disease, was significantly higher in congenics. Quantitative histology of 28 week old animals revealed the most significant genotype effect was for tubular dilation and intratubular protein. The congenic donor region is protective of kidney disease, and effects on Type 2 diabetes are likely limited to fasting glucose and adiponectin. The loss of urea together with a small increase of food intake in ZUC support the hypothesis that nitrogen balance is altered in ZUC from an early age. PMID:24498189

  16. Hydrogen sulphide and the kidney: important roles in renal physiology and pathogenesis and treatment of kidney injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Lobb, I; Sonke, E; Aboalsamh, G; Sener, A

    2015-04-30

    The kidney is an essential mammalian organ that serves to filter toxins and metabolic by-products out of the blood, which are then excreted through urine. Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a recently characterized, endogenous gaseous molecule with important physiological roles. Many interesting roles continue to be identified for H2S related specifically to the kidney. The current review discusses how production and action of H2S influences normal physiology of the kidney. We investigate as well the many roles H2S plays in the pathogenesis and treatment of kidney injury and disease, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), ureteral obstruction (UO), hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy), drug-induced nephrotoxicity (DIN) and renal ischaemia reperfusion injury (IRI). We suggest that H2S plays a complex and essential role in the normal function of the kidney and dysregulation of H2S production can directly or indirectly contribute to the pathogenesis of renal disease and injury. Also, H2S could be a promising potential therapeutic treatment to decrease the severity of several renal diseases. Further research will identify increasingly important and complex roles for H2S in renal physiology and how H2S can be effectively utilized to improve clinical outcomes of renal disease.

  17. Pinhole occulter experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ring, Jeff; Pflug, John

    1987-01-01

    Viewgraphs and charts from a briefing summarize the accomplishments, results, conclusions, and recommendations of a feasibility study using the Pinhole Occulter Facility (POF). Accomplishments for 1986 include: (1) improved IPS Gimbal Model; (2) improved Crew Motion Disturbance Model; (3) use of existing shuttle on-orbit simulation to study the effects of orbiter attitude deadband size on POF performance; (4) increased understanding of maximum performance expected from current actuator/sensor set; (5) use of TREETOPS nonlinear time domain program to obtain system dynamics describing the complex multibody flexible structures; (6) use of HONEY-X design tool to design and evaluate multivariable compensator for stability, robustness, and performance; (7) application of state-of-the-art compensator design methodology Linear Quadratic Gaussian/Loop Transfer Recovery (LQG/LTR); and (8) examination of tolerance required on knowledge of the POF boom flexible mode frequencies to insure stability, using structure uncertainty analysis.

  18. Pinhole occulter experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, Jeff; Pflug, John

    1987-02-01

    Viewgraphs and charts from a briefing summarize the accomplishments, results, conclusions, and recommendations of a feasibility study using the Pinhole Occulter Facility (POF). Accomplishments for 1986 include: (1) improved IPS Gimbal Model; (2) improved Crew Motion Disturbance Model; (3) use of existing shuttle on-orbit simulation to study the effects of orbiter attitude deadband size on POF performance; (4) increased understanding of maximum performance expected from current actuator/sensor set; (5) use of TREETOPS nonlinear time domain program to obtain system dynamics describing the complex multibody flexible structures; (6) use of HONEY-X design tool to design and evaluate multivariable compensator for stability, robustness, and performance; (7) application of state-of-the-art compensator design methodology Linear Quadratic Gaussian/Loop Transfer Recovery (LQG/LTR); and (8) examination of tolerance required on knowledge of the POF boom flexible mode frequencies to insure stability, using structure uncertainty analysis.

  19. Risk of Occult Uterine Sarcoma in Presumed Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Cui, Rosa R; Wright, Jason D

    2016-03-01

    Symptomatic fibroids are a common indication for hysterectomy or myomectomy. Although rare, unexpected gynecologic malignancies in presumed fibroids have been documented. In cases where tissue retrieval is performed through morcellation, there is increasing concern that intra-abdominal dispersion of occult uterine malignancies may lead to peritoneal dissemination and worse outcomes. We examined the available literature to determine the prevalence of all uterine cancers in women undergoing hysterectomy or myomectomy for benign uterine disease, with attention to the risk of morcellating occult uterine sarcomas. We also reviewed the available tools for preoperative discrimination between benign and malignant uterine disease. PMID:26645385

  20. Increased risk of atrial fibrillation in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cheng-Huang; Zheng, Cai-Mei; Kiu, Kee-Thai; Chen, Hsin-An; Wu, Chia-Chang; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wang, Yuan-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients commonly have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases than general population. Chronic kidney disease is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF); however, little is known about the AF risk among ESRD patients with various modalities of renal replacement therapy. We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database to determine the incident AF among peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) patients in Taiwan. Our ESRD cohort include Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 15,947 patients, who started renal replacement therapy between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003. From the same data source, 47,841 controls without ESRD (3 subjects for each patient) were identified randomly and frequency matched by gender, age (±1 year), and the year of the study patient's index date for ESRD between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003. During the follow-up period (mean duration: 8–10 years), 3428 individuals developed the new-onset AF. The incidence rate ratios for AF were 2.07 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.93–2.23) and 1.78 (95% CI = 1.30–2.44) in HD and PD groups, respectively. After we adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidities, the hazard ratios for the AF risk were 1.46 (95% CI = 1.32–1.61) and 1.32 (95% CI = 1.00–1.83) in HD and PD groups, respectively. ESRD patients with a history of certain comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have significantly increased risks of AF. This nationwide, population-based study suggests that incidence of AF is increased among dialysis ESRD patients. Furthermore, we have to pay more attention in clinical practice and long-term care for those ESRD patients with a history of certain comorbidities. PMID:27336884

  1. Effects of smoking on renal hemodynamics in healthy volunteers and in patients with glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Ritz, E; Benck, U; Franek, E; Keller, C; Seyfarth, M; Clorius, J

