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Sample records for occupational health guideline

  1. Overview of occupational safety and health guidelines for Superfund sites

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.S.; Martin, W.F.

    1985-04-01

    An overview of the NIOSH occupational safety and health guidelines for Superfund activities is presented. Critical elements are outlined for site safety plans, site surveys and monitoring plans. The gathering of accurate and adequate information to prepare a plan of action to clean up abandoned hazardous waste sites is the first step and continues throughout any Superfund activity. Major emphasis is placed on selecting personal protective equipment with consideration for preventing heat stress. Decontamination is stressed to prevent exposure of other site workers as well as off-site personnel and the public. Worker training and medical monitoring are key components in a comprehensive occupational safety and health program for hazardous waste workers.

  2. Integrating Occupational Safety and Health into TAFE Courses: Policy Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Graham L.; Mageean, Pauline

    Intended to help administrators, curriculum developers, and teachers integrate occupational health and safety into Australian vocational courses on bricklaying, metal fabrication, and horticulture, this document suggests specific policies and provides further amplification concerning three general policies for that integration. The three general…

  3. Occupational Health

    MedlinePlus

    Occupational health problems occur at work or because of the kind of work you do. These problems can include ... by exposure to radiation Exposure to germs in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices ...

  4. Occupational Safety and Health Program Guidelines for Colleges and Universities. An Administrative Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godbey, Frank W.; Hatch, Loren L.

    Designed as an aid for establishing and strengthening occupational safety and health programs on college and university campuses, this administrator guide is divided into four chapters. The first chapter defines and gives background information on the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA). In addition, it presents a discussion of what the OSHA…

  5. International occupational health.

    PubMed

    LaDou, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Working conditions for the majority of the world's workers do not meet the minimum standards and guidelines set by international agencies. Occupational health and safety laws cover only about 10 percent of the population in developing countries, omitting many major hazardous industries and occupations. With rare exception, most countries defer to the United Nations the responsibility for international occupational health. The UN's international agencies have had limited success in bringing occupational health to the industrializing countries. The International Labor Organization (ILO) conventions are intended to guide all countries in the promotion of workplace safety and in managing occupational health and safety programs. ILO conventions and recommendations on occupational safety and health are international agreements that have legal force only if they are ratified by ILO member states. The most important ILO Convention on Occupational Safety and Health has been ratified by only 37 of the 175 ILO member states. Only 23 countries have ratified the ILO Employment Injury Benefits Convention that lists occupational diseases for which compensation should be paid. The World Health Organization (WHO) is responsible for the technical aspects of occupational health and safety, the promotion of medical services and hygienic standards. Limited WHO and ILO funding severely impedes the development of international occupational health. The U.S. reliance on international agencies to promote health and safety in the industrializing countries is not nearly adequate. This is particularly true if occupational health continues to be regarded primarily as an academic exercise by the developed countries, and a budgetary triviality by the international agencies. Occupational health is not a goal achievable in isolation. It should be part of a major institutional development that touches and reforms every level of government in an industrializing country. Occupational health and safety

  6. Occupational Health for Healthcare Providers

    MedlinePlus

    ... of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, learn the right way to lift heavy objects, and find ways to manage stress. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

  7. [Management of hyperuricemia in occupational health: with reference to "guidelines for the management of hyperuricemia and gout"].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiromu

    2003-01-01

    In 1996, the need for the clinical guidelines for the management of hyperuricemia and gout was proposed of the consensus conference held at the 29th annual meeting of the Japanese Society of Purine and Pyrimidine Metabolism (president Yuji Matsuzawa). At the consensus conference, the following announcement was made. 1. Because the majority of patients with hyperuricemia are in the condition of multiple risk factor clustering syndrome, hyperuricemia per se should be counted as one of the typical lifestyle related diseases. 2. Medical management should be directed independently for the treatment of gouty arthritis and for control of the serum uric acid level. 3. The serum uric acid level should be taken into account as a possible cardiovascular risk factor. 4. Urine alkalization should be started if there is no symptom indicating hyperuricemia for the prophylaxis of urinary stones and renal dysfunction. 5. All the medical management should be considered under the consensus of the many expert physicians dealing with hyperuricemia and gout. This principal announcement was made by the consensus conference and the simple management recommendation of a 6-7-8 rule was proposed through the consensus of expert physicians. Recently, a guideline committee was organized in the Japanese Society of Gout and Nucleic Acid Metabolism (previous by the Japanese Society of Purine and Pyrimidine Metabolism) and the Guidelines for the Management of Hyperuricemia and Gout were prereleased in February and published in August 2002. In the new guidelines, the above policy was introduced and evidence was collected to give the guidelines contemporary clinical usefulness and value. It will help in the proper management of hyperuricemia in apparently healthy persons in occupational health, having multiple risk factors.

  8. Health Occupations Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the need for health occupations personnel in the Moraine Valley Community College district, specifically to: (1) describe present employment for selected health occupations; (2) project health occupation employment to 1974; (3) identify the supply of applicants for the selected occupations; and (4) identify…

  9. Japanese Guideline for Occupational Allergic Diseases 2014.

    PubMed

    Dobashi, Kunio; Akiyama, Kazuo; Usami, Atsushi; Yokozeki, Hiroo; Ikezawa, Zenro; Tsurikisawa, Naomi; Nakamura, Yoichi; Sato, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Jiro

    2014-09-01

    In 2013, a guideline for occupational allergic diseases was published for the first time in Japan. Occupational allergic diseases are likely to worsen or become intractable as a result of continuous exposure to high concentrations of causative antigens, and are socioeconomically important diseases with which the patients might sometimes lose jobs due to work interruptions. Guidelines for occupational allergic diseases have been published in many countries. This guideline consists of six chapters about occupational asthma, occupational allergic rhinitis, occupational skin diseases, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and occupational anaphylaxis shock, and legal aspects of these diseases. The guideline is characterized with the following basic structure: Clinical Questions (CQs) are set with reference to Minds (Medical Information Network Distribution Service), statements by the committee are correspondingly listed, recommended grades and evidence levels are defined, and then descriptions and references are indicated.

  10. Health Occupations

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the clock, people who work in the health care industry provide care for millions of people, ... newborns to the very ill. In fact, the health care industry is one of largest providers of ...

  11. Health Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist the vocational teacher in designing and implementing a cluster program in health occupations, this guide suggests ideas for teaching the specific knowledge and skills that qualify students for entry-level employment in the health occupations field. The knowledge and skills are applicable to 12 occupations: dental assistant;…

  12. Ethics in occupational health.

    PubMed

    Haines, Ted

    1989-11-01

    We know little about perceptions, practices, or constraints of ethics in occupational health because little research has been done. Opinions about the field, however, are abundant. Existing codes of ethical practice in occupational health have not consciously been derived from the fundamental principles of "freedom" and "well-being" or from philosophical premises and methods; rather, they are based on consensus among practitioners. The author outlines useful concepts and methods for making decisions about ethical questions in occupational health.

  13. Marketing occupational health care.

    PubMed

    Norris, M J; Harris, J C

    1981-01-01

    A very basic part of marketing success is determining areas of your business in which you have a competitive advantage. In drafting a marketing plan for the Denver Clinic, the competitive advantages group practices have in the area of occupational health were quickly realized. This competitive edge is presented along with the Denver Clinic's marketing strategies and plans to capitalize on occupational healthcare advantages.

  14. Virginia School Health Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Dept. of Education, Richmond.

    Virginia's Department of Education and Department of Health are concerned with the health of children and youth, and with the implementation of comprehensive school health programs. These guidelines provide a basis for developing a model school health program or for enriching an existing program, focusing on health services and school environment.…

  15. Occupational health in China.

    PubMed

    Christiani, David C; Tan, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiaorong

    2002-01-01

    China has been experiencing rapid industrialization and economic growth, resulting in a transformed industrial structure and expansion of the labor force. Occupational health and safety services, nonexistent before 1949, have made remarkable advances over the past decades. However, these services face greater challenges, consisting of both traditional and new occupational health problems. Poorly regulated work environments often lacking health services in recently developed and thriving small-scale industries and joint venture enterprises have created increasing risks for occupational diseases and work-related injuries. A special strategy based on cooperation among and contributions from the legal, administrative, social, economic, and scientific communities is critical to achieving the ultimate goal of control and prevention of these occupational health problems.

  16. Occupational health in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rampal, Krishna Gopal; Aw, Tar-Ching; Jefferelli, Shamsul Bahrin

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a detailed examination of Malaysian occupational health agencies and their roles in formulating and enforcing standards, promoting occupational health and safety (OSH), and providing advisory services. Available OSH training is described, and the need for policies and personnel in various industries is outlined. Further, the authors discuss how international models and collaboration have influenced Malaysian OSH, and how some successes can be repeated and failures remedied.

  17. Guidelines for Occupational Program Planning. Evaluation Handbook. California Guidelines for Modifying and Terminating Occupational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Robert E.; And Others

    The primary emphasis of this handbook is upon occupational program evaluation, particularly as it relates to modification and termination. It is the result of a series of nine workshops whose purpose was to review and improve Guidelines for Occupational Program Planning (ED 143 404) written in 1977. A basic flow chart is presented with specific…

  18. Occupational health in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Koh, D; Jeyaratnam, J

    1998-07-01

    Singapore, a newly industrializing country in Southeast Asia, has a resident population of 3 million and a work force of 1.75 million. Most workers are employed in the manufacturing, services, and commerce sectors. Agricultural and mining activities are negligible. In 1996 the infant mortality rate was 3.8 per 1,000 live births and the life expectancy at birth was 77 years. In 1996 the total industrial accident rate was 2.7 per million man-hours worked and the severity rate was 353 industrial man-days lost per million man-hours worked. The shipbuilding and construction industries had the most frequent and most severe accidents. In the same year, 1,521 cases of occupational disease were notified to, and confirmed by, the Ministry of Labor. The majority of cases involved noise-induced hearing loss. There is substantial underreporting of cases. New cases that are expected to appear will be work-related illnesses such as musculoskeletal or psychosocial disorders. The principal occupational health legislation in Singapore is the Factories Act. Although it selectively targets workers at highest risk of developing occupational illness, its main limitation is the exclusion of nonfactory workers, who comprise 63% of the working population. Labor regulations are enforced by the Ministry of Labor. Workmen's compensation paid in 1995 amounted to S $46.6 million (U.S. $1=S $1.75). Education and training in occupational health is provided by employer federations, employee unions, and various government agencies. Occupational health is taught to medical students during their undergraduate training. Postgraduate-diploma and Masters programs in occupational medicine are also available. About 600 doctors in Singapore have some form of postgraduate training in occupational health. Health care for workers is offered either through the private sector or through government clinics and hospitals. Although Singapore has made great strides in protecting and promoting the health of its

  19. Occupational health and safety in medical museums.

    PubMed

    Westhorpe, R N

    2008-07-01

    Medical museum collections provide challenges in occupational health and safety that do not become apparent in many other collections. During the recent development of the Geoffrey Kaye Museum of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, these challenges were addressed, following the guidelines of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations of the State of Victoria. This paper details these regulations and their necessary application in this specialist museum.

  20. Occupational health in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Werner, A F

    2000-07-01

    Argentina is within the denominated "new industrialised countries", with the characteristic of having high contrasts in the urban population, based on service and industry, and in the rural population, based on agriculture and cattle, still the main sources of wealth in the country. The process of globalisation and the need to compete hard in international markets have provoked high unemployment and the transfer of workers from a formal market to an informal one. Legislation on occupational health is old and it is in the process of being updated. The system of prevention, assistance and compensation for accidents at work and for occupational illnesses has changed from being optative for employers, to the compulsory hiring of private insurance companies. The Government keeps the role of supervisor of the system. There are enough professionals in occupational health, hygiene and safety but not occupational nurses. The teaching is given by many universities and professional associations, some of which have an active profile in the occupational health of the country.

  1. Occupational health in India.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Tushar Kant; Smith, Kirk R

    2002-01-01

    The population of India has crossed the billion mark; only one other country (China) shares this distinction. A declining female population and low literacy are negatives in an otherwise vibrant country. The empowerment of females and their role in society has become a point of debate, and radical economic changes are likely, to allow India to join the global economy. Problems in occupational health and safety (OHS) include: OHS legislation that covers only a minority of the working population; child labour; a physician-driven OHS model; little attention to industrial hygiene; poor surveillance of occupational diseases (making it impossible to gauge the burden of illness due to occupational exposures); and a fragile OHS academic base. A silver lining comprises the inclusion of OHS in national health policy and the decision by the Indian Medical Association to educate its members in occupational health. India urgently requires modern OHS legislation with adequate enforcement machinery, and establishment of centres of excellence in occupational medicine, to catch up with the rest of the world.

  2. Occupational health in Cuba.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, M R

    1981-01-01

    Health and safety regulation, training, and research were practically non-existent in Cuba before the Revolution in 1959. Since that time important advances have been made. Specialized inspectors, occupational physicians, and other such personnel are now trained in Cuba. An Occupational Health Institute, founded in 1976, provides training and specialized technical services, and conducts research. In 1978, a far reaching "Work Safety and Health Law" was enacted which defines the rights and responsibility of government agencies, workplace administrators, unions, and workers. Comprehensive control of toxic substances in workplaces, still at an early stage, is likely to increase in light of the new law, the growing availability of qualified personnel, and the mounting concern of public health authorities with the increasingly "developed" health profile of the population. PMID:7212141

  3. Latex sensitivity: an occupational health strategic plan.

    PubMed

    McCormack, B; Cameron, M; Biel, L

    1995-04-01

    1. Health care workers, due to ongoing exposure to latex products, may be at risk of developing latex sensitivity. 2. The spectrum of reactions related to medical glove use varies in severity. Awareness of latex sensitivity is heightened through worker education. 3. Guidelines and interventions for occupational health nurses are outlined so that workers who present with symptoms of occupational sensitivities related to latex products can be identified and assessed. 4. Occupational health nurses are effective resources for workers and managers on issues of latex allergy and appropriate accommodation.

  4. Health Occupations Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walraven, Catherine; And Others

    These instructional materials consist of a series of curriculum worksheets that cover tasks to be mastered by students in health occupations cluster programs. Covered in the curriculum worksheets are diagnostic procedures; observing/recording/reporting/planning; safety; nutrition/elimination; hygiene/personal care/comfort;…

  5. Data security in occupational health.

    PubMed

    Damrongsak, Mantana; Brown, Kathleen C

    2008-10-01

    Occupational health nurses are increasingly using computer systems in the delivery of efficient, high-quality occupational health services. However, potential breaches in data security are posing more risks to these data systems. The purpose of this article is to address concerns related to data security in occupational health nursing. Occupational health nurses must protect the personal health information of employees by proactively developing methods to ensure data security.

  6. Population Health and Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Braveman, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners play an important role in improving the health of populations through the development of occupational therapy interventions at the population level and through advocacy to address occupational participation and the multiple determinants of health. This article defines and explores population health as a concept and describes the appropriateness of occupational therapy practice in population health. Support of population health practice as evidenced in the official documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association and the relevance of population health for occupational therapy as a profession are reviewed. Recommendations and directions for the future are included related to celebration of the achievements of occupational therapy practitioners in the area of population health, changes to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and educational accreditation standards, and the importance of supporting, recognizing, rewarding, and valuing occupational therapy practitioners who assume roles in which direct care is not their primary function.

  7. Telehealth application in occupational health.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Janet G

    2015-01-01

    While occupational health is a significant driver of population health, productivity, and well-being in Canadian society, most workers do not currently have adequate access to qualified occupational health services. A case study is used to demonstrate the utility of a telehealth approach to service delivery.

  8. 77 FR 5711 - Guidelines for Determining Probability of Causation Under the Energy Employees Occupational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000; Revision of Guidelines on... Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) proposed to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) as a radiogenic cancer under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000...

  9. Achieving Quality in Occupational Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, Michele (Editor); Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The conference convened approximately 100 registered participants of invited guest speakers, NASA presenters, and a broad spectrum of the Occupational Health disciplines representing NASA Headquarters and all NASA Field Centers. Centered on the theme, "Achieving Quality in Occupational Health," conferees heard presentations from award winning occupational health program professionals within the Agency and from private industry; updates on ISO 9000 status, quality assurance, and information technologies; workshops on ergonomics and respiratory protection; an overview from the newly commissioned NASA Occupational Health Assessment Team; and a keynote speech on improving women's health. In addition, NASA occupational health specialists presented 24 poster sessions and oral deliveries on various aspects of current practice at their field centers.

  10. Development and Validation of Career Development Guidelines by Task/Activity Analysis of Occupational Safety and Health Professions: Industrial Hygiene and Safety Professional. Final Report. Technical Report XII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Ralph J.; And Others

    This report summarizes research findings which resulted in development of curricula for occupational safety and health professions based on task/activity analyses and related performance objectives. The first seven chapters focus on the seven objectives. Chapter 1, Literature Review and Selection of Employers, concerns tasks required for…

  11. Occupational health nursing in hungary.

    PubMed

    Hirdi, Henriett Éva; Hong, OiSaeng

    2014-10-01

    This article is the first about occupational health nursing in Hungary. The authors describe the Hungarian health care and occupational health care systems, including nursing education and professional organizations for occupational health nurses. The Fundamental Law of Hungary guarantees the right of every employee to healthy and safe working conditions, daily and weekly rest times and annual paid leave, and physical and mental health. Hungary promotes the exercise of these rights by managing industrial safety and health care, providing access to healthy food, supporting sports and regular physical exercise, and ensuring environmental protection. According to the law, the responsibility for regulation of the occupational health service lies with the Ministry of Human Resources. Safety regulations are under the aegis of the Ministry of National Economy.

  12. Health Occupations Education. Health Services Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Twenty-four units on health service careers are presented in this teacher's guide. The units are organized into four sections as follow: Section A--Orientation (health careers, career success, Health Occupations Students of America); Section B--Health and First Aid (personal health, community health, and first aid); Section C--Body Structure and…

  13. Teaching Occupational Health to Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegman, David H.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive training program is described that prepares students to identify and prevent occupational disease, emphasizing public health. Content areas include epidemiology and biostatistics, toxicology, industrial hygiene, safety and ergonomics, policy issues, administration, and clinical aspects. (Author/LBH)

  14. Curriculum Guide for Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Education, Salem. Div. of Community Colleges and Career Education.

    Developed by teachers and representatives of the health service industries, this curriculum guide outlines the basic skills and knowledge necessary for entry-level competencies in the health field or for entrance into a post-high school or university programs. Section 1, Occupational and Instructional Data, provides manpower data and an analysis…

  15. State Licensing of Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    About 25 health professions and occupations are licensed by one or more states according to the survey of state licensing provisions by the National Center for Health Statistics. Data is presented in 22 chapters on the licensure of administrators, chiropractors, clinical laboratory personnel, dental hygienists, dentists, professional engineers,…

  16. The New Nurse in Industry. A Guide for the Newly Employed Occupational Health Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jane A.

    These guidelines for professional nurses and employers in industrial settings present basic and fundamental nursing principles, duties, and responsibilities in the practice of occupational health. The content is presented in four chapters. The first briefly introduces occupational health. Chapter 2 on occupational health nursing service covers…

  17. The ocean and occupational health.

    PubMed

    Prossin, A

    1983-06-01

    With the increase in offshore industrial operations, more needs to be known about health and safety of workers in such industries. Some general principles of occupational health apply; some special situations, such as depth diving, demand special knowledge and facilities. Equipment used also brings its own hazards. This article outlines the scope of health and safety concerns for those physicians whose patients work on or in the ocean. PMID:21283297

  18. The Ocean and Occupational Health

    PubMed Central

    Prossin, Albert

    1983-01-01

    With the increase in offshore industrial operations, more needs to be known about health and safety of workers in such industries. Some general principles of occupational health apply; some special situations, such as depth diving, demand special knowledge and facilities. Equipment used also brings its own hazards. This article outlines the scope of health and safety concerns for those physicians whose patients work on or in the ocean. Imagesp1137-a PMID:21283297

  19. Health Occupations Extended Campus Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likhite, Vivek

    A Health Occupations Program designed as an integrated science course offers students at Evanston Township High School (Illinois) an opportunity to master science skills, content, and laboratory techniques while working and studying within local hospitals (the Evanston Hospital and St. Francis Hospital) as well as within their high school…

  20. Instructional Analysis for Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This instructional analysis centers on identifying the skills, related knowledge, teacher activities, and student activities that are central to teaching various topics included in the core curriculum for health occupations courses. Addressed in the volume are the following instructional areas: first aid; medical terminology; medical asepsis;…

  1. Health Occupations: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 3-year program in health occupations. The guide consists of a course description; general course…

  2. Innovative Approaches to Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurney, Elizabeth, Comp.; Kintgen, Jean, Comp.

    To improve communications between health occupations educators and health professionals about developments in health occupations education, a compilation of 21 approaches used in health occupations education is presented. Outlines of the 21 different courses are presented, grouped in eight areas: (1) career mobility--modified LPN program for…

  3. Evidence based guidelines for the prevention, identification, and management of occupational asthma

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, P; Cullinan, P; Newman, T; Burge, P; Boyle, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Occupational asthma is the most frequently reported work related respiratory disease in many countries. This work was commissioned by the British Occupational Health Research Foundation to assist the Health and Safety Executive in achieving its target of reducing the incidence of occupational asthma in Great Britain by 30% by 2010. Aim: The guidelines aim to improve the prevention, identification, and management of occupational asthma by providing evidence based recommendations on which future practice can be based. Methods: The literature was searched systematically using Medline and Embase for articles published in all languages up to the end of June 2004. Evidence based statements and recommendations were graded according to the Royal College of General Practitioner's star system and the revised Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network grading system. Results: A total of 474 original studies were selected for appraisal from over 2500 abstracts. The systematic review produced 52 graded evidence statements and 22 recommendations based on 223 studies. Discussion: Evidence based guidelines have become benchmarks for practice in healthcare and the process used to prepare them is well established. This evidence review and its recommendations focus on interventions and outcomes to provide a robust approach to the prevention, identification, and management of occupational asthma, based on and using the best available medical evidence. The most important action to prevent cases of occupational asthma is to reduce exposure at source. Thereafter surveillance should be performed for the early identification of symptoms, including occupational rhinitis, with additional functional and immunological tests where appropriate. Effective management of workers suspected to have occupational asthma involves the identification and investigation of symptoms suggestive of asthma immediately they occur. Those workers who are confirmed to have occupational asthma should be

  4. The Health Occupations Boom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozada, Marlene

    1995-01-01

    Profiles 10 health care jobs in terms of duties, work environment, education and training needs, and salary scale. Jobs profiled are physicians' assistants, recreational therapists, respiratory therapists, dental assistants and hygienists, medical assistants, nurses' aides, psychiatric aides, emergency medical technicians, licensed practical…

  5. Occupational health scenario of Indian informal sector

    PubMed Central

    NAG, Anjali; VYAS, Heer; NAG, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    Workers in the Indian informal sector are engaged with different occupations. These occupations involve varied work related hazards. These occupational hazards are a consequent risk to health. The study aimed to determine occupational health scenario in the Indian Informal sector. One thousand eleven hundred twenty two workers from five different occupations namely weaving (handloom and power loom), construction, transportation, tobacco processing and fish processing were assessed by interviewer administered health questionnaire. Workers suffered from musculo-skeletal complaints, respiratory health hazards, eye problems and skin related complaints. There was a high prevalence of self-reported occupational health problems in the selected sectors. The study finds that workers have occupational exposures to multiple hazards. The absence of protective guards aggrevate their health condition. The study attempts to draws an immediate attention on the existing health scenario of the Indian Informal sector. PMID:26903262

  6. Occupational health scenario of Indian informal sector.

    PubMed

    Nag, Anjali; Vyas, Heer; Nag, Pranab

    2016-08-01

    Workers in the Indian informal sector are engaged with different occupations. These occupations involve varied work related hazards. These occupational hazards are a consequent risk to health. The study aimed to determine occupational health scenario in the Indian Informal sector. One thousand eleven hundred twenty two workers from five different occupations namely weaving (handloom and power loom), construction, transportation, tobacco processing and fish processing were assessed by interviewer administered health questionnaire. Workers suffered from musculo-skeletal complaints, respiratory health hazards, eye problems and skin related complaints. There was a high prevalence of self-reported occupational health problems in the selected sectors. The study finds that workers have occupational exposures to multiple hazards. The absence of protective guards aggrevate their health condition. The study attempts to draws an immediate attention on the existing health scenario of the Indian Informal sector. PMID:26903262

  7. Occupational health scenario of Indian informal sector.

    PubMed

    Nag, Anjali; Vyas, Heer; Nag, Pranab

    2016-08-01

    Workers in the Indian informal sector are engaged with different occupations. These occupations involve varied work related hazards. These occupational hazards are a consequent risk to health. The study aimed to determine occupational health scenario in the Indian Informal sector. One thousand eleven hundred twenty two workers from five different occupations namely weaving (handloom and power loom), construction, transportation, tobacco processing and fish processing were assessed by interviewer administered health questionnaire. Workers suffered from musculo-skeletal complaints, respiratory health hazards, eye problems and skin related complaints. There was a high prevalence of self-reported occupational health problems in the selected sectors. The study finds that workers have occupational exposures to multiple hazards. The absence of protective guards aggrevate their health condition. The study attempts to draws an immediate attention on the existing health scenario of the Indian Informal sector.

  8. Health Occupations in Illinois: Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield. Dept. of Adult, Vocational and Technical Education.

    This executive summary of a comprehensive study of health occupations education and employment in Illinois contains data on eighty-nine allied health and nursing occupations. Job definitions, educational requirements, licensing and certification, training programs, salary ranges, and job availability in these occupations are summarized in both…

  9. Does occupational health nursing exist in India?

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Rajnarayan R.; Sharma, Anjali; Zodpey, Sanjay P.; Khandare, Shobha M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Occupational health services are important to develop healthy and productive work forces, which should be delivered through occupational health team. Occupational health nurse (OHN) is an important member of this team and is required to apply nursing principles in conserving the health of workers in occupational settings. Purpose: This article attempts to map the occupational health nursing courses in India and design competencies and curriculum for such a course. Materials and Methods: Information through the Internet, printed journals, and perspectives of the key stakeholders were the principal sources of data. Discussion: In India, there is a need to initiate a course on occupational health nursing to provide occupational health services for the organized and unorganized sector workforce. A certificate course for occupational health nursing for 3–4 months duration offered through contact session mode can be an opportune beginning. However, to cater employed nurses an online course can be another effective alternative. The theoretical part should essentially include modules on occupational diseases, industrial hygiene, and occupational health legislation, whereas the modules on practical aspects can include visits to industries. Taking into account the existing norms of Indian Factories Act for hazardous units of organized sector an estimated 1,34,640 OHNs are required. Conclusion: There is a need–supply gap in the number of occupational health nursing manpower in India, which can be attributed to the absence of any course to train such manpower. PMID:25598615

  10. Occupational Health Problems of Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Chong, John; Lynden, Melody; Harvey, David; Peebles, Marie

    1989-01-01

    Musicians, as well as other performing artists, may have their careers interrupted by, interfered with, or terminated by occupational health problems involving the neuro-musculoskeletal system. Adverse working conditions, organization, and activity may affect the health of musicians in all age groups and at all levels of performing ability. Instrument-specific health problems are related to excessive force, static loading, repetitive movement, and duration of musical performance. Important risk factors are 1) change in technique or instrument; 2) intense preparation for a performance; 3) preparation of a new and difficult repertoire; and 4) prolonged periods of performance without rest. Treatment protocols and health promotion or disease prevention programs are being developed in collaboration with the performing arts community. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:21248930

  11. Environmental justice: implications for occupational health nurses.

    PubMed

    Postma, Julie

    2006-11-01

    Through the use of innovative tools, such as clinical mnemonics, exercises in risk and asset mapping, and strategic program development, occupational health nurses can incorporate dimensions of environmental justice (EJ) into the workplace. Occupational health nurses who also take on educational roles can use case studies and network with labor and EJ groups to provide clinical experiences for occupational and environmental health nursing students, thereby integrating EJ into occupational and environmental health nursing practice. Occupational health nurses are well positioned to serve as technical experts within community-based participatory research projects. Occupational health nurses must share their knowledge and experience as members of coalitions that represent workers in their fight for worker health and safety.

  12. Consumer satisfaction with occupational health services: should it be measured?

    PubMed Central

    Verbeek, J; van Dijk, F; Rasanen, K; Piirainen, H; Kankaanpaa, E; Hulshof, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To find answers in the literature to the questions if, why, and how consumer satisfaction with occupational health services (OHSs) should be measured.
METHODS—Publications about the concept of consumer satisfaction with health care and surveys of consumer satisfaction with occupational health care were reviewed.
RESULTS—For care providers, surveys of consumer satisfaction can be useful to improve quality or as indicators of non-compliant behaviour among patients. For clients, satisfaction surveys can be helpful for choosing between healthcare providers. Satisfaction is made up of an affective component of evaluation and a cognitive component of expectations. Also, in occupational health care, patient satisfaction is measured by dimensions such as the humanness and competence of the care provider similar to health care in general. However, there are dimensions that are specific to occupational health—such as the perceived independence of the physician, unclear reasons for visiting an OHS, and the perceived extent of knowledge of OHS professionals about the patient's working conditions. Dimensions of client satisfaction are mostly similar to patient satisfaction but include more businesslike aspects. They are different for the two groups of client, employers and employees. To measure consumer satisfaction in occupational healthcare specific questionnaires must be constructed. To achieve the highest possible reader satisfaction guidelines are provided for construction of a questionnaire.
CONCLUSIONS—Consumer satisfaction is a complex theoretical concept, but it is relatively easy to measure in practice and can be a valuable tool for quality improvement. Consumers' evaluations of occupational health services will become increasingly important due to changes in the organisation of occupational health care. Occupational healthcare providers are encouraged to measure the consumer satisfaction of their services.


Keywords: consumer

  13. Occupational health nursing 2004 practice analysis report.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Patricia B; Maher, Helen K; Knuth, Georgia; Fabrey, Lawrence J

    2006-01-01

    As a certifying body for occupational health nurses in the United States and Canada, the American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc. (ABOHN) must ensure its certification examinations validly reflect current occupational health nurse practice. This report presents information from the ABOHN 2004 practice analysis. The study's primary purpose was to analyze areas of knowledge, skill, and ability for occupational health nurses as reflected by the tasks they perform to guide refinement of ABOHN's certification examinations. A valid and reliable survey instrument, containing demographic and job-related questions and 172 task statements was developed. A total of 5,586 surveys (4,921 Web-based and 665 paper) were made available to occupational health nurses throughout the United States and Canada. The usable response rate was 23.5% (N = 1,223). Decision rules were used to determine which survey tasks were appropriate for inclusion in Certified Occupational Health Nurse (COHN) and Certified Occupational Health Nurse Specialist (COHN-S) certification examination blueprints. The revised blueprints were used to develop new examinations. Study data also validated the existing ABOHN Case Management (CM) specialty examination blueprint, and verified occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities related to safety programs. Based on analysis of the safety-related items, ABOHN in collaboration with the Board of Certified Safety Professionals, has created a safety management credential (SM) and associated examination that certified occupational health nurses may use to verify their safety role proficiency.

