Science.gov

Sample records for occupant survey tool

  1. Health Occupations Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the need for health occupations personnel in the Moraine Valley Community College district, specifically to: (1) describe present employment for selected health occupations; (2) project health occupation employment to 1974; (3) identify the supply of applicants for the selected occupations; and (4) identify…

  2. Occupational Training in Selected Metalworking Industries, 1974. A Report on a Survey of Selected Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), New York, NY.

    A survey was conducted regarding the occupational training provided by employers for fourteen occupations in four metalworking industries. The fourteen occupations selected for study included crane operator, electrician, layout worker, machine tool setter, machinist, mechanic, sheet metal worker, and tool and die maker. The four industries…

  3. Development and Field-Testing of a Study Protocol, including a Web-Based Occupant Survey Tool, for Use in Intervention Studies of Indoor Environmental Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, Mark; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Spears, Michael; Fisk, William J.

    2009-06-01

    We developed and pilot-tested an overall protocol for intervention studies to evaluate the effects of indoor environmental changes in office buildings on the health symptoms and comfort of occupants. The protocol includes a web-based survey to assess the occupant's responses, as well as specific features of study design and analysis. The pilot study, carried out on two similar floors in a single building, compared two types of ventilation system filter media. With support from the building's Facilities staff, the implementation of the filter change intervention went well. While the web-based survey tool worked well also, low overall response rates (21-34percent among the three work groups included) limited our ability to evaluate the filter intervention., The total number of questionnaires returned was low even though we extended the study from eight to ten weeks. Because another simultaneous study we conducted elsewhere using the same survey had a high response rate (>70percent), we conclude that the low response here resulted from issues specific to this pilot, including unexpected restrictions by some employing agencies on communication with occupants.

  4. Rate and Occupancy Survey Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Atlantic Association of Coll. and Univ. Housing Officers.

    In its annual effort to determine rate and occupancy trends in the Mid-Atlantic region, MACUHO surveyed by questionnaire the chief housing officers on its mailing list and received 99 usable responses, compared with 65 the previous year. The average double room rate was reported to be $691, compared with $646 in 1975; the average board rate rose…

  5. Efficiency of workplace surveys conducted by Finnish occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Savinainen, Minna; Oksa, Panu

    2011-07-01

    In Finland, workplace surveys are used to identify and assess health risks and problems caused by work and make suggestions for continuous improvement of the work environment. With the aid of the workplace survey, occupational health services can be tailored to a company. The aims of this study were to determine how occupational health professionals gather data via the workplace survey and the effect survey results have on companies. A total of 259 occupational health nurses and 108 occupational health physicians responded to the questionnaire: 84.2% were women and 15.8% were men. The mean age of the respondents was 48.8 years (range, 26 to 65 years). Usually occupational health nurses and foremen and sometimes occupational health physicians and occupational safety and health representatives initiate the workplace survey. More than 90% of the surveys were followed by action proposals, and about 50% of these were implemented. The proposals implemented most often concerned personal protective equipment and less often leadership. Survey respondents should have both the opportunity and the authority to affect resources, the work environment, work arrangements, and tools. Teamwork among occupational health and safety professionals, management, and employees is vital for cost-effectively solving today's complex problems at workplaces around the globe. PMID:21710956

  6. Efficiency of workplace surveys conducted by Finnish occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Savinainen, Minna; Oksa, Panu

    2011-07-01

    In Finland, workplace surveys are used to identify and assess health risks and problems caused by work and make suggestions for continuous improvement of the work environment. With the aid of the workplace survey, occupational health services can be tailored to a company. The aims of this study were to determine how occupational health professionals gather data via the workplace survey and the effect survey results have on companies. A total of 259 occupational health nurses and 108 occupational health physicians responded to the questionnaire: 84.2% were women and 15.8% were men. The mean age of the respondents was 48.8 years (range, 26 to 65 years). Usually occupational health nurses and foremen and sometimes occupational health physicians and occupational safety and health representatives initiate the workplace survey. More than 90% of the surveys were followed by action proposals, and about 50% of these were implemented. The proposals implemented most often concerned personal protective equipment and less often leadership. Survey respondents should have both the opportunity and the authority to affect resources, the work environment, work arrangements, and tools. Teamwork among occupational health and safety professionals, management, and employees is vital for cost-effectively solving today's complex problems at workplaces around the globe.

  7. The 1986 residential occupant survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ivey, D.L.; Alley, P.K.

    1987-04-01

    In 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed the Residential Occupant Survey-Spring '86, which was implemented. The overall purpose of the study was to collect demographic, attitudinal, and behavioral data related to the use and conservation of electricity in dwellings participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's End-Use Load and Conservation Assessment Program (ELCAP). Information was collected on the respondents' perceptions of the energy efficiency of their dwelling, temperature the dwelling was kept when people were at home and awake during the last heating season, which rooms, if any, were not heated during the last heating season, number of times the dwelling was unoccupied for at least one week, number of times pets were let out of the dwelling per day, attitudes toward energy use and conservation and several socio-demographic variables such as age, sex, and total household income. The results of the data analyses showed age to be an important factor for reported indoor temperature and perceived energy efficiency of the dwelling. The results also showed that almost 60% of the ELCAP occupants do not heat one or more rooms during the heating season, and almost 45% of the ELCAP dwellings were unoccupied for at least one week during the reporting period. In terms of the reported allocation of household income for household energy expenses, the results showed that the reported dollar amount spent for the expenses remained relatively constant over income levels.

  8. 1985 Residential Occupant Survey-Telephone

    SciTech Connect

    Darwin, D.F.; Ivey, D.L.; Klan, M.S.; Shankle, S.A.; Mohler, B.L.

    1986-07-01

    The purpose of the survey was to collect information from residential occupants related to the use and conservation of electrical energy in Pacific Northwest residences. This report documents the development, implementation, and results of the survey. For most of the residences in the survey, information was collected on the thermal integrity of the residence; the capital stock of electrical equipment and appliances used by the occupants; various energy-use related behaviors such as conservation measures undertaken, the use of wood burning equipment, indoor temperature settings, and day-to-day occupancy patterns; the occupants' attitudes about electricity prices; and various demographic indices such as the age, sex, and education of the occupants. For some residences, information also was collected on the age and size of the residence; the space and water heating fuels used in the residence; and the number and income of the occupants.

  9. Health Occupations Education. Survey of Critical Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Washington, DC. Health Occupations Education Div.

    A survey of the members of the American Vocational Association-Health Occupations Education (AVA-HOE) was conducted to identify critical issues concerning health occupations, establish the order of priority of these issues, and determine a position regarding each issue that was reflective of the opinion of the AVA-HOE members. Each member of the…

  10. Occupational Programs Student Survey, Fall 2002. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuschke, Daylene M.; Gribbons, Barry C.

    Each semester, the College of the Canyons (California) surveys all students enrolled in occupational courses. This information has three primary purposes: (1) the survey results are used in determining funding through the Vocational and Technical Education Act (VTEA); (2) beginning in fall 2000, the College expanded the survey to include students'…

  11. Multiseason occupancy models for correlated replicate surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hines, James; Nichols, James; Collazo, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Occupancy surveys collecting data from adjacent (sometimes correlated) spatial replicates have become relatively popular for logistical reasons. Hines et al. (2010) presented one approach to modelling such data for single-season occupancy surveys. Here, we present a multiseason analogue of this model (with corresponding software) for inferences about occupancy dynamics. We include a new parameter to deal with the uncertainty associated with the first spatial replicate for both single-season and multiseason models. We use a case study, based on the brown-headed nuthatch, to assess the need for these models when analysing data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS), and we test various hypotheses about occupancy dynamics for this species in the south-eastern United States. The new model permits inference about local probabilities of extinction, colonization and occupancy for sampling conducted over multiple seasons. The model performs adequately, based on a small simulation study and on results of the case study analysis. The new model incorporating correlated replicates was strongly favoured by model selection for the BBS data for brown-headed nuthatch (Sitta pusilla). Latitude was found to be an important source of variation in local colonization and occupancy probabilities for brown-headed nuthatch, with both probabilities being higher near the centre of the species range, as opposed to more northern and southern areas. We recommend this new occupancy model for detection–nondetection studies that use potentially correlated replicates.

  12. A Survey of the Aviation Mechanics Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, David; Bowers, William K.

    The report documents the results of a national survey of the aviation mechanics' occupation. The study surveyed 151 companies in the four industrial categories of the aviation industry and was concerned only with the certificated airframe and powerplant mechanic. Results of the study provide the following: (1) identification of the technical…

  13. Remote vehicle survey tool

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Burks, B.L.; Kress, R.L.; Wagner, D.G.; Ward, C.R.

    1993-05-01

    The Remote Vehicle Survey Tool (RVS7) is a color graphical display tool for viewing remotely acquired scientific data. The RVST displays the data in the form of a color two-dimensional world model map. The world model map allows movement of the remote vehicle to be tracked by the operator and the data from sensors to be graphically depicted in the interface. Linear and logarithmic meters, dual channel oscilloscopes, and directional compasses are used to display sensor information. The RVST is user-configurable by the use of ASCII text files. The operator can configure the RVST to work with any remote data acquisition system and teleoperated or autonomous vehicle. The modular design of the RVST and its ability to be quickly configured for varying system requirements make the RVST ideal for remote scientific data display in all environmental restoration and waste management programs.

  14. Remote vehicle survey tool

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Burks, B.L.; Kress, R.L. ); Wagner, D.G.; Ward, C.R. )

    1993-01-01

    The Remote Vehicle Survey Tool (RVS7) is a color graphical display tool for viewing remotely acquired scientific data. The RVST displays the data in the form of a color two-dimensional world model map. The world model map allows movement of the remote vehicle to be tracked by the operator and the data from sensors to be graphically depicted in the interface. Linear and logarithmic meters, dual channel oscilloscopes, and directional compasses are used to display sensor information. The RVST is user-configurable by the use of ASCII text files. The operator can configure the RVST to work with any remote data acquisition system and teleoperated or autonomous vehicle. The modular design of the RVST and its ability to be quickly configured for varying system requirements make the RVST ideal for remote scientific data display in all environmental restoration and waste management programs.

  15. Occupational asthma in a national disability survey

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, P.

    1987-10-01

    The contribution of workplace exposures to the prevalence of asthma in adults has been minimized in the epidemiology of this illness. Analysis of the 1978 Social Security Disability Survey provides a population-based assessment as a novel approach utilizing self-attributed, occupationally related asthma as a measure of disease. Of 6063 respondents, 468 (7.7 percent) identified asthma as a personal medical condition; 72 (1.2 percent (15.4 percent of all those with asthma)) attributed it to workplace exposures. These subjects were older and included more men and cigarette smokers than groups of both asthmatic and nonasthmatic subjects. The relative risk for occupationally attributed asthma was elevated among industrial and agricultural workers as compared with white collar and service occupations. Analysis of disability benefit status did not indicate that this introduced major reporting bias in this survey. This study suggests that occupational factors may have a greater role in adult asthma than previously thought.

  16. Concept Mapping as a Learning Tool in Occupational Therapy Education.

    PubMed

    Grice, Kimatha

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes concept mapping and its use as a teaching and learning tool in an entry level occupational therapy program. In order for students to demonstrate their mastery of the concepts associated with a particular topic or body of knowledge, assignments involving concept maps were developed and used in two courses in an entry level occupational therapy program. Students were then surveyed about their perceptions and attitudes regarding the assignments. Students found the process of creating concept maps valuable to their learning of the content and the majority also enjoyed the process as a learning activity. The use of concept mapping as a way to encourage independent, individualized, and student-centered learning is discussed. PMID:26914229

  17. Concept Mapping as a Learning Tool in Occupational Therapy Education.

    PubMed

    Grice, Kimatha

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes concept mapping and its use as a teaching and learning tool in an entry level occupational therapy program. In order for students to demonstrate their mastery of the concepts associated with a particular topic or body of knowledge, assignments involving concept maps were developed and used in two courses in an entry level occupational therapy program. Students were then surveyed about their perceptions and attitudes regarding the assignments. Students found the process of creating concept maps valuable to their learning of the content and the majority also enjoyed the process as a learning activity. The use of concept mapping as a way to encourage independent, individualized, and student-centered learning is discussed.

  18. Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

    2013-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article.

  19. Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

    2013-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article. PMID:23380641

  20. Licensed Practical Nurses in Occupational Health. An Initial Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jane A.; And Others

    The study, conducted in 1971, assessed characteristics of licensed practical nurses (LPN's) who worked in occupational health nursing. The survey instrument, a questionnaire, was returned by 591 LPN's in occupational health and provided data related to: personal characteristics, work and setting, administrative and professional functioning,…

  1. Exposure to potential occupational asthmogens: prevalence data from the National Occupational Exposure Survey.

    PubMed

    de la Hoz, R E; Young, R O; Pedersen, D H

    1997-02-01

    Few data are available about the prevalence of occupational exposures to agents which can cause occupational asthma or aggravate preexisting asthma (asthmogens). Using potential occupational exposure data from the National Occupational Exposure Survey (NOES) of 1980-1983, we investigated the number of asthmogen exposures, asthmogen-exposure(s) per production worker, and unprotected occupational asthmogen exposures in different industries and occupations. Data for the entire United States were used to generate estimates of occupational exposure at two selected state and local levels. It was estimated that 7,864,000 workers in the surveyed industries were potentially exposed to one or more occupational asthmogen(s) in the United States. The average number of observed potential exposures per asthmogen-exposed worker was 4.4, and varied from 11.9, in the Water Transportation industry, to 1.2 in Local and Suburban transportation. The largest number of observed potential exposures was recorded in the Apparel and Other Finished Products (garment) industry. This work and further analyses using this approach are expected to contribute to a better understanding of the epidemiology of occupational asthma, and to serve as a guide to target future occupational asthma surveillance efforts.

  2. Smoking and occupation from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, S; Sunyer, J; Zock, J; Anto, J; Kogevinas, M; European, C

    2003-01-01

    Background: Smoking is among the most important personal and modifiable risk factors for adverse health outcomes. The workplace offers a potentially effective venue for tobacco prevention programmes; identifying occupational groups with high smoking prevalence may assist in targeting such programmes. Aims: To examine smoking prevalence among occupational groups in the European Union. Methods: The European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS), a cross sectional health survey conducted in 1992–93, was used to examine smoking prevalence by occupation among 14 565 subjects from 30 centres in 14 participating countries. Results: There was an approximately twofold range in smoking prevalence by occupation. For occupational groups with at least 50 subjects, the highest smoking prevalence was seen in metal making and treating for men (54.3%) and cleaners for women (50.7%). Increased smoking prevalence by occupation persisted after adjustment for age, country, and age at completion of education. Smoking was also increased among occupations with high exposure to mineral dust and gas or fumes. Conclusions: Smoking rates vary significantly by occupation. Prevention efforts in the workplace should focus on occupations with high smoking prevalence and large employment bases. PMID:12937184

  3. Designing occupancy studies: general advice and allocating survey effort

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKenzie, D.I.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2005-01-01

    1. The fraction of sampling units in a landscape where a target species is present (occupancy) is an extensively used concept in ecology. Yet in many applications the species will not always be detected in a sampling unit even when present, resulting in biased estimates of occupancy. Given that sampling units are surveyed repeatedly within a relatively short timeframe, a number of similar methods have now been developed to provide unbiased occupancy estimates. However, practical guidance on the efficient design of occupancy studies has been lacking. 2. In this paper we comment on a number of general issues related to designing occupancy studies, including the need for clear objectives that are explicitly linked to science or management, selection of sampling units, timing of repeat surveys and allocation of survey effort. Advice on the number of repeat surveys per sampling unit is considered in terms of the variance of the occupancy estimator, for three possible study designs. 3. We recommend that sampling units should be surveyed a minimum of three times when detection probability is high (> 0.5 survey-1), unless a removal design is used. 4. We found that an optimal removal design will generally be the most efficient, but we suggest it may be less robust to assumption violations than a standard design. 5. Our results suggest that for a rare species it is more efficient to survey more sampling units less intensively, while for a common species fewer sampling units should be surveyed more intensively. 6. Synthesis and applications. Reliable inferences can only result from quality data. To make the best use of logistical resources, study objectives must be clearly defined; sampling units must be selected, and repeated surveys timed appropriately; and a sufficient number of repeated surveys must be conducted. Failure to do so may compromise the integrity of the study. The guidance given here on study design issues is particularly applicable to studies of species

  4. Predicting carnivore occurrence with noninvasive surveys and occupancy modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Robert A.; Donovan, Therese M.; MacKay, Paula; Zielinski, William J.; Buzas, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Terrestrial carnivores typically have large home ranges and exist at low population densities, thus presenting challenges to wildlife researchers. We employed multiple, noninvasive survey methods—scat detection dogs, remote cameras, and hair snares—to collect detection–nondetection data for elusive American black bears (Ursus americanus), fishers (Martes pennanti), and bobcats (Lynx rufus) throughout the rugged Vermont landscape. We analyzed these data using occupancy modeling that explicitly incorporated detectability as well as habitat and landscape variables. For black bears, percentage of forested land within 5 km of survey sites was an important positive predictor of occupancy, and percentage of human developed land within 5 km was a negative predictor. Although the relationship was less clear for bobcats, occupancy appeared positively related to the percentage of both mixed forest and forested wetland habitat within 1 km of survey sites. The relationship between specific covariates and fisher occupancy was unclear, with no specific habitat or landscape variables directly related to occupancy. For all species, we used model averaging to predict occurrence across the study area. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses of our black bear and fisher models suggested that occupancy modeling efforts with data from noninvasive surveys could be useful for carnivore conservation and management, as they provide insights into habitat use at the regional and landscape scale without requiring capture or direct observation of study species.

  5. A survey of parallel programming tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Doreen Y.

    1991-01-01

    This survey examines 39 parallel programming tools. Focus is placed on those tool capabilites needed for parallel scientific programming rather than for general computer science. The tools are classified with current and future needs of Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator (NAS) in mind: existing and anticipated NAS supercomputers and workstations; operating systems; programming languages; and applications. They are divided into four categories: suggested acquisitions, tools already brought in; tools worth tracking; and tools eliminated from further consideration at this time.

  6. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries. PMID:25000546

  7. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries.

  8. Automotive Mechanics Occupational Performance Survey. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borcher, Sidney D.; Leiter, Paul B.

    The purpose of this federally-funded interim report is to present the results of a task inventory analysis survey of automotive mechanics completed by project staff within the Instructional Systems Design Program at the Center for Vocational and Technical Education. Intended for use in curriculum development for vocational education programs in…

  9. Kuder Occupational Interest Survey Profiles of Reentry Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tittle, Carol K.; Denker, Elenor R.

    1977-01-01

    The Kuder Occupational Interest Survey was administered to 202 women considering reentry into education. It was found that the KOIS does differentiate between women and individual interests are reflected for this sample of women. It was concluded that examination of male-normed scales is very useful in counseling. (Author)

  10. Career Maturity Aspects of the Kuder Occupational Interest Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigington, John H.

    1982-01-01

    Determined if selected scores from the Kuder Occupational Interest Survey (KOIS) could be indicative of client career maturity. The data for each subject included three scores from the KOIS and one measure of career maturity. Significant correlations were found between the KOIS scores and career maturity. (Author)

  11. Occupation and mental health in a national UK survey

    PubMed Central

    Rasul, F. R.; Head, J.; Singleton, N.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To measure the prevalence of common mental disorder (CMD) by occupation in a representative sample of Great Britain and to identify occupations with increased and decreased risk of CMD. Methods A cross-sectional interview-based survey was carried out including 5,497 working male and female respondents, 16–64 years from a stratified random survey of private households in Britain. Occupations were classified by the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) into four groups: major, sub-major, minor and constituent unit groups. Common Mental Disorder was measured by the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule. Results Major SOC groups with higher prevalence of common mental disorder included clerical and secretarial, sales, and personal and protective services whereas craft and related, ‘other’ professional occupations and plant and machine operatives had lower prevalence compared to 13% overall prevalence in all adults. In sub-major SOC groups managers and administrators, teaching professionals, clerical and secretarial, ‘other’ sales and personal service occupations had higher prevalence whereas many professional and skilled occupations had lower prevalence. Specific SOC unit groups with higher prevalence included primary and secondary teachers, welfare community, youth workers, security staff, waiters, bar staff, nurse auxiliaries and care assistants. General managers in government and large organizations (OR = 2.79, 95% CI 1.41–5.54), managers in transport and storing (OR = 2.44, 95% CI 1.18–5.03), buyers and mobile sales persons (OR = 2.48, 95% CI 1.09–5.60), sales occupations (NES) (OR = 2.78, 95% CI 1.25–6.19) and clerks (NES) (OR = 2.71, 95% CI 1.59–4.61) had increased risk of common mental disorder relative to specialist managers adjusting for social and financial factors and physical ill-health. Conclusions Occupations with higher risk of common mental disorder may be typified by high levels of job demands, especially

  12. Presence-nonpresence surveys of golden-cheeked warblers: detection, occupancy and survey effort

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, C.A.; Weckerly, F.W.; Hatfield, J.S.; Farquhar, C.C.; Williamson, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    Surveys to detect the presence or absence of endangered species may not consistently cover an area, account for imperfect detection or consider that detection and species presence at sample units may change within a survey season. We evaluated a detection?nondetection survey method for the federally endangered golden-cheeked warbler (GCWA) Dendroica chrysoparia. Three study areas were selected across the breeding range of GCWA in central Texas. Within each area, 28-36 detection stations were placed 200 m apart. Each detection station was surveyed nine times during the breeding season in 2 consecutive years. Surveyors remained up to 8 min at each detection station recording GCWA detected by sight or sound. To assess the potential influence of environmental covariates (e.g. slope, aspect, canopy cover, study area) on detection and occupancy and possible changes in occupancy and detection probabilities within breeding seasons, 30 models were analyzed. Using information-theoretic model selection procedures, we found that detection probabilities and occupancy varied among study areas and within breeding seasons. Detection probabilities ranged from 0.20 to 0.80 and occupancy ranged from 0.56 to 0.95. Because study areas with high detection probabilities had high occupancy, a conservative survey effort (erred towards too much surveying) was estimated using the lowest detection probability. We determined that nine surveys of 35 stations were needed to have estimates of occupancy with coefficients of variation <20%. Our survey evaluation evidently captured the key environmental variable that influenced bird detection (GCWA density) and accommodated the changes in GCWA distribution throughout the breeding season.

  13. A Survey of Occupational Therapy Practice in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yun; Howe, Tsu-Hsin

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing demand for rehabilitation services in China as a result of the growing number of people with physical and mental challenges, as well as the growing population of older adults. The purpose of this study was to explore the current occupational therapy (OT) resources available in Beijing, China, to serve as the first step in planning the response to increasing demand for OT services from the people of China. Specifically, using the snowball sampling survey method, we explored the work practice, including years of working experience, work setting, weekly work hours, annual income and factors related to job satisfaction among occupational therapists in Beijing, China. A total of 44 occupational therapists currently working in the Beijing area responded to our survey. The results demonstrated that most of the therapists working in Beijing area were young and inexperienced. Despite the fact that the participants had an average age of 31 years old and an average of 8 years' working experience, 61.4% of therapists were under 30 years old and more than half of therapists had less than 5 years of OT experiences. Among those included in the study sample, 50% had earned degrees in OT, and the rest of the OT personnel received OT-related on-the-job training in various forms and lengths of time. A majority of the participants worked in hospital settings with adults or children with physical disabilities and used therapeutic activities and therapeutic exercises. Being an occupational therapist is not a high-paying job. Education satisfaction, work experience and annual income are the factors related to job satisfaction for the participants. The majority of occupational therapists expressed the need to receive more support for clinical-related trainings. We plan to expand this pilot study nationwide to gain an in-depth and comprehensive understanding of the OT workforce in China. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A survey of occupational hand eczema in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Skoet, Rikke; Olsen, Jorn; Mathiesen, Bent; Iversen, Lars; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Agner, Tove

    2004-10-01

    Occupational hand eczema (OHE) is the most frequently recognized work-related disease in Denmark and the annual cost to society is high. Understanding of the epidemiology of OHE is essential to be able to give appropriate recommendations for its prevention. The study comprised 758 persons, 490 females and 268 males with recognized OHE in the period October 2001 to November 2002. Data were obtained prospectively from the National Board of Industrial Industry Registry and from a self-administered questionnaire (response rate, 82%). The most frequently recognized diagnosis was irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), mainly caused by wet occupations. The proportion of occupational ICD was equal for males and females, 59.7% and 63.1%, respectively. The estimated rates of OHE were high for bakers, hairdressers and dental surgery assistants, and a high proportion of apprentices were found among hairdressers. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis was low (16.4%) compared to previous studies among hand eczema patients. The prevalence of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in the study population was substantially higher among males than females, and the most frequent causes among males were allergy to chromium (leather exposure), rubber additives (gloves) and nickel due to exposure from work tools and metalworking industry. PMID:15500664

  15. Advanced REACH Tool: a Bayesian model for occupational exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    McNally, Kevin; Warren, Nicholas; Fransman, Wouter; Entink, Rinke Klein; Schinkel, Jody; van Tongeren, Martie; Cherrie, John W; Kromhout, Hans; Schneider, Thomas; Tielemans, Erik

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes a Bayesian model for the assessment of inhalation exposures in an occupational setting; the methodology underpins a freely available web-based application for exposure assessment, the Advanced REACH Tool (ART). The ART is a higher tier exposure tool that combines disparate sources of information within a Bayesian statistical framework. The information is obtained from expert knowledge expressed in a calibrated mechanistic model of exposure assessment, data on inter- and intra-individual variability in exposures from the literature, and context-specific exposure measurements. The ART provides central estimates and credible intervals for different percentiles of the exposure distribution, for full-shift and long-term average exposures. The ART can produce exposure estimates in the absence of measurements, but the precision of the estimates improves as more data become available. The methodology presented in this paper is able to utilize partially analogous data, a novel approach designed to make efficient use of a sparsely populated measurement database although some additional research is still required before practical implementation. The methodology is demonstrated using two worked examples: an exposure to copper pyrithione in the spraying of antifouling paints and an exposure to ethyl acetate in shoe repair. PMID:24665110

  16. Occupational injury in rural Bangladesh: data gathering using household survey.

    PubMed

    Davies, Hugh; Koehlmoos, Tracy Pérez; Courtice, Midori N; Ahmad, S Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    Occupational injuries are estimated to cause over 300,000 deaths per year worldwide. Many low- and middle-income countries often lack effective injury surveillance systems. We attempted to utilize household surveys to collect occupational injury data to develop more accurate injury incidence data. We undertook a pilot study of this approach in the rural area of Mirsarai, Bangladesh. Surveys were administered to 2,017 males and 120 females. Sixty-five percent were self-employed and over 80% worked in work places with less than six employees; over 60% worked seven days per week. Just over 50% of subjects reported at least one injury at work in the prior year. Incidence of lost-time injuries was 31%. The median number of work days lost was 7. The injury rates were higher than ILO estimates for Bangladesh, perhaps because of our study's focus on a rural population. We recommend expanding to larger and a more representative sample of the Bangladesh working community. PMID:21905389

  17. Nasal cancer in England and Wales: an occupational survey.

    PubMed Central

    Acheson, E D; Cowdell, R H; Rang, E H

    1981-01-01

    A national survey of the incidence of nasal cancer in England and Wales during the period 1963-7 with special reference to occupation confirmed the well-known increases in incidence of nasal cancer in cabinet makers and wood machinists, together with the absence of any significant increase in carpenters and joiners, and the increases in boot and shoe operatives and repairers, and in nickel smelters in South Wales. The significant excesses of cases found among coalminers, furnacemen in the gas, coke, and chemical industry, and furnacemen and labourers in foundries may be associated with exposure to coal and coke dust or may be spurious. No excess of nasal cancer was found among male textile workers. Excesses of uncertain significance were found among tailors and dressmakers, bakers and pastry cooks, and printers. Apart from the well-known relationships between adenocarcinoma and work in the furniture and footwear industries there is no definite indication in this survey of any association between a particular histological type of nasal tumour and occupation in England and Wales. PMID:7272233

  18. Fabric and Rubber Products Career Ladder AFSCs 58230/58250/58270/58290. Occupational Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force Occupational Measurement Center, Lackland AFB, TX.

    The report describes an occupational survey of the Fabric and Rubber Products career ladder, AFS 582XO, conducted by the Occupational Survey Branch. The report describes the development of the survey instrument, administration to career ladder incumbents, and resulting summaries of tasks performed by airmen grouped by skill level, experience…

  19. Red-shouldered hawk occupancy surveys in central Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henneman, C.; McLeod, M.A.; Andersen, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    Forest-dwelling raptors are often difficult to detect because many species occur at low density or are secretive. Broadcasting conspecific vocalizations can increase the probability of detecting forest-dwelling raptors and has been shown to be an effective method for locating raptors and assessing their relative abundance. Recent advances in statistical techniques based on presence-absence data use probabilistic arguments to derive probability of detection when it is <1 and to provide a model and likelihood-based method for estimating proportion of sites occupied. We used these maximum-likelihood models with data from red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus) call-broadcast surveys conducted in central Minnesota, USA, in 1994-1995 and 2004-2005. Our objectives were to obtain estimates of occupancy and detection probability 1) over multiple sampling seasons (yr), 2) incorporating within-season time-specific detection probabilities, 3) with call type and breeding stage included as covariates in models of probability of detection, and 4) with different sampling strategies. We visited individual survey locations 2-9 times per year, and estimates of both probability of detection (range = 0.28-0.54) and site occupancy (range = 0.81-0.97) varied among years. Detection probability was affected by inclusion of a within-season time-specific covariate, call type, and breeding stage. In 2004 and 2005 we used survey results to assess the effect that number of sample locations, double sampling, and discontinued sampling had on parameter estimates. We found that estimates of probability of detection and proportion of sites occupied were similar across different sampling strategies, and we suggest ways to reduce sampling effort in a monitoring program.

  20. Demonstrating the cost effectiveness of an expert occupational and environmental health nurse: application of AAOHN's success tools. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses.

    PubMed

    Morris, J A; Smith, P S

    2001-12-01

    According to DiBenedetto, "Occupational health nurses enhance and maximize the health, safety, and productivity of the domestic and global work force" (1999b). This project clearly defined the multiple roles and activities provided by an occupational and environmental health nurse and assistant, supported by a part time contract occupational health nurse. A well defined estimate of the personnel costs for each of these roles is helpful both in demonstrating current value and in future strategic planning for this department. The model highlighted both successes and a business cost savings opportunity for integrated disability management. The AAOHN's Success Tools (1998) were invaluable in launching the development of this cost effectiveness model. The three methods were selected from several tools of varying complexities offered. Collecting available data to develop these metrics required internal consultation with finance, human resources, and risk management, as well as communication with external health, safety, and environmental providers in the community. Benchmarks, surveys, and performance indicators can be found readily in the literature and online. The primary motivation for occupational and environmental health nurses to develop cost effectiveness analyses is to demonstrate the value and worth of their programs and services. However, it can be equally important to identify which services are not cost effective so knowledge and skills may be used in ways that continue to provide value to employers (AAOHN, 1996). As evidence based health care challenges the occupational health community to demonstrate business rationale and financial return on investment, occupational and environmental health nurses must meet that challenge if they are to define their preferred future (DiBenedetto, 2000).

  1. Recommended survey designs for occupancy modelling using motion-activated cameras: insights from empirical wildlife data

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jesse S.; Gerber, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Motion-activated cameras are a versatile tool that wildlife biologists can use for sampling wild animal populations to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling provides a flexible framework for the analysis of these data; explicitly recognizing that given a species occupies an area the probability of detecting it is often less than one. Despite the number of studies using camera data in an occupancy framework, there is only limited guidance from the scientific literature about survey design trade-offs when using motion-activated cameras. A fuller understanding of these trade-offs will allow researchers to maximise available resources and determine whether the objectives of a monitoring program or research study are achievable. We use an empirical dataset collected from 40 cameras deployed across 160 km2 of the Western Slope of Colorado, USA to explore how survey effort (number of cameras deployed and the length of sampling period) affects the accuracy and precision (i.e., error) of the occupancy estimate for ten mammal and three virtual species. We do this using a simulation approach where species occupancy and detection parameters were informed by empirical data from motion-activated cameras. A total of 54 survey designs were considered by varying combinations of sites (10–120 cameras) and occasions (20–120 survey days). Our findings demonstrate that increasing total sampling effort generally decreases error associated with the occupancy estimate, but changing the number of sites or sampling duration can have very different results, depending on whether a species is spatially common or rare (occupancy = ψ) and easy or hard to detect when available (detection probability = p). For rare species with a low probability of detection (i.e., raccoon and spotted skunk) the required survey effort includes maximizing the number of sites and the number of survey days, often to a level that may be logistically unrealistic for many studies. For common species with

  2. Recommended survey designs for occupancy modelling using motion-activated cameras: insights from empirical wildlife data.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Graeme; Lewis, Jesse S; Gerber, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    Motion-activated cameras are a versatile tool that wildlife biologists can use for sampling wild animal populations to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling provides a flexible framework for the analysis of these data; explicitly recognizing that given a species occupies an area the probability of detecting it is often less than one. Despite the number of studies using camera data in an occupancy framework, there is only limited guidance from the scientific literature about survey design trade-offs when using motion-activated cameras. A fuller understanding of these trade-offs will allow researchers to maximise available resources and determine whether the objectives of a monitoring program or research study are achievable. We use an empirical dataset collected from 40 cameras deployed across 160 km(2) of the Western Slope of Colorado, USA to explore how survey effort (number of cameras deployed and the length of sampling period) affects the accuracy and precision (i.e., error) of the occupancy estimate for ten mammal and three virtual species. We do this using a simulation approach where species occupancy and detection parameters were informed by empirical data from motion-activated cameras. A total of 54 survey designs were considered by varying combinations of sites (10-120 cameras) and occasions (20-120 survey days). Our findings demonstrate that increasing total sampling effort generally decreases error associated with the occupancy estimate, but changing the number of sites or sampling duration can have very different results, depending on whether a species is spatially common or rare (occupancy = ψ) and easy or hard to detect when available (detection probability = p). For rare species with a low probability of detection (i.e., raccoon and spotted skunk) the required survey effort includes maximizing the number of sites and the number of survey days, often to a level that may be logistically unrealistic for many studies. For common species with

  3. Development, use, and availability of a job exposure matrix based on national occupational hazard survey data.

    PubMed

    Sieber, W K; Sundin, D S; Frazier, T M; Robinson, C F

    1991-01-01

    A job exposure matrix has been developed based on potential exposure data collected during the 1972-1974 National Occupational Hazard Survey (NOHS). The survey sample was representative of all U.S. non-agricultural businesses covered under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and employing eight or more employees. Potential worker exposure to all chemical, physical, or biological agents was recorded during the field survey if certain minimum guidelines for exposure were met. The job exposure matrix (JEM) itself is a computerized database that assists the user in determining potential chemical or physical exposures in occupational settings. We describe the structure and possible uses of the job exposure matrix. In one example, potential occupational exposures to elemental lead were grouped by industry and occupation. In a second example, the matrix was used to determine exposure classifications in a hypothetical case-control study. Present availability as well as future enhancements of the job exposure matrix are described.

  4. Occupational health survey of farm workers by camp health aides.

    PubMed

    Cameron, L; Lalich, N; Bauer, S; Booker, V; Bogue, H O; Samuels, S; Steege, A L

    2006-05-01

    Little is known about the magnitude of occupational health problems among migrant farm workers. A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted in two migrant farm worker communities: Homestead, Florida, and Kankakee, Illinois. Camp Health Aides (CHAs) interviewed 425 workers about job tasks, personal protective equipment (PPE), field sanitation, work exposures, and selected health conditions. Limited provision of personal protective equipment was reported among those reporting early re-entry tasks: 35% in Kankakee and 42% in Homestead were provided gloves, and 22% in Homestead and 0% in Kankakee were provided protective clothing. About two-thirds were provided toilet facilities and water for hand-washing. Workers reported high prevalences of health conditions consistent with exposure to ergonomic hazards and pesticides. The prevalence of back pain in the past 12 months was 39% in Homestead and 24% in Kankakee. Among Homestead participants, 35% experienced eye symptoms, while 31% reported skin symptoms. These symptoms were less prevalent among Kankakee participants (16% for both eye and skin symptoms). Specific areas of concern included back pain associated with heavy lifting and ladder work; eye and skin irritation associated with fertilizer application tasks and with working in fields during or after spraying of chemicals, especially early re-entry of sprayed fields; and skin irritation associated with a lack of access to hand-washing facilities. In both Kankakee and Homestead, better adherence to safety standards is needed, as well as greater efforts to implement solutions that are available to help prevent work-related musculoskeletal problems. PMID:16724790

  5. [Tool for measuring occupational stress: a nurses' stress inventory].

    PubMed

    Stacciarini, J M; Tróccoli, B T

    2000-12-01

    We present an exploratory study aiming at constructing an inventory to measure occupational stress in nurses ("Inventário de Estresse em Enfermeiros"--IEE). A set of items was initially constructed from previously defined categories based on interviews with nurses and then improved through semantic analysis by referees and a pilot-test with nursing students. A sample of 461 nurses--workers from the public services of the Federal District--who answered the IEE was used in the study. Factorial analysis indicated the presence of a second-order global factor and three first-order factors: Interpersonal Relationships, Stressful Career Roles and Intrinsic Job Factors.

  6. Occupational Safety. Power Tools. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 1 Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This self-paced student training module on safety when using power tools is one of a number of modules developed for Pre-apprenticeship Phase 1 Training. Purpose of the module is to familiarize students with general safety rules and uses of commonly used electrical, pneumatic, hydraulic, and powder-actuated tools. The module may contain some or…

  7. Required competencies of occupational physicians: a Delphi survey of UK customers

    PubMed Central

    Reetoo, K; Harrington, J; Macdonald, E

    2005-01-01

    Background: Occupational physicians can contribute to good management in healthy enterprises. The requirement to take into account the needs of the customers when planning occupational health services is well established. Aims: To establish the priorities of UK employers, employees, and their representatives regarding the competencies they require from occupational physicians; to explore the reasons for variations of the priorities in different groups; and to make recommendations for occupational medicine training curricula in consideration of these findings. Methods: This study involved a Delphi survey of employers and employees from public and private organisations of varying business sizes, and health and safety specialists as well as trade union representatives throughout the UK. It was conducted in two rounds by a combination of computer assisted telephone interview (CATI) and postal survey techniques, using a questionnaire based on the list of competencies described by UK and European medical training bodies. Results: There was broad consensus about the required competencies of occupational physicians among the respondent subgroups. All the competencies in which occupational physicians are trained were considered important by the customers. In the order of decreasing importance, the competencies were: Law and Ethics, Occupational Hazards, Disability and Fitness for Work, Communication, Environmental Exposures, Research Methods, Health Promotion, and Management. Conclusion: The priorities of customers differed from previously published occupational physicians' priorities. Existing training programmes for occupational physicians should be regularly reviewed and where necessary, modified to ensure that the emphasis of training meets customer requirements. PMID:15901889

  8. Tools for regulatory assessment of occupational exposure: development and challenges.

    PubMed

    Tielemans, Erik; Warren, Nick; Schneider, Thomas; Tischer, Martin; Ritchie, Peter; Goede, Henk; Kromhout, Hans; Van Hemmen, Joop; Cherrie, John W

    2007-12-01

    REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of CHemicals) requires improved exposure models that can be incorporated into screening tools and refined assessment tools. These are referred to as tier 1 and 2 models, respectively. There are a number of candidate in tier 1 models that could be used with REACH. Tier 2 models, producing robust and realistic exposure assessments, are currently not available. A research programme is proposed in this paper that will result in a new, advanced exposure assessment tool for REACH. In addition, issues related to variability and uncertainty are discussed briefly, and some examples of tier 1 screening tools are presented. The proposed framework for the tier 2 tool is based on a Bayesian approach, and makes full use of mechanistically modelled estimates and any relevant measurements of exposure. The new approach will preclude the necessity to conduct of case-by-case exposure measurements for each chemical and scenario, since the system will allow for the use of analogous exposure data from relatively comparable scenarios. The development of the new approach requires substantial effort in the area of mechanistic modelling, database development and Bayesian statistical techniques. In this paper, the data gaps and areas for future research are identified to help realise and further improve this type of approach within REACH. A structured data collection and storage system is a central element of the research programme and the availability of this type of tool may also facilitate the sharing of exposure data down and up the supply chain. In addition, new data that are stored according to the proposed structure could enable the validation of any exposure model and thus this programme enhances the exposure assessment field as a whole.

  9. Survey of visualization and analysis tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    A large number of commercially available visualization and analysis tools are available to the researcher. Some of the strengths and limitations of some of these tools, from the viewpoint of the earth sciences discipline, are discussed. Visualization and analysis tools fall into one of two categories: those that are designed to a specific purpose and are non-extensive and those that are generic visual programming tools that are extensible. Most of the extensible packages examined incorporate a data flow paradigm.

  10. Perceived competence and comfort in respiratory protection: results of a nationwide survey of occupational health nurses.

    PubMed

    Burgel, Barbara J; Novak, Debra; Burns, Candace M; Byrd, Annette; Carpenter, Holly; Gruden, MaryAnn; Lachat, Ann; Taormina, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    In response to the Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training, a nationwide survey was conducted in May 2012 to assess occupational health nurses' educational preparation, roles, responsibilities, and training needs in respiratory protection. More than 2,000 occupational health nurses responded; 83% perceived themselves as competent, proficient, or expert in respiratory protection, reporting moderate comfort with 12 respiratory program elements. If occupational health nurses had primary responsibility for the respiratory protection program, they were more likely to perceive higher competence and more comfort in respiratory protection, after controlling for occupational health nursing experience, highest education, occupational health nursing certification, industry sector, Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare membership, taking a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health spirometry course in the prior 5 years, and perceiving a positive safety culture at work. These survey results document high perceived competence and comfort in respiratory protection. These findings support the development of targeted educational programs and interprofessional competencies for respiratory protection. PMID:23429638

  11. [Dangerous chemical substances--tools supporting occupational risk assessment].

    PubMed

    Dobrzyńska, Elżbieta; Pośniak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of risk associated with exposure to chemicals in the work environment is a task that still poses a lot of difficulties for the employers. At the same time the probability of adverse health effects faced by an employee as a result of such risks, and the related employer's material losses should motivate employers to seek effective solutions aimed at assessing the risks and controling them to an acceptable level by the application of appropriate preventive measures. The paper presents examples of tools to assist the employer in the risk assessment associated with the presence of chemical agents in the workplace. Examples of guides, manuals, checklists and various interactive tools, developed in Poland and other European Union (EU) countries, as well as in countries outside the EU and international organizations are described. These tools have been developed to meet the current requirements of the law and allow a rough estimation of chemical risk and based on these estimates take further steps to improve working con- ditions and safety.

  12. Dealing with trade-offs in destructive sampling designs for occupancy surveys.

    PubMed

    Canessa, Stefano; Heard, Geoffrey W; Robertson, Peter; Sluiter, Ian R K

    2015-01-01

    Occupancy surveys should be designed to minimise false absences. This is commonly achieved by increasing replication or increasing the efficiency of surveys. In the case of destructive sampling designs, in which searches of individual microhabitats represent the repeat surveys, minimising false absences leads to an inherent trade-off. Surveyors can sample more low quality microhabitats, bearing the resultant financial costs and producing wider-spread impacts, or they can target high quality microhabitats were the focal species is more likely to be found and risk more severe impacts on local habitat quality. We show how this trade-off can be solved with a decision-theoretic approach, using the Millewa Skink Hemiergis millewae from southern Australia as a case study. Hemiergis millewae is an endangered reptile that is best detected using destructive sampling of grass hummocks. Within sites that were known to be occupied by H. millewae, logistic regression modelling revealed that lizards were more frequently detected in large hummocks. If this model is an accurate representation of the detection process, searching large hummocks is more efficient and requires less replication, but this strategy also entails destruction of the best microhabitats for the species. We developed an optimisation tool to calculate the minimum combination of the number and size of hummocks to search to achieve a given cumulative probability of detecting the species at a site, incorporating weights to reflect the sensitivity of the results to a surveyor's priorities. The optimisation showed that placing high weight on minimising volume necessitates impractical replication, whereas placing high weight on minimising replication requires searching very large hummocks which are less common and may be vital for H. millewae. While destructive sampling methods are sometimes necessary, surveyors must be conscious of the ecological impacts of these methods. This study provides a simple tool for

  13. Practical Tools for Designing and Weighting Survey Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valliant, Richard; Dever, Jill A.; Kreuter, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Survey sampling is fundamentally an applied field. The goal in this book is to put an array of tools at the fingertips of practitioners by explaining approaches long used by survey statisticians, illustrating how existing software can be used to solve survey problems, and developing some specialized software where needed. This book serves at least…

  14. A two-phase sampling design for increasing detections of rare species in occupancy surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pacifici, Krishna; Dorazio, Robert M.; Dorazio, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    1. Occupancy estimation is a commonly used tool in ecological studies owing to the ease at which data can be collected and the large spatial extent that can be covered. One major obstacle to using an occupancy-based approach is the complications associated with designing and implementing an efficient survey. These logistical challenges become magnified when working with rare species when effort can be wasted in areas with none or very few individuals. 2. Here, we develop a two-phase sampling approach that mitigates these problems by using a design that places more effort in areas with higher predicted probability of occurrence. We compare our new sampling design to traditional single-season occupancy estimation under a range of conditions and population characteristics. We develop an intuitive measure of predictive error to compare the two approaches and use simulations to assess the relative accuracy of each approach. 3. Our two-phase approach exhibited lower predictive error rates compared to the traditional single-season approach in highly spatially correlated environments. The difference was greatest when detection probability was high (0·75) regardless of the habitat or sample size. When the true occupancy rate was below 0·4 (0·05-0·4), we found that allocating 25% of the sample to the first phase resulted in the lowest error rates. 4. In the majority of scenarios, the two-phase approach showed lower error rates compared to the traditional single-season approach suggesting our new approach is fairly robust to a broad range of conditions and design factors and merits use under a wide variety of settings. 5. Synthesis and applications. Conservation and management of rare species are a challenging task facing natural resource managers. It is critical for studies involving rare species to efficiently allocate effort and resources as they are usually of a finite nature. We believe our approach provides a framework for optimal allocation of effort while

  15. An Occupational Interest Survey for Hospitality Management Positions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS.

    As part of a study sponsored by the National Food Brokers Association, a survey of Johnson County Community College (JCCC) students was conducted to determine their perceptions of hospitality management and the factors that might deter them from choosing careers in that field. The survey instrument, distributed in the college commons by members of…

  16. ESTIMATING AMPHIBIAN OCCUPANCY RATES IN PONDS UNDER COMPLEX SURVEY DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring the occurrence of specific amphibian species in ponds is one component of the US Geological Survey's Amphibian Monitoring and Research Initiative. Two collaborative studies were conducted in Olympic National Park and southeastern region of Oregon. The number of ponds...

  17. Survey of Existing Tools for Formal Verification.

    SciTech Connect

    Punnoose, Ratish J.; Armstrong, Robert C.; Wong, Matthew H.; Jackson, Mayo

    2014-12-01

    Formal methods have come into wide use because of their effectiveness in verifying "safety and security" requirements of digital systems; a set of requirements for which testing is mostly ineffective. Formal methods are routinely used in the design and verification of high-consequence digital systems in industry. This report outlines our work in assessing the capabilities of commercial and open source formal tools and the ways in which they can be leveraged in digital design workflows.

  18. Web Surveys to Digital Movies: Technological Tools of the Trade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetterman, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Highlights some of the technological tools used by educational researchers today, focusing on data collection related tools such as Web surveys, digital photography, voice recognition and transcription, file sharing and virtual office, videoconferencing on the Internet, instantaneous chat and chat rooms, reporting and dissemination, and digital…

  19. Jenkins Activity Survey Scores among Women of Different Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morell, Marie A.; Katkin, Edward S.

    1982-01-01

    Studied prevalence of Type A behavior of female professionals, nonprofessionals, homemakers and students. Professionals had significantly higher scores than homemakers on Type A, Job Involvement, Speed and Impatience, and Hard-Driving and Competitive scales of the Jenkins Activity Survey. Type A behavior was not related to family history. (Author)

  20. The Training Requirements of the Clothing Industry. A Survey of Selected Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Kathleen M.; Kuhl, Dean H.

    This survey was conducted in order to determine the training requirements of the clothing industry in South Australia. The results and findings are intended to be used as a means for upgrading and revising the Clothing Production Certificate Course and for providing suitable training programs for other key occupations within the industry. Survey…

  1. Corrosion Control Specialist Career Ladder AFSC 53530, 53550, 53570, and 53690. Occupational Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force Occupational Measurement Center, Lackland AFB, TX.

    The report describes the results of a detailed occupational survey of the corrosion control career ladder. Responses to a 457-task, time rating inventory from 1,015 personnel (representing 64 percent of the career field) were analyzed to produce seven specific findings and the career ladder structure. The career ladder includes a variety of jobs…

  2. Monitoring carnivore populations at the landscape scale: occupancy modelling of tigers from sign surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karanth, Kota Ullas; Gopalaswamy, Arjun M.; Kumar, Narayanarao Samba; Vaidyanathan, Srinivas; Nichols, James D.; MacKenzie, Darryl I.

    2011-01-01

    1. Assessing spatial distributions of threatened large carnivores at landscape scales poses formidable challenges because of their rarity and elusiveness. As a consequence of logistical constraints, investigators typically rely on sign surveys. Most survey methods, however, do not explicitly address the central problem of imperfect detections of animal signs in the field, leading to underestimates of true habitat occupancy and distribution. 2. We assessed habitat occupancy for a tiger Panthera tigris metapopulation across a c. 38 000-km2 landscape in India, employing a spatially replicated survey to explicitly address imperfect detections. Ecological predictions about tiger presence were confronted with sign detection data generated from occupancy sampling of 205 sites, each of 188 km2. 3. A recent occupancy model that considers Markovian dependency among sign detections on spatial replicates performed better than the standard occupancy model (ΔAIC = 184·9). A formulation of this model that fitted the data best showed that density of ungulate prey and levels of human disturbance were key determinants of local tiger presence. Model averaging resulted in a replicate-level detection probability [inline image] = 0·17 (0·17) for signs and a tiger habitat occupancy estimate of [inline image] = 0·665 (0·0857) or 14 076 (1814) km2 of potential habitat of 21 167 km2. In contrast, a traditional presence-versus-absence approach underestimated occupancy by 47%. Maps of probabilities of local site occupancy clearly identified tiger source populations at higher densities and matched observed tiger density variations, suggesting their potential utility for population assessments at landscape scales. 4. Synthesis and applications. Landscape-scale sign surveys can efficiently assess large carnivore spatial distributions and elucidate the factors governing their local presence, provided ecological and observation processes are both explicitly modelled. Occupancy

  3. A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-10-01

    The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

  4. Technology-enhanced learning/distance education: market survey of occupational health and safety professionals.

    PubMed

    Carlson, V; Olson, D K

    2001-01-01

    A market survey of occupational health and safety professionals was performed to assess their interest in course work offered through distance education, using technology-enhanced learning methods such as the Internet or CD-ROM. A random sample of 800 active and student members of the American Industrial Hygiene Association, the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, and the American Society of Safety Engineers from the eight-state Midwest region were queried through a mail survey. Respondents expressed a high likeliness (87.4%) to participate in distance education opportunities for the purposes of continuing education and academic degree. The areas of study interest selected most often were occupational health (73%), injury prevention and control (60%), and industrial hygiene (53%). More than three-quarters of respondents (79%) said that an on-campus component was not important to their learning experience. The majority of respondents (68%) indicated that they were reimbursed for the cost of education with significant differences identified by association. Occupational health and safety professionals are interested in distance education using technology-enhanced learning (TEL) methodologies for meeting their educational needs. TEL/distance education, built on a tested educational approach, should be implemented and outcomes shared to increase the body of knowledge regarding these teaching strategies as they pertain to occupational health and safety professionals.

  5. A survey on annotation tools for the biomedical literature.

    PubMed

    Neves, Mariana; Leser, Ulf

    2014-03-01

    New approaches to biomedical text mining crucially depend on the existence of comprehensive annotated corpora. Such corpora, commonly called gold standards, are important for learning patterns or models during the training phase, for evaluating and comparing the performance of algorithms and also for better understanding the information sought for by means of examples. Gold standards depend on human understanding and manual annotation of natural language text. This process is very time-consuming and expensive because it requires high intellectual effort from domain experts. Accordingly, the lack of gold standards is considered as one of the main bottlenecks for developing novel text mining methods. This situation led the development of tools that support humans in annotating texts. Such tools should be intuitive to use, should support a range of different input formats, should include visualization of annotated texts and should generate an easy-to-parse output format. Today, a range of tools which implement some of these functionalities are available. In this survey, we present a comprehensive survey of tools for supporting annotation of biomedical texts. Altogether, we considered almost 30 tools, 13 of which were selected for an in-depth comparison. The comparison was performed using predefined criteria and was accompanied by hands-on experiences whenever possible. Our survey shows that current tools can support many of the tasks in biomedical text annotation in a satisfying manner, but also that no tool can be considered as a true comprehensive solution.

  6. A novel approach to surveying sturgeon using side-scan sonar and occupancy modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flowers, H. Jared; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances represent opportunities to enhance and supplement traditional fisheries sampling approaches. One example with growing importance for fisheries research is hydroacoustic technologies such as side-scan sonar. Advantages of side-scan sonar over traditional techniques include the ability to sample large areas efficiently and the potential to survey fish without physical handling-important for species of conservation concern, such as endangered sturgeons. Our objectives were to design an efficient survey methodology for sampling Atlantic Sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus by using side-scan sonar and to developmethods for analyzing these data. In North Carolina and South Carolina, we surveyed six rivers thought to contain varying abundances of sturgeon by using a combination of side-scan sonar, telemetry, and video cameras (i.e., to sample jumping sturgeon). Lower reaches of each river near the saltwater-freshwater interface were surveyed on three occasions (generally successive days), and we used occupancy modeling to analyze these data.We were able to detect sturgeon in five of six rivers by using these methods. Side-scan sonar was effective in detecting sturgeon, with estimated gear-specific detection probabilities ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 and river-specific occupancy estimates (per 2-km river segment) ranging from 0.0 to 0.8. Future extensions of this occupancy modeling framework will involve the use of side-scan sonar data to assess sturgeon habitat and abundance in different river systems.