    1998-10-01

    Patients with renal disease who smoke have a poor renal functional prognosis, but the mechanisms involved have not been explored. In this controlled study, the effects of smoking and sham smoking were compared in 15 healthy normotensive volunteers. All were occasional smokers and abstained from smoking for 48 h as documented by urinary cotinine measurements. These data were compared with those of seven patients with biopsy-confirmed IgA glomerulonephritis, also occasional smokers. Renal clearance examinations were obtained after hydration in the supine position before and while smoking two cigarettes or sham cigarettes in random order on 2 consecutive days. GFR and effective renal plasma flow were determined using In111-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid and 131I-hippurate with a dual tracer infusion clearance technique. In an ancillary study with six volunteers, the effect of smoking was compared with the effect of nicotine-containing chewing gum. In healthy volunteers, sham smoking caused a minor but significant increase of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and GFR with no significant change of effective renal plasma flow, filtration fraction (FF), or renovascular resistance. Smoking caused a significant and more marked increase of MAP (from baseline 92.8+/-8.98 to 105+/-7.78 mmHg) and heart rate (from 61.7+/-7.52 to 86.4+/-9.87 min(-1)), accompanied by a significant increase in arginine vasopressin (from 1.27+/-0.72 to 19.9+/-27.2 pg/ml) and epinephrine (from 37+/-13 to 140+/-129 pg/ml). During smoking, GFR decreased in all but one volunteer (from 120+/-17.7 to 102+/-19.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2), and this was accompanied by a significant decrease of FF (from 21.3+/-4.24 to 17.4+/-3.41%) and an increase in renovascular resistance (from 97.6+/-27.2 to 108+/-30.4 mmHg x min/ml per 1.73 m2). These findings were reproduced with nicotine-containing chewing gum. In contrast, when patients with IgA glomerulonephritis smoked, a similar increment in MAP was noted, the changes of

  2. The Occult: Diabolica to Alchemists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaney, Oliver J.

    1971-01-01

    The 91 items in this bibliography deal with works of occult science. The material is subdivided into biographies, dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks, noteworthy histories, indices, annuals, and a few miscellany works with treatises. (95 references) (Author)

  3. KPNO LUNAR OCCULTATION SUMMARY. III

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtke, P. C.; Africano, J. L.

    2011-01-15

    The results for 251 lunar occultation events recorded at Kitt Peak National Observatory are presented, including 20 observations of known or suspected double stars and five measurements of stars with resolved angular diameters.

  4. [Comprehensive analysis of urinary proteins for identification of renal disease markers].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Aki

    2014-07-01

    Urine can be obtained noninvasively and relatively easily to provide a large sample and it is an important source of biomarker discovery in kidney diseases. Today, urinary albumin screening is not only useful for detecting early kidney diseases, but also recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We have shown different kinds of post-translational modification of urinary albumin in patients with glomerulonephritis, such as high- and low-molecular mass forms of albumin and highly carbonylated albumin. These characteristic molecular forms of albumin are not detected in serum samples obtained from the same patients or urine of healthy subjects, reflecting the kidney diseases processes. Furthermore, measuring the levels of albumin and other urinary proteins enables comprehensive kidney examination. The urinary protein profile using cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis coupled with colloidal silver staining allows us to construct urinary protein profiles. Basically, urinary protein patterns in patients with glomerulonephritis show 5 fractions, the same as the serum pattern; however, characteristic bands of cathode β and anode β fractions, reflecting β2-microglobulin and retinol binding protein, appear in patients with tubular dysfunction. This method is useful to diagnose damaged portions of the kidney, and it provides supportive data for renal biopsy. Most recently, exosome-derived proteins are considered as a new marker source which reflects in-situ alterations in the urology and renal diseases. Different forms of electrophoresis reveal slight alterations in the protein profile on the analysis of urinary proteins including exosomes. This report introduces the electrophoresis-based urinary proteome results generated by our research group. PMID:25669044

  5. Association of preS/S Mutations with Occult Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Infection in South Korea: Transmission Potential of Distinct Occult HBV Variants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2015-06-15

    Occult hepatitis B virus infection (HBV) is characterized by HBV DNA positivity but HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) negativity. Occult HBV infection is associated with a risk of HBV transmission through blood transfusion, hemodialysis, and liver transplantation. Furthermore, occult HBV infection contributes to the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We recently reported the characteristic molecular features of mutations in the preS/S regions among Korean individuals with occult infections caused by HBV genotype C2; the variants of preS and S related to severe liver diseases among chronically infected patients were also responsible for the majority of HBV occult infections. We also reported that HBsAg variants from occult-infected Korean individuals exhibit lower HBsAg secretion capacity but not reduced HBV DNA levels. In addition, these variants exhibit increased ROS-inducing capacity compared with the wild-type strain, linking HBV occult infections to liver cell damage. Taken together, our previous reports suggest the transmission potential of distinct HBV occult infection-related variants in South Korea.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of epoetin alfa therapy for anemia of end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, L J; Carey, P; Johnson, C A

    1992-06-01

    The cost-effectiveness of epoetin alfa therapy for anemia in 20 patients with end-stage renal disease was retrospectively studied. Ten patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) were given subcutaneous epoetin alfa as part of a multicenter, protocol-controlled study of the efficacy of epoetin alfa. Ten patients on in-center hemodialysis were given intravenous epoetin alfa as part of their routine clinical care. Change in hematocrit was used as the measure of effectiveness of epoetin alfa. Medication, laboratory, and transfusion costs were monitored for the six months preceding the initiation of epoetin alfa and the first six months of treatment. The cost of therapy increased for all patients by an average of $2722 +/- 1118; transfusion costs decreased, whereas medication and laboratory costs increased. Laboratory costs were significantly greater in CAPD patients than in hemodialysis patients during epoetin alfa therapy; no significant differences in medication costs or transfusion costs were noted between the groups. The mean increase in hematocrit for all patients was 7.4 volume percent. Following the initial change in hematocrit, further therapeutic response did not appear to be determined by increasing expenditures. Epoetin alfa was shown to be effective in treating anemia in patients with end-stage renal disease, but it was associated with higher costs of therapy.