  14. Italian occupational health: concepts, conflicts, implications.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, M R; Goldman, R H

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines Italy's worker-based model for occupational health, especially its key concepts and its relation to social conflict. It briefly reviews the history of three approaches to occupational health in Italy: university-based, industry-based, and government-based. It then analyzes the worker-based approach, which emerged in the late 1960s and early 1970s as worker groups and trade unions mobilized around new concepts of occupational health. Five key concepts are discussed: the workers' homogeneous group; workers' subjectivity; the use of contract language; the development of local occupational health institutions; and the use of occupational hazard risk maps. The analysis illustrates how the social processes of mobilization and institutionalization affected the ideas and structures of Italian occupational health. Worker mobilization in Italy produced ideological changes in the nation's occupational health system, institutional changes in universities and governments, and legislative changes at national and local levels. The institutionalization of reforms, however, created new conflicts and problems and tended to restrict worker participation and promote expert intervention. The paper concludes with a brief outline of the history of occupational health approaches in the United States and then discusses the implications of the five Italian concepts for US occupational health policy. PMID:6380322

  15. Occupational trajectories and immigrant worker health.

    PubMed

    Crollard, Allison; de Castro, A B; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun

    2012-11-01

    During their initial years in the receiving country, many immigrants experience occupational downgrading. Downgrading is a loss of occupational status between one's last job in the home country and first job in the receiving country, often resulting in overeducation or overqualification. Although the extent and determinants of such occupational trajectories have been characterized, the connection to immigrant worker health has not been widely examined. However, an emerging body of knowledge indicates that negative health outcomes are associated with overeducation and overqualification in general worker populations, suggesting similar experiences by immigrant workers. This article provides an overview of the magnitude and conceptualization of occupational downgrading, overeducation, and overqualification and discusses implications for immigrant worker health. Occupational health professionals should spearhead research efforts on occupational downgrading, raise public awareness about the issue, and serve as advocates for immigrant workers' rights.

  16. The contribution of occupation to health inequality

    PubMed Central

    Ravesteijn, Bastian; van Kippersluis, Hans; van Doorslaer, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    Health is distributed unequally by occupation. Workers on a lower rung of the occupational ladder report worse health, have a higher probability of disability and die earlier than workers higher up the occupational hierarchy. Using a theoretical framework that unveils some of the potential mechanisms underlying these disparities, three core insights emerge: (i) there is selection into occupation on the basis of initial wealth, education, and health, (ii) there will be behavioural responses to adverse working conditions, which can have compensating or reinforcing effects on health, and (iii) workplace conditions increase health inequalities if workers with initially low socioeconomic status choose harmful occupations and don’t offset detrimental health effects. We provide empirical illustrations of these insights using data for the Netherlands and assess the evidence available in the economics literature. PMID:24899789

  17. Salary negotiations and occupational health nurses.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Sheila M

    2010-05-01

    The current recession has changed the financial situation of many occupational health nurses. Some occupational health nurses are delaying retirement because they need to maintain their income or health care benefits, or are postponing returning to school because of uncertainty in the job market. Occupational health nurses who have remained employed while coworkers have lost their jobs may be feeling lucky and may not be considering asking for a salary increase. When is the right time to lobby for a salary increase? What is currently considered an acceptable salary for an occupational health nurse? How does one prepare to ask for a salary increase? This article explores these questions and provides guidance for occupational health nurses as they determine their own appropriate salary. PMID:20507006

  18. Health Occupations Cluster. Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bruce; And Others

    This curriculum guide was designed for use in secondary health occupations education programs in Georgia. It provides a model for organizing vocational instructional content in health occupations, such as nurse, dental assistant, medical lab technician, radiologic technician, emergency medical technician, respiratory therapy assistant, medical…

  19. Health Occupations: Clinical Rotations and Learning Packets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrine, Patricia

    A one-year introductory course covering twelve different health occupations is presented in this curriculum guide designed for use at the secondary education level. Following a list of course objectives and suggested time allotments for each unit, the health occupations course outline is provided. Unit titles are the following: orientation and…

  20. Occupational Safety and Health Curriculum Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gourley, Frank A., Jr., Comp.

    With the enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, the need for manpower development in the field of industrial safety and hygiene has resulted in the development of a broad based program in Occupational Safety and Health. The manual provides information to administrators and instructors on a program of study in this field for…

  1. Health Occupations Education. Survey of Critical Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Washington, DC. Health Occupations Education Div.

    A survey of the members of the American Vocational Association-Health Occupations Education (AVA-HOE) was conducted to identify critical issues concerning health occupations, establish the order of priority of these issues, and determine a position regarding each issue that was reflective of the opinion of the AVA-HOE members. Each member of the…

  2. The occupational health of Santa Claus.

    PubMed

    Straube, Sebastian; Fan, Xiangning

    2015-01-01

    Previous publications in the field of Santa studies have not focused on health and safety issues arising from Santa's workplace activities. However, it should be acknowledged that unique occupational hazards exist for Santa Claus. Major occupational health issues affecting Santa are discussed, along with suggestions for future research directions.

  3. An overview of Japanese occupational health.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, M R; Frumkin, H

    1988-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Japanese occupational health and evaluates the current situation from three perspectives. Major occupational health hazards are assessed using four sources of data, showing patterns similar to those found in other advanced industrial societies. Institutional structures for occupational health policy are then examined, illustrating strengths and weaknesses of the Japanese legal and administrative systems. Trade union activities are presented, indicating the constraints of enterprise unions, and the tendency for a greater orientation toward compensation than prevention. Significant occupational health problems persist among marginal workers in Japan, including women and various minority groups. The analysis demonstrates a record for occupational health in Japan considerably more mixed than the conventional view. PMID:2968056

  4. 75 FR 44967 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Designation of a Class of Employees..., Division of Compensation Analysis and Support, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH... Occupational Safety and Health. BILLING CODE 4163-19-P...

  5. Work, obesity, and occupational safety and health.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Paul A; Wagner, Gregory R; Ostry, Aleck; Blanciforti, Laura A; Cutlip, Robert G; Krajnak, Kristine M; Luster, Michael; Munson, Albert E; O'Callaghan, James P; Parks, Christine G; Simeonova, Petia P; Miller, Diane B

    2007-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that obesity and overweight may be related, in part, to adverse work conditions. In particular, the risk of obesity may increase in high-demand, low-control work environments, and for those who work long hours. In addition, obesity may modify the risk for vibration-induced injury and certain occupational musculoskeletal disorders. We hypothesized that obesity may also be a co-risk factor for the development of occupational asthma and cardiovascular disease that and it may modify the worker's response to occupational stress, immune response to chemical exposures, and risk of disease from occupational neurotoxins. We developed 5 conceptual models of the interrelationship of work, obesity, and occupational safety and health and highlighted the ethical, legal, and social issues related to fuller consideration of obesity's role in occupational health and safety.

  6. Biological risk and occupational health.

    PubMed

    Corrao, Carmela Romana Natalina; Mazzotta, Adele; La Torre, Giuseppe; De Giusti, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Many work activities include hazards to workers, and among these biological risk is particularly important, mostly because of different types of exposure, contact with highly dangerous agents, lack of limit values able to compare all exposures, presence of workers with defective immune systems and therefore more susceptible to the risk. Bioaerosols and dust are considered important vehicles of microganisms at workplaces and interaction with other occupational agents is assumed. Moreover, biological risk can be significant in countries with increasing economic development or particular habits and some biological agents are also classified as carcinogenic to human. Specific emerging biological risks have been recently pointed out by Risk Observatory of the European Agency for Safety and Health at work, and we must consider the worker's attitude and behaviour, influenced by his own perception of risk more than his real knowledge, that could over-underestimate the risk itself. Therefore, biological risk at work requires a complex approach in relation to risk assessment and risk management, made more difficult due to the wide variety of biological agents, working environments and working techniques that can determine the exposures. PMID:22785422

  7. Biological risk and occupational health.

    PubMed

    Corrao, Carmela Romana Natalina; Mazzotta, Adele; La Torre, Giuseppe; De Giusti, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Many work activities include hazards to workers, and among these biological risk is particularly important, mostly because of different types of exposure, contact with highly dangerous agents, lack of limit values able to compare all exposures, presence of workers with defective immune systems and therefore more susceptible to the risk. Bioaerosols and dust are considered important vehicles of microganisms at workplaces and interaction with other occupational agents is assumed. Moreover, biological risk can be significant in countries with increasing economic development or particular habits and some biological agents are also classified as carcinogenic to human. Specific emerging biological risks have been recently pointed out by Risk Observatory of the European Agency for Safety and Health at work, and we must consider the worker's attitude and behaviour, influenced by his own perception of risk more than his real knowledge, that could over-underestimate the risk itself. Therefore, biological risk at work requires a complex approach in relation to risk assessment and risk management, made more difficult due to the wide variety of biological agents, working environments and working techniques that can determine the exposures.

  8. Occupational Exposure to HIV Among Health Care Providers: A Qualitative Study in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chunqing; Li, Li; Wu, Zunyou; Wu, Sheng; Jia, Manhong

    2009-01-01

    With the HIV/AIDS epidemic spreading, health care providers (HCPs) in China are facing a growing risk of occupational exposure to and infection with HIV. There is a need to describe occupational exposure cases and compliance with postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) guidelines among HCPs. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 33 HCPs in Yunnan Province, China. Information about occupational exposures the HCPs and their co-workers experienced was collected and analyzed using ATLAS.ti. Most occupational exposure accidents happened during emergencies, when HCPs did not have time to consider self-protection. Exposure to HIV caused exposed HCPs severe adverse psychological pressure, such as stress and anxiety. Compliance with PEP guidelines among participants was poor; barriers to better compliance were identified. This study underscored the importance of institutional support in promoting compliance with PEP guidelines among exposed providers. Further training and emphasis on universal precautions and PEP guidelines may reduce the risk of occupational infections. PMID:17641135

  9. Health Occupations Trends and Issues: Issue Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covelli, Nicholas J.; And Others

    A study was conducted to identify the trends occurring within the health service industry and their impact on the providers of health care; determine shifts or emerging occupational areas within health services; and assess local health service providers' staffing patterns and anticipated needs. The study involved meetings with local hospital…

  10. Future preparation of occupational health nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Scalzi, C C; Wilson, D L; Ebert, R

    1991-03-01

    This article presents the results of a national survey of job activities of corporate level occupational health nurse managers. The survey was designed to identify the relative amount of time spent and importance attributed to specific areas of their current job. In general this sample tended to have more management experience and educational preparation than previously cited studies: over 50% had completed a graduate degree. The scores for importance and time spent were highly correlated. That is, occupational health corporate nurse managers seemed to allocate their time to job responsibilities they considered most important. Management activities related to policy, practice standards, quality assurance, staff development, and systems for client care delivery appear to represent the core responsibilities of occupational health nursing management. Curriculum recommendations for management positions in occupational health include: health policy, program planning, and evaluation; business strategy; applications of management information systems; quality assurance; and marketing. PMID:2001272

  11. Ministry of Health clinical practice guidelines: depression.

    PubMed

    Chua, H C; Chan, L L; Chee, K S; Chen, Y H; Chin, S A; Chua, P L W; Fones, S L C; Fung, D; Khoo, C L; Kwek, S K D; Lim, E C L; Ling, J; Poh, P; Sim, K; Tan, B L; Tan, C H; Tan, L L; Tan, Y H C; Tay, W K; Yeo, C; Su, H C A

    2012-02-01

    The Ministry of Health (MOH) have updated the clinical practice guidelines on Depression to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for depression. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on Depression, for the information of readers of the Singapore Medical Journal. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/home/Publications/guidelines/cpg/2012/depression.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

  12. Drafting guidelines for occupational exposure to chemicals: the Dutch experience with the assessment of reproductive risks.

    PubMed

    Stijkel, A; van Eijndhoven, J C; Bal, R

    1996-12-01

    The Dutch procedure for standard setting for occupational exposure to chemicals, just like the European Union (EU) procedure, is characterized by an organizational separation between considerations of health on the one side, and of technology, economics, and policy on the other side. Health considerations form the basis for numerical guidelines. These guidelines are next combined with technical-economical considerations. Standards are then proposed, and are finally set by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment. An analysis of this procedure might be of relevance to the US, where other procedures are used and criticized. In this article we focus on the first stage of the standard-setting procedure. In this stage, the Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (DECOS) drafts a criteria document in which a health-based guideline is proposed. The drafting is based on a set of starting points for assessing toxicity. We raise the questions, "Does DECOS limit itself only to health considerations? And if not, what are the consequences of such a situation?" We discuss DECOS' starting points and analyze the relationships between those starting points, and then explore eight criteria documents where DECOS was considering reproductive risks as a possible critical effect. For various reasons, it will be concluded that the starting points leave much interpretative space, and that this space is widened further by the manner in which DECOS utilizes it. This is especially true in situations involving sex-specific risks and uncertainties in knowledge. Consequently, even at the first stage, where health considerations alone are intended to play a role, there is much room for other than health-related factors to influence decision making, although it is unavoidable that some interpretative space will remain. We argue that separating the various types of consideration should not be abandoned. Rather, through adjustments in the starting points and aspects of the procedure

  13. [The guidelines and other scientific technical instruments for improving, updating and validating the Occupational Physician activities].

    PubMed

    Apostoli, P

    2008-01-01

    From 2002 to 2007 the Italian Society of Industrial Medicine and Industrial Hygiene (S.I.M.L.I.I.) produced, in the context of the specific Education and Accreditation Programme for occupational physicians, more than 20 guide lines and consensus document on the most important and controversial themes for our Discipline. These instruments have aimed not only to improve the effectiveness of preventive actions but also to constantly adopt rigorous methodologies based where possible on evidence based medicine procedures. The Italian Occupational physicians agree with guidelines of our Scientific Society, but it appears now to be necessary to critically evaluate our experience, at the light of the new Framework Act for the occupational safety and health "Decreto legislativo 81/08" signed by the President of the Italian Republic on April 9, 2008, which firstly included in a legislative act terms such as technical normative, good practices, guide lines. Another important, mandatory reference, for a Medical Discipline as Occupational Medcine remains, in this debate is, in our Country, the National Program for Guide Lines edited By Italian National Health Institute since 2002 and part of current National System of Guide Lines concerning preparation, dissemination, updating, implementation of guide lines in Medicine. In this paper the main aspects related to different kind of instruments such as guide lines, consensus conference reports, technology assessment, good practices, technical normative, focusing in particular the argument identification, methodology, relationship between different instruments and their production and diffusion, economical and ethical issues and possible conflict of interest.

  14. Understanding privacy in occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Anne; Wickström, Gustav; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of privacy in occupational health services. Data were collected through in-depth theme interviews with occupational health professionals (n = 15), employees (n = 15) and employers (n = 14). Our findings indicate that privacy, in this context, is a complex and multilayered concept, and that companies as well as individual employees have their own core secrets. Co-operation between the three groups proved challenging: occupational health professionals have to consider carefully in which situations and how much they are entitled to release private information on individual employees for the benefit of the whole company. Privacy is thus not an absolute right of an individual, but involves the idea of sharing responsibility. The findings open up useful new perspectives on ethical questions of privacy and on the development of occupational health practices.

  15. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Benefits Corporate Members Current Chapters Individual & Business Awards & Recognition Occupational Health Nurses Week 2017 Elections - AAOHN Members ... election is essential for members to make your voice heard and set the future direction of the ...

  16. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries. PMID:25000546

  17. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries.

  18. Occupational health hazards in mining: an overview.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, A M

    2004-08-01

    This review article outlines the physical, chemical, biological, ergonomic and psychosocial occupational health hazards of mining and associated metallurgical processes. Mining remains an important industrial sector in many parts of the world and although substantial progress has been made in the control of occupational health hazards, there remains room for further risk reduction. This applies particularly to traumatic injury hazards, ergonomic hazards and noise. Vigilance is also required to ensure exposures to coal dust and crystalline silica remain effectively controlled.

  19. Occupational health hazards in mining: an overview.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, A M

    2004-08-01

    This review article outlines the physical, chemical, biological, ergonomic and psychosocial occupational health hazards of mining and associated metallurgical processes. Mining remains an important industrial sector in many parts of the world and although substantial progress has been made in the control of occupational health hazards, there remains room for further risk reduction. This applies particularly to traumatic injury hazards, ergonomic hazards and noise. Vigilance is also required to ensure exposures to coal dust and crystalline silica remain effectively controlled. PMID:15289583

  20. Occupational Competency Profile for Health Occupations Education Program: Health Agency Assessment. Information Series: Report No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Norma J.

    This assessment instrument is intended to provide health occupations teachers and state departments of education with information needed to revise and improve the curriculum used in training prospective health occupations teachers and in updating certification requirements for practicing health care professionals. The profile lists the…

  1. 75 FR 56549 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Safety and Occupational Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... Health (NIOSH), Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS) In accordance with section 10(a)(2... (Closed); 8 a.m.-5 p.m., October 8, 2010 (Closed). Place: Embassy Suites Hotel, 1900 Diagonal Road... Occupational Health Study Section will review, discuss, and evaluate grant application(s) received in...

  2. Infection Control Protocol for Student Clinical Experiences. A Protocol Document for Health Occupations Education Programs in Missouri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed especially for high school health occupations education programs in Missouri, this guide uses U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) rules as a base for guidelines for student participation in health care. The document informs administrators and teachers about special circumstances that must be considered in the…

  3. PATHWAYS TO HEALTH CAREERS, EXPLORING HEALTH OCCUPATIONS AND PROFESSIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Careers Council of Illinois, Chicago.

    CAREERS IN THE AREAS OF DENTISTRY, DIETETICS, MEDICAL RECORD LIBRARY SCIENCE, MEDICAL LABORATORY WORK, MEDICINE, NURSING, OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, OPTOMETRY, PHARMACY, PHYSICAL THERAPY, PODIATRY, PUBLIC HEALTH, RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY, SOCIAL WORK, VETERINARY MEDICINE, HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION, AND OTHER HEALTH OCCUPATIONS ARE DESCRIBED IN TERMS OF THE…

  4. 78 FR 64504 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH or Institute) Cancellation:...

  5. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Home Health Aide. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (home health aid) in the nursing cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing therapeutic…

  6. Introduction to Health Occupations Education II. Module No. I. Health Occupations Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Nancy; And Others

    This package of seven modules that introduce health occupations II is one of six such packages containing a total of 46 modules that comprise Health Occupations Education II, the second course of a two-year course of study. Each module may contain some or all of the following components: introduction, directions, objectives, a list of learning…

  7. Occupational therapy in geriatric mental health.

    PubMed

    Trace, S; Howell, T

    1991-09-01

    Elderly persons with psychiatric disorders often experience a variety of functional deficits that affect their independence, safety, and activity level. The occupational therapist's role in addressing these needs is discussed, as are the possibilities for improvement of the elderly person's autonomy, safety, and integrity. Barriers to optimal service provision in the health care and social service systems as well as in occupational therapy are addressed.

  8. Occupational health in fairy tales.

    PubMed

    Rivolta, Alice; Arienti, Federica; Smith, Derek R; Cesana, Giancarlo; Riva, Michele A

    2016-05-01

    Myths and folklore, as expressions of popular beliefs, provide valuable information on medical knowledge in earlier times. Fairy tales have often recounted occupational maladies throughout the ages and also provide some insight into the toxic effects of certain metals, such as mercury. Much historical information can be gleaned from unexpected sources, and as such, fairy tales should be more carefully scrutinized by contemporary researchers with an interest in the historical origins of workplace injury and disease.

  9. Occupational health in fairy tales.

    PubMed

    Rivolta, Alice; Arienti, Federica; Smith, Derek R; Cesana, Giancarlo; Riva, Michele A

    2016-05-01

    Myths and folklore, as expressions of popular beliefs, provide valuable information on medical knowledge in earlier times. Fairy tales have often recounted occupational maladies throughout the ages and also provide some insight into the toxic effects of certain metals, such as mercury. Much historical information can be gleaned from unexpected sources, and as such, fairy tales should be more carefully scrutinized by contemporary researchers with an interest in the historical origins of workplace injury and disease. PMID:26756526

  10. Safety Guide for Health Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Vocational Education and Rehabilitation, Springfield. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    The handbook is intended to be utilized by health occupations teachers as supplementary instructional materials for a unit on safety. The document contains general safety rules applicable to hospitals and other health care institutions. Outlined are general rules for fire safety and office and clerical safety and more specific rules for the…

  11. Educational Statistics for Selected Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Donald W.; Holz, Frank M.

    Detailed statistics on education are provided for a number of health occupations. Data are given as far back as 1950-1951 for medical and dental schools, while for schools of public health, the data begin in 1975-1976. Complete 1980 data are provided only for dentistry, pharmacy, and veterinary medicine. Statistical tables are included on the…

  12. Health Occupations Orientation Level Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyum, Paula G.; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in teaching a secondary-level orientation course in health occupations that is designed to prepare students for employment in all types of health care facilities and for entry into postsecondary programs. The guide is divided into two parts. The first part consists of a teacher's guide and 11 instructional units…

  13. Global occupational health and safety responsibilities of occupational health nurses based in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hong, OiSaeng; Chin, Dal Lae; Thomas, Elizabeth Anne

    2013-07-01

    The health and safety of workers is the primary concern of occupational health nurses. The purpose of this study was to identify the global occupational health and safety responsibilities of occupational health nurses based in the United States and factors contributing to these global responsibilities. A total of 2,123 American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc. members completed a web-based survey and were included in the study. Approximately 12% (n = 256) of the respondents worked globally. Occupational health nurses with three or four national certifications, OR (odds ratio) = 2.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.08, 3.98], more than 15 years of occupational health nursing experience, OR = 1.23, 95% CI [1.08, 1.39], and a doctoral degree, OR = 2.89, 95% CI [1.40, 5.99], were most likely to work globally. Advanced practice nurses, OR = 1.55, 95% CI [1.12, 2.15], occupational health nurses who worked for large employers, OR = 1.74, 95% CI [1.29, 2.33], and those who supervised other nurses, OR = 1.74, 95% CI [1.29, 2.34], were also more likely to work globally. In contrast, occupational health nurses who personally provided direct care to workers were less likely to work globally, OR = 0.60, 95% CI [0.44, 0.81]. The findings of this study provide direction for future education, practice, and research to increase global responsibilities among occupational health nurses in the United States. PMID:23819512

  14. 76 FR 36891 - Guidelines for Determining Probability of Causation Under the Energy Employees Occupational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000,'' on Monday, March 21, 2011 (76 FR 15268). In the notice... the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000; Revision of Guidelines on... proposing to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) as a radiogenic cancer under the Energy...

  15. Guidelines for School Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Sarah; And Others

    This publication was designed to assist chief school administrators, school nurses, school physicians, staff, and other school health personnel in developing, implementing, and evaluating sound school health programs for New Jersey public school students. Section I delineates responsibility for school health services, discussing the role of…

  16. Occupational health related concerns among surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Anjuman Gul; Naeem, Zahid; Zaman, Atif; Zahid, Faryal

    2016-01-01

    The surgeon’s daily workload renders him/her susceptible to a variety of the common work-related illness. They are exposed to a number of occupational hazards in their professional work. These hazards include sharp injuries, blood borne pathogens, latex allergy, laser plumes, hazardous chemicals, anesthetic gases, equipment hazards, static postures, and job related stressors. However, many pay little attention to their health, and neither do they seek the appropriate help when necessary. It is observed that occupational hazards pose a huge risk to the personal well-being of surgeons. As such, the importance of early awareness and education alongside prompt intervention is duly emphasized. Therefore, increased attention to the health, economic, personal, and social implications of these injuries is essential for appropriate management and future prevention. These risks are as great as any other occupational hazards affecting surgeons today. The time has come to recognize and address them. PMID:27103909

  17. Mental Health Practice Guidelines for Child Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The guidelines and supporting rationale presented in this paper were developed from the October 2007 "Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare Consensus Conference" sponsored by Casey Family Programs, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the REACH Institute (REsource for Advancing Children's Health). The purpose of the conference was to…

  18. Occupational Health Content in Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Marjorie J.; May, W. Theodore

    A 4-year project was conducted at the University of Tennessee College of Nursing to identify occupational health nursing content essential in baccalaureate education for professional nursing. In the process of determining content, a review of relevant literature was made, and a theoretical framework was developed which consisted of an integration…

  19. Health Occupations Education I. Instructor's Manual. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsey, Patricia E., Ed.; And Others

    This instructor's guide consists of materials for use in teaching the first year of a two-year course in health occupations education that is designed for high school students. Included in the volume are an introduction, a list of modules, a list of tools and supplies, instructional references, a list of suggested instructional filmstrips, an…

  20. Ethics in biomonitoring for occupational health.

    PubMed

    Manno, M; Sito, F; Licciardi, L

    2014-12-01

    Biological monitoring, i.e., the use of biomarkers for the measurement of systemic human exposure, effects and susceptibility to chemicals has increased considerably in recent years. Biomonitoring techniques, originally limited to a few metals and other chemicals in the workplace, are currently applied to a large number of exposure situations and have become a useful tool for occupational and environmental health risk assessment. Almost any biomonitoring program, however, entails a number of relevant ethical issues, which concern all the phases of the entire process, from the selection of the biomarker to the study design, from the collection, storage and analysis of the biological sample to the interpretation, communication and management of the results, from the (truly?) informed consent of the worker to the independence and autonomy of the occupational health professional. These issues require a balanced assessment of the interests and responsibilities of all the parties, the worker primarily, but also the employer, the occupational health professional, the health authorities and, for research studies on new biomarkers, also the scientists involved. Ideally, decisions of ethical relevance concerning biomarkers should be based on, and respectful of the best scientific, legal and ethical evidence available. When, however, a conflict should arise, before any decision is taken a thorough risk-benefit analysis should be done, at the beginning of the process and after listening to the workers and the management involved, by the occupational physician or scientist, based on his/her professional experience, independent judgement and individual responsibility.

  1. Emergency Care Skills for Occupational Health Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh. Occupational Information Center.

    Designed for use in community colleges, technical colleges, and technical institutes, this manual contains a course for teaching emergency care skills to both licensed practical and registered nurses employed in occupational health. The manual consists of three sections. In section 1 the need for the course, its content, objectives, length,…

  2. Interactive Laser Video Disc. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beam, Glennie; Wright, Patsy

    This module is intended to assist secondary school instructors in selecting and evaluating courseware related to the health occupations education curriculum. The main section contains descriptions of 20 pieces of courseware. Each entry includes the following information: title, description, audience, vendor, price, and recommendation. A glossary…

  3. Medical Terminology: Prefixes. Health Occupations Education Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on medical terminology (prefixes) is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module consists of an introduction to prefixes, a list of resources needed, and three learning experiences. Each learning experience contains an…

  4. Health Occupations Education--A Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clanton, Kaye Reames

    Developed to provide curriculum materials that secondary Health Occupations Education (HOE) teachers/coordinators can use in organizing their individual programs, this curriculum guide contains performance-based units covering the majority of a four-semester program of study in HOE. The following topics are covered: medical ethics, law, and…

  5. Health Occupations Module. The Integumentary System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the integumentary system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, objectives (e.g., list and describe the types of glands formed in the skin, and explain the…

  6. Health Occupations Education Program Management Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This final report describes a project to develop a secondary education program management guide for health occupations education in Iowa. Introductory material includes the following: a summary sheet on project objectives, a description of how the objectives were met, the audience served, an educational equity statement, a statement that the…

  7. Ethics in biomonitoring for occupational health.

    PubMed

    Manno, M; Sito, F; Licciardi, L

    2014-12-01

    Biological monitoring, i.e., the use of biomarkers for the measurement of systemic human exposure, effects and susceptibility to chemicals has increased considerably in recent years. Biomonitoring techniques, originally limited to a few metals and other chemicals in the workplace, are currently applied to a large number of exposure situations and have become a useful tool for occupational and environmental health risk assessment. Almost any biomonitoring program, however, entails a number of relevant ethical issues, which concern all the phases of the entire process, from the selection of the biomarker to the study design, from the collection, storage and analysis of the biological sample to the interpretation, communication and management of the results, from the (truly?) informed consent of the worker to the independence and autonomy of the occupational health professional. These issues require a balanced assessment of the interests and responsibilities of all the parties, the worker primarily, but also the employer, the occupational health professional, the health authorities and, for research studies on new biomarkers, also the scientists involved. Ideally, decisions of ethical relevance concerning biomarkers should be based on, and respectful of the best scientific, legal and ethical evidence available. When, however, a conflict should arise, before any decision is taken a thorough risk-benefit analysis should be done, at the beginning of the process and after listening to the workers and the management involved, by the occupational physician or scientist, based on his/her professional experience, independent judgement and individual responsibility. PMID:25447455

  8. Iowa Guidelines for Educationally Related Occupational Therapy Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Jean

    This guide provides background information to help interpret Iowa state and federal rules as they apply to occupational therapy (OT) for students with disabilities (birth to age 21) in educational settings. The first section is on personnel and provides definitions and statements of licensure for the positions of occupational therapist and…

  9. 75 FR 26266 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... improvements in the delivery of occupational safety and health services, and the prevention of work-related... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section...

  10. [The emergence of positive occupational health psychology].

    PubMed

    Bakker, Arnold B; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Alfredo; Derks, Daantje

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the emerging concept of Positive Occupational Health Psychology (POHP). We discuss the usefulness of focusing on positive constructs in order to understand the path to health and well-being at work. We describe research findings on several POHP topics, including engagement, psychological capital, and job crafting. Additionally, we review the first positive interventions in this field and conclude by identifying some specific questions for future research.

  11. [The occupational health of medical personnel of psychiatric institutions].

    PubMed

    Ruzhenskaia, E V

    2013-01-01

    The article considers the issues of self-assessment of occupational health by medical personnel of psychiatric service. The main issues and areas of occupation health disorders are identified. The main directions of disorders prevention are presented.

  12. [Occupational and non-occupational factors influencing health state of small and medium business workers].

    PubMed

    Fasikov, R M; Khuzhakhmetova, I B; Stepanov, E G

    2010-01-01

    Complex study of work conditions and health parameters of workers engaged into small and medium business proved that preserved and better health of these workers, prevention of occupational and occupationally mediated diseases necessitate federal and regional complex system of measures including legal basis, database on work conditions and their influence on small and medium business workers' health, occupational medicine training for employers and employees, more active involvement of medical institutioins into screening for occupational diseases.

  13. Occupational Safety and Health in Peru.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Ismael; Huerta-Mercado, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Peru is a country located on the Pacific coast of South America with a population of more than 30 million inhabitants. In the past 10 years, Peru has had a steady economic growth. Peru is predominantly an extractive industry country, but the manufacturing and construction sectors are booming. It is in this context that regulations have been implemented to protect the safety and health of workers. One of the most important regulations is the Law on Safety and Health at Work, which has been recently promulgated. Regulations are complemented by training and education in occupational safety and health. The measures are yet to be fully implemented thus a positive effect in reducing accidents and occupational diseases at work has not yet been seen. PMID:26709289

  14. Occupational Health Hazards in ICU Nursing Staff

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Helena Eri; Couto, Djalma Ticiani; Merchán-Hamann, Edgar; Branco, Anadergh Barbosa

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed occupational health hazards for Intensive Care Unit (ICU) nurses and nursing technicians, comparing differences in the number and types of hazards which occur at the beginning and end of their careers. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out with 26 nurses and 96 nursing technicians from a public hospital in the Federal District, Brazil. A Likert-type work-related symptom scale (WRSS) was used to evaluate the presence of physical, psychological, and social risks. Data were analyzed with the use of the SPSS, version 12.0, and the Kruskal-Wallis test for statistical significance and differences in occupational health hazards at the beginning and at the end of the workers' careers. As a workplace, ICUs can cause work health hazards, mostly physical, to nurses and nursing technicians due to the frequent use of physical energy and strength to provide care, while psychological and social hazards occur to a lesser degree. PMID:21994814

  15. Bilateral environmental and occupational health program with India.

    PubMed

    Allred, Mike; Campolucci, Sharon; Falk, Henry; Ganguly, N K; Saiyed, H N; Shah, Bela

    2003-08-01

    In spite of considerable economic progress in recent years, India continues to face challenges dealing with poverty, unemployment, malnutrition, disease and disability. The governments of India and the United States have formed a collaborative effort to address outstanding issues in the fields of environmental and occupational health. The Joint Statement on Indo-U.S. Collaboration in Environmental and Occupational Health, which was approved by the Minister of the Indian Union of Health and Family Welfare and the Secretary of Health and Human Services of the United State in Geneva in May of 2002, formalizes the collaborative relationship and calls for the development of Implementation Guidelines. The Implementation Guidelines establish a Joint Working Group, which is responsible for identifying and implementing the collaborative projects. The collaborating organizations have identified three broad areas for collaboration: emergency preparedness and response; training, education, and technology transfer; and research. Within the three broad areas, the organizations have identified two subject areas for initiation: arsenicosis and asbestosis. Researchers and health officials in both India and the U.S. share interest in both research and interventions efforts in these subject areas. As many as 42 million people in the West Bengal area of India may be exposed to arsenic in drinking water at concentrations of health concern. Similarly, as many as 10 million industrial or mine workers in India may be exposed to asbestos or other dusts at concentrations of health concern. The first Joint Working Group meeting is scheduled for March 2003 in New Delhi and will consider these subject areas in developing collaborative projects. Other tasks being undertaken by the signatory agencies include expanding the relationship to include academic and nongovernmental organizations and obtaining funds for the various projects from governmental and nongovernmental sources.