  7. The Prevalence of Short Sleep Duration by Industry and Occupation in the National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Luckhaupt, Sara E.; Tak, SangWoo; Calvert, Geoffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To explore whether employment in industries likely to have non-standard work schedules (e.g., manufacturing and service) and occupations with long work-weeks (e.g., managerial/ professional, sales, and transportation) is associated with an increased risk of short sleep duration. Design: Cross-sectional epidemiologic survey. Setting: Household-based face-to-face survey of civilian, non-institutionalized US residents. Participants: Sample adults interviewed for the National Health Interview Survey in 1985 or 1990 (N = 74,734) or between 2004 and 2007 (N = 110,422). Most analyses focused on civilian employed workers interviewed between 2004 and 2007 (N = 66,099). Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: The weighted prevalence of self-reported short sleep duration, defined as ≤6 h per day, among civilian employed workers from 2004-2007 was 29.9%. Among industry categories, the prevalence of short sleep duration was greatest for management of companies and enterprises (40.5%), followed by transportation/warehousing (37.1%) and manufacturing (34.8%). Occupational categories with the highest prevalence included production occupations in the transportation/warehousing industry, and installation, maintenance, and repair occupations in both the transportation/warehousing industry and the manufacturing industry. In the combined sample from 1985 and 1990, 24.2% of workers reported short sleep duration; the prevalence of short sleep duration was significantly lower during this earlier time period compared to 2004–2007 for 7 of 8 industrial sectors. Conclusions: Self-reported short sleep duration among US workers varies by industry and occupation, and has increased over the past two decades. These findings suggest the need for further exploration of the relationship between work and sleep, and development of targeted interventions for specific industry/occupation groups. Citation: Luckhaupt SE; Tak S; Calvert GM. The prevalence of short sleep duration

  8. TREXMO: A Translation Tool to Support the Use of Regulatory Occupational Exposure Models.

    PubMed

    Savic, Nenad; Racordon, Dimitri; Buchs, Didier; Gasic, Bojan; Vernez, David

    2016-10-01

    Occupational exposure models vary significantly in their complexity, purpose, and the level of expertise required from the user. Different parameters in the same model may lead to different exposure estimates for the same exposure situation. This paper presents a tool developed to deal with this concern-TREXMO or TRanslation of EXposure MOdels. TREXMO integrates six commonly used occupational exposure models, namely, ART v.1.5, STOFFENMANAGER(®) v.5.1, ECETOC TRA v.3, MEASE v.1.02.01, EMKG-EXPO-TOOL, and EASE v.2.0. By enabling a semi-automatic translation between the parameters of these six models, TREXMO facilitates their simultaneous use. For a given exposure situation, defined by a set of parameters in one of the models, TREXMO provides the user with the most appropriate parameters to use in the other exposure models. Results showed that, once an exposure situation and parameters were set in ART, TREXMO reduced the number of possible outcomes in the other models by 1-4 orders of magnitude. The tool should manage to reduce the uncertain entry or selection of parameters in the six models, improve between-user reliability, and reduce the time required for running several models for a given exposure situation. In addition to these advantages, registrants of chemicals and authorities should benefit from more reliable exposure estimates for the risk characterization of dangerous chemicals under Regulation, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of CHemicals (REACH). PMID:27358294

  9. Innovations in scholarly communication - global survey on research tool usage.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Bianca; Bosman, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Many new websites and online tools have come into existence to support scholarly communication in all phases of the research workflow. To what extent researchers are using these and more traditional tools has been largely unknown. This 2015-2016 survey aimed to fill that gap. Its results may help decision making by stakeholders supporting researchers and may also help researchers wishing to reflect on their own online workflows. In addition, information on tools usage can inform studies of changing research workflows. The online survey employed an open, non-probability sample. A largely self-selected group of 20663 researchers, librarians, editors, publishers and other groups involved in research took the survey, which was available in seven languages. The survey was open from May 10, 2015 to February 10, 2016. It captured information on tool usage for 17 research activities, stance towards open access and open science, and expectations of the most important development in scholarly communication. Respondents' demographics included research roles, country of affiliation, research discipline and year of first publication. PMID:27429740

  10. Innovations in scholarly communication - global survey on research tool usage

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Bianca; Bosman, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Many new websites and online tools have come into existence to support scholarly communication in all phases of the research workflow. To what extent researchers are using these and more traditional tools has been largely unknown. This 2015-2016 survey aimed to fill that gap. Its results may help decision making by stakeholders supporting researchers and may also help researchers wishing to reflect on their own online workflows. In addition, information on tools usage can inform studies of changing research workflows. The online survey employed an open, non-probability sample. A largely self-selected group of 20663 researchers, librarians, editors, publishers and other groups involved in research took the survey, which was available in seven languages. The survey was open from May 10, 2015 to February 10, 2016. It captured information on tool usage for 17 research activities, stance towards open access and open science, and expectations of the most important development in scholarly communication. Respondents’ demographics included research roles, country of affiliation, research discipline and year of first publication. PMID:27429740

  11. Estimating occupancy and predicting numbers of gray wolf packs in Montana using hunter surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rich, Lindsey N.; Russell, Robin E.; Glenn, Elizabeth M.; Mitchell, Michael S.; Gude, Justin A.; Podruzny, Kevin M.; Sime, Carolyn A.; Laudon, Kent; Ausband, David E.; Nichols, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Reliable knowledge of the status and trend of carnivore populations is critical to their conservation and management. Methods for monitoring carnivores, however, are challenging to conduct across large spatial scales. In the Northern Rocky Mountains, wildlife managers need a time- and cost-efficient method for monitoring gray wolf (Canis lupus) populations. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) conducts annual telephone surveys of >50,000 deer and elk hunters. We explored how survey data on hunters' sightings of wolves could be used to estimate the occupancy and distribution of wolf packs and predict their abundance in Montana for 2007–2009. We assessed model utility by comparing our predictions to MFWP minimum known number of wolf packs. We minimized false positive detections by identifying a patch as occupied if 2–25 wolves were detected by ≥3 hunters. Overall, estimates of the occupancy and distribution of wolf packs were generally consistent with known distributions. Our predictions of the total area occupied increased from 2007 to 2009 and predicted numbers of wolf packs were approximately 1.34–1.46 times the MFWP minimum counts for each year of the survey. Our results indicate that multi-season occupancy models based on public sightings can be used to monitor populations and changes in the spatial distribution of territorial carnivores across large areas where alternative methods may be limited by personnel, time, accessibility, and budget constraints.

  12. Optimizing occupancy surveys by maximizing detection probability: application to amphibian monitoring in the Mediterranean region

    PubMed Central

    Petitot, Maud; Manceau, Nicolas; Geniez, Philippe; Besnard, Aurélien

    2014-01-01

    Setting up effective conservation strategies requires the precise determination of the targeted species’ distribution area and, if possible, its local abundance. However, detection issues make these objectives complex for most vertebrates. The detection probability is usually <1 and is highly dependent on species phenology and other environmental variables. The aim of this study was to define an optimized survey protocol for the Mediterranean amphibian community, that is, to determine the most favorable periods and the most effective sampling techniques for detecting all species present on a site in a minimum number of field sessions and a minimum amount of prospecting effort. We visited 49 ponds located in the Languedoc region of southern France on four occasions between February and June 2011. Amphibians were detected using three methods: nighttime call count, nighttime visual encounter, and daytime netting. The detection nondetection data obtained was then modeled using site-occupancy models. The detection probability of amphibians sharply differed between species, the survey method used and the date of the survey. These three covariates also interacted. Thus, a minimum of three visits spread over the breeding season, using a combination of all three survey methods, is needed to reach a 95% detection level for all species in the Mediterranean region. Synthesis and applications: detection nondetection surveys combined to site occupancy modeling approach are powerful methods that can be used to estimate the detection probability and to determine the prospecting effort necessary to assert that a species is absent from a site. PMID:25478146

  13. An Occupational Survey of Refrigeration Technicians Aiming at Determining Psychomotor Competencies in Turkish Vocational Higher Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isik, Nurettin; Onat, Ayhan

    2004-01-01

    In this study of "Occupational Survey of Refrigeration Technicians" in which the "Task Inventory Questionnaires" have been developed, we aim at determining the vocational psychomotor competencies (skills) of refrigeration technicians for effectively carrying out the occupational duties in labor-life. In the first phase of the…

  14. The Factorial Validity of The Maslach Burnout Inventory--General Survey in Representative Samples of Eight Different Occupational Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langballe, Ellen Melbye; Falkum, Erik; Innstrand, Siw Tone; Aasland, Olaf Gjerlow

    2006-01-01

    The Maslach Burnout Inventory--General Survey (MBI-GS) is designed to measure the three subdimensions (exhaustion, cynicism, and professional efficacy) of burnout in a wide range of occupations. This article examines the factorial validity of the MBI-GS across eight different occupational groups in Norway: lawyers, physicians, nurses, teachers,…

  15. National survey of occupational therapy practitioners' involvement in response to intervention.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Susan M; McGuire, Beatriz; Krumdick, Nathaniel D; Lee, Michelle M

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We sought to describe occupational therapy practitioners' perceived levels of preparedness for and involvement in school-based Response to Intervention (RtI) initiatives. METHOD. We mailed a survey to a random sample of 1,000 practitioners from the American Occupational Therapy Association's Early Intervention and School Systems Special Interest Section. RESULTS. Of 295 returned surveys (29.9% response rate), 19 were excluded because of missing or incomplete data. Three-quarters of respondents (77.6%) reported that their districts implemented RtI. Two-thirds of respondents (66.3%) indicated that lack of resources limited their involvement in RtI; two-thirds (67%) said that district guidelines that describe expectations for practitioners' involvement would help increase their participation. Many respondents cited the need for continuing education and supported moving from a caseload to a workload model. CONCLUSION. Occupational therapy practitioners would benefit from specific district guidelines outlining the services they are able to provide within the context of RtI.

  16. Hierarchical Bayes estimation of species richness and occupancy in spatially replicated surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kery, M.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    1. Species richness is the most widely used biodiversity metric, but cannot be observed directly as, typically, some species are overlooked. Imperfect detectability must therefore be accounted for to obtain unbiased species-richness estimates. When richness is assessed at multiple sites, two approaches can be used to estimate species richness: either estimating for each site separately, or pooling all samples. The first approach produces imprecise estimates, while the second loses site-specific information. 2. In contrast, a hierarchical Bayes (HB) multispecies site-occupancy model benefits from the combination of information across sites without losing site-specific information and also yields occupancy estimates for each species. The heart of the model is an estimate of the incompletely observed presence-absence matrix, a centrepiece of biogeography and monitoring studies. We illustrate the model using Swiss breeding bird survey data, and compare its estimates with the widely used jackknife species-richness estimator and raw species counts. 3. Two independent observers each conducted three surveys in 26 1-km(2) quadrats, and detected 27-56 (total 103) species. The average estimated proportion of species detected after three surveys was 0.87 under the HB model. Jackknife estimates were less precise (less repeatable between observers) than raw counts, but HB estimates were as repeatable as raw counts. The combination of information in the HB model thus resulted in species-richness estimates presumably at least as unbiased as previous approaches that correct for detectability, but without costs in precision relative to uncorrected, biased species counts. 4. Total species richness in the entire region sampled was estimated at 113.1 (CI 106-123); species detectability ranged from 0.08 to 0.99, illustrating very heterogeneous species detectability; and species occupancy was 0.06-0.96. Even after six surveys, absolute bias in observed occupancy was estimated at up to 0

  17. Prevalence and pattern of occupational exposure to hand transmitted vibration in Great Britain: findings from a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, K.; Griffin, M.; Bendall, H.; Pannett, B.; Coggon, D.

    2000-01-01

    surprisingly prevalent, and preventive measures and health surveillance may be warranted for many men in Britain. Control strategies should focus on prevention at source, with priority accorded to the common sources of exposure and the occupations in which significant exposures tend to arise. Many vibratory tools that are common in Britain have been overlooked in previous surveys, highlighting an important focus for future research.


Keywords: hand transmitted vibration; population; prevalence; exposure PMID:10810107

  18. Preparing to thrive during career transitions: tools for the occupational health nurse.

    PubMed

    Morris, Judy A

    2005-05-01

    Whether planned or unexpected, career transition can have positive results that lead to personal growth and a more fulfilling work life. The transition period should be recognized as an opportunity to assess the past and positively shape the future. Occupational health nurses who enhance their professional and communication skills and maintain up-to-date tools are likely to have a competitive advantage during career transitions. Recommended job search tools include an up-to-date and scannable resume and a portfolio that includes summaries of key accomplishments and recognition received, business references, and a network of contacts. Networking is most effective when it is a mutual exchange. Tullier (1998) suggests individuals remember to seek opportunities to provide value to those who have provided assistance, and to become a resource to those in need of assistance. Ways to support and mentor others include sharing a current article of interest or information about an event they might wish to attend, recommending them as speakers, nominating them for awards, volunteering assistance on a special project or to a charity they support, and acknowledging and congratulating them on their accomplishments. Developing a personal action plan might include objectives such as initiating more frequent contact with individuals in one's network, developing or updating job search tools, improving speaking or writing skills, or increasing involvement in professional or community organizations. Whatever the action items identified and completed, the result will be future career transitions that are more likely to yield positive outcomes. PMID:15909877

  19. Socioeconomic Inequalities and Occupational Injury Disability in China: A Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haochen; Chen, Gong; Wang, Zhenjie; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of occupational injury disability (OID) and to examine the socioeconomic status of OID in China. Methods: The data derived from the China National Sample Survey on Disability in 2006 involving people aged 16–59 years old. Descriptive statistics are used to measure OID’s prevalence, and a binary logistic regression is used to identify the risk factors. Results: The population-weighted prevalence of OID is 1.81 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.67–1.94). Socioeconomic risk factors include male sex, older age, living in urban areas, junior high school education, income below the poverty line, a lack of occupational injury insurance, living in the western region and working in high-risk occupations. Conclusions: OID is common among Chinese people aged 16–59 years old. Being male or older and having a lower income are risk factors for OID, similar to the results of previous research, but education is different. More training and education needs to be implemented to prevent OID. PMID:26030469

  20. Survey of Ambient Air Pollution Health Risk Assessment Tools.

    PubMed

    Anenberg, Susan C; Belova, Anna; Brandt, Jørgen; Fann, Neal; Greco, Sue; Guttikunda, Sarath; Heroux, Marie-Eve; Hurley, Fintan; Krzyzanowski, Michal; Medina, Sylvia; Miller, Brian; Pandey, Kiran; Roos, Joachim; Van Dingenen, Rita

    2016-09-01

    Designing air quality policies that improve public health can benefit from information about air pollution health risks and impacts, which include respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and premature death. Several computer-based tools help automate air pollution health impact assessments and are being used for a variety of contexts. Expanding information gathered for a May 2014 World Health Organization expert meeting, we survey 12 multinational air pollution health impact assessment tools, categorize them according to key technical and operational characteristics, and identify limitations and challenges. Key characteristics include spatial resolution, pollutants and health effect outcomes evaluated, and method for characterizing population exposure, as well as tool format, accessibility, complexity, and degree of peer review and application in policy contexts. While many of the tools use common data sources for concentration-response associations, population, and baseline mortality rates, they vary in the exposure information source, format, and degree of technical complexity. We find that there is an important tradeoff between technical refinement and accessibility for a broad range of applications. Analysts should apply tools that provide the appropriate geographic scope, resolution, and maximum degree of technical rigor for the intended assessment, within resources constraints. A systematic intercomparison of the tools' inputs, assumptions, calculations, and results would be helpful to determine the appropriateness of each for different types of assessment. Future work would benefit from accounting for multiple uncertainty sources and integrating ambient air pollution health impact assessment tools with those addressing other related health risks (e.g., smoking, indoor pollution, climate change, vehicle accidents, physical activity).

  1. Occupational Safety Issues in Residential Construction Surveyed in Wisconsin, United States

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, Sang D.; CARLSON, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Residential construction is a high-risk industry in the U.S. due to the exposure to work-related safety hazards and fall injuries. This study aimed to examine the safety training and safe work practices of construction workers within the small residential construction industry. In order to achieve the study objectives, a survey was designed and sent to approximately 200 Wisconsin based residential construction contractors. About one third of the respondents stated that they did not have any form of safety programs. The study indicated that the most common types of work-related injuries in residential construction were slips/trips/falls and cuts/lacerations. The survey findings also suggested that the residential construction contractors needed to increase the utilization of fall protection safety equipment. Further education and subject matter expert training could provide benefits to improve occupational safety and health of the small business workforce in the residential construction industry. PMID:25016947

  2. [Population surveys as management tools and health care models].

    PubMed

    Andrade, Flávia Reis de; Narvai, Paulo Capel

    2013-12-01

    The article briefly systematizes health care models, emphasizes the role of population surveys as a management tool and analyzes the specific case of the Brazilian Oral Health Survey (SBBrasil 2010) and its contribution to the consolidation process of health care models consistent with the principles of the Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, Public Health Care System). While in legal terms SUS corresponds to a health care model, in actual practice the public policy planning and health action, the system gives rise to a care model which is not the result of legal texts or theoretical formulations, but rather the praxis of the personnel involved. Bearing in mind that the management of day-to-day health affairs is a privileged space for the production and consolidation of health care models, it is necessary to stimulate and support the development of technical and operational skills which are different from those required for the management of care related to individual demands.

  3. Technology Survey Assistance Tool Focusing on Their Advantages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Risa; Takeuchi, Hironori; Watanabe, Hideo; Nasukawa, Tetsuya

    It is important for R&D managers, consultants, and other people seeking broad knowledge in technology fields to survey technical literature such as research papers, white papers, and technology news articles. One of the important kinds of information for those people regards the effectiveness of new technologies in their own businesses. General search engines are good at selecting documents revealing the details of a specific technology or a technology field, but it is hard to obtain useful information about how a technology will apply to individual business cases from such search results. There is a need for a technology survey assistance tool that helps users find technologies with suitable capabilities. In this paper, two technical tasks were tackled to develop the prototype of this assistance tool: Extraction of advantage phrases and scoring for the advantage phrases to find novel applications in the target technology field. We describe a new method to identify advantage phrases in technical documents and our scoring function that gives higher scores to novel applications of the technology. The results of evaluations showed our phrase identification method with only a few phrasal patterns performs almost as well as human annotators, and the proposed scoring conforms better to the decisions made by professionals than random sort.

  4. Measuring vaccine hesitancy: The development of a survey tool.

    PubMed

    Larson, Heidi J; Jarrett, Caitlin; Schulz, William S; Chaudhuri, Mohuya; Zhou, Yuqing; Dube, Eve; Schuster, Melanie; MacDonald, Noni E; Wilson, Rose

    2015-08-14

    In March 2012, the SAGE Working Group on Vaccine Hesitancy was convened to define the term "vaccine hesitancy", as well as to map the determinants of vaccine hesitancy and develop tools to measure and address the nature and scale of hesitancy in settings where it is becoming more evident. The definition of vaccine hesitancy and a matrix of determinants guided the development of a survey tool to assess the nature and scale of hesitancy issues. Additionally, vaccine hesitancy questions were piloted in the annual WHO-UNICEF joint reporting form, completed by National Immunization Managers globally. The objective of characterizing the nature and scale of vaccine hesitancy issues is to better inform the development of appropriate strategies and policies to address the concerns expressed, and to sustain confidence in vaccination. The Working Group developed a matrix of the determinants of vaccine hesitancy informed by a systematic review of peer reviewed and grey literature, and by the expertise of the working group. The matrix mapped the key factors influencing the decision to accept, delay or reject some or all vaccines under three categories: contextual, individual and group, and vaccine-specific. These categories framed the menu of survey questions presented in this paper to help diagnose and address vaccine hesitancy.

  5. Ion mobility spectrometry: a comprehensive and versatile tool for occupational pharmaceutical exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Armenta, S; Blanco, M

    2012-05-15

    The qualitative and quantitative capabilities of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as a comprehensive and powerful tool in workplace air monitoring have been demonstrated on the example of a Spanish pharmaceutical company. The developed IMS based procedure is capable of detecting and determining in air samples the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) manipulated and/or produced in this pharmaceutical industry. Sensitivity, in the ng-pg range, selectivity, possibly to provide results in near real time, and reduction of analysis costs are the most important properties that ratify IMS as a serious alternative in occupational exposure assessment. The possibility of false positives by drift time interferences and false negatives by competitive ionization and also desorption process interferences has been deeply evaluated. Moreover, chemometric strategies based on self-modeling curve resolution (SMCR) have been applied to obtain qualitative and quantitative individual component information from overlapped peaks. The IMS procedure has been successfully applied to evaluate the concentration of APIs (nimesulide, dexketoprofen, deflazacort) handled by the pharmaceutical company employees in the making of tablets and granulates, and control measures have been suggested in accordance.

  6. Inflation, Dark Energy and the AFTA: Survey Evaluation Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Charles

    We propose to address these questions about the Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (AFTA) implementation of the Wide-Field Infra-Red Survey Telescope (WFIRST): (1) What constraints does WFIRST/AFTA place on inflationary and dark energy cosmological parameters for a given set of nominal instrument design and observing parameters? (2) How do these constraints change with variations in mission parameters (sky area, observing duration, sensitivity, purity, astrophysical assumptions, etc.)? and (3) How should requirements or capabilities be included in the design to ensure the dark energy and inflation parameter estimates can be met? To answer these questions we propose to develop a set of simulation tools to better understand the dependencies of the cosmological results on the mission design. We emphasize that it is not our intent to argue for particular changes to the mission, but rather to provide the WFIRST/AFTA Study Office with insights, specific numbers, and functional dependencies so that the Study Office can make informed decisions. Early time accelerated expansion (inflation) and late time accelerated expansion (from dark energy) have physical similarities and differences. They are both, in their simplest form, exponential expansions with the equation of state parameter w = -1, yet they appear unrelated in the sense that they occur on vastly different energy scales. Neither is well understood, hence the strong desire for improved measurements. In a practical sense, the interpretation of future measurements are interdependent. Flatness (Omega_k=0) is often assumed to deduce limits on w, or alternatively w = -1 is assumed to deduce limits on flatness. Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) are effectively differential and hence approximately independent of the detailed shape of the power spectrum, P(k), but if the AFTA galaxy redshift survey is used to deduce P(k), then there is a strong interaction between the interpretation of P(k) and inflation, including its

  7. OPTIMISATION OF OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION IN IMAGE-GUIDED INTERVENTIONS: EXPLORING VIDEO RECORDINGS AS A TOOL IN THE PROCESS.

    PubMed

    Almén, Anja; Sandblom, Viktor; Rystedt, Hans; von Wrangel, Alexa; Ivarsson, Jonas; Båth, Magnus; Lundh, Charlotta

    2016-06-01

    The overall purpose of this work was to explore how video recordings can contribute to the process of optimising occupational radiation protection in image-guided interventions. Video-recorded material from two image-guided interventions was produced and used to investigate to what extent it is conceivable to observe and assess dose-affecting actions in video recordings. Using the recorded material, it was to some extent possible to connect the choice of imaging techniques to the medical events during the procedure and, to a less extent, to connect these technical and medical issues to the occupational exposure. It was possible to identify a relationship between occupational exposure level to staff and positioning and use of shielding. However, detailed values of the dose rates were not possible to observe on the recordings, and the change in occupational exposure level from adjustments of exposure settings was not possible to identify. In conclusion, the use of video recordings is a promising tool to identify dose-affecting instances, allowing for a deeper knowledge of the interdependency between the management of the medical procedure, the applied imaging technology and the occupational exposure level. However, for a full information about the dose-affecting actions, the equipment used and the recording settings have to be thoroughly planned. PMID:27056142

  8. Survey of Student Interest in Home Economics Wage-Earning Programs and Employment Opportunities in Home Economics Related Occupations in Dade County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Margaret R.

    Occupational areas and coincident student interest in home economics were surveyed in Dade County to provide a basis for future program planning. Surveyed were 11,402 junior and senior high school students enrolled in home and family education courses in May 1972 and 64 employers in home economics related occupations. A series of recommendations…

  9. Male-Female Differences in Work Experience, Occupation, and Earnings: 1984. Data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, John M.; Lamas, Enrique J.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains 23 tables reporting the differences between men and women in lifetime labor force attachment, occupation, and earnings. The information was collected from a sample of approximately 20,000 households in May, June, July, and August 1984, as part of the Survey of Income Program Participation. The first part of this report…

  10. Effects of personal and occupational stress on injuries in a young, physically active population: a survey of military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bedno, Sheryl; Hauret, Keith; Loringer, Kelly; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Mallon, Timothy; Jones, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to document risk factors for any injury and sports- and exercise-related injuries, including personal and occupational stress among active duty service members (SMs) in the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy. A total of 10,692 SMs completed the April 2008 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Members. The survey asked about demographics, personal stress and occupational stress, injuries from any cause, and participation in sports- and exercise- related activities in the past year. The survey used a complex sampling procedure to create a representative sample of SMs. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations of injury outcomes with potential risk factors. 49% of SMs sought medical care for an injury in the past year and 25% sustained a sports- and exercise-related activities injury. Odds of injury were higher for the Army and Marine Corps than for the Air Force or Navy. This survey showed that higher personal and occupational stress was associated with higher risks of injury. SMs who experienced higher levels of personal or occupational stress reported higher risks of injuries. The effects of stress reduction programs on injury risks should be evaluated in military and other young physically active populations.

  11. A Survey of Occupational Safety & Health Libraries in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Karen S.

    There is very little published information available about occupational safety and health libraries. This study identified, described, and compared the occupational safety and health libraries in the United States. The questionnaire first filtered out those libraries that did not fit the definition of an occupational safety and health library;…

  12. The XMM Cluster Survey: The Halo Occupation Number of BOSS galaxies in X-ray clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtens, Nicola; Romer, A. Kathy; Nichol, Robert C.; Collins, Chris A.; Sahlén, Martin; Rooney, Philip J.; Mayers, Julian A.; Bermeo-Hernandez, A.; Bristow, Martyn; Capozzi, Diego; Christodoulou, L.; Comparat, Johan; Hilton, Matt; Hoyle, Ben; Kay, Scott T.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Mann, Robert G.; Masters, Karen; Miller, Christopher J.; Parejko, John K.; Prada, Francisco; Ross, Ashley J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Stott, John P.; Streblyanska, Alina; Viana, Pedro T. P.; White, Martin; Wilcox, Harry; Zehavi, Idit

    2016-08-01

    We present a direct measurement of the mean halo occupation distribution (HOD) of galaxies taken from the eleventh data release (DR11) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Survey (BOSS). The HOD of BOSS low-redshift (LOWZ: 0.2 < z < 0.4) and Constant-Mass (CMASS: 0.43 < z < 0.7) galaxies is inferred via their association with the dark-matter halos of 174 X-ray-selected galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS). Halo masses are determined for each galaxy cluster based on X-ray temperature measurements, and range between log10(M180/M⊙) = 13 - 15. Our directly-measured HODs are consistent with the HOD-model fits inferred via the galaxy-clustering analyses of Parejko et al. (2013) for the BOSS LOWZ sample and White et al. (2011) for the BOSS CMASS sample. Under the simplifying assumption that the other parameters that describe the HOD hold the values measured by these authors, we have determined a best-fit alpha-index of 0.91±0.08 and 1.27^{+0.03}_{-0.04} for the CMASS and LOWZ HOD, respectively. These alpha-index values are consistent with those measured by White et al. (2011) and Parejko et al. (2013). In summary, our study provides independent support for the HOD-models assumed during the development of the BOSS mock-galaxy catalogues that have subsequently been used to derive BOSS cosmological constraints.

  13. 78 FR 48859 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; 2013 NOAA Engagement Survey Tool

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-12

    ... Engagement Survey Tool AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION... Engagement Test, which the SAB recommended NOAA use for assessing engagement with constituents. One...

  14. The VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey: evolution in the halo occupation number since z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, U.; de la Torre, S.; Le Fèvre, O.; Guzzo, L.; Marinoni, C.; Meneux, B.; Pollo, A.; Zamorani, G.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Lamareille, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Mazure, A.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Vergani, D.; Zucca, E.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Brinchmann, J.; Cucciati, O.; de Ravel, L.; Gregorini, L.; Perez-Montero, E.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.

    2010-08-01

    We model the evolution of the mean galaxy occupation of dark matter haloes over the range 0.1 < z < 1.3, using the data from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey. The galaxy projected correlation function wp(rp) was computed for a set of luminosity-limited subsamples and fits to its shape were obtained using two variants of halo occupation distribution (HOD) models. These provide us with a set of best-fitting parameters, from which we obtain the average mass of a halo and average number of galaxies per halo. We find that after accounting for the evolution in luminosity and assuming that we are largely following the same population, the underlying dark matter halo shows a growth in mass with decreasing redshift as expected in a hierarchical structure formation scenario. Using two different HOD models, we see that the halo mass grows by 90 per cent over the redshift interval z = [0.5, 1.0]. This is the first time the evolution in halo mass at high redshifts has been obtained from a single data survey and it follows the simple form seen in N-body simulations with M(z) = M0 e-βz, and β = 1.3 +/- 0.30. This provides evidence for a rapid accretion phase of massive haloes having a present-day mass M0 ~ 1013.5 h-1 Msolar, with a m > 0.1 M0 merger event occurring between redshifts of 0.5 and 1.0. Furthermore, we find that more luminous galaxies are found to occupy more massive haloes irrespective of the redshift. Finally, the average number of galaxies per halo shows little increase from redshift z ~ 1.0 to ~0.5, with a sharp increase by a factor of ~3 from z ~ 0.5 to ~0.1, likely due to the dynamical friction of subhaloes within their host haloes. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, program 070.A-9007(A), and on data obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, operated by the CNRS of France, CNRC in Canada and the University of Hawaii. E-mail: abbas@oato.inaf.it

  15. A survey of occupational health hazards among 7,610 female workers in China's electronics industry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenlan; Lao, Xiang Qian; Pang, Shulan; Zhou, Jianjiao; Zhou, Anshou; Zou, Jianfang; Mei, Liangying; Yu, Ignatius Tak-sun

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the occupational hazards among Chinese female workers in the electronics industry, the authors systematically sampled a total of 8,300 female workers at random across 4 provinces in a variety of electronics factories. A detailed questionnaire was used to collect information on occupational hazards and the occurrence of occupation-related diseases. The results show that 4,283 female workers (51.9%) were exposed to 1 or more occupational hazards. The most common chemical hazard was organic solvent, and the second most common was heavy metals. The ergonomic hazards included repetitive movements, poor standing posture, and the lifting of heavy goods. More than 60% of the female workers self-reported occupation-related diseases. These results showed that occupational health hazards were common in the electronics industry in China and that they caused serious occupation-related health problems for the female workers therein.

  16. Risk Communication as a Tool for Training Apprentice Welders: A Study about Risk Perception and Occupational Accidents

    PubMed Central

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Bonow, Clarice Alves; Rocha, Laurelize Pereira; de Almeida, Marlise Capa Verde; Severo, Luana de Oliveira; Borges, Anelise Miritz; Vaz, Joana Cezar; Turik, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The present study has aimed to identify the perceptions of apprentice welders about physical, chemical, biological, and physiological risk factors to which they are exposed; identify types of occupational accidents involving apprentice welders; and report the development of a socioenvironmental education intervention as a tool for risk communication for apprentice welders. A quantitative study was performed with 161 apprentice welders in Southern Brazil in 2011. Data collection was performed via structured interviews with the apprentice welders about risk perception, occupational accidents, and time experienced in welding. The data were analyzed using SPSS 19.0. The participants identified the following risk types: physical (96.9%), chemical (95%), physiological (86.3%), and biological (51.5%). In this sample, 39.7% of apprentice welders reported occupational accidents and 27.3% reported burning. The inferential analysis showed that the frequency of risk perception factors increases with the length of experience, and apprentice welders who have experienced accidents during welding activity perceive a higher amount of risk factors than those who have never experienced them. It is concluded that apprentice welders perceive risks and that they tend to relate risks with the occurrence of occupational accidents as an indicator of the dangerous nature of their activity. PMID:23326211

  17. Results of the independent radiological verification survey at the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site, Fairfield, Ohio (FOH001)

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.E.; Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.

    1996-01-01

    The former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site is located at 3550 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, Ohio. Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company produced hollow uranium slugs in a machine shop at the site in 1956. The work was performed for National Lead of Ohio in a contract with the Atomic Energy Commission to augment the capacity of the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald in the development of nuclear energy for defense-related projects. The current occupant of the building, Force Control, operates a multipurpose machine shop. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company Site, Fairfield, Ohio. The survey was performed from February to May of 1995. The purpose of the survey was to verify that radioactivity from residues of {sup 238}U was remediated to a level below acceptable DOE guidelines levels.

  18. Attitudes toward Adults with Intellectual Disability: A Survey of Ontario Occupational and Physical Therapy Students

    PubMed Central

    Vermeltfoort, Kayla; Staruszkiewicz, Anna; Anselm, Katherine; Badnjevic, Alma; Burton, Kristin; Switzer-McIntyre, Sharon; Yeung, Euson

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To examine attitudes of students in Ontario master's degree programmes in occupational therapy (MScOT) and physical therapy (MScPT) toward adults with intellectual disability (ID). Methods: A quantitative cross-sectional survey study was conducted. An electronic questionnaire was distributed to 1,255 MScOT/PT students at five Ontario universities via email, using a modified Dillman approach. Descriptive statistics were used to describe experiences, attitudes, willingness, and preparedness. Results: Overall response rate was 17.9%. A total of 96.0% of respondents felt “quite” or “very willing” to deliver rehabilitation to adults with ID; however, 50.7% of respondents felt “not at all prepared” or “a little prepared” to interact with this population in a clinical setting. Of those who felt unprepared, 75.4% reported it to be due to inadequate knowledge. In addition, Ontario MScOT/PT students have neutral attitudes toward adults with ID. Conclusions: While many MScOT/PT students are willing to deliver rehabilitation to adults with ID, a large proportion do not feel adequately prepared to interact with this population in a clinical setting. These findings could inform future research and curricular reform in the rehabilitation professions so that future clinicians are better prepared to provide support for this population. PMID:24799749

  19. Unreported workers’ compensation claims to the BLS Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses: Establishment factors

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Darrin A.; Bonauto, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies suggest employers underreport injuries to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII); less is known about reporting differences by establishment characteristics. Methods We linked SOII data to Washington State workers’ compensation claims data, using unemployment insurance data to improve linking accuracy. We used multivariable regression models to estimate incidence ratios (IR) of unreported workers’ compensation claims for establishment characteristics. Results An estimated 70% of workers’ compensation claims were reported in SOII. Claims among state and local government establishments were most likely to be reported. Compared to large manufacturing establishments, unreported claims were most common among small educational services establishments (IR = 2.47, 95%CI: 1.52–4.01) and large construction establishments (IR = 2.05, 95%CI: 1.77–2.37). Conclusions Underreporting of workers’ compensation claims to SOII varies by establishment characteristics, obscuring true differences in work injury incidence. Findings may differ from previous research due to differences in study methods. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:274–289, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26792563

  20. [Ideas, reflections and tools for a modern role of the occupational physician].

    PubMed

    Porru, S; di Carlo, A Scotto; Arici, C

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few years, following new legislations, events of media impact, transitions in workplaces, Occupational Medicine is at stake. Often, debate is strong about technical-scientific issues in Occupational Physician (OP) activities, ethics and deontology, professional independence, dignity, training and education. The present work develops through personal thoughts, literature data, reporting of concrete personal experience across various occupational settings and risks, with the aim of promoting a "new" role for the OP, enhance his autonomy, professional skills, uniqueness, quality, credibility, while being convinced that it is certainly necessary and possible to conjugate ethics and scientific approach within daily professional activity of the OP, who in turn should be prone to change pace, evaluate effectiveness of his actions, abandon obsolete and useless practices, focussing on a new, proactive, clinical-diagnostic and managerial role, through good medical practices.

  1. Association among Working Hours, Occupational Stress, and Presenteeism among Wage Workers: Results from the Second Korean Working Conditions Survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study was to identify the association between presenteeism and long working hours, shiftwork, and occupational stress using representative national survey data on Korean workers. Methods We analyzed data from the second Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS), which was conducted in 2010, in which a total of 6,220 wage workers were analyzed. The study population included the economically active population aged above 15 years, and living in the Republic of Korea. We used the chi-squared test and multivariate logistic regression to test the statistical association between presenteeism and working hours, shiftwork, and occupational stress. Results Approximately 19% of the workers experienced presenteeism during the previous 12 months. Women had higher rates of presenteeism than men. We found a statistically significant dose–response relationship between working hours and presenteeism. Shift workers had a slightly higher rate of presenteeism than non-shift workers, but the difference was not statistically significant. Occupational stress, such as high job demand, lack of rewards, and inadequate social support, had a significant association with presenteeism. Conclusions The present study suggests that long working hours and occupational stress are significantly related to presenteeism. PMID:24661575

  2. Occupational Injuries in Germany: Population-Wide National Survey Data Emphasize the Importance of Work-Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Alexander; Varnaccia, Gianni; Lahmann, Nils; Kottner, Jan; Kroll, Lars Eric

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional injuries cause much of the global mortality burden, with the workplace being a common accident setting. Even in high-income economies, occupational injury figures remain remarkably high. Because risk factors for occupational injuries are prone to confounding, the present research takes a comprehensive approach. To better understand the occurrence of occupational injuries, sociodemographic factors and work- and health-related factors are tested simultaneously. Thus, the present analysis aims to develop a comprehensive epidemiological model that facilitates the explanation of varying injury rates in the workplace. The representative phone survey German Health Update 2010 provides information on medically treated occupational injuries sustained in the year prior to the interview. Data were collected on sociodemographics, occupation, working conditions, health-related behaviors, and chronic diseases. For the economically active population (18-70 years, n = 14,041), the 12-month prevalence of occupational injuries was calculated with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Blockwise multiple logistic regression was applied to successively include different groups of variables. Overall, 2.8% (95% CI 2.4-3.2) of the gainfully employed population report at least one occupational injury (women: 0.9%; 95% CI 0.7-1.2; men: 4.3%; 95% CI 3.7-5.0). In the fully adjusted model, male gender (OR 3.16) and age 18-29 (OR 1.54), as well as agricultural (OR 5.40), technical (OR 3.41), skilled service (OR 4.24) or manual (OR 5.12), and unskilled service (OR 3.13) or manual (OR 4.97) occupations are associated with higher chances of occupational injuries. The same holds for frequent stressors such as heavy carrying (OR 1.78), working in awkward postures (OR 1.46), environmental stress (OR 1.48), and working under pressure (OR 1.41). Among health-related variables, physical inactivity (OR 1.47) and obesity (OR 1.73) present a significantly higher chance of occupational injuries

  3. Occupational Injuries in Germany: Population-Wide National Survey Data Emphasize the Importance of Work-Related Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rommel, Alexander; Varnaccia, Gianni; Lahmann, Nils; Kottner, Jan; Kroll, Lars Eric

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional injuries cause much of the global mortality burden, with the workplace being a common accident setting. Even in high-income economies, occupational injury figures remain remarkably high. Because risk factors for occupational injuries are prone to confounding, the present research takes a comprehensive approach. To better understand the occurrence of occupational injuries, sociodemographic factors and work- and health-related factors are tested simultaneously. Thus, the present analysis aims to develop a comprehensive epidemiological model that facilitates the explanation of varying injury rates in the workplace. The representative phone survey German Health Update 2010 provides information on medically treated occupational injuries sustained in the year prior to the interview. Data were collected on sociodemographics, occupation, working conditions, health-related behaviors, and chronic diseases. For the economically active population (18–70 years, n = 14,041), the 12-month prevalence of occupational injuries was calculated with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Blockwise multiple logistic regression was applied to successively include different groups of variables. Overall, 2.8% (95% CI 2.4–3.2) of the gainfully employed population report at least one occupational injury (women: 0.9%; 95% CI 0.7–1.2; men: 4.3%; 95% CI 3.7–5.0). In the fully adjusted model, male gender (OR 3.16) and age 18–29 (OR 1.54), as well as agricultural (OR 5.40), technical (OR 3.41), skilled service (OR 4.24) or manual (OR 5.12), and unskilled service (OR 3.13) or manual (OR 4.97) occupations are associated with higher chances of occupational injuries. The same holds for frequent stressors such as heavy carrying (OR 1.78), working in awkward postures (OR 1.46), environmental stress (OR 1.48), and working under pressure (OR 1.41). Among health-related variables, physical inactivity (OR 1.47) and obesity (OR 1.73) present a significantly higher chance of occupational

  4. Occupational Injuries in Germany: Population-Wide National Survey Data Emphasize the Importance of Work-Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Alexander; Varnaccia, Gianni; Lahmann, Nils; Kottner, Jan; Kroll, Lars Eric

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional injuries cause much of the global mortality burden, with the workplace being a common accident setting. Even in high-income economies, occupational injury figures remain remarkably high. Because risk factors for occupational injuries are prone to confounding, the present research takes a comprehensive approach. To better understand the occurrence of occupational injuries, sociodemographic factors and work- and health-related factors are tested simultaneously. Thus, the present analysis aims to develop a comprehensive epidemiological model that facilitates the explanation of varying injury rates in the workplace. The representative phone survey German Health Update 2010 provides information on medically treated occupational injuries sustained in the year prior to the interview. Data were collected on sociodemographics, occupation, working conditions, health-related behaviors, and chronic diseases. For the economically active population (18-70 years, n = 14,041), the 12-month prevalence of occupational injuries was calculated with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Blockwise multiple logistic regression was applied to successively include different groups of variables. Overall, 2.8% (95% CI 2.4-3.2) of the gainfully employed population report at least one occupational injury (women: 0.9%; 95% CI 0.7-1.2; men: 4.3%; 95% CI 3.7-5.0). In the fully adjusted model, male gender (OR 3.16) and age 18-29 (OR 1.54), as well as agricultural (OR 5.40), technical (OR 3.41), skilled service (OR 4.24) or manual (OR 5.12), and unskilled service (OR 3.13) or manual (OR 4.97) occupations are associated with higher chances of occupational injuries. The same holds for frequent stressors such as heavy carrying (OR 1.78), working in awkward postures (OR 1.46), environmental stress (OR 1.48), and working under pressure (OR 1.41). Among health-related variables, physical inactivity (OR 1.47) and obesity (OR 1.73) present a significantly higher chance of occupational injuries

  5. Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT): A Planning and Control Tool for Occupational Field Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, John M., Jr.; And Others

    Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) is used in the U.S. Marine Corps task analysis program for occupational field studies. Scheduling sequential tasks, estimating time requirements, determining staffing needs, and locating checkpoints for control all can be accomplished using PERT. Examples of operational aspects of PERT, PERT…

  6. Survey of Occupational Stress of Secondary and Elementary School Teachers and the Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pei, Wang; Guoli, Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the measuring instruments used by scholars in China and abroad, we devised a questionnaire to study occupational stress of 500 secondary and elementary school teachers in Tacheng municipality in Xinjiang and examined its negative effects on teachers. They found that the occupational stress of secondary and elementary school teachers are…

  7. SURVEY OF OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAMS IN ILLINOIS COMMUNITY AND JUNIOR COLLEGES, 1967-1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GREDE, JOHN F.; AND OTHERS

    THIS DOCUMENT IS A LISTING IN TABULAR FORM OF THE VARIOUS OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAMS, BOTH IN OPERATION AND PLANNED, AVAILABLE IN ILLINOIS PUBLIC AND PRIVATE JUNIOR COLLEGES. THE PROGRAMS ARE ARRANGED IN FIVE LARGE GROUPINGS--(1) INDUSTRIAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY, (2) BUSINESS, SECRETARIAL, AND DATA PROCESSING, (3) HEALTH OCCUPATIONS, (4) PUBLIC…

  8. Nursing Home eTool: Occupational Hazards in Long Term Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Newsroom Small Business Anti-Retaliation eTools Home : Nursing Home Scope | References | Site Map | Credits Nursing Home eTool Bloodborne Pathogens Ergonomics Dietary Laundry Maintenance ...

  9. Monkeying around: Use of Survey Monkey as a Tool for School Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massat, Carol Rippey; McKay, Cassandra; Moses, Helene

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the use of an online survey tool called Survey Monkey, which can be used by school social workers and school social work educators for evaluation of practice, needs assessment, and program evaluation. Examples of questions are given. Principles of writing good survey questions are described. (Contains 2 tables and 1…

  10. Web Exploration Tools for a Fast Federated Optical Survey Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, Roberta M.

    2000-01-01

    We implemented several new web-based tools to improve the efficiency and versatility of access to the APS Catalog of the POSS I (Palomar Observatory-National Geographic Sky Survey) and its associated image database. The most important addition was a federated database system to link the APS Catalog and image database into one Internet-accessible database. With the FDBS, the queries and transactions on the integrated database are performed as if it were a single database. We installed Myriad the FDBS developed by Professor Jaideep Srivastava and members of his group in the University of Minnesota Computer Science Department. It is the first system to provide schema integration, query processing and optimization, and transaction management capabilities in a single framework. The attached figure illustrates the Myriad architecture. The FDBS permits horizontal access to the data, not just vertical. For example, for the APS, queries can be made not only by sky position, but also by any parameter present in either of the databases. APS users will be able to produce an image of all the blue galaxies and stellar sources for comparison with x-ray source error ellipses from AXAF (X Ray Astrophysics Facility) (Chandra) for example. The FDBS is now available as a beta release with the appropriate query forms at our web site. While much of our time was occupied with adapting Myriad to the APS environment, we also made major changes in Star Base, our DBMS for the Catalog, at the web interface to improve its efficiency for issuing and processing queries. Star Base is now three times faster for large queries. Improvements were also made at the web end of the image database for faster access; although work still needs to be done to the image database itself for more efficient return with the FDBS. During the past few years, we made several improvements to the database pipeline that creates the individual plate databases queries by StarBase. The changes include improved positions

  11. Occupational health of home care aides: results of the safe home care survey

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Margaret M; Markkanen, Pia K; Galligan, Catherine J; Sama, Susan R; Kriebel, David; Gore, Rebecca J; Brouillette, Natalie M; Okyere, Daniel; Sun, Chuan; Punnett, Laura; Laramie, Angela K; Davis, Letitia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In countries with ageing populations, home care (HC) aides are among the fastest growing jobs. There are few quantitative studies of HC occupational safety and health (OSH) conditions. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess quantitatively the OSH hazards and benefits for a wide range of HC working conditions, and (2) compare OSH experiences of HC aides who are employed via different medical and social services systems in Massachusetts, USA. Methods HC aides were recruited for a survey via agencies that employ aides and schedule their visits with clients, and through a labour union of aides employed directly by clients or their families. The questionnaire included detailed questions about the most recent HC visits, as well as about individual aides’ OSH experiences. Results The study population included 1249 HC aides (634 agency-employed, 615 client-employed) contributing information on 3484 HC visits. Hazards occurring most frequently related to musculoskeletal strain, exposure to potentially infectious agents and cleaning chemicals for infection prevention and experience of violence. Client-hired and agency-hired aides had similar OSH experiences with a few exceptions, including use of sharps and experience of verbal violence. Conclusions The OSH experience of HC aides is similar to that of aides in institutional healthcare settings. Despite OSH challenges, HC aides enjoy caring for others and the benefits of HC work should be enhanced. Quantification of HC hazards and benefits is useful to prioritise resources for the development of preventive interventions and to provide an evidence base for policy-setting. PMID:26209318

  12. University Graduates with Disabilities: A Follow-Up Survey Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Delar K.

    2009-01-01

    This survey explores the post-graduation outcomes of university students with disabilities. It gathers data on their employment, independent living, community participation/social integration, and supports received by adult disability agencies. It also captures their perceptions about their quality of life. (Contains 1 figure.) [This survey tool…

  13. An online network tool for quality information to answer questions about occupational safety and health: usability and applicability

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Common information facilities do not always provide the quality information needed to answer questions on health or health-related issues, such as Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) matters. Barriers may be the accessibility, quantity and readability of information. Online Question & Answer (Q&A) network tools, which link questioners directly to experts can overcome some of these barriers. When designing and testing online tools, assessing the usability and applicability is essential. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to assess the usability and applicability of a new online Q&A network tool for answers on OSH questions. Methods We applied a cross-sectional usability test design. Eight occupational health experts and twelve potential questioners from the working population (workers) were purposively selected to include a variety of computer- and internet-experiences. During the test, participants were first observed while executing eight tasks that entailed important features of the tool. In addition, they were interviewed. Through task observations and interviews we assessed applicability, usability (effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction) and facilitators and barriers in use. Results Most features were usable, though several could be improved. Most tasks were executed effectively. Some tasks, for example searching stored questions in categories, were not executed efficiently and participants were less satisfied with the corresponding features. Participants' recommendations led to improvements. The tool was found mostly applicable for additional information, to observe new OSH trends and to improve contact between OSH experts and workers. Hosting and support by a trustworthy professional organization, effective implementation campaigns, timely answering and anonymity were seen as important use requirements. Conclusions This network tool is a promising new strategy for offering company workers high quality information to answer OSH questions

  14. Survey design research: a tool for answering nursing research questions.

    PubMed

    Siedlecki, Sandra L; Butler, Robert S; Burchill, Christian N

    2015-01-01

    The clinical nurse specialist is in a unique position to identify and study clinical problems in need of answers, but lack of time and resources may discourage nurses from conducting research. However, some research methods can be used by the clinical nurse specialist that are not time-intensive or cost prohibitive. The purpose of this article is to explain the utility of survey methodology for answering a number of nursing research questions. The article covers survey content, reliability and validity issues, sample size considerations, and methods of survey delivery.

  15. Pediatric nurses' knowledge and attitudes survey regarding pain: a competency tool modification.

    PubMed

    Rieman, Mary T; Gordon, Mary; Marvin, Janet M

    2007-01-01

    Nurses' knowledge and attitudes about pain affect their ability to manage patients' pain. A mechanism was sought to evaluate nursing competency in pain management at eight pediatric hospitals. Several pain survey tools were reviewed, considering the patient population around which they were designed, the basis for survey content, and format. A survey with established validity and reliability, the Pediatric Nurses' Knowledge and Attitude Survey Regarding Pain (PNKAS) (Manworren 1999) was chosen as the most appropriate for this group. The tool was modified for applicability to the nurses caring for pediatric populations that do not include oncology. Revisions were made with the concurrence of Manworren to assure that neither the content being tested, nor the integrity of the tool, was affected. Stability of the modified tool (PNKAS-Shriners Version 2002) was verified by retesting 6-8 weeks after initial survey. PMID:17907730

  16. Occupational health nurses’ achievement of competence and comfort in respiratory protection and preferred learning methods results of a nationwide survey.

    PubMed

    Burgel, Barbara J; Novak, Debra A; Carpenter, Holly Elizabeth; Gruden, MaryAnn; Lachat, Ann M; Taormina, Deborah

    2014-02-01

    Additional findings are presented from a 2012 nationwide survey of 2,072 occupational health nurses regarding how they achieved competence in respiratory protection, their preferred methods of learning, and how they motivated employees to use respiratory protection. On-the-job training, taking a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health spirometry course, or attending professional conferences were the primary ways occupational health nurses gained respiratory protection knowledge. Attending professional conferences was the preferred method of learning, varying by type of industry and years of occupational health nurse experience. Employee motivational strategies were not widely used; the most common strategy was to tailor respiratory protection training to workplace culture. Designing training methods that match learning preferences, within the context of the organization's safety and quality improvement culture, is a key recommendation supported by the literature and these findings. Including respiratory protection content and competencies in all levels of academic nursing education is an additional recommendation. Additional research is needed to link training strategies with consistent and correct use of respiratory protection by employees. PMID:24812690

  17. Exploring the relationship between employer recordkeeping and underreporting in the BLS Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Wuellner, Sara E; Bonauto, David K

    2014-01-01

    Background Little empirical data exist to identify the reasons for underreporting in the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) non-fatal occupational injury and illness data. Methods We interviewed occupational injury and illness record keepers from Washington State establishments that participated in the 2008 BLS Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII). Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to explore recordkeeping and business practices that may explain SOII's incomplete case capture compared with WC claims data. Results Most participants (90%) did not comply with OSHA recordkeeping regulations. Other factors including using workplace injury data to evaluate supervisors' or SOII respondent's job performance, recording injuries for a worksite that operates multiple shifts, and failing to follow SOII instructions were more common among establishments with unreported WC claims. Conclusion Business practices that incentivize low injury rates, disorganized recordkeeping, and limited communication between BLS and survey respondents are barriers to accurate employer reports of work-related injuries and illnesses. Am. J. Ind. Med. 57:1133–1143, 2014. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25099477

  18. Ignoring imperfect detection in biological surveys is dangerous: a response to 'fitting and interpreting occupancy models'.

    PubMed

    Guillera-Arroita, Gurutzeta; Lahoz-Monfort, José J; MacKenzie, Darryl I; Wintle, Brendan A; McCarthy, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    In a recent paper, Welsh, Lindenmayer and Donnelly (WLD) question the usefulness of models that estimate species occupancy while accounting for detectability. WLD claim that these models are difficult to fit and argue that disregarding detectability can be better than trying to adjust for it. We think that this conclusion and subsequent recommendations are not well founded and may negatively impact the quality of statistical inference in ecology and related management decisions. Here we respond to WLD's claims, evaluating in detail their arguments, using simulations and/or theory to support our points. In particular, WLD argue that both disregarding and accounting for imperfect detection lead to the same estimator performance regardless of sample size when detectability is a function of abundance. We show that this, the key result of their paper, only holds for cases of extreme heterogeneity like the single scenario they considered. Our results illustrate the dangers of disregarding imperfect detection. When ignored, occupancy and detection are confounded: the same naïve occupancy estimates can be obtained for very different true levels of occupancy so the size of the bias is unknowable. Hierarchical occupancy models separate occupancy and detection, and imprecise estimates simply indicate that more data are required for robust inference about the system in question. As for any statistical method, when underlying assumptions of simple hierarchical models are violated, their reliability is reduced. Resorting in those instances where hierarchical occupancy models do no perform well to the naïve occupancy estimator does not provide a satisfactory solution. The aim should instead be to achieve better estimation, by minimizing the effect of these issues during design, data collection and analysis, ensuring that the right amount of data is collected and model assumptions are met, considering model extensions where appropriate.

  19. Concepts, tools, and strategies for effluent testing: An international survey

    EPA Science Inventory

    Whole effluent testing (also called Direct Toxicity Assessment) remains a critical long-term assessment tool for aquatic environmental protection. Use of animal alternative approaches for wastewater testing is expected to increase as more regulatory authorities routinely require ...

  20. Quality of life, social position and occupational groups in Brazil: evidence from a population-based survey.

    PubMed

    Flor, Luisa Sorio; Campos, Mônica Rodrigues; Laguardia, Josué

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates whether occupation, variable that reflects social position, is associated with good quality of life among Brazilians. It is a cross-sectional study based on data obtained from a population-based survey carried out in Brazil in 2008. The sample composed of 12,423 Brazilians, older than 20 years. Physical and mental quality of life were both measured by SF-36 and scores were grouped in "above the mean" and "below the mean" to set binary outcomes. Logistic regression analysis was carried out to verify the impact of occupational position on the chances of better physical and mental quality of life, controlling it by socio-demographic and health variables. Results showed that Brazilians included on the labour market have better chances of a good physical and mental quality of life, even if controlled by other variables.