  7. Obese and diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease: Peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Ekart, Robert; Hojs, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease that is increasingly prevalent around the world and is a well-recognized risk factor for type 2 diabetes and hypertension, leading causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The obese diabetic patient with ESRD is a challenge for the nephrologist with regard to the type of renal replacement therapy that should be suggested and offered to the patient. There is no evidence that either peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis is contraindicated in obese ESRD patients. In the literature, we can find a discrepancy in the impact of obesity on mortality among hemodialysis vs. peritoneal dialysis patients. Several studies in hemodialysis patients suggest that a higher BMI confers a survival advantage - the so-called "reverse epidemiology". In contrast, the literature among obese peritoneal dialysis patients is inconsistent, with various studies reporting an increased risk of death, no difference, or a decreased risk of death. Many of these studies only spanned across a few years, and this is probably too short of a time frame for a realistic assessment of obesity's impact on mortality in ESRD patients. The decision for dialysis modality in an obese diabetic patient with ESRD should be individualized. According to the results of published studies, we cannot suggest PD or HD as a better solution for all obese diabetic patients. The obese patient should be educated about all their dialysis options, including home dialysis therapies. In this review, the available literature related to the dialysis modality in obese patients with diabetes and ESRD was reviewed.

  8. Identification and treatment of protein-energy malnutrition in renal disease.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Kari; Farmer, Anna; Zuberbuhler, Lyn; Mager, Diana

    2010-01-01

    A web-based cross-country survey of renal registered dietitians (RRDs) was launched. It was used to assess whether or not their clinical practice in identifying and treating protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) in adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and dialysis was based on current nutrition practice guidelines (NPGs). The survey included questions on strategies, timelines, and markers used for the identification and treatment of PEM. Fifty-nine RRDs responded (21%). Sixty-seven percent did not base clinical practice on NPGs, while 33% indicated they followed the guidelines. Of those who followed guidelines, 76% use the National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative nutrition guidelines. Strategies used to identify and treat PEM were not related to duration of RRD experience in nephrology, but were significantly different between guidelines users and non-users. Guideline users commonly used key nutrition treatment strategies that included enteral/parenteral nutrition and medication therapy. The clinical practice of RRD is typically based on expert opinion/consensus, rather than on evidence-based practice guidelines (EBPG). It remains unclear if differences in RRDs' adoption of clinical guidelines influences patient outcomes, particularly in the treatment of PEM. Up-to-date EBPG need to be developed for the identification and treatment of PEM in patients with ESRD.

  9. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in renal disease and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Marlies E J; Fibbe, Willem E; Rabelink, Ton J

    2010-01-01

    Cell therapies aim at differentiation of stem cells into the specific cell type required to repair damaged or destroyed cells or tissues. Over recent years, cell therapy has been introduced in a variety of application areas, including cardiovascular repair, diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders and renal repair. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), often referred to as mesenchymal stem cells, are of particular interest as a cell therapy model, as this is one of the few cell types that are on the brink of entering the clinical arena in different areas of application. MSCs can be differentiated in vitro and in vivo into various cell types of mesenchymal origin such as bone, fat and cartilage. They have important effects on the innate and adaptive immune system and possess striking anti-inflammatory properties that make them attractive for potential use in diseases characterized by autoimmunity and inflammation. In addition, MSCs have been shown to migrate to sites of tissue injury and to enhance repair by secreting anti-fibrotic and pro-angiogenic factors. In this review, evidence for the renoprotective mechanisms of MSCs as well as their therapeutic possibilities and potential hazards in acute and chronic renal disease and allograft rejection is summarized. PMID:19861311

  10. Kidney disease in heart failure: the importance of novel biomarkers for type 1 cardio-renal syndrome detection.

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; McCullough, Peter A; Ronco, Claudio; Nuti, Ranuccio

    2015-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in heart failure (HF) has been recognized as an independent risk factor for adverse outcome, although the most important clinical trials tend to exclude patients with moderate and severe renal insufficiency. Despite this common association, the precise pathophysiological connection and liaison between heart and kidney is partially understood. Moreover, is it not enough considering how much cardio-renal syndrome type 1 is attributable to previous CKD, and how much to new-onset acute kidney injury (AKI). Neither development of AKI, its progression and time nor duration is related to an adverse outcome. An AKI definition is not universally recognized, and many confounding terms have been used in literature: "worsening renal function", "renal impairment", "renal dysfunction", etc., are all names that contribute to misunderstanding, and do not facilitate an universal classification. Therefore, AKI development should be the consequence of the basal clinical characteristics of patients, different primitive kidney disease and hemodynamic status. AKI could also be the mirror of several underlying associated diseases poorly controlled. Finally, it is not clear which is the optimal laboratory tool for identifying patients with an increased risk of AKI. In the current report, we review the different kidney diseases' impact in HF, and we analyze the modalities for AKI recognition during HF focusing our attention about some new biomarkers with potential application in the current setting.

  11. Animal Models to Study Links between Cardiovascular Disease and Renal Failure and Their Relevance to Human Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, Tim D.; Holt, Stephen G.; Smith, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    The close association between cardiovascular pathology and renal dysfunction is well documented and significant. Patients with conventional risk factors for cardiovascular disease like diabetes and hypertension also suffer renal dysfunction. This is unsurprising if the kidney is simply regarded as a “modified blood vessel” and thus, traditional risk factors will affect both systems. Consistent with this, it is relatively easy to comprehend how patients with either sudden or gradual cardiac and or vascular compromise have changes in both renal hemodynamic and regulatory systems. However, patients with pure or primary renal dysfunction also have metabolic changes (e.g., oxidant stress, inflammation, nitric oxide, or endocrine changes) that affect the cardiovascular system. Thus, cardiovascular and renal systems are intimately, bidirectionally and inextricably linked. Whilst we understand several of these links, some of the mechanisms for these connections remain incompletely explained. Animal models of cardiovascular and renal disease allow us to explore such mechanisms, and more importantly, potential therapeutic strategies. In this article, we review various experimental models used, and examine critically how representative they are of the human condition. PMID:26441970

  12. The renal histopathology spectrum of elderly patients with kidney diseases: a study of 430 patients in a single Chinese center.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ping; Zhou, Fu-de; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2014-12-01