  16. Women brothel workers and occupational health risks

    PubMed Central

    Cwikel, J; Ilan, K; Chudakov, B

    2003-01-01

    Study objectives: This study examined working conditions, reported morbidity, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression and their relation to an index of occupational health risk among women working in brothels in Israel. Design: Personal structured interviews with a scale of occupational risk that included seven self report items reflecting past and present morbidity and symptoms. Participants and setting: A purposive sample of 55 women in three cities in Israel, between the ages of 18–38. Main results: Most (82%) women were trafficked into Israel to work illegally in prostitution, effectively deriving them of access to discretionary health care. A third of the sample (32%) had a high score (between 3 to 6) on the index of occupational risk factors. A high score was not related to recent physician or gynaecological visits and was more common among illegal workers than those with residence status. A set of regression analyses showed that the most significant predictors of reporting a high level of occupational risk symptoms were starting sex work at an early age, the number of hours worked in a day, a history of suicide attempts and PTSD symptoms. Conclusions: High occupational risk was found to be unrelated to recent physician or gynaecological visits, indicating that these visits were most probably controlled by the brothel owners and not by medical need as perceived by the women themselves. Furthermore, occupational risk factors were associated with some of the working and background conditions reported by women brothel workers. There is an urgent need for medical care for this high risk group. PMID:14573588

  17. [Psychosocial risks at work and occupational health].

    PubMed

    Gil-Monte, Pedro R

    2012-06-01

    The changes on work processes and job design in recent decades are focused in the demographic, economic, political, and technological aspects. These changes have created new psychosocial risks at work that affect the health and quality of workplace, increasing stress levels among workers. The aim of this study is to present such risks, their consequences, and some recommendations to promote health at the workplace as a strategy to improve public health of the population. The study is divided into five points in which: (1) introduces the concept of risk factors and psychosocial work, (2) describes the main emerging psychosocial risks labor, (3) provides some information on the prevalence of psychosocial risks at work in Europe and its consequences, (4) recommendations for health promotion in the workplace, and (5) describes the objective of Occupational Health Psychology and concludes with the recommendations to promote psychosocial health in the workplace as a strategy to improve public health of the population.

  18. Child Health Guidelines: Health, Nutrition, Infants and Toddlers. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Ursula; And Others

    Forms and guidelines presented in this manual were compiled and/or developed by staff of agencies serving nursery schools, group day care centers, and family day care homes. The health and safety guidelines focus on excluding ill children and staff, caring for ill children, safety policies, emergency procedures, fire emergencies, pets, bites, and…

  19. Recent Cases: Administrative Law--Occupational Safety and Health Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Law Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Implications of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 are described in two cases: Brennan v. Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission (Underhill Construction Corp.), and Anning-Johnson Co. v. United States Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. (LBH)

  20. EM Health and Safety Plan Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This document contains information about the Health and Safety Plan Guidelines. Topics discussed include: Regulatory framework; key personnel; hazard assessment; training requirements; personal protective equipment; extreme temperature disorders or conditions; medical surveillance; exposure monitoring/air sampling; site control; decontamination; emergency response/contingency plan; emergency action plan; confined space entry; and spill containment.

  1. Environmental and Occupational Exposures in Immigrant Health

    PubMed Central

    Eamranond, Pracha P.; Hu, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Immigrants comprise vulnerable populations that are frequently exposed to a multitude of environmental and occupational hazards. The historical context behind state and federal legislation has helped to foster an environment that is particularly hostile toward caring for immigrant health. Current hazards include toxic exposures, air and noise pollution, motor vehicle accidents, crowded living and work environments with inadequate ventilation, poor sanitation, mechanical injury, among many others. Immigrants lack the appropriate training, materials, health care access, and other resources to reduce their exposure to preventable environmental and occupational health risks. This dilemma is exacerbated by current anti-immigrant sentiments, miscommunication between native and immigrant populations, and legislation denying immigrants access to publicly funded medical care. Given that current health policy has failed to address immigrant health appropriately and political impetus is lacking, efforts should also focus on alternative solutions, including organized labor. Labor unions that serve to educate workers, survey work environments, and defend worker rights will greatly alleviate and prevent the burden of disease incurred by immigrants. The nation’s health will benefit from improved regulation of living and workplace environments to improve the health of immigrants, regardless of legal status. PMID:21572847

  2. Occupational safety and health objectives of Healthy People 2010: a systematic approach for occupational health nurses--Part II.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Kimberly; Parks, Carol; Chikotas, Noreen E

    2007-03-01

    Occupational safety and health objectives 20.6 through 20.11 focus on reducing work-related assaults, lead exposure, skin diseases and disorders, needlestick injuries, and work-related, noise-induced hearing loss and promoting worksite stress reduction programs. Using the intervention strategies provided, occupational health nurses can play a key role in reducing workplace-related injury, disease, disability, and death. variety of resources pertaining to occupational health and safety from the federal, national, health care, nursing, and environmental realms can assist occupational health nurses in developing and implementing programs appropriate for their workplaces. Through the Healthy People 2010 occupational health and safety objectives, occupational health nurses have the opportunity to develop and implement workplace policies and programs promoting not only a safe and healthy work environment but also improved health and disease prevention. Occupational health nurses can implement strategies to increase quality and years of life and eliminate health disparities in the American work force.

  3. Industrialization and occupational health in underdeveloped countries.

    PubMed

    Elling, R H

    1977-01-01

    This paper examines world political economic relationships, especially the growing disparities between "developed" and underdeveloped countries and the role of multinational corporations in exploiting the people and resources of underdeveloped lands. Workers in these lands are identified as high risk for both new and old forms of occupational health hazards. To protect themselves, workers must establish governments on their own behalf rather than client governments serving external capitalist interests.

  4. Allied Health Occupations II (Health Careers--Core Curriculum).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with background informational material and practical skills used in various health fields. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: safety; ethical and legal…

  5. The occupational health field in the cochrane collaboration.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Jos

    2007-01-01

    It is the aim of the Cochrane Collaboration to gather, summarise and disseminate evidence of health care interventions. Recently, the Occupational Health Field has started to do so for occupational health interventions. In this article we would like to describe the organisation and the methods used by the Field. First, the use of research information to improve the quality of occupational health practice is explained. Next, the process and contents of Cochrane Reviews are described. The pros and cons of Cochrane Reviews are listed and what occupational health practitioners can learn from it. There is a great variety of occupational health interventions that requires flexibility in which research design to use. The Occupational Health Field will enhance our understanding of the effectiveness of occupational health interventions in the coming years.

  6. Occupational health experience with organic additives.

    PubMed

    Thiess, A M; Wellenreuther, G

    1984-12-01

    For many decades, interest in occupational medicine has been focused on the wide variety of organic additives, which includes a large number of substances, for example, dyestuffs, pigments, and auxiliaries for the textile, leather, and paper industries. The reason is that, if the recommended precautions are not observed, there is a risk of exposure to most of these substances during both production and use. Moreover, over the years, some additives have caused concern and aroused suspicion regarding adverse effects on health. In order to deal with health problems in this field, it is important to be aware of how, what, and where occupational diseases or accidents arise. Much knowledge has been gained about these, and it would be an impossible task to give a systematic survey of the data that have accumulated, especially since it is necessary to take account of the problem of exposure to more than one substance. Thus an attempt is made to report on occupational health experience in general, and to demonstrate how an industrial hygienist may approach the many and various problems. Some epidemiological studies on organic additives (auramine, anthraquinone dyestuffs, organic dyes, etc.) are discussed.

  7. 77 FR 33495 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of MACOSH..., Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, authorized the preparation of......

  8. 77 FR 58174 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of FACOSH meeting. SUMMARY: The Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)...

  9. 75 FR 78775 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meeting of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) and NACOSH......

  10. 76 FR 32374 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meetings of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) and NACOSH......

  11. 76 FR 54806 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of MACOSH Meeting. SUMMARY: The Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)...

  12. 78 FR 68865 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of FACOSH meeting. SUMMARY: The Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)...

  13. 77 FR 62536 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of renewal of... Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms.......

  14. 77 FR 46126 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nomination of members to serve on the Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health.......

  15. National guidelines on management of occupational exposure to HIV.

    PubMed

    Rewari, B B; Negi, Shivi

    2009-05-01

    During patient care, the healthcare personnel are at risk of infection of blood-borne pathogens (HIV, HBV, HCV) which is referred to as occupational exposure. Exposure to blood, semen, vaginal secretions, CSF, synovial, pleural, peritoneal, pericardial fluid, amniotic fluid and other body fluids contaminated with visible blood can lead to infection. Steps which are to be followed after occupational exposure are: (1) Step I : First aid following the exposure. (2) Step 2: Establish eligibility for postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). (3) Step 3: Counselling for PEP. (4) Step 4: Prescribe PEP. (5) HIV chemoprophylaxis. (6) Step 6: Follow-up of an exposed person. In order to get timely prophylactic therapy, PEP drugs should be kept available round-the-clock in at least three locations, casualty, ICU and labour room. Every hospital should have a written protocol and SOP for handling occupational exposure. NACO is in the process of launching a national HIV PEP Registry for capturing the cases of occupational exposure to HIV more effectively. PMID:19886385

  16. National guidelines on management of occupational exposure to HIV.

    PubMed

    Rewari, B B; Negi, Shivi

    2009-05-01

    During patient care, the healthcare personnel are at risk of infection of blood-borne pathogens (HIV, HBV, HCV) which is referred to as occupational exposure. Exposure to blood, semen, vaginal secretions, CSF, synovial, pleural, peritoneal, pericardial fluid, amniotic fluid and other body fluids contaminated with visible blood can lead to infection. Steps which are to be followed after occupational exposure are: (1) Step I : First aid following the exposure. (2) Step 2: Establish eligibility for postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). (3) Step 3: Counselling for PEP. (4) Step 4: Prescribe PEP. (5) HIV chemoprophylaxis. (6) Step 6: Follow-up of an exposed person. In order to get timely prophylactic therapy, PEP drugs should be kept available round-the-clock in at least three locations, casualty, ICU and labour room. Every hospital should have a written protocol and SOP for handling occupational exposure. NACO is in the process of launching a national HIV PEP Registry for capturing the cases of occupational exposure to HIV more effectively.

  17. High-occupancy-vehicle guidelines for planning, design, and operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The report, which was originally prepared for the California Department of Transportation, presents a set of guidelines and procedures for the implementation of typical HOV lanes. Topics covered in the manual include planning, operations, geometric design, ingress/egress, signing and delineation, and enforcement. The guidelines are advisory in nature, and should be used as a supplement to established traffic engineering standards in areas or on topics which are not covered by them. The document includes a substantial amount of material on the physical layout and geometrics of HOV facilities, based on California's experiences with the lanes they have implemented.

  18. Occupational health and safety in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Frumkin, H; Câmara, V de M

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Brazil is the world's fifth largest and sixth most populous nation. Its economy is varied, with strong manufacturing, agriculture, mining, and service sectors. Therefore, a wide variety of workplace hazards confronts its work force. This paper describes Brazil's occupational safety and health regulatory scheme, workers' compensation system, plant-level practices, training, and data collection. METHODS. We reviewed and analyzed Brazilian regulatory legislation and government and non-governmental organization (NGO) activity in occupational safety and health, as well as the structure and function of the workers' compensation system. We also reviewed available data on injuries and diseases from major sources, including the now-defunct Instituto Nacional do Previdencia Social (INPS) and the workers' compensation scheme, Seguro de Acidente de Trabalho (SAT). RESULTS. The incidence of workplace injuries has decreased in recent years and is now reported to be about 5 per 100 workers per year. The case fatality rate has been constant at about 5 fatalities per 1000 injuries. Less than 6% of reported injuries are classified as "diseases." Brazil's rates are comparable to those of Mexico and Zimbabwe, and two to four times higher than in most industrialized countries. CONCLUSIONS. Brazil has a high incidence of occupational injuries and diseases; these injuries and diseases are underreported; there is a large informal sector at special risk; and Brazil illustrates the disparity that exists in many countries between legislation on the books and legislation that is actually implemented. PMID:1836110

  19. Ethical issues in occupational health research.

    PubMed

    Ward, Elizabeth M; Hurrell, Joseph J; Colligan, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    This is an overview of ethical issues in occupational health research involving human subjects. Research that requires human subjects review must be distinguished from surveillance or public health practice. Confidentiality and privacy concerns are particularly important in an occupational setting because individual participants may be identifiable through job title or other characteristics, and because there may be concerns about employment discrimination associated with participation status or results. Additional issues include notification of individual test results to the study participants, including whether the results have clinical significance and/or provide other potentially relevant information to the study subjects; consent for banking of biological specimens for future research (e.g., uses of the specimens, plans for anonymization, notification of future results); and the higher level of sensitivity of workplace studies involving genetic modifiers of risk. Many occupational studies involve no more than minimal risk. Studies that involve greater than minimal risk require the investigator to document the potential risks and attempt to minimize them.

  20. Directory of Academic Programs in Occupational Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, William J., III; And Others

    This booklet describes academic program offerings in American colleges and universities in the area of occupational safety and health. Programs are divided into five major categories, corresponding to each of the core disciplines: (1) occupational safety and health/industrial hygiene, (2) occupational safety, (3) industrial hygiene, (4)…

  1. Low Wages as Occupational Health Hazards.

    PubMed

    Leigh, J Paul; De Vogli, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The history of occupational medicine has been characterized by ever-widening recognition of hazards, from fires in 1911 to asbestos in the 1960s, to job strain in the 1990s. In this essay, we argue for broadening the recognition further to include low wages. We first review possible mechanisms explaining the effects of wages on health or health behaviors. Mechanisms involve self-esteem, job satisfaction, deprivation, social rank, the "full" price of bad health, patience, and the ability to purchase health-producing goods and services. Second, we discuss empirical studies that rely on large, typically national, data sets and statistical models that use either instrumental variables or natural experiments and also account for other family income. Finally, we draw implications for laws governing minimum wages and labor unions. PMID:27158950

  2. Use of sentinel health events (occupational) in computer assisted occupational health surveillance.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, J R; Adess, M L; Titlow, T B; Zaharias, G R

    1991-08-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard has developed a Coast Guard-wide comprehensive system for surveillance of workplace diseases. The American Medical Association's fifth edition of the Current Medical Information and Terminology (CMIT) was used as a reference to expand the basic list of 50 Sentinel Health Events (Occupational) [SHE(O)] published by the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH), September, 1983. The expanded list of 107 sentinel events serves as a framework for the development of a computerized system of occupational health surveillance in the U.S. Coast Guard. This application of SHE(O) surveillance can have application in the early detection and prevention of environmental diseases.

  3. Occupational health hazards in the interventional laboratory: progress report of the Multispecialty Occupational Health Group.

    PubMed

    Miller, Donald L; Klein, Lloyd W; Balter, Stephen; Norbash, Alexander; Haines, David; Fairobent, Lynne; Goldstein, James A

    2010-09-01

    The Multispecialty Occupational Health Group (MSOHG), formed in 2005, is an informal coalition of societies representing professionals who work in, or are concerned with, interventional fluoroscopy. The group's long-term goals are to improve occupational health and operator and staff safety in the interventional laboratory while maintaining quality patient care and optimal use of the laboratory. MSOHG has conducted a dialogue with equipment manufacturers and has developed a list of specific objectives for research and development. The group has also represented the member societies in educating regulators, in educating interventionalists, and in fostering and collaborating on research into occupational health issues affecting interventionalists. Not least of the group's accomplishments, as a result of their collaboration in MSOHG, the group's members have developed a mutual respect that can serve as a basis for joint efforts in the future among interventionalists of different medical specialties. PMID:20800777

  4. Occupational Safety and Health Act: A Responsibility for Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Presents implications of the Occupational Safety and Health Act for science teachers both as workers and as they encourage, in students, the development of positive safety attitudes for future occupations. (PEB)

  5. [Construction: critical issues and occupational health].

    PubMed

    Mosconi, G; Riva, M M; Santini, M

    2012-01-01

    Construction is strategic in Italy and worldwide, on top for employees number and turnover but also for occupational accidents and diseases. The building site is at high risk and it is difficult to maintain good levels of safety: in recent years they have had an improvement, but the economic crisis did not favour it. The knowledge in the field of prevention is not as widespread as it would be necessary and as requested (OSHA - UE). The Occupational Physician, engaged in risk assessment and management of medical services, must protect the health of workers at high risk for health, aging and performing tiring work, without adequate vocational training and culture, often in precarious conditions of health and lifestyle at risk. There are good experiences around the world and in Italy. Implementation of research in technology and ergonomics, materials and the tools, reduction of workload are needed, improvement of building site organization, of knowledge about health effects, the rehabilitation and reintegration to work. The procedures and processes should improve productivity and at the same time be safer and less dangerous and the lows should be more fitting with the specific characteristics of the construction industry.

  6. The current status of occupational health in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueyan; Li, Tao

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to summarize the major health problems among Chinese workers, the strategies and measures for occupational hazards control, the network and organizations of occupational health administration, and the achievements and current challenges of occupational health in China. Results The situation of occupational health was found to be still serious in China. Enterprises with occupational hazards were widely distributed, the exposed population and cases of occupational diseases were numerous, and occupational risks were being transferred from the city to the countryside and from developed areas to developing ones. New emerging problems coexisted with traditional occupational hazards. Besides, a lack of occupational health services for migrant workers could be a major problem for a long time. Conclusions It is necessary to improve the fields related to occupational health, such as the supervision and administration of small- and medium-scale enterprises, research into key techniques for the prevention and control of occupational hazards, systems for the diagnosis and reporting of occupational diseases, and the training of health professionals. PMID:21432554

  7. Occupational Wellbeing in a School Community--Staff's and Occupational Health Nurses' Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saaranen, Terhi; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele; Vertio, Harri

    2006-01-01

    This study is part of an action research project titled "Promotion of School Community Staff's Occupational Wellbeing in Co-operation with Occupational Health Nurses" (2001-04), which aims to promote occupational wellbeing by actions that maintain the staff's ability to work in 12 school communities in Eastern Finland. This paper describes…

  8. 76 FR 18220 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... aggregate health burden associated with occupational injuries and illnesses, as well as to support more... health services, and the prevention of work-related injury and illness. It is anticipated that funded... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study...

  9. 77 FR 27776 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... aggregate health burden associated with occupational injuries and illnesses, as well as to support more... health services, and the prevention of work-related injury and illness. It is anticipated that research... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study...

  10. Complementary and alternative therapies in occupational health. Part One.

    PubMed

    Bascom, Angella

    2002-09-01

    Occupational health nurses have the opportunity to work effectively with employees in the area of complementary and alternative health care. The above Sidebar summarizes important points related to the occupational health nurse's role in this rapidly growing aspect of health care delivery.

  11. 78 FR 54923 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... occupational safety and health, particularly as it pertains to the federal workforce; and 6. A statement that... responsibility for occupational safety and health matters involving the federal workforce; experience and... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational......

  12. 76 FR 71077 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of... advise the Secretary of Labor (Secretary) on all matters relating to the occupational safety and......

  13. 75 FR 62147 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of meeting and member appointments. SUMMARY: The Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and......

  14. 77 FR 43616 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nominations to serve on NACOSH. SUMMARY: The Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and......

  15. 76 FR 60085 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for nominations to serve on NACOSH. SUMMARY: The Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and......

  16. Career Education for Leisure Occupations: Curriculum Guidelines for Recreation, Hospitality, and Tourism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoven, Peter J.; Vinton, Dennis A.

    The guidelines suggested in this publication have been designed to assist educators in developing career education programs based on local needs and resources in the leisure career family for the occupational groups in recreation services, recreation resources, tourism, and amusement and entertainment. The basic approaches presented are applicable…

  17. Radiation, chemicals, and occupational health research

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation protection and its interplay with physical research programs are described. Differences and similarities between problems in health protection for chemicals and for radiation are discussed. The importance of dosimetry in radiation work and its relevance to chemicals are cited. A collaborative program between physical and biological scientists on the toxicity of metals is briefly described. It serves as an example of new research directed toward the development of fundamental concepts and principles as a basis for understanding and controlling occupational and population exposures to chemicals. 12 references, 4 figures.

  18. Respiratory protection competencies for the occupational health nurse.

    PubMed

    Burns, Candace; Lachat, Ann M; Gordon, Kimberly; Ryan, Mary Gene; Gruden, MaryAnn; Barker, D Paxon; Taormina, Deborah

    2014-03-01

    Approximately 5 million workers employed at 1.3 million work settings are required to wear some form of respiratory protection as part of their jobs. Occupational health nurses can protect the respiratory health of America's workforce. In 2012, the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses Grants Committee Working Group conducted a nationwide survey of occupational health nurses to assess their knowledge, comfort, skills, and abilities relative to respiratory protection. The Working Group used the survey findings as a foundation for the development of respiratory protection competencies for occupational health nurses and a guide for the development of educational modules. PMID:24811695

  19. Emerging issues in occupational safety and health.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Paul A

    2006-01-01

    In developed countries, changes in the nature of work and the workforce may necessitate recalibrating the vision of occupational safety and health (OSH) researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to increase the focus on the most important issues. New methods of organizing the workplace, extensive labor contracting, expansion of service and knowledge sectors, increase in small business, aging and immigrant workers, and the continued existence of traditional hazards in high-risk sectors such as construction, mining, agriculture, health care, and transportation support the need to address: 1) broader consideration of the role and impact of work, 2) relationship between work and psychological dysfunction, 3) increased surveillance basis for research and intervention, 4) overcoming barriers to the conduct and use of epidemiologic research, 5) information and knowledge transfer and application, 6) economic issues in prevention, and 7) the global interconnectedness of OSH. These issues are offered to spur thinking as new national research agendas for OSH are considered for developed countries. PMID:16967836

  20. Emerging issues in occupational safety and health.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Paul A

    2006-01-01

    In developed countries, changes in the nature of work and the workforce may necessitate recalibrating the vision of occupational safety and health (OSH) researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to increase the focus on the most important issues. New methods of organizing the workplace, extensive labor contracting, expansion of service and knowledge sectors, increase in small business, aging and immigrant workers, and the continued existence of traditional hazards in high-risk sectors such as construction, mining, agriculture, health care, and transportation support the need to address: 1) broader consideration of the role and impact of work, 2) relationship between work and psychological dysfunction, 3) increased surveillance basis for research and intervention, 4) overcoming barriers to the conduct and use of epidemiologic research, 5) information and knowledge transfer and application, 6) economic issues in prevention, and 7) the global interconnectedness of OSH. These issues are offered to spur thinking as new national research agendas for OSH are considered for developed countries.

  1. Occupational Health Teaching for Pre Registration Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Stuart; Wynn, Philip; Williams, Nerys

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 41 of 66 nursing schools showed that occupational health is taught in 88% of nursing diploma and 80% of nursing degree programs. However, the majority focus on nurses' own occupational safety and health, not how patients' health can be affected by work or can affect the ability to work. (SK)

  2. 32 CFR 989.27 - Occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Occupational safety and health. 989.27 Section... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.27 Occupational safety and health. Assess direct and indirect impacts of proposed actions on the safety and health of Air Force employees...

  3. 32 CFR 989.27 - Occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Occupational safety and health. 989.27 Section... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.27 Occupational safety and health. Assess direct and indirect impacts of proposed actions on the safety and health of Air Force employees...

  4. 32 CFR 989.27 - Occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Occupational safety and health. 989.27 Section... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.27 Occupational safety and health. Assess direct and indirect impacts of proposed actions on the safety and health of Air Force employees...

  5. 32 CFR 989.27 - Occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Occupational safety and health. 989.27 Section... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.27 Occupational safety and health. Assess direct and indirect impacts of proposed actions on the safety and health of Air Force employees...

  6. 32 CFR 989.27 - Occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Occupational safety and health. 989.27 Section... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.27 Occupational safety and health. Assess direct and indirect impacts of proposed actions on the safety and health of Air Force employees...

  7. 78 FR 24751 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section...: Embassy Suites, 1900 Diagonal Road, Alexandria, Virginia 22314, Telephone: (703) 684-5900, Fax: (703) 684... Services Office, CDC, pursuant to Public Law 92-463. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health...

  8. 76 FR 52330 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section..., 1900 Diagonal Road, Alexandria, Virginia 22314, Telephone: (703) 684-5900, Fax: (703) 684-0653. Status... Office, CDC, pursuant to Public Law 92-463. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health Study...

  9. 76 FR 3908 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS); National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section... Suites Hotel, 1900 Diagonal Road, Alexandria, Virginia 22314, Telephone: (703) 684-5900, Fax: (703) 684-1403. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health Study Section will review, discuss, and...

  10. 77 FR 51810 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section... Diagonal Road, Alexandria, Virginia 22314, Telephone: (703) 684-5900, Fax: (703) 684-0653. Status: The..., pursuant to Public Law 92-463. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health Study Section will...

  11. 75 FR 5333 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section... Hotel, 1900 Diagonal Road, Alexandria, Virginia 22314, Telephone (703) 684-5900, Fax (703) 684-1403... Law 92-463. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health Study Section will review, discuss,...

  12. 77 FR 4048 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section..., 1900 Diagonal Road, Alexandria, Virginia 22314, Telephone: (703) 684-5900, Fax: (703) 684-0653. Status... Office, CDC, pursuant to Public Law 92-463. Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health Study...

  13. 77 FR 75633 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section...:00 p.m., February 22, 2013 (Closed). Place: Embassy Suites, 1900 Diagonal Road, Alexandria, Virginia.... Purpose: The Safety and Occupational Health Study Section will review, discuss, and evaluate...

  14. Pacific Health Research Guidelines: The Cartography of an Ethical Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mila-Schaaf, Karlo

    2009-01-01

    In 2004 the Health Research Council of New Zealand (HRC) published a set of "Guidelines on Pacific health research". The Guidelines were an attempt to articulate the features of ethical research relationships with Pacific peoples living in Aotearoa New Zealand. This article describes the process of developing these guidelines, using Pacific…

  15. [Good practice guidelines for health information].

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based health information is distinguished by the provision of an unbiased and trustworthy description of the current state of medical knowledge. It enables people to learn more about health and disease, and to make health-related decisions - on their own or together with others - reflecting their attitudes and lifestyle. To adequately serve this purpose, health information must be evidence-based. A working group from the German Network for Evidence-based Medicine (Deutsches Netzwerk Evidenzbasierte Medizin) has developed a first draft of good practice guidelines for health information (Gute Praxis Gesundheitsinformation) with the aim of providing support for authors and publishers of evidence-based health information. The group included researchers, patient representatives, journalists and developers of health information. The criteria for evidence-based health information were developed and agreed upon within this author group, and then made available for public comment. All submitted comments were documented and assessed regarding the need to revise or amend the draft. Changes were subsequently implemented following approval by the author group. Gute Praxis Gesundheitsinformation calls for a transparent methodological approach in the development of health information. To achieve this, evidence-based information must be based on (a) a systematic literature search, (b) a justified selection of evidence, (c) unbiased reporting of relevant results, (d) appropriate factual and linguistic communication of uncertainties, (e) either avoidance of any direct recommendations or a strict division between the reporting of results and the derivation of recommendations, (f) the consideration of current evidence on the communication of figures, risks and probabilities, and (g) transparent information about the authors and publishers of the health information, including their funding sources. Gute Praxis Gesundheitsinformation lists a total of 16 aspects to be addressed

  16. Occupational health in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed Central

    Christiani, D C

    1984-01-01

    China's drive to modernize its economy will produce new occupational health problems even as it resolves earlier ones. Well aware of this, Chinese occupational health experts are intensifying efforts to improve workers' health and establish a modern occupational health program. Occupational lung disease, occupational cancer, heavy metal poisoning, industrial chemical poisoning, and physical factor-induced diseases (noise and heat) have all been targeted for expanded research which will serve as a basis for standard setting. Hazard control efforts include engineering controls, particularly in new construction, limited use of personal protective equipment, and expansion of environmental and medical monitoring. Worker education and professional activities have been expanded. International exchanges have been initiated and will prove occupational health a promising area of scientific cooperation. PMID:6228153

  17. Occupational health priorities for health standards: the current NIOSH approach.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, J L; Rose, V E

    1979-01-01

    Government agencies responsible for protecting the public from the adverse effects of toxic chemicals must set priorities for research, regulatory action, protocol testing, and monitoring due to the vast number of toxic chemicals and the limited resources available to these agencies. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) must set priorities for research on hazards encountered in the workplace. Priorities are also utilized by NIOSH in preparing criteria for recommended occupational standards which are forwarded to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor, for possible promulgation. For various reasons, including rapidly changing conditions in the American workplace, NIOSH has instituted a revised priorities program. In the future, NIOSH research and recommended standards activities will focus not only on individual chemicals, but also on industries, occupations, chemical classes, and general industrial processes. NIOSH has also implemented a new program which will allow recommended control procedures for certain chemicals to be forwarded to OSHA in a shorter time period than has been experienced previously. PMID:434273

  18. Occupational health nurses' work and expertise in Finland: occupational health nurses' perspective.

    PubMed

    Naumanen-Tuomela, P

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Finnish occupational health nurses' (OHNs) work in terms of its contents, characteristics, necessities, meanings, development areas, changes, and expertise. The data were gathered via essays handwritten by OHNs (n = 20). Qualitative content analysis revealed that occupational health nursing practice included work with individuals, work communities, and various collaborative partners, office tasks, and other duties. Responses about OHNs' work were classified as characteristics of OHNs and of their work with advantages as well as disadvantages. The work of OHNs requires a multidisciplinary knowledge basis, professional skills, certain personal characteristics, and other features. These should be maintained and developed through continual education. The outcomes of OHNs' work were better health and healthier habits for employers, higher productivity for employers and occupational health care units, and health care savings for society. The most significant change that has occurred over the last 20 years was the move from an individual and medicine orientation toward a focus on the work community and on nursing. Expert OHNs were expected to be competent and multiskilled professionals who apply multidisciplinary knowledge in practice. This study brought out the need for further study with a focus on the client's perspective. PMID:11285105

  19. A search strategy for occupational health intervention studies

    PubMed Central

    Verbeek, J; Salmi, J; Pasternack, I; Jauhiainen, M; Laamanen, I; Schaafsma, F; Hulshof, C; van Dijk, F

    2005-01-01

    Background: As a result of low numbers and diversity in study type, occupational health intervention studies are not easy to locate in electronic literature databases. Aim: To develop a search strategy that facilitates finding occupational health intervention studies in Medline, both for researchers and practitioners. Methods: A gold standard of articles was created by going through two whole volumes of 19 biomedical journals, both occupational health specialty and non-occupational health journals. Criteria for occupational health intervention studies were: evaluating an intervention with an occupational health outcome and a study design with a control group. Each journal was searched independently by two of the authors. Search terms were developed by asking specialists and counting word frequencies in gold standard articles. Results: Out of 11 022 articles published we found 149 occupational health intervention studies. The most sensitive single terms were work*[tw] (sensitivity 71%, specificity 88%) and effect*[tw] (sensitivity 75%, specificity 63%). The most sensitive string was (effect*[tw] OR control*[tw] OR evaluation*[tw] OR program*[tw]) AND (work*[tw] OR occupation*[tw] OR prevention*[tw] OR protect*[tw]) (sensitivity 89%, specificity 78%). The most specific single terms were "occupational health"[tw] (sensitivity 22%, specificity 98%) and effectiveness[tw] (sensitivity 22%, specificity 98%). The most specific string was (program[tw] OR "prevention and control"[sh]) AND (occupational[tw] OR worker*[tw]) (sensitivity 47%, specificity 98%). Conclusion: No single search terms are available that can locate occupational health intervention studies sufficiently. The authors' search strings have acceptable sensitivity and specificity to be used by researchers and practitioners respectively. Redefinition and elaboration of keywords in Medline could greatly facilitate the location of occupational health intervention studies. PMID:16169913

  20. Code of Sustainable Practice in Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety for Corporations.

    PubMed

    Castleman, Barry; Allen, Barbara; Barca, Stefania; Bohme, Susanna Rankin; Henry, Emmanuel; Kaur, Amarjit; Massard-Guilbaud, Genvieve; Melling, Joseph; Menendez-Navarro, Alfredo; Renfrew, Daniel; Santiago, Myrna; Sellers, Christopher; Tweedale, Geoffrey; Zalik, Anna; Zavestoski, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    At a conference held at Stony Brook University in December 2007, "Dangerous Trade: Histories of Industrial Hazard across a Globalizing World," participants endorsed a Code of Sustainable Practice in Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety for Corporations. The Code outlines practices that would ensure corporations enact the highest health and environmentally protective measures in all the locations in which they operate. Corporations should observe international guidelines on occupational exposure to air contaminants, plant safety, air and water pollutant releases, hazardous waste disposal practices, remediation of polluted sites, public disclosure of toxic releases, product hazard labeling, sale of products for specific uses, storage and transport of toxic intermediates and products, corporate safety and health auditing, and corporate environmental auditing. Protective measures in all locations should be consonant with the most protective measures applied anywhere in the world, and should apply to the corporations' subsidiaries, contractors, suppliers, distributors, and licensees of technology. Key words: corporations, sustainability, environmental protection, occupational health, code of practice. PMID:18686726

  1. Behavioral health leadership: new directions in occupational mental health.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amy B; Saboe, Kristin N; Anderson, James; Sipos, Maurice L; Thomas, Jeffrey L

    2014-10-01

    The impact of stress on mental health in high-risk occupations may be mitigated by organizational factors such as leadership. Studies have documented the impact of general leadership skills on employee performance and mental health. Other researchers have begun examining specific leadership domains that address relevant organizational outcomes, such as safety climate leadership. One emerging approach focuses on domain-specific leadership behaviors that may moderate the impact of combat deployment on mental health. In a recent study, US soldiers deployed to Afghanistan rated leaders on behaviors promoting management of combat operational stress. When soldiers rated their leaders high on these behaviors, soldiers also reported better mental health and feeling more comfortable with the idea of seeking mental health treatment. These associations held even after controlling for overall leadership ratings. Operational stress leader behaviors also moderated the relationship between combat exposure and soldier health. Domain-specific leadership offers an important step in identifying measures to moderate the impact of high-risk occupations on employee health.