  1. Evaluating Tablet Computers as a Survey Tool in Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Steve M.; Logan, Henrietta L.; Guo, Yi; Marks, John G.; Shepperd, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although tablet computers offer advantages in data collection over traditional paper-and-pencil methods, little research has examined whether the 2 formats yield similar responses, especially with underserved populations. We compared the 2 survey formats and tested whether participants’ responses to common health questionnaires or perceptions of usability differed by survey format. We also tested whether we could replicate established paper-and-pencil findings via tablet computer. Methods We recruited a sample of low-income community members living in the rural southern United States. Participants were 170 residents (black = 49%; white = 36%; other races and missing data = 15%) drawn from 2 counties meeting Florida’s state statutory definition of rural with 100 persons or fewer per square mile. We randomly assigned participants to complete scales (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Inventory and Regulatory Focus Questionnaire) along with survey format usability ratings via paper-and-pencil or tablet computer. All participants rated a series of previously validated posters using a tablet computer. Finally, participants completed comparisons of the survey formats and reported survey format preferences. Findings Participants preferred using the tablet computer and showed no significant differences between formats in mean responses, scale reliabilities, or in participants’ usability ratings. Conclusions Overall, participants reported similar scales responses and usability ratings between formats. However, participants reported both preferring and enjoying responding via tablet computer more. Collectively, these findings are among the first data to show that tablet computers represent a suitable substitute among an underrepresented rural sample for paper-and-pencil methodology in survey research. PMID:25243953

  2. Survey explores nurses' of e-health tools.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Alison

    2012-03-01

    E-health is concerned with promoting the health and wellbeing of individuals, families and communities, and improving professional practice through the use of information management and information and communication technology. In autumn 2010 the RCN, supported by an information technology consultancy, carried out a survey of members' views on e-health to assess their involvement in, and readiness for, e-health developments and their knowledge of its benefits. A total of 1,313 nurses, midwives, healthcare support workers and pre-registration students from across the UK responded. This article describes ways in which nurse managers can influence the successful implementation of the survey recommendations.

  3. A survey of visualization tools for biological network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Wegener, Anna-Lynn; Schneider, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    The analysis and interpretation of relationships between biological molecules, networks and concepts is becoming a major bottleneck in systems biology. Very often the pure amount of data and their heterogeneity provides a challenge for the visualization of the data. There are a wide variety of graph representations available, which most often map the data on 2D graphs to visualize biological interactions. These methods are applicable to a wide range of problems, nevertheless many of them reach a limit in terms of user friendliness when thousands of nodes and connections have to be analyzed and visualized. In this study we are reviewing visualization tools that are currently available for visualization of biological networks mainly invented in the latest past years. We comment on the functionality, the limitations and the specific strengths of these tools, and how these tools could be further developed in the direction of data integration and information sharing. PMID:19040716

  4. Place Based Assistance Tools: Networking and Resident Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC.

    "Place-based assistance" is not a new concept. Asking what people want and finding ways to give it to them sounds simplistic, but it can result in "win-win" solutions in which everyone involved benefits. This document is a guide to using networking and surveys of residents to determine community needs. Some case studies show networking and surveys…

  5. MOS: A Critical Tool for Current and Future Radio Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. J. B.

    2016-10-01

    Since radio continuum observations are not affected by dust obscuration, they are of immense potential diagnostic power as cosmological probes and for studying galaxy formation and evolution out to high redshifts. However, the power-law nature of radio frequency spectra ensures that ancillary spectroscopic information remains critical for studying the properties of the faint radio sources being detected in rapidly-increasing numbers on the pathway to the Square Kilometre Array. In this contribution, I present some of the key scientific motivations for exploiting the immense synergies between radio continuum observations and multi-object spectroscopic surveys. I review some of the ongoing efforts to obtain the spectra necessary to harness the huge numbers of star-forming galaxies and AGN that current and future radio surveys will detect. I also touch on the WEAVE-LOFAR survey, which will use the WEAVE spectrograph currently being built for the William Herschel Telescope to target hundreds of thousands of low-frequency sources selected from the LOFAR continuum surveys.

  6. 75 FR 10755 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; 2010 NOAA Engagement Survey Tool

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... Engagement Survey Tool AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), DOC. ACTION: Notice... Kellogg Engagement Test, which the SAB recommended NOAA use for assessing engagement with constituents... accessing engagement with constituents. II. Method of Collection Primarily, respondents will be asked...

  7. The Employee Survey: An Important Tool for Changing the Culture of an Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drapeau, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    A regularly administered employee opinion survey is an important institutional outcomes measurement tool. It can provide robust benchmarks and standards for a whole range of dimensions of a healthy workplace. This kind of survey should also be a critically important component of the process of engaging employees in the development of the…

  8. Development of clinical competence assessment tool for novice physical and occupational therapists-a mixed Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Kanada, Yoshikiyo; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiura, Yoshito; Hirano, Yudai; Koyama, Soichiro; Tanabe, Shigeo

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify essential abilities of novice physical and occupational therapists for independent execution of their duties and to develop a clinical competence assessment tool. [Subjects] Forty-five experienced therapists participated in this study. [Methods] A two-phase mixed-methods design was used. First, semi structured interviews were conducted on 15 experienced therapists to create a comprehensive list of essential abilities that novice therapists need. Second, 30 experienced therapists participated in a two-round Delphi study to select items for the assessment tool being developed. [Results] Fifty-five items were extracted and classified into three categories: basic attitudes, therapeutic skills, and clinical practice-related thoughts. [Conclusion] Present results suggest that not only knowledge of execution of therapy-related duties and therapeutic skills is essential in novice therapist, but also appropriate abilities in social adjustment, self-management, and self-education. The newly developed tool might be useful for postgraduate education in clinical practice. PMID:27134395

  9. 75 FR 26345 - Agency Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) New Enrollee Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) New Enrollee Survey.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0502).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT... experience during the Ethics Consultation Service. VA will be used the data to improve the process of...

  10. Organization of Knowledge in Occupational Therapy: A Proposal and a Survey of the Literature and Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kielhofner, Gary; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Kielhofner and Barris examine two existing proposals for knowledge organization and proposes a related but alternative approach. Based on this proposed structure, literature in the "American Journal of Occupational Therapy" over the past 10 years was reviewed and classified to reveal patterns and trends. Labovitz and Miller critique the proposed…

  11. Biofeedback: A Survey Regarding Current Clinical Use and Content in Occupational Therapy Educational Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Theodore I., II

    1992-01-01

    Responses from 301 of 418 physical dysfunction clinics and 91 of 136 occupational therapy college programs found that 47 percent of clinics use biofeedback; 63 percent of professional-level and 13 percent of technical-level programs teach biofeedback; 73 percent of clinicians learned biofeedback on job; and 95 percent of clinics use…

  12. Occupational Programs Student Survey--Fall 2000 to Spring 2003. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuschke, Daylene M.; Gribbons, Barry C.

    California's community colleges are the state's largest workforce preparation provider to technically skilled positions in well-established occupations such as nursing, computer and data processing, and administration of justice. Each semester, the Institutional Development and Technology (IDT) office, in cooperation with the Dean of Occupational…

  13. Community-Based Occupational Therapy Services for Children: A Quebec Survey on Service Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotellesso, Annie; Mazer, Barbara; Majnemer, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Community-based occupational therapy (OT) services are intended to promote social integration and minimize disability. The objective of this study was to describe community-based OT services for children in the province of Quebec, Canada. Specific aims included (a) to determine the proportion of Centres Locaux de Services Communautaires (CLSCs)…

  14. Surface Grinder Operator. Instructor's Guide. Part of Single-Tool Skills Program. Machine Industries Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This course, the second one to be published in what is expected to be a series of instructor's guides in the Single-Tool Skills Program, is expected to help meet the need for trained operators in metalworking and is designed for use in the adult education programs of school districts, in Manpower Development and Training Programs, and in secondary…

  15. Survey on low-dose medical radiation exposure in occupational workers: the effect on hematological change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, J. K.; Cho, S. M.; Cho, J. H.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Lee, J. W.

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the changes in the hematological index caused by low-dose medical radiation exposure in workers in a medical radiation-exposed environment. The cumulative dose was obtained using thermoluminescent dosimeters over a 9-year period, and the changes in hematological index count (red blood cells (RBCs), hemoglobin, platelets, white blood cells (WBCs), monocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils, basophils, and eosinophils) were examined in both the occupational workers and controls. In total, 370 occupational workers and 335 controls were compared. The analysis led to the following observations: (1) The average cumulative dose in males and females was 9.65±15.2 and 4.82±5.55 mSv, respectively. (2) In both males and females, there was a very low correlation between the occupation period and the cumulative dose (r<±0.25). (3) When the occupation period was longer, the WBC counts both decreased and increased in the male workers and the RBC counts were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). In females, the WBC counts both decreased and increased in the workers and the eosinophil counts were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.01). (4) When the cumulative dose was large, the lymphocyte counts decreased in male workers and the platelet count was lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). In females, the lymphocyte count and RBC count were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). Abnormal distributions of some blood indices were observed in the occupational radiation workers compared with the controls. Attempts were made to limit radiation exposure to personnel, but the employees did not always follow the preset rules. Actually, the adverse effects of low-level radiation were attributed to probability. Overall, workers should obey the radiation protection regulations provided by the government and a national system of radiation protection is needed.

  16. Stochastic ecological network occupancy (SENO) models: a new tool for modeling ecological networks across spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Dunne, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    Stochastic ecological network occupancy (SENO) models predict the probability that species will occur in a sample of an ecological network. In this review, we introduce SENO models as a means to fill a gap in the theoretical toolkit of ecologists. As input, SENO models use a topological interaction network and rates of colonization and extinction (including consumer effects) for each species. A SENO model then simulates the ecological network over time, resulting in a series of sub-networks that can be used to identify commonly encountered community modules. The proportion of time a species is present in a patch gives its expected probability of occurrence, whose sum across species gives expected species richness. To illustrate their utility, we provide simple examples of how SENO models can be used to investigate how topological complexity, species interactions, species traits, and spatial scale affect communities in space and time. They can categorize species as biodiversity facilitators, contributors, or inhibitors, making this approach promising for ecosystem-based management of invasive, threatened, or exploited species.

  17. Application of the MERIT survey in the multi-criteria quality assessment of occupational health and safety management.

    PubMed

    Korban, Zygmunt

    2015-01-01

    Occupational health and safety management systems apply audit examinations as an integral element of these systems. The examinations are used to verify whether the undertaken actions are in compliance with the accepted regulations, whether they are implemented in a suitable way and whether they are effective. One of the earliest solutions of that type applied in the mining industry in Poland involved the application of audit research based on the MERIT survey (Management Evaluation Regarding Itemized Tendencies). A mathematical model applied in the survey facilitates the determination of assessment indexes WOPi for each of the assessed problem areas, which, among other things, can be used to set up problem area rankings and to determine an aggregate (synthetic) assessment. In the paper presented here, the assessment indexes WOPi were used to calculate a development measure, and the calculation process itself was supplemented with sensitivity analysis.

  18. Application of the MERIT survey in the multi-criteria quality assessment of occupational health and safety management.

    PubMed

    Korban, Zygmunt

    2015-01-01

    Occupational health and safety management systems apply audit examinations as an integral element of these systems. The examinations are used to verify whether the undertaken actions are in compliance with the accepted regulations, whether they are implemented in a suitable way and whether they are effective. One of the earliest solutions of that type applied in the mining industry in Poland involved the application of audit research based on the MERIT survey (Management Evaluation Regarding Itemized Tendencies). A mathematical model applied in the survey facilitates the determination of assessment indexes WOPi for each of the assessed problem areas, which, among other things, can be used to set up problem area rankings and to determine an aggregate (synthetic) assessment. In the paper presented here, the assessment indexes WOPi were used to calculate a development measure, and the calculation process itself was supplemented with sensitivity analysis. PMID:26414772

  19. Application of the MERIT survey in the multi-criteria quality assessment of occupational health and safety management

    PubMed Central

    Korban, Zygmunt

    2015-01-01

    Occupational health and safety management systems apply audit examinations as an integral element of these systems. The examinations are used to verify whether the undertaken actions are in compliance with the accepted regulations, whether they are implemented in a suitable way and whether they are effective. One of the earliest solutions of that type applied in the mining industry in Poland involved the application of audit research based on the MERIT survey (Management Evaluation Regarding Itemized Tendencies). A mathematical model applied in the survey facilitates the determination of assessment indexes WOPi for each of the assessed problem areas, which, among other things, can be used to set up problem area rankings and to determine an aggregate (synthetic) assessment. In the paper presented here, the assessment indexes WOPi were used to calculate a development measure, and the calculation process itself was supplemented with sensitivity analysis. PMID:26414772

  20. Occupant Protection Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Genie; Somers, Jeff; Granderson, Brad; Gernhardt, Mike; Currie, Nancy; Lawrence, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    Topics include occupant protection overview with a focus on crew protection during dynamic phases of flight; occupant protection collaboration; modeling occupant protection; occupant protection considerations; project approach encompassing analysis tools, injury criteria, and testing program development; injury criteria update methodology, unique effects of pressure suits and other factors; and a summary.

  1. A survey of environmental and occupational work practices in the automotive refinishing industry of a developing country: Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Luis; Bello, Dhimiter; Munguia, Nora; Zavala, Andrea; Marin, Amina; Moure-Eraso, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The automotive repair and refinishing industry has been studied intensively in industrialized countries, in part due to use of hazardous chemicals such as isocyanates and solvents, but little is known about industry practices in the developing world. The main objective of this paper was to investigate environmental and occupational work practices of this industry in a developing region, Sonora, Mexico. An integrated survey approach maximizes the opportunity for identifying risks as well as reducing risks. This investigation included detailed workplace visits to 41 body shops and 6 paint suppliers, as well as a survey of shop owners and 24 workers. Information was collected on work practices, level of technology in the shops, use of personal protective equipment, consumption and handling of hazardous chemicals and waste, hazard communication, and environmental consciousness. Most shops had little capital, outdated technology for exposure control, poor working conditions, high potential for exposure to hazardous chemicals, and little awareness of environmental and occupational health and safety. We concluded that work practices in the Sonoran auto refinishing industry are unsustainable and may pose a health risk to workers and the environment.

  2. [Occupational physicians' system in the United kingdom and fit note to promote access to occupational health services].

    PubMed

    Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Muramatsu, Keiji; Matsuda, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    The Statement of Fitness for Work (Fit Note) policy was started in the UK in 2010 in order to promote return to work after sickness absence. Fit Note is issued by General Practitioners (GP). We conducted an interview survey of 2 occupational physicians working in the UK to ascertain the impact of the introduction of Fit Note on occupational health in the UK. They regard the low coverage of occupational health services in the UK, especially among small companies and self-employed workers, as a serious issue. Fit Note was regarded as a tool to induce GPs to participate in occupational health services, and it is expected that they will be new partners in occupational health. The English occupational physicians evaluated the Fit Note system highly, and believe that the increasing participation of GPs in occupational health services will be a steady advancement in occupational health in the UK. PMID:24334697

  3. Serial measurements of exhaled nitric oxide at work and at home: a new tool for the diagnosis of occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Merget, Rolf; Sander, Ingrid; van Kampen, Vera; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Hagemeyer, Olaf; Marek, Eike; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Whereas serial measurements of lung function at work and at home are a well-known diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of occupational asthma (OA), little is known about the serial measurements of non-invasive parameters such as exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). A 51-year-old baker with variable shortness of breath without relation to work was examined for suspected OA. Skin prick test showed weak sensitizations to wheat and rye flour (without sensitizations to environmental allergens) that were corroborated by in vitro testing (CAP class 3). Baseline FEV1 of 58% predicted and a decrease of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) after placebo (sugar powder) of 17% did not allow inhalational challenge testing. The patient performed daily measurements of FEV1 and eNO for about a month during a holiday at home and at work. Whereas symptoms and FEV1 did not show differences between holidays and work periods, eNO showed a clear increase from below 10 ppb to a maximum of 75 ppb. A diagnosis of baker's asthma was made, and the patient quit his job immediately after medical advice. A year afterwards, the patient was still taking asthma medication, but his symptoms had improved, FEV1 had increased to 73% predicted, and eNO was 25 ppb. We conclude that serial measurements of eNO at home and at work may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of OA. PMID:25252906

  4. Serial measurements of exhaled nitric oxide at work and at home: a new tool for the diagnosis of occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Merget, Rolf; Sander, Ingrid; van Kampen, Vera; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Hagemeyer, Olaf; Marek, Eike; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Whereas serial measurements of lung function at work and at home are a well-known diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of occupational asthma (OA), little is known about the serial measurements of non-invasive parameters such as exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). A 51-year-old baker with variable shortness of breath without relation to work was examined for suspected OA. Skin prick test showed weak sensitizations to wheat and rye flour (without sensitizations to environmental allergens) that were corroborated by in vitro testing (CAP class 3). Baseline FEV1 of 58% predicted and a decrease of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) after placebo (sugar powder) of 17% did not allow inhalational challenge testing. The patient performed daily measurements of FEV1 and eNO for about a month during a holiday at home and at work. Whereas symptoms and FEV1 did not show differences between holidays and work periods, eNO showed a clear increase from below 10 ppb to a maximum of 75 ppb. A diagnosis of baker's asthma was made, and the patient quit his job immediately after medical advice. A year afterwards, the patient was still taking asthma medication, but his symptoms had improved, FEV1 had increased to 73% predicted, and eNO was 25 ppb. We conclude that serial measurements of eNO at home and at work may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of OA.

  5. Occupational exposures estimated by means of job exposure matrices in relation to lung function in the PAARC survey.

    PubMed Central

    Le Moual, N; Orlowski, E; Schenker, M B; Avignon, M; Brochard, P; Kauffmann, F

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--The aim of this analysis of the French Cooperative PAARC (Pollution Atmosphérique et Affections Respiratoires Chroniques) survey, was to test whether occupational exposures to dusts, gases, or chemical fumes or to specific hazards, estimated by job exposure matrices, were related to a decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). METHODS--The most recent occupation was recorded in adults, aged 25-59, from non-manual worker households. Analysis was restricted to 10,046 subjects whose occupation was encountered at least 10 times in the study and who performed good FEV1 tracings. From occupational title, exposures to dusts, gases, and chemical fumes, and to specific hazards were classified in three categories (no, low, and high) with a British, a French, and an Italian job exposure matrix. Specific hazards were analysed for the British and French job exposure matrices for the same 42 specific dusts, gases, and chemical fumes. To limit spurious associations, a selection of seven hazard groups and 12 specific hazards was set before the start of the analysis. Based on the consistency of the relations according to sex and the British and French job exposure matrices, associations of age, height, city, and smoking adjusted FEV1 score with occupational exposures were classified as very likely, possible, or unlikely. RESULTS--For the three job exposure matrices and both sexes clear exposure-response relations between the level of exposure to dusts, gases, and chemical fumes, and a decrease in FEV1 were found. Associations with FEV1 were classified as very likely for known hazards such as organic dusts and textile dusts, and not previously recognised hazards such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and detergents, and as possible for solvents, waxes and polishes, and diesel fumes. Associations found for PAHs and solvents were confirmed by the Italian job exposure matrix. Associations remained significant in women, but not in men, after

  6. Manpower Requirements for Scientific and Technical Communication: An Occupational Survey of Information Professionals. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debons, Anthony; And Others

    The first phase of a three-phase program, this study determined the functions entailed in information work and identified the number of individuals who exercise these functions in a survey of 1,193 establishments in state and local government, industry, and academia. The survey revealed that there were over 1.64 million information professionals…

  7. Survey of studies of occupational populations exposed to low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.

    1980-04-01

    Studies of occupational populations exposed to large doses of radiation, principally from the ingestion of radium by dial painters and inhalation of radon and its daughters by miners, have provided important information on the health effects of those radioisotopes. Studies of medical radiologists, military personnel exposed to nuclear tests, and factory workers exposed to thorium are in progress. Employees of DOE-contractor facilities and of naval shipyards are also under study. Personnel dosimetry data are generally available for the latter category of occupational populations. Reasons for conducting the studies include interest in exploring the verification at low exposure levels of results of studies of heavily exposed populations and the responsibility of the employer to maintain adequate surveillance of the health of his workers by conducting appropriate epidemiologic studies. The low level of exposure of workers in facilities where adequate personnel dosimetry records are available make it unlikely that the results of such studies can be used to provide health risk estimates in the near future.

  8. Developing a household survey tool for health equity: A practical guide in Islamic Republic of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Beheshtian, Maryam; Khosravi, Ardeshir; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Malekafzali, Hossein; Bonakdar Esfahani, Shirin; Hosseiny Ghavamabad, Leila; Aghamohammadi, Saeideh; Nouri, Mahnaz; Kazemi, Elaheh; Zakeri, Mohammadreza; Sagha, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: An obvious gradient in health outcomes has been implicated in many evidences relating to social and economic factors. Proper data are requested to convince policy-makers calling for intersectoral action for health. Recently, I.R. of Iran has come up with 52 health equity indicators to monitor health equity through the country. Conducting regular surveys on 14 out of 52 national health equity indicators is needed to provide a basis for the health inequality analysis through the country. We aimed to introduce a survey tool and its related protocols on health equity indicators. Methods: This study was conducted through addressing the literature and expertise of health and demographic surveys at the national and international levels. Also, we conducted technical and consultative committee meetings, a final consensus workshop and a pilot study to finalize the survey tool. Results: We defined the study design, sampling method, reliable questionnaires and instructions, data collection and supervision procedure. We also defined the data analysis protocol on health equity indicators, generated from non-routine data. Conclusion: A valid and reliable tool, which could be employed at the national and sub-national levels, was designed to measure health equity in Iran. Policy-makers can use this survey tool to generate useful information and evidence to design appropriate required intervention and reduce health inequality across the country. PMID:26913268

  9. Cigarette Smoking Trends Among U.S. Working Adult by Industry and Occupation: Findings From the 2004–2012 National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Syamlal, Girija; Mazurek, Jacek M.; Hendricks, Scott A.; Jamal, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine trends in age-adjusted cigarette smoking prevalence among working adults by industry and occupation during 2004–2012, and to project those prevalences and compare them to the 2020 Healthy People objective (TU-1) to reduce cigarette smoking prevalence to ≤12%. Methods We analyzed the 2004–2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data. Respondents were aged ≥18 years working in the week prior to the interview. Temporal changes in cigarette smoking prevalence were assessed using logistic regression. We used the regression model to extrapolate to the period 2013–2020. Results Overall, an estimated 19.0% of working adults smoked cigarettes: 22.4% in 2004 to 18.1% in 2012. The largest declines were among workers in the education services (6.5%) industry and in the life, physical, and social science (9.7%) occupations. The smallest declines were among workers in the real estate and rental and leasing (0.9%) industry and the legal (0.4%) occupations. The 2020 projected smoking prevalences in 15 of 21 industry groups and 13 of the 23 occupation groups were greater than the 2020 Healthy People goal. Conclusions During 2004–2012, smoking prevalence declined in the majority of industry and occupation groups. The decline rate varied by industry and occupation groups. Projections suggest that certain groups may not reach the 2020 Healthy People goal. Consequently, smoking cessation, prevention, and intervention efforts may need to be revised and strengthened, particularly in specific occupational groups. PMID:25239956

  10. The effectiveness and practicality of occupational stress management interventions: a survey of subject matter expert opinions.

    PubMed

    Bellarosa, C; Chen, P Y

    1997-07-01

    Stress management (SM) subject matter experts (SMEs) evaluated 6 widely used occupational SM interventions (relaxation, physical fitness, cognitive restructuring, meditation, assertiveness training, and stress inoculation) on the basis of 10 practicality criteria and 7 effectiveness objectives. Relaxation was evaluated overall as the most practical intervention, while meditation and stress inoculation were judged as the least practical. Physical fitness was chosen to be the most effective intervention, while both meditation and assertiveness training were rated overall as the least effective. The findings also revealed that the SMEs considered history of success and duration of effect, rather than "relevance to program objectives," as the most important factors when selecting SM interventions. Incongruence between effectiveness ratings and actual choices of interventions are discussed.

  11. iDNA from terrestrial haematophagous leeches as a wildlife surveying and monitoring tool - prospects, pitfalls and avenues to be developed.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Ida Bærholm; Sollmann, Rahel; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Siddall, Mark E; Yu, Douglas W; Wilting, Andreas; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Invertebrate-derived DNA (iDNA) from terrestrial haematophagous leeches has recently been proposed as a powerful non-invasive tool with which to detect vertebrate species and thus to survey their populations. However, to date little attention has been given to whether and how this, or indeed any other iDNA-derived data, can be combined with state-of-the-art analytical tools to estimate wildlife abundances, population dynamics and distributions. In this review, we discuss the challenges that face the application of existing analytical methods such as site-occupancy and spatial capture-recapture (SCR) models to terrestrial leech iDNA, in particular, possible violations of key assumptions arising from factors intrinsic to invertebrate parasite biology. Specifically, we review the advantages and disadvantages of terrestrial leeches as a source of iDNA and summarize the utility of leeches for presence, occupancy, and spatial capture-recapture models. The main source of uncertainty that attends species detections derived from leech gut contents is attributable to uncertainty about the spatio-temporal sampling frame, since leeches retain host-blood for months and can move after feeding. Subsequently, we briefly address how the analytical challenges associated with leeches may apply to other sources of iDNA. Our review highlights that despite the considerable potential of leech (and indeed any) iDNA as a new survey tool, further pilot studies are needed to assess how analytical methods can overcome or not the potential biases and assumption violations of the new field of iDNA. Specifically we argue that studies to compare iDNA sampling with standard survey methods such as camera trapping, and those to improve our knowledge on leech (and other invertebrate parasite) physiology, taxonomy, and ecology will be of immense future value. PMID:26430464

  12. Clinical evaluation tools: a survey of doctors of chiropractic and students at one chiropractic college

    PubMed Central

    Mansholt, Barbara A.; Vining, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The reliability and validity of many evaluation tools leading to clinical decision-making for spinal manipulation are varied. We surveyed senior students and DC employees at one chiropractic college regarding 1) which analysis tools should be used and 2) factors that influence their choices. Methods: The survey queried which tools should be used on a routine patient encounter. Clinical evaluation tools included palpation, skin temperature analysis, leg length analysis, and radiographs. Results: Surveys were collected from 58 doctors of chiropractic (DCs) and 74 students. Respondents from both groups reported to most commonly use static palpation, followed by motion palpation and leg length analysis. DC respondents ranked evidence and personal experience high for rationale; student respondents frequently chose patient preference. Conclusion: DC and student respondents reported use of clinical evaluation tools consistently. However, some variations in rationale were noted. It is important for educators to provide a balanced presentation of the strengths and limitations of clinical analysis procedures to support the development of well-justified evidence-based clinical decision-making skills. PMID:27069264

  13. A survey of tools and resources for the next generation analyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David L.; Graham, Jake; Catherman, Emily

    2015-05-01

    We have previously argued that a combination of trends in information technology (IT) and changing habits of people using IT provide opportunities for the emergence of a new generation of analysts that can perform effective intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) on a "do it yourself" (DIY) or "armchair" approach (see D.L. Hall and J. Llinas (2014)). Key technology advances include: i) new sensing capabilities including the use of micro-scale sensors and ad hoc deployment platforms such as commercial drones, ii) advanced computing capabilities in mobile devices that allow advanced signal and image processing and modeling, iii) intelligent interconnections due to advances in "web N" capabilities, and iv) global interconnectivity and increasing bandwidth. In addition, the changing habits of the digital natives reflect new ways of collecting and reporting information, sharing information, and collaborating in dynamic teams. This paper provides a survey and assessment of tools and resources to support this emerging analysis approach. The tools range from large-scale commercial tools such as IBM i2 Analyst Notebook, Palantir, and GeoSuite to emerging open source tools such as GeoViz and DECIDE from university research centers. The tools include geospatial visualization tools, social network analysis tools and decision aids. A summary of tools is provided along with links to web sites for tool access.

  14. Occupational practices and the making of health news: a national survey of US Health and medical science journalists.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, K; Blake, Kelly D; Meissner, Helen I; Saiontz, Nicole Gottlieb; Mull, Corey; Freeman, Carol S; Hesse, Bradford; Croyle, Robert T

    2008-12-01

    News media coverage of health topics can frame and heighten the salience of health-related issues, thus influencing the public's beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors. Through their routine coverage of scientific developments, news media are a critical intermediary in translating research for the public, patients, practitioners, and policymakers. Until now, little was known about how health and medical science reporters and editors initiate, prioritize, and develop news stories related to health and medicine. We surveyed 468 reporters and editors representing 463 local and national broadcast and print media outlets to characterize individual characteristics and occupational practices leading to the development of health and medical science news. Our survey revealed that 70% of respondents had bachelor's degrees; 8% were life sciences majors in college. Minorities are underrepresented in health journalism; 97% of respondents were non-Hispanic and 93% were White. Overall, initial ideas for stories come from a "news source" followed by press conferences or press releases. Regarding newsworthiness criteria, the "potential for public impact" and "new information or development" are the major criteria cited, followed by "ability to provide a human angle" and "ability to provide a local angle." Significant differences were seen between responses from reporters vs. editors and print vs. broadcast outlets.

  15. Occupational Bloodborne Exposure Incident Survey & Management of Exposure Incidents in a Dental Teaching Environment

    PubMed Central

    Sedky, Nabila A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of occupational exposure incidents among undergraduate dental students and the factors associated with it in the educational dental clinics at Pharos University in Alexandria – Egypt, and to measure the commitment with applying infection control policy in the form of compliance with post-exposure management protocol and reporting exposure incidents. Materials and Methods An anonymous self-administered questionnaire consisting of thirteen multiple-choice questions was distributed among 350 undergraduate dental students in mid-senior and senior levels during lectures at the end of the second semester of 2011, with a response rate of 90.00%. Results About 62.00% of the senior students reported that exposures occurred outside the patient’s mouth. A high percentage of both the mid-senior and senior students (74.70% and 70.70%, respectively) reported that they were exposed to multiple sources of incidents. The vast majority of studied groups stated that they didn’t follow Infection Control Protocol after Incident Exposure. Conclusion The findings of this study confirm that dental students experience exposure incidents but are not likely to report them, thus it is important that the principles of infection control training and reporting of all exposure incidents continue to be emphasized throughout undergraduate dental education. PMID:24421746

  16. Survey of occupational therapy students' attitudes towards sexual issues in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mairwen K; Weerakoon, Patricia; Pynor, Rosemary A

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the level of comfort of 340 occupational therapy students during clinical interactions that have sexual implications. Participants completed the Comfort Scale Questionnaire to indicate their anticipated level of comfort. More than half of the students anticipated that they would not feel comfortable in dealing with sexual issues. The three items that students indicated as being most uncomfortable with were 'Walking in on a patient/client who is masturbating' (91.7%), 'Dealing with a patient/client who makes an overt sexual remark' (82.1%) and 'Dealing with a patient/client who makes a covert sexual remark' (77.2%). The three items which students felt relatively comfortable with were 'Homosexual male' (26.4%), '14-year-old female seeking contraception' (26.4%) and 'Handicapped individual who is inquiring about sexual options' (33.5%). At least half the senior students believed that their educational programme had not dealt adequately with sexual issues. Further research investigating the nature and origin of discomfort in clinical settings is recommended as well as research examining the effectiveness of sexuality education in increasing comfort in dealing with sexual issues in clinical settings.

  17. U.S. Geological Survey ArcMap Sediment Classification tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Malley, John

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ArcMap Sediment Classification tool is a custom toolbar that extends the Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) ArcGIS 9.2 Desktop application to aid in the analysis of seabed sediment classification. The tool uses as input either a point data layer with field attributes containing percentage of gravel, sand, silt, and clay or four raster data layers representing a percentage of sediment (0-100%) for the various sediment grain size analysis: sand, gravel, silt and clay. This tool is designed to analyze the percent of sediment at a given location and classify the sediments according to either the Folk (1954, 1974) or Shepard (1954) as modified by Schlee(1973) classification schemes. The sediment analysis tool is based upon the USGS SEDCLASS program (Poppe, et al. 2004).

  18. Technology survey of nursing programs: implications for electronic end-of-life teaching tool development.

    PubMed

    Wells, Marjorie J; Wilkie, Diana J; Brown, Marie-Annette; Corless, Inge B; Farber, Stuart J; Judge, M Kay M; Shannon, Sarah E

    2003-01-01

    From an online survey of current technological capabilities of US undergraduate nursing programs, we found almost universal use of Microsoft Windows-based computers and Microsoft Office Suite software. Netscape and Microsoft Internet Explorer were the most popular browsers for Internet access. The survey also assessed faculty preferences for end-of-life care teaching materials and found that nurse educators preferred simple easy-to-use tools provided on CD-ROM or the Internet, with instructions provided via CD-ROM, the Internet, and demonstration workshops. Our findings have numerous implications for the development of electronic teaching materials for nursing.

  19. On the importance of incorporating sampling weights in occupancy model estimation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occupancy models are used extensively to assess wildlife-habitat associations and to predict species distributions across large geographic regions. Occupancy models were developed as a tool to properly account for imperfect detection of a species. Current guidelines on survey des...

  20. Patient satisfaction surveys as a market research tool for general practices.

    PubMed Central

    Khayat, K; Salter, B

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recent policy developments, embracing the notions of consumer choice, quality of care, and increased general practitioner control over practice budgets have resulted in a new competitive environment in primary care. General practitioners must now be more aware of how their patients feel about the services they receive, and patient satisfaction surveys can be an effective tool for general practices. AIM. A survey was undertaken to investigate the use of a patient satisfaction survey and whether aspects of patient satisfaction varied according to sociodemographic characteristics such as age, sex, social class, housing tenure and length of time in education. METHOD. A sample of 2173 adults living in Medway District Health Authority were surveyed by postal questionnaire in September 1991 in order to elicit their views on general practice services. RESULTS. Levels of satisfaction varied with age, with younger people being consistently less satisfied with general practice services than older people. Women, those in social classes 1-3N, home owners and those who left school aged 17 years or older were more critical of primary care services than men, those in social classes 3M-5, tenants and those who left school before the age of 17 years. CONCLUSION. Surveys and analyses of this kind, if conducted for a single practice, can form the basis of a marketing strategy aimed at optimizing list size, list composition, and service quality. Satisfaction surveys can be readily incorporated into medical audit and financial management. PMID:8204335

  1. Northeast regional and state trends in anuran occupancy from calling survey data (2001-2011) from the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weir, Linda A.; Royle, Andy; Gazenski, Kimberly D.; Villena Carpio, Oswaldo

    2014-01-01

    We present the first regional trends in anuran occupancy from North American Amphibian Monitoring Program (NAAMP) data from 11 northeastern states using an 11 years of data. NAAMP is a long-term monitoring program where observers collect data at assigned random roadside routes using a calling survey technique. We assessed occupancy trends for 17 species. Eight species had statistically significant regional trends, of these seven were negative (Anaxyrus fowleri, Acris crepitans, Pseudacris brachyphona, Pseudacris feriarum-kalmi complex, Lithobates palustris, Lithobates pipiens, and Lithobates sphenocephalus) and one was positive (Hyla versicolor-chrysoscelis complex). We also assessed state level trends for 101 species/state combinations, of these 29 showed a significant decline and nine showed a significant increase in occupancy.

  2. Spatial-Temporal Survey and Occupancy-Abundance Modeling To Predict Bacterial Community Dynamics in the Drinking Water Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ameet J.; Schroeder, Joanna; Lunn, Mary; Sloan, William

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial communities migrate continuously from the drinking water treatment plant through the drinking water distribution system and into our built environment. Understanding bacterial dynamics in the distribution system is critical to ensuring that safe drinking water is being supplied to customers. We present a 15-month survey of bacterial community dynamics in the drinking water system of Ann Arbor, MI. By sampling the water leaving the treatment plant and at nine points in the distribution system, we show that the bacterial community spatial dynamics of distance decay and dispersivity conform to the layout of the drinking water distribution system. However, the patterns in spatial dynamics were weaker than those for the temporal trends, which exhibited seasonal cycling correlating with temperature and source water use patterns and also demonstrated reproducibility on an annual time scale. The temporal trends were driven by two seasonal bacterial clusters consisting of multiple taxa with different networks of association within the larger drinking water bacterial community. Finally, we show that the Ann Arbor data set robustly conforms to previously described interspecific occupancy abundance models that link the relative abundance of a taxon to the frequency of its detection. Relying on these insights, we propose a predictive framework for microbial management in drinking water systems. Further, we recommend that long-term microbial observatories that collect high-resolution, spatially distributed, multiyear time series of community composition and environmental variables be established to enable the development and testing of the predictive framework. PMID:24865557

  3. Employer reasons for failing to report eligible workers’ compensation claims in the BLS survey of occupational injuries and illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Wuellner, Sara E.; Bonauto, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little research has been done to identify reasons employers fail to report some injuries and illnesses in the Bureau of Labor Statistics Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII). Methods We interviewed the 2012 Washington SOII respondents from establishments that had failed to report one or more eligible workers’ compensation claims in the SOII about their reasons for not reporting specific claims. Qualitative content analysis methods were used to identify themes and patterns in the responses. Results Non‐compliance with OSHA recordkeeping or SOII reporting instructions and data entry errors led to unreported claims. Some employers refused to include claims because they did not consider the injury to be work‐related, despite workers’ compensation eligibility. Participant responses brought the SOII eligibility of some claims into question. Conclusion Systematic and non‐systematic errors lead to SOII underreporting. Insufficient recordkeeping systems and limited knowledge of reporting requirements are barriers to accurate workplace injury records. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:343–356, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26970051

  4. Prevalence and pattern of occupational exposure to whole body vibration in Great Britain: findings from a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, K.; Griffin, M.; Bendall, H.; Pannett, B.; Coggon, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To estimate the number of workers in Great Britain with significant occupational exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) and to identify the common sources of exposure and the occupations and industries where such exposures arise.
METHODS—A postal questionnaire was posted to a random community sample of 22 194 men and women of working age. Among other things, the questionnaire asked about exposure to WBV in the past week, including occupational and common non-occupational sources. Responses were assessed by occupation and industry, and national prevalence estimates were derived from census information. Estimates were also made of the average estimated daily personal dose of vibration (eVDV).
RESULTS—From the 12 907 responses it was estimated that 7.2 million men and 1.8 million women in Great Britain are exposed to WBV at work in a 1 week period if the occupational use of cars, vans, buses, trains, and motor cycles is included within the definition of exposure. The eVDV of >374 000 men and 9000 women was estimated to exceed a proposed British Standard action level of 15 ms-1.75. Occupations in which the estimated exposures most often exceeded 15 ms-1.75 included forklift truck and mechanical truck drivers, farm owners and managers, farm workers, and drivers of road goods vehicles. These occupations also contributed the largest estimated numbers of workers in Great Britain with such levels of exposure. The highest estimated median occupational eVDVs were found in forklift truck drivers, drivers of road goods vehicles, bus and coach drivers, and technical and wholesale sales representatives, among whom a greater contribution to total dose was received from occupational exposures than from non-occupational ones; but in many other occupations the reverse applied. The most common sources of occupational exposure to WBV are cars, vans, forklift trucks, lorries, tractors, buses, and loaders.
CONCLUSIONS—Exposure to whole body vibration is

  5. SkICAT: A cataloging and analysis tool for wide field imaging surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, N.; Fayyad, U. M.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Roden, J.

    1992-01-01

    We describe an integrated system, SkICAT (Sky Image Cataloging and Analysis Tool), for the automated reduction and analysis of the Palomar Observatory-ST ScI Digitized Sky Survey. The Survey will consist of the complete digitization of the photographic Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS-II) in three bands, comprising nearly three Terabytes of pixel data. SkICAT applies a combination of existing packages, including FOCAS for basic image detection and measurement and SAS for database management, as well as custom software, to the task of managing this wealth of data. One of the most novel aspects of the system is its method of object classification. Using state-of-theart machine learning classification techniques (GID3* and O-BTree), we have developed a powerful method for automatically distinguishing point sources from non-point sources and artifacts, achieving comparably accurate discrimination a full magnitude fainter than in previous Schmidt plate surveys. The learning algorithms produce decision trees for classification by examining instances of objects classified by eye on both plate and higher quality CCD data. The same techniques will be applied to perform higher-level object classification (e.g., of galaxy morphology) in the near future. Another key feature of the system is the facility to integrate the catalogs from multiple plates (and portions thereof) to construct a single catalog of uniform calibration and quality down to the faintest limits of the survey. SkICAT also provides a variety of data analysis and exploration tools for the scientific utilization of the resulting catalogs. We include initial results of applying this system to measure the counts and distribution of galaxies in two bands down to Bj is approximately 21 mag over an approximate 70 square degree multi-plate field from POSS-II. SkICAT is constructed in a modular and general fashion and should be readily adaptable to other large-scale imaging surveys.

  6. A survey of tools for variant analysis of next-generation genome sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Pabinger, Stephan; Dander, Andreas; Fischer, Maria; Snajder, Rene; Sperk, Michael; Efremova, Mirjana; Krabichler, Birgit; Speicher, Michael R.; Zschocke, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genome sequencing technologies provide unprecedented opportunities to characterize individual genomic landscapes and identify mutations relevant for diagnosis and therapy. Specifically, whole-exome sequencing using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies is gaining popularity in the human genetics community due to the moderate costs, manageable data amounts and straightforward interpretation of analysis results. While whole-exome and, in the near future, whole-genome sequencing are becoming commodities, data analysis still poses significant challenges and led to the development of a plethora of tools supporting specific parts of the analysis workflow or providing a complete solution. Here, we surveyed 205 tools for whole-genome/whole-exome sequencing data analysis supporting five distinct analytical steps: quality assessment, alignment, variant identification, variant annotation and visualization. We report an overview of the functionality, features and specific requirements of the individual tools. We then selected 32 programs for variant identification, variant annotation and visualization, which were subjected to hands-on evaluation using four data sets: one set of exome data from two patients with a rare disease for testing identification of germline mutations, two cancer data sets for testing variant callers for somatic mutations, copy number variations and structural variations, and one semi-synthetic data set for testing identification of copy number variations. Our comprehensive survey and evaluation of NGS tools provides a valuable guideline for human geneticists working on Mendelian disorders, complex diseases and cancers. PMID:23341494

  7. A SURVEY OF LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC-MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF MERCAPTURIC ACID BIOMARKERS IN OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE MONITORING

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Patricia I.; B’Hymer, Clayton

    2015-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) is sensitive and specific for targeted quantitative analysis and is readily utilized for small molecules from biological matricies. This brief review describes recent selected HPLC/MS methods for the determination of urinary mercapturic acids (mercapturates) which are useful as biomarkers in characterizing human exposure to electrophilic industrial chemicals in occupational and environmental studies. Electrophilic compounds owing to their reactivity are used in chemical and industrial processes. They are present in industrial emissions, are combustion products of fossil fuels, and are components in tobacco smoke. Their presence in both the industrial and general environment are of concern for human and environmental health. Urinary mercapturates which are the products of metabolic detoxification of reactive chemicals provide a non-invasive tool to investigate human exposure to electrophilic toxicants. Selected recent mercapturate quantification methods are summarized and specific cases are presented. The biological formation of mercapturates is introduced and their use as biomarkers of metabolic processing of electrophilic compounds is discussed. Also, the use of liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry in simultaneous determinations of the mercapturates of multiple parent compounds in a single determination is considered, as well as future trends and limitations in this area of research. PMID:24746702

  8. A survey of liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of mercapturic acid biomarkers in occupational and environmental exposure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patricia I; B'Hymer, Clayton

    2014-08-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) is sensitive and specific for targeted quantitative analysis and is readily utilized for small molecules from biological matrices. This brief review describes recent selected HPLC/MS methods for the determination of urinary mercapturic acids (mercapturates) which are useful as biomarkers in characterizing human exposure to electrophilic industrial chemicals in occupational and environmental studies. Electrophilic compounds owing to their reactivity are used in chemical and industrial processes. They are present in industrial emissions, are combustion products of fossil fuels, and are components in tobacco smoke. Their presence in both the industrial and general environments are of concern for human and environmental health. Urinary mercapturates which are the products of metabolic detoxification of reactive chemicals provide a non-invasive tool to investigate human exposure to electrophilic toxicants. Selected recent mercapturate quantification methods are summarized and specific cases are presented. The biological formation of mercapturates is introduced and their use as biomarkers of metabolic processing of electrophilic compounds is discussed. Also, the use of liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry in simultaneous determinations of the mercapturates of multiple parent compounds in a single determination is considered, as well as future trends and limitations in this area of research.

  9. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  10. Emergency healthcare worker sleep, fatigue, & alertness behavior survey (SFAB): Development and content validation of a survey tool

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Buysse, Daniel J.; Weaver, Matthew D.; Suffoletto, Brian P.; McManigle, Kyle L.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Yealy, Donald M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Workplace safety is a recognized concern in Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Ambulance crashes are common and injury rates exceed that of the general working public. Fatigue and sleepiness during shift work pose a safety risk for patients and EMS workers. Changing EMS worker behaviors and improving alertness during shift work is hampered by a lack of instruments that reliably and accurately measure multidimensional beliefs and habits that predict alertness behavior. Objectives: We sought to test the reliability and validity of a survey tool (the Sleep, Fatigue, and Alertness Behavior Survey [SFAB]) designed to identify the cognitions of emergency medical services (EMS) workers concerning sleep, fatigue, and alertness behaviors during shift work. Methods: We operationalized the Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction (IMBP) and developed a pool of 97 candidate items and sub-items to measure eight domains of the IMBP. Five sleep scientists judged the content validity of each item and a convenience sample of EMS workers completed a paper-based version of the SFAB. We retained items judged content valid by five sleep scientists and performed exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and tests of reliability and internal consistency. We identified a simple factor structure for each scale and calculated means and standard deviations for each item and scale. Results: We received 360 completed SFAB surveys from a convenience sample of 800 EMS workers attending two regional continuing education conferences (45% participation rate). Forty-seven candidate items and sub-items/options were removed following content validation, EFA, and CFA testing. Analyses revealed a simple factor structure for seven of eight domains and a final pool of 50 items and sub-items/options. Domains include: Attitudes, Normative Beliefs, Knowledge, Salience, Habits, Environmental Constraints, and Intent. EFA tests of self-efficacy items failed to identify

  11. A survey of occupational cancer in the rubber and cablemaking industries: results of five-year analysis, 1967-71

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A. J.; Lindars, D. C.; Owen, R.

    1974-01-01

    Fox, A. J., Lindars, D. C., and Owen, R. (1974).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,31, 140-151. A survey of occupational cancer in the rubber and cablemaking industries: results of five-year analysis, 1967-71. A mortality study of 40 867 subjects employed in the rubber and cablemaking industries on 1 February 1967 is reported. No evidence is found of a continued excess risk of neoplasms of the bladder in people who entered the industry after 1949. For those employed before that date, during the period when known bladder carcinogens were in use, the SMR is higher than predicted, indicating that men are still dying with occupationally induced tumours. An excess of all neoplasms was noted in the five years of the study. In certain sections of the industry (tyre manufacture, belting hose rubber with asbestos, and flooring industry) there is a particular excess of bronchial carcinoma. In those sections which use asbestos such an excess is not altogether surprising, but this does not apply to the tyre industry. The latter industry is sufficiently large (16 035 men in the study compared with 4 350 in the belting, hose rubber with asbestos, and flooring industry) for attention to be focused on particular operations. Two job groups are found to share the excess: moulding, press, autoclave, and pan curemen; and finished goods, packaging, and despatch. Job selection may play a part in the latter, as the work is generally considered suitable for older and perhaps less healthy people. Crude analyses have been undertaken to indicate whether the excesses are due to regional differences or to the population comprising an abnormally high proportion of smokers. No excesses are found in other smoking-related diseases. Although the effects of differences in smoking habit and regional differences cannot be ruled out, the indications are against these factors being the primary cause. The difficulties of this type of study are discussed. It is emphasized that the results can be used

  12. The Florence Baptistery: 3-D Survey as a Knowledge Tool for Historical and Structural Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucci, G.; Bonora, V.; Fiorini, L.; Conti, A.

    2016-06-01

    The Baptistery of San Giovanni is one of the most important pieces of architecture in Florence. It is an octagonal building, encrusted with marble both internally and externally (including the pyramidal roof) and covered inside by a magnificent dome with sparkling gold mosaics. During Dante's time, it appeared much older than the other monuments, so its origins were considered as hailing straight from Florence's most remote and mythical history. Even though we have much more data now, scholars still disagree over the interpretations on the origin and construction sequence of the monument. Survey has always been considered a main instrument for understanding historical architecture, mostly from constructional and structural points of view. During the last century, the Baptistery was surveyed using both traditional techniques and the most up-to-date instruments available at the time, such as topography, close-range photogrammetry and laser scanning. So, a review of those early applications, even if partial or isolated, can significantly attest to the state of the art and evolution of survey techniques. During recent years, the Opera di Santa Maria del Fiore promoted new research and a wide range of diagnostic investigations aimed at acquiring greater knowledge of the monument in anticipation of the cleaning and restoration of the outer wall surfaces during 2015. Among this research, GeCo Lab carried out a new systematic and complete laser scanner survey of the whole Baptistery, acquiring data for the more inaccessible parts that were given little attention during other survey campaigns. First of all, the paper analyses recent contributions given by instrumental surveys in advancing knowledge of the building, with references to the cutting-edge techniques and measurement tools used at the time. Then, it describes the new survey campaign, illustrating the approach followed in the planning, data acquisition and data elaboration phases; finally, it gives examples of some

  13. U.S. Geological Survey community for data integration: data upload, registry, and access tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2012-01-01

    As a leading science and information agency and in fulfillment of its mission to provide reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ensures that all scientific data are effectively hosted, adequately described, and appropriately accessible to scientists, collaborators, and the general public. To succeed in this task, the USGS established the Community for Data Integration (CDI) to address data and information management issues affecting the proficiency of earth science research. Through the CDI, the USGS is providing data and metadata management tools, cyber infrastructure, collaboration tools, and training in support of scientists and technology specialists throughout the project life cycle. One of the significant tools recently created to contribute to this mission is the Uploader tool. This tool allows scientists with limited data management resources to address many of the key aspects of the data life cycle: the ability to protect, preserve, publish and share data. By implementing this application inside ScienceBase, scientists also can take advantage of other collaboration capabilities provided by the ScienceBase platform.

  14. Measuring Work Activities and Skill Requirements of Occupations: Experiences from a European Pilot Study with a Web-Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijdens, Kea G.; De Ruijter, Judith; De Ruijter, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to evaluate a method for measuring work activities and skill requirements of 160 occupations in eight countries, used in EurOccupations, an EU-FP6 project. Additionally, it aims to explore how the internet can be used for measuring work activities and skill requirements. Design/methodology/approach: For the…

  15. E-learning as a technological tool to meet the requirements of occupational standards in training of it specialists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokareva, N. A.; Tyatyushkina, O. Y.; Cheremisina, E. N.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss issues of updating educational programs to meet requirements of the labor market and occupational standards of IT industry. We suggest the technology of e-learning that utilizes an open educational resource to provide the employers' participation in the development of educational content and the intensification of practical training.

  16. Modeling and Results for Creating Oblique Fields in a Magnetic Flux Leakage Survey Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simek, James C.

    2010-02-01

    Integrity management programs designed to maintain safe pipeline systems quite often will use survey results from In line inspection (ILI) tools in addition to data from other sources. Commonly referred to a "smart pigs," one of the most widely used types are those based upon the magnetic flux leakage technique, typically used to detect and quantify metal loss zones. The majority of pipelines surveyed to date have used tools with the magnetic field direction axially aligned with the length of the pipeline. In order to enable detection and quantification of extremely narrow metal loss features or certain types of weld zone anomalies, tools employing magnetic circuits directing the magnetic fields around the pipe circumference have been designed and are use in segments where these feature categories are a primary concern. Modeling and laboratory test data of metal loss features will be used to demonstrate the response of extremely narrow metal loss zones as the features are rotated relative to the induced field direction. Based upon these results, the basis for developing a magnetizer capable of creating fields oblique to either pipeline axis will be presented along with the magnetic field profile models of several configurations.

  17. Recruiting the occupational and environmental medicine physicians of the future: results of a survey of current residents.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, B S; Pransky, G; Lashley, D

    1995-06-01

    In July 1994, current occupational and environmental medicine (OEM) residents (n = 180) were surveyed about their motivation for decisions to enter OEM residencies, near-term and long-term career goals, and their opinions on various strategies for recruitment to the field. A total of 151 persons responded (84%), representing all 40 accredited OEM residencies in the United States and Canada. A total of 16% first learned about OEM in medical school, and 11% were first exposed during residency training. Most respondents (62%) decided to enter OEM residency training after beginning their professional working careers. Only 11% of respondents decided to enter OEM residency training before (2%) or during (9%) medical school, whereas 24% made their decision during internship or residency. Respondents were attracted to several aspects of OEM, but the prevention focus of the field (64%), lifestyle (56%), and worker and labor issues (53%) were most commonly cited. Although only 25% of respondents stated that a role model had a significant impact on their decision to pursue training in OEM, persons influenced by a role model were more likely to have made the decision to pursue a career in OEM during medical school or clinical residency training (odds ratio = 2.4; 95% CI, 1.0-5.4; Fisher's exact two-tailed P value = 0.04). In the short term, residents were most often interested in working for industry (32%), whereas over the long term, careers in consulting were most often preferred (39%). The data have important implications for strategies to increase recruitment to residency training programs in OEM and to increase staffing in the field. PMID:7670921

  18. [Hand and occupational diseases].

    PubMed

    Bensefa-Colas, Lynda; Choudat, Dominique

    2013-12-01

    Hand is frequently the site of work accidents or occupational diseases. The musculoskeletal upper limb is the first recognized occupational disease and carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common of them. The most common location of occupational dermatoses is the hand. Their causes are often multifactorial, involving chemical irritants, physical, allergens and endogenous factors (mainly atopic dermatitis). Occupational exposure to microtrauma and iterative use of vibrating tools may also be the cause of hypothenar hammer syndrome and acrosyndromes. The frequent chronicity and functional impairment induced by these attacks can cause lasting disabilities, an inability to source workstation. Occupational physician is a focal point for helping to maintain the position and the prevention of socioprofessional disinsertion. Many pathologies of the hand related to professional activity may benefit from a statement in occupational disease and thus allow the patient to obtain compensation and employment protection. Prevention of occupational hand diseases should be made by all health actors, especially in occupations and industries at risk.