    The elderly population has significantly increased in China. However, data regarding renal histopathology in this population is lacking. The present study retrospectively analyzed renal disease spectrum of 430 elderly patients who had received renal biopsy at Peking University First Hospital between January 2003 and December 2012. Among 6049 patients receiving renal biopsies during the same period, 430 (7.10%) were elderly (≥65 years). The ratio of male (263 patients) to female (167 patients) was 1.57:1, with an age of 70.29±3.99 (range 65-82) years at the time of biopsy. The most common indication for renal biopsy was nephrotic syndrome (59.53%), followed by acute kidney injury (AKI, 19.53%) and chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN, 16.05%). The most common renal histopathology in primary glomerular disease was idiopathic membranous nephropathy (iMN, 61.02%), followed by IgA nephropathy (18.22%), minimal change disease (MCD, 9.32%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (6.78%). ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV, 43.95%) was the leading secondary glomerular disease, followed by HBV-related glomerulonephritis (HBV-GN, 24.2%), and amyloidosis (14.01%). In patients with nephrotic syndrome, iMN (50%) was the leading cause, followed by HBV-GN (16.02%), MCD (7.81%), and amyloidosis (7.81%). In patients with iMN, 89.5% presented as nephrotic syndrome, 8.39% as CGN. In patients with AKI, the leading cause was AAV (48.12%), followed by acute interstitial nephritis (20.48%) and acute tubular necrosis (8.43%). In conclusion, in elderly Chinese patients, the most common renal histopathology pattern was iMN in patients with nephrotic syndrome, and AAV in patients with AKI.

  13. Autoantibodies in renal diseases - clinical significance and recent developments in serological detection.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni-Kirsztajn, Gianna; Hornig, Nora; Schlumberger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune dysfunctions are the "bête noire" in a range of debilitating nephropathies. Autoimmune-mediated damage to the kidneys can be triggered by autoantibodies directed against specific proteins or renal structures, for example, the phospholipase A2 receptor or the glomerular basement membrane, resulting in glomerular diseases such as primary membranous nephropathy or Goodpasture's disease. Moreover, secondary damage to the kidney can be part of the wide-reaching effects of systemic autoimmune diseases such as vasculitis or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) - the latter counts lupus nephritis among its most severe manifestations. Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by non-organ-specific autoantibodies, directed for example against neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens in systemic vasculitis and against double-stranded DNA and nucleosomes in SLE. A large variety of innovative and highly specific and sensitive autoantibody tests have been developed in the last years that are available to identify autoimmune kidney diseases at an early stage. Thus, serological in vitro diagnostics allow for appropriate interventional therapy in order to prevent disease progression often resulting in need of dialysis and transplantation. PMID:26029207

  14. Autoantibodies in Renal Diseases – Clinical Significance and Recent Developments in Serological Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mastroianni-Kirsztajn, Gianna; Hornig, Nora; Schlumberger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune dysfunctions are the “bête noire” in a range of debilitating nephropathies. Autoimmune-mediated damage to the kidneys can be triggered by autoantibodies directed against specific proteins or renal structures, for example, the phospholipase A2 receptor or the glomerular basement membrane, resulting in glomerular diseases such as primary membranous nephropathy or Goodpasture’s disease. Moreover, secondary damage to the kidney can be part of the wide-reaching effects of systemic autoimmune diseases such as vasculitis or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) – the latter counts lupus nephritis among its most severe manifestations. Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by non-organ-specific autoantibodies, directed for example against neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens in systemic vasculitis and against double-stranded DNA and nucleosomes in SLE. A large variety of innovative and highly specific and sensitive autoantibody tests have been developed in the last years that are available to identify autoimmune kidney diseases at an early stage. Thus, serological in vitro diagnostics allow for appropriate interventional therapy in order to prevent disease progression often resulting in need of dialysis and transplantation. PMID:26029207

  15. Autoantibodies in renal diseases - clinical significance and recent developments in serological detection.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni-Kirsztajn, Gianna; Hornig, Nora; Schlumberger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune dysfunctions are the "bête noire" in a range of debilitating nephropathies. Autoimmune-mediated damage to the kidneys can be triggered by autoantibodies directed against specific proteins or renal structures, for example, the phospholipase A2 receptor or the glomerular basement membrane, resulting in glomerular diseases such as primary membranous nephropathy or Goodpasture's disease. Moreover, secondary damage to the kidney can be part of the wide-reaching effects of systemic autoimmune diseases such as vasculitis or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) - the latter counts lupus nephritis among its most severe manifestations. Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by non-organ-specific autoantibodies, directed for example against neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens in systemic vasculitis and against double-stranded DNA and nucleosomes in SLE. A large variety of innovative and highly specific and sensitive autoantibody tests have been developed in the last years that are available to identify autoimmune kidney diseases at an early stage. Thus, serological in vitro diagnostics allow for appropriate interventional therapy in order to prevent disease progression often resulting in need of dialysis and transplantation.

  16. Self-management in patients with end stage renal disease: exploring domains and dimensions.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Roberta Braun; Mapes, Donna; Schatell, Dori; Burrows-Hudson, Sally

    2005-01-01

    The management and appropriate treatment of chronic disease are ongoing challenges in health care. As the population ages, the prevalence of chronic disease can be expected to increase. Since by definition there is no cure for chronic disease, controlling, minimizing, or managing its negative effects becomes a primary goal. In the self-management perspective, it is neither clinicians nor health care systems who must accomplish the bulk of chronic disease management but rather the patients themselves. Moreover, self-management has been shown to be associated with improved outcomes. Self-management is comprised of two domains: self-management of health care and self management of everyday life. Self-management of health care includes self-care activity, partnership in care, communication, self-care self-efficacy, and adherence. Self-management of everyday life entails achieving/maintaining "normality" in everyday roles and functioning. End stage renal disease (ESRD) is a chronic disease for which self-management is particularly relevant. Understanding the components of self-management may help patients and clinicians to embrace this approach, to enter the mutual relationship it requires, and to maximize positive outcomes for patients with ESRD.