  2. Hand VR Exergame for Occupational Health Care.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Saskia; Uribe-Quevedo, Alvaro; Kapralos, Bill

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use and ubiquity of mobile computing technologies such as smartphones, tablets, laptops and portable gaming consoles has led to an increase in musculoskeletal disorders due to overuse, bad posture, repetitive movements, fixed postures and physical de-conditioning caused by low muscular demands while using (and over-using) these devices. In this paper we present the development of a hand motion-based virtual reality-based exergame for occupational health purposes that allows the user to perform simple exercises using a cost-effective non-invasive motion capture device to help overcome and prevent some of the muskoloskeletal problems associated with the over-use of keyboards and mobile devices. PMID:27046592

  3. Gender issues on occupational safety and health.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Eugenio; Vona, Rosa; Monterosso, Davide; Giammarioli, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing proportion of women in the workforce raises a range of gender-related questions about the different effects of work-related risks on men and women. Few studies have characterized gender differences across occupations and industries, although at this time, the gender sensitive approach is starting to acquire relevance in the field of human preventive medicine. The European Agency for Safety and Health at Work has encouraged a policy of gender equality in all European member states. Italy has adopted European provisions with new specific legislation that integrates the previous laws and introduces the gender differences into the workplace. Despite the fact that gender equal legislation opportunities have been enacted in Italy, their application is delayed by some difficulties. This review examines some of these critical aspects. PMID:27364393

  4. Hand VR Exergame for Occupational Health Care.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Saskia; Uribe-Quevedo, Alvaro; Kapralos, Bill

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use and ubiquity of mobile computing technologies such as smartphones, tablets, laptops and portable gaming consoles has led to an increase in musculoskeletal disorders due to overuse, bad posture, repetitive movements, fixed postures and physical de-conditioning caused by low muscular demands while using (and over-using) these devices. In this paper we present the development of a hand motion-based virtual reality-based exergame for occupational health purposes that allows the user to perform simple exercises using a cost-effective non-invasive motion capture device to help overcome and prevent some of the muskoloskeletal problems associated with the over-use of keyboards and mobile devices.

  5. Efficiency of workplace surveys conducted by Finnish occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Savinainen, Minna; Oksa, Panu

    2011-07-01

    In Finland, workplace surveys are used to identify and assess health risks and problems caused by work and make suggestions for continuous improvement of the work environment. With the aid of the workplace survey, occupational health services can be tailored to a company. The aims of this study were to determine how occupational health professionals gather data via the workplace survey and the effect survey results have on companies. A total of 259 occupational health nurses and 108 occupational health physicians responded to the questionnaire: 84.2% were women and 15.8% were men. The mean age of the respondents was 48.8 years (range, 26 to 65 years). Usually occupational health nurses and foremen and sometimes occupational health physicians and occupational safety and health representatives initiate the workplace survey. More than 90% of the surveys were followed by action proposals, and about 50% of these were implemented. The proposals implemented most often concerned personal protective equipment and less often leadership. Survey respondents should have both the opportunity and the authority to affect resources, the work environment, work arrangements, and tools. Teamwork among occupational health and safety professionals, management, and employees is vital for cost-effectively solving today's complex problems at workplaces around the globe. PMID:21710956

  6. Efficiency of workplace surveys conducted by Finnish occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Savinainen, Minna; Oksa, Panu

    2011-07-01

    In Finland, workplace surveys are used to identify and assess health risks and problems caused by work and make suggestions for continuous improvement of the work environment. With the aid of the workplace survey, occupational health services can be tailored to a company. The aims of this study were to determine how occupational health professionals gather data via the workplace survey and the effect survey results have on companies. A total of 259 occupational health nurses and 108 occupational health physicians responded to the questionnaire: 84.2% were women and 15.8% were men. The mean age of the respondents was 48.8 years (range, 26 to 65 years). Usually occupational health nurses and foremen and sometimes occupational health physicians and occupational safety and health representatives initiate the workplace survey. More than 90% of the surveys were followed by action proposals, and about 50% of these were implemented. The proposals implemented most often concerned personal protective equipment and less often leadership. Survey respondents should have both the opportunity and the authority to affect resources, the work environment, work arrangements, and tools. Teamwork among occupational health and safety professionals, management, and employees is vital for cost-effectively solving today's complex problems at workplaces around the globe.

  7. Challenges facing occupational health services in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Westerholm, P

    1999-12-01

    The mission and tasks of occupational health services are reviewed in the context of the global megatrends of productivity increase, population overgrowth, and the implications of changes in the technology of information and communication. Current trends in attempts to achieve harmonization with respect to the concept and tasks of occupational health services in the European Union are described, along with the basic features of occupational health services as a human service organization with implications for the setting of objectives and criteria for assessing quality and performance and ethics. The need to adopt a quality-focused approach to occupational health service programs is emphasized, and some of the inhibitions and obstacles to quality work are mentioned. The need for professional commitment to develop and implement quality concepts is outlined. Evidence-based health care in the setting of occupational health services and some salient aspects of professional ethics in the 21st century are commented on.

  8. Curriculum Guide for Health Occupations Education. Revised and Expanded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyler, Charles; Swinney, Peggy

    Designed to emphasize the acquisition of job skills, job-practical knowledge, job-theoretical knowledge, and associative needs, this curriculum guide for health occupations education utilizes principles of competency-based education and is reflective of a training model approach to health occupations education. The first of three major parts…

  9. Stepping Up Occupational Safety and Health Through Employee Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Gary R.

    1986-01-01

    The effectiveness of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 is examined, and it is suggested that employee participation could help improve occupational safety and health in the future, through safety committees, safety circles, safety teams, and individual participation. (MSE)

  10. Software for the occupational health and safety integrated management system

    SciTech Connect

    Vătăsescu, Mihaela

    2015-03-10

    This paper intends to present the design and the production of a software for the Occupational Health and Safety Integrated Management System with the view to a rapid drawing up of the system documents in the field of occupational health and safety.

  11. 77 FR 22358 - Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Health Act of 1970 (29 U.S.C. 653, 655, 657), 29 CFR part 1911, and Secretary's Order 1-2012 (77 FR 3912... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Preparations for the 23rd Session of the UN Sub-Committee of... Stakeholder Input for the Regulatory Coordination Council (RCC) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and...

  12. Occupational Safety and Health Systems: A Three-Country Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    This article compares the occupational safety and health systems of Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States, looking at the origins of their legislation and its effects on occupational safety and health, with a view to determining what lessons may emerge, particularly for developing countries. (Author/SSH)

  13. Licensed Practical Nurses in Occupational Health. An Initial Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jane A.; And Others

    The study, conducted in 1971, assessed characteristics of licensed practical nurses (LPN's) who worked in occupational health nursing. The survey instrument, a questionnaire, was returned by 591 LPN's in occupational health and provided data related to: personal characteristics, work and setting, administrative and professional functioning,…

  14. Marital Status and Occupational Success Among Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, John H.; Spray, S. Lee

    1970-01-01

    Concludes that personal relations, professional experiences and occupational success form a network of relationships which integrate the occupational and nonoccupational roles of highly specialized practitioners. Part of a Study of Careers in the Mental Health Field, supported by National Institute of Mental Health Grant MH-09192 and directed by…

  15. Needlestick and occupational exposure to infections: a compendium of current guidelines.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, L; Scully, C

    2013-08-01

    Needlestick and occupational exposure to infections is a constant threat in dental practice. Many blood-borne infections, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, hepatitis B and hepatitis C, may be contracted through this route. We provide here a useful compendium for dental practitioners on current guidelines available to obviate such threats, as well as a simple flowchart on prophylactic measures that could be taken after an accidental exposure.

  16. A Bibliographic Guide to Occupational Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pease, Sue

    1981-01-01

    Lists government publications, periodicals, loose-leaf services, reports, and reference materials dealing with health and safety in the work environment. Addresses for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration regional offices are provided. (FM)

  17. Ethics in occupational health: deliberations of an international workgroup addressing challenges in an African context

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background International codes of ethics play an important role in guiding professional practice in developing countries. In the occupational health setting, codes developed by international agencies have substantial import on protecting working populations from harm. This is particularly so under globalisation which has transformed processes of production in fundamental ways across the globe. As part of the process of revising the Ethical Code of the International Commission on Occupational Health, an Africa Working Group addressed key challenges for the relevance and cogency of an ethical code in occupational health for an African context through an iterative consultative process. Discussion Firstly, even in the absence of strong legal systems of enforcement, and notwithstanding the value of legal institutionalisation of ethical codes, guidelines alone may offer advantageous routes to enhancing ethical practice in occupational health. Secondly, globalisation has particularly impacted on health and safety at workplaces in Africa, challenging occupational health professionals to be sensitive to, and actively redress imbalance of power. Thirdly, the different ways in which vulnerability is exemplified in the workplace in Africa often places the occupational health professional in invidious positions of Dual Loyalty. Fourth, the particular cultural emphasis in traditional African societies on collective responsibilities within the community impacts directly on how consent should be sought in occupational health practice, and how stigma should be dealt with, balancing individual autonomy with ideas of personhood that are more collective as in the African philosophy of ubuntu. To address stigma, practitioners need to be additionally sensitive to how power imbalances at the workplace intersect with traditional cultural norms related to solidarity. Lastly, particularly in the African context, the inseparability of workplace and community means that efforts to address

  18. Posttraumatic stress disorder in reserve veterans: important reintegration considerations for the occupational health nurse.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Lynn A; Burns, Candace

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious mental health concern for returning U.S. military personnel who have a higher prevalence rate of PTSD than the general population. Among the military population, reserve service members are at increased risk of developing PTSD compared with full-time active duty service members mainly due to difficulty reintegrating into civilian life. Understanding the social risk factors along with the protective effects social support has on PTSD in veterans will provide occupational health professionals the opportunity to support reserve veterans with adjustment into post-deployment life. This literature review examines PTSD in reserve veterans, with a focus on occupational factors, social factors, guideline recommendations, available resources, as well as provides suggestions for occupational health nurses caring for reserve veterans returning to the workplace.

  19. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Dental Assisting. Occupation: Dental Assistant. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathrop, Janice

    This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (dental assistant) in the dental assisting cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing…

  20. The occupational health service. Staffing, facilities, and equipment.

    PubMed

    Rieth, L K

    2000-08-01

    An occupational health service can be an integral part of any company. It is incumbent on the industry to conduct a thorough assessment of the need for such a service and then support the service from a financial and resource perspective. Consequently, staffing and equipping an occupational health service adequately are dependent on the services to be delivered and the type of professional staff hired. All occupational health programs can be conducted in a cost effective manner when the goals and mission are in alignment with company goals, management supports appropriate funding, and space supports the delivery of quality health care.

  1. Shift work and employee fatigue: implications for occupational health nursing.

    PubMed

    Yumang-Ross, Doreen J; Burns, Candace

    2014-06-01

    Long work hours and irregular shifts are part of the nation's 24-hour society and contribute to employee fatigue. Factors affecting employee fatigue are circadian rhythm, sleep quality and quantity, individual health, the environment, and work tasks. Employee fatigue contributes to accidents and injuries, and affects occupational performance, safety, and health. These findings should be used by occupational health nurses to address fatigue management and develop comprehensive fatigue management programs.

  2. Occupational health research priorities in Malaysia: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Sadhra, S; Beach, J; Aw, T; Sheikh-Ahmed, K

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—As part of a consultancy project on occupational health, the Delphi method was used to identify research priorities in occupational health in Malaysia.
METHODS—Participation was sought from government ministries, industry, and professional organisations, and university departments with an interest in occupational and public health. Two rounds of questionnaires resulted in a final list of priorities, with noticeable differences between participants depending on whether they worked in industry or were from government organisations.
RESULTS—The participation rate of 71% (55 of 78) was obtained for the first questionnaire and 76% (72 of 95) for the second questionnaire. The participants identified occupational health problems for specific groups and industries as the top research priority area (ranked as top priority by 25% of participants). Ministry of Health participants placed emphasis on healthcare workers (52% ranking it as top priority), whereas those from industry identified construction and plantation workers as groups, which should be accorded the highest priority. Evaluation of research and services was given a low priority.
CONCLUSIONS—The priorities for occupational health determined with the Delphi approach showed differences between Malaysia, a developing country, and findings from similar European studies. This may be expected, as differences exist in stages of economic development, types of industries, occupational activities, and cultural attitudes to occupational health and safety. Chemical poisonings and workplace accidents were accorded a high priority. By contrast with findings from western countries, workplace psychosocial problems and musculoskeletal injuries were deemed less important. There also seemed to be greater emphasis on adopting interventions for identified problems based on experience in other countries rather than the need to evaluate local occupational health provisions.


Keywords: occupational

  3. Smoking and occupation from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, S; Sunyer, J; Zock, J; Anto, J; Kogevinas, M; European, C

    2003-01-01

    Background: Smoking is among the most important personal and modifiable risk factors for adverse health outcomes. The workplace offers a potentially effective venue for tobacco prevention programmes; identifying occupational groups with high smoking prevalence may assist in targeting such programmes. Aims: To examine smoking prevalence among occupational groups in the European Union. Methods: The European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS), a cross sectional health survey conducted in 1992–93, was used to examine smoking prevalence by occupation among 14 565 subjects from 30 centres in 14 participating countries. Results: There was an approximately twofold range in smoking prevalence by occupation. For occupational groups with at least 50 subjects, the highest smoking prevalence was seen in metal making and treating for men (54.3%) and cleaners for women (50.7%). Increased smoking prevalence by occupation persisted after adjustment for age, country, and age at completion of education. Smoking was also increased among occupations with high exposure to mineral dust and gas or fumes. Conclusions: Smoking rates vary significantly by occupation. Prevention efforts in the workplace should focus on occupations with high smoking prevalence and large employment bases. PMID:12937184

  4. The evolution of occupational health and the role of government.

    PubMed

    Wade, R

    1982-12-01

    Concern for the protection of workers' health is not new to medicine. Physicians in the 1400's raised awareness among colleagues as to the need to prevent the diseases of employment in mines. Society has responded to increasing levels of evidence as to the relationships between disease and certain worksites by making employers accountable for the individual and social costs incurred by poor workplace hygiene. This has occurred by the development of workers' compensation and occupational health and safety regulatory programs. The impact of these efforts has been to significantly reduce occupational disease and safety problems in industry. Increasing resources have also been given to the training of physicians in occupational medicine and research into links between occupations and disease. Increasing pressure to reduce public spending and to deregulate are challenging government's ability to continue research, training, technical information distribution, consultation and regulatory cleanup efforts to improve work conditions and thus reduce the incidence of occupational safety and health problems.

  5. Health and safety implications of occupational exposure to engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Stebounova, Larissa V; Morgan, Hallie; Grassian, Vicki H; Brenner, Sara

    2012-01-01

    The rapid growth and commercialization of nanotechnology are currently outpacing health and safety recommendations for engineered nanomaterials. As the production and use of nanomaterials increase, so does the possibility that there will be exposure of workers and the public to these materials. This review provides a summary of current research and regulatory efforts related to occupational exposure and medical surveillance for the nanotechnology workforce, focusing on the most prevalent industrial nanomaterials currently moving through the research, development, and manufacturing pipelines. Their applications and usage precedes a discussion of occupational health and safety efforts, including exposure assessment, occupational health surveillance, and regulatory considerations for these nanomaterials.

  6. [Developmental status and goals in occupational therapy. The "Guidelines for Occupational Therapy in Psychiatric Hospitals"].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, K; Kunze, H

    1987-01-01

    Work therapy, or ergotherapy, is a recognised and permanent part of psychiatric treatment and medical rehabilitation. It is also an essential part of psychiatric diagnosis and therapy; furthermore, it enables the patient to develop and stabilise a realistic image of himself and contributes to the prevention and reduction of damage caused by hospitalism. The present status of work therapy was checked in 74 psychiatric hospitals throughout the Federal Republic of Germany, resulting in the need for further development of present practical procedures. A working group was created by the Federal Ministry of Labour and National Welfare within the framework of the model programme for psychiatry, at the suggestion of a Federal Working Group of the organisations running public mental hospitals in the FRG. The aim of this working group was to develop a specialised concept of work therapy. The group consisted of experts from clinical practice as well as from the Federal German Labour Office Institution, psychiatric consultants of the Federal Government and the Land Governments, as well as from the Land Government sponsors of state social welfare services. The "Guidelines for Work Therapy in Psychiatric Hospitals and Departments of Psychiatry" are officially considered to be a suitable basis for further development work in the field of ergotherapy.

  7. Health Care. Georgia Core Standards for Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Occupational Studies.

    This document lists core standards and occupational knowledge and skills that have been identified/validated by industry as necessary to all Georgia students in secondary-level health care occupations programs. First, foundation skills are grouped as follows: basic skills (reading, writing, arithmetic/mathematics, listening, speaking); thinking…

  8. A case of standardization? Implementing health promotion guidelines in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Rod, Morten Hulvej; Høybye, Mette Terp

    2016-09-01

    Guidelines are increasingly used in an effort to standardize and systematize health practices at the local level and to promote evidence-based practice. The implementation of guidelines frequently faces problems, however, and standardization processes may in general have other outcomes than the ones envisioned by the makers of standards. In 2012, the Danish National Health Authorities introduced a set of health promotion guidelines that were meant to guide the decision making and priority setting of Denmark's 98 local governments. The guidelines provided recommendations for health promotion policies and interventions and were structured according to risk factors such as alcohol, smoking and physical activity. This article examines the process of implementation of the new Danish health promotion guidelines. The article is based on qualitative interviews and participant observation, focusing on the professional practices of health promotion officers in four local governments as well as the field of Danish health promotion more generally. The analysis highlights practices and episodes related to the implementation of the guidelines and takes inspiration from Timmermans and Epstein's sociology of standards and standardization. It remains an open question whether or not the guidelines lead to more standardized policies and interventions, but we suggest that the guidelines promote a risk factor-oriented approach as the dominant frame for knowledge, reasoning, decision making and priority setting in health promotion. We describe this process as a case of epistemic standardization. PMID:25912256

  9. Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Goh, S Y; Ang, S B; Bee, Y M; Chen, Y T; Gardner, D S; Ho, E T; Adaikan, K; Lee, Y C; Lee, C H; Lim, F S; Lim, H B; Lim, S C; Seow, J; Soh, A W; Sum, C F; Tai, E S; Thai, A C; Wong, T Y; Yap, F

    2014-06-01

    The Ministry of Health (MOH) have updated the clinical practice guidelines on Diabetes Mellitus to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for diabetes mellitus. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on Diabetes Mellitus, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

  10. Occupational Pesticide Exposures and Respiratory Health

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ming; Beach, Jeremy; Martin, Jonathan W.; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides have been widely used to control pest and pest-related diseases in agriculture, fishery, forestry and the food industry. In this review, we identify a number of respiratory symptoms and diseases that have been associated with occupational pesticide exposures. Impaired lung function has also been observed among people occupationally exposed to pesticides. There was strong evidence for an association between occupational pesticide exposure and asthma, especially in agricultural occupations. In addition, we found suggestive evidence for a link between occupational pesticide exposure and chronic bronchitis or COPD. There was inconclusive evidence for the association between occupational pesticide exposure and lung cancer. Better control of pesticide uses and enforcement of safety behaviors, such as using personal protection equipment (PPE) in the workplace, are critical for reducing the risk of developing pesticide-related symptoms and diseases. Educational training programs focusing on basic safety precautions and proper uses of personal protection equipment (PPE) are possible interventions that could be used to control the respiratory diseases associated with pesticide exposure in occupational setting. PMID:24287863

  11. Legal regulations on occupational health system in Poland.

    PubMed

    Dawydzik, L T

    2001-01-01

    Occupational health care has a long tradition in Poland. It has evolved from the industrial health care system established in the post-war period to a modern system defined in the Occupational Health Services Act of 1997. When the process of political and economic transformation began in Poland in 1989, the reforms of the workers' health care became inevitable. The process of introducing and implementing new legal regulations comprised three phases: 1. Introduction of amendments to the Polish Labor Code, according to which employers are now committed to provide their workers with occupational health services (OHS) appropriate to given working conditions. 2. Incorporation into the 1991 Health Care Institutions Act the provisions which allow for the establishment of alternative non-public structures responsible for the health care of the working population. 3. Adoption of the Occupational Health Services Act in 1997, the most important law providing grounds for establishing a most comprehensive system of occupational health services. The Occupational Health Services Act introduces, for the first time, the concept of the OHS system that encompasses the whole working population. The Act outlines a broad range of OHS competences; defines individual tasks; and provides the up-to-date definition of the OHS structure with its two organizational levels, consisting of primary and regional occupational health centers. In addition, the Act specifies the sources of finance for the accomplishment of the defined tasks. Pursuant to the provisions of the Act, OHS units co-operate with employers and employees, bodies supervising working conditions and other organizations involved in occupational health that become their partners in activities aimed at protecting and promoting health of workers. In order to further develop the workers' health care system its constant adaptation to changing conditions is absolutely necessary through: developing modern training for specialists in the

  12. Legal regulations on occupational health system in Poland.

    PubMed

    Dawydzik, L T

    2001-01-01

    Occupational health care has a long tradition in Poland. It has evolved from the industrial health care system established in the post-war period to a modern system defined in the Occupational Health Services Act of 1997. When the process of political and economic transformation began in Poland in 1989, the reforms of the workers' health care became inevitable. The process of introducing and implementing new legal regulations comprised three phases: 1. Introduction of amendments to the Polish Labor Code, according to which employers are now committed to provide their workers with occupational health services (OHS) appropriate to given working conditions. 2. Incorporation into the 1991 Health Care Institutions Act the provisions which allow for the establishment of alternative non-public structures responsible for the health care of the working population. 3. Adoption of the Occupational Health Services Act in 1997, the most important law providing grounds for establishing a most comprehensive system of occupational health services. The Occupational Health Services Act introduces, for the first time, the concept of the OHS system that encompasses the whole working population. The Act outlines a broad range of OHS competences; defines individual tasks; and provides the up-to-date definition of the OHS structure with its two organizational levels, consisting of primary and regional occupational health centers. In addition, the Act specifies the sources of finance for the accomplishment of the defined tasks. Pursuant to the provisions of the Act, OHS units co-operate with employers and employees, bodies supervising working conditions and other organizations involved in occupational health that become their partners in activities aimed at protecting and promoting health of workers. In order to further develop the workers' health care system its constant adaptation to changing conditions is absolutely necessary through: developing modern training for specialists in the

  13. The physician-owned occupational health department.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Robert B

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a process to evaluate the likelihood of establishing a financially viable occupational medicine program (OMP), and discusses opportunities in which the occupational medicine clinic can partner with employers to help them to reduce the occurrence of work-related injuries and provide a safer work environment. Not all germane topics are discussed-employers must address safety and ergonomic issues within the workplace as well as those that a successful OMP is designed to address. However, the OMP should be a readily available resource for any of these issues. Common occupational challenges and opportunities also are examined. PMID:18061770

  14. [Occupational dermatitis in health care personnel].

    PubMed

    Barbaud, Annick

    2002-09-01

    Occupational dermatosis are frequent among healthcare workers. Irritant hand dermatitis is more common than allergic contact dermatitis. It is enhanced by the exposure to irritants: water, detergents, disinfectants and a history of atopic dermatitis. Natural rubber latex contained in rubber gloves can induce contact urticaria or generalized immediate allergic reactions. Contact eczema can be induced by rubber accelerators such as thiurams, disinfectants (glutaraldehyde, dodecyldimethylammonium). Nurses can become sensitized to handled drugs (antibiotics, propacetamol...). These occupational allergies have to be diagnosed, because sensitized nurses can develop severe generalized cutaneous adverse drug reactions if they are systemically exposed to the same drug than those that has previously induced an occupational contact allergy. PMID:12385152

  15. Occupational health concerns in the welding industry.

    PubMed

    Korczynski, R E

    2000-12-01

    The Workplace Safety and Health Branch initiated a proactive study in the welding industry in Manitoba. Eight welding companies participated in this study. Health concerns raised by welders were welders' flash, sore/red/teary eyes, headaches, nosebleeds, and a black mucous discharge from their nasal membrane. Most welders expressed concern regarding excessive smoke levels in the workplace and inadequate ventilation. Types of welding identified were MIG mild steel, MIG stainless steel, and TIG aluminum. Monitoring involved an assessment of noise levels, fume composition, and carbon monoxide and ozone concentrations. Metal analyses were according to National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method 7300. Noise dosimeters used were the Quest model 100 and Micro 14 & 15. Carbon monoxide was monitored using the Gastech Model 4700 and ozone using the AID Portable Ozone Meter Model 560. In Manitoba, a hearing conservation program is required when the equivalent sound exposure level (normalized Lex 8-hr) exceeds 80 dBA-weighted. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' threshold limit value-time weighted average (ACGIH TLV-TWA) for iron is 5.0 mg/m3, manganese is 0.2 mg/m3, carbon monoxide is 25 ppm, and ozone is 0.05 ppm (heavy work), 0.08 ppm (moderate work), and 0.1 ppm (light work). Welders' personal exposures to manganese ranged from 0.01-4.93 mg/m3 (N = 42; AM = 0.5; GM = 0.2; SD +/- 0.9; GSD +/- 3.2) and to iron ranged from 0.04-16.29 mg/m3 (N = 42; AM = 3.0; GM = 1.4; SD +/- 3.5; GSD +/- 2.5). Noise exposures ranged from 79-98 dBA (N = 44; AM = 88.9; GM = 88.8; SD +/- 4.2; GSD +/- 1.0). Carbon monoxide levels were less than 5.0 ppm (at source) and ozone levels varied from 0.4-0.6 ppm (at source). Ventilation upgrades in the workplace were required in most welding shops. Only 7 percent of the welders wore respiratory protection. A hearing conservation program and hearing protection were required at all monitored workplaces.

  16. [Occupational physicians' system in the United kingdom and fit note to promote access to occupational health services].

    PubMed

    Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Muramatsu, Keiji; Matsuda, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    The Statement of Fitness for Work (Fit Note) policy was started in the UK in 2010 in order to promote return to work after sickness absence. Fit Note is issued by General Practitioners (GP). We conducted an interview survey of 2 occupational physicians working in the UK to ascertain the impact of the introduction of Fit Note on occupational health in the UK. They regard the low coverage of occupational health services in the UK, especially among small companies and self-employed workers, as a serious issue. Fit Note was regarded as a tool to induce GPs to participate in occupational health services, and it is expected that they will be new partners in occupational health. The English occupational physicians evaluated the Fit Note system highly, and believe that the increasing participation of GPs in occupational health services will be a steady advancement in occupational health in the UK. PMID:24334697

  17. Occupational and environmental health nursing: ethics and professionalism.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie

    2012-04-01

    This article provides an overview of ethical issues related to the practice of occupational and environmental health nursing and possible strategies for resolution. Also, professionalism related to professional growth and advancing the specialty is discussed.

  18. Workplace Safety and Health Topics: Industries and Occupations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH Industries & Occupations Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Agriculture ... Health Fatalities in the Oil and Gas Extraction Industry Fire Fighters Resources Directory Flight Crew Research Program ...

  19. Development of an occupational health data base system.

    PubMed

    Dye, B J; Lombard, R A; Worthy, C D

    1983-06-01

    Operational concerns, coupled with rising workers' compensation costs and the proliferation of regulatory requirements, call for a new approach to occupational health data base management. To meet this challenge, an automated system to store and manage worker and workplace exposure data is being developed. The system will include individual minicomputers at local Air Force bases and a central host computer for long-term storage and retrieval. The first step in establishing this data base is the standardization of data entry and storage at base level. This manual system, known as the Standardized Occupational Health Program (SOHP), serves as the basic building block for the Computerized Occupational Health Program (COHP). Standardization and automation of all relevant industrial hygiene, occupational medicine, and environmental data will significantly enhance the flow of information needed by those charged with providing a healthful work environment for Air Force personnel.

  20. Allied Health Occupations I (Health Assistant). Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a first-year course in allied health occupations education that is intended to prepare students for entry-level employment in such allied health occupations as nurse's aide and health assistant. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: health worker…

  1. Functions and Positions of Corporate Occupational Health Managers in Company-Wide Occupational Health Management.

    PubMed

    Mori, Koji; Nagata, Tomohisa; Kajiki, Shigeyuki; Hino, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Masako

    2013-08-21

    Objectives: It has become necessary for Japanese corporations to manage occupational health (OH) programs consistently throughout their organizations. Corporations need to clarify their health policies, develop standardized programs, assign OH staff, and ensure that they communicate with each other. To realize such conditions, many occupational physicians (OPs), who have the skills to lead corporation-wide OH activities, are now being assigned to head offices of corporations and referred to as corporate OH managers. However, there has been no research to date in Japan on their actual situation and function. We conducted an interview study of corporate OH managers to clarify their functions and positions in corporations. Subjects and Methods: We conducted semi-structural interviews with 14 corporate OH managers in large corporations employing more than 5,000 workers and multiple OPs. Interview scripts were coded to identify their functions as corporate OH managers and the context of their positions within corporate-wide OH management systems. Results: Five contexts were suggested. 1) Corporate OH managers played central roles in developing corporate health policies, standards and plans. 2) Head office department managers who supervised the sites distributed the policies and standards, and corporate OH managers instructed site OPs and OH staff. 3) In some corporations, corporate OH managers participated in the evaluation process of OH programs as part of occupational safety and health management systems or business audits. 4) Corporate OH managers led communications among OPs and OH staff by facilitating corporate OH meetings, and provided technical training. 5) Corporate OH managers in positions that enabled them to report directly or indirectly to decision makers (i.e., directors in charge) on human resource issues. Discussion: The results of this study suggest that companies that promote consistent company-wide OH programs also utilized the professional knowledge

  2. Proceedings of the 1992 Annual Meeting NASA Occupational Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to exchange information across NASA facilities that is critical to agency-wide improvement in the efforts to maintain and enhance employee health. The topics covered include the following: occupational medicine, environmental health, physical fitness, and health education.