  19. The population survey as a tool for assessing family health in the Keewatin region, NWT, Canada.

    PubMed

    Young, T K; Moffatt, M E; O'Neil, J D; Thika, R; Mirdad, S

    1995-01-01

    The population survey is an important tool in community health assessment, including the physical and psychological aspects of family health. It provides data on health status and health determinants not available from vital statistics and health service utilization. The Keewatin Health Assessment Study (KHAS), which was designed in collaboration with the Keewatin Regional Health Board (KRHB), surveyed a representative sample of the predominantly Inuit population in 8 communities in the central Canadian Arctic. The entire survey included 874 individuals in all age groups, of whom 440 were children and adolescents under 18 years of age, and consisted of questionnaires, clinical examination and laboratory tests. Of the large number of variables on which data were collected, some were of particular relevance to the health of children and the well-being of the family, including: (1) Child growth and development; (2) Nutrition and diet; (3) Social pathologies: suicide attempts and sexual abuse; (4) Oral health; and (5) Audiologic health. In addition to providing cross-sectional data, survey participants constitute a cohort which, if followed up longitudinally, can be used to determine the incidence of specific conditions and identify risk factors which promote or prevent their occurrence. An example of such a cohort study is one on acute respiratory infection. Surveys serve many functions--providing data for planning and evaluation, promoting community awareness of health issues, and addressing basic research questions. The KHAS is one of several surveys launched over the past several years which jointly will begin to provide a circumpolar perspective on the health of Inuit people. PMID:7639909

  20. Surveying and optical tooling technologies combined to align a skewed beamline at the LAMPF accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bauke, W.; Clark, D.A.; Trujillo, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    Optical Tooling evolved from traditional surveying, and both technologies are sometimes used interchangeably in large industrial installations, since the instruments and their specialized adapters and supports complement each other well. A unique marriage of both technologies was accomplished in a novel application at LAMPF, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. LAMPF consists of a linear accelerator with multiple target systems, one of which had to be altered to accommodate a new beamline for a neutrino experiment. The new line was to be installed into a crowded beam tunnel and had to be skewed and tilted in compound angles to avoid existing equipment. In this paper we describe how Optical Tooling was used in conjunction with simple alignment and reference fixtures to set fiducials on the magnets and other mechanical components of the beamline, and how theodolites and sight levels were then adapted to align these components along the calculated skew planes. Design tolerances are compared with measured alignment results.

  1. A systematic approach to cross-cultural adaptation of survey tools

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Filipa A.; Duggan, Catherine; Bates, Ian

    Background Involving patients in health care is increasingly acknowledged as the best way to empower patients to manage their illness. Whilst the involvement of patients is laudable and widely recognised, how much they want to be involved needs to be ascertained. Research has shown that inappropriate provision of information to patients can increase their anxieties towards illness and alter perceptions of medicines’ usefulness, consequently impacting on medicines’ taking behaviour. Tools have been validated in the UK to identify information desires, perceived usefulness of medicines and anxiety felt about illness. There is a need to adapt validated tools for use in other settings and countries. This paper is the first of a series describing the processes involved in the adaptation and validation of these. Aim to review and adapt the processes established to translate and back translate scales and tools in practice. Methods The survey tool was translated and back- translated according to published guidelines, subsequently tested in a sample of medical patients and further refined by seeking health care professionals’ perceptions and input from lay people. Results Data demonstrates the importance of including various perspectives in this process, through which sequential modifications were made to the original scales. Issues relating to religious beliefs, educational and health literacy differences between countries highlight the relevance of taking cultural values into account. Some led to significant modifications, discussed in this first paper, and tested for validity and reliability in a second paper. PMID:25214927

  2. Gesture and Body-Movement as Teaching and Learning Tools in the Classical Voice Lesson: A Survey into Current Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nafisi, Julia

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the use of gesture and body-movement in the teaching of singing and reports on a survey amongst professional singing teachers in Germany regarding their use of gesture and body movement as pedagogic tools in their teaching. The nomenclature of gestures and movements used in the survey is based on a previous study by the…

  3. Survey of symptoms, respiratory function, and immunology and their relation to glutaraldehyde and other occupational exposures among endoscopy nursing staff

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, A; Pickering, C; Oldham, L; Francis, H; Fletcher, A; Merrett, T; Niven, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To find the nature and incidence of symptoms experienced by a large sample of hospital endoscopy nurses. To find whether nurses in endoscopy units develop asthma under current working conditions in endoscopy units. To obtain analytically reliable data on exposure concentrations of glutaraldehyde (GA) vapour in endoscopy units, and to relate them to individual hygiene and work practices. To characterise any exposure-response relations between airborne GA and the occurrence of work related symptoms (WRSs). Due to the growing concern about the perceived increase in WRSs among workers regularly exposed to biocides, all of whom work within a complex multiexposure environment, a cross sectional study was designed.
METHODS—Current endoscopy nurses (n=348) from 59 endoscopy units within the United Kingdom and ex-employees (who had left their job for health reasons (n=18) were surveyed. Symptom questionnaires, end of session spirometry, peak flow diaries, skin prick tests (SPTs) to latex and common aeroallergens, and measurements of total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgE specific to GA and latex were performed. Exposure measurements included personal airborne biocide sampling for peak (during biocide changeover) and background (endoscopy room, excluding biocide changeover) concentrations.
RESULTS—All 18 ex-employees and 91.4% of the current nurses were primarily exposed to GA, the rest were exposed to a succinaldehyde-formaldehyde (SF) composite. Work related contact dermatitis was reported by 44% of current workers exposed to GA, 56.7% of those exposed to SF composite, and 44.4% of ex-employees. The prevalence of WRSs of the eyes, nose, and lower respiratory tract in current workers exposed to GA was 13.5%, 19.8%, and 8.5% respectively and 50%, 61.1%, and 66.6% in the ex-employees. The mean percentage predicted forced expired volume in 1 second (ppFEV1) for ex-employees (93.82, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 88.53 to 99.11) was significantly lower

  4. Inference about species richness and community structure using species-specific occupancy models in the National Swiss Breeding Bird Survey MUB

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kery, M.; Royle, J. Andrew; Thomson, David L.; Cooch, Evan G.; Conroy, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Species richness is the most widely used biodiversity measure. Virtually always, it cannot be observed but needs to be estimated because some species may be present but remain undetected. This fact is commonly ignored in ecology and management, although it will bias estimates of species richness and related parameters such as occupancy, turnover or extinction rates. We describe a species community modeling strategy based on species-specific models of occurrence, from which estimates of important summaries of community structure, e.g., species richness, occupancy, or measures of similarity among species or sites, are derived by aggregating indicators of occurrence for all species observed in the sample, and for the estimated complement of unobserved species. We use data augmentation for an efficient Bayesian approach to estimation and prediction under this model based on MCMC in WinBUGS. For illustration, we use the Swiss breeding bird survey (MHB) that conducts 2?3 territory-mapping surveys in a systematic sample of 267 1 km2 units on quadrat-specific routes averaging 5.1 km to obtain species-specific estimates of occupancy, and estimates of species richness of all diurnal species free of distorting effects of imperfect detectability. We introduce into our model species-specific covariates relevant to occupancy (elevation, forest cover, route length) and sampling (season, effort). From 1995 to 2004, 185 diurnal breeding bird species were known in Switzerland, and an additional 13 bred 1?3 times since 1900. 134 species were observed during MHB surveys in 254 quadrats surveyed in 2001, and our estimate of 169.9 (95% CI 151?195) therefore appeared sensible. The observed number of species ranged from 4 to 58 (mean 32.8), but with an estimated 0.7?11.2 (mean 2.6) further, unobserved species, the estimated proportion of detected species was 0.48?0.98 (mean 0.91). As is well known, species richness declined at higher elevation and fell above the timberline, and most

  5. The influence of handedness on hemispheric representation of tools: a survey.

    PubMed

    Gainotti, Guido

    2015-03-01

    An important debate exists in contemporary cognitive neuroscience about the innate or experience-dependent origin of the brain representation of conceptual categories. The 'domains of knowledge' hypothesis maintains that innate factors subsume the categorical organization at the brain level of animals, plant life and artefacts. On the other hand, the 'sensory-motor model of conceptual knowledge' and the embodied cognition theory attribute this categorical organization to experience-dependent factors. I tried to clarify this issue by surveying the influence that handedness could have on the lateralization of tools representation in the inferior fronto-parietal and posterior middle temporal cortices of the left hemisphere. The underlying assumption was that, if this lateralization results from innate mechanisms, then handedness should not influence this hemispheric asymmetry. If, on the other hand, this lateralization is due to the motor and somatosensory experiences made with the right dominant hand during the manipulation of tools and other artefacts, then this asymmetry should be inverted or strongly attenuated in left-handers. Results of the review strongly suggest that manual experience acquired during tool manipulation can influence the hemispheric representation of tools and other artefacts. They also suggest, however, that handedness-related embodiment is not fixed, but influenced by personal motor experiences (such as those made by left-handers who have been forced to use their right hand) and by social visual experiences (such as the fact that, living in a right-handed world, left-handers see more people in their environment who use the right rather than the left hand) during tool manipulation.

  6. Entry Occupations in Off-Farm Agriculture; A Survey and Task Analysis of Entry Level Off-Farm Agricultural Occupations in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, William E.; Tom, Frederick K.T.

    To ascertain the number of entry level off-farm agricultural jobs by specific job title in New York with implications for curriculum development, 1,110 nonpublic employers were contacted from a population of over 7,000 listed by the New York State Department of Labor. A 70 percent return of the employer survey questionnaire and a 28-percent return…

  7. Repeated rapid assessment surveys reveal contrasting trends in occupancy of marinas by non-indigenous species on opposite sides of the western English Channel.

    PubMed

    Bishop, John D D; Wood, Christine A; Lévêque, Laurent; Yunnie, Anna L E; Viard, Frédérique

    2015-06-30

    Rapid assessment surveys of non-indigenous species (NIS) of sessile invertebrates were made at seven marinas in NW France and 10 marinas in SW England in 2010, and repeated in 2013. Fourteen NIS were recorded, 12 of which were seen on both coasts. Site occupancy differed between the opposite sides of the western English Channel. In Brittany, most species occurred at most sites in both 2010 and 2013. In 2010, site occupancy in Devon & Cornwall was distinctly lower; by 2013, the difference compared to Brittany had narrowed considerably, largely because of rapid colonisation of additional sites by species that were infrequent in 2010. Three more of the recent NIS are present in Devon & Cornwall but have still not become widespread. It is concluded that the recently introduced fouling animals studied here are longer established in NW France than in SW England, and have probably spread northwards across the Channel.

  8. Status of occupational hazards and their prevention among dental professionals in Chandigarh, India: A comprehensive questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Abhishek; Gupta, Mohit; Upadhyaya, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Background: To assess the status of occupational hazards and their prevention among the practicing dentists in Chandigarh city, India. Materials and Methods: A closed-ended questionnaire was prepared to record demographic status, types of occupational hazards encountered, and status of measures used for their prevention. A total 113 out of 130 dentists completed the questionnaire and the response rate was 86.9%. Frequency tables were prepared and coefficient of correlation was computed to check correlation between different variables. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The most common occupational hazard reported was injury from “sharps” (77%), out of which needle prick injury was the most frequent. Of the other occupational problems job related stress (43.3%), musculoskeletal problems (39.8%), and allergies (23.8%) from things used in dental clinics were most common. A reasonably high percentage of dentists were immunized against hepatitis-B virus (88.4%) and were following proper infection control measures and hospital waste disposal methods. Very few dentists were following the correct method of disposal of excess amalgam (11%) and measurement of radiation exposure (27.5%) within their clinic. Most of them (90.2%) were satisfied with their current working hours and job. Conclusion: Prevalence of occupational hazards among the studied group was high and certain preventive measures were not being followed properly. Therefore, there is a need to improve the knowledge of dentists regarding these hazards and their prevention. PMID:24130578

  9. Lead exposure in radiator repair workers: a survey of Washington State radiator repair shops and review of occupational lead exposure registry data.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Stephen G

    2003-07-01

    Radiator repair workers in Washington State have the greatest number of very elevated (> or =60 microg/dL) blood lead levels of any other worker population. The goals of this study were to determine the number of radiator repair workers potentially exposed to lead; estimate the extent of blood lead data underreporting to the Occupational Lead Exposure Registry; describe current safety and health practices in radiator repair shops; and determine appropriate intervention strategies to reduce exposure and increase employer and worker awareness. Lead exposure in Washington State's radiator repair workers was assessed by reviewing Registry data and conducting a statewide survey of radiator repair businesses. This study revealed that a total of 226 workers in Washington State (including owner-operators and all employees) conduct repair activities that could potentially result in excessive exposures to lead. Approximately 26% of radiator repair workers with elevated blood lead levels (> or =25 microg/dL) were determined to report to Washington State's Registry. This study also revealed a lack of awareness of lead's health effects, appropriate industrial hygiene controls, and the requirements of the Lead Standard. Survey respondents requested information on a variety of workplace health and safety issues and waste management; 80% requested a confidential, free-of-charge consultation. Combining data derived from an occupational health surveillance system and a statewide mail survey proved effective at characterizing lead exposures and directing public health intervention in Washington State.

  10. The Flexible Learning Needs and Preferences of Regional Occupational Therapy Students In Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeldenryk, Lynne; Bradey, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the flexible learning needs and preferences of occupational therapy students from a regional Australian university. Participants ("n"?=?170) were surveyed using a quantitative survey tool. Findings were analysed using SPSS to determine significant differences between variable attributes of the student cohort. The survey…

  11. [Development of a Tool for Training and Evaluation of the Competencies in Occupational Mental Health Necessary for Labor and Social Security Attorneys].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Hideki; Shibata, Yoshiyuki; Kayashima, Kotaro; Motoyama, Kyoko; Wakabayashi, Tadashi; Horasawa, Ken; Maruta, Wakako; Ogasawara, Takayuki; Nishikido, Noriko; Oyama, Yuji; Toyoda, Hiroyuki; Mori, Ayaka; Mori, Koji

    2016-06-01

    Labor and Social Security Attorneys (LSSAs) advise their clients about occupational mental health, but the competencies necessary in this field are not clear to them. We standardized the necessary competencies as a counseling guide for LSSAs, and we also designed a related discussion training program. These competencies were summarized in a brainstorming session at a research conference comprised of physicians, an occupational health nurse, LSSAs, an instructional design expert, and a management consultant, and then a training program (lasting 9 hours 30 minutes) was developed. Nineteen trainees who were introduced by members of the research conference collectively completed a seven-question written test, both before and after the training, in order to assess its effectiveness. Sixteen trainees who completed the training were surveyed, with a recovery rate of 100%. The necessary competencies that they identified were: information about circular notices from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare; behavior such as the gathering of information; and dealing with the reinstatement of employees. The scores were subjected to the Wilcoxon signed-rank test in order to evaluate the training, and the answers from the pre-training were compared with those from the post-training. A significant difference (P < 0.05) was seen for each question. These results show the effectiveness of the developed training program for the learning of the competencies necessary for LSSAs.

  12. [Development of a Tool for Training and Evaluation of the Competencies in Occupational Mental Health Necessary for Labor and Social Security Attorneys].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Hideki; Shibata, Yoshiyuki; Kayashima, Kotaro; Motoyama, Kyoko; Wakabayashi, Tadashi; Horasawa, Ken; Maruta, Wakako; Ogasawara, Takayuki; Nishikido, Noriko; Oyama, Yuji; Toyoda, Hiroyuki; Mori, Ayaka; Mori, Koji

    2016-06-01

    Labor and Social Security Attorneys (LSSAs) advise their clients about occupational mental health, but the competencies necessary in this field are not clear to them. We standardized the necessary competencies as a counseling guide for LSSAs, and we also designed a related discussion training program. These competencies were summarized in a brainstorming session at a research conference comprised of physicians, an occupational health nurse, LSSAs, an instructional design expert, and a management consultant, and then a training program (lasting 9 hours 30 minutes) was developed. Nineteen trainees who were introduced by members of the research conference collectively completed a seven-question written test, both before and after the training, in order to assess its effectiveness. Sixteen trainees who completed the training were surveyed, with a recovery rate of 100%. The necessary competencies that they identified were: information about circular notices from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare; behavior such as the gathering of information; and dealing with the reinstatement of employees. The scores were subjected to the Wilcoxon signed-rank test in order to evaluate the training, and the answers from the pre-training were compared with those from the post-training. A significant difference (P < 0.05) was seen for each question. These results show the effectiveness of the developed training program for the learning of the competencies necessary for LSSAs. PMID:27302730

  13. Mobile Gis: a Tool for Informal Settlement Occupancy Audit to Improve Integrated Human Settlement Implementation in Ekurhuleni, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokoena, B. T.; Musakwa, W.

    2016-06-01

    Upgrading and relocating people in informal settlements requires consistent commitment, good strategies and systems so as to improve the lives of those who live in them. In South Africa, in order to allocate subsidised housing to beneficiaries of an informal settlement, beneficiary administration needs to be completed to determine the number of people who qualify for a subsidised house. Conventional methods of occupancy audits are often unreliable, cumbersome and non-spatial. Accordingly, this study proposes the use of mobile GIS to conduct these audits to provide up-to-date, accurate, comprehensive and real-time data so as to facilitate the development of integrated human settlements. An occupancy audit was subsequently completed for one of the communities in the Ekurhuleni municipality, Gauteng province, using web-based mobile GIS as a solution to providing smart information through evidence based decision making. Fieldworkers accessed the off-line capturing module on a mobile device recording GPS coordinates, socio-economic information and photographs. The results of this audit indicated that only 56.86% of the households residing within the community could potentially benefit from receiving a subsidised house. Integrated residential development, which includes fully and partially subsidised housing, serviced stands and some fully bonded housing opportunities, would then be key to adequately providing access to suitable housing options within a project in a post-colonial South Africa, creating new post-1994 neighbourhoods, in line with policy. The use of mobile GIS therefore needs to be extended to other informal settlement upgrading projects in South Africa.

  14. Association of active and passive smoking with occupational injury in manual workers: a cross-sectional study of the 2011 Korean working conditions survey.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwan-Cheol; Lamichhane, Dirga Kumar; Jung, Dal-Young; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul; Choi, Eun-Hee; Oh, Sung-Soo; Kang, Hee-Tae; Rhee, Kyung-Yong; Chang, Sei-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the relationship of active and passive smoking with occupational injury among manual workers. Data from the 2011 Korean Working Conditions Survey were analyzed for 12,507 manual workers aged ≥15 yr. Overall, 60.4% of men and 5.8% of women were current smokers. The prevalence of injury was higher among never smokers who were exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS) (7.7% in men and 8.1% in women) than current smokers (4.2% in men and 4.1% in women). After controlling for potential confounders, in men, compared to those who never smoked and were not exposed to SHS, people who never smoked and were exposed to SHS (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=3.7, 2.2-6.4) and current smokers (aOR=2.5, 1.6-3.8) were more likely to experience injury. Among women, the aORs of occupational injury were 8.4 (4.2-16.7) for never smoking women with occasional exposure to SHS and 3.5 (95% CI: 1.4-8.7) for current smokers, in comparison to never smoking women who were never exposed to SHS at work (reference group). The present study suggests that exposure to SHS is a possible risk factor of occupational injury for never smoking men and women. PMID:26051290

  15. Association of active and passive smoking with occupational injury in manual workers: a cross-sectional study of the 2011 Korean working conditions survey

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Hwan-Cheol; LAMICHHANE, Dirga Kumar; JUNG, Dal-Young; KIM, Hyoung-Ryoul; CHOI, Eun-Hee; OH, Sung-Soo; KANG, Hee-Tae; RHEE, Kyung-Yong; CHANG, Sei-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the relationship of active and passive smoking with occupational injury among manual workers. Data from the 2011 Korean Working Conditions Survey were analyzed for 12,507 manual workers aged ≥15 yr. Overall, 60.4% of men and 5.8% of women were current smokers. The prevalence of injury was higher among never smokers who were exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS) (7.7% in men and 8.1% in women) than current smokers (4.2% in men and 4.1% in women). After controlling for potential confounders, in men, compared to those who never smoked and were not exposed to SHS, people who never smoked and were exposed to SHS (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=3.7, 2.2–6.4) and current smokers (aOR=2.5, 1.6–3.8) were more likely to experience injury. Among women, the aORs of occupational injury were 8.4 (4.2–16.7) for never smoking women with occasional exposure to SHS and 3.5 (95% CI: 1.4–8.7) for current smokers, in comparison to never smoking women who were never exposed to SHS at work (reference group). The present study suggests that exposure to SHS is a possible risk factor of occupational injury for never smoking men and women. PMID:26051290

  16. The Premise Condition Index: a tool for streamlining surveys of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Tun-Lin, W; Kay, B H; Barnes, A

    1995-12-01

    Premise inspections and treatment of the larval habitats of container-breeding Aedes aegypti are extremely labor intensive. Since this means of control is the only one available in relation to dengue fever, this report presents an effective approach for streamlining premise surveys in north Queensland, Australia. From a survey of 877 premises in Townsville, Charters Towers, and Mingela/Ravenswood in 1990, occupier and premise variables were collected to examine any relationships with the presence of Ae. aegypti. Statistical modeling of these parameters using multiple and simple Poisson regression indicated that for both adjusted and unadjusted models respectively, the degree of shade and tidiness of the yard had strong correlations with both the proportion of positive premises and the numbers of infested containers therein. Condition of the house was also a significant variable in the unadjusted model. On this basis, the Premise Condition Index is proposed as a rapid assessment tool that can increase efficiency of detecting positive premises and containers by 270-370%. Although habitat selection by Aedes varies throughout the world, this approach could be used as a model for control of vectors of both dengue and yellow fever.

  17. MACUHO (Mid-Atlantic Association of College and University Housing Officers) Research and Information Rate and Occupancy Survey III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedivy, Robert R.

    A third annual study, involving 107 higher education institutions (39 public, 68 private) was conducted to determine rate and occupancy trends in housing operations of the Middle Atlantic Region. Each responding institution was asked to state its basic nine-month double-room rate or to compute an average rate if they have more than one. It is…

  18. Integrated Analysis and Tools for Land Subsidence Surveying and Monitoring: a Semi-Quantitative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosconi, A.; Pozzoli, A.; Meroni, A.; Gagliano, S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an integrated approach for land subsidence monitoring using measures coming from different sensors. Eni S.p.A., the main Italian oil and gas company, constantly surveys the land with all the state of the art and innovative techniques, and a method able to integrate the results is an important and actual topic. Nowadays the world is a multi-sensor platform, and measure integration is strictly necessary. Combining the different data sources should be done in a clever way, taking advantages from the best performances of each technique. An integrated analysis allows the interpretation of simultaneous temporal series of data, coming from different sources, and try to separate subsidence contributions. With this purpose Exelis VIS in collaboration with Eni S.p.A. customize PISAV (Permanent Interferometric Scatterometer Analysis and Visualization), an ENVI extension able to capitalize on and combine all the different data collected in the surveys. In this article are presented some significant examples to show the potential of this tool in oil and gas activity: a hydrocarbon storage field where the comparison between SAR and production volumes emphasise a correlation between the two measures in few steps; and a hydrocarbon production field with the Satellite Survey Unit (S.S.U.), where SAR, CGPS, piezometers and assestimeters measure in the same area at the same time, giving the opportunity to analyse data contextually. In the integrated analysis performed with PISAV not always a mathematical rigorous study is possible, and a semi-quantitative approach is the only method for results interpretation. As a result, in the first test case strong correlation between injected hydrocarbon volume and vertical displacement were highlighted; in the second one the integrated analysis has different advantages in monitoring the land subsidence: permits a first qualitative "differentiation" of the natural and anthropic component of subsidence, and also gives more

  19. Distributing Sloan Digital Sky Survey Plates and Posters as Interactive Teaching Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Danielle; Meredith, Kate; Masters, Karen; MacDonald, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of aluminum spectroscopic plug plates from the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys await second lives as teaching tools in the Plates for Education program. Educators from formal and informal settings around the globe can take part in this program, which was launched in August of 2015. As part of this EPO effort, educators are provided with a plate, a corresponding poster, and educational materials (through the voyages.sdss.org website). Each plug plate represents the spectroscopic targets from a unique three-degree section of the sky. The poster displays the optical image associated with the target area. Together with the SkyServer Plate Browser and Navigate tools, students can locate individual objects, examine spectra, and pursue their own studies. As of September 2015, forty-five plates and posters had been distributed to teachers during professional development workshops. Follow-up research will be conducted to determine how effective the plates and posters are in teaching students about astronomy and the SDSS data. Materials and outlines for conducting professional development workshops are available to SDSS collaborators interested in hosting their own educational events.

  20. Education is associated with lower levels of abdominal obesity in women with a non-agricultural occupation: an interaction study using China’s four provinces survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of obesity is increasing rapidly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) as their populations become exposed to obesogenic environments. The transition from an agrarian to an industrial and service-based economy results in important lifestyle changes. Yet different socioeconomic groups may experience and respond to these changes differently. Investigating the socioeconomic distribution of obesity in LMICs is key to understanding the causes of obesity but the field is limited by the scarcity of data and a uni-dimensional approach to socioeconomic status (SES). This study splits socioeconomic status into two dimensions to investigate how educated women may have lower levels of obesity in a context where labour market opportunities have shifted away from agriculture to other forms of employment. Methods The Four Provinces Study in China 2008/09 is a household-based community survey of 4,314 people aged ≥60  years (2,465 women). It was used to investigate an interaction between education (none/any) and occupation (agricultural/non-agricultural) on high-risk central obesity defined as a waist circumference ≥80 cm. An interaction term between education and occupation was incorporated in a multivariate logistic regression model, and the estimates adjusted for age, parity, urban/rural residence and health behaviours (smoking, alcohol, meat and fruit & vegetable consumption). Complete case analyses were undertaken and results confirmed using multiple imputation to impute missing data. Results An interaction between occupation and education was present (P = 0.02). In the group with no education, the odds of central obesity in the sedentary occupation group were more than double those of the agricultural occupation group even after taking age group and parity into account (OR; 95%CI: 2.21; 1.52, 3.21), while in the group with any education there was no evidence of such a relationship (OR; 95%CI: 1.25; 0.92, 1.70). Health behaviours

  1. Perceived usefulness of data entry tools in medical encounters: a survey.

    PubMed

    Celikkan, Ufuk; Sahin, Yasar Guneri; Senuzun, Fisun

    2013-12-01

    Electronic Health Records allows direct data entry and is an important factor for accurate diagnosis. However, two drawbacks of this system is the time needed to create them, which can reduce health care professional productivity, and the fact that it is error prone. It is important, therefore, to select the most appropriate methods and tools for data entry by the health care providers at the point of care in order to minimize a loss of productivity. The study aims to understand health care professionals' perceptions of the data entry process, and determine the appropriate methods, tools and functions that would facilitate the process, minimize loss of productivity and improve quality. A questionnaire which consisting of 18 basic questions (including demographic data) was posted on a web site which hosts questionnaires, on an established online community space and also mailed to health care professionals who are working in various hospitals for a duration of 10 months. Totally, 533 medical care professionals who are primarily from Turkey participated in the survey, of which 284 were medical doctors, 127 were nurses and the rest, other medical professionals. While the clear majority of participants involved in data entry use keyboard and mouse, most expressed a preference for more convenient methods, such as voice recognition or touch screen. Furthermore, physicians reported rarely spending more than 15 min for each consultation and conducting 21-30 examinations a day. The main motivation for creating an efficient direct data entry is to increase time allowed for patient examination, and to improve accuracy of diagnosis. Despite a heavy workload, health care professionals are very receptive to the idea of using a convenient data entry tool and keeping electronic patient records. Emergent data entry technologies in health sector can improve the quality of examinations, physicians' productivity and can decrease the percentage of medical misdiagnosis.

  2. A survey of cancer and occupation in young and middle aged men. I. Cancers of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Coggon, D; Pannett, B; Osmond, C; Acheson, E D

    1986-01-01

    In a search for clues to previously industrial carcinogens the occupational and smoking histories of young and middle aged men with different types of cancer were compared. The study population comprised men aged 18-54 and resident in the counties of Cleveland, Humberside, and Cheshire (including the Wirral). From hospital and cancer registration records 2942 members of the study population in whom cancers were diagnosed during the period 1975-80 were identified retrospectively. The occupational and smoking histories of these patients were sought by a postal questionnaire addressed either to the patients themselves or, if they had died, to their next of kin. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 52.1%. Additionally, limited occupational information was obtained for 89% of cases from their hospital notes. Analysis of these data suggests that no serious bias arose as a consequence of the incomplete response to the questionnaire. This paper concentrates on the results for cancers of the respiratory tract and mesothelioma. Mesothelioma was found to cluster in laggers, electricians, and shipyard workers, and nasal carcinoma in woodworkers. Carcinomas of the larynx and of the bronchus were examined by formal statistical techniques, each being compared with a control group made up of all other cancers combined. Several interesting occupational and industrial associations were shown, in particular, an excess of bronchial carcinoma in the leather industry (RR = 2.6, CI 1.2-6.0), in building labourers (RR = 1.7, CI 1.0-2.9) and other construction workers (RR = 1.8, CI 1.0-3.0), in bakers and pastry cooks (RR = 3.6, CI 1.3-10.4). and in cooks (RR = 2.5, CI 1.2-5.1). In addition, a small cluster of lung tumours was observed in men who had worked as dental mechanics. PMID:3707871

  3. A survey of cancer and occupation in young and middle aged men. I. Cancers of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Coggon, D; Pannett, B; Osmond, C; Acheson, E D

    1986-05-01

    In a search for clues to previously industrial carcinogens the occupational and smoking histories of young and middle aged men with different types of cancer were compared. The study population comprised men aged 18-54 and resident in the counties of Cleveland, Humberside, and Cheshire (including the Wirral). From hospital and cancer registration records 2942 members of the study population in whom cancers were diagnosed during the period 1975-80 were identified retrospectively. The occupational and smoking histories of these patients were sought by a postal questionnaire addressed either to the patients themselves or, if they had died, to their next of kin. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 52.1%. Additionally, limited occupational information was obtained for 89% of cases from their hospital notes. Analysis of these data suggests that no serious bias arose as a consequence of the incomplete response to the questionnaire. This paper concentrates on the results for cancers of the respiratory tract and mesothelioma. Mesothelioma was found to cluster in laggers, electricians, and shipyard workers, and nasal carcinoma in woodworkers. Carcinomas of the larynx and of the bronchus were examined by formal statistical techniques, each being compared with a control group made up of all other cancers combined. Several interesting occupational and industrial associations were shown, in particular, an excess of bronchial carcinoma in the leather industry (RR = 2.6, CI 1.2-6.0), in building labourers (RR = 1.7, CI 1.0-2.9) and other construction workers (RR = 1.8, CI 1.0-3.0), in bakers and pastry cooks (RR = 3.6, CI 1.3-10.4). and in cooks (RR = 2.5, CI 1.2-5.1). In addition, a small cluster of lung tumours was observed in men who had worked as dental mechanics.

  4. Prevalence of Injury in Occupation and Industry: Role of Obesity in the National Health Interview Survey 2004 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ja K.; Charles, Luenda E.; Fekedulegn, Desta; Ma, Claudia C.; Andrew, Michael E.; Burchfiel, Cecil M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to estimate prevalence of injury by occupation and industry and obesity’s role. Methods Self-reported injuries were collected annually for US workers during 2004 to 2013. Prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained from fitted logistic regression models. Results Overall weighted injury prevalence during the previous three months was 77 per 10,000 workers. Age-adjusted injury prevalence was greatest for Construction and Extraction workers (169.7/10,000) followed by Production (160.6) among occupations, while workers in the Construction industry sector (147.9) had the highest injury prevalence followed by the Agriculture/Forestry/Fishing/Mining/Utilities sector (122.1). Overweight and obese workers were 26% to 45% more likely to experience injuries than normal-weight workers. Conclusion The prevalence of injury, highest for Construction workers, gradually increased as body mass index levels increased in most occupational and industry groups. PMID:27058472

  5. Anuran site occupancy and species richness as tools for evaluating restoration of a hydrologically-modified landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walls, Susan; Waddle, J. Hardin; Barichivich, William J.; Bartoszek, Ian A.; Brown, Mary E.; Hefner, Jeromi M.; Schuman, Melinda J.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental goal of wetland restoration is to reinstate pre-disturbance hydrological conditions to degraded landscapes, facilitating recolonization by native species and the production of resilient, functional ecosystems. To evaluate restoration success, baseline conditions need to be determined and a reference target needs to be established that will serve as an ecological blueprint in the restoration process. During the summer wet seasons of 2010 and 2011, we used automated recording units to monitor a community of calling anuran amphibians in the Picayune Strand State Forest of Southwest Florida, USA. This area is undergoing hydrological restoration as part of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. We compared occurrence of anurans at sites in the restoration area, to nearby locations in relatively undisturbed habitat (reference sites). We assessed the utility of the latter as restoration targets, using a hierarchical model of community species occupancy to estimate the probability of occurrence of anurans in restoration and reference locations. We detected 14 species, 13 of which were significantly more likely to occur in reference areas. All 14 species were estimated by our model to occur at these sites but, across both years, only 8–13 species were estimated to occur at restoration sites. The composition and structure of these habitats within and adjacent to the Picayune Strand State Forest indicate that they are suitable targets for habitat restoration, as measured by amphibian occurrence and species richness. These areas are important sources for recolonization of anuran amphibians as the hydrologically degraded Picayune Strand undergoes restoration to mitigate the effects of overdrainage and habitat loss.

  6. Spatial occupancy models for large data sets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Devin S.; Conn, Paul B.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Ray, Justina C.; Pond, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Since its development, occupancy modeling has become a popular and useful tool for ecologists wishing to learn about the dynamics of species occurrence over time and space. Such models require presence–absence data to be collected at spatially indexed survey units. However, only recently have researchers recognized the need to correct for spatially induced overdisperison by explicitly accounting for spatial autocorrelation in occupancy probability. Previous efforts to incorporate such autocorrelation have largely focused on logit-normal formulations for occupancy, with spatial autocorrelation induced by a random effect within a hierarchical modeling framework. Although useful, computational time generally limits such an approach to relatively small data sets, and there are often problems with algorithm instability, yielding unsatisfactory results. Further, recent research has revealed a hidden form of multicollinearity in such applications, which may lead to parameter bias if not explicitly addressed. Combining several techniques, we present a unifying hierarchical spatial occupancy model specification that is particularly effective over large spatial extents. This approach employs a probit mixture framework for occupancy and can easily accommodate a reduced-dimensional spatial process to resolve issues with multicollinearity and spatial confounding while improving algorithm convergence. Using open-source software, we demonstrate this new model specification using a case study involving occupancy of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) over a set of 1080 survey units spanning a large contiguous region (108 000 km2) in northern Ontario, Canada. Overall, the combination of a more efficient specification and open-source software allows for a facile and stable implementation of spatial occupancy models for large data sets.

  7. A survey of ground operations tools developed to simulate the pointing of space telescopes and the design for WISE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabinsky, Beth

    2006-01-01

    WISE, the Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer, is scheduled for launch in June 2010. The mission operations system for WISE requires a software modeling tool to help plan, integrate and simulate all spacecraft pointing and verify that no attitude constraints are violated. In the course of developing the requirements for this tool, an investigation was conducted into the design of similar tools for other space-based telescopes. This paper summarizes the ground software and processes used to plan and validate pointing for a selection of space telescopes; with this information as background, the design for WISE is presented.

  8. Instructional Support System--Occupational Education. Building Industries Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Theodore; And Others

    The modules which make up the bulk of this report are the result of a two-week workshop at which thirteen building industries occupations teachers worked toward the development of a student outcome oriented curriculum. These modules are divided into the following occupational units: (1) carpentry (containing hand tools; portable power tools;…

  9. Measuring Educators' Perceptions of Their Skills Relative to Response to Intervention: A Psychometric Study of a Survey Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Jose M.; March, Amanda L.; Stockslager, Kevin M.; Hines, Constance V.

    2016-01-01

    The "Perceptions of RtI Skills Survey" is a self-report measure that assesses educators' perceptions of their data-based problem-solving skills--a critical element of many Response-to-Intervention (RtI) models. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to evaluate the underlying factor structure of this tool. Educators from 68 (n =…

  10. Tinnitus and Hearing Survey: A Screening Tool to Differentiate Bothersome Tinnitus From Hearing Difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Griest, Susan; Zaugg, Tara L.; Thielman, Emily; Kaelin, Christine; Galvez, Gino; Carlson, Kathleen F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Individuals complaining of tinnitus often attribute hearing problems to the tinnitus. In such cases some (or all) of their reported “tinnitus distress” may in fact be caused by trouble communicating due to hearing problems. We developed the Tinnitus and Hearing Survey (THS) as a tool to rapidly differentiate hearing problems from tinnitus problems. Method For 2 of our research studies, we administered the THS twice (mean of 16.5 days between tests) to 67 participants who did not receive intervention. These data allow for measures of statistical validation of the THS. Results Reliability of the THS was good to excellent regarding internal consistency (α = .86–.94), test–retest reliability (r = .76–.83), and convergent validity between the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (Newman, Jacobson, & Spitzer, 1996; Newman, Sandridge, & Jacobson, 1998) and the A (Tinnitus) subscale of the THS (r = .78). Factor analysis confirmed that the 2 subscales, A (Tinnitus) and B (Hearing), have strong internal structure, explaining 71.7% of the total variance, and low correlation with each other (r = .46), resulting in a small amount of shared variance (21%). Conclusion These results provide evidence that the THS is statistically validated and reliable for use in assisting patients and clinicians in quickly (and collaboratively) determining whether intervention for tinnitus is appropriate. PMID:25551458

  11. Consumer satisfaction with occupational health services: should it be measured?

    PubMed Central

    Verbeek, J; van Dijk, F; Rasanen, K; Piirainen, H; Kankaanpaa, E; Hulshof, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To find answers in the literature to the questions if, why, and how consumer satisfaction with occupational health services (OHSs) should be measured.
METHODS—Publications about the concept of consumer satisfaction with health care and surveys of consumer satisfaction with occupational health care were reviewed.
RESULTS—For care providers, surveys of consumer satisfaction can be useful to improve quality or as indicators of non-compliant behaviour among patients. For clients, satisfaction surveys can be helpful for choosing between healthcare providers. Satisfaction is made up of an affective component of evaluation and a cognitive component of expectations. Also, in occupational health care, patient satisfaction is measured by dimensions such as the humanness and competence of the care provider similar to health care in general. However, there are dimensions that are specific to occupational health—such as the perceived independence of the physician, unclear reasons for visiting an OHS, and the perceived extent of knowledge of OHS professionals about the patient's working conditions. Dimensions of client satisfaction are mostly similar to patient satisfaction but include more businesslike aspects. They are different for the two groups of client, employers and employees. To measure consumer satisfaction in occupational healthcare specific questionnaires must be constructed. To achieve the highest possible reader satisfaction guidelines are provided for construction of a questionnaire.
CONCLUSIONS—Consumer satisfaction is a complex theoretical concept, but it is relatively easy to measure in practice and can be a valuable tool for quality improvement. Consumers' evaluations of occupational health services will become increasingly important due to changes in the organisation of occupational health care. Occupational healthcare providers are encouraged to measure the consumer satisfaction of their services.


Keywords: consumer

  12. Post exposure prophylaxis following occupational exposure to HIV: a survey of health care workers in Mbeya, Tanzania, 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Mponela, Marcelina John; Oleribe, Obinna Ositadimma; Abade, Ahmed; Kwesigabo, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately, 1,000 HIV infections are transmitted annually to health care workers (HCWs) worldwide from occupational exposures. Tanzania HCWs experience one to nine needle stick injuries (NSIs) per year, yet the use of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is largely undocumented. We assessed factors influencing use of PEP among HCWs following occupational exposure to HIV. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Mbeya Referral Hospital, Mbozi and Mbarali District Hospitals from December 2009 to January 2010 with a sample size of 360 HCWs. Participants were randomly selected from a list of eligible HCWs in Mbeya hospital and all eligible HCWs were enrolled in the two District Hospitals. Information regarding risk of exposure to body fluids and NSIs were collected using a questionnaire. Logistic regression was done to identify predictors for PEP use using Epi Info 3.5.1 at 95% confidence interval. Results Of 291 HCWs who participated in the study, 35.1% (102/291) were exposed to NSIs and body fluids, with NSIs accounting for 62.9% (64/102). Exposure was highest among medical attendants 38.8% (33/85). Out of exposed HCWs, (22.5% (23/102) used HIV PEP with females more likely to use PEP than males. Reporting of exposures (OR=21.1, CI: 3.85-115.62) and having PEP knowledge (OR =6.5, CI: 1.78-23.99) were significantly associated with using PEP. Conclusion Despite the observed rate of occupational exposure to HCWs in Tanzania, use of PEP is still low. Effective prevention from HIV infection at work places is required through proper training of HCWs on PEP with emphasis on timely reporting of exposures. PMID:26405468

  13. [Survey of carbon fiber reinforced plastic orthoses and occupational and medical problems based on a questionnaire administered to companies involved in the manufacture of prosthetics and orthotics].

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Yuko; Furuta, Nami; Makino, Kenichiro; Wada, Futoshi; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    We surveyed carbon fiber reinforced plastic orthoses (carbon orthoses) and their associated occupational and medical problems based on a questionnaire sent to 310 companies which were members of the Japan Orthotics and Prosthetics Association. Of all the companies, 232 responded: 77 of the 232 companies dealt with ready-made carbon orthoses, 52 dealt with fabricated custom-made orthoses, and 155 did not dealt with carbon orthoses. Although the total number of custom-made carbon ortheses in Japan was 829/ 5 years, there was a difference by region, and one company fabricated only 12 (per 5 years) custom-made carbon orthoses on average. The advantages of the carbon orthosis were the fact that it was "light weight", "well-fitted", had a "good appearance", and "excellent durability", while the disadvantages were that it was "expensive", "high cost of production", of "black color", and required a "longer time for completion", and "higher fabrication techniques". From the standpoint of industrial medicine, "scattering of fine fragments of carbon fibers", "itching on the skin" and "health hazards" were indicated in companies that manufacture the orthosis. In order to make the carbon orthosis more popular, it is necessary to develop a new carbon material that is easier to fabricate at a lower cost, to improve the fabrication technique, and to resolve the occupational and medical problems.

  14. An elementary framework for judging the cardiovascular toxicity of carbon soot: experiences from an occupational health survey of diamond industry workers.

    PubMed

    Beniwal, Rajesh; Shivgotra, Vijay Kumar

    2009-12-01

    Carbon soot is produced in the process of diamond manufacture. Recent experimental and epidemiological studies have associated exposure to carbon nanoparticles with effects on cardiovascular system and blood cells. The objective of this study is to assess the cardiovascular effects consequent to chronic respiratory exposure of carbon soot. A cross-sectional occupational health survey was conducted in all consenting workers who employed in the production wing of diamond-processing industries. Blood pressure, ECGs, height, weight, and blood counts were measured and evaluated. Blood pressure measurements revealed a high prevalence of hypertension in young workers. Left atrial abnormality (LAA) was the major finding in the electrocardiograms. We found a high prevalence of hypertension in young diamond workers. The LASER saw operators had highest prevalence of LAA. White cell count and prevalence of hypertension was highest for the workers in grinder operations.

  15. The Liege Acromegaly Survey (LAS): a new software tool for the study of acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Petrossians, Patrick; Tichomirowa, Maria A; Stevenaert, Achile; Martin, Didier; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2012-06-01

    Acromegaly is a chronic rare disease associated with negative pathological effects on multiple systems and organs. We designed a new informatics tool to study data from patients with acromegaly, the Liege Acromegaly Survey (LAS). This relational database permits the inclusion of anonymous historical and prospective data on patients and includes pathophysiology, clinical features, responses to therapy and long term outcomes of acromegaly. We deployed the LAS in a validation study at a single center in order to study the characteristics of patients with acromegaly diagnosed at our center from 1970-2011. A total of 290 patients with acromegaly were included (147 males and 143 females). There was a linear relationship between age at diagnosis and the date of diagnosis, indicating that older patients are being diagnosed with acromegaly more frequently. A majority presented with macroadenomas (77.5%) and the median diameter was 14 mm. Patients with macroadenomas were significantly younger than patients with microadenomas (P=0.01). GH values at diagnosis decreased with the age of the patients (P=0.01) and there was a correlation between GH values and tumor size at diagnosis (P=0.02). No correlation existed between insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels and tumor characteristics. The prevalence of diabetes was 21.4% in this population and 41.0% had hypertension. The presence of hypertension and diabetes were significantly associated with one another (P<0.001). There was a linear relation between initial GH and IGF-1 levels at diagnosis and those obtained during SSA analog treatment and the lowest GH and IGF-1 values following SSA therapy were obtained in older patients (GH: P<0.001; IGF-1: P<0.001). The LAS is a new relational database that is feasible to use in the clinical research setting and permits ready pooling of anonymous patient data from multiple study sites to undertake robust statistical analyses of clinical and therapeutic characteristics.

  16. How do nurses manage their occupational exposure to cytotoxic drugs? A descriptive survey in chemotherapy settings, Shiraz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Momeni, M; Danaei, M; Askarian, M

    2013-04-01

    Occupational exposure to cytotoxic drugs is a global concern. We conducted this cross-sectional study in 2012 to describe the adverse effects experienced by nurses working in one of chemotherapy facilities affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, southern Iran, and their proper use of personal protective equipment and educational programs. The frequency of side effects reported by participants was noticeably high. Approximately, 60% of the nurses used all personal protective equipment. There were air conditioner ventilation systems in all facilities, but they were not standard. Clinics did not have any dedicated room. Lack of adequate training was noticeable among all participants. We concluded that establishment of safety regulations, health care workers safety surveillance systems as well as continuous training for nurses are of paramount importance. PMID:23567536

  17. Evaluating the integration of cultural competence skills into health and physical assessment tools: a survey of Canadian schools of nursing.

    PubMed

    Chircop, Andrea; Edgecombe, Nancy; Hayward, Kathryn; Ducey-Gilbert, Cherie; Sheppard-Lemoine, Debbie

    2013-04-01

    Currently used audiovisual (AV) teaching tools to teach health and physical assessment reflect a Eurocentric bias using the biomedical model. The purpose of our study was to (a) identify commonly used AV teaching tools of Canadian schools of nursing and (b) evaluate the identified tools. A two-part descriptive quantitative method design was used. First, we surveyed schools of nursing across Canada. Second, the identified AV teaching tools were evaluated for content and modeling of cultural competence. The majority of the schools (67%) used publisher-produced videos associated with a physical assessment textbook. Major findings included minimal demonstration of negotiation with a client around cultural aspects of the interview including the need for an interpreter, modesty, and inclusion of support persons. Identification of culturally specific examples given during the videos was superficial and did not provide students with a comprehensive understanding of necessary culturally competent skills.

  18. Community Health Environment Scan Survey (CHESS): a novel tool that captures the impact of the built environment on lifestyle factors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Fiona; Stevens, Denise; O'Connor-Duffany, Kathleen; Siegel, Karen; Gao, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Background Novel efforts and accompanying tools are needed to tackle the global burden of chronic disease. This paper presents an approach to describe the environments in which people live, work, and play. Community Health Environment Scan Survey (CHESS) is an empirical assessment tool that measures the availability and accessibility, of healthy lifestyle options lifestyle options. CHESS reveals existing community assets as well as opportunities for change, shaping community intervention planning efforts by focusing on community-relevant opportunities to address the three key risk factors for chronic disease (i.e. unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, and tobacco use). Methods The CHESS tool was developed following a review of existing auditing tools and in consultation with experts. It is based on the social-ecological model and is adaptable to diverse settings in developed and developing countries throughout the world. Results For illustrative purposes, baseline results from the Community Interventions for Health (CIH) Mexico site are used, where the CHESS tool assessed 583 food stores and 168 restaurants. Comparisons between individual-level survey data from schools and community-level CHESS data are made to demonstrate the utility of the tool in strategically guiding intervention activities. Conclusion The environments where people live, work, and play are key factors in determining their diet, levels of physical activity, and tobacco use. CHESS is the first tool of its kind that systematically and simultaneously examines how built environments encourage/discourage healthy eating, physical activity, and tobacco use. CHESS can help to design community interventions to prevent chronic disease and guide healthy urban planning. PMID:21394246

  19. Preferred tools and techniques for implantation of cardiac electronic devices in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Proclemer, Alessandro; Dobreanu, Dan; Marinskis, Germanas; Pison, Laurent; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in relation to the tools and techniques used for cardiac implantable electronic devices procedures in the European countries. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 62 members of the EHRA research network. The survey involved high-, medium-, and low-volume implanting centres, performing, respectively, more than 200, 100-199 and under 100 implants per year. The following topics were explored: the side approach for implantation, surgical techniques for pocket incision, first venous access for lead implantation, preference of lead fixation, preferred coil number for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads, right ventricular pacing site, generator placement site, subcutaneous ICD implantation, specific tools and techniques for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), lead implantation sequence in CRT, coronary sinus cannulation technique, target site for left ventricular lead placement, strategy in left ventricular lead implant failure, mean CRT implantation time, optimization of the atrioventricular (AV) and ventriculo-ventricular intervals, CRT implants in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation, AV node ablation in patients with permanent AF. This panoramic view allows us to find out the operator preferences regarding the techniques and tools for device implantation in Europe. The results showed different practices in all the fields we investigated, nevertheless the survey also outlines a good adherence to the common standards and recommendations.

  20. The Laboratory Course Assessment Survey: A Tool to Measure Three Dimensions of Research-Course Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Lisa A.; Runyon, Christopher; Robinson, Aspen; Dolan, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are increasingly being offered as scalable ways to involve undergraduates in research. Yet few if any design features that make CUREs effective have been identified. We developed a 17-item survey instrument, the Laboratory Course Assessment Survey (LCAS), that measures students' perceptions…

  1. Consumer Opinion Surveys and Sales Leakage Data: Effective Community Development Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Dennis U.; Woods, Mike D.

    1987-01-01

    The authors discuss a consumer opinion survey that analyzes local service and retail business activity. The survey identifies where consumers shop and why. Findings provide community development practitioners with information to develop educational programs involving local business management. (Author/CH)

  2. Finding the State Story in the National Lake Survey Data with an Excel Exploratory Tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Lakes Assessment (NLA) surveyed over 1200 U.S. lakes in the summer of 2007, evaluating lake quality based on water quality, physical habitat, and indicators of biological and recreational condition. An upcoming national report will summarize survey results primarily ...

  3. Generic Skills. Trade Families. Based on Data on the Use of 588 Tool Skills from 1600 Workers and Supervisors in 131 Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Arthur De W.

    The Generic Skills studies were designed to provide training specifications that will enable graduates of trades training programs to compete for job placement in a range of occupations rather than in a single occupation. The studies identified a number of trade families, classified on the basis of skills used in work performance, and also…

  4. Observations of the Earth's magnetic field from the shuttle: Using the Spartan carrier as a magnetic survey tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, W. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The shuttle-deployed and recovered Spartan shows promise as an inexpensive and simple support module for potential field measurements. The results of a preliminary engineering study on the applications of the Spartan carrier to magnetic measurements shows: (1) Extension of the mission duration to as long as 7 days is feasible but requires more reconfiguration of the internal systems; (2) On-board recording of Global Positioning System signals will provide position determination with an accuracy consistent with the most severe requirements; and (3) Making Spartan a magnetically clean spacecraft is straight forward but requires labor-intensive modifications to both the data and power systems. As a magnetic survey tool, Spartan would allow surveys at regularly spaced intervals and could make quick-reaction surveys at times of instability in the secular variation.

  5. Occupational Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    When choosing a career, jobseekers often want to know which occupations offer the best prospects. Generally, occupations that have rapid job growth, many new jobs, or many job openings--and good wages--promise better opportunities. This article shows how employment in particular occupations is projected to change over the 2008-2018 decade. The…

  6. Occupational Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    When choosing a career, jobseekers often want to know which occupations offer the best prospects. Generally, occupations that have rapid job growth, many new jobs, or many job openings--and good wages--promise better opportunities. This paper shows how employment in particular occupations is projected to change from 2010 to 2020. It presents…

  7. Meso-Scale Metrology Tools: A Survey of Relevant Tools and a Discussion of Their Strengths and Weaknesses

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbard, R; Bono, M

    2002-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, LLNL, manufactures laser experiment targets made of cylindrical and spherical components and assemblies that are generally 2 mm in size or smaller, which are machined with micron level accuracy. The targets illustrated in Figure 1 exhibit many features that are common to typical inertial confinement fusion, ICF, and high energy density laser targets. The left side of Figure 1 illustrates a cylindrical target composed of multiple materials of various shapes, including a disk that has a multi-mode sinusoid with a 4 {micro}m amplitude cut into it. The spherical target on the right consists of an inner capsule surrounded by four concentric hemispheres made of foams and polystyrene that are bonded together at a butt joint. Targets such as these are currently being manufactured for laser experiments conducted on the Omega Laser at the University of Rochester, and they are beginning to be fabricated for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The targets need to be fully characterized with an uncertainty of {+-} 1 {micro}m, but in approximately five years, the required accuracy is expected to become {+-} 0.25 {micro}m. It is difficult to find metrology tools than can adequately measure these laser targets. The requirements for a laser experiment revolve around matching experimental laser shot results with results from predictive physics codes. The ability to provide a complete set of accurate dimensional metrology on a target is the input to the physics model. Therefore any inaccuracy or lack of data, affects the accuracy of the predictive model. In fact, it is more critical to have accurate metrology data rather than accurate manufacturing in this case. Diagnostics of the experimental results and the ability to resolve the physical behavior of the effect being modeled is the other element of the experiment cycle that is critical. Any of these errors reduces the ability to match the experimental and theoretical findings. One of the

  8. Results of the radiological survey at the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site, Fairfield, Ohio (FOH001)

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.; Mathis, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey of the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company facility, Fairfield, Ohio. The survey was performed in July and September 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine if the facility had become contaminated with residuals containing radioactive materials during the work performed under government contract from February to September, 1956. The survey included gamma scanning over a circumscribed area around and outside of the building, and gamma scanning over most accessible indoor floor surfaces as well as the collection of soil and other samples for radionuclide analyses. Roof trusses were beta-gamma scanned in locations where floor contamination was found. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in indoor and outdoor samples, and radiation measurements over floor and overhead surfaces, in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines. Elevated uranium concentrations outdoors were limited to several small, isolated spots. Radiation measurements exceeded guidelines indoors over numerous spots and areas inside the building, mainly in the areas that had been used in the early government work.

  9. The Scope of Industrial Training in Selected Skilled and Technical Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Harry V.

    A mail questionnaire survey was made of employment, formal training, and the use of apprenticeships within the metalworking industry for the "growth occupations" of maintenance electrician, tool and die maker, electronic technician, maintenance mechanic, millwright, and welder. Over 2,400 metal working plants in the United States with 500 or more…

  10. Design tool survey. IEA Solar Heating and Cooling - Task 8. Passive and hybrid solar low-energy buildings, Subtask C: design methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rittelmann, P.R.; Ahmed, S.F.

    1985-05-01

    This document presents the results of a survey of design tools conducted as part of Subtask C (Design Methods) of Task VIII of the IAE Solar Heating and Cooling Program. At the start of the task, the participants agreed that it would be useful to identify and characterize the various design tools which existed for predicting the energy performance of passive and hybrid solar low energy buildings. A standard survey form was adopted, and Subtask C representatives from the member countries collected and submitted information on the design tools in use in each country. These responses were compiled into the present survey document.