  17. A retrospective study of end-stage renal disease in captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    LaDouceur, Elise E B; Davis, Barbara; Tseng, Flo

    2014-03-01

    This retrospective study summarizes 11 cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from eight zoologic institutions across the United States and Canada. Ten bears were female, one was male, and the mean age at the time of death was 24 yr old. The most common clinical signs were lethargy, inappetence, and polyuria-polydipsia. Biochemical findings included azotemia, anemia, hyperphosphatemia, and isosthenuria. Histologic examination commonly showed glomerulonephropathies and interstitial fibrosis. Based on submissions to a private diagnostic institution over a 16-yr period, ESRD was the most commonly diagnosed cause of death or euthanasia in captive polar bears in the United States, with an estimated prevalence of over 20%. Further research is needed to discern the etiology of this apparently common disease of captive polar bears. PMID:24712164

  18. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) and vascular access grafting: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Szycher, M

    1999-04-01

    End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) is a major disease state, costing the U.S. $9.5 billion in 1992, and increasing 10% yearly. The growth in the number of ESRD patients can be attributed principally to demographic trends: the aging of the general population and the improved treatment and increased survival rate of patients with diabetes, hypertension, and other illnesses that lead to ESRD. Moreover, improved dialysis technology has enabled older patients and those who previously could not tolerate dialysis due to other illnesses to benefit from this treatment. Three modalities exist for the treatment of ESRD: hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and kidney transplant. This article reviews the medical treatments and the synthetic polymers used in the manufacture of vascular access grafts. We report on the development of a new, polyurethane-based microporous vascular graft, which displays self-sealing and improved compliance characteristics for use in vascular access grafting.

  19. Geometry-independent assessment of renal volume in polycystic kidney disease from magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Turco, Dario; Severi, Stefano; Mignani, Renzo; Magistroni, Riccardo; Corsi, Cristiana

    2015-01-01

    Total renal volume (TRV) is an important quantitative indicator of the progression of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease proposes a method for TRV computation based on manual tracing and geometric modeling. We developed a fast and nearly-automated technique for kidney segmentation and automatically compute TRV. In this study we aim to compare TRV estimates derived from these two different approaches. The highly-automated technique for the analysis of MR images was tested on 30 ADPKD patients. TRV was computed from both axial and coronal acquisitions, and compared to measurements based on geometric modeling by linear regression and Bland Altman analysis. In addition, to assess reproducibility, intra-observer and inter-observer variabilities were computed. The results of this study provide the feasibility of using a nearly-automated approach for accurate and fast evaluation of TRV also in markedly enlarged ADPKD kidneys. PMID:26736943

  20. Effects of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Teresa; Lennon, Emily S; Akbar, Hina; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Oliphant, Carrie S; Khouzam, Rami N

    2016-03-01

    Blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are routinely used in patients with chronic kidney disease because of their cardiovascular (CV) and renoprotective effects. However, there are no uniform recommendations about RAAS blockers for CV protection in the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) population other than the preferred drug class for blood pressure control. This uncertainty stems from the fact that patients with ESRD were generally excluded from randomized controlled trials evaluating the cardioprotective benefits of RAAS blockers. It is important to weigh the potential harms associated with the use of RAAS blockers, such as electrolyte disturbances and worsening anemia, with their role in protection of residual kidney function, alleviation of thirst and potential CV benefits. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the use of RAAS blockers in patients with ESRD. PMID:26992264

  1. Estimation of renal cell carcinoma treatment effects from disease progression modeling

    PubMed Central

    Maitland, Michael L.; Wu, Kehua; Sharma, Manish R.; Jin, Yuyan; Kang, Soonmo Peter; Stadler, Walter M.; Karrison, Theodore G.; Ratain, Mark J.; Bies, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    To improve future drug development efficiency in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), a disease progression model was developed with longitudinal tumor size data from a phase III trial of sorafenib in RCC. The best fit model was externally evaluated on 145 placebo-treated patients in a phase III trial of pazopanib, and incorporated baseline tumor size, a linear disease progression component, and an exponential drug effect parameter. With the model-estimated effect of sorafenib on RCC growth we calculated the power of randomized phase II trials between sorafenib and hypothetical comparators over a range of effects. A hypothetical comparator with 80% greater drug effect than sorafenib would have 82% power (one-sided α = 0.1) with 50 patients per arm. Model-based quantitation of treatment effect with CT imaging offers a scaffold on which to develop new, more efficient, phase II trial endpoints and analytic strategies for RCC. PMID:23443753

  2. Phosphate control in end-stage renal disease: barriers and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Ahmed A.; Pedraza, Fernando; Lenz, Oliver; Isakova, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is a nearly universal complication of end-stage renal disease that is widely recognized as one of the most important and most challenging clinical targets to meet in the care of dialysis patients. Left untreated, it can lead to bone pain, pruritus and worsening secondary hyperparathyroidism. Data from observational studies demonstrate that an elevated serum phosphorus level is an independent risk factor for mortality, and that treatment with phosphate binders is independently associated with improved survival. Experimental studies provide support for the epidemiologic findings: phosphate excess promotes vascular calcification, induces endothelial dysfunction and may contribute to other emerging chronic kidney disease-specific mechanisms of cardiovascular toxicity. On the basis of this evidence, clinical practice guidelines recommend specific targets for serum phosphorus levels in the dialysis population. The purpose of this review is to summarize common challenges in meeting these targets and to identify potential opportunities for improvement. PMID:23901051

  3. Etiology and management of dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Mona; Silverstein, Douglas M

    2015-12-01

    Lipids are essential components of cell membranes, contributing to cell fuel, myelin formation, subcellular organelle function, and steroid hormone synthesis. Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) exhibit various co-morbidities, including dyslipidemia. The prevalence of dyslipidemias in children with CKD and ESRD is high, being present in 39-65% of patients. Elevated lipid levels in children without renal disease are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), while the risk for CVD in pediatric CKD/ESRD is unclear. The pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in CKD features various factors, including increased levels of triglycerides, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC-III), decreased levels of cholesterylester transfer protein and high-density lipoproteins, and aberrations in serum very low-density and intermediate-density lipoproteins. If initial risk assessment indicates that a child with advanced CKD has 2 or more co-morbidities for CVD, first-line treatment should consist of non-pharmacologic management such as therapeutic lifestyle changes and dietary counseling. Pharmacologic treatment of dyslipidemia may reduce the incidence of CVD in children with CKD/ESRD, but randomized trials are lacking. Statins are the only class of lipid-lowering drugs currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the pediatric population. FDA-approved pediatric labeling for these drugs is based on results from placebo-controlled trial results, showing 30-50% reductions in baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although statins are generally well tolerated in adults, a spectrum of adverse events has been reported with their use in both the clinical trial and post-marketing settings.