  3. 78 FR 56235 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section...). Place: Embassy Suites, 1900 Diagonal Road, Alexandria, Virginia 22314, Telephone: (703) 684-5900, Fax... Health Study Section will review, discuss, and evaluate grant application(s) received in response to...

  4. Occupational health assessment of chromite toxicity among Indian miners

    PubMed Central

    Das, Alok Prasad; Singh, Shikha

    2011-01-01

    Elevated concentration of hexavalent chromium pollution and contamination has contributed a major health hazard affecting more than 2 lakh mine workers and inhabitants residing in the Sukinda chromite mine of Odisha, India. Despite people suffering from several forms of ill health, physical and mental deformities, constant exposure to toxic wastes and chronic diseases as a result of chromite mining, there is a tragic gap in the availability of 'scientific’ studies and data on the health hazards of mining in India. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Odisha State Pollution Control Board and the Odisha Voluntary Health Association data were used to compile the possible occupational health hazards, hexavalent chromium exposure and diseases among Sukinda chromite mines workers. Studies were reviewed to determine the routes of exposure and possible mechanism of chromium induced carcinogenicity among the workers. Our studies suggest all forms of hexavalent chromium are regarded as carcinogenic to workers however the most important routes of occupational exposure to Cr (VI) are inhalation and dermal contact. This review article outlines the physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial occupational health hazards of chromite mining and associated metallurgical processes to monitor the mining environment as well as the miners exposed to these toxicants to foster a safe work environment. The authors anticipate that the outcome of this manuscript will have an impact on Indian chromite mining industry that will subsequently bring about improvements in work conditions, develop intervention experiments in occupational health and safety programs. PMID:21808494

  5. Effective outcomes management in occupational and environmental health.

    PubMed

    Kosinski, M

    1998-10-01

    In the final analysis, outcomes management is about changing behavior, specifically in the occupational and environmental health practitioner's communication process and practice patterns and in the workers' prevention and compliance behavior. Outcomes management is also about quantifying results, establishing occupational and environmental health performance benchmarks, developing a best practices model and asking even more questions. As health care embraces the use of outcomes in evaluating its effectiveness, similar developments can be anticipated in occupational and environmental health. While occupational and environmental health outcomes management is still in its infancy, nurses in the workplace are well positioned to "shape it" into a useful tool that meets the needs of all the various practice settings. As nurses in the workplace begin to evaluate, report, and benchmark results, measurement tools will be refined, data bases will grow and new, useful benchmarks will be established. Because occupational and environmental health programs usually operate as part of a larger business unit, nurses in the workplace are continually faced with the challenge of ensuring that corporate programs including workers' compensation, health and disability benefit programs, vaccination programs, injury prevention, and health promotion or wellness programs are delivered in an efficient and cost-effective manner and that the expected outcomes are achieved. Effective outcomes management programs are the vehicles to effective goal achievement.

  6. [The role and future task of the occupational health nurse].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tomoko

    2013-10-01

    The Industrial Safety and Health Act was enacted focusing on occupational disease prevention in 1972. It has been revised over the years to include consideration of work associated diseases, and the participation and cooperation of employer and employees. From now, positive participation of employer-and-employees in occupational health activity becomes important in order to achieve the expanded purpose of the law. It is necessary to empower all workers to be able to perform occupational health activity independently. Florence Nightingale defined nursing in the 1850's. "Nursing is to put the patient in the best condition by improvement of environment, including a population approach. The goal of nursing is to enable the patient to use his faculty fully." The Public Health Nurse is, "assistance to the process of solving one's health, identifying health issues based on a community, using systematic measures which lead to prevention, and aiming at public responsibility." The daily activity of Nurses including Occupational Health Nurses (OHNs) is based on the theory and technology of "empowerment". In promoting the employer-and-employees independent Occupational Safety and Health Activity, the OHN's professional specialty of "empowerment" can play an important role.

  7. Revised Guidelines for Comprehensive Health Education, Grades 3 and 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska State Dept. of Education, Lincoln. Div. of Instructional Services.

    These health curriculum guidelines were designed for teachers of students in grades 3 and 4. Seven major topic areas are covered: 1) anatomy and physiology, 2) physical fitness, 3) the family as a basic social unit, 4) mental health, 5) drug education, 6) safety, and 7) community health. The format provides the teacher with health concepts which…

  8. Prospective evaluation of mental health training for occupational health practitioners

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Occupational health (OH) practitioners need to be confident in identifying and managing mental health problems in the workforce. Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of a one-day workshop in improving the knowledge, attitude and confidence of OH practitioners in detecting and managing depression, anxiety, suicide risk, alcohol misuse and drug abuse. Methods Interactive mental health workshops for 164 OH practitioners held in five regions in England were evaluated by self-administered questionnaire. Data were collected immediately prior to the workshop (T1), immediately after the workshop (T2) and 4 months following the workshop (T3). Results At T1, the response rate was 97% (159/164), 90% at T2 and 63% at T3. The mean improvement in participants’ knowledge was 8% (95% CI 6–10) at T2 compared with T1. The biggest improvement was in participants with no previous training in the management of common mental health problems in the workplace, mean improvement 9% (95% CI 6–12). Participants’ confidence improved in all areas assessed at T2, and the improvement in confidence compared with that at baseline was sustained at 4 months (T3). Participants reported using the knowledge gained in clinical practice in all topic areas covered. Use of knowledge gained at the workshop was significantly higher in those who had had previous training in managing common mental health disorders. Conclusions This one-day interactive workshop was a feasible and effective method of improving OH professionals’ confidence, knowledge and application of skills in practice in key areas of mental health. PMID:23447034

  9. 77 FR 22355 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of... approved. FACOSH is authorized by 5 U.S.C. 7902, section 19 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act......

  10. 78 FR 30337 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement of.... 7902; section 19 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act) (29 U.S.C. 668);...

  11. Electronic health records in an occupational health setting--part I. A global overview.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Euzelia S

    2013-02-01

    Most health care settings have focused on becoming more interconnected using technology. The same trend is occurring in occupational health settings. Using technology to enhance communications, facilitate workers' health, and measure the quality of occupational health services is advantageous to employers. The privacy and security of health information is as much the company's responsibility as protecting financial and personal data. As the health privacy agent for the employer, the occupational health nurse must have knowledge of legal regulations and professional standards that govern the security and privacy of health care information, especially when that information is collected, stored, and potentially transmitted within and outside country boundaries.

  12. Health promotion overview: evidence-based strategies for occupational health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Jill J; Snelling, Anastasia M; Kalicki, Michelle

    2014-08-01

    Health promotion practice has evolved over the past four decades in response to the rising rates of chronic disease. The focus of health promotion is attaining wellness by managing modifiable risk factors, such as smoking, diet, or physical activity. Occupational health nurses are often asked to conduct worksite health promotion programs for individuals or groups, yet may be unfamiliar with evidence-based strategies. Occupational health nurses should lead interprofessional groups in designing and implementing worksite health promotion programs. This article introduces occupational health nurses to health promotion concepts and discusses evidence-based theories and planning models that can be easily introduced into practice.

  13. The Development of Occupations in Health Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Carol Anderson

    The study examined the general question of how the place of an occupation in the economic division of labor becomes shaped and defined. The shaping was seen as basically a political process, a utilization of power in various forms by interested parties acting with the conscious intention of gaining control over the economic activity of themselves…

  14. Occupational hazards to the health of professional gardeners.

    PubMed

    Knibbs, Luke D

    2014-01-01

    Professional gardening is a broad occupation that involves a wide range of tasks. Gardeners confront an equally wide variety of physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial hazards in their workplace. Consequently, occupational injuries and mortality are unfortunately common. The aim of this brief review is to collate and summarise the main hazards of gardening, their health effects and control measures. The diversity and size of gardeners' occupational exposures to the hazards outlined in this paper highlight some of the underlying causes of their increased risk of occupational injury or death. The risk can be reduced in many cases by ensuring appropriate protective strategies are adopted. Other ways through which the burden of occupational injury and mortality can be minimised are introduced and discussed in this paper. PMID:24517285

  15. Guidelines for Fitness for Health Programs in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin.

    This publication presents approved guidelines for Texas institutions of higher and postsecondary education in the academic preparation of practitioners in the field of fitness for health. Developed in response to the rapid growth of this field, the guidelines identify and recommend the knowledge and expertise required in career preparation, and…

  16. [Taking Care of Asylum Seekers: Occupational Health Aspects with a Special Focus on Vaccination].

    PubMed

    Kolb, S; Hörmansdorfer, S; Ackermann, N; Höller, C; Brenner, B; Herr, C

    2016-04-01

    Employees and volunteers often feel insecure about the potential transmission of infectious diseases when taking care of asylum seekers. It could be shown that overall only a minor risk of infection emanates from asylum seekers. However, aspects of occupational health and vaccination should be kept in mind.Besides the standard vaccination the Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO) recommends for occupational indication, which is given for employees and volunteers in asylum facilities, vaccination against hepatitis A, hepatitis B, polio (if the last vaccination was more than 10 years before) as well as influenza (seasonal).According to the German Occupational Safety and Health Act taking care of the employer has to determine which exposures might occur at the workplace (risk assessment) and define necessary protection measures. Depending on task and exposure when taking care of asylum seekers different acts (e. g. biological agents regulation) and technical guidelines for the handling biological agents (e. g. TRBA 250 or TRBA 500) have to be applied.The Bavarian Health and Food Safety Authority (LGL) has published several information sheets regarding "asylum seekers and health management" for employees and volunteers from the non-medical as well as the medical area (www.lgl.bayern.de search term "Asylbewerber"). With theses publications insecurities in taking care of asylum seekers should be prevented. Furthermore the employer gets support in the implementation of legal obligations to ensure occupational safety for the employees. PMID:27078829

  17. 76 FR 40733 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program Science/Technical Advisory Committee...

  18. Occupational health problems among migrant and seasonal farm workers.

    PubMed Central

    Mobed, K; Gold, E B; Schenker, M B

    1992-01-01

    Migrant and seasonal farm workers are one of the most underserved and understudied populations in the United States. The total US population of such farm workers has been estimated at 5 million, of whom about 20% live or work in California. Farm workers perform strenuous tasks and are exposed to a wide variety of occupational risks and hazards. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to health care also contribute to existing health problems in this population. Potential farm work-related health problems include accidents, pesticide-related illnesses, musculoskeletal and soft-tissue disorders, dermatitis, noninfectious respiratory conditions, reproductive health problems, health problems of children of farm workers, climate-caused illnesses, communicable diseases, bladder and kidney disorders, and eye and ear problems. Few epidemiologic studies exist of these occupational health problems. No comprehensive epidemiologic studies have assessed the magnitude of occupational health problems among migrant and seasonal farm workers and their dependents. Although the migratory nature of this population makes long-term studies difficult, the development of standardized data collection instruments for health consequences and scientific assessment of farm work exposures and working conditions are vital to characterize and reduce the occupational health risks in farm workers. PMID:1413786

  19. The occupational health and safety of flight attendants.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Robin F; Powell, David M C

    2012-05-01

    In order to perform safety-critical roles in emergency situations, flight attendants should meet minimum health standards and not be impaired by factors such as fatigue. In addition, the unique occupational and environmental characteristics of flight attendant employment may have consequential occupational health and safety implications, including radiation exposure, cancer, mental ill-health, musculoskeletal injury, reproductive disorders, and symptoms from cabin air contamination. The respective roles of governments and employers in managing these are controversial. A structured literature review was undertaken to identify key themes for promoting a future agenda for flight attendant health and safety. Recommendations include breast cancer health promotion, implementation of Fatigue Risk Management Systems, standardization of data collection on radiation exposure and health outcomes, and more coordinated approaches to occupational health and safety risk management. Research is ongoing into cabin air contamination incidents, cancer, and fatigue as health and safety concerns. Concerns are raised that statutory medical certification for flight attendants will not benefit either flight safety or occupational health.

  20. The occupational health and safety of flight attendants.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Robin F; Powell, David M C

    2012-05-01

    In order to perform safety-critical roles in emergency situations, flight attendants should meet minimum health standards and not be impaired by factors such as fatigue. In addition, the unique occupational and environmental characteristics of flight attendant employment may have consequential occupational health and safety implications, including radiation exposure, cancer, mental ill-health, musculoskeletal injury, reproductive disorders, and symptoms from cabin air contamination. The respective roles of governments and employers in managing these are controversial. A structured literature review was undertaken to identify key themes for promoting a future agenda for flight attendant health and safety. Recommendations include breast cancer health promotion, implementation of Fatigue Risk Management Systems, standardization of data collection on radiation exposure and health outcomes, and more coordinated approaches to occupational health and safety risk management. Research is ongoing into cabin air contamination incidents, cancer, and fatigue as health and safety concerns. Concerns are raised that statutory medical certification for flight attendants will not benefit either flight safety or occupational health. PMID:22606869

  1. Process Evaluation of an Integrated Health Promotion/Occupational Health Model in WellWorks-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Mary Kay; Lederman, Ruth; Stoddard, Anne M.; LaMontagne, Anthony D.; McLellan, Deborah; Combe, Candace; Barbeau, Elizabeth; Sorensen, Glorian

    2005-01-01

    Disparities in chronic disease risk by occupation call for new approaches to health promotion. WellWorks-2 was a randomized, controlled study comparing the effectiveness of a health promotion/occupational health program (HP/OHS) with a standard intervention (HP). Interventions in both studies were based on the same theoretical foundations. Results…

  2. Need and supply gap in occupational health manpower in India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kavya; Zodpey, Sanjay P; Tiwari, Rajnarayan R

    2013-07-01

    Industrial growth in India has resulted in increased employment opportunities, thereby inflating the size of the workforce engaged in both organized and unorganized sectors. This workforce is exposed to various occupational factors at workplace and hence is susceptible to occupational diseases, which requires trained occupational health manpower. The present study is undertaken to estimate the need and supply gap of occupational health manpower, based on present regulations. The total workforce in the organized sector in India is 26.92 million. There are 254,951 working registered industrial factories in India, with about 11.16 million workers. These factories have employed 6953 factory medical officers (FMOs) and 2308 safety officers (SOs). Hence, for 26.92 million of total workforce engaged in organized sector, we would require a total of 16,728 FMOs and 5619 SOs, thereby estimating the deficit of 58% for FMOs and 59% for SOs based on current ratio of employment.

  3. Occupational health and safety in the mining industry in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Laraqui, C H; Caubet, A; Harourate, K; Laraqui, O; Verger, C

    1999-01-01

    The mining sector is one of the pillars of our national economy. Our paper concerns safety and occupational health in the mining sector in Morocco. This sector employs 60,000 persons, more than half of them working in the phosphate sectors. There are 36 occupational medical services, with 83 practitioners 395 nurses and 91 agents, protecting 43,926 workers (73% of all personnel). The task of labour inspection in this sector is entrusted to mining engineers. The statistics of the central department of industrial inspection in mines from 1975 to 1995 show a fall in occupational injuries and a progressive increase reported in occupational diseases, 96% of which are silicosis. The improvement of prevention and health at work in the mining sector in Morocco has led to a reduction in occupational hazards and specially occupational injuries. However, an effort seems required so as to generalize occupational medical and safety services in all the mining enterprises and in the craft mining sector in particular.

  4. Guidelines for Management Information Systems in Canadian Health Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Larry E.

    1987-01-01

    The MIS Guidelines are a comprehensive set of standards for health care facilities for the recording of staffing, financial, workload, patient care and other management information. The Guidelines enable health care facilities to develop management information systems which identify resources, costs and products to more effectively forecast and control costs and utilize resources to their maximum potential as well as provide improved comparability of operations. The MIS Guidelines were produced by the Management Information Systems (MIS) Project, a cooperative effort of the federal and provincial governments, provincial hospital/health associations, under the authority of the Canadian Federal/Provincial Advisory Committee on Institutional and Medical Services. The Guidelines are currently being implemented on a “test” basis in ten health care facilities across Canada and portions integrated in government reporting as finalized.

  5. Occupational health survey of farm workers by camp health aides.

    PubMed

    Cameron, L; Lalich, N; Bauer, S; Booker, V; Bogue, H O; Samuels, S; Steege, A L

    2006-05-01

    Little is known about the magnitude of occupational health problems among migrant farm workers. A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted in two migrant farm worker communities: Homestead, Florida, and Kankakee, Illinois. Camp Health Aides (CHAs) interviewed 425 workers about job tasks, personal protective equipment (PPE), field sanitation, work exposures, and selected health conditions. Limited provision of personal protective equipment was reported among those reporting early re-entry tasks: 35% in Kankakee and 42% in Homestead were provided gloves, and 22% in Homestead and 0% in Kankakee were provided protective clothing. About two-thirds were provided toilet facilities and water for hand-washing. Workers reported high prevalences of health conditions consistent with exposure to ergonomic hazards and pesticides. The prevalence of back pain in the past 12 months was 39% in Homestead and 24% in Kankakee. Among Homestead participants, 35% experienced eye symptoms, while 31% reported skin symptoms. These symptoms were less prevalent among Kankakee participants (16% for both eye and skin symptoms). Specific areas of concern included back pain associated with heavy lifting and ladder work; eye and skin irritation associated with fertilizer application tasks and with working in fields during or after spraying of chemicals, especially early re-entry of sprayed fields; and skin irritation associated with a lack of access to hand-washing facilities. In both Kankakee and Homestead, better adherence to safety standards is needed, as well as greater efforts to implement solutions that are available to help prevent work-related musculoskeletal problems. PMID:16724790

  6. Current issues in occupational health nursing. A Canadian perspective.

    PubMed

    Hunter, C

    1991-07-01

    The National Association of Occupational Health Nurses is still in its infancy and is striving to become an interest group under the umbrella of the Canadian Nurses Association. This will bring together the provincial associations in a common goal of promoting worker health and safety. The diversity of the country and the sheer magnitude of the various occupations of Canadians reflect the need for the occupational health nurse to be well educated and kept abreast of new developments. Changes in the worksite echo changes in health and safety legislation that will help to improve conditions in the workplace. Future challenges arise from changes in the work force and the nature of work and include: ergonomic issues, job stress, older workers, EAPs, and increased competition.

  7. Towards an Inclusive Occupational Health and Safety For Informal Workers.

    PubMed

    Lund, Francie; Alfers, Laura; Santana, Vilma

    2016-08-01

    Large numbers of workers worldwide work informally. Yet the discipline and practice of occupational health and safety covers largely only formal workers, in formal work places. A comprehensive approach would have to take into account specific hazards faced by those in different occupations, working in "atypical" work places. Local authorities exert significant influence in the provision of infrastructure that impacts on health and safety, such as water and sanitation. Examples from Brazil and Ghana show that positive interventions are possible so long as informal workers are recognized as contributing to the economy. A more inclusive occupational health and safety is most likely to happen in contexts where informal workers have an organized voice and where there are responsive health and safety personnel who understand that the world of work has changed. Some policy interventions that impact on healthy and safe work will need to involve multiple stakeholders and institutions. PMID:27261445

  8. Towards an Inclusive Occupational Health and Safety For Informal Workers.

    PubMed

    Lund, Francie; Alfers, Laura; Santana, Vilma

    2016-08-01

    Large numbers of workers worldwide work informally. Yet the discipline and practice of occupational health and safety covers largely only formal workers, in formal work places. A comprehensive approach would have to take into account specific hazards faced by those in different occupations, working in "atypical" work places. Local authorities exert significant influence in the provision of infrastructure that impacts on health and safety, such as water and sanitation. Examples from Brazil and Ghana show that positive interventions are possible so long as informal workers are recognized as contributing to the economy. A more inclusive occupational health and safety is most likely to happen in contexts where informal workers have an organized voice and where there are responsive health and safety personnel who understand that the world of work has changed. Some policy interventions that impact on healthy and safe work will need to involve multiple stakeholders and institutions.

  9. Current issues in occupational health nursing. A Canadian perspective.

    PubMed

    Hunter, C

    1991-07-01

    The National Association of Occupational Health Nurses is still in its infancy and is striving to become an interest group under the umbrella of the Canadian Nurses Association. This will bring together the provincial associations in a common goal of promoting worker health and safety. The diversity of the country and the sheer magnitude of the various occupations of Canadians reflect the need for the occupational health nurse to be well educated and kept abreast of new developments. Changes in the worksite echo changes in health and safety legislation that will help to improve conditions in the workplace. Future challenges arise from changes in the work force and the nature of work and include: ergonomic issues, job stress, older workers, EAPs, and increased competition. PMID:2069607

  10. Health Track System—An Automated Occupational Medical System

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Jack E.; Hartridge, Anne D.; Maluish, Andrew G.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an automated occupational health and hazards system is being undertaken at the Department of Energy by Electronic Data Systems. This system, called the Health Track System (HTS), involves the integration and collection of data from the fields of occupational medicine, industrial hygiene, health physics, safety and personnel. This in itself is an exciting prospect, however, the scope of the system calls for it to be installed throughout DOE and contractor organizations across the country, which is even more exciting. Presented here are the main ideas behind the system, and how state of the art technology can be applied to this task.

  11. Hepatitis C: nutrition care Canadian guidelines for health care providers.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Nutrition plays a critical role in the management of hepatitis C. Dietitians of Canada has developed comprehensive, evidence-based guidelines to familiarize health care providers with effective nutrition care for the growing number of Canadians infected with the hepatitis C virus. The complete guidelines and two supporting educational fact sheets are available for downloading from http://www.dietitians.ca/resources/HepatitisC_Guidelines.htm. The guidelines and fact sheets are available in both English and French. The guidelines contain the full text, practice essentials, references, and extensive appendices with practical tools to assist educators in promoting nutrition to persons infected with the hepatitis C virus. Reprinting or photocopying of the document is encouraged provided the source is acknowledged. In addition, an on-line education course is available for health care providers and is available on www.dieteticsatwork.ca. These guidelines are directed to all health care providers who are in a position to offer nutrition-related advice and guidance to persons infected with the hepatitis C virus, in all stages of the disease. A national advisory committee comprised of leading authorities in Canada steered the development of the guidelines. The guidelines are based on the best information available at the time of publication; where scientific evidence was not available, best-accepted practice is presented. PMID:12959661

  12. Occupational health hazards of mine workers*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, K. S.; Lee, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    Mining has always been among the most hazardous of occupations, and with the increasing demand for coal and minerals safety in mines assumes even greater importance. This article describes the present situation with regard to conditions in mines, the diseases and disabilities resulting from them, and measures that can be taken to prevent or treat them. The hazards covered are: accidents, dust (including poisoning by certain ores), high temperature and humidity, noise and vibration, toxic gases, and miscellaneous other hazards. PMID:307452

  13. Integrating Occupational Health and Safety into TAFE Courses: Curriculum Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Bob; Mageean, Pauline

    This guide is designed to help technical and further education (TAFE) curriculum writers in Australia integrate safety education into vocational education courses. It provides a general overview of occupational health and safety from the perspective of TAFE trade training and a brief summary of the major health and safety issues that might be…

  14. Promoting Resilience in Schools: A View from Occupational Health Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers teacher resilience from the viewpoint of a discipline concerned with the interactions between work design, management style and employee health and well-being: occupational health psychology. It will be suggested that there are strong parallels between interventions designed to promote resilience and those designed to reduce…

  15. Health Occupations Education. Units of Instruction. Teacher's Guide. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This manual is the first part of a two-volume teacher's guide to a series of instructional units for use in health occupations education programs in Texas. Covered in the 10 units included in this volume are the following topics: taking and recording vital signs; job applications and interviews; grooming and personal hygiene; health careers;…

  16. Units of Instruction. Health Occupations Education. Volume I. [Teacher's Guide].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    Ten units on health occupations are presented in this teacher's guide. The units are the following: recording vital signs; job application and interview; grooming and personal hygiene; health careers; medical careers; medical ethics; medical terminology and abbreviations; medical asepsis; basic patient care (e.g., measuring and recording fluid…

  17. Nursing III. A Course of Study. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen V.

    This curriculum guide for instructors provides a course of study (Nursing III) requisite for the third and concluding portion of a 1-year practical nursing curriculum designed to continue opportunities for career mobility in the health occupations. Content is in three sections: (1) Medical Surgical Nursing II, (2) Mental Health Nursing, and (3)…

  18. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychologists practice in an increasingly diverse range of health care delivery systems. The following guidelines are intended to assist psychologists, other health care providers, administrators in health care delivery systems, and the public to conceptualize the roles and responsibilities of psychologists in these diverse contexts. These…

  19. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  20. Brazilian physical activity guidelines as a strategy for health promotion

    PubMed Central

    Sebastião, Emerson; Schwingel, Andiara; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek

    2014-01-01

    Public health actions endorsed by the federal government, for instance, health promotion initiatives, usually have greater impact at population level compared to other types of initiatives. This commentary aims to instigate debate on the importance and necessity of producing federally endorsed brazilian physical activity guidelines as a strategy for health promotion. PMID:25210830

  1. Status of occupational health and safety in Iran.

    PubMed

    Vigeh, Mohsen; Mazaheri, Maria; Seyedaghamiri, Zahrabigom

    2011-12-01

    In recent decades, Iran has had a steadily growing economy with an annual rate of 6% on average. The country's economy is dominantly influenced by oil and natural gas production and related industries like petrochemicals and fertilizers. There are two million job units and sixteen million employees. The occupational health and safety (OHS) system is mainly regulated by two bodies: the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, responsible for occupational health services and legislations; and the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, which undertakes the enactment and enforcement of occupational safety legal issues. Inspectorates in each ministry carry out regular health and safety monitoring according to the OHS legislations. The most common occupational health disorders are musculoskeletal problems, respiratory diseases, noise induced hearing loss, and occupational injuries. Because the OHS is a complex system with overlapping responsibilities among the co-responders, its improvement needs well-organized collaboration among Iranian universities, industries, and governmental agencies, and reliable basic data. The present study takes a glance at the situation and activities of the Iranian OHS system.

  2. Status of occupational health and safety in Iran.

    PubMed

    Vigeh, Mohsen; Mazaheri, Maria; Seyedaghamiri, Zahrabigom

    2011-12-01

    In recent decades, Iran has had a steadily growing economy with an annual rate of 6% on average. The country's economy is dominantly influenced by oil and natural gas production and related industries like petrochemicals and fertilizers. There are two million job units and sixteen million employees. The occupational health and safety (OHS) system is mainly regulated by two bodies: the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, responsible for occupational health services and legislations; and the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, which undertakes the enactment and enforcement of occupational safety legal issues. Inspectorates in each ministry carry out regular health and safety monitoring according to the OHS legislations. The most common occupational health disorders are musculoskeletal problems, respiratory diseases, noise induced hearing loss, and occupational injuries. Because the OHS is a complex system with overlapping responsibilities among the co-responders, its improvement needs well-organized collaboration among Iranian universities, industries, and governmental agencies, and reliable basic data. The present study takes a glance at the situation and activities of the Iranian OHS system. PMID:22259833

  3. 75 FR 10629 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Programs), 41 CFR part 102-3, and Secretary of Labor's Order 5-2007 (72 FR 31160... Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and...; ] DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory......

  4. 77 FR 64549 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... meetings of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) and a NACOSH Work... of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH); NACOSH Work Group report and... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational......

  5. 76 FR 60535 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Reopening of the record and extension of... submitting nominations for membership on the Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety......

  6. Health and Human Services. Occupational Analyses. Worker Task Lists and Supplementary Information for Selected Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    This publication contains worker task lists and supplementary information for eight occupations in the health and human services cluster: (1) criminal justice; (2) protective services; (3) dental assistant; (4) dental hygienist; (5) diagnostic medical sonographer; (6) medical office assistant; (7) fire medic; and (8) parks and recreation manager.…

  7. Common Intra-Cluster Competencies Needed in Selected Occupational Clusters. Health Occupations. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClurg, Ronald B.

    An analysis of competencies practiced by seventeen health occupation groups was conducted to determine the extent to which commonality existed in job activities. (The groups include accredited records technician, aide/orderly, dental assistant, dental hygienist, dental lab technician, dietetic technician, licensed practical nurse, medical…

  8. 78 FR 75922 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section... a.m.-5:00 p.m., February 21, 2014 (Closed) Place: Embassy Suites, 1900 Diagonal Road, Alexandria... Study Section will review, discuss, and evaluate grant application(s) received in response to...

  9. Occupational health effects of nonionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, M.G. )

    1992-07-01

    Nonionizing radiation includes electromagnetic energy distributed as near-ultraviolet and visible light, infrared radiation, microwaves, radio frequencies, and very low frequency and extremely low frequency alternating electric and magnetic fields, and almost every member of modern society is exposed to it in some form. Usually the intensity of exposure is low in the general population but can be greatly increased in the workplace. The forms of nonionizing radiation are described and their physical characteristics, occupational sources, biologic effects, and exposure criteria are delineated.90 references.

  10. Health Occupations. Dental Auxiliaries, Nursing, Therapy and Rehabilitation, Health Services Administration. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on health occupations, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include dental assistants, dental hygienists, dental…

  11. [The role of ergonomics in occupational health - past and future].

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    The aim of working condition and ergonomics is to control the task method and condition for the best productive activity with the highest efficiency and sustainability. The Principles of Scientific Management by Frederick Winslow Taylor and its criticism by Gito Teruoka, the 1st director of The Institute for Science of Labour, are introduced for a better understanding of work condition and ergonomics in this article. Occupational physician have a duty to control working method and condition to reduce the health hazards induced by job duty. Not only the technical knowledge of medicine, but also a fundamental knowledge of manufacturing is needed for the occupational physician. The development of tools for early detection of health hazards and workload evaluation, the introduction of work management systems with cooperation between occupational physicians and technical experts of manufacturing are needed for effective control of the workplace. The strengthening of the Industrial Safety and Health Law should help to drive these improvements. PMID:24107345

  12. Promoting Occupational Safety and Health for Cambodian Entertainment Sector Workers.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Lee-Nah; Howard, Richard; Torriente, Anna Maria; Por, Chuong

    2016-08-01

    Cambodia has developed booming textile, garment, tourism, and entertainment service industries since the mid-1990s. The 2007 global financial crisis pushed many garment workers, who lost their jobs, into the entertainment sector. Entertainment workers are typically engaged informally by their employers and are subjected to long working hours, sexual harassment, and violence. Many who sell beverages are forced into excessive alcohol consumption as part of their work. Many are also expected by their employers and clients to provide sexual services. To address unsafe and unhealthy working conditions for these workers, an innovative occupational safety and health regulation was adopted in 2014. This first-of-its-kind occupational safety and health regulation was developed jointly by the Cambodian Ministry of Labour and Vocational Training and employers' and workers' organizations in the entertainment sector. The implementation of this regulation can also be a viable contribution of occupational safety and health to HIV interventions for these workers.