  11. The National Single Assessment Tool (SAT) a pilot study in older persons care-survey results.

    PubMed

    McDermott-Scales, L; Beaton, D; McMahon, F; Vereker, N; McCormack, B; Coen, R F; O'Keefe, S T

    2013-01-01

    Following a consultation and review process, the interRAI suite of assessment tools was chosen as the most suitable instrument for assessment of the care needs of older people in Ireland. We used previously validated questionnaires to examine the usability, practicality and acceptability of these tools to professionals, carers and clients in rural and urban acute, long-term care and community settings. Of the 45 professionals, 42-44 (93-98%) agreed or strongly agreed with 14 of 15 positive statements regarding the acceptability, clinical value and ease of use of the interRAl tools; 39 (87%) felt the terminology was consistent and familiar, although 35 (78%) felt some areas would require further explanation. Responses from carers (n = 15) and clients (n = 68) were similarly overwhelmingly positive regarding the experience of being assessed using these tools. These results support the clinical utility and practicality of using this approach to assess older people in Irish clinical practice. PMID:24218751

  12. Finnish occupational health nurses' view of work-related stress: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen-Amoroso, Maritta; Liira, Juha

    2014-03-01

    Occupational stress at work has been increasingly recognized as a major risk factor for chronic disease and poor quality of work life among employees. The purpose of this study was to examine how occupational health nurses in Finland manage work-related stress. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used with a sample of 354 Finnish occupational nurses who responded to the survey. No specific standardized tools to assess or handle work-related stress in occupational health services or their client companies were identified. Open-ended interviews together with burnout questionnaires were the most frequently used methods to assess the stress of employees. Interventions were directed at individual employees. A need for standardized stress assessment instruments and stress management by work organizations was found. Methods to cope with work-related stress should be developed by the occupational health team and companies' health resources departments to ensure the adoption of common protocols.

  13. Radiological Survey Tool Set for ArcGIS 8.3 and ArcPad 6.0

    SciTech Connect

    ROGER, COTTRELL

    2004-11-30

    The Radiological Control Operations (RCO) group at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is tasked with conducting routine surveys for the detection of radiological contaminants in the environment. The Radiological Survey Tool Set (RSTS) was developed by the Environmental & Geographic Information Systems (EGIS) group of SRS to assist RCO personnel in this survey process. The tool set consists of two major components. The first component is a custom extension for ArcGIS 8.3 that allows the user to interactively create a sampling plan prior to entering the field. Additionally, the extension allows the user to upload field-collected data to the GIS with post-processing functionality. The second component is a custom ArcPad 6.0 applet. This applet provides the user with navigational capabilities to a selected origin point with the help of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) technology, and the recording of the sample data results into a hand-held field computer via ArcPad 6.0 software.

  14. Measuring Science Instructional Practice: A Survey Tool for the Age of NGSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Kathryn N.; Lee, Christine S.; DiStefano, Rachelle; O'Connor, Dawn; Seitz, Jeffery C.

    2016-03-01

    Ambitious efforts are taking place to implement a new vision for science education in the United States, in both Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)-adopted states and those states creating their own, often related, standards. In-service and pre-service teacher educators are involved in supporting teacher shifts in practice toward the new standards. With these efforts, it will be important to document shifts in science instruction toward the goals of NGSS and broader science education reform. Survey instruments are often used to capture instructional practices; however, existing surveys primarily measure inquiry based on previous definitions and standards and with a few exceptions, disregard key instructional practices considered outside the scope of inquiry. A comprehensive survey and a clearly defined set of items do not exist. Moreover, items specific to the NGSS Science and Engineering practices have not yet been tested. To address this need, we developed and validated a Science Instructional Practices survey instrument that is appropriate for NGSS and other related science standards. Survey construction was based on a literature review establishing key areas of science instruction, followed by a systematic process for identifying and creating items. Instrument validity and reliability were then tested through a procedure that included cognitive interviews, expert review, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (using independent samples), and analysis of criterion validity. Based on these analyses, final subscales include: Instigating an Investigation, Data Collection and Analysis, Critique, Explanation and Argumentation, Modeling, Traditional Instruction, Prior Knowledge, Science Communication, and Discourse.

  15. Occupational Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Ramugondo, Elelwani L.

    2015-01-01

    Occupational consciousness refers to ongoing awareness of the dynamics of hegemony and recognition that dominant practices are sustained through what people do every day, with implications for personal and collective health. The emergence of the construct in post-apartheid South Africa signifies the country’s ongoing struggle with negotiating long-standing dynamics of power that were laid down during colonialism, and maintained under black majority rule. Consciousness, a key component of the new terminology, is framed from post-colonial perspectives – notably work by Biko and Fanon – and grounded in the philosophy of liberation, in order to draw attention to continuing unequal intersubjective relations that play out through human occupation. The paper also draws important links between occupational consciousness and other related constructs, namely occupational possibilities, occupational choice, occupational apartheid, and collective occupation. The use of the term ‘consciousness’ in sociology, with related or different meanings, is also explored. Occupational consciousness is then advanced as a critical notion that frames everyday doing as a potentially liberating response to oppressive social structures. This paper advances theorizing as a scholarly practice in occupational science, and could potentially expand inter or transdisciplinary work for critical conceptualizations of human occupation. PMID:26549984

  16. Validity of a self-report survey tool measuring the nutrition and physical activity environment of primary schools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Valid tools measuring characteristics of the school environment associated with the physical activity and dietary behaviours of children are needed to accurately evaluate the impact of initiatives to improve school environments. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of Principal self-report of primary school healthy eating and physical activity environments. Methods Primary school Principals (n = 42) in New South Wales, Australia were invited to complete a telephone survey of the school environment; the School Environment Assessment Tool – SEAT. Equivalent observational data were collected by pre-service teachers located within the school. The SEAT, involved 65 items that assessed food availability via canteens, vending machines and fundraisers and the presence of physical activity facilities, equipment and organised physical activities. Kappa statistics were used to assess agreement between the two measures. Results Almost 70% of the survey demonstrated moderate to almost perfect agreement. Substantial agreement was found for 10 of 13 items assessing foods sold for fundraising, 3 of 6 items assessing physical activity facilities of the school, and both items assessing organised physical activities that occurred at recess and lunch and school sport. Limited agreement was found for items assessing foods sold through canteens and access to small screen recreation. Conclusions The SEAT provides researchers and policy makers with a valid tool for assessing aspects of the school food and physical activity environment. PMID:23758936

  17. Occupational Burnout among Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haack, Mary; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Outlines stages of occupational burnout (enthusiasm, stagnation, frustration, apathy) and begins empirical assessment of burnout syndrome among librarians and other information professionals. Results of pilot survey conducted at one-day conference on reference service using two measures (Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals, projective…

  18. The science of trail surveys: Recreation ecology provides new tools for managing wilderness trails

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, Jeffrey L.; Wimpey, Jeremy F.; Park, Logan O.

    2011-01-01

    Recreation ecology examines the effects of recreation on protected area ecosystems. One core focus of recreation ecology research is trail science, including the development of efficient protocols to assess and monitor the type and severity of resource impacts, analyses to improve knowledge of factors that influence trail conditions, and studies to assist land managers in improving trail design, maintenance, and visitor management. This article reviews alternative trail survey methodologies most useful for the management of wilderness and backcountry trail networks. Illustrations and implications from survey data for trail planning, design, and management are included.

  19. Tool, weapon, or white elephant? A realist analysis of the five phases of a twenty-year programme of occupational health information system implementation in the health sector

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although information systems (IS) have been extensively applied in the health sector worldwide, few initiatives have addressed the health and safety of health workers, a group acknowledged to be at high risk of injury and illness, as well as in great shortage globally, particularly in low and middle-income countries. Methods Adapting a context-mechanism-outcome case study design, we analyze our team’s own experience over two decades to address this gap: in two different Canadian provinces; and two distinct South African settings. Applying a realist analysis within an adapted structuration theory framing sensitive to power relations, we explore contextual (socio-political and technological) characteristics and mechanisms affecting outcomes at micro, meso and macro levels. Results Technological limitations hindered IS usefulness in the initial Canadian locale, while staffing inadequacies amid pronounced power imbalances affecting governance restricted IS usefulness in the subsequent Canadian application. Implementation in South Africa highlighted the special care needed to address power dynamics regarding both worker-employer relations (relevant to all occupational health settings) and North–south imbalances (common to all international interactions). Researchers, managers and front-line workers all view IS implementation differently; relationships amongst the workplace parties and between community and academic partners have been pivotal in determining outcome in all circumstances. Capacity building and applying creative commons and open source solutions are showing promise, as is international collaboration. Conclusions There is worldwide consensus on the need for IS use to protect the health workforce. However, IS implementation is a resource-intensive undertaking; regardless of how carefully designed the software, contextual factors and the mechanisms adopted to address these are critical to mitigate threats and achieve outcomes of interest to all

  20. Learning Objects as Tools for Teaching Information Literacy Online: A Survey of Librarian Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mestre, Lori S.; Baures, Lisa; Niedbala, Mona; Bishop, Corinne; Cantrell, Sarah; Perez, Alice; Silfen, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Based on information gathered from two discussion sessions moderated by members of the Education and Behavioral Sciences Section's Online Learning Research Committee a survey was conducted to identify how librarians use course/learning management systems and learning objects to deliver instruction. Objectives of the study were to identify the…

  1. Breeder survey, tools, and resources to visualize diversity and pedigree relationships at MaizeGDB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In collaboration with maize researchers, the MaizeGDB Team prepared a survey to identify breeder needs for visualizing pedigrees, diversity data, and haplotypes, and distributed it to the maize community on behalf of the Maize Genetics Executive Committee (Summer 2015). We received 48 responses from...

  2. Information and Communication Technologies as Agricultural Extension Tools: A Survey among Farmers in West Macedonia, Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasios, Michailidis; Koutsouris, Alex; Konstadinos, Mattas

    2010-01-01

    This article critically assesses the potential of information and communication technologies (ICTs) as agricultural extension tools. Specifically, the purpose of the current piece of work is to identify the extent of the use of ICTs on farms, look into farmers' characteristics as related to ICTs' adoption and explore farmers' preferred extension…

  3. PubMed and beyond: a survey of web tools for searching biomedical literature

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhiyong

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed the modern advances of high-throughput technology and rapid growth of research capacity in producing large-scale biological data, both of which were concomitant with an exponential growth of biomedical literature. This wealth of scholarly knowledge is of significant importance for researchers in making scientific discoveries and healthcare professionals in managing health-related matters. However, the acquisition of such information is becoming increasingly difficult due to its large volume and rapid growth. In response, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is continuously making changes to its PubMed Web service for improvement. Meanwhile, different entities have devoted themselves to developing Web tools for helping users quickly and efficiently search and retrieve relevant publications. These practices, together with maturity in the field of text mining, have led to an increase in the number and quality of various Web tools that provide comparable literature search service to PubMed. In this study, we review 28 such tools, highlight their respective innovations, compare them to the PubMed system and one another, and discuss directions for future development. Furthermore, we have built a website dedicated to tracking existing systems and future advances in the field of biomedical literature search. Taken together, our work serves information seekers in choosing tools for their needs and service providers and developers in keeping current in the field. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Lu/search PMID:21245076

  4. How to Conduct Multimethod Field Studies in the Operating Room: The iPad Combined With a Survey App as a Valid and Reliable Data Collection Tool

    PubMed Central

    Tscholl, David W; Weiss, Mona; Spahn, Donat R

    2016-01-01

    Background Tablet computers such as the Apple iPad are progressively replacing traditional paper-and-pencil-based data collection. We combined the iPad with the ready-to-use survey software, iSurvey (from Harvestyourdata), to create a straightforward tool for data collection during the Anesthesia Pre-Induction Checklist (APIC) study, a hospital-wide multimethod intervention study involving observation of team performance and team member surveys in the operating room (OR). Objective We aimed to provide an analysis of the factors that led to the use of the iPad- and iSurvey-based tool for data collection, illustrate our experiences with the use of this data collection tool, and report the results of an expert survey about user experience with this tool. Methods We used an iPad- and iSurvey-based tool to observe anesthesia inductions conducted by 205 teams (N=557 team members) in the OR. In Phase 1, expert raters used the iPad- and iSurvey-based tool to rate team performance during anesthesia inductions, and anesthesia team members were asked to indicate their perceptions after the inductions. In Phase 2, we surveyed the expert raters about their perceptions regarding the use of the iPad- and iSurvey-based tool to observe, rate, and survey teams in the ORs. Results The results of Phase 1 showed that training data collectors on the iPad- and iSurvey-based data collection tool was effortless and there were no serious problems during data collection, upload, download, and export. Interrater agreement of the combined data collection tool was found to be very high for the team observations (median Fleiss’ kappa=0.88, 95% CI 0.78-1.00). The results of the follow-up expert rater survey (Phase 2) showed that the raters did not prefer a paper-and-pencil-based data collection method they had used during other earlier studies over the iPad- and iSurvey-based tool (median response 1, IQR 1-1; 1=do not agree, 2=somewhat disagree, 3=neutral, 4=somewhat agree, 5=fully agree). They

  5. The Laboratory Course Assessment Survey: A Tool to Measure Three Dimensions of Research-Course Design

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, Lisa A.; Runyon, Christopher; Robinson, Aspen; Dolan, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are increasingly being offered as scalable ways to involve undergraduates in research. Yet few if any design features that make CUREs effective have been identified. We developed a 17-item survey instrument, the Laboratory Course Assessment Survey (LCAS), that measures students’ perceptions of three design features of biology lab courses: 1) collaboration, 2) discovery and relevance, and 3) iteration. We assessed the psychometric properties of the LCAS using established methods for instrument design and validation. We also assessed the ability of the LCAS to differentiate between CUREs and traditional laboratory courses, and found that the discovery and relevance and iteration scales differentiated between these groups. Our results indicate that the LCAS is suited for characterizing and comparing undergraduate biology lab courses and should be useful for determining the relative importance of the three design features for achieving student outcomes. PMID:26466990

  6. The Laboratory Course Assessment Survey: A Tool to Measure Three Dimensions of Research-Course Design.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Lisa A; Runyon, Christopher; Robinson, Aspen; Dolan, Erin L

    2015-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are increasingly being offered as scalable ways to involve undergraduates in research. Yet few if any design features that make CUREs effective have been identified. We developed a 17-item survey instrument, the Laboratory Course Assessment Survey (LCAS), that measures students' perceptions of three design features of biology lab courses: 1) collaboration, 2) discovery and relevance, and 3) iteration. We assessed the psychometric properties of the LCAS using established methods for instrument design and validation. We also assessed the ability of the LCAS to differentiate between CUREs and traditional laboratory courses, and found that the discovery and relevance and iteration scales differentiated between these groups. Our results indicate that the LCAS is suited for characterizing and comparing undergraduate biology lab courses and should be useful for determining the relative importance of the three design features for achieving student outcomes.

  7. The Laboratory Course Assessment Survey: A Tool to Measure Three Dimensions of Research-Course Design.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Lisa A; Runyon, Christopher; Robinson, Aspen; Dolan, Erin L

    2015-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are increasingly being offered as scalable ways to involve undergraduates in research. Yet few if any design features that make CUREs effective have been identified. We developed a 17-item survey instrument, the Laboratory Course Assessment Survey (LCAS), that measures students' perceptions of three design features of biology lab courses: 1) collaboration, 2) discovery and relevance, and 3) iteration. We assessed the psychometric properties of the LCAS using established methods for instrument design and validation. We also assessed the ability of the LCAS to differentiate between CUREs and traditional laboratory courses, and found that the discovery and relevance and iteration scales differentiated between these groups. Our results indicate that the LCAS is suited for characterizing and comparing undergraduate biology lab courses and should be useful for determining the relative importance of the three design features for achieving student outcomes. PMID:26466990

  8. Surveying food and beverage liking: a tool for epidemiological studies to connect chemosensation with health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Valerie B; Hayes, John E; Sullivan, Bridget S; Faghri, Pouran

    2009-07-01

    Genetics, environmental exposures, and aging interact to produce variations in the perception or liking of taste, olfaction, and somatosensory sensations (i.e., chemosensation). Chemosensory variation can affect disease risk by influencing what people like and choose to eat from abundant supplies of desirable high-fat, sweet, and salty foods and alcoholic beverages at the expense of less-available or less-liked vegetables. We contend that assessing dietary preference via liking-disliking surveys holds promise for linking chemosensation with dietary intake and health outcomes in population-based studies. Typical intake measures (e.g., frequency surveys, dietary records) are difficult to complete and interpret. Because of memory issues and dietary restraint, individuals under- or overreport intakes, leading to inaccurate conclusions about diet-disease relationships. Surveying food and beverage liking is a time-efficient, simple task that minimizes the cognitive limitations of intake measures. In the present study, women in a worksite health risk appraisal completed brief food frequency and liking surveys and reported their height and weight, and blood pressure was measured. While liking and intake measures for high-fat and high-fiber foods were correlated, only liking was associated with disease risk. In multiple regression models, women reporting greater liking for high-fat foods and less liking for spicy foods had greater adiposity and/or blood pressure, controlling for age. These data, along with previous laboratory and community-based studies, support that reported liking of high-fat foods explains variability in adiposity and adiposity-related outcomes. Hedonic measures appear to capture habitual intake of foods and beverages, are easy to implement in the field, and thus may increase understanding of how chemosensory variation modifies disease risk. PMID:19686193

  9. Making change pay. Survey: more hospitals tap compensation as a tool of change.

    PubMed

    Farrell, J P; Pagoaga, J A

    1995-09-01

    No matter how much you say you want your health care organization's performance levels to change, you've got to put your money where your wish list is. That, in a nutshell, is the bottom-line finding of this year's Hay Hospital Compensation Survey, exclusively in this issue. But while the concept is simple, the execution is not, as the authors point out in their analysis. PMID:7655529

  10. Use of a customer satisfaction survey by health care regulators: a tool for total quality management.

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejewski, N; Lagua, R T

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of health care providers to determine the quality of service provided by the staff of a regulatory agency; to collect information on provider needs and expectations; to identify perceived and potential problems that need improvement; and to make changes to improve regulatory services. METHODS: The authors surveyed health care providers using a customer satisfaction questionnaire developed in collaboration with a group of providers and a research consultant. The questionnaire contained 20 declarative statements that fell into six quality domains: proficiency, judgment, responsiveness, communication, accommodation, and relevance. A 10% level of dissatisfaction was used as the acceptable performance standard. RESULTS: The survey was mailed to 324 hospitals, nursing homes, home care agencies, hospices, ambulatory care centers, and health maintenance organizations. Fifty-six percent of provider agencies responded; more than half had written comments. The three highest levels of customer satisfaction were in courtesy of regulatory staff (90%), efficient use of onsite time (84%), and respect for provider employees (83%). The three lowest levels of satisfaction were in the judgment domain; only 44% felt that there was consistency among regulatory staff in the interpretation of regulations, only 45% felt that interpretations of regulations were flexible and reasonable, and only 49% felt that regulations were applied objectively. Nine of 20 quality indicators had dissatisfaction ratings of more than 10%; these were considered priorities for improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Responses to the survey identified a number of specific areas of concern; these findings are being incorporated into the continuous quality improvement program of the office. PMID:9160054

  11. Training Manual: Dictionary of Occupational Titles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Human Resources, Atlanta.

    The training manual was developed as a tool for understanding the occupational information and descriptive data presented in the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) (Volumes 1 and 2 and Supplements 1 and 2). Exercises are provided in workbook form to increase an understanding of the occupational information presented. Exercises coordinated…

  12. A Survey of GPs Awareness and Use of Risk Assessment Tools and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Byrne, D; O'Connor, L; Jennings, S; Bennett, K; Murphy, A W

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. This study aimed to benchmark awareness and use of CVD risk assessment (RA) tools and prevention guidelines in Irish general practice. 493 (18%) Irish general practitioners (GPs) were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study in 2011. 213 (43%) GPs responded with most being male (n = 128, 58.2%) and aged ≥ 45 years (n = 124, 56.8%). While 197 (92.5%) GPs were aware of at least one RA tool, only 69 (32.4%) GPs reported frequent use. 187 (87.8%) GPs were aware of one or more CVD prevention guidelines with 115 (54.0%) GPs reporting frequent use of at least one guideline. No age or gender difference observed. Barriers to implementation of CVD prevention guidelines were lack of remuneration, too many CVD guidelines and time constraints. Most Irish GPs were aware of RA tools and CVD prevention guidelines with half reporting frequent use of guidelines.

  13. Developing user-friendly habitat suitability tools from regional stream fish survey data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zorn, T.G.; Seelbach, P.; Wiley, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    We developed user-friendly fish habitat suitability tools (plots) for fishery managers in Michigan; these tools are based on driving habitat variables and fish population estimates for several hundred stream sites throughout the state. We generated contour plots to show patterns in fish biomass for over 60 common species (and for 120 species grouped at the family level) in relation to axes of catchment area and low-flow yield (90% exceedance flow divided by catchment area) and also in relation to axes of mean and weekly range of July temperatures. The plots showed distinct patterns in fish habitat suitability at each level of biological organization studied and were useful for quantitatively comparing river sites. We demonstrate how these plots can be used to support stream management, and we provide examples pertaining to resource assessment, trout stocking, angling regulations, chemical reclamation of marginal trout streams, indicator species, instream flow protection, and habitat restoration. These straightforward and effective tools are electronically available so that managers can easily access and incorporate them into decision protocols and presentations.

  14. Do Predictors of Career Success Differ between Swedish Women and Men? Data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH).

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Anna; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Leineweber, Constanze; Johansson, Gunn

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to explore predictors of objective career success among Swedish women and men, focussing on gender differences. Data were drawn from the 2008 and 2010 waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) with a total of 3670 female and 2773 male participants. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for job promotion and an above-average salary increase between 2008 and 2010 were obtained through binary logistic regression analyses. Individual and organisational factors measured in 2008 were used as predictors in analyses stratified by sex. Mutual adjustment was performed for these variables, as well as for labour market sector and staff category at baseline. In both sexes, younger age predicted both job promotion and an above-average salary increase. Job promotion was also in both sexes predicted by being part of decision-making processes, having conflicts with superiors, and being eager to advance. Furthermore, promotion was predicted by, among men, being educated to post-graduate level and having an open coping strategy and, among women, working >60 hours/week. An above-average salary increase was predicted in both sexes by having a university education. Postgraduate education, having children living at home, and being very motivated to advance predicted an above-average salary increase among women, as did working 51-60 hours/week and being part of decision-making processes in men. Gender differences were seen in several predictors. In conclusion, the results support previous findings of gender differences in predictors of career success. A high level of education, motivation to advance, and procedural justice appear to be more important predictors of career success among women, while open coping was a more important predictor among men. PMID:26501351

  15. Remote sensing as a tool to survey endemic diseases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Correia, Virginia Ragoni de Moraes; Carvalho, Marilia Sá; Sabroza, Paulo Chagastelles; Vasconcelos, Cíntia Honório

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study, based on a systematic literature review, is to present the characteristics and potentialities of remote sensing as a useful environmental surveillance tool for applied research in the control of endemics in Brazil. Onboard satellite sensors allow for monitoring the territory, furnishing spatial and temporal information on various scales and regions in the electromagnetic spectrum. Based on the literature review on the application of this technology to the study of endemics and the identification of the potential of new sensors with better spectral, spatial, and temporal resolutions, this study highlights perspectives for the use of remote sensing in the study of important endemics for Brazil.

  16. Generic Skills. Secondary School Vocational Model for Craft Trades. Based on Data on the Use of 588 Tool Skills from 1600 Workers and Supervisors in 131 Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Arthur De W.

    This pamphlet provides a hierarchy of skills, from those most often used in the craft trades to those less frequently used, indicating the extent to which these skills are used by workers in 24 different occupational groups. The pamphlet also provides a secondary school vocational model for craft trades along with lists of the identified skills.…

  17. Social responsibility tools in online gambling: a survey of attitudes and behavior among Internet gamblers.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Mark D; Wood, Richard T A; Parke, Jonathan

    2009-08-01

    To date, little empirical research has focused on social responsibility in gambling. This study examined players' attitudes and behavior toward using the social responsibility tool PlayScan designed by the Swedish gaming company Svenska Spel. Via PlayScan, players have the option to utilize various social responsibility control tools (e.g., personal gaming budgets, self-diagnostic tests of gambling habits, self-exclusion options). A total of 2,348 participants took part in an online questionnaire study. Participants were clientele of the Svenska Spel online gambling Web site. Results showed that just over a quarter of players (26%) had used PlayScan. The vast majority of those who had activated PlayScan (almost 9 in 10 users) said that PlayScan was easy to use. Over half of PlayScan users (52%) said it was useful; 19% said it was not. Many features were seen as useful by online gamblers, including limit setting (70%), viewing their gambling profile (49%), self-exclusion facilities (42%), self-diagnostic problem gambling tests (46%), information and support for gambling issues (40%), and gambling profile predictions (36%). In terms of actual (as opposed to theoretical) use, over half of PlayScan users (56%) had set spending limits, 40% had taken a self-diagnostic problem gambling test, and 17% had used a self-exclusion feature.

  18. Occupational Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Dean

    1982-01-01

    Bronchospasm is a common cause of morbidity in the workplace. More than 100 agents are now recognized as occupational causes of asthma and numerous agents can cause exacerbations of preexisting asthma. Because of the large number of potential causative agents and the complexity of modern industrial processes, knowledge of the characteristic clinical features of occupational asthma is the key to recognizing this disease. Early diagnosis of occupational asthma is important in preventing long-term morbidity. Present evidence that prolonged exposure to some work-encountered agents can cause asthma that persists for years after the end of exposure suggests that avoidance is the only acceptable countermeasure against this disease. PMID:7164429

  19. Occupational Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Leslie C

    2016-05-01

    Occupational rhinitis (OR) involves nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, nasal itching, and/or sneezing resulting from workplace exposures. OR can have a significant negative effect on quality of life and productivity. OR can be divided into allergic or nonallergic subgroups based on the underlying pathogenesis. Certain occupational exposures place employees at greater risk for developing disease. Primary treatment is avoidance of implicated exposures. Antihistamines, saline rinses, and nasal steroids may be useful. OR can coexist with occupational asthma, and rhinitis symptoms have been reported to precede those of the lower respiratory tract. OR is has both medical and socioeconomic implications. PMID:27083106

  20. Occupational Mobility and Career Planning: What Is Needed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Robert W.

    According to the author, a review of occupational changes and alternative views of occupations leads to the following conclusions: (1) Occupational mobility--job changing--is a fact of life in the American economy and is likely to continue. (2) The way occupations are generally examined through national surveys does not consider how an…

  1. Occupational Health

    MedlinePlus

    Occupational health problems occur at work or because of the kind of work you do. These problems can include ... by exposure to radiation Exposure to germs in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices ...

  2. Occupational Skin Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Skin disease is the most common occupational disease, but the reported number is small in Korea due to a difficulty of detection and diagnosis in time. We described various official statistics and data from occupational skin disease surveillance system, epidemiological surveys and cases published in scientific journals. Until 1981, 2,222 cases of occupational skin disease were reported by Korean employee's regular medical check-up, accounting for 4.9% of the total occupational diseases. There was no subsequent official statistics to figure out occupational skin diseases till 1998. From 1999, the Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency (KOSHA) published the number of occupational skin diseases through the statistics of Cause Investigation for Industrial Accidents. A total of 301 cases were reported from 1999 to 2007. Recent one study showed the figures of compensated occupational skin diseases. Many of them belonged to daily-paid workers in the public service, especially forestry workers. Also, it described the interesting cases such as vitiligo and trichloroethylene-induced Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. Skin diseases are still important though the number of cases has decreased, and therefore it is recommended to grasp the status of occupational skin diseases through continuous surveillance system and to make policy protecting high-risk group. PMID:21258591

  3. Identifying the biting species in snakebite by clinical features: an epidemiological tool for community surveys.

    PubMed

    Pathmeswaran, A; Kasturiratne, A; Fonseka, M; Nandasena, S; Lalloo, D G; de Silva, H J

    2006-09-01

    The outcome of snakebite is related to the biting species but it is often difficult to identify the biting snake, particularly in community settings. We have developed a clinical scoring system suitable for use in epidemiological surveys, with the main aim of identifying the presumed biting species in those with systemic envenoming who require treatment. The score took into account ten features relating to bites of the five medically important snakes in Sri Lanka, and an algorithm was developed applying different weightings for each feature for different species. A systematically developed artificial data set was used to fine tune the score and to develop criteria for definitive identification. The score was prospectively validated using 134 species-confirmed snakebites. It correctly differentiated the bites caused by the three snakes that commonly cause major clinical problems (Russell's viper (RV), kraits and cobra) from other snakes (hump-nosed viper (HNV) and saw-scaled viper (SSV)) with 80% sensitivity and 100% specificity. For individual species, sensitivity and specificity were, respectively: cobra 76%, 99%; kraits 85%, 99%; and RV 70%, 99%. As anticipated, the score was insensitive in the identification of bites due to HNV and SSV. PMID:16412486

  4. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Cambray-Gutiérrez, Julio César; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha

    2015-01-01

    The occupational asthma is the most common form of lung disease caused by factors that are attributed to a specific working environment in industrialized countries. It causes variable limitation of airflow and/or hyper-responsiveness of the airway due to contact with specific agents present in an atmosphere of work and not to stimuli found out of this place. It is recognized more and more frequently, and many agents are capable of causing occupational asthma by different pathophysiological mechanisms. More than 400 agents causing occupational asthma are known and every year new triggers are detected. Numerous factors contribute to the pathogenesis of occupational asthma induced chemically, including immunological, non-immunological mechanisms of epithelial damage, airway remodeling, oxidative stress, neurogenic inflammation as well as genetic factors. The most important risk factors for occupational asthma include: atopy, smoking and genetic factors. The diagnosis is based on the clinical history, skin tests, immunological tests and functional studies. The fundamental treatment is removing the worker from exposure as soon as possible. The advance in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of occupational asthma will importantly influence in the prevention and the management of this disease.

  5. Can Occupational Labor Shortages Be Identified Using Available Data?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veneri, Carolyn M.

    1999-01-01

    Current Population Survey and Occupational Employment Survey data alone are not adequate to identify labor-market shortages for specific occupations. These data work better in combination with background information on a specified occupation, anecdotal evidence, and factors of demand and supply. (JOW)

  6. Occupational neurology.

    PubMed

    Feldman, R G

    1987-01-01

    The nervous system is vulnerable to the effects of certain chemicals and physical conditions found in the work environment. The activities of an occupational neurologist focus on the evaluation of patients with neurological disorders caused by occupational or environmental conditions. When one is making a differential diagnosis in patients with neurological disorders, the possibility of toxic exposure or encounters with physical factors in the workplace must not be overlooked. Central to an accurate clinical diagnosis is the patient's history. A diagnosis of an occupational or environmental neurological problem requires a careful assessment of the clinical abnormalities and confirmation of these disabilities by objective tests such as nerve conduction velocity, evoked potentials, electroencephalogram, neuropsychological batteries, or nerve biopsy. On the basis of information about hazards in the workplace, safety standards and environmental and biological monitoring can be implemented in the workplace to reduce the risks of undue injury. Clinical manifestations of headache, memory disturbance, and peripheral neuropathy are commonly encountered presentations of the effects of occupational hazards. Physicians in everyday clinical practice must be aware of the signs and symptoms associated with exposure to possible neurotoxins and work methods. Occupational and environmental circumstances must be explored when evaluating patients with neurologic disorders.

  7. [Occupational epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ahrens, W; Behrens, T; Mester, B; Schmeisser, N

    2008-03-01

    The aim of occupational epidemiology is to describe workplace-related diseases and to identify their underlying causes. Its primary goal is to protect workers from hazardous effects of the working process by applying work-related primary and secondary prevention measures. To assess health risks different study designs and a wide array of complex study instruments and methods are frequently employed that cannot be replaced by toxicological investigations. This paper primarily addresses health risks by agent exposures. In this context a central task of occupational epidemiology is careful assessment of exposure. Different data sources, such as work site measurements, register data, archive material, experts' opinion, and the workers' personal estimates of exposure may be used during this process. In addition, biological markers can complement exposure assessment. Since thorough occupational epidemiologic studies allow assessment of disease risks under realistic exposure conditions, their results should be more frequently used to derive workplace-related threshold limit values. PMID:18311483

  8. [Occupational eczema].

    PubMed

    Lachapelle, J M

    1998-05-01

    Cases of occupational allergic contact dermatitis are less frequent nowadays than in the past: for instance the prevalence of allergic contact dermatitis to cement chromates is decreasing steadily among building workers. On the other hand, new haptens do occur in our environment, due to the diversification of industrial techniques; e.g. methylchloro- and methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI) present as a preservative in paints or varnishes, acrylates and methacrylates, or, at the hospital, glutaraldehyde, propacetamol or various antibiotics. A new entity has been clinically characterized: protein contact dermatitis. The prevention of occupational allergic contact dermatitis is multidisciplinary. It includes all aspects of prevention: primary, secondary and tertiary. PMID:11767354

  9. Perceived problems with computer gaming and internet use among adolescents: measurement tool for non-clinical survey studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Existing instruments for measuring problematic computer and console gaming and internet use are often lengthy and often based on a pathological perspective. The objective was to develop and present a new and short non-clinical measurement tool for perceived problems related to computer use and gaming among adolescents and to study the association between screen time and perceived problems. Methods Cross-sectional school-survey of 11-, 13-, and 15-year old students in thirteen schools in the City of Aarhus, Denmark, participation rate 89%, n = 2100. The main exposure was time spend on weekdays on computer- and console-gaming and internet use for communication and surfing. The outcome measures were three indexes on perceived problems related to computer and console gaming and internet use. Results The three new indexes showed high face validity and acceptable internal consistency. Most schoolchildren with high screen time did not experience problems related to computer use. Still, there was a strong and graded association between time use and perceived problems related to computer gaming, console gaming (only boys) and internet use, odds ratios ranging from 6.90 to 10.23. Conclusion The three new measures of perceived problems related to computer and console gaming and internet use among adolescents are appropriate, reliable and valid for use in non-clinical surveys about young people’s everyday life and behaviour. These new measures do not assess Internet Gaming Disorder as it is listed in the DSM and therefore has no parity with DSM criteria. We found an increasing risk of perceived problems with increasing time spent with gaming and internet use. Nevertheless, most schoolchildren who spent much time with gaming and internet use did not experience problems. PMID:24731270

  10. The Use of Tools, Modelling Methods, Data Types, and Endpoints in Systems Medicine: A Survey on Projects of the German e:Med-Programme.

    PubMed

    Gietzelt, Matthias; Höfer, Thomas; Knaup-Gregori, Petra; König, Rainer; Löpprich, Martin; Poos, Alexandra; Ganzinger, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Systems medicine is the consequent continuation of research efforts on the road to an individualized medicine. Thereby, systems medicine tries to offer a holistic view on the patient by combining different data sources to highlight different perspectives on the patient's health. Our research question was to identify the main data types, modelling methods, analysis tools, and endpoints currently used and studied in systems medicine. Therefore, we conducted a survey on projects with a systems medicine background. Fifty participants completed this survey. The results of the survey were analyzed using histograms and cross tables, and finally compared to results of a former literature review with the same research focus. The data types reported in this survey were widely diversified. As expected, genomic and phenotype data were used most frequently. In contrast, environmental and behavioral data were rarely used in the projects. Overall, the cross tables of the data types in the survey and the literature review showed overlapping results. PMID:27577469

  11. Adjustment of the thermal component of two tourism climatological assessment tools using thermal perception and preference surveys from Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, Attila; Unger, János; Gál, Csilla V.; Kántor, Noémi

    2016-07-01

    This study introduces new methodological concepts for integrating seasonal subjective thermal assessment patterns of people into the thermal components of two tourism climatological evaluation tools: the Tourism Climatic Index (TCI) and the Climate-Tourism/Transfer-Information-Scheme (CTIS). In the case of the TCI, we replaced the air temperature and relative humidity as the basis of the initial rating system with the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET)—a complex human biometeorological index. This modification improves the TCI's potential to evaluate the thermal aspects of climate. The major accomplishments of this study are (a) the development of a new, PET-based rating system and its integration into the thermal sub-indices of the TCI and (b) the regionalization of the thermal components of CTIS to reflect both the thermal sensation and preference patterns of people. A 2-year-long (2011-2012) thermal comfort survey conducted in Szeged, Hungary, from spring to autumn was utilized to demonstrate the implementation of the introduced concepts. We found considerable differences between the thermal perception and preference patterns of Hungarians, with additional variations across the evaluated seasons. This paper describes the proposed methodology for the integration of the new seasonal, perception-based, and preference-based PET rating systems into the TCI, and presents the incorporation of new PET thresholds into the CTIS. In order to demonstrate the utility of the modified evaluation tools, we performed case study climate analyses for three Hungarian tourist destinations. The additional adjustments introduced during the course of those analyses include the reduction of TCI's temporal resolution to 10-day intervals and the exclusion of nocturnal and winter periods from the investigation.

  12. Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery in Gaia survey: GUASOM, an analysis tool based on Self Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manteiga, Minia; Dafonte, Jose Carlos; Ulla, Ana; Alvarez, Marco Antonio; Garabato, Daniel; Fustes, Diego

    2015-08-01

    Gaia, the astrometric cornerstone mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) was successfully launched in December 2013. In June 2014 Gaia started its scientific operations phase scanning the sky with the different instruments on board. Gaia was designed to measure positions, parallaxes and motions to the microarcsec level, thus providing the first highly accurate 6-D map of about a thousand million objects of the Milky Way. A vast community of astronomers are looking forward to the delivery of the promise of the first non-biased survey of the entire sky down to magnitude 20.We present GUASOM a data mining tool designed for knowledge discovery in large astronomical spectrophotometric archives, that was developed in the framework of Gaia DPAC (Data Processing and Analysis Consocium). Our tool is based on a type of unsupervised learning Artificial Neural Networks named Self-organizing maps (SOMs).SOMs are used to organize the information in clusters of objects, as homogeneously as possible according to their spectral energy distributions, and to project them onto a 2D grid where the data structure can be visualized. Each cluster has a representative, called prototype which is a virtual pattern that better represents or resembles the set of input patterns belonging to such a cluster. Prototypes make easier the task of determining the physical nature of the objects populating each cluster. Our algorithm has been tested on SDSS observations and theoretical spectral libraries covering a wide sample of astronomical objects.Self-organizing maps permit the grouping and visualization of big amount of data for which there is no a priori knowledge..GUASOM provides a useful toolbox for data visualization and crossmatching. To this effect, we have used SIMBAD catalog to perform astrometric crossmatching with a sample of SDSS classification outliers, seeking for identifications.

  13. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Pauli, G; Bessot, J C; Gourdon, C

    1992-12-01

    The diagnosis of occupational asthma requires the integration of a multiplicity of data; the history, cutaneous skin tests, biological tests, respiratory function tests and non-specific tests of bronchial hyperreactivity and specific bronchial provocation test. The history search for the presence of an atopic state, the occurrence of similar disorders in members of the same firm and also the timing of symptoms in relation to the occupational activities. Cutaneous tests are particularly helpful in IgE-mediated asthma in relation to the inhalation of animal or vegetable materials of glycoprotein origin. For haptens, the need for their prior coupling to a protein carrier causes problems which have not been entirely resolved. Laboratory tests run into the same snags. Respiratory function and non-specific bronchial provocation tests, confirm the diagnosis of asthma and enable the medium and long term prognostic to be assessed. Specific bronchial provocation tests are the most appropriate tests to establish an aetiological diagnosis in occupational asthma. Different technical methods are possible: quantitative administration of allergen aerosols, realistic tests, and tests using exposure chambers to achieve true test doses. The products responsible for occupational asthma are multiple. The different substances are characterised in a simplified manner: first animal matter (mammalian and arthropod allergens), secondly substances of vegetable origin (roots, leaves, flowers, grain and flour, wood and its derivates) and finally chemical products. The chemical products are primarily from the pharmaceutical and metal industries and above all from the plastics industry. PMID:1296320

  14. Twitter Social Media is an Effective Tool for Breast Cancer Patient Education and Support: Patient-Reported Outcomes by Survey

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite reported benefits, many women do not attend breast cancer support groups. Abundant online resources for support exist, but information regarding the effectiveness of participation is lacking. We report the results of a Twitter breast cancer support community participant survey. Objective The aim was to determine the effectiveness of social media as a tool for breast cancer patient education and decreasing anxiety. Methods The Breast Cancer Social Media Twitter support community (#BCSM) began in July 2011. Institutional review board approval with a waiver of informed consent was obtained for a deidentified survey that was posted for 2 weeks on Twitter and on the #BCSM blog and Facebook page. Results There were 206 respondents to the survey. In all, 92.7% (191/206) were female. Respondents reported increased knowledge about breast cancer in the following domains: overall knowledge (80.9%, 153/189), survivorship (85.7%, 162/189), metastatic breast cancer (79.4%, 150/189), cancer types and biology (70.9%, 134/189), clinical trials and research (66.1%, 125/189), treatment options (55.6%, 105/189), breast imaging (56.6%, 107/189), genetic testing and risk assessment (53.9%, 102/189), and radiotherapy (43.4%, 82/189). Participation led 31.2% (59/189) to seek a second opinion or bring additional information to the attention of their treatment team and 71.9% (136/189) reported plans to increase their outreach and advocacy efforts as a result of participation. Levels of reported anxiety before and after participation were analyzed: 29 of 43 (67%) patients who initially reported “high or extreme” anxiety reported “low or no” anxiety after participation (P<.001). Also, no patients initially reporting low or no anxiety before participation reported an increase to high or extreme anxiety after participation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that breast cancer patients’ perceived knowledge increases and their anxiety decreases by participation in a

  15. Extending the Librarian's Domain: A Survey of Emerging Occupation Opportunities for Librarians and Information Professionals. SLA Occasional Papers Series, Number Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Forest Woody, Jr.

    This paper is a review of emerging occupational opportunities for librarians and information professionals. It is structured around three concepts: working assumptions; changing environments; and emerging job opportunities. In the first section, the six assumptions upon which this review is based are outlined. The second section begins with a…

  16. The Occupations and Earnings of Young Australians: The Role of Education and Training. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Research Report 55

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Gary N.

    2008-01-01

    This report investigates the effect of post-secondary education and training on the occupation and earnings of young people. The majority of young Australians undertake further education and training after leaving school; understanding the pathways that they follow, and the impact of different types of experience on the early career can help young…

  17. Occupational Survey Report on Automotive Mechanics: Task Data from Workers and Supervisors Indicating Job Relevance and Training Criticalness. [Interim Report]. Research and Development Series No. 110.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammerman, Harry L.; Pratzner, Frank C.

    The study was conducted to develop methods for using timely, firsthand occupational task information on automotive mechanics in order to identify critical performance requirements that warrant formal training. The methodology used is described in detail. A Task Inventory Questionnaire was completed by 18 auto mechanics and 12 supervisors in each…

  18. U.S. Geological Survey Community for Data Integration-NWIS Web Services Snapshot Tool for ArcGIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holl, Sally

    2011-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data resources are so vast that many scientists are unaware of data holdings that may be directly relevant to their research. Data are also difficult to access and large corporate databases, such as the National Water Information System (NWIS) that houses hydrologic data for the Nation, are challenging to use without considerable expertise and investment of time. The USGS Community for Data Integration (CDI) was established in 2009 to address data and information management issues affecting the proficiency of earth science research. A CDI workshop convened in 2009 identified common data integration needs of USGS scientists and targeted high value opportunities that might address these needs by leveraging existing projects in USGS science centers, in-kind contributions, and supplemental funding. To implement this strategy, CDI sponsored a software development project in 2010 to facilitate access and use of NWIS data with ArcGIS, a widely used Geographic Information System. The resulting software product, the NWIS Web Services Snapshot Tool for ArcGIS, is presented here.

  19. Survey Administration Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-12

    This software allows a student/user at some point during the flow of content on a web page to input comments and rate the content with things such as: 1) True false 2) Text Comments 3) Ratings 1-5 4) etc. This information is stored anonymously in the database and can be retrieved and reported on.

  20. Predictive habitat modelling of humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae) and Antarctic minke (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) whales in the Southern Ocean as a planning tool for seismic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombosch, Annette; Zitterbart, Daniel P.; Van Opzeeland, Ilse; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Burkhardt, Elke; Wisz, Mary S.; Boebel, Olaf

    2014-09-01

    Seismic surveys are frequently a matter of concern regarding their potentially negative impacts on marine mammals. In the Southern Ocean, which provides a critical habitat for several endangered cetacean species, seismic research activities are undertaken at a circumpolar scale. In order to minimize impacts of these surveys, pre-cruise planning requires detailed, spatio-temporally resolved knowledge on the likelihood of encountering these species in the survey area. In this publication we present predictive habitat modelling as a potential tool to support decisions for survey planning. We associated opportunistic sightings (2005-2011) of humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae, N=93) and Antarctic minke whales (Balaenoptera bonaerensis, N=139) with a range of static and dynamic environmental variables. A maximum entropy algorithm (Maxent) was used to develop habitat models and to calculate daily basinwide/circumpolar prediction maps to evaluate how species-specific habitat conditions evolved throughout the spring and summer months. For both species, prediction maps revealed considerable changes in habitat suitability throughout the season. Suitable humpback whale habitat occurred predominantly in ice-free areas, expanding southwards with the retreating sea ice edge, whereas suitable Antarctic minke whale habitat was consistently predicted within sea ice covered areas. Daily, large-scale prediction maps provide a valuable tool to design layout and timing of seismic surveys as they allow the identification and consideration of potential spatio-temporal hotspots to minimize potential impacts of seismic surveys on Antarctic cetacean species.

  1. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M.; Grzybowski, S.

    1976-01-01

    Occupational asthma is probably much more common than is generally realized. Though many causes have been described, undoubtedly many more are yet to be recognized. One of the diagnostic difficulties lies in the fact that in most forms of this disease a late asthmatic reaction occurs in the evening rather than at work. The pathogenetic mechanisms differ in various forms of occupational asthma. In some, an immunologic mechanism is likely; in others, a "pharmacologic" action of the offending agent is implicated. Asthma due to inhalation of dusts of western red cedar, isocyanates, detergent enzymes and textiles is considered in detail. Periodic examination of workers at risk is of value for early diagnosis and prevention of irrversible airway obstruction. PMID:766943

  2. Occupational dermatoses in composite production.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, M; Zimerson, E; Bruze, M

    1999-04-01

    In a plant that produces fiber-resin composite by impregnation of cellulose fibers with phenol-formaldehyde and melamine-formaldehyde resins, a new technique was introduced that resulted in problems in the handling of uncured products. Many workers suffered dermatitis on areas of exposed skin. A primary investigation found that some workers had an occupationally related skin disease with contact allergy to work materials. We undertook a survey of occupational dermatoses, based on a questionnaire, clinical examination, and patch test with a standard series and a series of products and chemicals representing the work environment. Eighty-eight workers participated in the clinical investigation. In six workers, contact allergy to phenol-formaldehyde resin was seen, and in five workers, contact allergy to melamine-formaldehyde resin was noted. Two workers were allergic to both resins. Occupational dermatitis was diagnosed in nine of 88 (10.2%) workers. In this article, we discuss possible preventive measures for avoiding occupational dermatitis.

  3. Occupational health nursing 2004 practice analysis report.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Patricia B; Maher, Helen K; Knuth, Georgia; Fabrey, Lawrence J

    2006-01-01

    As a certifying body for occupational health nurses in the United States and Canada, the American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc. (ABOHN) must ensure its certification examinations validly reflect current occupational health nurse practice. This report presents information from the ABOHN 2004 practice analysis. The study's primary purpose was to analyze areas of knowledge, skill, and ability for occupational health nurses as reflected by the tasks they perform to guide refinement of ABOHN's certification examinations. A valid and reliable survey instrument, containing demographic and job-related questions and 172 task statements was developed. A total of 5,586 surveys (4,921 Web-based and 665 paper) were made available to occupational health nurses throughout the United States and Canada. The usable response rate was 23.5% (N = 1,223). Decision rules were used to determine which survey tasks were appropriate for inclusion in Certified Occupational Health Nurse (COHN) and Certified Occupational Health Nurse Specialist (COHN-S) certification examination blueprints. The revised blueprints were used to develop new examinations. Study data also validated the existing ABOHN Case Management (CM) specialty examination blueprint, and verified occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities related to safety programs. Based on analysis of the safety-related items, ABOHN in collaboration with the Board of Certified Safety Professionals, has created a safety management credential (SM) and associated examination that certified occupational health nurses may use to verify their safety role proficiency.

  4. Some operational tools for solving fractional and higher integer order differential equations: A survey on their mutual relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiryakova, Virginia S.

    2012-11-01

    The Laplace Transform (LT) serves as a basis of the Operational Calculus (OC), widely explored by engineers and applied scientists in solving mathematical models for their practical needs. This transform is closely related to the exponential and trigonometric functions (exp, cos, sin) and to the classical differentiation and integration operators, reducing them to simple algebraic operations. Thus, the classical LT and the OC give useful tool to handle differential equations and systems with constant coefficients. Several generalizations of the LT have been introduced to allow solving, in a similar way, of differential equations with variable coefficients and of higher integer orders, as well as of fractional (arbitrary non-integer) orders. Note that fractional order mathematical models are recently widely used to describe better various systems and phenomena of the real world. This paper surveys briefly some of our results on classes of such integral transforms, that can be obtained from the LT by means of "transmutations" which are operators of the generalized fractional calculus (GFC). On the list of these Laplace-type integral transforms, we consider the Borel-Dzrbashjan, Meijer, Krätzel, Obrechkoff, generalized Obrechkoff (multi-index Borel-Dzrbashjan) transforms, etc. All of them are G- and H-integral transforms of convolutional type, having as kernels Meijer's G- or Fox's H-functions. Besides, some special functions (also being G- and H-functions), among them - the generalized Bessel-type and Mittag-Leffler (M-L) type functions, are generating Gel'fond-Leontiev (G-L) operators of generalized differentiation and integration, which happen to be also operators of GFC. Our integral transforms have operational properties analogous to those of the LT - they do algebrize the G-L generalized integrations and differentiations, and thus can serve for solving wide classes of differential equations with variable coefficients of arbitrary, including non-integer order

  5. Southeast regional and state trends in anuran occupancy from calling survey data (2001-2013) from the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villena Carpio, Oswaldo; Royle, J. Andrew; Weir, Linda; Foreman, Tasha M.; Gazenski, Kimberly D.; Campbell Grant, Evan H.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first regional trends in anuran occupancy for eight states of the southeastern United States, based on 13 y (2001–2013) of North American Amphibian Monitoring Program (NAAMP) data. The NAAMP is a longterm monitoring program in which observers collect anuran calling observation data at fixed locations along random roadside routes. We assessed occupancy trends for 14 species. We found weak evidence for a general regional pattern of decline in calling anurans within breeding habitats along roads in the southeastern USA over the last 13 y. Two species had positive regional trends with 95% posterior intervals that did not include zero (Hyla cinerea and Pseudacris crucifer). Five other species also showed an increasing trend, while eight species showed a declining trend, although 95% posterior intervals included zero. We also assessed state level trends for 107 species/state combinations. Of these, 14 showed a significant decline and 12 showed a significant increase in occupancy (i.e., credible intervals did not include zero for these 26 trends).

  6. Strengthening the perception-assessment tools for dengue prevention: a cross-sectional survey in a temperate region (Madeira, Portugal)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Community participation is mandatory in the prevention of Dengue outbreaks. Taking public views into account is crucial to guide more effective planning and quicker community participation in preventing campaigns. This study aims to assess community perceptions of Madeira population in order to explore their involvement in the A. aegypti’s control and reinforce health-educational planning. Due to the lack of accurate methodologies for measuring perception, a new tool to assess the community’s perceptions was built. Methods A cross-sectional survey was performed in the Island’s aegypti-infested area, exploring residents’ perceptions regarding most critical community behaviour: aegypti-source reduction and their domestic aegypti-breeding sites. A novel tool defining five essential topics which underlie the source reduction’s awareness and accession was built, herein called Essential-Perception (EP) analysis. Results Of 1276 individuals, 1182 completed the questionnaire (92 · 6%). EP-Score analysis revealed that community’s perceptions were scarce, inconsistent and possibly incorrect. Most of the population (99 · 6%) did not completely understood the five essential topics explored. An average of 54 · 2% of residents only partially understood each essential topic, revealing inconsistencies in their understanding. Each resident apparently believed in an average of four false assumptions/myths. Significant association (p<0.001) was found between both the EP-Score level and the domestic presence of breeding sites, supporting the validity of this EP-analysis. Aedes aegypti’s breeding sites, consisting of décor/leisure containers, presented an atypical pattern of infestation comparing with dengue prone regions. Conclusions The studied population was not prepared for being fully engaged in dengue prevention. Evidences suggest that EP-methodology was efficient and accurate in assessing the community perception and its compliance to

  7. Human occupation along the Steel Creek floodplain: results of an intensive archeological survey for the L area reactivation project, Savannah River Plant, Barnwell County, South Carolina. Research manuscript series 173

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.T. Jr.; Brooks, R.D.; White, J.W.

    1981-12-01

    An intensive archeological survey of the Steel Creek terrace and floodplain system below the L Reactor Area was conducted for the purpose of identifying the archeological resources and assessing their significance within this portion of the Savannah River Plant. The survey was required as part of the project plan for the reactivation of the L Reactor in order to comply with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, Executive Order 11593, the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended in 1980, and the Archeological and Historic Preservation of 1974. In accordance with these laws, a complete archeological survey of the potential impact area along Steel Creek was accomplished, resulting in the recovery of data for 18 archeological sites. According to the evidence recovered from the 18 sites, the Steel Creek watershed's occupation extends to at least 8000 B.P. Site 38BR55 is considered eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. Recommendations for the protection of this site and of four historic earthen structures in the floodplain are presented, along with a summary of the archeological background, methods, environmental reconstruction, research results, and recommendations resulting from the survey of the Steel Creek terrace and floodplain system.

  8. Occupational Sex Roles and Occupational Prestige.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simerly, D. Emily; Ruback, R. Barry

    Past studies on the sex-typing of occupations have used a single bipolar scale, ranging from masculinity to femininity. An empirical examination of both occupational sex roles and occupational prestige was conducted using two unipolar scales to assess masculinity and femininity. College students (N=183) rated 94 occupations, which were then…

  9. Average Passenger Occupancy (APO) in Your Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenstrup, Al

    1995-01-01

    Provides details of an activity in which students in grades 4-10 determine the Average Passenger Occupancy (APO) in their community and develop, administer, and analyze a survey to determine attitudes toward carpooling. (DDR)

  10. Pilot Programs in Agricultural Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binkley, Harold

    The joint supervisory and teacher education staffs developed criteria and surveyed needed agricultural competencies as a basis for course building. Teacher educators developed unit outlines for pilot programs in off-farm agricultural occupations conducted in Lafayette, Shelby County, Daviess County, and Reidland high schools. A quasi-experimental…

  11. State Licensing of Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    About 25 health professions and occupations are licensed by one or more states according to the survey of state licensing provisions by the National Center for Health Statistics. Data is presented in 22 chapters on the licensure of administrators, chiropractors, clinical laboratory personnel, dental hygienists, dentists, professional engineers,…

  12. Medical insurance claims and surveillance for occupational disease: analysis of respiratory, cardiac, and cancer outcomes in auto industry tool grinding operations.