  4. Etiology and management of dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Mona; Silverstein, Douglas M

    2015-12-01

    Lipids are essential components of cell membranes, contributing to cell fuel, myelin formation, subcellular organelle function, and steroid hormone synthesis. Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) exhibit various co-morbidities, including dyslipidemia. The prevalence of dyslipidemias in children with CKD and ESRD is high, being present in 39-65% of patients. Elevated lipid levels in children without renal disease are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), while the risk for CVD in pediatric CKD/ESRD is unclear. The pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in CKD features various factors, including increased levels of triglycerides, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC-III), decreased levels of cholesterylester transfer protein and high-density lipoproteins, and aberrations in serum very low-density and intermediate-density lipoproteins. If initial risk assessment indicates that a child with advanced CKD has 2 or more co-morbidities for CVD, first-line treatment should consist of non-pharmacologic management such as therapeutic lifestyle changes and dietary counseling. Pharmacologic treatment of dyslipidemia may reduce the incidence of CVD in children with CKD/ESRD, but randomized trials are lacking. Statins are the only class of lipid-lowering drugs currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the pediatric population. FDA-approved pediatric labeling for these drugs is based on results from placebo-controlled trial results, showing 30-50% reductions in baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although statins are generally well tolerated in adults, a spectrum of adverse events has been reported with their use in both the clinical trial and post-marketing settings. PMID:25801207

  5. The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Edouard; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost; Pisoni, Ron L.; Robinson, Bruce M.; Massy, Ziad A.

    2014-01-01

    Background While much has been learned about the epidemiology and treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the last 30 years, chronic kidney disease (CKD) before the end-stage has been less investigated. Not enough is known about factors associated with CKD progression and complications, as well as its transition to ESRD. We designed the CKD-renal epidemiology and information network (REIN) cohort to provide a research platform to address these key questions and to assess clinical practices and costs in patients with moderate or advanced CKD. Methods A total of 46 clinic sites and 4 renal care networks participate in the cohort. A stratified selection of clinic sites yields a sample that represents a diversity of settings, e.g. geographic region, and public versus for-profit and non-for-profit private clinics. In each site, 60–90 patients with CKD are enrolled at a routine clinic visit during a 12-month enrolment phase: 3600 total, including 1800 with Stage 3 and 1800 with Stage 4 CKD. Follow-up will continue for 5 years, including after initiation of renal replacement therapy. Data will be collected from medical records at inclusion and at yearly intervals, as well as from self-administered patient questionnaires and provider-level questionnaires. Patients will also be interviewed at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 5 years. Healthcare costs will also be determined. Blood and urine samples will be collected and stored for future studies on all patients at enrolment and at study end, and at 1 and 3 years in a subsample of 1200. Conclusions The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of the biological, clinical and healthcare system determinants associated with CKD progression and adverse outcomes as well as of international variations in collaboration with the CKD Outcome and Practice Pattern Study (CKDopps). It will foster CKD epidemiology and outcomes research and provide evidence to improve the health and quality of life of patients with CKD and

  6. Unresolved problems concerning optimal therapy of puberty in children with chronic renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Hokken-Koelega, A C; Saenger, P; Cappa, M; Greggio, N

    2001-07-01

    Many children with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) show growth retardation and severely delayed pubertal development. Successful renal transplantation (RTx) also rarely results in full growth rehabilitation. Pubertal height gain in CRI patients is only 58% and 48% of that observed in late-maturing boys and girls, respectively. Growth retardation in both CRI and RTx patients is not the result of abnormal GH secretion or decreased levels of IGF-I, but rather of elevated levels of IGFBPs inhibiting the bioavailability of the IGFs. In RTx patients prednisone may also inhibit growth directly via inhibition of bone matrix formation. Several studies have convincingly shown that GH therapy at a dose of 4 IU/m2/day results in a sustained improvement of growth in prepubertal and pubertal children with CRI and in growth-retarded prepubertal and pubertal post-transplant patients. The following consensus was reached concerning optimal therapy of puberty in children with chronic renal disease. GH therapy does not lead to an earlier start of puberty. It is safe to give GH to RTx patients if transplant function is stable. GH therapy will not accelerate bone maturation and can improve the final height of children with CRI and after RTx. Increasing the GH dose above 4 IU/m2/day in pubertal RTx patients does not increase height gain or final height and is not advised as it may increase insulin resistance. GH should best be started before the start of the pubertal growth spurt but will still be effective in RTx patients with advanced bone age. GH testing should not be a prerequisite for starting GH therapy. It is important to optimise other therapies during puberty. During GH therapy of RTx patients use minimum daily, not alternate-day, steroid dosing. Further research is still required on the possible long-term effects of GH therapy in children with chronic diseases. Two studies demonstrated improved long-term growth and final height within the target height range, without

  7. End-Stage Renal Disease from Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in the United States, 1995 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Donal J.; Reule, Scott; Solid, Craig A.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.; Foley, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Management of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has evolved rapidly, and optimal treatment strategies are controversial. However, it is unknown whether the burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from HUS has changed, and outcomes on dialysis in the US are not well described. Methods We retrospectively examined data for patients initiating maintenance renal replacement therapy (RRT) (n = 1,557,117), 1995–2010, to define standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and outcomes of ESRD from HUS) (n = 2241). Results Overall ESRD rates from HUS in 2001–2002 were 0.5 cases/million per year; and were higher for patients characterized by age 40–64 years (0.6), ≥ 65 years (0.7), female sex (0.6), and non-Hispanic African American race (0.7). SIRs remained unchanged (P ≥ 0.05) between 2001–2002 and 2009–2010 in the overall population. Compared with patients with ESRD from other causes, patients with HUS were more likely to be younger, female, white, and non-Hispanic. Over 5.4 years of follow-up, HUS patients differed from matched controls with ESRD from other causes by lower rates of death (8.3 per 100 person-years in cases vs. 10.4 in controls, P < 0.001), listing for renal transplant (7.6 vs. 8.6 per 100 person-years, P = 0.04), and undergoing transplant (6.9 vs. 9 per 100 person-years, P < 0.001). Conclusions The incidence of ESRD from HUS appears not to have risen substantially in the last decade. However, given that HUS subtypes could not be determined in this study, these findings should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25689876