  13. Promoting Occupational Safety and Health for Cambodian Entertainment Sector Workers.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Lee-Nah; Howard, Richard; Torriente, Anna Maria; Por, Chuong

    2016-08-01

    Cambodia has developed booming textile, garment, tourism, and entertainment service industries since the mid-1990s. The 2007 global financial crisis pushed many garment workers, who lost their jobs, into the entertainment sector. Entertainment workers are typically engaged informally by their employers and are subjected to long working hours, sexual harassment, and violence. Many who sell beverages are forced into excessive alcohol consumption as part of their work. Many are also expected by their employers and clients to provide sexual services. To address unsafe and unhealthy working conditions for these workers, an innovative occupational safety and health regulation was adopted in 2014. This first-of-its-kind occupational safety and health regulation was developed jointly by the Cambodian Ministry of Labour and Vocational Training and employers' and workers' organizations in the entertainment sector. The implementation of this regulation can also be a viable contribution of occupational safety and health to HIV interventions for these workers. PMID:27242184

  14. The 'value case' for investment in occupational health.

    PubMed

    Marson, G K

    2001-12-01

    This paper introduces the problems facing occupational health departments in the current environment created by new legislation and changes in social attitudes. The problems of establishing the true costs and benefits of service provision are discussed. The paper also explains the employment of the 'value principle' in organizations and postulates its use in order to establish the appropriate position of occupational health in corporate thinking. A practical system is suggested, based on a four-step process of strategic planning, issues development, option establishment and plan implementation, which can be used to evaluate and justify investment in services. The problems of future risk are addressed. The paper concludes with the priority of establishing the strategic importance of occupational health services alongside other personnel issues and expresses the possibility of using the same principles outside the business world. PMID:11741081

  15. Occupational Safety and Health Symposia (37th American Medical Association Congress on Occupational Health. St. Louis, Missouri, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Bruce E.; And Others

    The papers compiled here were presented at the fourth symposium in a series designed to provide a continuing introduction to current aspects of occupational safety and health. The papers represent eight topics: (1) special health programs, (2) degenerative disease and injury of the back, (3) job stress and work performance, (4) role of industry in…

  16. Guidelines for Health Services for Migrant Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strazicich, Mirko, Ed.

    This publication provides a standard by which California migrant education health staff can plan, implement, and evaluate a health program for students in grades K-12. Following sections which describe current state legislation, the need for health services, and California's objectives and activities regarding health services for migrant students…

  17. Quality and quality improvement in occupational health nursing.

    PubMed

    Widtfeldt, A K

    1992-07-01

    Donabedian first defined quality as the result of assessing the structures, processes, and outcomes of health care. The emphasis on quality assurance is changing to quality improvement. The definition of quality in health care has expanded to include the expectations and opinion of patients, their representative, and society. As the cost of health care continues to rise at twice the rate of inflation, business wants to know how health care dollars are spent. Occupational health nurses, to add value to the businesses in which they work, must be a part of the trend in measuring the quality of the products and services of their health services. PMID:1616507

  18. Occupational health issues in marine and freshwater research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Marine and freshwater scientists are potentially exposed to a wide variety of occupational hazards. Depending on the focus of their research, risks may include animal attacks, physiological stresses, exposure to toxins and carcinogens, and dangerous environmental conditions. Many of these hazards have been investigated amongst the general population in their recreational use of the environment; however, very few studies have specifically related potential hazards to occupational exposure. For example, while the incidence of shark and crocodile attacks may invoke strong emotions and the occupational risk of working with these animals is certainly real, many more people are stung by jellyfish or bitten by snakes or dogs each year. Furthermore, a large proportion of SCUBA-related injuries and deaths are incurred by novice or uncertified divers, rather than professional divers using aquatic environments. Nonetheless, marine and freshwater research remains a potentially risky occupation, and the likelihood of death, injury and long-term health impacts still needs to be seriously considered. PMID:22429712

  19. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 1991 projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The report presents information on projects conducted by NIOSH in 1991 aimed at improving working conditions and worker health. The planning format for 1991 was depicted using a flow chart. Each division of NIOSH was listed along with phone numbers and brief descriptions of the projects conducted by the division. Summaries were included of national prevention strategies for occupational lung diseases, musculoskeletal injuries, occupational cancers, severe occupational traumatic injuries, occupational cardiovascular diseases, disorders of reproduction, neurotoxic disorders, noise induced hearing loss, dermatological conditions, and psychological disorders. The purpose of each NIOSH project was described, and projects were categorized by program areas. These programs areas included the subjects of the national prevention strategies, agriculture related projects, construction related projects, assistance requests, and administration.

  20. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH EDUCATION AND TRAINING FOR UNDERSERVED POPULATIONS

    PubMed Central

    O’CONNOR, TOM; FLYNN, MICHAEL; WEINSTOCK, DEBORAH; ZANONI, JOSEPH

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the essential elements of effective occupational safety and health education and training programs targeting under-served communities. While not an exhaustive review of the literature on occupational safety and health training, the paper provides a guide for practitioners and researchers to the key factors they should consider in the design and implementation of training programs for underserved communities. It also addresses issues of evaluation of such programs, with specific emphasis on considerations for programs involving low-literacy and limited-English-speaking workers. PMID:25053607

  1. Occupational mercury exposure and male reproductive health

    SciTech Connect

    Alcser, K.H.; Brix, K.A.; Fine, L.J.; Kallenbach, L.R.; Wolfe, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study was designed to investigate the relationship of male occupational exposure to elemental mercury and several reproductive outcomes. All subjects worked at least 4 months between 1953 and 1966 at a plant that used elemental mercury; 247 white male employees who had the highest exposures were compared to 255 matched nonexposed employees. Individual exposure to mercury was estimated from urinary mercury measurement records. Information on reproductive history and potential confounding variables was obtained through personal interview with each of the employees and with a subset of their wives. No associations were demonstrated between mercury exposure and decreased fertility or increased rates of major malformations or serious childhood illnesses. After controlling for previous miscarriage history, mercury exposure was not a significant risk factor for miscarriage. Because of this study's potential problems with long-term recall, further studies of the effect of mercury on pregnancy outcome are warranted in other populations.

  2. Operational design guidelines for high occupancy vehicle lanes on arterial roadways including planning strategies and supporting measures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize relevant information and proven guidelines in the areas of planning, design and operation of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes on arterial roadways in Ontario Municipalities. It is intended for reference by planners, designers and decision-makers involved in developing municipal transportation programs and facilities.

  3. Adapted Physical Education, Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy in Special Education Programs in Colorado: Guidelines for Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Div. of Special Education Services.

    The guidelines address implementation of related services (adapted physical education, occupational therapy, and physical therapy) in Colorado special education programs. The first section considers factors in organizing services: the legal mandate of P.L. 94-142, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act; characteristics and professional…

  4. Review of occupational medicine practice guidelines for interventional pain management and potential implications.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay; Derby, Richard; Helm, Standiford; Trescot, Andrea M; Staats, Peter S; Prager, Joshua P; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2008-01-01

    In the modern day environment, workers' compensation costs continue to be a challenge, with a need to balance costs, benefits, and quality of medical care. The cost of workers' compensation care affects all stakeholders including workers, employers, providers, regulators, legislators, and insurers. Consequently, a continued commitment to quality, accessibility to care, and cost containment will help ensure that workers are afforded accessible, high quality, and cost-effective care. In 2004, workers' compensation programs in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and federal programs in the United States combined received an income of $87.4 billion while paying out only $56 billion in medical and cash benefits with $31.4 billion or 37% in administrative expenses and profit. Occupational diseases represented only 8% of the workers' compensation claims and 29% of the cost. The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) has published several guidelines; though widely adopted by WCPs, these guidelines evaluate the practice of medicine of multiple specialties without adequate expertise and expert input from the concerned specialties, including interventional pain management. An assessment of the ACOEM guidelines utilizing Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) criteria, the criteria developed by the American Medical Association (AMA), the Institute of Medicine (IOM), and other significantly accepted criteria, consistently showed very low scores (< 30%) in most aspects of the these guidelines. The ACOEM recommendations do not appear to have been based on a careful review of the literature, overall quality of evidence, standard of care, or expert consensus. Based on the evaluation utilizing appropriate and current evidence-based medicine (EBM) principles, the evidence ratings for diagnostic techniques of lumbar discography; cervical, thoracic, and lumbar facet joint nerve blocks and sacroiliac joint nerve blocks; therapeutic

  5. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... and health research training centers, continuing education NIOSH Science Blog A-Z Index A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Top Resources Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards Manual of Analytical Methods Health Hazard Evaluations (HHEs) NIOSH en Español Research ...

  6. A short history of occupational fitness and health promotion.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    1991-05-01

    The suggestion of a linkage between adequate exercise and occupational health dates back to Ramazzini's classical observations on cobblers and tailors. However, excessive hours of work at too high an intensity were of greater concern than increase of fitness or health promotion in the early phases of the industrial revolution. Loss of physical condition is a more recent phenomenon, and it can be traced to automation in industry and the home, progressive urbanization, and widespread use of the automobile. The Canadian government has seen worksite fitness and health promotion programs as convenient tactics to reverse this trend. Exercise programs apparently yield a healthier and more effective labor force, and major corporations have thus followed the government's lead in developing fitness and health promotional facilities as a part of personnel or occupational health departments. Some health economists have suggested a substantial return upon such investment, but most corporations still regard the promotion of fitness and a healthy lifestyle as an expression of good citizenship. Currently, unifocal fitness programs are being replaced by modular health programs that address a wide range of lifestyle issues, including nutrition, stress relaxation, cigarette addiction, and drug abuse. The purpose of the present brief review is to trace from a personal perspective the development of an interest in employee fitness as an important component of occupational health programs over the past 300 years. The linkage of this phenomenon to the changing human demands of the worksite will also be explored.

  7. Introducing guidelines for good evaluation practice in health informatics.

    PubMed

    Nykänen, Pirkko; Brender, Jytte; Ammenwerth, Elske; Talmon, Jan; de Keizer, Nicolette; Rigby, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Good evaluation practice guidelines have been developed through a consensus making process by a core team and the health informatics community. A set of 60 issues has been identified that is relevant for planning, implementation and execution of an evaluation study in the health informatics domain. These issues cover all phases of an evaluation study: Study exploration, first study design, operationalization of methods, detailed study design, execution and finalization of an evaluation study. Issues of risk management and project control are also addressed in the guidelines. Through application of these guidelines the general validity and generalization of evaluation studies are likely to be increased, since these guidelines aim at avoiding a number of omissions, pitfalls and risks. PMID:19745455

  8. Self-rated health and occupational conditions in Russia.

    PubMed

    Nazarova, I

    2000-11-01

    A low level of health promotion and disease prevention awareness in Russia, such as disregard for personal health during periods of well-being or illness, have contributed to a decline in general population health over the past decade. The relationship of working conditions and health awareness was explored among a sample of adults in Russia. This research project was conducted, July-August, 1998, in the city of Kazan. Data was collected by probability sampling of addresses and personal interview. Working conditions influence general public and family health. The occupation of the spouse contributed significantly to family conflicts, and financial problems ranked first as the cause of marital conflict. Due to lack of material resources, one-third of respondents, even though employed, reported being dissatisfied with the quality of their nutritional status and one-fifth with the lack of leisure time. Although more than two-thirds were satisfied with their work, every fifth did not consider their wages sufficient, every fourth wanted to change occupations, and every third was afraid of being fired. The majority of employed respondents reported low salaries, worked a full 8-hour day at their primary occupations and one-fifth had a second job. Younger people were especially prone to disregard their health with intensive work schedules. About half of respondents reported being exposed to toxic health hazards in their past or current jobs. Almost one-fifth agreed to work at hazardous occupations because of higher salaries. Social status, indicated by a higher education, was associated with having the opportunity to chose work in more favourable circumstances, and consequently with less health risks. In summary, the research demonstrated that health was an instrumental value in Russia, exploited as a economic resource not only during periods of well-being but also during illness, by individuals not seeking preventive or timely health care because of the fear of losing

  9. Hypertension guidelines and their effects on the health system

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Wilhelm; Konta, Brigitte

    2005-01-01

    present time. One can assume from international studies with analogical reasoning that these are confessed and have a high level of acceptance in the medical community. Unfortunately the actual usage is not represented satisfactorily in the scientific literature. The effects of the guidelines on the medical procedures seem to be very strongly individual and the analyses to the compliance show at least an observable effect within the last few years. No publications could be found for the cost effectiveness of the guidelines. The actual compliance with guidelines seems to be in relation with the duration of the professional practice. It seems the shorter the professional practice takes place, the stronger the guidelines are adhered. Discussion At present, there are only a few notes for the German health service regarding the actual effect of the hypertonus guidelines. However, the reason is not that the effect would not be possibly strong but at the methodical challenge to evaluate the sustaining effects of the application of the hypertonus guidelines. For this reason the literature is very rare regarding this topic. For Germany it can be derived by analogical reasoning from foreign studies that guidelines will facilitate a more and more essential contribution to the design of the health system. Considering that primarily younger physicians accepted guidelines mode, the further construction, update and implementation of guidelines are essential, particularly with regard to the quality assurance. Straight guidelines can express a standard of the quality of a health system as a benchmark. The existence of guidelines or the lack thereof is considered also as a quality indicator of a health system at the organisation for economic cooperation and development (OECD). Conclusion Guidelines should be evaluated - especially the hypertonus guideline. Also further development and implementation should be emphasised. Methodically oriented work to the approach is pretty recent. It is

  10. Occupational health and health care in Russia and Russian Arctic: 1980–2010

    PubMed Central

    Dudarev, Alexey A.; Odland, Jon Øyvind

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a paradox in Russia and its Arctic regions which reports extremely low rates of occupational diseases (ODs), far below those of other socially and economically advanced circumpolar countries. Yet, there is widespread disregard for occupational health regulations and neglect of basic occupational health services across many industrial enterprises. Study design and methods This review article presents official statistics and summarises the results of a search of peer-reviewed scientific literature published in Russia on ODs and occupational health care in Russia and the Russian Arctic, within the period 1980–2010. Results Worsening of the economic situation, layoff of workers, threat of unemployment and increased work load happened during the “wild market” industrial restructuring in 1990–2000, when the health and safety of workers were of little concern. Russian employers are not legally held accountable for neglecting safety rules and for underreporting of ODs. Almost 80% of all Russian industrial enterprises are considered dangerous or hazardous for health. Hygienic control of working conditions was minimised or excluded in the majority of enterprises, and the health status of workers remains largely unknown. There is direct evidence of general degradation of the occupational health care system in Russia. The real levels of ODs in Russia are estimated to be at least 10–100 times higher than reported by official statistics. The low official rates are the result of deliberate hiding of ODs, lack of coverage of working personnel by properly conducted medical examinations, incompetent management and the poor quality of staff, facilities and equipment. Conclusions Reform of the Russian occupational health care system is urgently needed, including the passing of strong occupational health legislation and their enforcement, the maintenance of credible health monitoring and effective health services for workers, improved training of

  11. Occupational Health Education--A Vital Topic for Adding to the School Health Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambler, Moses

    School health education curricula can be an important vehicle for including units on occupational and vocational health. The traditional cognitive learning of health concepts in the classroom should be expanded to include the functional learning of health on the job through positive health behavior. Together with the media and social and political…

  12. Managing workplace depression: an untapped opportunity for occupational health professionals.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Kelly; McKibbin, Laura

    2004-03-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent and costly health issues affecting the American work force. Despite well established research demonstrating the association between employee depression and reduced on-the-job productivity, increased absenteeism, and higher health care use, most employers remain largely unresponsive to the need for company based depression initiatives. Organizational and individual barriers can prevent companies from effectively managing employee depression. Organizational barriers include information gaps, lack of data to justify increased investment in employee mental health programs, and employers' ambiguous roles in addressing depression. Individual barriers such as an inability to recognize signs and symptoms; stigma; confidentiality and privacy concerns; and unavailability of easily accessible, quality resources can keep employees who are depressed from seeking treatment. Many occupational health professionals may feel ill prepared or uncomfortable taking the lead in creating more aggressive worksite responses to depression, but they are, perhaps, in the best of all possible positions within an organization to succeed. Occupational health professionals have the credentials, credibility, training, and experience necessary to build a strong case for business leaders for why investing in workplace depression programs is so important. Occupational health professionals are the most qualified to design and deliver destigmatized, customer friendly programs and services for employees to access for help with depression, and to integrate their services with other departments such as benefits, health promotion, EAP, and human resources, to create an effective, organization-wide depression initiative.

  13. Health Occupations Module. The Skeletal System--II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the skeletal system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, two objectives (e.g., list the types of joints and movements, and give examples), and two learning…

  14. Automobile Occupant Protection: An Issue for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Education (Washington D.C.), 1984

    1984-01-01

    Health educators can play a significant role in reducing public misconceptions about safety belts and child restraints. Ten articles deal with federal education efforts to promote occupant protection, safety belt education resources, and attitudes of rural areas toward restraints and loan programs. Various safety programs are described. (DF)

  15. Unintentional Learning and the Occupational Health and Safety Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, R. Bruce

    1998-01-01

    Evidence from the occupational safety and health field suggests that much unintentional learning takes place in the workplace that is not a result of conscious decisions and lacks critical reflection. Such learning may have negative consequences. Action can be taken to identify and mitigate the effects of unintentional learning. (SK)

  16. Teacher's Guide for Competency Based Core Curriculum for Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meckley, Richard; And Others

    This teacher's guide is intended to acompany the Competency Based Core Curriculum for Health Occupations student materials--see note. Contents include suggested tests and answer keys for student evaluation and a tool and equipment list. A comprehensive bibliography is organized into these topics: dental hygiene, medical laboratory technology,…

  17. Diversified Cooperative Training. Diversified Cooperative Health Occupations. Manual of Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational and Adult Education.

    This manual is designed to assist school personnel, employers, parents/guardians, and students in understanding the policies and procedures required to operate effective diversified cooperative training (DCT) and diversified cooperative health occupations (DCHO) programs. Chapter I describes DCT/DCHO programs, their structure, types of program…

  18. Health Occupations Education. Units of Instruction. Teacher's Guide. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Catherine

    This manual is the second part of a two-volume teacher's guide to a series of instructional units for use in health occupations education programs in Texas. Covered in the 10 units included in this volume are the following topics: special procedures (administering oxygen to patients; using elastic bandages; assisting with postural drainage; and…

  19. An Evaluation of an Occupational Health Advice Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearn, P.; Ford, Norma J.; Murphy, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this article is to identify the profile of service users of an occupational health (OH) support service and establish areas of need, and to gather client feedback on the experience of participating in the support service and perceived outcomes and the impact of the advice received. Design and Setting: We carried out…

  20. Strategies for Learners with Special Needs in Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Missouri LINC.

    This Vocational Instructional Management System (VIMS) module illustrates instructional and cognitive strategies that can be used to teach special needs students vocational competencies in three areas of health occupations: (1) identification of pulse sites; (2) taking a radial pulse; and (3) converting ounces to cubic centimeters (cc). Three…

  1. Health Occupations. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This packet of technology learning activity (TLA) materials on health occupations for students in grades 6-10 consists of a technology education overview, information on use, and instructor's and student's sections. The overview discusses the technology education program and materials. Components of the instructor's and student's sections are…

  2. Meditation practice as related to occupational stress, health and productivity.

    PubMed

    Delmonte, M M

    1984-10-01

    This article reviews three studies giving evidence on the effects of meditation practice on employees' health in the work setting. Although there may be a beneficial role for meditation, unfortunately, these findings await further replication so it would be premature to conclude that meditation practice reduces occupational stress.

  3. Cluster Matrices for Health Occupations. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathrop, Janice

    These cluster matrices provide duties and tasks that form the basis of instructional content for secondary, postsecondary, and adult training programs for health occupations. The eight clusters (and the job titles included in each cluster) are as follows: (1) dental assisting (dental assistant); (2) dental laboratory technology (dental laboratory…

  4. [Evaluating occupational health risk in titanium alloys production workers].

    PubMed

    Bazarova, E L

    2007-01-01

    The authors present data on evaluation of personified and non-personified occupational risk of health disorders in titanium alloys production workers, concerning hygienic, medical and biologic, social and psychologic criteria. One-digit assessment of the work conditions is suggested.

  5. Community and occupational health concerns in pork production: a review.

    PubMed

    Donham, K J

    2010-04-01

    Public concerns relative to adverse consequences of large-scale livestock production have been increasingly voiced since the late 1960s. Numerous regional, national, and international conferences have been held on the subject since 1994. This paper provides a review of the literature on the community and occupational health concerns of large-scale livestock production with a focus on pork production. The industry has recognized the concerns of the public, and the national and state pork producer groups are including these issues as an important component of their research and policy priorities. One reason large-scale livestock production has raised concern is that a significant component of the industry has separated from traditional family farming and has developed like other industries in management, structure, and concentration. The magnitude of the problem cited by environmental groups has often been criticized by the pork production industry for lack of science-based evidence to document environmental concerns. In addition to general environmental concerns, occupational health of workers has become more relevant because many operations now are employing more than 10 employees, which brings many operations in the United States under the scrutiny of the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration. In this paper, the scientific literature is reviewed relative to the science basis of occupational and environmental impacts on community and worker health. Further, recommendations are made to help promote sustainability of the livestock industry within the context of maintaining good stewardship of our environmental and human capital. PMID:20154166

  6. A STUDY OF HEALTH AND RELATED SERVICE OCCUPATIONS IN WISCONSIN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Employment Service, Madison.

    THE SURVEY WAS CONDUCTED AT THE REQUEST OF REPRESENTATIVES OF VARIOUS HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS TO DETERMINE THE PRESENT AND FUTURE EMPLOYMENT NEEDS IN 10 OCCUPATIONS IN WHICH THERE MIGHT BE A SHORTAGE OF MANPOWER AND IN WHICH PERSONS COULD BE TRAINED UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF THE AREA REDEVELOPMENT AND MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING ACTS. A…

  7. Health Occupations Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This document contains vocational education program courses standards (curriculum frameworks and student performance standards) for exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs in health occupations education offered at the secondary or postsecondary level as a part of Florida's comprehensive vocational education…

  8. Anatomy and Physiology. Module No. IV. Health Occupations Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Nancy; And Others

    This package of 31 modules on anatomy and physiology is one of six such packages containing a total of 46 modules that comprise Health Occupations Education II, the second course of a two-year course of study. Each module may contain some or all of the following components: introduction, directions, objectives, a list of learning activities,…

  9. Orientation to Health Occupations: Year One Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Idaho state curriculum document for the first year of the secondary educations health occupations program contains the following introductory material: (1) a description of the program design; (2) a list of first-year areas of competency; (3) a foundation and job-readiness skills task list; and (4) a core curriculum task list. The curriculum…

  10. Engineering Maintenance. Occupational Analysis. UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Thomas D.; And Others

    The report has described the results of a questionnaire survey covering task performance in the occupational area of hospital engineering and maintenance and the implications for curriculum development in personnel training. Survey respondents were selected from among personnel of 48 health care facilities in six cities, representing various sized…

  11. Health Occupations Education Program Development Guide No. 5: Dental Assisting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Occupational Education Instruction.

    The bulletin, which is part of the New York State "Health Occupations Education Program Development Guide Series," focuses on the dental assisting program. The curriculum is designed to provide training for dental assistants in their assistant role at chairside, in the dental operatory and laboratory, and in the dental office and reception area. A…

  12. Late industrial development and occupational health in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Assennato, Giorgio; Bisceglia, Lucia; De Nichilo, Gigliola; Grassi, Maria Emanuela; Lo Izzo, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The authors report the occupational medicine problems in the Apulia region, which are representative of those in Southern Italy. Late industrialization was associated with an early peak in injuries that was not associated with an increased workforce. Examples of operations adversely affecting worker and population health are presented.

  13. Health Occupations Module. The Skeletal System--I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the skeletal system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, three objectives (e.g., define the skeletal system and list its functions), and three learning…

  14. The Microscope: I--Structure. Health Occupations Education Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the structure of the microscope is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module consists of an introduction to the module topic, a list of resources needed, and two learning experiences. Each learning experience contains…

  15. Health Occupations Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This document contains vocational education program course standards for health occupations programs in Florida. Standards are provided for a total of 71 exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs offered at the secondary or postsecondary level. Each program courses standard consists of a curriculum framework and…

  16. Health Occupations Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This document contains vocational education program courses standards (curriculum frameworks and student performance standards) for exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs in health occupations (HO) education offered at the secondary or postsecondary level as a part of Florida's comprehensive vocational education…

  17. 42 CFR 9.10 - Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and... SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.10 Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements. (a) How are employee Occupational Health and Safety Program risks and concerns addressed? The sanctuary...

  18. 42 CFR 9.10 - Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and... SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.10 Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements. (a) How are employee Occupational Health and Safety Program risks and concerns addressed? The sanctuary...

  19. 42 CFR 9.10 - Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and... SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.10 Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements. (a) How are employee Occupational Health and Safety Program risks and concerns addressed? The sanctuary...

  20. 42 CFR 9.10 - Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and... SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.10 Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements. (a) How are employee Occupational Health and Safety Program risks and concerns addressed? The sanctuary...

  1. 42 CFR 9.10 - Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and... SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.10 Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements. (a) How are employee Occupational Health and Safety Program risks and concerns addressed? The sanctuary...

  2. The occupational health nurse as the trusted clinician in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Burgel, Barbara J; Childre, Frances

    2012-04-01

    Occupational health nurses as trusted clinicians use their direct care skills in both on-site and off-site roles to protect human resources and contain health care costs. On-site clinics leverage the knowledge, skills, and abilities of occupational health nurses. To maximize the health of the work force, occupational health nurses use strategies aimed at improving health, engaging employees, enhancing accountability of employees, linking provider strategies, using technology creatively, and promoting healthy work environments. Occupational health nurses maintain a proactive and effective impact on occupational health and safety as part of a broader framework of holistic primary care.

  3. Occupational and environmental lung disease: occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Stenton, S C

    2010-01-01

    Occupational exposures cause 10-15% of new-onset asthma in adults, and that represents a considerable health and economic burden. Exposure to many causative agents is now well controlled but workplace practices are constantly evolving and new hazards being introduced. Overall, there is no good evidence that the incidence of occupational asthma is decreasing. Evidence-based guidelines such as those published by the British Occupational Health research Foundation and Standards of Care documents should help raise awareness of the problem and improve management. Key targets include the control of occupational exposures, a high index of suspicion in any adult with new onset asthma, and early detailed investigation.

  4. Occupational safety and health objectives of Healthy People 2010: a systematic approach for occupational health nurses--part I.

    PubMed

    Chikotas, Noreen E; Parks, Carol; Olszewski, Kimberly

    2007-02-01

    The Healthy People 2010 prevention agenda, along with the nation's leading health indicators, provides employers with national targets regarding safety, health, and disease prevention. The first five safety and health objectives presented in this article target a reduction in work-related deaths, work-related injuries, overexertion or repetitive motion injuries and illnesses, pneumoconiosis deaths, and work-related homicides. Although progress is being made, opportunities exist to make a greater impact. Using the information and strategies discussed, occupational health nurses can play a key role in developing and implementing workplace safety and health promotion programs.

  5. In vitro assessment of equivalence of occupational health risk: welders.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, R M

    1983-01-01

    The possibility of using in vitro testing to determine the equivalence of risk for various occupational groups is discussed. In the absence of epidemiological evidence or relevant animal in vivo bioassays on which to determine the health effects of specific occupational exposures, it is proposed to use similarities in the in vitro response to substances with known (or strongly suspected) and unknown risk to demonstrate their risk equivalence. Identification and evaluation of a high risk "hot spot" due to exposure to Cr(VI) for stainless steel welders is discussed in terms of recent developments in collection, analysis and bioassay of welding fumes. PMID:6641655

  6. Medical Physicists and Health Physicists: Radiation Occupations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPointe, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Physics is the study of matter and energy and the ways in which the two interact. Some physicists use their expertise in physics to focus on radiation. These specialists, called medical physicists and health physicists, work to help people or protect the environment. Medical physicists work with physicians, assisting patients who need imaging…

  7. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  8. Health Occupations Education. Biennial National Health Occupations Research Conference Proceedings. (5th, Nashville, Tennessee, December 1, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rzonca, Chet, Ed.

    These proceedings include the agenda of the conference, a list of its cosponsors, and the texts of the following six papers presented at the conference: "Hepatitis Vaccine: Are Health Occupations Education Students Protected?" (Cynthia Chappelka); "Integrated Academics: An HOE Model" (Karen E. Gable, Beverly Ransdell); "The Ability of Work Related…

  9. Occupational safety and health management among five ASEAN countries: Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore.

    PubMed

    Buranatrevedh, Surasak

    2015-03-01

    Occupational safety and health is one of important issues for workforce movement among ASEAN countries. The objective was to study laws, main agencies, and law enforcement regarding occupational safety and health in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore. This documentary research covered laws, main agencies' duties, and occupational safety and health law enforcement in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore. Thailand has its Occupational Safety, Health, and Work EnvironmentAct 2011. Its main agency was Department of Labor Protection and Welfare. Indonesia had WorkSafety Act (Law No. 1, 1970). Its main agency was Department of Manpower and Transmigration. Malaysia had Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) 1994. Its main agency is the Department of Occupational Safety and Health. The Philippines has its Occupational Safety and Health Standards. Its main agency was Department ofLabor and Employment. Singapore has its Workplace Safety and Health Act 2006. Its main agency is Occupational Safety and Health Division. Occupational safety and health law enforcement among each county covers work environment surveillance, workers' health surveillance, advice about prevention and control of occupational health hazards, training and education of employers and employees, data systems, and research. Further in-depth surveys of occupational safety and health among each ASEAN county are needed to develop frameworks for occupational safety and health management for all ASEAN countries. PMID:26211106

  10. Guidelines for clinical supervision in health service psychology.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This document outlines guidelines for supervision of students in health service psychology education and training programs. The goal was to capture optimal performance expectations for psychologists who supervise. It is based on the premises that supervisors (a) strive to achieve competence in the provision of supervision and (b) employ a competency-based, meta-theoretical approach to the supervision process. The Guidelines on Supervision were developed as a resource to inform education and training regarding the implementation of competency-based supervision. The Guidelines on Supervision build on the robust literatures on competency-based education and clinical supervision. They are organized around seven domains: supervisor competence; diversity; relationships; professionalism; assessment/evaluation/feedback; problems of professional competence, and ethical, legal, and regulatory considerations. The Guidelines on Supervision represent the collective effort of a task force convened by the American Psychological Association (APA) Board of Educational Affairs (BEA).

  11. Collaboration between infection control and occupational health in three continents: a success story with international impact.

    PubMed

    Yassi, Annalee; Bryce, Elizabeth A; Breilh, Jaime; Lavoie, Marie-Claude; Ndelu, Lindiwe; Lockhart, Karen; Spiegel, Jerry

    2011-11-08

    Globalization has been accompanied by the rapid spread of infectious diseases, and further strain on working conditions for health workers globally. Post-SARS, Canadian occupational health and infection control researchers got together to study how to better protect health workers, and found that training was indeed perceived as key to a positive safety culture. This led to developing information and communication technology (ICT) tools. The research conducted also showed the need for better workplace inspections, so a workplace audit tool was also developed to supplement worker questionnaires and the ICT. When invited to join Ecuadorean colleagues to promote occupational health and infection control, these tools were collectively adapted and improved, including face-to-face as well as on-line problem-based learning scenarios. The South African government then invited the team to work with local colleagues to improve occupational health and infection control, resulting in an improved web-based health information system to track incidents, exposures, and occupational injury and diseases. As the H1N1 pandemic struck, the online infection control course was adapted and translated into Spanish, as was a novel skill-building learning tool that permits health workers to practice selecting personal protective equipment. This tool was originally developed in collaboration with the countries from the Caribbean region and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). Research from these experiences led to strengthened focus on building capacity of health and safety committees, and new modules are thus being created, informed by that work.The products developed have been widely heralded as innovative and interactive, leading to their inclusion into "toolkits" used internationally. The tools used in Canada were substantially improved from the collaborative adaptation process for South and Central America and South Africa. This international collaboration between occupational

  12. Discretionary Review by the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission: Is It Necessary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Robert D.

    1974-01-01

    Deficiencies in the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission (OSAHRC), a court system created to carry out adjudicatory functions under the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, are exposed and alternative solutions offered. (JT)

  13. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mroz, Tracy M; Pitonyak, Jennifer S; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy's rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy's perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy's research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. PMID:26356651

  14. NIOH and NIOSH basis for an occupational health standard: Chlorobenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, B.