    PubMed

    Park, R M

    2001-04-01

    To evaluate medical insurance claims for chronic disease investigation, claims from eight automotive machining plants (1984 to 1993) were linked with work histories (1967 to 1993), and associations with respiratory, cardiac, and cancer conditions were investigated, in a case-control design analyzed with logistic regression. The primary focus was tool grinding, but other important processes examined were metal-working, welding, forging, heat treat, engine testing, and diverse-skilled trades work. Considerable variability in claim-derived incidence rates across plants was not explained by age or known exposure differences. Asthma incidence increased in tool grinding (at mean cumulative duration: odds ratio [OR], 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90 to 10.0), as did non-ischemic heart disease (cardiomyopathy, cor pulmonale, rheumatic heart disease, or hypertension; OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.26 to 7.6). These trends appeared in models with deficits (OR < 1.0) for those ever exposed to tool grinding because of exposure-response miss-specification, demographic confounding, or removal of high-risk workers from the exposed group. The apparent cancer rates identified from claims greatly exceeded the expected rates from a cancer registry, suggesting that diagnostic, "rule-out," and surveillance functions were contributing. This study supports the epidemiologic use of medical insurance records in surveillance and, possibly, etiologic investigation and identifies issues requiring special attention or resolution. PMID:11322094

  13. Medical insurance claims and surveillance for occupational disease: analysis of respiratory, cardiac, and cancer outcomes in auto industry tool grinding operations.

    PubMed

    Park, R M

    2001-04-01

    To evaluate medical insurance claims for chronic disease investigation, claims from eight automotive machining plants (1984 to 1993) were linked with work histories (1967 to 1993), and associations with respiratory, cardiac, and cancer conditions were investigated, in a case-control design analyzed with logistic regression. The primary focus was tool grinding, but other important processes examined were metal-working, welding, forging, heat treat, engine testing, and diverse-skilled trades work. Considerable variability in claim-derived incidence rates across plants was not explained by age or known exposure differences. Asthma incidence increased in tool grinding (at mean cumulative duration: odds ratio [OR], 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90 to 10.0), as did non-ischemic heart disease (cardiomyopathy, cor pulmonale, rheumatic heart disease, or hypertension; OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.26 to 7.6). These trends appeared in models with deficits (OR < 1.0) for those ever exposed to tool grinding because of exposure-response miss-specification, demographic confounding, or removal of high-risk workers from the exposed group. The apparent cancer rates identified from claims greatly exceeded the expected rates from a cancer registry, suggesting that diagnostic, "rule-out," and surveillance functions were contributing. This study supports the epidemiologic use of medical insurance records in surveillance and, possibly, etiologic investigation and identifies issues requiring special attention or resolution.

  14. Analysis of the Medical Assisting Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keir, Lucille; And Others

    The occupational analysis contains a brief job description, presenting for the occupation of medical assistant 113 detailed task statements which specify job duties (tools, equipment, materials, objects acted upon, performance knowledge, safety consideration/hazards, decisions, cues, and errors) and learning skills (science, mathematics/number…

  15. An Analysis of the Plumbing Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Earnest L.; Hollar, Charles E.

    The occupational analysis contains a brief job description, presenting for the occupation of plumbing 12 detailed task statements which specify job duties (tools, equipment, materials, objects acted upon, performance knowledge, safety considerations/hazards, decisions, cues, and errors) and learning skills (science, mathematics/number systems, and…

  16. Causes and Alleviation of Occupational Stress in Child Care Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillenburger, Karola

    2004-01-01

    Occupational stress in not a new phenomenon in the working population. However, in the helping professions it has only recently attracted attention. The survey reported here was carried out in order to assess the extent of occupational stress, identify its causes, and suggest ways in which occupational stress can be alleviated. Field social…

  17. Improving Rural Bone Health and Minimizing Fracture Risk in West Virginia: Validation of the World Health Organization FRAX Assessment Tool as a Phone Survey for Osteoporosis Detection.

    PubMed

    Shuler, Franklin D; Scott, Kelly; Wilson-Byrne, Timothy; Morgan, Linda; Olajide, Omolola B

    2016-01-01

    West Virginia ranks second nationally in population ≥ 65 years old placing our state at greater risk for osteoporosis and fracture. The gold standard for detecting osteoporosis is dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), yet over half of West Virginia's counties do not have this machine. Due to access barriers, a validated phone-administered fracture prediction tool would be beneficial for osteoporosis screening. The World Health Organization's FRAX fracture prediction tool was administered as a phone survey to 45 patients; these results were compared to DXA bone mineral density determination. Results confirmed that the FRAX phone survey is as reliable as DXA in detecting osteoporosis or clinically significant osteopenia: 92% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value, 100% sensitivity and 91% specificity when compared to the gold standard. These promising results allow for the development of telephone-based protocols to improve osteoporosis detection, referral and treatment especially in areas with health care access barriers. PMID:27301160

  18. A survey of occupational exposure to inhalable wood dust among workers in small- and medium-scale wood-processing enterprises in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ayalew, Eyasu; Gebre, Yonas; De Wael, Karolien

    2015-03-01

    A study of wood dust exposure in 20 small- and medium-scale wood-processing enterprises was performed in Ethiopia. Sampling was conducted daily from January to June, 2013 and a total of 360 samples from 113 workers were collected with Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) personal samplers. Eight-hour time-weighted average exposure to wood dust ranged from 0.24 to 23.3mg m(-3) with a geometric mean (GM) of 6.82mg m(-3) and a geometric standard deviation of 1.82. Although Ethiopia did not have any defined standard of Occupational Exposure Limit for wood dust exposure, 71% of the measurements exceeded the limit of 5mg m(-3) set by the European Union (EU). Higher than the EU exposure limit was measured while workers perform sanding and sawing activities with a GM of 9.72 and 7.60mg m(-3), respectively. In conclusion, wood workers in the small- and medium-scale enterprises are at a higher risk of developing different respiratory health problems with continuous exposure trends.

  19. Data from camera surveys identifying co-occurrence and occupancy linkages between fishers (Pekania pennanti), rodent prey, mesocarnivores, and larger predators in mixed-conifer forests.

    PubMed

    Sweitzer, Rick A; Furnas, Brett J

    2016-03-01

    These data provide additional information relevant to the frequency of fisher detections by camera traps, and single-season occupancy and local persistence of fishers in small patches of forest habitats detailed elsewhere, "Landscape Fuel Reduction, Forest Fire, and Biophysical Linkages to Local Habitat Use and Local Persistence of Fishers (Pekania pennanti) in Sierra Nevada Mixed-conifer Forests" [10]. The data provides insight on camera trap detections of 3 fisher predators (bobcat [Lynx rufus]). Coyote [Canis latrans], mountain lion [Puma concolor], 5 mesocarnivores in the same foraging guild as fishers (gray fox [Urocyon cinereoargenteus]) ringtail [Bassariscus astutus], marten [Martes americana], striped skunk [Mephitis mephitis] spotted skunk [Spilogale gracilis], and 5 Sciuridae rodents that fishers consume as prey (Douglas squirrel [Tamiasciurus douglasii]), gray squirrel [Sciurus griseus], northern flying squirrel [Glaucomys sabrinus], long-eared chipmunk [Neotamias quadrimaculatus], California ground squirrel [Spermophilus beecheyi]. We used these data to identify basic patterns of co-occurrence with fishers, and to evaluate the relative importance of presence of competing mesocarnivores, rodent prey, and predators for fisher occupancy of small, 1 km(2) grid cells of forest habitat. PMID:26937448

  20. Data from camera surveys identifying co-occurrence and occupancy linkages between fishers (Pekania pennanti), rodent prey, mesocarnivores, and larger predators in mixed-conifer forests

    PubMed Central

    Sweitzer, Rick A.; Furnas, Brett J.

    2016-01-01

    These data provide additional information relevant to the frequency of fisher detections by camera traps, and single-season occupancy and local persistence of fishers in small patches of forest habitats detailed elsewhere, “Landscape Fuel Reduction, Forest Fire, and Biophysical Linkages to Local Habitat Use and Local Persistence of Fishers (Pekania pennanti) in Sierra Nevada Mixed-conifer Forests” [10]. The data provides insight on camera trap detections of 3 fisher predators (bobcat [Lynx rufus]). Coyote [Canis latrans], mountain lion [Puma concolor], 5 mesocarnivores in the same foraging guild as fishers (gray fox [Urocyon cinereoargenteus]) ringtail [Bassariscus astutus], marten [Martes americana], striped skunk [Mephitis mephitis] spotted skunk [Spilogale gracilis], and 5 Sciuridae rodents that fishers consume as prey (Douglas squirrel [Tamiasciurus douglasii]), gray squirrel [Sciurus griseus], northern flying squirrel [Glaucomys sabrinus], long-eared chipmunk [Neotamias quadrimaculatus], California ground squirrel [Spermophilus beecheyi]. We used these data to identify basic patterns of co-occurrence with fishers, and to evaluate the relative importance of presence of competing mesocarnivores, rodent prey, and predators for fisher occupancy of small, 1 km2 grid cells of forest habitat. PMID:26937448

  1. Immunization against hepatitis B--what can we expect? Results of a survey of antibody response to immunization in persons 'at risk' of occupational exposure to hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, D; Player, V; Heap, D C; Hammond, A

    1990-06-01

    One thousand three hundred and twenty adults at risk of occupational exposure to hepatitis B were immunized using genetically engineered surface antigen and their antibody response (anti-HBs IU/l) assessed. Sex was known for all subjects and age for 1120 (range from 17-71 years). Seven hundred and sixty-four subjects were immunized in the local Department of Occupational Health, the remainder mainly by general practitioners. Analysis of 'good responders' (anti-HBs greater than 100 IU/l) according to age and sex showed that increasing age and male sex had independent adverse effects on the likelihood of developing a satisfactory level of antibody to HBsAg. Furthermore even those most likely to respond well (young women), had a 1/5 to 1/6 failure rate to achieve greater than 100 IU/l anti-HBs. Of 63 persons who received a fourth dose of vaccine, 26 developed anti-HBs titres greater than 100 IU/l when tested after 6 months. Subjects who had a low level of anti-HBs following primary immunization were more likely to develop greater than 100 IU/l anti-HBs following a booster dose than were non-responders (less than 10 IU/l). PMID:2140795

  2. A survey of occupational exposure to inhalable wood dust among workers in small- and medium-scale wood-processing enterprises in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ayalew, Eyasu; Gebre, Yonas; De Wael, Karolien

    2015-03-01

    A study of wood dust exposure in 20 small- and medium-scale wood-processing enterprises was performed in Ethiopia. Sampling was conducted daily from January to June, 2013 and a total of 360 samples from 113 workers were collected with Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) personal samplers. Eight-hour time-weighted average exposure to wood dust ranged from 0.24 to 23.3mg m(-3) with a geometric mean (GM) of 6.82mg m(-3) and a geometric standard deviation of 1.82. Although Ethiopia did not have any defined standard of Occupational Exposure Limit for wood dust exposure, 71% of the measurements exceeded the limit of 5mg m(-3) set by the European Union (EU). Higher than the EU exposure limit was measured while workers perform sanding and sawing activities with a GM of 9.72 and 7.60mg m(-3), respectively. In conclusion, wood workers in the small- and medium-scale enterprises are at a higher risk of developing different respiratory health problems with continuous exposure trends. PMID:25349370

  3. Data from camera surveys identifying co-occurrence and occupancy linkages between fishers (Pekania pennanti), rodent prey, mesocarnivores, and larger predators in mixed-conifer forests.

    PubMed

    Sweitzer, Rick A; Furnas, Brett J

    2016-03-01

    These data provide additional information relevant to the frequency of fisher detections by camera traps, and single-season occupancy and local persistence of fishers in small patches of forest habitats detailed elsewhere, "Landscape Fuel Reduction, Forest Fire, and Biophysical Linkages to Local Habitat Use and Local Persistence of Fishers (Pekania pennanti) in Sierra Nevada Mixed-conifer Forests" [10]. The data provides insight on camera trap detections of 3 fisher predators (bobcat [Lynx rufus]). Coyote [Canis latrans], mountain lion [Puma concolor], 5 mesocarnivores in the same foraging guild as fishers (gray fox [Urocyon cinereoargenteus]) ringtail [Bassariscus astutus], marten [Martes americana], striped skunk [Mephitis mephitis] spotted skunk [Spilogale gracilis], and 5 Sciuridae rodents that fishers consume as prey (Douglas squirrel [Tamiasciurus douglasii]), gray squirrel [Sciurus griseus], northern flying squirrel [Glaucomys sabrinus], long-eared chipmunk [Neotamias quadrimaculatus], California ground squirrel [Spermophilus beecheyi]. We used these data to identify basic patterns of co-occurrence with fishers, and to evaluate the relative importance of presence of competing mesocarnivores, rodent prey, and predators for fisher occupancy of small, 1 km(2) grid cells of forest habitat.

  4. Imaging of occupational and environmental lung diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Akira, M.

    2008-03-15

    The chest radiograph is the basic tool for identifying occupational and environmental lung diseases; however, its sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of occupational and environmental lung diseases are low. High-resolution CT is the optimal method of recognizing parenchymal abnormalities in occupational and environmental disease. With the exception of pleural plaques, the CT findings of occupational and environmental lung diseases are nonspecific. Therefore, correlation of imaging features with history of exposure, other clinical features, and sometimes pathology is needed for the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis.

  5. A job safety program for construction workers designed to reduce the potential for occupational injury using tool box training sessions and computer-assisted biofeedback stress management techniques.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kenneth A; Ruppe, Joan

    2002-01-01

    This project was conducted with a multicultural construction company in Hawaii, USA. The job duties performed included drywall and carpentry work. The following objectives were selected for this project: (a) fire prevention training and inspection of first aid equipment; (b) blood-borne pathogen training and risk evaluation; (c) ergonomic and risk evaluation intervention program; (d) electrical safety training and inspection program; (e) slips, trips, and falls safety training; (f) stress assessment and Personal Profile System; (g) safety and health program survey; (h) improving employee relations and morale by emphasizing spirituality; and (i) computer-assisted biofeedback stress management training. Results of the project indicated that observed safety hazards, reported injuries, and levels of perceived stress. were reduced for the majority of the population. PMID:12189103

  6. Occupational careers and mortality of elderly men.

    PubMed

    Moore, D E; Hayward, M D

    1990-02-01

    This article presents findings from an analysis of occupational differentials in mortality among a cohort of males aged 55 years and older in the United States for the period 1966-1983. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Men, we construct event histories for 3,080 respondents who reach the exact age of 55. The dynamics that characterize socioeconomic differentials in mortality are analyzed by evaluating the differential effects of occupation over the career cycle. Maximum likelihood estimates of hazard-model parameters show that the mortality of current or last occupation differs substantially from that of longest occupation, controlling for education, income, health status, and other sociodemographic factors. In particular, the rate of mortality is reduced by the substantive complexity of the longest occupation while social skills and physical and environmental demands of the latest occupation lower mortality. PMID:2303140

  7. THE OCCUPATIONAL ASPIRATION SCALE--THEORY, STRUCTURE AND CORRELATES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HALLER, ARCHIBALD O.; MILLER, IRWIN W.

    A SCALE TO MEASURE THE LEVEL OF OCCUPATIONAL ASPIRATION (LOA) OF SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS AS A PREDICTIVE TOOL IN FUTURE OCCUPATIONAL CHOICE IS PRESENTED AND EXTENSIVELY EVALUATED IN THIS MONOGRAPH. THE OCCUPATIONAL ASPIRATION SCALE IS AN EASILY ADMINISTERED INSTRUMENT WHICH FOCUSES ON IDEALISTIC AND REALISTIC EXPRESSION LEVELS AS WELL AS ON…

  8. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M

    1995-01-01

    Many toxic compounds found in air emissions may induce bronchoconstriction. In the workplace, workers are exposed to these compounds, often in much higher concentrations. Some of these compounds act as sensitizers. Of these, some compounds induce asthma by producing specific IgE antibodies to the compound or its protein conjugate, while others induce asthma through yet unidentified immunologic mechanisms. Some compounds, when inhaled in high concentrations, act as irritants and produce bronchoconstriction probably by inducing acute airway inflammation. The latter condition is called Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS) or irritant-induced asthma. Occupational asthma is an excellent model to study the pathogenesis and the natural history of adult onset asthma because the responsible agent can be identified, complete avoidance is possible, and exposure can be measured or estimated. PMID:8549481

  9. Environmental justice: implications for occupational health nurses.

    PubMed

    Postma, Julie

    2006-11-01

    Through the use of innovative tools, such as clinical mnemonics, exercises in risk and asset mapping, and strategic program development, occupational health nurses can incorporate dimensions of environmental justice (EJ) into the workplace. Occupational health nurses who also take on educational roles can use case studies and network with labor and EJ groups to provide clinical experiences for occupational and environmental health nursing students, thereby integrating EJ into occupational and environmental health nursing practice. Occupational health nurses are well positioned to serve as technical experts within community-based participatory research projects. Occupational health nurses must share their knowledge and experience as members of coalitions that represent workers in their fight for worker health and safety.

  10. Using the North American Breeding Bird Survey as a tool for conservation: A critique of Bart et al. (2004)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, John R.; Link, William A.; Nichols, James D.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Bart et al. (2004) develop methods for predicting needed samples for estimation of long-term trends from Count survey data, and they apply these methods to the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS). They recommend adding approximately 40% more survey routes ill the BBS to allow for estimation of long-term (i.e., 20 year) trends for a collection of species. We critique several aspects of their analysis and suggest that their focus on long-term trends and expansion of the present survey design will provide limited benefits for conservation because it fails to either enhance the credibility of the survey or better tie the survey to regional management activities. A primary innovation claimed by Bart et al. (2004) is the incorporation of bias in estimation of study planning. We question the value of this approach, as it requires reliable estimates of range of future bias. We show that estimates of bias used by Bart et al. (2004) are speculative. Failure to obtain better estimates of this bias is likely to compromise the credibility of future analyses of the survey. We also note that the generic analysis of population trends that they provide is of questionable validity and is unlikely to be relevant for regions and species of management concern.

  11. Image processing occupancy sensor

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2016-09-27

    A system and method of detecting occupants in a building automation system environment using image based occupancy detection and position determinations. In one example, the system includes an image processing occupancy sensor that detects the number and position of occupants within a space that has controllable building elements such as lighting and ventilation diffusers. Based on the position and location of the occupants, the system can finely control the elements to optimize conditions for the occupants, optimize energy usage, among other advantages.

  12. Empirical Evidence on Occupation and Industry Specific Human Capital

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents instrumental variables estimates of the effects of firm tenure, occupation specific work experience, industry specific work experience, and general work experience on wages using data from the 1979 Cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The estimates indicate that both occupation and industry specific human capital are key determinants of wages, and the importance of various types of human capital varies widely across one-digit occupations. Human capital is primarily occupation specific in occupations such as craftsmen, where workers realize a 14% increase in wages after five years of occupation specific experience but do not realize wage gains from industry specific experience. In contrast, human capital is primarily industry specific in other occupations such as managerial employment where workers realize a 23% wage increase after five years of industry specific work experience. In other occupations, such as professional employment, both occupation and industry specific human capital are key determinants of wages. PMID:20526448

  13. Compliance with Standard Guidelines for the Prevention of Occupational Transmission of Bloodborne and Airborne Pathogens: A Survey of Postanesthesia Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tait, Alan R.; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Tuttle, Dale B.; Malviya, Shobha

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 34 nurses found that 81% always complied with guidelines for caring for patients with human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis B; only 31% complied when patients were low risk. Reasons for noncompliance were "no anticipated blood contact" (53%) or "too busy" (25%). (SK)

  14. Comparative Occupational Survey of Civilian and Military Members in the Pavements Maintenance and Construction Equipment Operator Specialties. Final Report for Period 1 October 1975-30 October 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Douglas K.

    A study was conducted to analyze and compare the job performance of civil service and military pavements maintenance workers and construction equipment operators. A military sample of 2,675 and a civilian sample of 1,974 were surveyed by means of a job inventory checklist and relative time spent rating method. Of the three job types that were…

  15. A survey of available tools and web servers for analysis of protein–protein interactions and interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Kar, Gozde; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila

    2009-01-01

    The unanimous agreement that cellular processes are (largely) governed by interactions between proteins has led to enormous community efforts culminating in overwhelming information relating to these proteins; to the regulation of their interactions, to the way in which they interact and to the function which is determined by these interactions. These data have been organized in databases and servers. However, to make these really useful, it is essential not only to be aware of these, but in particular to have a working knowledge of which tools to use for a given problem; what are the tool advantages and drawbacks; and no less important how to combine these for a particular goal since usually it is not one tool, but some combination of tool-modules that is needed. This is the goal of this review. PMID:19240123

  16. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs that other tools may not discover. We recommended the users to use multiple motif finding Web tools that implement different algorithms for obtaining significant motifs, overlapping resemble motifs, and non-overlapping motifs. Finally, we provided our suggestions for future development of motif finding Web tool that better assists researchers for finding motifs in ChIP-Seq data. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Prof. Sandor Pongor, Dr. Yuriy Gusev, and Dr. Shyam Prabhakar (nominated by Prof. Limsoon Wong). PMID:24555784

  17. Photogrammetry surveys and mosaic: a useful tool to monitor active zones. Applications to the Indonesian Lusi eruption site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Giovanni; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Mazzini, Adriano; Iarocci, Alessandro; Caramelli, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Unmanned and remotely operated aircraft showed to be an efficient and cost effective way to explore remote or extreme environments. Comparative photogrammetry studies are an efficient way to study and monitor he evolution of geologically active areas and ongoing events and are able to highlight details that are typically lost during traditional field campaigns. The Lusi mud eruption in eastern Java (Indonesia) represents one of the most spectacular geological phenomena that is ongoing since May 2006. In the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126) we designed and constructed a multipurpose drone to survey the eruption site. Among the numerous other payloads, the Lusi drone is equipped with Olympus EPM-2 and Go-Pro Hero3 cameras that allow the operator to collect video stills, high quality pictures and to complete photogrammetry surveys. Targeted areas have been selected for detailed studies in the 7 km2 region inside the embankment that was prevent the mud burial of the settlements in the Sidoarjo Regency. The region is characterized by the presence of the Watukosek fault zone. This strike slip system originates from the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex and extends to the north east of the Java Island intersecting the Lusi crater. Therefore of particular interest are the faulted surveyed areas present around the Lusi crater inside the embankment. Results reveal a surprising accuracy for the collected mosaic. Multiple surveys are able to reveal the changes and the evolution of the fault through time and to indicate more active zones. In particular this type of survey can highlight the weakness zones and is thus useful to prevent potential geohazards in the area. The poster shows the aerial survey results, including a 3d-printed slice of LuSi, obtained combining 2500 16 Mp photographs. A 3d zoomed detail is also shown, evidencing the resolution that this technique can offer.

  18. Statement--fundamental concepts of occupational therapy: occupation, purposeful activity, and function.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa, J; Kramer, P

    1997-01-01

    Deriving from the philosophical basis of the profession, occupation is the core concept of the profession of occupational therapy. However, in the occupational therapy literature, the term occupation is used in a variety of ways. Occupation, a collection of activities that people use to fill their time and give life meaning, is organized around roles or in terms of activities of daily living, work and productive activities, or pleasure, for survival, for necessity, and for their personal meaning. It is the individualized, unique combination of activities that comprises an individual's occupations. Purposeful activities have been described in many different ways: as something all people engage in; as tools or media that therapists use to enhance or facilitate performance; and vehicles for bringing about change. Purposeful activities are seen as part of the process of occupational therapy. Purposeful activities are subset of occupations in that they are goal directed and serve as a major tool in the process of occupational therapy. The term function, viewed as the ability to perform activities required in one's occupations has become increasingly important to society in describing the performance or change in individuals. This societal shift in ideas has prompted the concept of function, viewed as a product, to become more important than the process of bringing about change. Occupational therapy practitioners typically have viewed the process as being just as important as the product. When working to improve function, occupational therapy practitioners use purposeful activities that are meaningful to the person in relation to his or her occupational history, preferences, personal goals, and needs. Occupational therapy practitioners need to keep the individual's occupations in the forefront of their thoughts when using any purposeful activity and to plan interventions toward improving the individual's ability to function within his or her occupations. In the interest

  19. Occupational Therapy Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of occupational therapy assistant, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 16 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general as well as those specific to the occupation of occupational therapy assistant. The…

  20. Surveying Graduates of a Self-Contained High School Gifted Program: A Tool for Evaluation, Development, and Strategic Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, L. D.; VanderPloeg, Merri Kae

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a survey of graduates of a high school program for the academically gifted and argue that such data, both qualitative and quantitative, can add an important element to the evaluation of a program--in this case, a regional Governor's School--especially by using a Comparison group of high-achieving graduates of the same systems'…

  1. Soil Survey Manuals and 3-D Models: Tools for Teaching Concepts of Land Use in Environmental Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a role-playing exercise designed to allow students to make decisions on land use activities while requiring them to address a range of ecological and environmental issues. The activity uses data and information from soil survey manuals in conjunction with a student-created physical topographical model. (WRM)

  2. Portal Surveys of Time-Out Drinking Locations: A Tool for Studying Binge Drinking and AOD Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voas, Robert B.; Furr-Holden, Debra; Lauer, Elizabeth; Bright, Kristin; Johnson, Mark B.; Miller, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Portal surveys, defined as assessments occurring proximal to the entry point to a high-risk locale and immediately on exit, can be used in different settings to measure characteristics and behavior of attendees at an event of interest. This methodology has been developed to assess alcohol and other drug (AOD) use at specific events and has…

  3. Occupational therapy practice: focusing on occupational performance.

    PubMed

    Baum, C M; Law, M

    1997-04-01

    Changes in the health system require occupational therapy practitioners to focus their concerns on the long-term health needs of people and to help them develop healthy behaviors not only to improve their health, but also to minimize the health care costs associated with dysfunction. Occupational therapy practitioners must initiate efforts in the community to integrate a range of services that promote, protect, and improve the health of the public. This article shares the experiences of Canadian occupational therapy practitioners, who were challenged by their government nearly 15 years ago to establish a system that demonstrates effectiveness by improving the health of occupational therapy clients. By focusing on occupational performance, occupational therapy practitioners assist clients in becoming actively engaged in their life activities. This requires client-centered and family-centered practice and services that span from the agency or institution to the community. Occupational therapy practitioners must work collaboratively with persons in the client's environment (e.g., family members, teachers, independent living specialists, employers, neighbors, friends) to assist the client in obtaining skills and to make modifications to remove barriers that create a social disadvantage. A focus on occupational performance requires occupational therapy personnel to reframe how we think about occupational therapy to a sociomedical context and to take an active role in building healthy communities. PMID:9085726

  4. Future preparation of occupational health nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Scalzi, C C; Wilson, D L; Ebert, R

    1991-03-01

    This article presents the results of a national survey of job activities of corporate level occupational health nurse managers. The survey was designed to identify the relative amount of time spent and importance attributed to specific areas of their current job. In general this sample tended to have more management experience and educational preparation than previously cited studies: over 50% had completed a graduate degree. The scores for importance and time spent were highly correlated. That is, occupational health corporate nurse managers seemed to allocate their time to job responsibilities they considered most important. Management activities related to policy, practice standards, quality assurance, staff development, and systems for client care delivery appear to represent the core responsibilities of occupational health nursing management. Curriculum recommendations for management positions in occupational health include: health policy, program planning, and evaluation; business strategy; applications of management information systems; quality assurance; and marketing. PMID:2001272

  5. Occupational stress and social support in naval personnel

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, A.A.; Chikkanna, C.B.; Rote, M.S.; Singh, R.J.; Bhanot, G.; Pillai, Anil; Pisharody, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Data show that naval personnel have a high incidence of stress related disorders. A high prevalence of occupational stress was seen in a previous survey carried out on Indian Naval personnel. However, the role of social support in reducing occupational stress was not studied. To study occupational stress in Indian Naval personnel and to study the effect of social support on occupational stress. Methods 5077 naval personnel were surveyed using study questionnaires which included Occupational Stress Inventory, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-12 item version as a measure of psychological health. The data was statistically analysed using chi square test and other non-parametric tests. Results High occupational stress was seen in personnel serving afloat (66.47%) as compared to those serving ashore (51.55%) and on submarines (53.72%). Among personnel serving afloat, occupational stress was highest among Junior Sailors as compared to Senior Sailors and Officers. Occupational stress was linked to poor psychological health as measured by the GHQ and younger age. Perceived social support was effective in reducing occupational stress in Officers and Senior Sailors but not in Junior Sailors where paradoxically it seemed to lead to greater occupational stress. Conclusions High occupational stress was seen in more than half the service personnel studied. Occupational stress is mitigated by social support in Officers and Senior Sailors but not in Junior Sailors. PMID:24532905

  6. Exposure Estimation and Interpretation of Occupational Risk: Enhanced Information for the Occupational Risk Manager.

    PubMed

    Waters, Martha; McKernan, Lauralynn; Maier, Andrew; Jayjock, Michael; Schaeffer, Val; Brosseau, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental goal of this article is to describe, define, and analyze the components of the risk characterization process for occupational exposures. Current methods are described for the probabilistic characterization of exposure, including newer techniques that have increasing applications for assessing data from occupational exposure scenarios. In addition, since the probability of health effects reflects variability in the exposure estimate as well as the dose-response curve-the integrated considerations of variability surrounding both components of the risk characterization provide greater information to the occupational hygienist. Probabilistic tools provide a more informed view of exposure as compared to use of discrete point estimates for these inputs to the risk characterization process. Active use of such tools for exposure and risk assessment will lead to a scientifically supported worker health protection program. Understanding the bases for an occupational risk assessment, focusing on important sources of variability and uncertainty enables characterizing occupational risk in terms of a probability, rather than a binary decision of acceptable risk or unacceptable risk. A critical review of existing methods highlights several conclusions: (1) exposure estimates and the dose-response are impacted by both variability and uncertainty and a well-developed risk characterization reflects and communicates this consideration; (2) occupational risk is probabilistic in nature and most accurately considered as a distribution, not a point estimate; and (3) occupational hygienists have a variety of tools available to incorporate concepts of risk characterization into occupational health and practice.

  7. Exposure Estimation and Interpretation of Occupational Risk: Enhanced Information for the Occupational Risk Manager

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Martha; McKernan, Lauralynn; Maier, Andrew; Jayjock, Michael; Schaeffer, Val; Brosseau, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental goal of this article is to describe, define, and analyze the components of the risk characterization process for occupational exposures. Current methods are described for the probabilistic characterization of exposure, including newer techniques that have increasing applications for assessing data from occupational exposure scenarios. In addition, since the probability of health effects reflects variability in the exposure estimate as well as the dose-response curve—the integrated considerations of variability surrounding both components of the risk characterization provide greater information to the occupational hygienist. Probabilistic tools provide a more informed view of exposure as compared to use of discrete point estimates for these inputs to the risk characterization process. Active use of such tools for exposure and risk assessment will lead to a scientifically supported worker health protection program. Understanding the bases for an occupational risk assessment, focusing on important sources of variability and uncertainty enables characterizing occupational risk in terms of a probability, rather than a binary decision of acceptable risk or unacceptable risk. A critical review of existing methods highlights several conclusions: (1) exposure estimates and the dose-response are impacted by both variability and uncertainty and a well-developed risk characterization reflects and communicates this consideration; (2) occupational risk is probabilistic in nature and most accurately considered as a distribution, not a point estimate; and (3) occupational hygienists have a variety of tools available to incorporate concepts of risk characterization into occupational health and practice. PMID:26302336

  8. Estimating site occupancy and abundance using indirect detection indices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, T.R.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of factors influencing animal distribution and abundance is essential in many areas of ecological research, management, and policy-making. Because common methods for modeling and estimating abundance (e.g., capture-recapture, distance sampling) are sometimes not practical for large areas or elusive species, indices are sometimes used as surrogate measures of abundance. We present an extension of the Royle and Nichols (2003) generalization of the MacKenzie et al. (2002) site-occupancy model that incorporates length of the sampling interval into the, model for detection probability. As a result, we obtain a modeling framework that shows how useful information can be extracted from a class of index methods we call indirect detection indices (IDIs). Examples of IDIs include scent station, tracking tube, snow track, tracking plate, and hair snare surveys. Our model is maximum likelihood, and it can be used to estimate site occupancy and model factors influencing patterns of occupancy and abundance in space. Under certain circumstances, it can also be used to estimate abundance. We evaluated model properties using Monte Carlo simulations and illustrate the method with tracking tube and scent station data. We believe this model will be a useful tool for determining factors that influence animal distribution and abundance.

  9. [Prevention of occupational dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Géraut, Christian; Tripodi, Dominique

    2002-09-01

    The prevention of the occupational skin disease is essential to avoid some clinical complications and to preserve job. The suppression of the responsible factor is rarely possible at work, but when it is possible, it is efficient. The practice of real orders of prevention is the best way to proceed, writing individual and collective prevention prescriptions, which have to be very precise and adapted to every case during one sufficient time to get a good adherence of the patients. The implementation of the prevention consists of a set of advices on the prevention measures carrying on the environment, the processes or the work tools, the bad habits, and advices about the professional gestures to avoid and about the convenient information on the manner to use the means of individual prevention (gloves, protective creams and moisturizers) recommended and adapted to each work sequence. PMID:12385155

  10. [Ergonomics and occupational therapy].

    PubMed

    Capodaglio, E M

    2010-01-01

    Occupational ergonomics mostly deals with risk assessment and design/redesign of the work layout, oriented to enhance the worker's safety and wellbeing and the system's efficiency. Risk assessment is the fundamental phase, conducted through international standards and guidelines, according to the different areas. Then the risk level is connected with preventive or corrective measures. This second phase is direct to organizational, ergonomic, engeneering interventions but it behaves in essential way the employer participation. At this scope, educational, training and technological tools are available. Ergonomics configure itself as a valid complement in the return-to-work phase, providing for workstation adjustment or job modification, contributing to enhance safety and comfort and to reduce the risk of injury and disability in the worker.

  11. Aggregate Exposure and Cumulative Risk Assessment--Integrating Occupational and Non-occupational Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T J; Dotson, G S; Williams, P R D; Maier, A; Gadagbui, B; Pandalai, S P; Lamba, A; Hearl, F; Mumtaz, M

    2015-01-01

    Occupational exposure limits have traditionally focused on preventing morbidity and mortality arising from inhalation exposures to individual chemical stressors in the workplace. While central to occupational risk assessment, occupational exposure limits have limited application as a refined disease prevention tool because they do not account for all of the complexities of the work and non-occupational environments and are based on varying health endpoints. To be of greater utility, occupational exposure limits and other risk management tools could integrate broader consideration of risks from multiple exposure pathways and routes (aggregate risk) as well as the combined risk from exposure to both chemical and non-chemical stressors, within and beyond the workplace, including the possibility that such exposures may cause interactions or modify the toxic effects observed (cumulative risk). Although still at a rudimentary stage in many cases, a variety of methods and tools have been developed or are being used in allied risk assessment fields to incorporate such considerations in the risk assessment process. These approaches, which are collectively referred to as cumulative risk assessment, have potential to be adapted or modified for occupational scenarios and provide a tangible path forward for occupational risk assessment. Accounting for complex exposures in the workplace and the broader risks faced by the individual also requires a more complete consideration of the composite effects of occupational and non-occupational risk factors to fully assess and manage worker health problems. Barriers to integrating these different factors remain, but new and ongoing community-based and worker health-related initiatives may provide mechanisms for identifying and integrating risk from aggregate exposures and cumulative risks from all relevant sources, be they occupational or non-occupational. PMID:26583907

  12. Aggregate Exposure and Cumulative Risk Assessment—Integrating Occupational and Non-occupational Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, T. J.; Dotson, G. S.; Williams, P. R.D.; Maier, A.; Gadagbui, B.; Pandalai, S. P.; Lamba, A.; Hearl, F.; Mumtaz, M.

    2015-01-01

    Occupational exposure limits have traditionally focused on preventing morbidity and mortality arising from inhalation exposures to individual chemical stressors in the workplace. While central to occupational risk assessment, occupational exposure limits have limited application as a refined disease prevention tool because they do not account for all of the complexities of the work and non-occupational environments and are based on varying health endpoints. To be of greater utility, occupational exposure limits and other risk management tools could integrate broader consideration of risks from multiple exposure pathways and routes (aggregate risk) as well as the combined risk from exposure to both chemical and non-chemical stressors, within and beyond the workplace, including the possibility that such exposures may cause interactions or modify the toxic effects observed (cumulative risk). Although still at a rudimentary stage in many cases, a variety of methods and tools have been developed or are being used in allied risk assessment fields to incorporate such considerations in the risk assessment process. These approaches, which are collectively referred to as cumulative risk assessment, have potential to be adapted or modified for occupational scenarios and provide a tangible path forward for occupational risk assessment. Accounting for complex exposures in the workplace and the broader risks faced by the individual also requires a more complete consideration of the composite effects of occupational and non-occupational risk factors to fully assess and manage worker health problems. Barriers to integrating these different factors remain, but new and ongoing community-based and worker health-related initiatives may provide mechanisms for identifying and integrating risk from aggregate exposures and cumulative risks from all relevant sources, be they occupational or non-occupational. PMID:26583907

  13. Occupational and environmental lung disease: occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Stenton, S C

    2010-01-01

    Occupational exposures cause 10-15% of new-onset asthma in adults, and that represents a considerable health and economic burden. Exposure to many causative agents is now well controlled but workplace practices are constantly evolving and new hazards being introduced. Overall, there is no good evidence that the incidence of occupational asthma is decreasing. Evidence-based guidelines such as those published by the British Occupational Health research Foundation and Standards of Care documents should help raise awareness of the problem and improve management. Key targets include the control of occupational exposures, a high index of suspicion in any adult with new onset asthma, and early detailed investigation.

  14. Respiratory protection competencies for the occupational health nurse.

    PubMed

    Burns, Candace; Lachat, Ann M; Gordon, Kimberly; Ryan, Mary Gene; Gruden, MaryAnn; Barker, D Paxon; Taormina, Deborah

    2014-03-01

    Approximately 5 million workers employed at 1.3 million work settings are required to wear some form of respiratory protection as part of their jobs. Occupational health nurses can protect the respiratory health of America's workforce. In 2012, the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses Grants Committee Working Group conducted a nationwide survey of occupational health nurses to assess their knowledge, comfort, skills, and abilities relative to respiratory protection. The Working Group used the survey findings as a foundation for the development of respiratory protection competencies for occupational health nurses and a guide for the development of educational modules. PMID:24811695

  15. Evolution of Data Management Tools for Managing Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose Results: A Survey of iPhone Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Anoop; Hou, Philip; Golnik, Timothy; Flaherty, Joseph; Vu, Sonny

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies have indicated that sharing of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) data and subsequent feedback from the health care provider (HCP) can help achieve glycemic goals such as a reduction in glycated hemoglobin. Electronic SMBG data management and sharing tools for the PC and smartphones may help in reducing the effort to manage SMBG data. Methods We reviewed software and top-ranking applications (Apps) for the iPhone platform to document the variety of useful features. Additionally, in an attempt to assess metrics such as task analysis and user friendliness of diabetes Apps, we observed and surveyed patients with diabetes as they recorded and relayed sample SMBG results to their hypothetical HCP using three Apps. Results Observation and survey demonstrated that the WaveSense Diabetes Manager allowed the participants to complete preselected SMBG data entry and relay tasks faster than other Apps. The survey revealed patient behavior patterns that would be useful in future App development. Conclusion Being able to record, analyze, seamlessly share, and obtain feedback on the SMBG data using an iPhone/iTouch App might potentially benefit patients. Trends in SMBG data management and the possibility of having interoperability of blood glucose monitors and smartphones may open up new avenues of diabetes management for the technologically savvy patient. PMID:20663461

  16. National Nursing Home Survey

    Cancer.gov

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  17. Community occupancy before-after-control-impact (CO-BACI) analysis of Hurricane Gudrun on Swedish forest birds.

    PubMed

    Russell, James C; Stjernman, Martin; Lindström, Åke; Smith, Henrik G

    2015-04-01

    Resilience of ecological communities to perturbation is important in the face of increased global change from anthropogenic stressors. Monitoring is required to detect the impact of, and recovery from, perturbations, and before-after-control-impact (BACI) analysis provides a powerful framework in this regard. However, species in a community are not observed with perfect detection, and occupancy analysis is required to correct for imperfect detectability of species. We present a Bayesian community occupancy before-after-control-impact (CO-BACI) framework to monitor ecological community response to perturbation when constituent species are imperfectly detected. We test the power of the model to detect changes in community composition following an acute perturbation with simulation. We then apply the model to a study of the impact of a large hurricane on the forest bird community of Sweden, using data from the national bird survey scheme. Although simulation shows the model can detect changes in community occupancy following an acute perturbation, application to a Swedish forest bird community following a major hurricane detected no change in community occupancy despite widespread forest loss. Birds with landscape occupancy less than 50% required correcting for detectability. We conclude that CO-BACI analysis is a useful tool that can incorporate rare species in analyses and detect occupancy changes in ecological communities following perturbation, but, because it does not include abundance, some impacts may be overlooked. PMID:26214914

  18. Community occupancy before-after-control-impact (CO-BACI) analysis of Hurricane Gudrun on Swedish forest birds.

    PubMed

    Russell, James C; Stjernman, Martin; Lindström, Åke; Smith, Henrik G

    2015-04-01

    Resilience of ecological communities to perturbation is important in the face of increased global change from anthropogenic stressors. Monitoring is required to detect the impact of, and recovery from, perturbations, and before-after-control-impact (BACI) analysis provides a powerful framework in this regard. However, species in a community are not observed with perfect detection, and occupancy analysis is required to correct for imperfect detectability of species. We present a Bayesian community occupancy before-after-control-impact (CO-BACI) framework to monitor ecological community response to perturbation when constituent species are imperfectly detected. We test the power of the model to detect changes in community composition following an acute perturbation with simulation. We then apply the model to a study of the impact of a large hurricane on the forest bird community of Sweden, using data from the national bird survey scheme. Although simulation shows the model can detect changes in community occupancy following an acute perturbation, application to a Swedish forest bird community following a major hurricane detected no change in community occupancy despite widespread forest loss. Birds with landscape occupancy less than 50% required correcting for detectability. We conclude that CO-BACI analysis is a useful tool that can incorporate rare species in analyses and detect occupancy changes in ecological communities following perturbation, but, because it does not include abundance, some impacts may be overlooked.

  19. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: modelling the clustering and halo occupation distribution of BOSS CMASS galaxies in the Final Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Guo, Hong; Klypin, Anatoly; Behroozi, Peter; Hahn, Chang Hoon; Comparat, Johan; Yepes, Gustavo; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K.; Tinker, Jeremy; Gottlöber, Stefan; Favole, Ginevra; Shu, Yiping; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Bolton, Adam; Scoccimarro, Román; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of the clustering and halo occupation distribution of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) CMASS galaxies in the redshift range 0.43 < z < 0.7 drawn from the Final SDSS-III Data Release. We compare the BOSS results with the predictions of a halo abundance matching (HAM) clustering model that assigns galaxies to dark matter haloes selected from the large BigMultiDark N-body simulation of a flat Λ cold dark matter Planck cosmology. We compare the observational data with the simulated ones on a light cone constructed from 20 subsequent outputs of the simulation. Observational effects such as incompleteness, geometry, veto masks and fibre collisions are included in the model, which reproduces within 1σ errors the observed monopole of the two-point correlation function at all relevant scales: from the smallest scales, 0.5 h-1 Mpc, up to scales beyond the baryon acoustic oscillation feature. This model also agrees remarkably well with the BOSS galaxy power spectrum (up to k ˜ 1 h Mpc-1), and the three-point correlation function. The quadrupole of the correlation function presents some tensions with observations. We discuss possible causes that can explain this disagreement, including target selection effects. Overall, the standard HAM model describes remarkably well the clustering statistics of the CMASS sample. We compare the stellar-to-halo mass relation for the CMASS sample measured using weak lensing in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey with the prediction of our clustering model, and find a good agreement within 1σ. The BigMD-BOSS light cone including properties of BOSS galaxies and halo properties is made publicly available.

  20. [Lessons from a long-term survey on the effects of massive occupational exposure to asbestos. The AMISOL affair 10 years later].

    PubMed

    Molina, C; Perdrizet, S; Cheminat, J C; Maillet, J; Bedu, M; Caillaud, D

    1985-01-01

    For the past 10 years the authors have followed up a cohort of workers who had been massively exposed to dust in an asbestos textile factory which closed down in 1974. They report on the difficulties of all kinds they encountered during this epidemiological survey. The most original result is that they were able to establish that the radiological and functional manifestations of asbestosis pursue their course after the subjects have ceased to be exposed. Another important point is the early development of lesions in peripheral bronchioles, detected by volume-flow loops. The authors insist on the psycho-social problems at the site of work or in daily life which arise from the use of asbestos or of fibres with similar properties. Social protection, at present well organized, should suppress the risk of asbestosis in Western countries. However, a number of problems remain to be solved, notably those concerning the long-term risk of pleural mesothelioma, the mode of action of the fibers and the immune reactions they induce, and the economic and social consequences of a hypothetical ban on asbestos--a material very difficult to replace. This study embodies, in miniature, all the problems of society associated with asbestos during this second half of the XX th century.

  1. Invasive Species Forecasting System: A Decision Support Tool for the U.S. Geological Survey: FY 2005 Benchmarking Report v.1.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Tom; Schnase, John; Morisette, Jeffrey; Most, Neal; Sheffner, Ed; Hutchinson, Charles; Drake, Sam; Van Leeuwen, Willem; Kaupp, Verne

    2005-01-01

    The National Institute of Invasive Species Science (NIISS), through collaboration with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), recently began incorporating NASA observations and predictive modeling tools to fulfill its mission. These enhancements, labeled collectively as the Invasive Species Forecasting System (ISFS), are now in place in the NIISS in their initial state (V1.0). The ISFS is the primary decision support tool of the NIISS for the management and control of invasive species on Department of Interior and adjacent lands. The ISFS is the backbone for a unique information services line-of-business for the NIISS, and it provides the means for delivering advanced decision support capabilities to a wide range of management applications. This report describes the operational characteristics of the ISFS, a decision support tool of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Recent enhancements to the performance of the ISFS, attained through the integration of observations, models, and systems engineering from the NASA are benchmarked; i.e., described quantitatively and evaluated in relation to the performance of the USGS system before incorporation of the NASA enhancements. This report benchmarks Version 1.0 of the ISFS.

  2. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Occupational Therapy Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in jobs in occupational therapy. Agency partners involved in this project include: the Illinois State board of Education, Illinois Community College…

  3. Aeromagnetic Survey of the Amargosa Desert, Nevada and California: A Tool for Understanding Near-Surface Geology and Hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, Richard J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Ponce, David A.; Dixon, Gary L.

    2000-01-01

    A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the Amargosa Desert and surrounding areas provides insights into the buried geology of this structurally complex region. The survey covers an area of approximately 7,700 km2 (2,970 mi2), extending from Beatty, Nevada, to south of Shoshone, California, and includes parts of the Nevada Test Site and Death Valley National Park. Aeromagnetic flight lines were oriented east-west, spaced 400 m (0.25 mi) apart, and flown at an altitude of 150 m (500 ft) above terrain, or as low as permitted by safety considerations. Characteristic magnetic anomalies occur over volcanic terranes, such as Yucca Mountain and the Greenwater Range, and over Proterozoic basement rocks, such as Bare Mountain and the Black Mountains. Linear magnetic anomalies caused by offsets of volcanic rocks permit detailed mapping of shallow faults in volcanic terranes. Of particular interest are subtle anomalies that overlie alluvial deposits at Devils Hole and Pahrump Valley. Alignments of springs along magnetic anomalies at these locales suggest that these anomalies are caused by faults that cut the alluvium, displace magnetic rocks at depth, and eventually influence ground-water flow. Linear magnetic anomalies over the Funeral Mountains appear to coincide with a prominent set of north-northeast-striking faults that cut the Precambrian Stirling Quartzite, rocks that are typically nonmagnetic. The position and orientation of these anomalies with respect to springs north of Furnace Creek suggest that the faults may act as conduits for the flow of water from the north into Death Valley, but the mineralogical cause of the anomalies is unknown.

  4. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey-Infrared (NGVS-IR). I. A New Near-Ultraviolet, Optical, and Near-Infrared Globular Cluster Selection Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Roberto P.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lançon, Ariane; Peng, Eric W.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Blakeslee, John P.; Mei, Simona; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Hudelot, Patrick; Courteau, Stéphane; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Balogh, Michael L.; Boselli, Alessandro; Bournaud, Frédéric; Carlberg, Raymond G.; Chapman, Scott C.; Durrell, Patrick; Eigenthaler, Paul; Emsellem, Eric; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Gwyn, Stephen; Huertas-Company, Marc; Ilbert, Olivier; Jordán, Andrés; Läsker, Ronald; Licitra, Rossella; Liu, Chengze; MacArthur, Lauren; McConnachie, Alan; McCracken, Henry Joy; Mellier, Yannick; Peng, Chien Y.; Raichoor, Anand; Taylor, Matthew A.; Tonry, John L.; Tully, R. Brent; Zhang, Hongxin

    2014-01-01

    The NGVS-IR project (Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey-Infrared) is a contiguous, near-infrared imaging survey of the Virgo cluster of galaxies. It complements the optical wide-field survey of Virgo (NGVS). In its current state, NGVS-IR consists of Ks -band imaging of 4 deg2 centered on M87 and J- and Ks -band imaging of ~16 deg2 covering the region between M49 and M87. We present observations of the central 4 deg2 centered on Virgo's core region. The data were acquired with WIRCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, and the total integration time was 41 hr distributed over 34 contiguous tiles. A survey-specific strategy was designed to account for extended galaxies while still measuring accurate sky brightness within the survey area. The average 5σ limiting magnitude is Ks = 24.4 AB mag, and the 50% completeness limit is Ks = 23.75 AB mag for point-source detections, when using only images with better than 0.''7 seeing (median seeing 0.''54). Star clusters are marginally resolved in these image stacks, and Virgo galaxies with \\mu _{K_s} \\simeq 24.4 AB mag arcsec-2 are detected. Combining the Ks data with optical and ultraviolet data, we build the uiKs color-color diagram, which allows a very clean color-based selection of globular clusters in Virgo. This diagnostic plot will provide reliable globular cluster candidates for spectroscopic follow-up campaigns, needed to continue the exploration of Virgo's photometric and kinematic substructures, and will help the design of future searches for globular clusters in extragalactic systems. We show that the new uiKs diagram displays significantly clearer substructure in the distribution of stars, globular clusters, and galaxies than the gzKs diagram—the NGVS + NGVS-IR equivalent of the BzK diagram that is widely used in cosmological surveys. Equipped with this powerful new tool, future NGVS-IR investigations based on the uiKs diagram will address the mapping and analysis of extended structures and compact

  5. Mortality in Iraq Associated with the 2003–2011 War and Occupation: Findings from a National Cluster Sample Survey by the University Collaborative Iraq Mortality Study

    PubMed Central

    Hagopian, Amy; Flaxman, Abraham D.; Takaro, Tim K.; Esa Al Shatari, Sahar A.; Rajaratnam, Julie; Becker, Stan; Levin-Rector, Alison; Galway, Lindsay; Hadi Al-Yasseri, Berq J.; Weiss, William M.; Murray, Christopher J.; Burnham, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous estimates of mortality in Iraq attributable to the 2003 invasion have been heterogeneous and controversial, and none were produced after 2006. The purpose of this research was to estimate direct and indirect deaths attributable to the war in Iraq between 2003 and 2011. Methods and Findings We conducted a survey of 2,000 randomly selected households throughout Iraq, using a two-stage cluster sampling method to ensure the sample of households was nationally representative. We asked every household head about births and deaths since 2001, and all household adults about mortality among their siblings. We used secondary data sources to correct for out-migration. From March 1, 2003, to June 30, 2011, the crude death rate in Iraq was 4.55 per 1,000 person-years (95% uncertainty interval 3.74–5.27), more than 0.5 times higher than the death rate during the 26-mo period preceding the war, resulting in approximately 405,000 (95% uncertainty interval 48,000–751,000) excess deaths attributable to the conflict. Among adults, the risk of death rose 0.7 times higher for women and 2.9 times higher for men between the pre-war period (January 1, 2001, to February 28, 2003) and the peak of the war (2005–2006). We estimate that more than 60% of excess deaths were directly attributable to violence, with the rest associated with the collapse of infrastructure and other indirect, but war-related, causes. We used secondary sources to estimate rates of death among emigrants. Those estimates suggest we missed at least 55,000 deaths that would have been reported by households had the households remained behind in Iraq, but which instead had migrated away. Only 24 households refused to participate in the study. An additional five households were not interviewed because of hostile or threatening behavior, for a 98.55% response rate. The reliance on outdated census data and the long recall period required of participants are limitations of our study. Conclusions Beyond

  6. [Impact of indirect factors on the growing prevalence of workers with abnormal findings in periodic general health examinations: a survey on the definition and detection of such abnormal workers by occupational health organizations].