  8. Encephalopathy and Hypotonia due to Baclofen Toxicity in a Patient with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Mohsin; Tariq, Hassan; Kashif, Muhammad; Marquez, Jose Gomez

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 57 Final Diagnosis: Baclofen toxicity Symptoms: Encephalopathy • hypotonia Medication: Baclofen Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis Specialty: Critical Care Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Baclofen is a centrally acting gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist used for the symptomatic relief of skeletal muscle spasm and spasticity in traumatic spinal cord lesions, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, and stroke. It is also used in the treatment of chronic hiccups and cocaine abuse. Baclofen-induced central nervous system depression is rare at the usual therapeutic doses. However, patients with impaired renal function are at a higher risk of developing baclofen toxicity, even at a lower dose. Case Report: A 57-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis was admitted to our emergency department with progressive confusion and a generalized decrease in muscular tone. There was no obvious metabolic or infectious etiology that could have explained her condition. A comprehensive laboratory and imaging workup was negative. A review of her medication showed that she had recently been prescribed baclofen for muscular spasm. She was diagnosed with baclofen toxicity and was treated with emergent hemodialysis, which improved her mental status and her decreased muscle tone. Repeated sessions of hemodialysis administered on her second and third days of admission ultimately produced sustained clinical improvement and a complete return to her baseline mental status. She was subsequently discharged home with instructions to stay off baclofen. Conclusions: Baclofen toxicity is an under-diagnosed condition, especially in patients with renal dysfunction. Physicians should consider baclofen toxicity in patients with suboptimal kidney function on baclofen who present with altered mental status. Emergent hemodialysis and intensive care unit monitoring is recommended. PMID:25895118

  9. Effect of Bicarbonate Supplementation on Renal Function and Nutritional Indices in Predialysis Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil

    2014-01-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m2) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m2) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m2, p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m2).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition. PMID:25606047

  10. Genetic and environmental effects and characteristics of Japanese end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Satoshi; Yorioka, Noriaki; Gilbertson, David T; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Foley, Robert N; Collins, Allan J

    2009-10-01

    Few studies of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) investigate genetic and environmental effects simultaneously in one racial/ethnic group. United States Renal Data System data show racial differences in primary causes of ESRD, survival rates, and causes of death. Comparing these with Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy data, survival rates appear better for Japanese than for US patients. To explore genetic and environmental differences, we investigated incident and prevalent ESRD patient characteristics. The United States Renal Data System and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy databases were analyzed between 1983 and 2002 for the following patient subsets: Americans excluding Asian Americans (n=1,153,974); Asian Americans excluding Japanese Americans (n=35,983); Hawaiian and non-Hawaiian Japanese Americans by state, race, and Japanese surname (n=3932); native Japanese living in Japan (n=450,593). Japanese Americans tended to be older, male, have more diabetes and hypertension and less glomerulonephritis, and to die more often of heart failure than the other US groups. Adjusted mortality hazard ratios were 0.70 for non-Japanese Asian Americans and 0.75 for Japanese Americans vs. non-Asian Americans (1.00). Hawaiian Japanese patients tended to be older, with more diabetes and hypertension and less glomerulonephritis than the other Japanese groups; their survival rates improved after adjustment for rate of diabetes. Japanese American ESRD patients differ from Asian and non-Asian Americans, and from native Japanese, despite similar genetic make-ups. Both genetic and environmental factors may affect patient outcomes.

  11. Lower Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease but Suboptimal Pre-Dialysis Renal Care in Schizophrenia: A 14-Year Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yueh-Han; Cheng, Jur-Shan; Ouyang, Wen-Chen; Lin, Chen-Li; Huang, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is closely associated with cardiovascular risk factors which are consequently attributable to the development of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, no study has been conducted to examine ESRD-related epidemiology and quality of care before starting dialysis for patients with schizophrenia. By using nationwide health insurance databases, we identified 54,361 ESRD-free patients with schizophrenia and their age-/gender-matched subjects without schizophrenia for this retrospective cohort study (the schizophrenia cohort). We also identified a cohort of 1,244 adult dialysis patients with and without schizophrenia (1:3) to compare quality of renal care before dialysis and outcomes (the dialysis cohort). Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for dialysis and death. Odds ratio (OR) derived from logistic regression models were used to delineate quality of pre-dialysis renal care. Compared to general population, patients with schizophrenia were less likely to develop ESRD (HR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.4-0.8), but had a higher risk for death (HR = 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3). Patients with schizophrenia at the pre-ESRD stage received suboptimal pre-dialysis renal care; for example, they were less likely to visit nephrologists (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.8) and received fewer erythropoietin prescriptions (OR = 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6-0.9). But they had a higher risk of hospitalization in the first year after starting dialysis (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, P < .05). Patients with schizophrenia undertaking dialysis had higher risk for mortality than the general ESRD patients. A closer collaboration between psychiatrists and nephrologists or internists to minimize the gaps in quality of general care is recommended.