    1993-01-01

    Information relevant for assessing potential adverse health effects from occupational exposure to chlorobenzene was reviewed and summarized. Topics included physical properties, chemical properties, production levels, industrial uses, occupational exposure levels, toxicokinetics, acute and chronic toxicity, organ system toxicity, immunotoxicity, allergy, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, reproductive toxicity, dose/response relationships, and research needs. Studies have indicated that chlorobenzene is absorbed via respiratory and dermal routes and has resulted in headaches, dizziness, somnolence, and dyspeptic disorders in humans chronically exposed. There were no case reports or epidemiological studies available concerned with the potential carcinogenicity of chlorobenzene in humans. There was some limited evidence indicating that the compound is genotoxic and that it may induce hematopoietic toxicity at relatively moderate doses. The author concludes that the central nervous system effects and the hepatotoxic effects should be considered in setting occupational exposure limits.

  15. Occupation and mental health in a national UK survey

    PubMed Central

    Rasul, F. R.; Head, J.; Singleton, N.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To measure the prevalence of common mental disorder (CMD) by occupation in a representative sample of Great Britain and to identify occupations with increased and decreased risk of CMD. Methods A cross-sectional interview-based survey was carried out including 5,497 working male and female respondents, 16–64 years from a stratified random survey of private households in Britain. Occupations were classified by the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) into four groups: major, sub-major, minor and constituent unit groups. Common Mental Disorder was measured by the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule. Results Major SOC groups with higher prevalence of common mental disorder included clerical and secretarial, sales, and personal and protective services whereas craft and related, ‘other’ professional occupations and plant and machine operatives had lower prevalence compared to 13% overall prevalence in all adults. In sub-major SOC groups managers and administrators, teaching professionals, clerical and secretarial, ‘other’ sales and personal service occupations had higher prevalence whereas many professional and skilled occupations had lower prevalence. Specific SOC unit groups with higher prevalence included primary and secondary teachers, welfare community, youth workers, security staff, waiters, bar staff, nurse auxiliaries and care assistants. General managers in government and large organizations (OR = 2.79, 95% CI 1.41–5.54), managers in transport and storing (OR = 2.44, 95% CI 1.18–5.03), buyers and mobile sales persons (OR = 2.48, 95% CI 1.09–5.60), sales occupations (NES) (OR = 2.78, 95% CI 1.25–6.19) and clerks (NES) (OR = 2.71, 95% CI 1.59–4.61) had increased risk of common mental disorder relative to specialist managers adjusting for social and financial factors and physical ill-health. Conclusions Occupations with higher risk of common mental disorder may be typified by high levels of job demands, especially

  16. Regulatory system reform of occupational health and safety in China

    PubMed Central

    WU, Fenghong; CHI, Yan

    2015-01-01

    With the explosive economic growth and social development, China’s regulatory system of occupational health and safety now faces more and more challenges. This article reviews the history of regulatory system of occupational health and safety in China, as well as the current reform of this regulatory system in the country. Comprehensive, a range of laws, regulations and standards that promulgated by Chinese government, duties and responsibilities of the regulatory departments are described. Problems of current regulatory system, the ongoing adjustments and changes for modifying and improving regulatory system are discussed. The aim of reform and the incentives to drive forward more health and safety conditions in workplaces are also outlined. PMID:25843565

  17. Occupational health and safety issues among nurses in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    de Castro, A B; Cabrera, Suzanne L; Gee, Gilbert C; Fujishiro, Kaori; Tagalog, Eularito A

    2009-04-01

    Nursing is a hazardous occupation in the United States, but little is known about workplace health and safety issues facing the nursing work force in the Philippines. In this article, work-related problems among a sample of nurses in the Philippines are described. Cross-sectional data were collected through a self-administered survey during the Philippine Nurses Association 2007 convention. Measures included four categories: work-related demographics, occupational injury/illness, reporting behavior, and safety concerns. Approximately 40% of nurses had experienced at least one injury or illness in the past year, and 80% had experienced back pain. Most who had an injury did not report it. The top ranking concerns were stress and overwork. Filipino nurses encounter considerable health and safety concerns that are similar to those encountered by nurses in other countries. Future research should examine the work organization factors that contribute to these concerns and strengthen policies to promote health and safety.

  18. London 2012: occupational health in the construction programme.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Lawrence

    2007-05-01

    This article explores the approach to occupational health in the UK construction industry in both broad and narrow contexts. The construction programme for the 2012 Olympic Games and Paralympic Games includes the creation of a large urban park in east London containing many sports venues and served by enhanced infrastructure. The Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA), responsible for the construction programme, is developing plans that seek to assure the health of the thousands of workers who will be engaged in this work. Such plans are not being drafted in a vacuum. In addition to considerable consultation with stakeholders the ODA is also drawing on some of the exciting work that has been undertaken in occupational health in recent years. In particular, the move from a focus on technical health services provided by 'experts' to an acceptance that health issues should be managed within employing organizations. Understanding this broad context provides a solid basis for analysing the specific proposals for occupational support during the Olympic Park construction. PMID:17542423

  19. Occupational health nursing with Navajo workers. Providing culturally competent care.

    PubMed

    Lusk, P; Holst, P

    2001-01-01

    1. Native Americans in the southwestern United States are considered a "vulnerable population." Native Americans have economic difficulties, poor health, and little access to health care. The Navajo nation is the largest Native American reservation in the United States. 2. Occupational health nurses who provide culturally competent care increase the likelihood for Navajo workers to obtain optimal benefits from workplace health services. 3. The nurse uses cultural assessment skills and critical thinking abilities to maximize therapeutic interactions and minimize barriers in communications with workers of other cultural backgrounds. 4. The nurse who is knowledgeable about the Navajo way can help achieve a balance between the traditional ways and Western ways of addressing serious health care issues facing the Navajo worker. This knowledge and cultural awareness also increases the effectiveness of health promotion and health education programs offered to workers, their families, and their communities. PMID:11760275

  20. [OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT IN WORKERS IN IMPROVEMENT OF NATIONAL POLICY IN OCCUPATIONAL HYGIENE AND SAFETY].

    PubMed

    Shur, P Z; Zaĭtseva, N V; Alekseev, V B; Shliapnikov, D M

    2015-01-01

    In accordance with the international documents in the field of occupational safety and hygiene, the assessment and minimization of occupational risks is a key instrument for the health maintenance of workers. One of the main ways to achieve it is the minimization of occupational risks. Correspondingly, the instrument for the implementation of this method is the methodology of analysis of occupational risks. In Russian Federation there were the preconditions for the formation of the system for the assessment and management of occupational risks. As the target of the national (state) policy in the field of occupational safety in accordance with ILO Conventions it can be offered the prevention of accidents and injuries to health arising from work or related with it, minimizing the causes of hazards inherent in the working environment, as far as it is reasonably and practically feasible. Global trend ofusing the methodology of the assessment and management of occupational risks to life and health of citizens requires the improvement of national policies in the field of occupational hygiene and safety. Achieving an acceptable level of occupational risk in the formation of national policy in the field of occupational hygiene and safety can be considered as one of the main tasks. PMID:26155652

  1. A Survey of Occupational Safety & Health Libraries in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Karen S.

    There is very little published information available about occupational safety and health libraries. This study identified, described, and compared the occupational safety and health libraries in the United States. The questionnaire first filtered out those libraries that did not fit the definition of an occupational safety and health library;…

  2. 77 FR 39743 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    .... App, 2), Executive Order 12196 and 13511, Secretary of Labor's Order 1-2012 (77 FR 3912, 1/25/2012... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request...

  3. 75 FR 13783 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ...'s Order 5-2007 (72 FR 31160), and 29 CFR part 1912. Signed at Washington, DC, this 17th day of March... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: MACOSH...

  4. 76 FR 28816 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ...-2010 (75 FR 55335 (9/10/2010)). Signed at Washington, DC, on May 13, 2011. David Michaels, Assistant... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement...

  5. 75 FR 28661 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... Secretary of Labor's Order No. 5-2007 (71 FR 31160). ] Signed at Washington, DC, on May 17, 2010. David... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request...

  6. 76 FR 39902 - Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... 12196 and 13511, Secretary of Labor's Order 4-2010 (75 FR 55355, 9/10/2010), 29 CFR Part 1960 (Basic... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health (FACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request...

  7. 75 FR 28659 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ...), 29 CFR 1912a, and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 5-2007 (71 FR 31160). ] Signed at Washington, DC, on... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement...

  8. 77 FR 31398 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... 1912a; 41 CFR part 102-3; and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 1-2012 (77 FR 3912 1/25/2012). Signed at... Occupational Safety and Health Administration National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Announcement...

  9. 77 FR 5577 - Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App. 2), Secretary of Labor's Order No. 1-2012 (77 FR 3912), and... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MACOSH) AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of...

  10. Examination of the Health Occupations Education Curriculum from a Futurist Perspective: I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Occupational and Continuing Education.

    A project examined the curriculum in the health occupations program to determine what curriculum changes will be necessary to keep pace with and anticipate advances in health occupations. A statewide Texas health occupations education review committee composed of employers, graduates, educators, a union representative, and representatives from…

  11. Core competencies for UK occupational health nurses: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Demou, E.; Kiran, S.; Gaffney, M.; Stevenson, M.; Macdonald, E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Occupational health nurses (OHNs) play a pivotal role in the delivery of occupational health (OH) services. Specific competency guidance has been developed in a number of countries, including the UK. While it is acknowledged that UK OHN practice has evolved in recent years, there has been no formal research to capture these developments to ensure that training and curricula remain up-to-date and reflect current practice. Aims To identify current priorities among UK OHNs of the competencies required for OH practice. Methods A modified Delphi study undertaken among representative OHN networks in the UK. This formed part of a larger study including UK and international occupational physicians. The study was conducted in two rounds using a questionnaire based on available guidance on training competencies for OH practice, the published literature, expert panel reviews and conference discussions. Results Consensus among OHNs was high with 7 out of the 12 domains scoring 100% in rating. ‘Good clinical care’ was the principal domain ranked most important, followed by ‘general principles of assessment & management of occupational hazards to health’. ‘Research methods’ and ‘teaching & educational supervision’ were considered least important. Conclusions This study has established UK OHNs’ current priorities on the competencies required for OH practice. The timing of this paper is opportune with the formal launch of the Faculty of Occupational Health Nursing planned in 2018 and should inform the development of competency requirements as part of the Faculty’s goals for standard setting in OHN education and training. PMID:27492470

  12. Globalization and occupational health: a perspective from southern Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Loewenson, R.

    2001-01-01

    Increased world trade has generally benefited industrialized or strong economies and marginalized those that are weak. This paper examines the impact of globalization on employment trends and occupational health, drawing on examples from southern Africa. While the share of world trade to the world's poorest countries has decreased, workers in these countries increasingly find themselves in insecure, poor-quality jobs, sometimes involving technologies which are obsolete or banned in industrialized countries. The occupational illness which results is generally less visible and not adequately recognized as a problem in low-income countries. Those outside the workplace can also be affected through, for example, work-related environmental pollution and poor living conditions. In order to reduce the adverse effects of global trade reforms on occupational health, stronger social protection measures must be built into production and trade activities, including improved recognition, prevention, and management of work-related ill-health. Furthermore, the success of production and trade systems should be judged on how well they satisfy both economic growth and population health. PMID:11584735

  13. Occupational safety and health in India: now and the future.

    PubMed

    Pingle, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    India, a growing economy and world's largest democracy, has population exceeding 1.2 billion. Out of this huge number, 63.6% form working age group. More than 90% work in the informal economy, mainly agriculture and services. Less than 10% work in the organized sector; mainly industry, mining and some services. New service industries like Information Technology (IT), Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) are increasing rapidly; so is the proportion of females in the workforce. The occupational safety and health (OSH) scenario in India is complex. Unprecedented growth and progress go hand in hand with challenges such as huge workforce in unorganized sector, availability of cheap labor, meager public spending on health, inadequate implementation of existing legislation, lack of reliable OSH data, shortage of OSH professionals, multiplicity of statutory controls, apathy of stakeholders and infrastructure problems. The national policy on OSH at workplace, adopted by the government in 2009, is yet to be implemented. Some of the major occupational risks are accidents, pneumoconiosis, musculoskeletal injuries, chronic obstructive lung diseases; pesticide poisoning and noise induced hearing loss. The three most important OSH needs are: 1. legislation to extend OSH coverage to all sectors of working life including the unorganized sector; 2. spreading the awareness about OSH among stakeholders; 3. development of OSH infrastructure and OSH professionals. Other issues include integration of occupational health with primary health care.

  14. Occupational safety and health in India: now and the future.

    PubMed

    Pingle, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    India, a growing economy and world's largest democracy, has population exceeding 1.2 billion. Out of this huge number, 63.6% form working age group. More than 90% work in the informal economy, mainly agriculture and services. Less than 10% work in the organized sector; mainly industry, mining and some services. New service industries like Information Technology (IT), Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) are increasing rapidly; so is the proportion of females in the workforce. The occupational safety and health (OSH) scenario in India is complex. Unprecedented growth and progress go hand in hand with challenges such as huge workforce in unorganized sector, availability of cheap labor, meager public spending on health, inadequate implementation of existing legislation, lack of reliable OSH data, shortage of OSH professionals, multiplicity of statutory controls, apathy of stakeholders and infrastructure problems. The national policy on OSH at workplace, adopted by the government in 2009, is yet to be implemented. Some of the major occupational risks are accidents, pneumoconiosis, musculoskeletal injuries, chronic obstructive lung diseases; pesticide poisoning and noise induced hearing loss. The three most important OSH needs are: 1. legislation to extend OSH coverage to all sectors of working life including the unorganized sector; 2. spreading the awareness about OSH among stakeholders; 3. development of OSH infrastructure and OSH professionals. Other issues include integration of occupational health with primary health care. PMID:22790480

  15. Occupational Health Management in the Lead Industry: The Korean Experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In 1967, the problem of occupational lead exposure came to public attention in Korea. Since then, regular progress has been made in lowering workplace lead exposures, instituting new workplace controls, and implementing health examinations of exposed workers. Past serious lead poisoning episodes made it possible to introduce biological monitoring programs on a voluntary basis in high-lead-exposure facilities in Korea. Industry-specific occupational health services for lead workers in Korea during the last 22 years can be categorized into three phases. During the first phase (1988-1993), efforts were directed at increasing awareness among workers about the hazards of lead exposure, biological monitoring of blood zinc protoporphyrin began, and a respiratory protection program was introduced. During the second phase (1994-1997), a computerized health management system for lead workers was developed, blood-lead measurement was added to biologic monitoring, and engineering controls were introduced in the workplace to lower air-lead levels to comply with air-lead regulations. Finally, during the third phase (1998-present), a new biomarker, bone-lead measurement by X-ray fluorescence, was introduced. Bone-lead measurement proved to be useful for assessing body burden and to demonstrate past lead exposure in retired workers. Occupational health service practice for lead workers, including the industry-specific group occupational health system, has brought considerable success in the prevention of lead poisoning and in reducing the lead burden in Korean lead workers during the last several decades. The successful achievement of prevention of lead poisoning in Korea was a result of the combined efforts of lead workers, employers, relevant government agencies, and academic institutes. PMID:22953192

  16. Successful business process design. Business plan development for the occupational health services unit.

    PubMed

    Kalina, C M; Fitko, J

    1997-02-01

    1. The occupational health nurse is often mandated by management to validate health services offered and programs developed for employees as valuable to the business and company mission. 2. The business plan of the occupational health service is a working document, changing as needs of the client/customer and internal and external business and socio-economic environment evolve. 3. Alignment with and support of the company mission, goals, and objectives is another method of proving good occupational health is good business. 4. Business planning is a basic business tool the wise and prudent occupational health nurse can use in proving good occupational health is vital to the success of a company.

  17. Revised Guidelines for Comprehensive Health Education, Grades 10-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska State Dept. of Education, Lincoln. Div. of Instructional Services.

    These health curriculum guidelines were designed for teachers of secondary students. Four major topic areas are covered: 1) anatomy, physiology, tissues, systems, heredity, physical activity, and nutriition; 2) family structures, functions, and responsibilities; 3) values, stress, and drug abuse; and 4) the environment, disease control, cancer,…

  18. Guidelines for Training Community Health Workers in Nutrition. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This task-oriented manual for the training of community health workers in nutrition presents information and instructions in two parts. The first part consists of three chapters. The first chapter introduces the guidelines; the second deals with teaching skills and is intended to improve teaching. The third chapter presents some basic facts about…

  19. Occupational health services for shift and night workers.

    PubMed

    Koller, M

    1996-02-01

    It is important for an occupational health service to plan health supervision and measures for shift and night workers considering the biorhythmic and psychosocial desynchronisation, as well as the frequent prevalence of combined effects of adverse environmental and working conditions. The measures taken should be preventive to reduce the expected health risks rather than being rehabilitative. Both a medical surveillance and a counselling service are recommended before and during engagement in shift and night work. Sleep, digestive, metabolic and cardiovascular troubles should be noted and followed up. Medical counselling is especially necessary in the first months of shift and night work exposure and then after long-term exposure. The postulate for timed surveillance and intervention is supported by data of our epidemiologic investigations. The importance of the single health measures is underlined by direct reference to the relevant literature. Recommendations that should be applied in all countries and enterprises are in accordance with the ILO Night Work Convention 1990a and include: (1) appropriate occupational health services provided for night and shift workers, including counselling; (2) first aid facilities during all shift hours; (3) the option of transfer to day work when certified unfit for night work for reasons of health; and (4) measures for women on night shifts, in particular special maternity protection (transfer to day work, social security benefits or an extension of maternity leave). Examples of occupational health services already installed in some states for shift and night workers, and information on future developments are given. Up to now the medical service has been implemented mostly on the basis of collective agreements rather than on the basis of legal provisions. The Austrian Night Shift/Heavy Work Law Regulations of 1981, revised 1993, are cited: workers exposed to night shifts under defined single or combined additional heavy

  20. [Current status of occupational health activities and the way that occupational health services should be offered to small- and medium-scale enterprises].

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Kotaro

    2013-10-01

    Activating occupational safety and health activities among Small- and Medium-scale Enterprises (SMEs) is a major issue because more than 80% of Japanese workers belong to these enterprises, in which the number of workers are less than 300 people. However, as the size of the enterprise decreases, the occurrence of problems of safety and health management systems and safety and health activities increases. Reasons for this include both the limitations of investments shortages of human resources. Occupational health services in SMEs has been provided by the cooperation of the following institutions: public associations (such as Regional Occupational Health Centers, Occupational Health Promotion Centers, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association (JISHA)), occupational health agencies which provide checkup services, health insurance associations, and regional medical services. In contrast to the low coverage of occupational health services among SMEs in Japan, there are some countries in Europe in which this coverage is almost 100%. This is because of the development of occupational health services outside the company. To show the benefits of the safety and health activities to managers of SMEs, and to motivate them to take advantage of the services, it is important to consider measurements. Also, establishing systems that provide those services, improving the quality of specialists such as occupational physicians, and educating human resources, are all necessary.

  1. [Current status of occupational health activities and the way that occupational health services should be offered to small- and medium-scale enterprises].

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Kotaro

    2013-10-01

    Activating occupational safety and health activities among Small- and Medium-scale Enterprises (SMEs) is a major issue because more than 80% of Japanese workers belong to these enterprises, in which the number of workers are less than 300 people. However, as the size of the enterprise decreases, the occurrence of problems of safety and health management systems and safety and health activities increases. Reasons for this include both the limitations of investments shortages of human resources. Occupational health services in SMEs has been provided by the cooperation of the following institutions: public associations (such as Regional Occupational Health Centers, Occupational Health Promotion Centers, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association (JISHA)), occupational health agencies which provide checkup services, health insurance associations, and regional medical services. In contrast to the low coverage of occupational health services among SMEs in Japan, there are some countries in Europe in which this coverage is almost 100%. This is because of the development of occupational health services outside the company. To show the benefits of the safety and health activities to managers of SMEs, and to motivate them to take advantage of the services, it is important to consider measurements. Also, establishing systems that provide those services, improving the quality of specialists such as occupational physicians, and educating human resources, are all necessary. PMID:24107334

  2. Guidelines for school health programs to promote lifelong healthy eating.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    Healthy eating patterns in childhood and adolescence promote optimal childhood health, growth, and intellectual development; prevent immediate health problems, such as iron deficiency anemia, obesity, eating disorders, and dental caries; and may prevent long-term health problems, such as coronary heart disease, cancer, and stroke. School health programs can help children and adolescents attain full educational potential and good health by providing them with the skills, social support, and environmental reinforcement they need to adopt long-term, healthy eating behaviors. This report summarizes strategies most likely to be effective in promoting healthy eating among school-age youths and provides nutrition education guidelines for a comprehensive school health program. These guidelines are based on a review of research, theory, and current practice, and they were developed by CDC in collaboration with experts from universities and from national, federal, and voluntary agencies. The guidelines include recommendations on seven aspects of a school-based program to promote healthy eating: school policy on nutrition, a sequential, coordinated curriculum, appropriate instruction for students, integration of school food service and nutrition education, staff training, family and community involvement, and program evaluation.

  3. Building the occupational health team: keys to successful interdisciplinary collaboration.

    PubMed

    Wachs, Joy E

    2005-04-01

    Teamwork among occupational health and safety professionals, management, and employees is vital to solving today's complex problems cost-effectively. No single discipline can meet all the needs of workers and the workplace. However, teamwork can be time-consuming and difficult if attention is not given to the role of the team leader, the necessary skills of team members, and the importance of a supportive environment. Bringing team members together regularly to foster positive relationships and infuse them with the philosophy of strength in diversity is essential for teams to be sustained and work to be accomplished. By working in tandem, occupational health and safety professionals can become the model team in business and industry delivering on their promise of a safe and healthy workplace for America's work force. PMID:15853292

  4. Trial-Based Economic Evaluations in Occupational Health

    PubMed Central

    van Wier, Marieke F.; Tompa, Emile; Bongers, Paulien M.; van der Beek, Allard J.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Bosmans, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    To allocate available resources as efficiently as possible, decision makers need information on the relative economic merits of occupational health and safety (OHS) interventions. Economic evaluations can provide this information by comparing the costs and consequences of alternatives. Nevertheless, only a few of the studies that consider the effectiveness of OHS interventions take the extra step of considering their resource implications. Moreover, the methodological quality of those that do is generally poor. Therefore, this study aims to help occupational health researchers conduct high-quality trial-based economic evaluations by discussing the theory and methodology that underlie them, and by providing recommendations for good practice regarding their design, analysis, and reporting. This study also helps consumers of this literature with understanding and critically appraising trial-based economic evaluations of OHS interventions. PMID:24854249

  5. Proceedings from the 1998 Occupational Health Conference: Benchmarking for Excellence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe (Editor); O'Donnell, Michele D. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The theme of the 1998 NASA Occupational Health Conference was "Benchmarking for Excellence." Conference participants included NASA and contractor Occupational Health professionals, as well as speakers from NASA, other Federal agencies and private companies. Addressing the Conference theme, speakers described new concepts and techniques for corporate benchmarking. They also identified practices used by NASA, other Federal agencies, and by award winning programs in private industry. A two-part Professional Development Course on workplace toxicology and indoor air quality was conducted a day before the Conference. A program manager with the International Space Station Office provided an update on station activities and an expert delivered practical advice on both oral and written communications. A keynote address on the medical aspects of space walking by a retired NASA astronaut highlighted the Conference. Discipline breakout sessions, poster presentations, and a KSC tour complemented the Conference agenda.

  6. New Consultant Joins Occupational Health Services’ Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    One of Occupational Health Services’ (OHS') most valuable resources is new medical consultant Anusha Belani, M.D., chief of epidemiology at Frederick Memorial Hospital (FMH). Belani graduated from the University of Delhi and received her medical degree from Lady Hardinge Medical College in 1979. She is currently the only physician in Frederick County who specializes in infectious diseases. After completing her residency at Sinai Hospital, Belani established her own practice in Frederick in January of 1987.

  7. Demonstrating the value of occupational and environmental health programs.

    PubMed

    Strasser, P B

    2001-12-01

    As the saying goes, "Just do it." If the occupational and environmental health service has never been formally evaluated, there is no better time than now. Company management may change at any time. A new administrator may want an accounting of the department's value. Do not wait for that time and be in a position where you have to put something together instantly. Be proactive--start the process now.

  8. Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

    2013-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article.

  9. Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

    2013-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article. PMID:23380641

  10. Kaizen: ergonomics approach to occupational health and safety.

    PubMed

    Kumashiro, Masaharu

    2011-12-01

    Kaizen (work improvement) is the forte of Japanese industry. Kaizen activities were born in the early 20th century under the name efficiency research. These activities were the beginning of industrial engineering (IE). Later on people began to rethink the single-minded devotion to improving productivity. Then the job re-design concept was developed. The main target of kaizen in the area of occupational health and safety in Japanese manufacturing is the improvement of inadequate working posture followed by the improvement of work for transporting and lifting heavy objects. Unfortunately, the kaizen activities undertaken by most Japanese companies are still focused on improving productivity and quality. The know-how for promoting kaizen activities that integrate the three aspects of IE, occupational health, and ergonomics is not being accumulated, however. In particular, the IE techniques should be incorporated into kaizen activities aimed at occupational safety and health, and the quantitative assessment of workload is required. In addition, it is important for on-the-job kaizen training in the ERGOMA Approach for production supervisors, who are the main advocates of IE kaizen.

  11. Occupational health and the rural worker: agriculture, mining, and logging.

    PubMed

    Pratt, D S

    1990-10-01

    More than 50 million Americans live in rural areas. These rural residents often work for small businesses or in the extraction industries (farming, mining, and logging). Because of the size of the businesses, the mandate of the Occupation Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) does not cover these workers and they are seldom afforded the same protection as urban workers. This review focuses on the special health problems facing farm workers, farmers, miners, and loggers. Farm workers are often ill and are affected by psychological illness, injuries, parasites, skin diseases, and the dangers of agrichemicals. Farm owners also face the hazards of stress and have very high rates of suicide. In addition, they are often injured on the job and suffer the highest rate of job related fatality of any work group. The complex farm environment presents a continuous threat to the lungs. This danger has worsened with the increased use of confinement buildings for poultry, hogs, and cattle. As farming has changed with increased mechanization, attendant medical problems have arisen. These "illnesses of innovation" are important. Mining and logging also are dangerous occupations with acute and chronic problems including respiratory illness, vascular problems, and malignancy. The decade of the 1990s must be one of increased attention to rural occupational health care and research.

  12. Cardiovascular Health Status by Occupational Group - 21 States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Shockey, Taylor M; Sussell, Aaron L; Odom, Erika C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for one of every three deaths in the United States, making it the leading cause of mortality in the country (1). The American Heart Association established seven ideal cardiovascular health behaviors or modifiable factors to improve CVD outcomes in the United States. These cardiovascular health metrics (CHMs) are 1) not smoking, 2) being physically active, 3) having normal blood pressure, 4) having normal blood glucose, 5) being of normal weight, 6) having normal cholesterol levels, and 7) eating a healthy diet (2). Meeting six or all seven CHMs is associated with a lower risk for all-cause, CVD, and ischemic heart disease mortalities compared with the risk to persons who meet none or only one CHM (3). Fewer than 2% of U.S. adults meet all seven of the American Heart Association's CHMs (4). Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality account for an estimated annual $120 billion in lost productivity in the workplace; thus, workplaces are viable settings for effective health promotion programs (5). With over 130 million employed persons in the United States, accounting for about 55% of all U.S. adults, the working population is an important demographic group to evaluate with regard to cardiovascular health status. To determine if an association between occupation and CHM score exists, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) industry and occupation module, which was implemented in 21 states. Among all occupational groups, community and social services employees (14.6%), transportation and material moving employees (14.3%), and architecture and engineering employees (11.6%) had the highest adjusted prevalence of meeting two or fewer CHMs. Transportation and material moving employees also had the highest prevalence of "not ideal" ("0" [i.e., no CHMs met]) scores for three of the seven CHMs: physical activity (54.1%), blood pressure (31.9%), and weight (body mass index [BMI]; 75.5%). Disparities

  13. [ILO plan of action (2010-2016) on occupational safety and health and new list of occupational diseases].

    PubMed

    Denisov, É I; Mazitova, N N; Shemetova, M V; Chelishcheva, M Iu; Chesalin, P V

    2011-01-01

    ILO plan of action (2010-2016) to achieve widespread ratification and effective implementation of the occupational safety and health instruments (Convention No. 155, its 2002 Protocol and Convention No. 187) is discussed. ILO documents on recording and notification as well as new list of occupational diseases (revised 2010) are considered.

  14. [ILO plan of action (2010-2016) on occupational safety and health and new list of occupational diseases].

    PubMed

    Denisov, É I; Mazitova, N N; Shemetova, M V; Chelishcheva, M Iu; Chesalin, P V

    2011-01-01

    ILO plan of action (2010-2016) to achieve widespread ratification and effective implementation of the occupational safety and health instruments (Convention No. 155, its 2002 Protocol and Convention No. 187) is discussed. ILO documents on recording and notification as well as new list of occupational diseases (revised 2010) are considered. PMID:21614798

  15. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Professional Nurse (Associate Degree). Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (professional nurse) in the nursing cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing therapeutic…

  16. Study on occupational safety and health strategy for Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Kuen-Yuan; Su, Teh-Sheng; Kuo, Chao-Yin; Lin, Chien-Liang; Lin, Han-Yu; Yu, Yi-Chun

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a set of occupational safety and health (OSH) issues and development policies suitable for adoption in Taiwan. A survey was conducted on a sample of 102 experts and 235 industrial work safety personnel in Taiwan for statistical analysis of the general consensus, with the results showing such consensus in 104 individual policy indicators. Our results reveal that the most appropriate targets were considered to be annual 10% reductions in the 'occupational accident disability rate', 'occupational accident injury rate' and 'occupational diseases before 2010'. Responding to the specific question of the appropriate method of achieving a reduction in the number of accidents in Taiwan, the primary consideration for 13.4% of the experts and 10.6% of the industry personnel was 'promoting OSH awareness and enhancing the overall safety culture'. As regards the current OSH policy focus, 11.2% of the experts considered 'improving OSH legislation, standards and systems' to be the most important, whilst 8.9% of the industry personnel felt that 'recognizing work stress, overwork and emerging OSH issues' were the most important.

  17. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment: Development and Testing of an Undergraduate Occupational Health Nursing Curriculum.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Marjorie C; Berry, Peggy

    2015-08-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses' success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education.

  18. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment: Development and Testing of an Undergraduate Occupational Health Nursing Curriculum.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Marjorie C; Berry, Peggy

    2015-08-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses' success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education. PMID:26077879

  19. A Pilot Assessment of Occupational Health Hazards in the US Electronic Scrap Recycling Industry

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Diana M.; Gong, Wei; Page, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) surveyed a randomly selected sample of electronic scrap (e-scrap) recycling facilities nationwide to characterize work processes, exposures, and controls. Despite multiple attempts to contact 278 facilities, only 47 responded (17% response rate). Surveyed facilities reported recycling a wide variety of electronics. The most common recycling processes were manual dismantling and sorting. Other processes included shredding, crushing, and automated separation. Many facilities reported that they had health and safety programs in place. However, some facilities reported the use of compressed air for cleaning, a practice that can lead to increased employee dust exposures, and some facilities allowed food and drinks in the production areas, a practice that can lead to ingestion of contaminants. Although our results may not be generalizable to all US e-scrap recycling facilities, they are informative regarding health and safety programs in the industry. We concluded that e-scrap recycling has the potential for a wide variety of occupational exposures particularly because of the frequent use of manual processes. On-site evaluations of e-scrap recyclers are needed to determine if reported work processes, practices, and controls are effective and meet current standards and guidelines. Educating the e-scrap recycling industry about health and safety best practices, specifically related to safe handling of metal dust, would help protect employees. PMID:25738822

  20. A Pilot Assessment of Occupational Health Hazards in the US Electronic Scrap Recycling Industry.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Diana M; Gong, Wei; Page, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) surveyed a randomly selected sample of electronic scrap (e-scrap) recycling facilities nationwide to characterize work processes, exposures, and controls. Despite multiple attempts to contact 278 facilities, only 47 responded (17% response rate). Surveyed facilities reported recycling a wide variety of electronics. The most common recycling processes were manual dismantling and sorting. Other processes included shredding, crushing, and automated separation. Many facilities reported that they had health and safety programs in place. However, some facilities reported the use of compressed air for cleaning, a practice that can lead to increased employee dust exposures, and some facilities allowed food and drinks in the production areas, a practice that can lead to ingestion of contaminants. Although our results may not be generalizable to all US e-scrap recycling facilities, they are informative regarding health and safety programs in the industry. We concluded that e-scrap recycling has the potential for a wide variety of occupational exposures particularly because of the frequent use of manual processes. On-site evaluations of e-scrap recyclers are needed to determine if reported work processes, practices, and controls are effective and meet current standards and guidelines. Educating the e-scrap recycling industry about health and safety best practices, specifically related to safe handling of metal dust, would help protect employees.