    PubMed

    Hoshuyama, T; Takahashi, K; Fujishiro, K; Uchida, K; Okubo, T

    2000-05-01

    The prevalence of workers with abnormal findings in periodic general health examinations (PGHEx) has been growing recently in Japan and reached 41.2% in 1998. To clarify the indirect factors related to such an increase in workers with abnormal findings in the PGHEx, we carried out a questionnaire survey on the content of the statutory notification form of results of the PGHEx among a representative sample of 136 Occupational Health Organizations (OHOs). Questions on how those workers with abnormal findings were defined and detected and when the definition and the reference intervals for total cholesterol became available were included. Of the 107 OHOs which answered the questionnaire, 85 were included in the analyses because they actually calculated the number of workers with abnormal findings in each company and helped the employer fill out the notification form. The results revealed that there was no standardized definition of workers with abnormal findings in the PGHEx. Both reference intervals of items in the PGHEx and algorithm in detecting workers with abnormal findings in the PGHEx varied among the OHOs. When detecting the workers, 13 OHOs (15.3%) selected them taking into consideration medical background factors such as previous results of the PGHEx and current medical treatment. From the late 1980s to the early 1990s, many OHOs modified the definition of workers with abnormal findings, and have tended to reduce the upper limit of the reference interval for serum cholesterol. This is mainly due to amendment of the Industrial Safety and Health Law and a new recommendation for a reference interval/value proposed by the related scientific society. Although the prevalence of workers with abnormal findings in the PGHEx has continuously increased, it is not valid to compare the prevalence over the years because of modification in the definition of such workers. The prevalence of workers with abnormal findings in the PGHEx, which is one of the most important

  7. Health Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist the vocational teacher in designing and implementing a cluster program in health occupations, this guide suggests ideas for teaching the specific knowledge and skills that qualify students for entry-level employment in the health occupations field. The knowledge and skills are applicable to 12 occupations: dental assistant;…

  8. Agricultural Occupations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Floyd J.; Henderson, Billie

    This agricultural occupations handbook was developed from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) and the U.S. Departments of Health, Education, and Welfare, and Labor publication, Vocational Education and Occupations. It includes the U.S. Office of Education coding for the instructional area of agriculture and the cluster coding for the…

  9. Development and Validation of an Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Taiwan (OSTAi) Postmenopausal Women-A Sub-Study of the Taiwan OsteoPorosis Survey (TOPS)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Feng; Yu, Shan-Fu; Chiu, Wen-Chan; Hsu, Chung-Yuan; Ko, Chi-Hua; Tsai, Ching-Chou; Cheng, Tien-Tsai

    2015-01-01

    Background To develop an OSTAi tool and compare this with the National Osteoporosis Foundation recommendations in 2013 (NOF 2013) for bone mineral density (BMD) testing among Taiwan postmenopausal women. Methods Taiwan Osteoporosis Association (TOA) conducted a nationwide BMD survey by a bus installed with a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) between 2008 and 2011. All of the participants completed questionnaire, which included demographics and risk factors of osteoporotic fracture in FRAX tool. We used the database to analyze potential risk factors for osteoporosis and followed the model by Koh et al. to develop a risk index via multiple variable regression analysis and item reduction. We used the index values to set up a simple algorithm (namely OSTAi) to identify those who need BMD measurement. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the area under the curve (AUC) was used to compare the sensitivity/specificity analysis of this model with that of recommendations by NOF 2013. Results A total of 12,175 Taiwan postmenopausal women enrolled in this survey. The index value was derived by age and body weight of the participants according to weighted odds of each risk factor and the selected cutoff value was set at “-1”. There are 6393 (52.5%) participants whose index value is below “-1” and whose risk of osteoporosis was 57.5% (3674/6393). The AUC for OSTAi and NOF 2013 were 0.739 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.728–0.749, P<0.001) and 0.618 (95% CI, 0.606–0.630, P<0.001), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of OSTAi, at the selected cutoff value of -1, and NOF 2013 to identify osteoporosis were 73.1%, 62.0% and 78.3%, 45.7%, respectively. Conclusions As OSTA for Asian populations, OSTAi is an useful tool to identify Taiwan postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, In comparison with NOF 2013, OSTAi may be an easier and better tool for referral to BMD measurement by DXA in this area. PMID:26086766

  10. Digital bedrock mapping at the Geological Survey of Norway: BGS SIGMA tool and in-house database structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasser, Deta; Viola, Giulio; Bingen, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Since 2010, the Geological Survey of Norway has been implementing and continuously developing a digital workflow for geological bedrock mapping in Norway, from fieldwork to final product. Our workflow is based on the ESRI ArcGIS platform, and we use rugged Windows computers in the field. Three different hardware solutions have been tested over the past 5 years (2010-2015). (1) Panasonic Toughbook CE-19 (2.3 kg), (2) Panasonic Toughbook CF H2 Field (1.6 kg) and (3) Motion MC F5t tablet (1.5 kg). For collection of point observations in the field we mainly use the SIGMA Mobile application in ESRI ArcGIS developed by the British Geological Survey, which allows the mappers to store georeferenced comments, structural measurements, sample information, photographs, sketches, log information etc. in a Microsoft Access database. The application is freely downloadable from the BGS websites. For line- and polygon work we use our in-house database, which is currently under revision. Our line database consists of three feature classes: (1) bedrock boundaries, (2) bedrock lineaments, and (3) bedrock lines, with each feature class having up to 24 different attribute fields. Our polygon database consists of one feature class with 38 attribute fields enabling to store various information concerning lithology, stratigraphic order, age, metamorphic grade and tectonic subdivision. The polygon and line databases are coupled via topology in ESRI ArcGIS, which allows us to edit them simultaneously. This approach has been applied in two large-scale 1:50 000 bedrock mapping projects, one in the Kongsberg domain of the Sveconorwegian orogen, and the other in the greater Trondheim area (Orkanger) in the Caledonian belt. The mapping projects combined collection of high-resolution geophysical data, digital acquisition of field data, and collection of geochronological, geochemical and petrological data. During the Kongsberg project, some 25000 field observation points were collected by eight

  11. Use of multispecies occupancy models to evaluate the response of bird communities to forest degradation associated with logging.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Rubio, Eduardo; Kéry, Marc; Morreale, Stephen J; Sullivan, Patrick J; Gardner, Beth; Cooch, Evan G; Lassoie, James P

    2014-08-01

    Forest degradation is arguably the greatest threat to biodiversity, ecosystem services, and rural livelihoods. Therefore, increasing understanding of how organisms respond to degradation is essential for management and conservation planning. We were motivated by the need for rapid and practical analytical tools to assess the influence of management and degradation on biodiversity and system state in areas subject to rapid environmental change. We compared bird community composition and size in managed (ejido, i.e., communally owned lands) and unmanaged (national park) forests in the Sierra Tarahumara region, Mexico, using multispecies occupancy models and data from a 2-year breeding bird survey. Unmanaged sites had on average higher species occupancy and richness than managed sites. Most species were present in low numbers as indicated by lower values of detection and occupancy associated with logging-induced degradation. Less than 10% of species had occupancy probabilities >0.5, and degradation had no positive effects on occupancy. The estimated metacommunity size of 125 exceeded previous estimates for the region, and sites with mature trees and uneven-aged forest stand characteristics contained the highest species richness. Higher estimation uncertainty and decreases in richness and occupancy for all species, including habitat generalists, were associated with degraded young, even-aged stands. Our findings show that multispecies occupancy methods provide tractable measures of biodiversity and system state and valuable decision support for landholders and managers. These techniques can be used to rapidly address gaps in biodiversity information, threats to biodiversity, and vulnerabilities of species of interest on a landscape level, even in degraded or fast-changing environments. Moreover, such tools may be particularly relevant in the assessment of species richness and distribution in a wide array of habitats.

  12. A goodness-of-fit test for occupancy models with correlated within-season revisits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Wilson; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    specifically evaluates occupancy model lack of fit related to correlation among detections within a sample unit. Our diagnostic tool is available for practitioners that serially deploy survey equipment as a way to achieve cost savings.

  13. Synthetic data products for future H I galaxy surveys: a tool for characterizing source confusion in spectral line stacking experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elson, E. C.; Blyth, S. L.; Baker, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    Much of our current understanding of neutral, atomic gas in galaxies comes from radio observations of the nearby Universe. Until the next generation of instruments allow us to push to much higher redshifts, we must rely mostly upon theoretical models of galaxy formation to provide us with key insights into the likely cosmic evolution of H I in the Universe, and its links to molecular clouds and star formation. In this work, we present a new set of methods to convert mock galaxy catalogues into synthetic data cubes containing model galaxies with realistic spatial and spectral H I distributions over large cosmological volumes. Such synthetic data products can be used to guide observing and data handling/analysis strategies for forthcoming H I galaxy surveys. As a demonstration of the potential use of our simulated products we use them to conduct several mock H I stacking experiments for both low and high-redshift galaxy samples. The stacked spectra can be accurately decomposed into contributions from target and non-target galaxies, revealing in all co-added spectra large fractions of contaminant mass due to source confusion. Our results are consistent with similar estimates extrapolated from z = 0 observational data. The amount of confused mass in a stacked spectrum grows almost linearly with the size of the observational beam, suggesting potential overestimates of Ω _{H I} by some recent H I stacking experiments. Our simulations will allow the study of subtle redshift-dependent effects in future stacking analyses.

  14. Occupational cancer in Britain. Preventing occupational cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiqun; Osman, John

    2012-06-19

    Although only a relatively small proportion of cancer is attributable to occupational exposure to carcinogenic agents, the estimated number of deaths due to occupational cancer is high when compared to other deaths due to work-related ill health and injury. However, risk from occupational exposure to carcinogens can be minimised through proportionate but effective risk management. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is the regulator of workplace health and safety in Great Britain. As part of its aim to reduce ill health arising from failures to control properly exposure to hazards at work, HSE commissioned the research presented elsewhere in this supplement to enable it to identify priorities for preventing occupational cancer. The research has shown that occupational cancer remains a key health issue and that low-level exposure of a large number of workers to carcinogens is important. The finding that a small number of carcinogens have been responsible for the majority of the burden of occupational cancer provides key evidence in the development of priorities for significant reduction of occupational cancer. Although the research presented in this supplement reflects the consequences of past exposures to carcinogens, occupational cancer remains a problem. The potential for exposure to the agents considered in this research is still present in the workplace and the findings are relevant to prevention of future disease. In this article, the principle approaches for risk reduction are described. It provides supporting information on some of the initiatives already being undertaken, or those being put in place, to reduce occupational cancer in Great Britain. The need also for systematic collection of exposure information and the importance of raising awareness and changing behaviours are discussed.

  15. ALHAMBRA-survey: a new tool for photo-z calibrations in absence of spec-z information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molino Benito, A.; Benitez Lozano, N.; The Alhambra-Team

    2013-05-01

    La estimación de los desplazamientos al rojo (redshift) de las galaxias, derivados mediante fotometría multi-banda, se conoce con el nombre de photometric redshifts (photo-z). Es bien sabido que la precisión alcanzable por estas técnicas puede verse incrementada si se dispone de una muestra espectroscópica de galaxias (cuyos redshifts (spec-z) sean conocidos) con la que re-calibrar los puntos cero fotométricos. (Coe et al. 2006, Ilbert et al. 2008, Molino et al. 2012 in prep). ALHAMBRA-survey, que es un cartografiado extragaláctico (de ˜4 grados cuadrados) dedicado a la realización de un estudio de la evolución de las propiedades y contenido del Universo (Moles et al. 2005, 2008), presenta solapamientos parciales con otros cartografiados espectroscópicos ya existentes con el objetivo de validar y mejorar la precisión de sus photo-z. Sin embargo, dada la variabilidad fotométrica entre sus campos, resulta ineficiente extrapolar las correcciones de punto cero, introduciendo sesgos de inhomogeneidad en la precisión de los resultados. En este trabajo se presenta una nueva metodología que permite mejorar la calibración de los puntos cero fotométricos mediante la utilización de la información estadística proporcionada por los propios photo-z. Mediante esta técnica resulta posible no sólo mejorar la precisión de las estimaciones sino, además, soslayar la necesidad de obtener grandes muestras espectroscópicas.

  16. Report on an Informal Survey of Groundwater Modeling Practitioners About How They Quantify Uncertainty: Which Tools They Use, Why, and Why Not.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginn, T. R.; Scheibe, T. D.

    2006-12-01

    Hydrogeology is among the most data-limited of the earth sciences, so that uncertainty arises in every aspect of subsurface flow and transport modeling, from conceptual model to spatial discretization to parameter values. Thus treatment of uncertainty is unavoidable, and the literature and conference proceedings are replete with approaches, templates, paradigms and such for doing so. However, such tools remain not well used, especially those of the stochastic analytic sort, leading recently to explicit inquiries about why this is the case, in response to which entire journal issues have been dedicated. In an effort to continue this discussion in a constructive way we report on an informal yet extensive survey of hydrogeology practitioners, as the "marketplace" for techniques to deal with uncertainty. We include scientists, engineers, regulators, and others in the survey, that reports on quantitative (or not) methods for uncertainty characterization and analysis, frequency and level of usage, and reasons behind the selection or avoidance of available methods. Results shed light on fruitful directions for future research in uncertainty quantification in hydrogeology.

  17. Pol(F)lux software, a dedicated tool to stream nutrient fluxes and uncertainties calculations for survey optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moatar, F.; Curie, F.; Meybeck, M.

    2015-12-01

    Data on stream material fluxes are essential for calculating element cycles (carbon, nutrients, and pollutants) and erosion rates from local to global scales. In most water-quality stations throughout the world stream fluxes are calculated from daily flow data (Q) and discrete concentration data (C), the latter being often the main cause of large uncertainties. This paper present the Pol(F)lux software tool, which addresses with two major issues: i) the selection of the optimal (minimal uncertainties) flux calculation method among 8 methods based on the flux variability matrix. ii) for the the discharge-weighted concentration method (the most commonly used method and recommended in the international convention for the protection of the North Sea and the Northeast Atlantic, OSPAR Convention), sampling frequency can be predicted to achieve a specified level of precision from the flux variability indicator (M2%, cumulative material fluxes discharged during the upper 2% of highest daily fluxes) through a nomograph for sampling intervals of 3 to 60 days. The software was validated for water-quality stations in medium to large basins (basin area>500 km²). The flux variability matrix, the cornerstone of the Pol(F)lux software, is based on two indicators: (a) cumulative flow volume discharged during the upper 2% of highest daily flow, W2%, which characterizes the hydrological reactivity of the catchment during highest flow, and (b) the truncated b50sup exponent, calculated as the exponent of the relationship between concentration and discharge (in logarithmic scale) at the high-water stages (discharges greater than median flow), which characterize the behaviour of stream material. We postulate that performance is similar for stream materials found in the same flux variability class, composed of 4 classes of hydrological reactivity (W2%) and 5 classes of biogeochemical behavior (b50sup), defining 20 potential variability classes.

  18. Healthcare Providers' Knowledge of Disordered Sleep, Sleep Assessment Tools, and Nonpharmacological Sleep Interventions for Persons Living with Dementia: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Cary A.; Jones, Allyson; Crick, Katelyn

    2014-01-01

    A large proportion of persons with dementia will also experience disordered sleep. Disordered sleep in dementia is a common reason for institutionalization and affects cognition, fall risk, agitation, self-care ability, and overall health and quality of life. This report presents findings of a survey of healthcare providers' awareness of sleep issues, assessment practices, and nonpharmacological sleep interventions for persons with dementia. There were 1846 participants, with the majority being from nursing and rehabilitation. One-third worked in long-term care settings and one-third in acute care. Few reported working in the community. Findings revealed that participants understated the incidence of sleep deficiencies in persons with dementia and generally lacked awareness of the relationship between disordered sleep and dementia. Their knowledge of sleep assessment tools was limited to caregiver reports, self-reports, and sleep diaries, with few using standardized tools or other assessment methods. The relationship between disordered sleep and comorbid conditions was not well understood. The three most common nonpharmacological sleep interventions participants identified using were a regular bedtime routine, increased daytime activity, and restricted caffeine. Awareness of other evidence-based interventions was low. These findings will guide evidence-informed research to develop and test more targeted and contextualized sleep and dementia knowledge translation strategies. PMID:24851185

  19. Relationship between structural features and water chemistry in boreal headwater streams--evaluation based on results from two water management survey tools suggested for Swedish forestry.

    PubMed

    Lestander, Ragna; Löfgren, Stefan; Henrikson, Lennart; Ågren, Anneli M

    2015-04-01

    Forestry may cause adverse impacts on water quality, and the forestry planning process is a key factor for the outcome of forest operation effects on stream water. To optimise environmental considerations and to identify actions needed to improve or maintain the stream biodiversity, two silvicultural water management tools, BIS+ (biodiversity, impact, sensitivity and added values) and Blue targeting, have been developed. In this study, we evaluate the links between survey variables, based on BIS+ and Blue targeting data, and water chemistry in 173 randomly selected headwater streams in the hemiboreal zone. While BIS+ and Blue targeting cannot replace more sophisticated monitoring methods necessary for classifying water quality in streams according to the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD, 2000/60/EC), our results lend support to the idea that the BIS+ protocol can be used to prioritise the protection of riparian forests. The relationship between BIS+ and water quality indicators (concentrations of nutrients and organic matter) together with data from fish studies suggests that this field protocol can be used to give reaches with higher biodiversity and conservation values a better protection. The tools indicate an ability to mitigate forestry impacts on water quality if the operations are adjusted to this knowledge in located areas.

  20. Development of a Statewide Occupational Matrix. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, B. R.

    A project was undertaken to develop an occupational matrix in the vocational service area of Industrial Electricity and Electronics. To develop the matrix, researchers administered a mail survey to employers in the following occupational areas: non-electrical machinery, electricity and electronic equipment, miscellaneous repair services, radio and…

  1. Occupational Therapy: Roles and Functions in British Columbia Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Linda E.; Backman, Catherine L.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 73 school districts in British Columbia (Canada) evaluated availability of occupational therapy (OT) services, the most important aspects of OT evaluation, OT treatment and services in general, additional training needed by occupational therapists, demographic information on therapists, and therapists' current roles and functions. (DB)

  2. Occupation and Activity Gender Trends in the Berenstain Bear Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashey, Melissa J.

    A study of 74 volumes of the Berenstain Bear Series rated illustrations according to the gender orientation of the activity or occupation the pictured bear is engaged in. Each occupation was assigned a number on the continuum by 32 psychology undergraduates at Bethany College who were given a written survey in a classroom together. Results showed…

  3. Teachers' Perceptions of the Role of Occupational Therapist in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Jeryl D.; Szucs, Kimberly A.; Mejasic, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how teachers in the school system perceive the role of the occupational therapist. Participants of this study were 47 teachers in the school systems that currently work with an occupational therapist in a public or private school. Data were collected via an anonymous online survey and analyzed using descriptive statistics and…

  4. Inservice Training Needs of Postsecondary Occupational Teachers in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Frederick G.; Yung, Kirby

    1980-01-01

    A survey of occupational teachers and school administrators was conducted to determine their preparation, educational background, and inservice needs. Nine out of 10 administrators felt that teachers' occupational skills and teaching competencies needed upgrading. Most teachers wanted inservice education in new and emerging technologies. (LRA)

  5. Occupation-related risks for colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegelman, D.; Wegman, D.H.

    1985-11-01

    Several population data bases were used to generate hypotheses about associations between colorectal cancer and workplace exposures. The Third National Cancer Survey interview sample was used to select 343 male and 208 female cases and 626 male and 1,235 female cancer controls. Potential work exposures were assigned with the use of data from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health National Occupational Hazard Survey. Dietary factors were modeled from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. Work-related stress was considered with the use of a model based on the U.S. Department of Labor's Quality of Employment Survey. Other risk factors included age, race, ponderosity, and menopausal status. Logistic analysis yielded hypotheses for colon cancer risk in males with potentially high exposure to solvents, abrasives, and fuel oil and in those in jobs with high demand and low control (high stress). Hypotheses emerged for females with potentially high exposure to dyes, solvents, and grinding wheel dust.

  6. The expanding role of occupational therapy in the treatment of industrial hand injuries.

    PubMed

    Bear-Lehman, J; McCormick, E

    1985-01-01

    A recent survey of members of the American Society of Hand Therapists revealed an expanding role for the therapist in the treatment of industrial hand injuries. In the traditional role of treatment provider, occupational therapists are using their assessment tools and work capacity programming to aid in predicting return to work readiness. This is aimed at preventing reinjury of the present patient population. In addition to this, therapists have begun to identify relationships between specific injuries and work that produced them. This gives rise to a specified goal of preventing the injury from ever occuring. To reach this goal therapists are becoming involved in industrial settings and are working with industrial safety teams.

  7. Listing Occupational Carcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Siemiatycki, Jack; Richardson, Lesley; Straif, Kurt; Latreille, Benoit; Lakhani, Ramzan; Campbell, Sally; Rousseau, Marie-Claude; Boffetta, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The occupational environment has been a most fruitful one for investigating the etiology of human cancer. Many recognized human carcinogens are occupational carcinogens. There is a large volume of epidemiologic and experimental data concerning cancer risks in different work environments. It is important to synthesize this information for both scientific and public health purposes. Various organizations and individuals have published lists of occupational carcinogens. However, such lists have been limited by unclear criteria for which recognized carcinogens should be considered occupational carcinogens, and by inconsistent and incomplete information on the occupations and industries in which the carcinogenic substances may be found and on their target sites of cancer. Based largely on the evaluations published by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and augmented with additional information, the present article represents an attempt to summarize, in tabular form, current knowledge on occupational carcinogens, the occupations and industries in which they are found, and their target organs. We have considered 28 agents as definite occupational carcinogens, 27 agents as probable occupational carcinogens, and 113 agents as possible occupational carcinogens. These tables should be useful for regulatory or preventive purposes and for scientific purposes in research priority setting and in understanding carcinogenesis. PMID:15531427

  8. Follow-Up of 1977 Occupational Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Mary Kathryne

    As part of a series of annual studies, this survey determined the characteristics and opinions of Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) occupational graduates for 1976-77. Graduates of business (51 of 81 contacted), health service (72 of 151), public service (60 of 99), and technology (28 of 35) programs responded to a questionnaire that…

  9. Occupational Stress and Burnout in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torelli, Joseph A.; Gmelch, Walter H.

    1993-01-01

    Surveys 1,000 Washington principals and superintendents to ascertain the nature and extent of their occupational stress and burnout and the association with sex role orientation. Superintendents perceive less task-based and conflict-mediating stress than do principals, but report more externally caused stress. Task-based stress is the best…

  10. Career and Occupational Development Kit. Instruction Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    This manual is part of a kit consisting of four documents which bring together different types of items that measure a number of career and occupational development (COD) objectives developed by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). (NAEP--which completed a national survey measuring the achievement of knowledge, skills,…

  11. A Prestige Scale for Agricultural Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosby, Arthur G.; Frank, Lianne M.

    A prestige scale for 50 agricultural and agriculturally related occupations was developed. The scale was constructed utilizing data from a mailed-questionnaire survey conducted during the spring semester of 1977 at 14 universities in the Southern United States. A 15% random sample of undergraduate majors in agriculture at these schools were…

  12. Occupational Aspirations and Expectations of Australian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Wendy; Creed, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Adolescents across the five years of high school (169 females and 164 males) completed a survey that identified occupational status aspirations and expectations coded into six types-- realistic, investigative, artistic, social, enterprising, or conventional--according to the RIASEC model (Holland, 1997). As the focus of the study was to explore…

  13. Occupational Deferments in U. S. Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, John D.; Vetter, Betty M.

    Contained are the results and conclusions of a survey conducted in December, 1969, to ascertain the extent to which occupational deferments are an important factor in manpower utilization. A questionnaire was sent to employers in the following major employment categories - aerospace and defense; chemicals, metals and petroleum; construction and…

  14. Behavior-Based Safety and Occupational Risk Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, E. Scott

    2005-01-01

    The behavior-based approach to managing occupational risk and preventing workplace injuries is reviewed. Unlike the typical top-down control approach to industrial safety, behavior-based safety (BBS) provides tools and procedures workers can use to take personal control of occupational risks. Strategies the author and his colleagues have been…

  15. An Analysis of the Waste Water Treatment Operator Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Anthony B.; And Others

    The occupational analysis contains a brief job description for the waste water treatment occupations of operator and maintenance mechanic and 13 detailed task statements which specify job duties (tools, equipment, materials, objects acted upon, performance knowledge, safety considerations/hazards, decisions, cues, and errors) and learning skills…

  16. Task Lists for Industrial Occupations. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimmlich, David

    These cluster matrices provide duties and tasks that form the basis of instructional content for secondary, postsecondary, and adult occupational training programs for industrial occupations. Duties and skills are presented for the following: (1) electric home appliance and power tool repairers; (2) office machine/cash register repairer; (3)…

  17. Occupational Health and Safety Management and Turnover Intention in the Ghanaian Mining Sector

    PubMed Central

    Amponsah-Tawiah, Kwesi; Ntow, Michael Akomeah Ofori; Mensah, Justice

    2015-01-01

    Background The mining industry is considered as one of the most dangerous and hazardous industries and the need for effective and efficient occupational health and safety management is critical to safeguard workers and the industry. Despite the dangers and hazards present in the mining industry, only few studies have focused on how occupational health and safety and turnover intentions in the mines. Method The study suing a cross-sectional survey design collected quantitative data from the 255 mine workers that were conveniently sampled from the Ghanaian mining industry. The data collection tools were standardized questionnaires that measured occupational health and safety management and turnover intentions. These scales were also pretested before their usage in actual data collection. Results The correlation coefficient showed that a negative relationship existed between dimensions of occupational health and safety management and turnover intention; safety leadership (r = −0.33, p < 0.01); supervision (r = −0.26, p < 0.01); safety facilities and equipment (r = −0.32, p < 0.01); safety procedure (r = −0.27, p < 0.01). Among these dimensions, safety leadership and safety facility were significant predictors of turnover intention, (β = −0.28, p < 0.01) and (β = −0.24, p < 0.01) respectively. The study also found that turnover intention of employees is heavily influenced by the commitment of safety leadership in ensuring the effective formulation of policies and supervision of occupational health and safety at the workplace. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that safety leadership is crucial in the administration of occupational health and safety and reducing turnover intention in organizations. PMID:27014486

  18. Inference for occupancy and occupancy dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, Allan F.; Bailey, Larissa L.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    This chapter deals with the estimation of occupancy as a state variable to assess the status of, and track changes in, species distributions when sampling with camera traps. Much of the recent interest in occupancy estimation and modeling originated from the models developed by MacKenzie et al. (2002, 2003), although similar methods were developed independently (Azuma et al. 1990; Bayley and Petersen 2001; Nichols and Karanth, 2002; Tyre et al. 2003), all of which deal with species occurrence information and imperfect detection. Less than a decade after these publications, the modeling and estimation of species occurrence and occupancy dynamics have increased significantly. Special features of scientific journals have explored innovative uses of detection–nondetection data with occupancy models (Vojta 2005), and an entire volume has synthesized the use and application of occupancy estimation methods (MacKenzie et al. 2006). Reviews of the topical concepts, philosophical considerations, and various sampling designs that can be used for occupancy estimation are now readily available for a range of audiences (MacKenzie and Royle 2005; MacKenzie et al. 2006; Bailey et al. 2007; Royle and Dorazio 2008; Conroy and Carroll 2009; Kendall and White 2009; Hines et al. 2010; Link and Barker 2010). As a result, it would be pointless here to recast all that these publications have so eloquently articulated, but that said, a review of any scientific topic requires sufficient context and relevant background information, especially when relatively new methodologies and techniques such as occupancy estimation and camera traps are involved. This is especially critical in a digital age where new information is published at warp speed, making it increasingly difficult to stay abreast of theoretical advances and research developments.

  19. Untangling occupation and activity.

    PubMed

    Pierce, D

    2001-01-01

    Activity and occupation are two core concepts of occupational therapy that are in need of differentiation. Occupation is defined here as a person's personally constructed, one-time experience within a unique context. Activity is defined as a more general, culturally shared idea about a category of action. The ways in which subjectivity and context are handled within the concepts of occupation and activity are keys to disentangling them. The proposed untangling of the two concepts into distinct definitions is congruent with their historical origins as well as with current definitional trends. Once occupation and activity are recognized as two separate and equally valuable concepts, they offer a rich set of theoretical relations for exploration. The clarity that will result from differentiating occupation and activity will enhance disciplinary discourse and research as well as enhance the intervention efficacy, moral surety, and political strength of the profession.

  20. Estimation of an Occupational Choice Model when Occupations Are Misclassified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops an empirical occupational choice model that corrects for misclassification in occupational choices and measurement error in occupation-specific work experience. The model is used to estimate the extent of measurement error in occupation data and quantify the bias that results from ignoring measurement error in occupation codes…

  1. Ethics in occupational health.

    PubMed

    Haines, Ted

    1989-11-01

    We know little about perceptions, practices, or constraints of ethics in occupational health because little research has been done. Opinions about the field, however, are abundant. Existing codes of ethical practice in occupational health have not consciously been derived from the fundamental principles of "freedom" and "well-being" or from philosophical premises and methods; rather, they are based on consensus among practitioners. The author outlines useful concepts and methods for making decisions about ethical questions in occupational health.

  2. Health Occupations Education I. Instructor's Manual. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsey, Patricia E., Ed.; And Others

    This instructor's guide consists of materials for use in teaching the first year of a two-year course in health occupations education that is designed for high school students. Included in the volume are an introduction, a list of modules, a list of tools and supplies, instructional references, a list of suggested instructional filmstrips, an…

  3. Occupational cancer in Italy.

    PubMed

    Merler, E; Vineis, P; Alhaique, D; Miligi, L

    1999-05-01

    This article is a discussion of occupational cancer in Italy. The introduction provides the necessary context of Italian industrialization and occupational health regulation. This is followed by a review of Italian epidemiologic studies of occupational cancer risks considered in terms of relative measures of risk and attributable risk of carcinogenic agents or exposure circumstances. We attempt to establish the number of workers exposed to carcinogens in Italy and the intensity of their exposures. Finally, the Italian system of compensation for occupational cancer is discussed. Several cohort and case-control studies have addressed the issue of occupational risks, mostly among male workers. The results of these studies suggest that the growing incidence of and mortality by mesothelioma is explained by the widespread and intense exposure to asbestos in some Italian industrial settings. A high attributable risk of lung tumors among male populations in industrial areas of northern Italy is explained by occupational exposures. However, insufficient data are available for clear definition of the extent and intensity of occupational exposure to carcinogenic substances. In Italy, we must prioritize and maximize resources in occupational cancer epidemiology and revitalize the role of national institutions. Recent legislation has established new regulations on the handling of carcinogenic substances in industrial settings, a new list of occupational diseases, and a national registry of mesothelioma linked to asbestos exposure. These legislative changes are expected to have positive effects.

  4. Occupational cancer in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Merler, E; Vineis, P; Alhaique, D; Miligi, L

    1999-01-01

    This article is a discussion of occupational cancer in Italy. The introduction provides the necessary context of Italian industrialization and occupational health regulation. This is followed by a review of Italian epidemiologic studies of occupational cancer risks considered in terms of relative measures of risk and attributable risk of carcinogenic agents or exposure circumstances. We attempt to establish the number of workers exposed to carcinogens in Italy and the intensity of their exposures. Finally, the Italian system of compensation for occupational cancer is discussed. Several cohort and case-control studies have addressed the issue of occupational risks, mostly among male workers. The results of these studies suggest that the growing incidence of and mortality by mesothelioma is explained by the widespread and intense exposure to asbestos in some Italian industrial settings. A high attributable risk of lung tumors among male populations in industrial areas of northern Italy is explained by occupational exposures. However, insufficient data are available for clear definition of the extent and intensity of occupational exposure to carcinogenic substances. In Italy, we must prioritize and maximize resources in occupational cancer epidemiology and revitalize the role of national institutions. Recent legislation has established new regulations on the handling of carcinogenic substances in industrial settings, a new list of occupational diseases, and a national registry of mesothelioma linked to asbestos exposure. These legislative changes are expected to have positive effects. PMID:10350509

  5. Features of Occupational Programs at the Secondary and Postsecondary Education Levels. Statistical Analysis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Richard P.; Parsad, Basmat; Farris, Elizabeth; Hudson, Lisa

    Two Spring 1999 surveys collected data weighted to provide national estimates of occupational program activities. Respondents in public secondary schools (SSs) were asked about program activities for 28 selected occupations within 6 broad occupational areas; those in less than four-year postsecondary institutions (PIs) were asked about activities…

  6. Using multi-species occupancy models in structured decision making on managed lands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, John R.; Blank, Peter J.; Zipkin, Elise F.; Fallon, Jane E.; Fallon, Frederick W.

    2013-01-01

    Land managers must balance the needs of a variety of species when manipulating habitats. Structured decision making provides a systematic means of defining choices and choosing among alternative management options; implementation of a structured decision requires quantitative approaches to predicting consequences of management on the relevant species. Multi-species occupancy models provide a convenient framework for making structured decisions when the management objective is focused on a collection of species. These models use replicate survey data that are often collected on managed lands. Occupancy can be modeled for each species as a function of habitat and other environmental features, and Bayesian methods allow for estimation and prediction of collective responses of groups of species to alternative scenarios of habitat management. We provide an example of this approach using data from breeding bird surveys conducted in 2008 at the Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel, Maryland, evaluating the effects of eliminating meadow and wetland habitats on scrub-successional and woodland-breeding bird species using summed total occupancy of species as an objective function. Removal of meadows and wetlands decreased value of an objective function based on scrub-successional species by 23.3% (95% CI: 20.3–26.5), but caused only a 2% (0.5, 3.5) increase in value of an objective function based on woodland species, documenting differential effects of elimination of meadows and wetlands on these groups of breeding birds. This approach provides a useful quantitative tool for managers interested in structured decision making.

  7. Use of creative activities in occupational therapy practice in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Müllersdorf, Maria; Ivarsson, Ann Britt

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of creative activities in occupational therapy in Sweden and how often Swedish occupational therapists use creative activities as a means of intervention. A web-mail survey was sent to 2975 Swedish occupational therapists working in health care at regional, county council or primary health care level, and those working in vocational rehabilitation. A total of 1867 (63%) answered the questionnaire and showed that 44% did use creative activities as a means of intervention and most often by practitioners working in psychiatric health care. The most commonly used form of creative activity was arts and crafts followed by gardening. This web-mail survey was based on a limited amount of items regarding creative activities. Further research should focus on in-depth inquiries about how occupational therapists and their patients perceive the use of creative activities as a means of treatment in occupational therapy. PMID:22489029

  8. [Predictive models for the assessment of occupational exposure to chemicals: a new challenge for employers].

    PubMed

    Gromiec, Jan Piotr; Kupczewska-Dobecka, Małgorzata; Jankowska, Agnieszka; Czerczak, Sławomir

    2013-01-01

    Employers are obliged to carry out and document the risk associated with the use of chemical substances. The best but the most expensive method is to measure workplace concentrations of chemicals. At present no "measureless" method for risk assessment is available in Poland, but predictive models for such assessments have been developed in some countries. The purpose of this work is to review and evaluate the applicability of selected predictive methods for assessing occupational inhalation exposure and related risk to check the compliance with Occupational Exposure Limits (OELs), as well as the compliance with REACH obligations. Based on the literature data HSE COSHH Essentials, EASE, ECETOC TRA, Stoffenmanager, and EMKG-Expo-Tool were evaluated. The data on validation of predictive models were also examined. It seems that predictive models may be used as a useful method for Tier 1 assessment of occupational exposure by inhalation. Since the levels of exposure are frequently overestimated, they should be considered as "rational worst cases" for selection of proper control measures. Bearing in mind that the number of available exposure scenarios and PROC categories is limited, further validation by field surveys is highly recommended. Predictive models may serve as a good tool for preliminary risk assessment and selection of the most appropriate risk control measures in Polish small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) providing that they are available in the Polish language. This also requires an extensive training of their future users. PMID:24502133

  9. Welding. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), which is one of a series of OCAPs developed to identify the skills that Ohio employers deem necessary to entering a given occupation/occupational area, lists the occupational, academic, and employability skills required of individuals entering the occupation of welder. The introduction explains…

  10. OCCUPATIONAL ASPIRATION SCALE FOR FEMALES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JEFFS, GEORGE A.

    OCCUPATIONAL TITLES USABLE IN ASSESSING OCCUPATIONAL GOALS OFSENIOR HIGH SCHOOL FEMALES WERE SELECTED AS THE FIRST STEP IN ESTABLISHING AN OCCUPATIONAL ASPIRATION SCALE FOR FEMALES. A LIST OF 117 OCCUPATIONAL TITLES, COMPILED FROM THREE PREVIOUS STUDIES AND "THE DICTIONARY OF OCCUPATIONAL TITLES," WAS RATED ON A SIX-LEVEL SCALE AS TO ITS GENERAL…

  11. International occupational health.

    PubMed

    LaDou, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Working conditions for the majority of the world's workers do not meet the minimum standards and guidelines set by international agencies. Occupational health and safety laws cover only about 10 percent of the population in developing countries, omitting many major hazardous industries and occupations. With rare exception, most countries defer to the United Nations the responsibility for international occupational health. The UN's international agencies have had limited success in bringing occupational health to the industrializing countries. The International Labor Organization (ILO) conventions are intended to guide all countries in the promotion of workplace safety and in managing occupational health and safety programs. ILO conventions and recommendations on occupational safety and health are international agreements that have legal force only if they are ratified by ILO member states. The most important ILO Convention on Occupational Safety and Health has been ratified by only 37 of the 175 ILO member states. Only 23 countries have ratified the ILO Employment Injury Benefits Convention that lists occupational diseases for which compensation should be paid. The World Health Organization (WHO) is responsible for the technical aspects of occupational health and safety, the promotion of medical services and hygienic standards. Limited WHO and ILO funding severely impedes the development of international occupational health. The U.S. reliance on international agencies to promote health and safety in the industrializing countries is not nearly adequate. This is particularly true if occupational health continues to be regarded primarily as an academic exercise by the developed countries, and a budgetary triviality by the international agencies. Occupational health is not a goal achievable in isolation. It should be part of a major institutional development that touches and reforms every level of government in an industrializing country. Occupational health and safety

  12. Occupation and Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H.; Valle, Curt T. Della; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. Methods The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text “occupation” “job” ”employment” or “work” and “thyroid cancer”. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarized the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design, and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender stratified results are reported. Results The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and health care occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. Conclusion The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis. PMID:24604144

  13. An investigation of moral distress experienced by occupational therapists.

    PubMed

    Penny, Neil H; Ewing, Timothy L; Hamid, Rachel C; Shutt, Kimberly A; Walter, Amy S

    2014-10-01

    This study used a quantitative survey design to investigate the existence of moral distress among occupational therapists. The Moral Distress Scale-Revised (MDS-R-OHPA) was distributed to a random sample of 600 members of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). The results of this explorative study found that occupational therapists reported moderate levels of moral distress with occupational therapists working in geriatric settings reporting higher levels of moral distress than occupational therapists who work in physical disability settings, although the difference was not statistically significant. However, occupational therapists who were considering leaving their current position reported the highest levels of moral distress. These initial findings are discussed as well as the need for further research.

  14. Occupancy estimation and the closure assumption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rota, Christopher T.; Fletcher, Robert J.; Dorazio, Robert M.; Betts, Matthew G.

    2009-01-01

    1. Recent advances in occupancy estimation that adjust for imperfect detection have provided substantial improvements over traditional approaches and are receiving considerable use in applied ecology. To estimate and adjust for detectability, occupancy modelling requires multiple surveys at a site and requires the assumption of 'closure' between surveys, i.e. no changes in occupancy between surveys. Violations of this assumption could bias parameter estimates; however, little work has assessed model sensitivity to violations of this assumption or how commonly such violations occur in nature. 2. We apply a modelling procedure that can test for closure to two avian point-count data sets in Montana and New Hampshire, USA, that exemplify time-scales at which closure is often assumed. These data sets illustrate different sampling designs that allow testing for closure but are currently rarely employed in field investigations. Using a simulation study, we then evaluate the sensitivity of parameter estimates to changes in site occupancy and evaluate a power analysis developed for sampling designs that is aimed at limiting the likelihood of closure. 3. Application of our approach to point-count data indicates that habitats may frequently be open to changes in site occupancy at time-scales typical of many occupancy investigations, with 71% and 100% of species investigated in Montana and New Hampshire respectively, showing violation of closure across time periods of 3 weeks and 8 days respectively. 4. Simulations suggest that models assuming closure are sensitive to changes in occupancy. Power analyses further suggest that the modelling procedure we apply can effectively test for closure. 5. Synthesis and applications. Our demonstration that sites may be open to changes in site occupancy over time-scales typical of many occupancy investigations, combined with the sensitivity of models to violations of the closure assumption, highlights the importance of properly addressing

  15. Perturbation analysis for patch occupancy dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; Nichols, James D.; McIntyre, Carol L.; Ferraz, Goncalo; Hines, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Perturbation analysis is a powerful tool to study population and community dynamics. This article describes expressions for sensitivity metrics reflecting changes in equilibrium occupancy resulting from small changes in the vital rates of patch occupancy dynamics (i.e., probabilities of local patch colonization and extinction). We illustrate our approach with a case study of occupancy dynamics of Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nesting territories. Examination of the hypothesis of system equilibrium suggests that the system satisfies equilibrium conditions. Estimates of vital rates obtained using patch occupancy models are used to estimate equilibrium patch occupancy of eagles. We then compute estimates of sensitivity metrics and discuss their implications for eagle population ecology and management. Finally, we discuss the intuition underlying our sensitivity metrics and then provide examples of ecological questions that can be addressed using perturbation analyses. For instance, the sensitivity metrics lead to predictions about the relative importance of local colonization and local extinction probabilities in influencing equilibrium occupancy for rare and common species.

  16. Perturbation analysis for patch occupancy dynamics.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julien; Nichols, James D; McIntyre, Carol L; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Hines, James E

    2009-01-01

    Perturbation analysis is a powerful tool to study population and community dynamics. This article describes expressions for sensitivity metrics reflecting changes in equilibrium occupancy resulting from small changes in the vital rates of patch occupancy dynamics (i.e., probabilities of local patch colonization and extinction). We illustrate our approach with a case study of occupancy dynamics of Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nesting territories. Examination of the hypothesis of system equilibrium suggests that the system satisfies equilibrium conditions. Estimates of vital rates obtained using patch occupancy models are used to estimate equilibrium patch occupancy of eagles. We then compute estimates of sensitivity metrics and discuss their implications for eagle population ecology and management. Finally, we discuss the intuition underlying our sensitivity metrics and then provide examples of ecological questions that can be addressed using perturbation analyses. For instance, the sensitivity metrics lead to predictions about the relative importance of local colonization and local extinction probabilities in influencing equilibrium occupancy for rare and common species. PMID:19294907

  17. Occupational Stress among Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertson, Larry M.; Kagan, Dona M.

    1987-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to investigate the degree to which occupational stress among teachers could be attributed to personal characteristics of the individuals themselves. The first study developed dispositional stress scales. The second examined correlations between these scales, occupational stress scales, and teachers' attitudes toward…

  18. Characteristics of Occupational Entrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Max L.

    1989-01-01

    The United States is mobile society, and mobility is evident in the jobs people hold. From one year to the next, almost 1 worker in 5 enters or returns to an occupation that he/she did not work in 12 months earlier. A worker's age, sex, race, and ethnicity influence likelihood of changing occupations. (Contains detailed data tables.) (JOW)

  19. OCCUPATION EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GRIEST, JEANNE; MORSCH, WILLIAM C.

    THE OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS (OERA) SYSTEM IS A RESEARCH EFFORT DESIGNED TO DEVELOP A FEASIBLE METHOD OF PROJECTING VOCATIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS THAT WILL SATISFY LABOR MARKET NEEDS. THE OUTPUTS OF THE OERA WILL BE ANNUAL PROJECTIONS OF EMPLOYMENT DEMANDS IN OCCUPATIONS CLASSIFIED BY VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. THESE…

  20. The Heath Occupational Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, William E.

    1990-01-01

    Career development programs must identify occupational needs of adults. A model based on Maslow's hierarchy develops occupational questions related to individual motivations (physiology, safety, love, esteem, and self-actualization). Individual needs are then compared with characteristics and benefits of proposed jobs, companies, or careers. (SK)

  1. Occupations and the Farm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert-Krocker, Laurie

    2001-01-01

    Describes "occupation" as a Montessori term, which the Hershey Montessori Farm School, in Huntsburg, Ohio, has adopted for any task arising from the needs of the farm that then generates a scientific or historic study. Includes lists of occupations pursued during 2000-2001 and samples of record forms students used to manage their work. (Author/KB)

  2. Cabinetmaker. Occupational Analysis Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinien, Chris; Boutin, France

    This document contains the analysis of the occupation of cabinetmaker, or joiner, that is accepted by the Canadian Council of Directors as the national standard for the occupation. The front matter preceding the analysis includes exploration of the development of the analysis, structure of the analysis, validation method, scope of the cabinetmaker…

  3. Bricklayer. Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cap, Orest; Cap, Ihor; Semenovych, Viktor

    This analysis covers tasks performed by a bricklayer, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as bricklayer-mason, brick and stone mason, and mason. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and safety. To facilitate understanding the…

  4. Counselling for Occupational Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwamuo, P. A.; Ugonna, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to ascertain the general attitude which senior secondary school students display towards counselling for occupational development while determining gender difference in students' attitude towards occupational information. It is also aimed at discovering whether these students seek vocational guidance in their choice of…

  5. Occupational asthma: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, L J; Balmes, J R

    2000-01-01

    Occupational asthma is the most common form of occupational lung disease in the developed world at the present time. In this review, the epidemiology, pathogenesis/mechanisms, clinical presentations, management, and prevention of occupational asthma are discussed. The population attributable risk of asthma due to occupational exposures is considerable. Current understanding of the mechanisms by which many agents cause occupational asthma is limited, especially for low-molecular-weight sensitizers and irritants. The diagnosis of occupational asthma is generally established on the basis of a suggestive history of a temporal association between exposure and the onset of symptoms and objective evidence that these symptoms are related to airflow limitation. Early diagnosis, elimination of exposure to the responsible agent, and early use of inhaled steroids may play important roles in the prevention of long-term persistence of asthma. Persistent occupational asthma is often associated with substantial disability and consequent impacts on income and quality of life. Prevention of new cases is the best approach to reducing the burden of asthma attributable to occupational exposures. Future research needs are identified. PMID:10931788

  6. Leadership and Occupational Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Fred E.; Scott, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    In a leadership position, it is important to understand what stress is and how it affects others. In an occupational setting, stressors vary according to personality types, gender, and occupational rank. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the foundations of stress and to explore how personality characteristics influence stress.…

  7. Occupational Standards: International Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Joao, Ed.

    These nine papers from a conference of the International Research Network for Training and Development focus on occupational classification, standards, and certification. "Introduction" (Joao Oliveria) presents synopses with highlights from the papers. Part I offers an overview of recent developments in the United States in "Occupational Standards…

  8. Marketing occupational health care.

    PubMed

    Norris, M J; Harris, J C

    1981-01-01

    A very basic part of marketing success is determining areas of your business in which you have a competitive advantage. In drafting a marketing plan for the Denver Clinic, the competitive advantages group practices have in the area of occupational health were quickly realized. This competitive edge is presented along with the Denver Clinic's marketing strategies and plans to capitalize on occupational healthcare advantages.

  9. [Market oriented occupational medicine].

    PubMed

    Rurik, Imre; Cseh, Károly

    2012-09-01

    The history and the recent state of occupational medicine in Hungary, and its relation with governmental labor organizations are analyzed. In the past 20 years, large "socialist" factories were replaced by smaller companies employing fewer workers. They have been forced to establish contract with occupational health providers. Many of them offer primary care services, whereas family physicians having a board examination in occupational medicine are allowed to work in this field as well. The market of occupational medicine is less regulated, and ethical rules are not always considered. Undercutting prices is a common practice. The recent system could be improved by some regulations which should be respected. There is no reason to make rough changes establishing a new market for profit oriented insurance companies, and to allow employees and employers to work without specification neglecting international agreements. Occupational medicine should be supervised again by the health authorities instead of economists who have quite different, short-term priorities. PMID:22951411

  10. Perspectives in Occupational Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, C. G. Toby; Maibach, Howard I.

    1982-01-01

    Because large surface areas of the skin are exposed directly to the environment, skin is an organ particularly vulnerable to occupationally induced disease. Statistics show that, excluding accidental injury, nearly half of all occupational illnesses occur in this organ; a fourth of all workers suffering from occupational skin disease lose an average of 10 to 12 workdays. The constant evolution of new industrial chemicals and methods of manufacture continue to bring new skin hazards and disease into the workplace. Occupational health physicians and practitioners, who usually have minimal training in dermatology, must diagnose and treat unfamiliar diseases in a setting of even less familiar, often overwhelming, technology. A thorough understanding of cutaneous defense mechanisms, clinical patterns of occupational skin disease and methods for establishing accurate diagnoses is essential. PMID:6219498

  11. OCCUPATIONAL ASPECTS OF COCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Levan, Norman E.

    1954-01-01

    Infections with coccidioides immitis have been frequently associated with circumstances suggesting the likelihood of occupational origin. Some cases have been accepted as compensable by insurance carriers, the Industrial Accident Commission, and the courts. The factors considered in determining whether or not infection is of occupational origin are reviewed under the following headings. 1. Laboratory infections. 2. Other infections due to exposure to contaminated articles, arising outside endemic areas. 3. Infections in employees entering endemic areas pursuant to their occupations. 4. Primary cutaneous inoculation. 5. Localization and/or aggravation of pre-existing coccidioidomycosis by occupational injury. 6. Infections in agricultural workers imported into endemic areas. 7. Infections in residents of endemic areas alleged to result from occupational exposures. PMID:13150196

  12. The Occupations of Literacy: Occupational Therapy's Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frolek Clark, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Nationally, student proficiency in reading and writing is very low and requires ongoing focus from state and local agencies. With almost 25% of occupational therapists working in early intervention and school settings (AOTA, 2015), their role of facilitating literacy (e.g., reading, writing, speaking and listening) is critical. Occupational…

  13. Occupations: Military--Civilian Occupational Source Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armed Forces Vocational Testing Group, Universal City, TX.

    Information on enlisted military occupations is offered in the source book to arrive at a comprehensive statement of job tasks in the military service and their similarities to jobs in civilian life. Basic information about five areas of the U.S. military services (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) focuses on their military…

  14. Occupational exposure in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mcrobbie, D W

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B0, imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B0 fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2–0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42±24% of B0, with time-averaged exposures of 5.2±2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6–4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B0 fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s−1. Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  15. Overeducation and Earnings within an Occupation: Controlling for Occupational Heterogeneity of Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubb, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, the role of occupational heterogeneity in the standard overeducation-required-undereducation (ORU) earnings function introduced by Duncan and Hoffman [1981. "The incidence and wage effects of overeducation." "Economics of Education Review" 1, no. 1: 75-86] is…

  16. Global occupational health and safety responsibilities of occupational health nurses based in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hong, OiSaeng; Chin, Dal Lae; Thomas, Elizabeth Anne

    2013-07-01

    The health and safety of workers is the primary concern of occupational health nurses. The purpose of this study was to identify the global occupational health and safety responsibilities of occupational health nurses based in the United States and factors contributing to these global responsibilities. A total of 2,123 American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc. members completed a web-based survey and were included in the study. Approximately 12% (n = 256) of the respondents worked globally. Occupational health nurses with three or four national certifications, OR (odds ratio) = 2.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.08, 3.98], more than 15 years of occupational health nursing experience, OR = 1.23, 95% CI [1.08, 1.39], and a doctoral degree, OR = 2.89, 95% CI [1.40, 5.99], were most likely to work globally. Advanced practice nurses, OR = 1.55, 95% CI [1.12, 2.15], occupational health nurses who worked for large employers, OR = 1.74, 95% CI [1.29, 2.33], and those who supervised other nurses, OR = 1.74, 95% CI [1.29, 2.34], were also more likely to work globally. In contrast, occupational health nurses who personally provided direct care to workers were less likely to work globally, OR = 0.60, 95% CI [0.44, 0.81]. The findings of this study provide direction for future education, practice, and research to increase global responsibilities among occupational health nurses in the United States. PMID:23819512

  17. Using occupancy models to determine mammalian responses to landscape changes.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Jeremy M; VAN Manen, Frank T

    2009-06-01

    Determining impacts of anthropogenic landscape changes on wildlife populations is difficult. Besides the challenges of designing field studies to document conditions before and after landscape changes occur, assessment of population responses (e.g. changes in population density) often provide poor inference because of sampling limitations. Estimation of occupancy, however, only requires data on detection or non-detection of a species and might provide better inference. To demonstrate the utility of occupancy models, we used data from an American black bear (Ursus americanus Pallas) population in North Carolina, USA to test our research hypothesis that documented declines in site occupancy of black bears would be greater near a new four-lane highway. We used multi-season occupancy models to estimate site occupancy based on bear visitation to survey sites before and after completion of the new highway and as a function of distance to the highway. Site occupancy declined from 0.81 to 0.35 between the two study phases, but was not a function of distance to the highway. Therefore, the impact of the new highway on occupancy extended to the entire study area. Our case study demonstrates that occupancy models can provide powerful inference regarding the potential impacts of landscape changes on species occupancy. As urban areas and transportation infrastructure are rapidly expanding in developing regions of the world, the need to determine how these changes affect mammal populations and how they might be mitigated increases accordingly. Because field sampling for occupancy models only requires detection data, surveys can be conducted for extensive geographic areas, thus making these surveys particularly applicable to studies of large mammals. PMID:21392293

  18. [Occupational asthma in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Endre, László

    2015-05-10

    Occupational asthma belongs to communicable diseases, which should be reported in Hungary. During a 24-year period between January 1990 and December 2013, 180 occupational asthma cases were reported in Hungary (52 cases between 1990 and 1995, 83 cases between 1996 and 2000, 40 cases between 2001 and 2006, and 5 cases between 2007 and 2013). These data are unusual, because according to the official report of the National Korányi Pulmonology Institute in Budapest, at least 14,000 new adult asthma cases were reported in every year between 2000 and 2012 in Hungary. Also, international data indicate that at least 2% of adult patients with asthma have occupational asthma and at least 50 out of 1 million employees develop occupational asthma in each year. In 2003, 631 new occupational asthma patients were reported in the United Kingdom, but only 7 cases in Hungary. Because it is unlikely that the occupational environment in Hungary is much better than anywhere else in the world, it seems that not all new occupational asthma cases are reported in Hungary. Of the 180 reported cases in Hungary, 55 were bakers or other workers in flour mills. There were 11 metal-workers, 10 health care assistants, 9 workers dealing with textiles (tailors, dressmakers, workers in textile industry) and 9 employees worked upon leather and animal fur. According to international data, the most unsafe profession is the animal keeper in scientific laboratories, but only 4 of them were reported as having occupational asthma during the studied 24 years in Hungary. Interestingly, 3 museologists with newly-diagnosed occupational asthma were reported in 2003, but not such cases occurred before or after that year. In this paper the Hungarian literature of occupational asthma is summarized, followed by a review on the classification, pathomechanism, clinical presentation, predisposing factors, diagnostics and therapeutic aspects of the disease. Epidemiological data of adult asthma in Hungary and data from

  19. Development and validation of a food photography manual, as a tool for estimation of food portion size in epidemiological dietary surveys in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Bouchoucha, Mongia; Akrout, Mouna; Bellali, Hédia; Bouchoucha, Rim; Tarhouni, Fadwa; Mansour, Abderraouf Ben; Zouari, Béchir

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimation of food portion sizes has always been a challenge in dietary studies on free-living individuals. The aim of this work was to develop and validate a food photography manual to improve the accuracy of the estimated size of consumed food portions. Methods A manual was compiled from digital photos of foods commonly consumed by the Tunisian population. The food was cooked and weighed before taking digital photographs of three portion sizes. The manual was validated by comparing the method of 24-hour recall (using photos) to the reference method [food weighing (FW)]. In both the methods, the comparison focused on food intake amounts as well as nutritional issues. Validity was assessed by Bland–Altman limits of agreement. In total, 31 male and female volunteers aged 9–89 participated in the study. Results We focused on eight food categories and compared their estimated amounts (using the 24-hour recall method) to those actually consumed (using FW). Animal products and sweets were underestimated, whereas pasta, bread, vegetables, fruits, and dairy products were overestimated. However, the difference between the two methods is not statistically significant except for pasta (p<0.05) and dairy products (p<0.05). The coefficient of correlation between the two methods is highly significant, ranging from 0.876 for pasta to 0.989 for dairy products. Nutrient intake calculated for both methods showed insignificant differences except for fat (p<0.001) and dietary fiber (p<0.05). A highly significant correlation was observed between the two methods for all micronutrients. The test agreement highlights the lack of difference between the two methods. Conclusion The difference between the 24-hour recall method using digital photos and the weighing method is acceptable. Our findings indicate that the food photography manual can be a useful tool for quantifying food portion sizes in epidemiological dietary surveys. PMID:27585631

  20. Engineering Maintenance. Occupational Analysis. UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Thomas D.; And Others

    The report has described the results of a questionnaire survey covering task performance in the occupational area of hospital engineering and maintenance and the implications for curriculum development in personnel training. Survey respondents were selected from among personnel of 48 health care facilities in six cities, representing various sized…

  1. Building Technologies Residential Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Secrest, Thomas J.

    2005-11-07

    Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

  2. Use of a Google Map Tool Embedded in an Internet Survey Instrument: Is it a Valid and Reliable Alternative to Geocoded Address Data?