  12. The Impact of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease on Renal Function in Children with Overweight/Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Pacifico, Lucia; Bonci, Enea; Andreoli, Gian Marco; Di Martino, Michele; Gallozzi, Alessia; De Luca, Ester; Chiesa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic kidney disease has attracted interest and attention over recent years. However, no data are available in children. We determined whether children with NAFLD show signs of renal functional alterations, as determined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urinary albumin excretion. We studied 596 children with overweight/obesity, 268 with NAFLD (hepatic fat fraction ≥5% on magnetic resonance imaging) and 328 without NAFLD, and 130 healthy normal-weight controls. Decreased GFR was defined as eGFR < 90 mL/min/1.73 m2. Abnormal albuminuria was defined as urinary excretion of ≥30 mg/24 h of albumin. A greater prevalence of eGFR < 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 was observed in patients with NAFLD compared to those without liver involvement and healthy subjects (17.5% vs. 6.7% vs. 0.77%; p < 0.0001). The proportion of children with abnormal albuminuria was also higher in the NAFLD group compared to those without NAFLD, and controls (9.3% vs. 4.0% vs. 0; p < 0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that NAFLD was associated with decreased eGFR and/or microalbuminuria (odds ratio, 2.54 (confidence interval, 1.16–5.57); p < 0.05) independently of anthropometric and clinical variables. Children with NAFLD are at risk for early renal dysfunction. Recognition of this abnormality in the young may help to prevent the ongoing development of the disease. PMID:27472326

  13. Association Between Chronic Osteomyelitis and Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Tseng, Chun-Hung; Chang, Yen-Jung; Wang, I-Kuan; Yeh, Hung-Chieh; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Inflammation, which initiates endothelial dysfunction, vascular atherosclerosis, and oxidative stress, may negatively influence renal function and accelerate the development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The role of chronic osteomyelitis (COM), a chronic inflammatory disease, in the development of ESRD has not been investigated. This study explored whether patients with COM have a higher risk of ESRD than that of patients without COM. Taiwan National Health Insurance claims from 1997 to 2010 were used to identify 24,267 newly diagnosed patients with COM and 97,068 age- and sex-matched non-COM controls for comparison. The risks of ESRD among COM patients, with adjustment for comorbidities, namely, hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and hyperlipidemia, were assessed until the end of 2010. ESRD risk was 2.01-fold higher (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.81–2.25) in the COM cohort than in the non-COM cohort. Regarding the joint effect of COM with comorbidity, the ESRD risk was 1.57-fold higher (95% CI: 1.23–2.00) for the COM cohort without comorbidities and increased to 2.25 (95% CI: 1.97–2.57) for the COM cohort with at least 1 comorbidity. Age-specific analysis revealed that the adjusted ESRD risk for the COM cohort increased as age decreased, with the highest hazard ratio being 17.8 (95% CI: 5.18–61.4) for patients aged 20–34 years. This was the first study to report that COM is associated with an increased risk of ESRD, particularly among patients with comorbidities and younger patients. PMID:26166123

  14. The Impact of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease on Renal Function in Children with Overweight/Obesity.

    PubMed

    Pacifico, Lucia; Bonci, Enea; Andreoli, Gian Marco; Di Martino, Michele; Gallozzi, Alessia; De Luca, Ester; Chiesa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic kidney disease has attracted interest and attention over recent years. However, no data are available in children. We determined whether children with NAFLD show signs of renal functional alterations, as determined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urinary albumin excretion. We studied 596 children with overweight/obesity, 268 with NAFLD (hepatic fat fraction ≥5% on magnetic resonance imaging) and 328 without NAFLD, and 130 healthy normal-weight controls. Decreased GFR was defined as eGFR < 90 mL/min/1.73 m². Abnormal albuminuria was defined as urinary excretion of ≥30 mg/24 h of albumin. A greater prevalence of eGFR < 90 mL/min/1.73 m² was observed in patients with NAFLD compared to those without liver involvement and healthy subjects (17.5% vs. 6.7% vs. 0.77%; p < 0.0001). The proportion of children with abnormal albuminuria was also higher in the NAFLD group compared to those without NAFLD, and controls (9.3% vs. 4.0% vs. 0; p < 0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that NAFLD was associated with decreased eGFR and/or microalbuminuria (odds ratio, 2.54 (confidence interval, 1.16-5.57); p < 0.05) independently of anthropometric and clinical variables. Children with NAFLD are at risk for early renal dysfunction. Recognition of this abnormality in the young may help to prevent the ongoing development of the disease. PMID:27472326

  15. Defective renal maintenance of the vitamin D endocrine system impairs vitamin D renoprotection: a downward spiral in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dusso, Adriana S; Tokumoto, Masanori

    2011-04-01

    In kidney disease, the progressive loss of renal capacity to produce calcitriol, the vitamin D hormone, is a key contributor to elevations in parathyroid hormone (PTH) and mineral and skeletal disorders predisposing to renal and cardiovascular damage, ectopic calcifications, and high mortality rates. Thus, the safe correction of calcitriol deficiency to suppress PTH has been the treatment of choice for decades. However, recent epidemiological and experimental data suggest that calcitriol replacement may improve outcomes through renal and cardioprotective actions unrelated to PTH suppression. Furthermore, a striking incidence of vitamin D deficiency occurs in kidney disease and associates more strongly than calcitriol deficiency with a higher risk for kidney disease progression and death. Despite the translational relevance of these findings, no prospective trials are currently available in support of the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation and/or calcitriol replacement to safely halt/moderate renal disease progression. This review updates the pathophysiology behind the vicious cycle by which kidney injury impairs the maintenance of normal vitamin D and calcitriol levels, which in turn impedes vitamin D/calcitriol renoprotective actions, a requirement for the design of prospective trials to improve current recommendations for vitamin D interventions at all stages of kidney disease.

  16. Mode of renal replacement therapy determines endotoxemia and neutrophil dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lemesch, Sandra; Ribitsch, Werner; Schilcher, Gernot; Spindelböck, Walter; Hafner-Gießauf, Hildegard; Marsche, Gunther; Pasterk, Lisa; Payerl, Doris; Schmerböck, Bianca; Tawdrous, Monika; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Stiegler, Philipp; Kager, Gerd; Hallström, Seth; Oettl, Karl; Eberhard, Katharina; Horvath, Angela; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection and sepsis are common complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A vicious cycle of increased gut permeability, endotoxemia, inadequate activation of the innate immune system and resulting innate immune dysfunction is hypothesized. We assessed endotoxemia, neutrophil function and its relation to oxidative stress, inflammation and gut permeability in patients with CKD grade 3–5 without renal replacement therapy (CKD group, n = 57), patients with CKD stage 5 undergoing haemodialysis (HD, n = 32) or peritoneal dialysis (PD, n = 28) and patients after kidney transplantation (KT, n = 67) in a cross-sectional observational study. In HD patients, endotoxin serum levels were elevated and neutrophil phagocytic capacity was decreased compared to all other group