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Adam S; Kramer, Michael R; Sanchez, Travis H; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2014-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States are at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and poor HIV related outcomes. Maps can be used to identify, quantify, and address gaps in access to HIV care among HIV-positive MSM, and tailor intervention programs based on the needs of patients being served. Objective The objective of our study was to assess the usability of a Google map question embedded in a Web-based survey among Atlanta-based, HIV-positive MSM, and determine whether it is a valid and reliable alternative to collection of address-based data on residence and last HIV care provider. Methods Atlanta-based HIV-positive MSM were recruited through Facebook and from two ongoing studies recruiting primarily through venue-based sampling or peer referral (VBPR). Participants were asked to identify the locations of their residence and last attended HIV care provider using two methods: (1) by entering the street address (gold standard), and (2) “clicking” on the locations using an embedded Google map. Home and provider addresses were geocoded, mapped, and compared with home and provider locations from clicked map points to assess validity. Provider location error values were plotted against home location error values, and a kappa statistic was computed to assess agreement in degree of error in identifying residential location versus provider location. Results The median home location error across all participants was 0.65 miles (interquartile range, IQR, 0.10, 2.5 miles), and was lower among Facebook participants (P<.001), whites (P<.001), and those reporting higher annual household income (P=.04). Median home location error was lower, although not statistically significantly, among older men (P=.08) and those with higher educational attainment (P=.05). The median provider location error was 0.32 miles (IQR, 0.12, 1.2 miles), and did not vary significantly by age, recruitment method, race, income, or level of educational attainment

  3. Occupational Noise Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    ... OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration 200 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20210 800-321-6742 (OSHA) TTY www.OSHA.gov FEDERAL GOVERNMENT White House Affordable Care Act Disaster Recovery ...

  4. Occupational Therapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & ... traumatic amputations cancer severe hand injuries multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy , and other chronic illnesses Occupational therapists might: help ...

  5. Paternal occupation and anencephaly

    SciTech Connect

    Brender, J.D.; Suarez, L. )

    1990-03-01

    It has been suggested that paternal occupational exposures to pesticides and solvents increase the risk of neural tube defects in offspring. With the use of Texas livebirth, fetal death, and linked livebirth-death records, the authors conducted a population-based case-control study among 1981-1986 Texas births to examine the association between paternal occupation and anencephalic births. Fathers employed in occupations associated with solvent exposure were more likely to have offspring with anencephaly (odds ratio (OR) = 2.53), with painters having the highest risk (OR = 3.43). A lesser association was found for fathers employed in occupations involving pesticide exposure (OR = 1.28). Further studies are indicated to clarify these associations.

  6. Occupational health in China.

    PubMed

    Christiani, David C; Tan, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiaorong

    2002-01-01

    China has been experiencing rapid industrialization and economic growth, resulting in a transformed industrial structure and expansion of the labor force. Occupational health and safety services, nonexistent before 1949, have made remarkable advances over the past decades. However, these services face greater challenges, consisting of both traditional and new occupational health problems. Poorly regulated work environments often lacking health services in recently developed and thriving small-scale industries and joint venture enterprises have created increasing risks for occupational diseases and work-related injuries. A special strategy based on cooperation among and contributions from the legal, administrative, social, economic, and scientific communities is critical to achieving the ultimate goal of control and prevention of these occupational health problems.

  7. Occupational stress and related factors among surgical residents in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sanghee; Jo, Hye Sung; Lee, Ji Sung; Kim, Chong Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The application rate for surgical residents in Korea has continuously decreased over the past few years. The demanding workload and the occupational stress of surgical training are likely causes of this problem. The aim of this study was to investigate occupational stress and its related factors in Korean surgical residents. Methods With the support of the Korean Surgical Society, we conducted an electronic survey of Korean surgical residents related to occupational stress. We used the Korean Occupational Stress Scale (KOSS) to measure occupational stress. We analyzed the data focused on the stress level and the factors associated with occupational stress. Results The mean KOSS score of the surgical residents was 55.39, which was significantly higher than that of practicing surgeons (48.16, P < 0.001) and the average score of specialized professionals (46.03, P < 0.001). Exercise was the only factor found to be significantly associated with KOSS score (P = 0.001) in univariate analysis. However, in multiple linear regression analysis, the mean number of assigned patients, resident occupation rate and exercise were all significantly associated with KOSS score. Conclusion Surgical residents have high occupational stress compared to practicing surgeons and other professionals. Their mean number of assigned patients, resident recruitment rate and exercise were all significantly associated with occupational stress for surgical residents. PMID:26576407

  8. Occupancy in continuous habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Efford, Murray G.; Dawson, Deanna K.

    2012-01-01

    The probability that a site has at least one individual of a species ('occupancy') has come to be widely used as a state variable for animal population monitoring. The available statistical theory for estimation when detection is imperfect applies particularly to habitat patches or islands, although it is also used for arbitrary plots in continuous habitat. The probability that such a plot is occupied depends on plot size and home-range characteristics (size, shape and dispersion) as well as population density. Plot size is critical to the definition of occupancy as a state variable, but clear advice on plot size is missing from the literature on the design of occupancy studies. We describe models for the effects of varying plot size and home-range size on expected occupancy. Temporal, spatial, and species variation in average home-range size is to be expected, but information on home ranges is difficult to retrieve from species presence/absence data collected in occupancy studies. The effect of variable home-range size is negligible when plots are very large (>100 x area of home range), but large plots pose practical problems. At the other extreme, sampling of 'point' plots with cameras or other passive detectors allows the true 'proportion of area occupied' to be estimated. However, this measure equally reflects home-range size and density, and is of doubtful value for population monitoring or cross-species comparisons. Plot size is ill-defined and variable in occupancy studies that detect animals at unknown distances, the commonest example being unlimited-radius point counts of song birds. We also find that plot size is ill-defined in recent treatments of "multi-scale" occupancy; the respective scales are better interpreted as temporal (instantaneous and asymptotic) rather than spatial. Occupancy is an inadequate metric for population monitoring when it is confounded with home-range size or detection distance.

  9. Occupational health in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rampal, Krishna Gopal; Aw, Tar-Ching; Jefferelli, Shamsul Bahrin

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a detailed examination of Malaysian occupational health agencies and their roles in formulating and enforcing standards, promoting occupational health and safety (OSH), and providing advisory services. Available OSH training is described, and the need for policies and personnel in various industries is outlined. Further, the authors discuss how international models and collaboration have influenced Malaysian OSH, and how some successes can be repeated and failures remedied.

  10. Occupational issues of adults with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ADHD is a common neurodevelopmental disorder that persists into adulthood. Its symptoms cause impairments in a number of social domains, one of which is employment. We wish to produce a consensus statement on how ADHD affects employment. Methods This consensus development conference statement was developed as a result of a joint international meeting held in July 2010. The consensus committee was international in scope (United Kingdom, mainland Europe, United Arab Emirates) and consisted of individuals from a broad range of backgrounds (Psychiatry, Occupational Medicine, Health Economists, Disability Advisors). The objectives of the conference were to discuss some of the occupational impairments adults with ADHD may face and how to address these problems from an inclusive perspective. Furthermore the conference looked at influencing policy and decision making at a political level to address impaired occupational functioning in adults with ADHD and fears around employing people with disabilities in general. Results The consensus was that there were clear weaknesses in the current arrangements in the UK and internationally to address occupational difficulties. More so, Occupational Health was not wholly integrated and used as a means of making positive changes to the workplace, but rather as a superfluous last resort that employers tried to avoid. Furthermore the lack of cross professional collaboration on occupational functioning in adults with ADHD was a significant problem. Conclusions Future research needs to concentrate on further investigating occupational functioning in adults with ADHD and pilot exploratory initiatives and tools, leading to a better and more informed understanding of possible barriers to employment and potential schemes to put in place to address these problems. PMID:23414364

  11. Occupational cancer in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    González, C A; Agudo, A

    1999-01-01

    The knowledge of specific problems of occupational cancer in Spain is scarce. The environment of the workplace has improved over the last few years after a long period distinguished by bad working conditions, incomplete legislation, and insufficient safety measures and control. It has been estimated that 3,083,479 workers (25.4% of employees) were exposed to carcinogens. The most common occupational exposures to carcinogenic agents were solar radiation, environmental tobacco smoke, silica, and wood dust. The highest number of employees were exposed to silica crystalline (404,729), diesel engine exhaust (274,321), rubber products (99,804), benzene (89,932), ethylene dibromide (81,336), agents used in furniture and cabinet making (72,068), and formaldehyde (71,189). The percentage of total cancer deaths attributed to occupational exposure was 4% (6% in men, 0.9% in women). Compared with other European countries, the incidence of lung cancer and leukemia in Spain are one of the lowest, but it is rapidly increasing. The incidence of urinary bladder and larynx cancer, on the contrary, are one of the highest. Few studies on occupational cancer have been conducted in Spain. The main problems are the availability of death certificates and the quality of the information on occupation in mortality of statistics. It is necessary to improve methods of assessment of exposures using expert hygienists and biologic markers of exposure and diseases. Reduction of cancer by limiting or avoiding exposure to known occupational carcinogens is still necessary. PMID:10350510

  12. Occupant thermal comfort evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiardi, Gena L.

    1999-03-01

    Throughout the automotive industry there has been an increasing concern and focus on the thermal comfort of occupants. Manufacturers are continuously striving to improve heating and air conditioning performance to comply with expanding customer needs. To optimize these systems, the technology to acquire data must also be enhanced. In this evaluation, the standard use of isolated thermocouple location technology is compared to utilizing infrared thermal vision in an air conditioning performance assessment. Infrared data on an actual occupant is correlated to breath and air conditioning output temperatures measured by positioned thermocouples. The use of infrared thermal vision highlights various areas of comfort and discomfort experienced by the occupant. The evaluation involves utilizing an infrared thermal vision camera to film an occupant in the vehicle as the following test procedure is run. The vehicle is soaked in full sun load until the interior temperature reaches a minimum of 150 degrees F (65.6 degrees Celsius). The occupant enters the vehicle and takes an initial temperature reading. The air conditioning is turned on to full cold, full fan speed, and recirculation mode. While being filmed, the driver drives for sixty minutes at 30 miles per hour (48.3 kph). The thermocouples acquire data in one minute intervals while the infrared camera films the cooling process of the occupant.

  13. Occupational health needs of universities: a review with an emphasis on the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Venables, K M; Allender, S

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the needs of universities in relation to planning the provision of occupational health services, by detailing their occupational hazards and risks and other relevant factors. The paper presents the results of (1) an enquiry into publicly available data relevant to occupational health in the university sector in the United Kingdom, (2) a literature review on occupational health provision in universities, and (3) selected results from a survey of university occupational health services in the UK. Although the enquiry and survey, but not the literature review, were restricted to the UK, the authors consider that the results are relevant to other countries because of the broad similarities of the university sector between countries. These three approaches showed that the university sector is large, with a notably wide range of occupational hazards, and other significant factors which must be considered in planning occupational health provision for individual universities or for the sector as a whole. PMID:16497856

  14. Courses in environmental and occupational epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Philipp, R; Kjellström, T

    1994-01-01

    The results of a survey are reported in which members of WHO's Global Environmental Epidemiology Network were asked for details of free-standing environmental and occupational epidemiology courses that were offered or planned for 1991-93 with tuition in English, French or Spanish and with places for persons living outside the countries concerned. Of the 126 courses on which information was received, 72 were open to health professionals from more than one discipline.

  15. The neurological basis of occupation.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Sharon A; Schindler, Victoria P

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to survey the literature about the neurological basis of human activity and its relationship to occupation and health. Activities related to neurological function were organized into three categories: those that activate the brain's reward system; those that promote the relaxation response; and those that preserve cognitive function into old age. The results from the literature review correlating neurological evidence and activities showed that purposeful and meaningful activities could counter the effects of stress-related diseases and reduce the risk for dementia. Specifically, it was found that music, drawing, meditation, reading, arts and crafts, and home repairs, for example, can stimulate the neurogical system and enhance health and well-being, Prospective research studies are needed to examine the effects of purposeful activities on reducing stress and slowing the rate of cognitive decline.

  16. The neurological basis of occupation.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Sharon A; Schindler, Victoria P

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to survey the literature about the neurological basis of human activity and its relationship to occupation and health. Activities related to neurological function were organized into three categories: those that activate the brain's reward system; those that promote the relaxation response; and those that preserve cognitive function into old age. The results from the literature review correlating neurological evidence and activities showed that purposeful and meaningful activities could counter the effects of stress-related diseases and reduce the risk for dementia. Specifically, it was found that music, drawing, meditation, reading, arts and crafts, and home repairs, for example, can stimulate the neurogical system and enhance health and well-being, Prospective research studies are needed to examine the effects of purposeful activities on reducing stress and slowing the rate of cognitive decline. PMID:17623380

  17. Geographical pathology as a method for detecting occupational cancer.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J R

    1977-08-01

    Geographical pathology points to environmental factors in cancer and helps estimate their potential magnitude. An occupational contribution was established by 1972 for cancer of the mouth, lung, bladder, and skin. Additionally partly based on geographical pathology, an occupational etiology is accepted for some cancer of nasopharynx, brain, liver, pleura, nasal sinus, bone and bone marrow, and possibly stomach. For identifying new occupational factors based on geographical comparisons, both an optimal size of work force to be followed-up and a sufficiently high proportion of work force in the geographical unit's population are necessary. Hypothetical variations based on 30-year follow-up of asbestos workers illustrate this. Cancer surveys and registries can greatly facilitate detection of occupational cancer. Evidence for occupational factors in the geographical pathology of lymphosarcoma is briefly summarized; but no conclusions are reached.

  18. Worker awareness of exposure: industries and occupations with low awareness.

    PubMed

    Behrens, V J; Brackbill, R M

    1993-05-01

    A goal of occupational health is to inform workers of hazards on their jobs. This analysis addresses this goal by identifying industries and occupations with low worker awareness of potential exposures. Industries and occupations were ranked by the greatest positive difference between the proportion of workers exposed and proportion perceiving exposure to chemical and physical hazards. Those with low awareness had the greatest difference, i.e., high exposure and low perception. This analysis was performed by adding exposure data from a national exposure survey to a national health survey with perceived exposure data. The hospital and construction industries and occupations in these industries ranked among the top five for all hazards. For example, for hospital workers the difference between proportion exposed and proportion perceiving exposure to chemicals was 62% and to radiation was 42%, and for workers in construction the difference was 54% for exposure to noise and 63% for exposure to vibration.

  19. [Hodgkin's disease and occupation].

    PubMed

    Franco, G; Fonte, R

    1984-01-01

    In order to discuss the hypothesized existence of occupational risk factors in the etiology of Hodgkin's disease (HD), the available literature data are reviewed. The occupations most often considered to be at increased risk of the disease are woodworking, school teaching, hospital occupations and occupations entailing exposure to chemicals. The association between HD and employment in wood industry suggest that exposure to unknown occupational factors may play a role as etiologic agent in this disease. A number of chemical substances that are regularly used may be suspected as causative factors. There are many discrepancies among the results of the studies on the association between school teaching and HD. To date no certain conclusion may be drawn from the presented data. However it has been suggested that the reported excess risk for HD among teachers may be explicable by social class gradient for the disease. The existence of risk factors other than viral may explain the excess risk among physicians and nurses. Because of the characteristics of some highly reactive chemicals their etiologic role may not be underestimated. An association between HD and occupations entailing exposure to various chemicals (organic solvents, benzene, phenoxy acids, chlorophenols) was shown; however no definitive conclusion may be drawn. There are increasing findings that point out the importance of the association between some occupations and development of HD. In spite of the evidence of a link between exposure to various chemicals and HD, there is a clear need to evaluate dose-response relationship between specific type and amount of chemicals and the disease, in order to provide some of the answer we need about the etiology of HD.

  20. Occupational and Environmental Bronchiolar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Kristin J.; Kreiss, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Occupational and environmental causes of bronchiolar disorders are recognized on the basis of case reports, case series, and, less commonly, epidemiologic investigations. Pathology may be limited to the bronchioles or also involve other components of the respiratory tract, including the alveoli. A range of clinical, functional, and radiographic findings, including symptomatic disease lacking abnormalities on noninvasive testing, poses a diagnostic challenge and highlights the value of surgical biopsy. Disease clusters in workplaces and communities have identified new etiologies, drawn attention to indolent disease that may otherwise have been categorized as idiopathic, and expanded the spectrum of histopathologic responses to an exposure. More sensitive noninvasive diagnostic tools, evidence-based therapies, and ongoing epidemiologic investigation of at-risk populations are needed to identify, treat, and prevent exposure-related bronchiolar disorders. PMID:26024345

  1. Incorporating Occupational Risk in Heat Stress Vulnerability Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Crider, Kyle G.; Maples, Elizabeth H.; Gohlke, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    Both obesity and strenuous outdoor work are known risk factors for heat-related illness (HRI). These risk factors may be compounded by more and longer periods of extreme heat in the southeastern U.S. To quantify occupational risk and investigate the possible predictive value of a GIS-based tool, a weighted occupation-based metabolic equivalent (MET) index was created. The correlation between current MET-weighted employment rates or obesity rates and 2012 HRI report rates in Alabama were then determined. With the current dataset, results indicate occupational and obesity rates may explain some of the geographical variation seen in HRI report rates, although results are not statistically significant with this limited dataset. Mapping occupational and physiological risk factors with HRI rates may be useful for environmental and occupational health professionals to identify “hotspots” that may require special attention. PMID:25185323

  2. College Textbook Reading Attitude Survey: The Development of an Attitude Measuring Tool and Vocabulary and Reading Comprehension's Impact on Student Teachers' Attitudes and Perceptions Concerning College Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, James E.; Becker, Melisa; Lamb, Holy; McGregor, Jenifer

    2009-01-01

    Attitude toward reading has long proven to be of importance in learning. This study designed a survey instrument for college teachers to gage future teachers, college students' attitudes toward the reading of textbooks. College students (n = 64) responded to two instruments, the newly created survey called the College Textbook Reading Attitude…

  3. Occupational health in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Koh, D; Jeyaratnam, J

    1998-07-01

    Singapore, a newly industrializing country in Southeast Asia, has a resident population of 3 million and a work force of 1.75 million. Most workers are employed in the manufacturing, services, and commerce sectors. Agricultural and mining activities are negligible. In 1996 the infant mortality rate was 3.8 per 1,000 live births and the life expectancy at birth was 77 years. In 1996 the total industrial accident rate was 2.7 per million man-hours worked and the severity rate was 353 industrial man-days lost per million man-hours worked. The shipbuilding and construction industries had the most frequent and most severe accidents. In the same year, 1,521 cases of occupational disease were notified to, and confirmed by, the Ministry of Labor. The majority of cases involved noise-induced hearing loss. There is substantial underreporting of cases. New cases that are expected to appear will be work-related illnesses such as musculoskeletal or psychosocial disorders. The principal occupational health legislation in Singapore is the Factories Act. Although it selectively targets workers at highest risk of developing occupational illness, its main limitation is the exclusion of nonfactory workers, who comprise 63% of the working population. Labor regulations are enforced by the Ministry of Labor. Workmen's compensation paid in 1995 amounted to S $46.6 million (U.S. $1=S $1.75). Education and training in occupational health is provided by employer federations, employee unions, and various government agencies. Occupational health is taught to medical students during their undergraduate training. Postgraduate-diploma and Masters programs in occupational medicine are also available. About 600 doctors in Singapore have some form of postgraduate training in occupational health. Health care for workers is offered either through the private sector or through government clinics and hospitals. Although Singapore has made great strides in protecting and promoting the health of its

  4. Sustainable occupational responses to climate change through lifestyle choices.

    PubMed

    Hocking, Clare; Kroksmark, Ulla

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Occupational therapists and occupational scientists are increasingly aware of the relationship between occupation and global climate change, with some working to raise awareness of the issues and others proposing that an occupational perspective can make a valuable contribution to understanding and addressing the issues. In this discussion paper the United Nations Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles ( 1 ), which reports young adults' beliefs about everyday occupations that have a substantial impact on the environment (food, housekeeping, and transportation) is introduced. The authors argue that the survey findings are a valuable resource for occupational therapists who are concerned about global climate change and work with young adults (age 18-35), providing valuable insights into their concerns and preferences in relation to sustainability. To illustrate the insights contained in the reports, findings from four countries are presented: New Zealand and Sweden, the authors' countries of origin, and the Philippines and Lebanon which have people living in New Zealand and Sweden. Application to individual and community-based interventions to promote more sustainable lifestyles is suggested, along with studies to examine the perspectives of young adults with a disability, as their concerns and sustainability preferences might differ due to the barriers that limit their participation in educational and vocational occupations.

  5. Sustainable occupational responses to climate change through lifestyle choices.

    PubMed

    Hocking, Clare; Kroksmark, Ulla

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Occupational therapists and occupational scientists are increasingly aware of the relationship between occupation and global climate change, with some working to raise awareness of the issues and others proposing that an occupational perspective can make a valuable contribution to understanding and addressing the issues. In this discussion paper the United Nations Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles ( 1 ), which reports young adults' beliefs about everyday occupations that have a substantial impact on the environment (food, housekeeping, and transportation) is introduced. The authors argue that the survey findings are a valuable resource for occupational therapists who are concerned about global climate change and work with young adults (age 18-35), providing valuable insights into their concerns and preferences in relation to sustainability. To illustrate the insights contained in the reports, findings from four countries are presented: New Zealand and Sweden, the authors' countries of origin, and the Philippines and Lebanon which have people living in New Zealand and Sweden. Application to individual and community-based interventions to promote more sustainable lifestyles is suggested, along with studies to examine the perspectives of young adults with a disability, as their concerns and sustainability preferences might differ due to the barriers that limit their participation in educational and vocational occupations. PMID:23004010

  6. Occupational health in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Werner, A F

    2000-07-01

    Argentina is within the denominated "new industrialised countries", with the characteristic of having high contrasts in the urban population, based on service and industry, and in the rural population, based on agriculture and cattle, still the main sources of wealth in the country. The process of globalisation and the need to compete hard in international markets have provoked high unemployment and the transfer of workers from a formal market to an informal one. Legislation on occupational health is old and it is in the process of being updated. The system of prevention, assistance and compensation for accidents at work and for occupational illnesses has changed from being optative for employers, to the compulsory hiring of private insurance companies. The Government keeps the role of supervisor of the system. There are enough professionals in occupational health, hygiene and safety but not occupational nurses. The teaching is given by many universities and professional associations, some of which have an active profile in the occupational health of the country.

  7. Occupational health in India.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Tushar Kant; Smith, Kirk R

    2002-01-01

    The population of India has crossed the billion mark; only one other country (China) shares this distinction. A declining female population and low literacy are negatives in an otherwise vibrant country. The empowerment of females and their role in society has become a point of debate, and radical economic changes are likely, to allow India to join the global economy. Problems in occupational health and safety (OHS) include: OHS legislation that covers only a minority of the working population; child labour; a physician-driven OHS model; little attention to industrial hygiene; poor surveillance of occupational diseases (making it impossible to gauge the burden of illness due to occupational exposures); and a fragile OHS academic base. A silver lining comprises the inclusion of OHS in national health policy and the decision by the Indian Medical Association to educate its members in occupational health. India urgently requires modern OHS legislation with adequate enforcement machinery, and establishment of centres of excellence in occupational medicine, to catch up with the rest of the world.

  8. Prefecture-wide multi-centre radiation dose survey as a useful tool for CT dose optimisation: report of Gunma radiation dose study.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Nakajima, Takahito; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the usefulness for the dose optimisation of setting a diagnostic reference level (DRL) based on the results of a prefecture-wide multi-centre radiation dose survey and providing data feedback. All hospitals/clinics in the authors' prefecture with computed tomography (CT) scanners were requested to report data. The first survey was done in July 2011, and the results of dose-length products (DLPs) for each CT scanner were fed back to all hospitals/clinics, with DRL set from all the data. One year later, a second survey was done in the same manner. The medians of DLP in the upper abdomen, whole body and coronary CT in 2012 were significantly smaller than those of the 2011 survey. The interquartile ranges of DLP in the head, chest, pelvis and coronary CT were also smaller in 2012. Radiation dose survey with data feedback may be helpful for CT dose optimisation.

  9. Pursuing Post-Secondary Education in the Host Country and the Occupational Attainment of Highly Educated Immigrants to Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamuti-Trache, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the occupational attainment of highly educated adult immigrants by employing a secondary analysis of three waves of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada that provide data on immigrant arrivals in 2000-2001. Occupational attainment is described in terms of matching immigrants' pre-migration occupation with the main…

  10. Population Health and Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Braveman, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners play an important role in improving the health of populations through the development of occupational therapy interventions at the population level and through advocacy to address occupational participation and the multiple determinants of health. This article defines and explores population health as a concept and describes the appropriateness of occupational therapy practice in population health. Support of population health practice as evidenced in the official documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association and the relevance of population health for occupational therapy as a profession are reviewed. Recommendations and directions for the future are included related to celebration of the achievements of occupational therapy practitioners in the area of population health, changes to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and educational accreditation standards, and the importance of supporting, recognizing, rewarding, and valuing occupational therapy practitioners who assume roles in which direct care is not their primary function.

  11. Occupational Cohort Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Roth, H. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores how highly correlated time variables (occupational cohort time scales) contribute to confounding and ambiguity of interpretation. Methods: Occupational cohort time scales were identified and organized through simple equations of three time scales (relational triads) and the connections between these triads (time scale web). The behavior of the time scales was examined when constraints were imposed on variable ranges and interrelationships. Results: Constraints on a time scale in a triad create high correlations between the other two time scales. These correlations combine with the connections between relational triads to produce association paths. High correlation between time scales leads to ambiguity of interpretation. Conclusions: Understanding the properties of occupational cohort time scales, their relational triads, and the time scale web is helpful in understanding the origins of otherwise obscure confounding bias and ambiguity of interpretation. PMID:25647318

  12. Marketing occupational therapy services.

    PubMed

    Kautzmann, L N

    1985-01-01

    The ability to understand and appropriately apply business skills is a key component in the development of a successful private practice. Marketing is one of the business skills occupational therapists need to have in order to take full advantage of the opportunities available to entrepeneurs in the health care industry. The purpose of this article is to present a structured approach to marketing occupational therapy services through the use of a marketing plan. The four components of a marketing plan, a situation analysis, the identification of problems, opportunities, and target markets, the development of a marketing strategy for each targeted market, and a method to monitor the plan, are discussed. Applications to occupational therapy practice are suggested. The use of a marketing plan as a method for organizing and focusing marketing efforts is an effective means of supporting and enhancing the development of a private practice.

  13. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, D.B.; Samet, J.M. )

    1992-06-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much more conservative. For example, Doll and Peto estimated that 15% of lung cancer in men and 5% in women could be attributed to occupational exposures. A number of population-based case-control studies also provide relevant estimates. In a recent literature review, Vineis and Simonato cited attributable risk estimates for occupation and lung cancer that ranged from 4% to 40%; for asbestos alone, the estimates ranged from 1% to 5%. These estimates would be expected to vary across locations and over time. Nevertheless, these recent estimates indicate that occupation remains an important cause of lung cancer. Approaches to Prevention. Prevention of lung cancer mortality among workers exposed to agents or industrial processes that cause lung cancer may involve several strategies, including eliminating or reducing exposures, smoking cessation, screening, and chemo-prevention. For example, changes in industrial processes that have eliminated or reduced exposures to chloromethyl ethers and nickel compounds have provided evidence of reduced risk of lung cancer following these changes. Although occupational exposures are important causes of lung cancer, cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of lung cancer. For adults, the work site offers an important location to target smoking cessation efforts. In fact, the work site may be the only place to reach many smokers.

  14. 29 CFR 1926.301 - Hand tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand tools. 1926.301 Section 1926.301 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Tools-Hand and Power § 1926.301 Hand tools. (a)...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.133 - Hand tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand tools. 1915.133 Section 1915.133 Labor Regulations...) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Tools and Related Equipment § 1915.133 Hand...) Employers shall not issue or permit the use of unsafe hand tools. (b) Wrenches, including crescent,...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.133 - Hand tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hand tools. 1915.133 Section 1915.133 Labor Regulations...) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Tools and Related Equipment § 1915.133 Hand...) Employers shall not issue or permit the use of unsafe hand tools. (b) Wrenches, including crescent,...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.133 - Hand tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hand tools. 1915.133 Section 1915.133 Labor Regulations...) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Tools and Related Equipment § 1915.133 Hand...) Employers shall not issue or permit the use of unsafe hand tools. (b) Wrenches, including crescent,...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.133 - Hand tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hand tools. 1915.133 Section 1915.133 Labor Regulations...) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Tools and Related Equipment § 1915.133 Hand...) Employers shall not issue or permit the use of unsafe hand tools. (b) Wrenches, including crescent,...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.133 - Hand tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hand tools. 1915.133 Section 1915.133 Labor Regulations...) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Tools and Related Equipment § 1915.133 Hand...) Employers shall not issue or permit the use of unsafe hand tools. (b) Wrenches, including crescent,...

  20. Dynamic occupancy models for explicit colonization processes.

    PubMed

    Broms, Kristin M; Hooten, Mevin B; Johnson, Devin S; Altwegg, Res; Conquest, Loveday L

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic, multi-season occupancy model framework has become a popular tool for modeling open populations with occupancies that change over time through local colonizations and extinctions. However, few versions of the model relate these probabilities to the occupancies of neighboring sites or patches. We present a modeling framework that incorporates this information and is capable of describing a wide variety of spatiotemporal colonization and extinction processes. A key feature of the model is that it is based on a simple set of small-scale rules describing how the process evolves. The result is a dynamic process that can account for complicated large-scale features. In our model, a site is more likely to be colonized if more of its neighbors were previously occupied and if it provides more appealing environmental characteristics than its neighboring sites. Additionally, a site without occupied neighbors may also become colonized through the inclusion of a long-distance dispersal process. Although similar model specifications have been developed for epidemiological applications, ours formally accounts for detectability using the well-known occupancy modeling framework. After demonstrating the viability and potential of this new form of dynamic occupancy model in a simulation study, we use it to obtain inference for the ongoing Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) invasion in South Africa. Our results suggest that the Common Myna continues to enlarge its distribution and its spread via short distance movement, rather than long-distance dispersal. Overall, this new modeling framework provides a powerful tool for managers examining the drivers of colonization including short- vs. long-distance dispersal, habitat quality, and distance from source populations. PMID:27008788

  1. Dynamic occupancy models for explicit colonization processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broms, Kristin M.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Johnson, Devin S.; Altwegg, Res; Conquest, Loveday

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic, multi-season occupancy model framework has become a popular tool for modeling open populations with occupancies that change over time through local colonizations and extinctions. However, few versions of the model relate these probabilities to the occupancies of neighboring sites or patches. We present a modeling framework that incorporates this information and is capable of describing a wide variety of spatiotemporal colonization and extinction processes. A key feature of the model is that it is based on a simple set of small-scale rules describing how the process evolves. The result is a dynamic process that can account for complicated large-scale features. In our model, a site is more likely to be colonized if more of its neighbors were previously occupied and if it provides more appealing environmental characteristics than its neighboring sites. Additionally, a site without occupied neighbors may also become colonized through the inclusion of a long-distance dispersal process. Although similar model specifications have been developed for epidemiological applications, ours formally accounts for detectability using the well-known occupancy modeling framework. After demonstrating the viability and potential of this new form of dynamic occupancy model in a simulation study, we use it to obtain inference for the ongoing Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) invasion in South Africa. Our results suggest that the Common Myna continues to enlarge its distribution and its spread via short distance movement, rather than long-distance dispersal. Overall, this new modeling framework provides a powerful tool for managers examining the drivers of colonization including short- vs. long-distance dispersal, habitat quality, and distance from source populations.

  2. Cause of occupational disease.

    PubMed Central

    Muir, D C

    1995-01-01

    The concept of causality is reviewed with special emphasis on occupational diseases. Separate approaches from the philosophical, scientific, and legal points of view are identified. There is controversy over the methodology of logical causality; inductive and deductive methods are described and reference is made to the verification or refutation approach. Application of the methods to epidemiology are reviewed. It is likely that many diseases have multiple causes and that only a component of occupational causality can be identified in each patient. Methods of assigning such a component are discussed. The difficulties of developing an equitable compensation policy in such circumstances are reviewed. The possible benefits of proportional compensation are noted. PMID:7795749

  3. Occupational Sleep Medicine.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Philip; Drake, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms significantly impact almost all aspects of human behavior and are therefore relevant to occupational sleep medicine, which is focused predominantly around workplace productivity, safety, and health. In this article, 5 main factors that influence occupational functioning are reviewed: (1) sleep deprivation, (2) disordered sleep, (3) circadian rhythms, (4) common medical illnesses that affect sleep and sleepiness, and (5) medications that affect sleep and sleepiness. Consequences of disturbed sleep and sleepiness are also reviewed, including cognitive, emotional, and psychomotor functioning and drowsy driving. PMID:26972034

  4. Bellarmine College Alumni Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Frank

    Alumni of Bellarmine College, Kentucky, who had obtained B.A. or B.S. degrees from 1974 to 1978 were surveyed in 1979. Areas of assessment were as follows: majors, desired occupation at time of graduation, attendance at graduate school, present employment status, jobs held by respondents, reasons why respondents chose their present jobs,…

  5. Successful business process design. Business plan development for the occupational health services unit.

    PubMed

    Kalina, C M; Fitko, J

    1997-02-01

    1. The occupational health nurse is often mandated by management to validate health services offered and programs developed for employees as valuable to the business and company mission. 2. The business plan of the occupational health service is a working document, changing as needs of the client/customer and internal and external business and socio-economic environment evolve. 3. Alignment with and support of the company mission, goals, and objectives is another method of proving good occupational health is good business. 4. Business planning is a basic business tool the wise and prudent occupational health nurse can use in proving good occupational health is vital to the success of a company.

  6. [What are the tools for post-occupational follow-up, how should they be performed and what are their performance, limits and benefit/risk ratio? Chest X-Ray and CT scan].

    PubMed

    Ferretti, G

    2011-06-01

    Chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) are the two radiological techniques used for the follow-up of people exposed to asbestos. Since the last conference of consensus (1999), the scientific literature has primarily covered high-resolution CT and high-resolution volume CT (HR-VCT). We consider in turn the contribution of digital thoracic radiography, recommendations for the performance of HR-VCT to ensure the quality of examination while controlling the delivered radiation dose, and the need to refer to the "CT atlas of benign diseases related to asbestos exposure", published by a group of French experts in 2007, for interpretation. The results of the published studies concerning radiography or CT are then reviewed. We note the great interobserver variability in the recognition of pleural plaques and asbestosis, indicating the need for adequate training of radiologists, and the importance of defining standardized, quantified criteria for CT abnormalities. The very low agreement between thoracic and general radiologists must be taken into account. The reading of CT scans in cases of occupational exposure to asbestos should be entrusted to thoracic radiologists or to general radiologists having validated specific training. A double interpretation of CT could be considered in medicosocial requests. CT is more sensitive than chest radiography in the detection of bronchial carcinoma but generates a great number of false positive results (96 to 99%). No scientific data are available to assess the role of imaging by either CT or chest radiography in the early detection of mesothelioma.

  7. A goodness-of-fit test for occupancy models with correlated within-season revisits.

    PubMed

    Wright, Wilson J; Irvine, Kathryn M; Rodhouse, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    specifically evaluates occupancy model lack of fit related to correlation among detections within a sample unit. Our diagnostic tool is available for practitioners that serially deploy survey equipment as a way to achieve cost savings. PMID:27551392

  8. Outline of occupational chromium poisoning in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Liu, Hong; Xiang, Xian-hong; Liu, Fu-you

    2013-06-01

    The present study analyzed the feature of occupational chromium poisoning in China since the 1980s. The collected data were acquired from 18 previous surveys of chromium poisoning in 14 cities of China. The method of risk assessment was applied to calculate the relative risk and 95% CI, p < 0.05 was considered as a significant risk. The results showed that nasal disease was the most common sign of occupational chromium poisoning, and the prevalence rate of nasal disease was 17.83% in total population of 6,998. Further, the risk analysis showed that occupational chromium poisoning led to an increased risk of lung or liver cancer in male workers due to the definite carcinogenicity of hexavalent chromium. Significantly, an increased risk of spontaneous or threatened abortion was also found in female workers. In conclusion, these studies suggest that early detection of impaired reproductive function or impaired lung or liver function in female or male workers is essential for controlling occupational chromium poisoning in China. PMID:23604023

  9. A Bayesian Machine Learning Model for Estimating Building Occupancy from Open Source Data

    DOE PAGES

    Stewart, Robert N.; Urban, Marie L.; Duchscherer, Samantha E.; Kaufman, Jason; Morton, April M.; Thakur, Gautam; Piburn, Jesse; Moehl, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding building occupancy is critical to a wide array of applications including natural hazards loss analysis, green building technologies, and population distribution modeling. Due to the expense of directly monitoring buildings, scientists rely in addition on a wide and disparate array of ancillary and open source information including subject matter expertise, survey data, and remote sensing information. These data are fused using data harmonization methods which refer to a loose collection of formal and informal techniques for fusing data together to create viable content for building occupancy estimation. In this paper, we add to the current state of the artmore » by introducing the Population Data Tables (PDT), a Bayesian based informatics system for systematically arranging data and harmonization techniques into a consistent, transparent, knowledge learning framework that retains in the final estimation uncertainty emerging from data, expert judgment, and model parameterization. PDT probabilistically estimates ambient occupancy in units of people/1000ft2 for over 50 building types at the national and sub-national level with the goal of providing global coverage. The challenge of global coverage led to the development of an interdisciplinary geospatial informatics system tool that provides the framework for capturing, storing, and managing open source data, handling subject matter expertise, carrying out Bayesian analytics as well as visualizing and exporting occupancy estimation results. We present the PDT project, situate the work within the larger community, and report on the progress of this multi-year project.Understanding building occupancy is critical to a wide array of applications including natural hazards loss analysis, green building technologies, and population distribution modeling. Due to the expense of directly monitoring buildings, scientists rely in addition on a wide and disparate array of ancillary and open source information

  10. A Bayesian Machine Learning Model for Estimating Building Occupancy from Open Source Data

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Robert N.; Urban, Marie L.; Duchscherer, Samantha E.; Kaufman, Jason; Morton, April M.; Thakur, Gautam; Piburn, Jesse; Moehl, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding building occupancy is critical to a wide array of applications including natural hazards loss analysis, green building technologies, and population distribution modeling. Due to the expense of directly monitoring buildings, scientists rely in addition on a wide and disparate array of ancillary and open source information including subject matter expertise, survey data, and remote sensing information. These data are fused using data harmonization methods which refer to a loose collection of formal and informal techniques for fusing data together to create viable content for building occupancy estimation. In this paper, we add to the current state of the art by introducing the Population Data Tables (PDT), a Bayesian based informatics system for systematically arranging data and harmonization techniques into a consistent, transparent, knowledge learning framework that retains in the final estimation uncertainty emerging from data, expert judgment, and model parameterization. PDT probabilistically estimates ambient occupancy in units of people/1000ft2 for over 50 building types at the national and sub-national level with the goal of providing global coverage. The challenge of global coverage led to the development of an interdisciplinary geospatial informatics system tool that provides the framework for capturing, storing, and managing open source data, handling subject matter expertise, carrying out Bayesian analytics as well as visualizing and exporting occupancy estimation results. We present the PDT project, situate the work within the larger community, and report on the progress of this multi-year project.Understanding building occupancy is critical to a wide array of applications including natural hazards loss analysis, green building technologies, and population distribution modeling. Due to the expense of directly monitoring buildings, scientists rely in addition on a wide and disparate array of ancillary and open source information including

  11. Health Occupations Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walraven, Catherine; And Others

    These instructional materials consist of a series of curriculum worksheets that cover tasks to be mastered by students in health occupations cluster programs. Covered in the curriculum worksheets are diagnostic procedures; observing/recording/reporting/planning; safety; nutrition/elimination; hygiene/personal care/comfort;…

  12. Evaluating Occupational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, James P.

    1987-01-01

    Stresses the importance of evaluating occupational programs on a regular basis. Offers a brief explanation of the approaches to program evaluation taken at the Dallas County Community College District (TX), South Puget Sound Community College (WA), and Triton College (IL). Offers a list of references on program evaluation. (CBC)

  13. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  14. Coping With Occupational Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Dianne Boswell

    1981-01-01

    Ways of reducing occupational stress include: (1) avoiding the stressful situation; (2) changing the response to the stress; and (3) changing the environment. Administrators can help teachers manage stress by developing communication techniques, steering committees, and support groups. A second part of this article will be published in the January…

  15. Building Industries Occupations: Syllabus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The Building Industries Occupations course is a two-year program of approximately 160 three-period teaching days per year. The required course content is designed to be effectively taught in 80 percent of the total course time, thus allowing 20 percent of the time for instruction adapted to such local conditions as employment prospects, student…

  16. Diversified Occupations I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noto, Jody

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in presenting the first year of a two-year course in diversified occupations that is designed to teach job search and job-holding skills to disadvantaged and English as a second language (ESL) students. Addressed in the 25 units included in the guide are the following topics: the purposes of…

  17. Pharmacist. Occupational Simulation Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsley, Nancy

    This career exploration instructional booklet on the pharmacist's occupation is one of several resulting from the rural southwestern Colorado CEPAC Project (Career Education Process of Attitude Change). Based on a job analysis and utilizing a programed instructional format, the following content is included: A brief description of two real…

  18. British Communicator Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunstall, Jeremy

    Occupations and organizations within the British press and broadcasting systems are examined in this paper. Its sections summarize recent British research on media communicators and discuss characteristics of craft unions and other media organizations; the historical development of the British press; the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and…

  19. Occupational Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun A

    2010-01-01

    Korea has industrialized since the 1970s. Pneumoconiosis in coal miners was the most common occupational disease in the 1970s to 1980s. With the industrialization, the use of many chemicals have increased since the 1970s. As a consequence, there were outbreaks of occupational diseases caused by poisonous chemicals, such as heavy metal poisoning, solvent poisoning and occupational asthma in the late 1980s and early 1990s with civil movement for democracy. Many actions have been taken for prevention by the government, employers and employees or unions. In the 1990s most chemical related diseases and pneumoconiosis have rapidly decreased due to improving work environment. In the late 1990s, cerebro-cardiovascular diseases related to job stress or work overloads have abruptly increased especially after the economic crisis in 1998. After the year 2000, musculoskeletal disorders became a major problem especially in assembly lines in the manufacturing industry and they were expanded to the service industry. Mental diseases related to job stress have increased. Infectious diseases increased in health care workers and afforestation workers. Occupational cancers are increasing because of their long latency, although the use of carcinogenic substances are reduced, limited, and even banned. PMID:21258589

  20. Occupation and lymphoid neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    La Vecchia, C.; Negri, E.; D'Avanzo, B.; Franceschi, S.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between occupation and exposure to a number of occupational agents and lymphoid neoplasms was investigated in a case-control study of 69 cases of Hodgkin's disease, 153 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, 110 multiple myelomas and 396 controls admitted for acute diseases to a network of teaching and general hospitals in the greater Milan area. Among the cases, there was a significant excess of individuals ever occupied in agriculture and food processing: the multivariate relative risks (RR) were 2.1 (95% confidence interval, CI = 1.0-3.8) for Hodgkin's disease, 1.9 (95% CI = 1.2-3.0) for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and 2.0 (95% CI = 1.1-3.5) for multiple myeloma. Significant trends for duration of exposure to herbicides were observed for lymphomas, but the association was stronger for overall occupation in agriculture than with the specific question of herbicide use. History of occupation in the chemical industry was more frequent among Hodgkin's disease (RR = 4.3, 95% CI = 1.4-10.2), and a significant trend in risk was observed between duration of exposure to benzene and other solvents and multiple myeloma. No significant relation was found between any of the lymphoid neoplasms considered and rubber, dye, painting, printing, tanning leather, photography, pharmaceuticals, wood, coal/gas and nuclear industries. PMID:2789947

  1. Occupational Literacy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, R. Timothy; And Others

    Intended for teachers of adult basic education as well as teachers in job retraining programs, this book focuses on the development of written and oral language competencies required in occupational and training settings. The first four chapters offer a concise synthesis of recent research on adult learning and on workplace literacy for ten…

  2. Computers and occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    English, C B

    1975-01-01

    The benefits and applications of computer science for occupational therapy are explored and a basic, functional description of the computer and computer programming is presented. Potential problems and advantages of computer utilization are compared and examples of existing computer systems in health fields are cited. Methods for successfully introducing computers are discussed.

  3. Marketing Occupations. Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This cluster guide, which is designed to show teachers what specific knowledge and skills qualify high school students for entry-level employment (or postsecondary training) in marketing occupations, is organized into three sections: (1) cluster organization and implementation, (2) instructional emphasis areas, and (3) assessment. The first…

  4. Occupational Hazards of Farming

    PubMed Central

    White, Gill; Cessna, Allan

    1989-01-01

    A number of occupational hazards exist for the farmer and farm worker. They include the hazards of farm machinery, biologic and chemical hazards, and social and environmental stresses. Recognizing of these hazards will help the family physician care for farmers and their families. PMID:21248929

  5. Occupational Choice and Student Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McSweeney, R. V.

    1973-01-01

    Article attempts to set out a way of measuring determination, the element capable of making students' occupational choice' a reality not just an ideal, by exploration of the part played by the value system in relation to occupational choice. (Author)

  6. Identifying Occupationally Specific Affective Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucel, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Data from two groups of cosmetology instructors (n=15) and two groups of machinist instructors (n=17) validated the Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis instrument as capable of identifying affective behaviors viewed as important to success in a given occupation. (SK)

  7. Occupational Therapist Assistants and Aides

    MedlinePlus

    ... 700 [ XLSX ] <- Pay State & Area Data -> State & Area Data About this section Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) The ... the major industries employing the occupation. State & Area Data The State and Area Data tab provides links ...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.244 - Other portable tools and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Other portable tools and equipment. 1910.244 Section 1910.244 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hand and Portable Powered Tools and Other...

  9. 29 CFR 1910.244 - Other portable tools and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Other portable tools and equipment. 1910.244 Section 1910.244 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hand and Portable Powered Tools and Other...

  10. 29 CFR 1910.244 - Other portable tools and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Other portable tools and equipment. 1910.244 Section 1910.244 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hand and Portable Powered Tools and Other...

  11. 29 CFR 1915.132 - Portable electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Portable electric tools. 1915.132 Section 1915.132 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Tools and Related Equipment § 1915.132 Portable electric...

  12. Reliability and validity of the Healthy Home Survey: A tool to measure factors within homes hypothesized to relate to overweight in children

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Maria J; Ward, Dianne S; Hales, Derek; Vaughn, Amber; Tabak, Rachel G; Stevens, June

    2008-01-01

    Background The contribution of the environment to the obesity epidemic is well recognized. Parents have control over their home environment and can, therefore, support healthy dietary and activity habits in their children by manipulating factors such as access to energy-dense foods, availability of physical activity equipment, and restricting screen time. This paper describes the development of the Healthy Home Survey and its reliability and validity. The Healthy Home Survey was designed to assess characteristics of the home environment that are hypothesized to influence healthy weight behaviors in children including diet and physical activity. Methods We recruited 85 families with at least one child between 3–8 years. The Healthy Home Survey was administered to parents via telephone and repeated in a random sample of 45 families after 7 days. In-home observations were performed within 14 days of the first Healthy Home Survey interview. Percent agreement, Kappa statistics, Intra-class correlation coefficients and sensitivity analyses were used to evaluate reliability and validity evidence. Results Reliability and validity estimates for the Healthy Home Survey were varied, but generally high (0.22–1.00 and 0.07–0.96 respectively), with lower scores noted for perishable foods and policy items. Lower scores were likely related to actual change in the perishable foods present and the subjective nature or clarity of policy questions and response categories. Conclusion Initial testing demonstrated that the Healthy Home Survey is a feasible, reliable, and valid assessment of the home environment; however, it has also highlighted areas that need improvement. The Healthy Home Survey will be useful in future research exploring the relationship between the home environment and child weight. PMID:18442392

  13. Ethics in biomonitoring for occupational health.

    PubMed

    Manno, M; Sito, F; Licciardi, L

    2014-12-01

    Biological monitoring, i.e., the use of biomarkers for the measurement of systemic human exposure, effects and susceptibility to chemicals has increased considerably in recent years. Biomonitoring techniques, originally limited to a few metals and other chemicals in the workplace, are currently applied to a large number of exposure situations and have become a useful tool for occupational and environmental health risk assessment. Almost any biomonitoring program, however, entails a number of relevant ethical issues, which concern all the phases of the entire process, from the selection of the biomarker to the study design, from the collection, storage and analysis of the biological sample to the interpretation, communication and management of the results, from the (truly?) informed consent of the worker to the independence and autonomy of the occupational health professional. These issues require a balanced assessment of the interests and responsibilities of all the parties, the worker primarily, but also the employer, the occupational health professional, the health authorities and, for research studies on new biomarkers, also the scientists involved. Ideally, decisions of ethical relevance concerning biomarkers should be based on, and respectful of the best scientific, legal and ethical evidence available. When, however, a conflict should arise, before any decision is taken a thorough risk-benefit analysis should be done, at the beginning of the process and after listening to the workers and the management involved, by the occupational physician or scientist, based on his/her professional experience, independent judgement and individual responsibility.

  14. Ethics in biomonitoring for occupational health.

    PubMed

    Manno, M; Sito, F; Licciardi, L

    2014-12-01

    Biological monitoring, i.e., the use of biomarkers for the measurement of systemic human exposure, effects and susceptibility to chemicals has increased considerably in recent years. Biomonitoring techniques, originally limited to a few metals and other chemicals in the workplace, are currently applied to a large number of exposure situations and have become a useful tool for occupational and environmental health risk assessment. Almost any biomonitoring program, however, entails a number of relevant ethical issues, which concern all the phases of the entire process, from the selection of the biomarker to the study design, from the collection, storage and analysis of the biological sample to the interpretation, communication and management of the results, from the (truly?) informed consent of the worker to the independence and autonomy of the occupational health professional. These issues require a balanced assessment of the interests and responsibilities of all the parties, the worker primarily, but also the employer, the occupational health professional, the health authorities and, for research studies on new biomarkers, also the scientists involved. Ideally, decisions of ethical relevance concerning biomarkers should be based on, and respectful of the best scientific, legal and ethical evidence available. When, however, a conflict should arise, before any decision is taken a thorough risk-benefit analysis should be done, at the beginning of the process and after listening to the workers and the management involved, by the occupational physician or scientist, based on his/her professional experience, independent judgement and individual responsibility. PMID:25447455

  15. Data security in occupational health.

    PubMed

    Damrongsak, Mantana; Brown, Kathleen C

    2008-10-01

    Occupational health nurses are increasingly using computer systems in the delivery of efficient, high-quality occupational health services. However, potential breaches in data security are posing more risks to these data systems. The purpose of this article is to address concerns related to data security in occupational health nursing. Occupational health nurses must protect the personal health information of employees by proactively developing methods to ensure data security.

  16. Masonry. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) for masonry occupations contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability…

  17. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in Office Buildings Through the use of Annual Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-06-01

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  18. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in an Office Building through the Use of Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-12-01

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  19. Tobacco Smoking Surveillance: Is Quota Sampling an Efficient Tool for Monitoring National Trends? A Comparison with a Random Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Guignard, Romain; Wilquin, Jean-Louis; Richard, Jean-Baptiste; Beck, François

    2013-01-01

    Objectives It is crucial for policy makers to monitor the evolution of tobacco smoking prevalence. In France, this monitoring is based on a series of cross-sectional general population surveys, the Health Barometers, conducted every five years and based on random samples. A methodological study has been carried out to assess the reliability of a monitoring system based on regular quota sampling surveys for smoking prevalence. Design / Outcome Measures In 2010, current and daily tobacco smoking prevalences obtained in a quota survey on 8,018 people were compared with those of the 2010 Health Barometer carried out on 27,653 people. Prevalences were assessed separately according to the telephone equipment of the interviewee (landline phone owner vs “mobile-only”), and logistic regressions were conducted in the pooled database to assess the impact of the telephone equipment and of the survey mode on the prevalences found. Finally, logistic regressions adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics were conducted in the random sample in order to determine the impact of the needed number of calls to interwiew “hard-to-reach” people on the prevalence found. Results Current and daily prevalences were higher in the random sample (respectively 33.9% and 27.5% in 15-75 years-old) than in the quota sample (respectively 30.2% and 25.3%). In both surveys, current and daily prevalences were lower among landline phone owners (respectively 31.8% and 25.5% in the random sample and 28.9% and 24.0% in the quota survey). The required number of calls was slightly related to the smoking status after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics. Conclusion Random sampling appears to be more effective than quota sampling, mainly by making it possible to interview hard-to-reach populations. PMID:24194924

  20. Occupational safety and health management among five ASEAN countries: Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore.

    PubMed

    Buranatrevedh, Surasak

    2015-03-01

    Occupational safety and health is one of important issues for workforce movement among ASEAN countries. The objective was to study laws, main agencies, and law enforcement regarding occupational safety and health in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore. This documentary research covered laws, main agencies' duties, and occupational safety and health law enforcement in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore. Thailand has its Occupational Safety, Health, and Work EnvironmentAct 2011. Its main agency was Department of Labor Protection and Welfare. Indonesia had WorkSafety Act (Law No. 1, 1970). Its main agency was Department of Manpower and Transmigration. Malaysia had Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) 1994. Its main agency is the Department of Occupational Safety and Health. The Philippines has its Occupational Safety and Health Standards. Its main agency was Department ofLabor and Employment. Singapore has its Workplace Safety and Health Act 2006. Its main agency is Occupational Safety and Health Division. Occupational safety and health law enforcement among each county covers work environment surveillance, workers' health surveillance, advice about prevention and control of occupational health hazards, training and education of employers and employees, data systems, and research. Further in-depth surveys of occupational safety and health among each ASEAN county are needed to develop frameworks for occupational safety and health management for all ASEAN countries. PMID:26211106