  1. Behavioral Health Competence: An Exploration of Army Reserve Occupational Therapists

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Paul B.; DeCleene, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The behavioral health competence of Army Reserve Occupational Therapists (OT) was examined by electronic survey to determine current levels of competence and highlight pre-deployment training needs. Results indicated that while Army Reserve OTs report high levels of behavioral health competence, many questions regarding diagnosis, assessment, evaluation, treatment planning, intervention, and progress arose throughout deployment. OT’s often relied on skills from Level II fieldwork education and entry-level didactic education for competency. Perceived competencies may be compromised by curriculum changes in entry-level education, available fieldwork settings, and a lack of adequate training currently available prior to deployment. PMID:25368437

  2. [Students awareness of health teaching: evaluation of "health education" course and the occupational health nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Junko; Majima, Yukie; Ishihara, Itsuko

    2003-09-01

    The "health education" course is an important part of the baccalaureate curriculum in nursing. It is essential to teach students effective health education in a client oriented way. In order to improve the quality and content of this course, we extracted students descriptions from records of 44 students who had carried out group health education during nursing practice for the occupational health nursing course. We then analyzed students written sentences on their views concerning health teaching. After sentence analysis, we categorized these concepts into groups and titled them. The results of clarification of categories showed that the most common student awareness was in regard to technical and instructional skills, such as precise and suitable language selection for laymen, and utilization of teaching devices or mediums, during implementation of health teaching(43.6%). Secondly, assessment of health needs for a certain working population(10.3%), and effective teaching types such as instructional participant volunteers and full participation(9.2%) were deemed important. Thirdly, identification of the role of the occupational nurse(7.7%), and lastly the necessity of evaluation(2.3%) were considered necessary. Over all, in this study we found that students were most concerned about the instructional skills during the presentation of health education. Also, these results suggest that development of contents in the "health education" course to reinforce students assessment and evaluative abilities should be incorporated into the course. Furthermore, faculties who teach a "health education" course should provide a large variety of teaching materials and creative instructional methods for the students.

  3. Gender in occupational health research of farmworkers: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Rima R; Hojeij, Safa; Elzein, Kareem

    2014-01-01

    Background Farmwork is one of the most hazardous occupations for men and women. Research suggests sex/gender shapes hazardous workplace exposures and outcomes for farmworkers. This paper reviews the occupational health literature on farmworkers, assessing how gender is treated and interpreted in exposure-outcome studies. Methods The paper evaluates peer-reviewed articles on men and women farmworkers' health published between 2000 and 2012 in PubMed or SCOPUS. Articles were identified and analyzed for approaches toward sampling, data analysis, and use of exposure indicators in relation to sex/gender. Results 18% of articles reported on and interpreted sex/gender differences in health outcomes and exposures. Sex/gender dynamics often shaped health outcomes, yet adequate data was not collected on established sex/gender risk factors relating to study outcomes. Conclusion Research can better incorporate sex/gender analysis into design, analytical and interpretive approaches to better explore its mediation of health outcomes in light of emerging calls to mainstream gender research. Am. J. Ind. Med. 57:1344–1367, 2014. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:25227724

  4. Objectives for the nation: occupational safety and health

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Fifteen priority areas were identified in the 1979 Surgeon General's report pertaining to improving health in America, for which objectives were then established. Specific to the problem of occupational safety and health was modification of working conditions where individuals were exposed to toxic chemicals, harmful fibrous dusts, coal dust, cotton fiber, ionizing radiation, physical hazards, excessive noise and stress, and routinized trivial tasks. Various health problems associated with these tasks included lung cancer and other cancers, heart disease, birth defects, sensory deficits, injuries, and psychological problems. Prevention/promotion measures included potential measures aimed at worker education and development of occupational health and safety systems, service measures for preventive and treatment services, technological measures (engineering, control technology, and measurement methods), legislative and regulatory measures, and economic measures. Use of specific measures differed for different problems. Specific objectives for no later than 1990, including improving health status, reducing risk factors, improving public and professional awareness, improving services and protection, and improving surveillance and evaluation were described. Data sources at national and state or local levels were provided.

  5. Occupational safety and health implications of increased coal utilization.

    PubMed Central

    Bridbord, K; Costello, J; Gamble, J; Groce, D; Hutchison, M; Jones, W; Merchant, J; Ortmeyer, C; Reger, R; Wagner, W L

    1979-01-01

    An area of major concern in considering increased coal production and utilization is the health and safety of increased numbers of workers who mine, process, or utilize coal. Hazards related to mining activities in the past have been especially serious, resulting in many mine related accidental deaths, disabling injuries, and disability and death from chronic lung disease. Underground coal mines are clearly less safe than surface mines. Over one-third of currently employed underground miners experience chronic lung disease. Other stresses include noise and extremes of heat and cold. Newly emphasized technologies of the use of diesel powered mining equipment and the use of longwall mining techniques may be associated with serious health effects. Workers at coal-fired power plants are also potentially at risk of occupational diseases. Occupational safety and health aspects of coal mining are understood well enough today to justify implementing necessary and technically feasible and available control measures to minimize potential problems associated with increased coal production and use in the future. Increased emphasis on safety and health training for inexperienced coal miners expected to enter the work force is clearly needed. The recently enacted Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 will provide impetus for increased control over hazards in coal mining. PMID:540621

  6. [The labor potential in occupational health services at the provincial level before the occupational health services act came into effect].

    PubMed

    Durasiewicz, Z

    1999-01-01

    The author evaluates how far the personnel of occupational health services (OHS) at the provincial level is ready to undertake and implement the tasks provided by the Occupational Health Services Act at the eve of its coming into force. Personnel resources of OHS differ depending on the region. This applies to all groups of workers and is generally related to the provincial regulations and employment policy. Specialists-consultants constituted 12% of provincial OHS workers and the majority of them (60%) were employed on a full-time basis. Specialists in laryngology, ophthalmology and neurology were employed most frequently. Physicians with additional qualifications necessary for performing preventive examinations accounted for 16% of the total number of OHS workers; and those with acknowledged competence due to long experience--40%. Thus, 60% (400) of physicians should be trained in research institutions. As to qualifications of nurses, the situation is even worse. Only 6% of nurses were specialised in occupational health, and 35% of nurses employed at the provincial level completed relevant qualification courses. The qualifications of over 60% of nurses are insufficient for implementing tasks provided by the new OHS Act.

  7. Occupational health management system: A study of expatriate construction professionals.

    PubMed

    Chan, I Y S; Leung, M Y; Liu, A M M

    2016-08-01

    Due to its direct impact on the safety and function of organizations, occupational health has been a concern of the construction industry for many years. The inherent complexity of occupational health management presents challenges that make a systems approach essential. From a systems perspective, health is conceptualized as an emergent property of a system in which processes operating at the individual and organizational level are inextricably connected. Based on the fundamental behavior-to-performance-to-outcome (B-P-O) theory of industrial/organizational psychology, this study presents the development of an I-CB-HP-O (Input-Coping Behaviors-Health Performance-Outcomes) health management systems model spanning individual and organizational boundaries. The model is based on a survey of Hong Kong expatriate construction professionals working in Mainland China. Such professionals tend to be under considerable stress due not only to an adverse work environment with dynamic tasks, but also the need to confront the cross-cultural issues arising from expatriation. A questionnaire was designed based on 6 focus groups involving 44 participants, and followed by a pilot study. Of the 500 questionnaires distributed in the main study, 137 valid returns were received, giving a response rate of 27.4%. The data were analyzed using statistical techniques such as factor analysis, reliability testing, Pearson correlation analysis, multiple regression modeling, and structural equation modeling. Theories of coping behaviors and health performance tend to focus on the isolated causal effects of single factors and/or posits the model at single, individual level; while industrial practices on health management tend to focus on organizational policy and training. By developing the I-CB-HP-O health management system, incorporating individual, interpersonal, and organizational perspectives, this study bridges the gap between theory and practice while providing empirical support for a

  8. Occupational health management system: A study of expatriate construction professionals.

    PubMed

    Chan, I Y S; Leung, M Y; Liu, A M M

    2016-08-01

    Due to its direct impact on the safety and function of organizations, occupational health has been a concern of the construction industry for many years. The inherent complexity of occupational health management presents challenges that make a systems approach essential. From a systems perspective, health is conceptualized as an emergent property of a system in which processes operating at the individual and organizational level are inextricably connected. Based on the fundamental behavior-to-performance-to-outcome (B-P-O) theory of industrial/organizational psychology, this study presents the development of an I-CB-HP-O (Input-Coping Behaviors-Health Performance-Outcomes) health management systems model spanning individual and organizational boundaries. The model is based on a survey of Hong Kong expatriate construction professionals working in Mainland China. Such professionals tend to be under considerable stress due not only to an adverse work environment with dynamic tasks, but also the need to confront the cross-cultural issues arising from expatriation. A questionnaire was designed based on 6 focus groups involving 44 participants, and followed by a pilot study. Of the 500 questionnaires distributed in the main study, 137 valid returns were received, giving a response rate of 27.4%. The data were analyzed using statistical techniques such as factor analysis, reliability testing, Pearson correlation analysis, multiple regression modeling, and structural equation modeling. Theories of coping behaviors and health performance tend to focus on the isolated causal effects of single factors and/or posits the model at single, individual level; while industrial practices on health management tend to focus on organizational policy and training. By developing the I-CB-HP-O health management system, incorporating individual, interpersonal, and organizational perspectives, this study bridges the gap between theory and practice while providing empirical support for a

  9. Potential health effects associated with dermal exposure to occupational chemicals.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey E; Meade, B Jean

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of workers in the United States, spanning a variety of occupational industries and sectors, who are potentially exposed to chemicals that can be absorbed through the skin. Occupational skin exposures can result in numerous diseases that can adversely affect an individual's health and capacity to perform at work. In general, there are three types of chemical-skin interactions of concern: direct skin effects, immune-mediated skin effects, and systemic effects. While hundreds of chemicals (metals, epoxy and acrylic resins, rubber additives, and chemical intermediates) present in virtually every industry have been identified to cause direct and immune-mediated effects such as contact dermatitis or urticaria, less is known about the number and types of chemicals contributing to systemic effects. In an attempt to raise awareness, skin notation assignments communicate the potential for dermal absorption; however, there is a need for standardization among agencies to communicate an accurate description of occupational hazards. Studies have suggested that exposure to complex mixtures, excessive hand washing, use of hand sanitizers, high frequency of wet work, and environmental or other factors may enhance penetration and stimulate other biological responses altering the outcomes of dermal chemical exposure. Understanding the hazards of dermal exposure is essential for the proper implementation of protective measures to ensure worker safety and health. PMID:25574139

  10. Potential Health Effects Associated with Dermal Exposure to Occupational Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey E; Meade, B Jean

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of workers in the United States, spanning a variety of occupational industries and sectors, who are potentially exposed to chemicals that can be absorbed through the skin. Occupational skin exposures can result in numerous diseases that can adversely affect an individual’s health and capacity to perform at work. In general, there are three types of chemical–skin interactions of concern: direct skin effects, immune-mediated skin effects, and systemic effects. While hundreds of chemicals (metals, epoxy and acrylic resins, rubber additives, and chemical intermediates) present in virtually every industry have been identified to cause direct and immune-mediated effects such as contact dermatitis or urticaria, less is known about the number and types of chemicals contributing to systemic effects. In an attempt to raise awareness, skin notation assignments communicate the potential for dermal absorption; however, there is a need for standardization among agencies to communicate an accurate description of occupational hazards. Studies have suggested that exposure to complex mixtures, excessive hand washing, use of hand sanitizers, high frequency of wet work, and environmental or other factors may enhance penetration and stimulate other biological responses altering the outcomes of dermal chemical exposure. Understanding the hazards of dermal exposure is essential for the proper implementation of protective measures to ensure worker safety and health. PMID:25574139

  11. 78 FR 12065 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Personal Protective Technology for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

  12. 78 FR 78362 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Personal; Notice of public meeting in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and... Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of... Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces...

  13. 29 CFR 1960.19 - Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health. 1960.19 Section 1960.19 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Standards § 1960.19 Other...

  14. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960.79 Section 1960.79 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  15. 48 CFR 1371.113 - Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. 1371.113 Section 1371.113 Federal Acquisition... CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.113 Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. Insert clause 1352.271-82, Department of Labor Occupational Safety and...

  16. 29 CFR 1960.35 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1960.35 Section 1960.35 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  17. 29 CFR 1960.35 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1960.35 Section 1960.35 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  18. 29 CFR 1960.19 - Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health. 1960.19 Section 1960.19 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Standards § 1960.19 Other...

  19. 29 CFR 1960.12 - Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information. 1960.12 Section 1960.12 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.12 Dissemination...

  20. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960.79 Section 1960.79 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  1. 29 CFR 1912.5 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. 1912.5 Section 1912.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Matters § 1912.5 National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. (a) Section 7(a) of...

  2. 48 CFR 1371.113 - Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. 1371.113 Section 1371.113 Federal Acquisition... CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.113 Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. Insert clause 1352.271-82, Department of Labor Occupational Safety and...

  3. 29 CFR 1960.35 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1960.35 Section 1960.35 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  4. 29 CFR 1960.12 - Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information. 1960.12 Section 1960.12 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.12 Dissemination...

  5. 29 CFR 1912.5 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. 1912.5 Section 1912.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Matters § 1912.5 National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. (a) Section 7(a) of...

  6. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960.79 Section 1960.79 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  7. 29 CFR 1912.5 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. 1912.5 Section 1912.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Matters § 1912.5 National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. (a) Section 7(a) of...

  8. 29 CFR 1960.12 - Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information. 1960.12 Section 1960.12 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.12 Dissemination...

  9. 48 CFR 1371.113 - Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. 1371.113 Section 1371.113 Federal Acquisition... CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.113 Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. Insert clause 1352.271-82, Department of Labor Occupational Safety and...

  10. 29 CFR 1960.19 - Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health. 1960.19 Section 1960.19 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Standards § 1960.19 Other...

  11. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs. 1960.80 Section 1960.80 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal...

  12. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs. 1960.80 Section 1960.80 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal...

  13. 29 CFR 1902.6 - Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1902.6 Section 1902.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... Occupational Safety and Health. The Assistant Secretary will consult, as appropriate, with the Director of...

  14. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs. 1960.80 Section 1960.80 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal...

  15. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs. 1960.80 Section 1960.80 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal...

  16. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  17. 29 CFR 1912.5 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. 1912.5 Section 1912.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Matters § 1912.5 National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. (a) Section 7(a) of...

  18. 29 CFR 1902.6 - Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1902.6 Section 1902.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... Occupational Safety and Health. The Assistant Secretary will consult, as appropriate, with the Director of...

  19. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960.79 Section 1960.79 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  20. 29 CFR 1960.12 - Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information. 1960.12 Section 1960.12 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.12 Dissemination...

  1. 29 CFR 1902.6 - Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1902.6 Section 1902.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... Occupational Safety and Health. The Assistant Secretary will consult, as appropriate, with the Director of...

  2. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs. 1960.80 Section 1960.80 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal...

  3. 29 CFR 1960.19 - Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health. 1960.19 Section 1960.19 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Standards § 1960.19 Other...

  4. 29 CFR 1902.6 - Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1902.6 Section 1902.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... Occupational Safety and Health. The Assistant Secretary will consult, as appropriate, with the Director of...

  5. 29 CFR 1912.5 - National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. 1912.5 Section 1912.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Matters § 1912.5 National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. (a) Section 7(a) of...

  6. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  7. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  8. 29 CFR 1960.19 - Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Other Federal agency standards affecting occupational safety and health. 1960.19 Section 1960.19 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Standards § 1960.19 Other...

  9. 48 CFR 1371.113 - Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. 1371.113 Section 1371.113 Federal Acquisition... CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.113 Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. Insert clause 1352.271-82, Department of Labor Occupational Safety and...

  10. 48 CFR 1371.113 - Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. 1371.113 Section 1371.113 Federal Acquisition... CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.113 Department of Labor occupational safety and health standards for ship repair. Insert clause 1352.271-82, Department of Labor Occupational Safety and...

  11. 29 CFR 1960.35 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1960.35 Section 1960.35 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  12. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960.79 Section 1960.79 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  13. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. 1960.11 Section 1960.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL...

  14. 29 CFR 1960.12 - Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information. 1960.12 Section 1960.12 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.12 Dissemination...

  15. 29 CFR 1902.6 - Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Consultation with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 1902.6 Section 1902.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... Occupational Safety and Health. The Assistant Secretary will consult, as appropriate, with the Director of...

  16. Variation in health blog features and elements by gender, occupation, and perspective.

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward Alan; Pole, Antoinette; Bateman, Clancey

    2011-08-01

    This study explores whether there are gender and occupational differences in the health blogosphere and whether there are differences by blogger perspective. Data were derived from content analysis of 951 health blogs identified between June 2007 and May 2008. Results indicate that male, physician bloggers were more likely to have blogs that feature a SiteMeter, sponsorship, and advertising, which also were more prevalent among those blogging from a professional perspective. Women, bloggers in non-health-related employment, and patient/consumer and caregiver bloggers were more likely to blog about disease and disability; men, bloggers in health-related employment, and professional bloggers were more likely to blog about provider experiences, health research/news, and health policy, business, law, and technology. Because the Internet is becoming a primary source of health information, establishing normative guidelines regarding information quality, patient privacy, and conflicts of interest is essential. Future research should build on these findings using national surveys of health bloggers and textual analysis of blog content. PMID:21432711

  17. Variation in health blog features and elements by gender, occupation, and perspective.

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward Alan; Pole, Antoinette; Bateman, Clancey

    2011-08-01

    This study explores whether there are gender and occupational differences in the health blogosphere and whether there are differences by blogger perspective. Data were derived from content analysis of 951 health blogs identified between June 2007 and May 2008. Results indicate that male, physician bloggers were more likely to have blogs that feature a SiteMeter, sponsorship, and advertising, which also were more prevalent among those blogging from a professional perspective. Women, bloggers in non-health-related employment, and patient/consumer and caregiver bloggers were more likely to blog about disease and disability; men, bloggers in health-related employment, and professional bloggers were more likely to blog about provider experiences, health research/news, and health policy, business, law, and technology. Because the Internet is becoming a primary source of health information, establishing normative guidelines regarding information quality, patient privacy, and conflicts of interest is essential. Future research should build on these findings using national surveys of health bloggers and textual analysis of blog content.

  18. Improving occupational health care for construction workers: a process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the process of a job-specific workers’ health surveillance (WHS) in improving occupational health care for construction workers. Methods From January to July 2012 were 899 bricklayers and supervisors invited for the job-specific WHS at three locations of one occupational health service throughout the Netherlands. The intervention aimed at detecting signs of work-related health problems, reduced work capacity and/or reduced work functioning. Measurements were obtained using a recruitment record and questionnaires at baseline and follow-up. The process evaluation included the following: reach (attendance rate), intervention dose delivered (provision of written recommendations and follow-up appointments), intervention dose received (intention to follow-up on advice directly after WHS and remembrance of advice three months later), and fidelity (protocol adherence). The workers scored their increase in knowledge from 0–10 with regard to health status and work ability, their satisfaction with the intervention and the perceived (future) effect of such an intervention. Program implementation was defined as the mean score of reach, fidelity, and intervention dose delivered and received. Results Reach was 9% (77 workers participated), fidelity was 67%, the intervention dose delivered was 92 and 63%, and the intervention dose received was 68 and 49%. The total programme implementation was 58%. The increases in knowledge regarding the health status and work ability of the workers after the WHS were graded as 7.0 and 5.9, respectively. The satisfaction of the workers with the entire intervention was graded as 7.5. The perceived (future) effects on health status were graded as 6.3, and the effects on work ability were graded with a 5.2. The economic recession affected the workers as well as the occupational health service that enacted the implementation. Conclusions Programme implementation was acceptable. Low reach, limited protocol adherence and

  19. Occupational health problems of bridge and tunnel officers.

    PubMed

    Herbert, R; Szeinuk, J; O'Brien, S

    2001-01-01

    Bridge and tunnel officers (BTOs) sustain potential exposure to a number of physical, chemical, and work-organizational factors. They are at risk for both fatal and non-fatal occupational injuries due to moving vehicles, workplace violence, vehicular fires, and physical hazards, such as slippery walking surfaces due to oil or ice on roadways. This chapter describes the spectrum of occupational injuries and illnesses which may be seen in BTOs, focusing on: 1) vehicular exhaust and air pollution, 2) ergonomic hazards, 3) job strain, 4) noise, 5) blood-borne pathogens, 6) chemicals used in road work and maintenance (e.g., lead-based paint), and 7) with the recent advent of electronic traffic sensors, microwave radiation. Special emphasis is given to respiratory disease and cardiovascular disease. Finally, some recommendations for focused health surveillance and preventive efforts in this population are made.

  20. Occupational health problems of bridge and tunnel officers.

    PubMed

    Herbert, R; Szeinuk, J; O'Brien, S

    2001-01-01

    Bridge and tunnel officers (BTOs) sustain potential exposure to a number of physical, chemical, and work-organizational factors. They are at risk for both fatal and non-fatal occupational injuries due to moving vehicles, workplace violence, vehicular fires, and physical hazards, such as slippery walking surfaces due to oil or ice on roadways. This chapter describes the spectrum of occupational injuries and illnesses which may be seen in BTOs, focusing on: 1) vehicular exhaust and air pollution, 2) ergonomic hazards, 3) job strain, 4) noise, 5) blood-borne pathogens, 6) chemicals used in road work and maintenance (e.g., lead-based paint), and 7) with the recent advent of electronic traffic sensors, microwave radiation. Special emphasis is given to respiratory disease and cardiovascular disease. Finally, some recommendations for focused health surveillance and preventive efforts in this population are made. PMID:11107224

  1. Draugen HSE-case - occupational health risk management

    SciTech Connect

    Glas, J.J.P.; Kjaer, E.

    1996-12-31

    The Draugen HSE-Case serves as a risk management tool. Originally, risk management included only major safety hazards to personnel, environment and assets. Work Environment risks such as ergonomics, psycho-social factors and exposure to chemicals and noise, was not given the same attention. The Draugen HSE-Case addresses this weakness and extends all work environment risks. In order to promote line responsibility and commitment, relevant personnel is involved in the Case development. {open_quotes}THESIS{degrees}, a software application, is used to systematize input and to generate reports. The Draugen HSE-case encompasses: HSE risk analyses related to specific activities; Control of risk related to work environment; Established tolerability criteria; Risk reducing measures; Emergency contingency measures; and Requirements for Competence and Follow-up. The development of Draugen HSE-Case is a continuous process. It will serve to minimize the potential of occupational illnesses, raise general awareness, and make occupational health management more cost-effective.

  2. Technology architecture guidelines for a health care system.

    PubMed

    Jones, D T; Duncan, R; Langberg, M L; Shabot, M M

    2000-01-01

    Although the demand for use of information technology within the healthcare industry is intensifying, relatively little has been written about guidelines to optimize IT investments. A technology architecture is a set of guidelines for technology integration within an enterprise. The architecture is a critical tool in the effort to control information technology (IT) operating costs by constraining the number of technologies supported. A well-designed architecture is also an important aid to integrating disparate applications, data stores and networks. The authors led the development of a thorough, carefully designed technology architecture for a large and rapidly growing health care system. The purpose and design criteria are described, as well as the process for gaining consensus and disseminating the architecture. In addition, the processes for using, maintaining, and handling exceptions are described. The technology architecture is extremely valuable to health care organizations both in controlling costs and promoting integration.

  3. Canadian soil quality guidelines for copper: Environmental and human health

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This report begins with background information on the physical and chemical properties of copper, the production and use of copper in Canada, its levels in the Canadian environment, and existing guidelines and criteria regarding copper concentrations in various media. It then reviews the environmental fate and behaviour of copper, notably in the soil; the behavior and effects of copper in biota, including soil microbial processes, terrestrial plants and invertebrates, livestock and wildlife, and bioaccumulation; and the pharmacokinetics and toxicology of copper in mammals and humans, concluding with an overall toxicological evaluation and human exposure estimates. This information is used to derive environmental and human health soil quality guidelines for copper to protect environmental and human health receptors, for agricultural, residential/parkland, commercial, and industrial land uses.

  4. Gathering Occupational Health Data from Informal Workers: The Brazilian Experience.

    PubMed

    Santana, Vilma Sousa; Ferrite, Silvia; Galdino, Adriana; Peres Moura, Maria Cláudia; Machado, Jorge Mesquita Huet

    2016-08-01

    This study describes how occupational health data have been gathered by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) to provide morbidity and mortality estimates for formal and informal workers. In 2007, data on work-related diseases and injuries was incorporated into the compulsory notification system (SINAN) and analyzed by the SUS occupational health service network, which covers all Brazilian states. However, this work has not been fully implemented, resulting in the large-scale undercounting and underreporting of cases, particularly in relation to informal workers. This is suggestive of barriers that prevent access to services and good quality health care. The inclusion of work-related diseases and injuries in SINANs appears to be a feasible strategy for the collection of useful data for the surveillance of the entire universe of workers, particularly in countries where informal workers prevail within the labor force. Attention needs to be paid to the disparities in access and quality that affect low-paid, informal workers. PMID:27235998

  5. Occupational Health Hazards among Healthcare Workers in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaozhong; Buregyeya, Esther; Musoke, David; Wang, Jia-Sheng; Halage, Abdullah Ali; Whalen, Christopher; Bazeyo, William; Williams, Phillip; Ssempebwa, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the occupational health hazards faced by healthcare workers and the mitigation measures. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional study utilizing quantitative data collection methods among 200 respondents who worked in 8 major health facilities in Kampala. Results. Overall, 50.0% of respondents reported experiencing an occupational health hazard. Among these, 39.5% experienced biological hazards while 31.5% experienced nonbiological hazards. Predictors for experiencing hazards included not wearing the necessary personal protective equipment (PPE), working overtime, job related pressures, and working in multiple health facilities. Control measures to mitigate hazards were availing separate areas and containers to store medical waste and provision of safety tools and equipment. Conclusion. Healthcare workers in this setting experience several hazards in their workplaces. Associated factors include not wearing all necessary protective equipment, working overtime, experiencing work related pressures, and working in multiple facilities. Interventions should be instituted to mitigate the hazards. Specifically PPE supply gaps, job related pressures, and complacence in adhering to mitigation measures should be addressed. PMID:25802531

  6. [Comparative analysis of occupational health services practice of international companies of oil and gas industry and ILO Convention "Occupational Health Services"].

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, É V; Spiridonov, V L; Shatokhin, A S; Ékgardt, E V; Avdokhin, A V; Iakovlev, A P

    2013-01-01

    A comparative analysis of current work practices of occupational health services of international companies of Russian oil & gas industry and provisions of ILO Convention 161 and Recommendation 171 "Occupational Health Services" has been carried out. Proposals for improvement and harmonization of labor legislation related to this problem have been formulated.

  7. [Comparative analysis of occupational health services practice of international companies of oil and gas industry and ILO Convention "Occupational Health Services"].

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, É V; Spiridonov, V L; Shatokhin, A S; Ékgardt, E V; Avdokhin, A V; Iakovlev, A P

    2013-01-01

    A comparative analysis of current work practices of occupational health services of international companies of Russian oil & gas industry and provisions of ILO Convention 161 and Recommendation 171 "Occupational Health Services" has been carried out. Proposals for improvement and harmonization of labor legislation related to this problem have been formulated. PMID:24000724

  8. Preparing and presenting testimony. Guidelines for the health care practitioner.

    PubMed

    Melillo, K D

    1994-09-01

    Whether presenting to Hillary Rodham Clinton's Health Care Reform Task Force, or as citizens presenting to a Board of Selectmen on issues affecting the Council on Aging, health providers possess a unique and valuable perspective that few policymakers or politicians have. The health practitioner's role as a direct provider of health services, advocate, educator, role model, policymaker, clinician, researcher, consultant, collaborator, administrator, and counselor [1] can be combined to influence policy and policymakers through formal testimony preparation and presentation. Presenting testimony for public hearings is an effort to influence public policy. The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines which will encourage increased legislative involvement on the part of health providers. Those willing to be involved in local, regional, state, or national government activities by providing testimony may effect needed change. PMID:7816373

  9. 41 CFR 101-5.304 - Type of occupational health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... health services. 101-5.304 Section 101-5.304 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... FEDERAL BUILDINGS AND COMPLEXES 5.3-Federal Employee Health Services § 101-5.304 Type of occupational health services. The type of occupational health services made available to occupying agencies will be...

  10. 41 CFR 101-5.304 - Type of occupational health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... health services. 101-5.304 Section 101-5.304 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... FEDERAL BUILDINGS AND COMPLEXES 5.3-Federal Employee Health Services § 101-5.304 Type of occupational health services. The type of occupational health services made available to occupying agencies will be...

  11. Health and safety economics: limitations of economic appraisal of occupational health services activities in Poland.

    PubMed

    Rydlewska-Liszkowska, Izabela

    2002-01-01

    Methods of economic appraisal developed for evaluating activities in health care system may as well be successfully used for evaluating occupational health service activities. This involves the problem of resources management and cost containment not only at the company level, but also at different managerial and institutional levels. The decision makers have to know what resources are spent on occupational health, what is the effectiveness and efficiency of investing in employees health. The key issue of good understanding of the theory and practice of economic appraisal is a precise definition of costs, effectiveness and benefits. Another important area is the identification of information sources and barriers of economic appraisal. The results of the project carried out by the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine have provided evidence that defining costs, effectiveness and benefits of preventive activities need to be developed. It becomes even more clear after an analysis of existing limitations of economic appraisal in Polish enterprises.

  12. Smoking cessation guidelines for health professionals: an update

    PubMed Central

    West, R.; McNeill, A.; Raw, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper updates the evidence base and key recommendations of the Health Education Authority (HEA) smoking cessation guidelines for health professionals published in Thorax in 1998. The strategy for updating the evidence base makes use of updated Cochrane reviews supplemented by individual studies where appropriate. This update contains additional detail concerning the effectiveness of interventions as well as comments on issues relating to implementation. The recommendations include clarification of some important issues addressed only in general terms in the original guidelines. The conclusion that smoking cessation interventions delivered through the National Health Service are an extremely cost effective way of preserving life and reducing ill health remains unchanged. The strategy recommended by the guidelines involves: (1) GPs opportunistically advising smokers to stop during routine consultations, giving advice on and/or prescribing effective medications to help them and referring them to specialist cessation services; (2) specialist smokers' services providing behavioural support (in groups or individually) for smokers who want help with stopping and using effective medications wherever possible; (3) specialist cessation counsellors providing behavioural support for hospital patients and pregnant smokers who want help with stopping; (4) all health professionals involved in smoking cessation encouraging and assisting smokers in use of nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) or bupropion where appropriate. The key points of clarification of the previous guidelines include: (1) primary health care teams and hospitals should create and maintain readily accessible records on the current smoking status of patients; (2) GPs should aim to advise smokers to stop, and record having done so, at least once a year; (3) inpatient, outpatient, and pregnant smokers should be advised to stop as early as possible and the advice recorded in the notes in a readily accessible

  13. Potential occupational health hazards in the microelectronics industry.

    PubMed

    LaDou, J

    1983-02-01

    The microelectronics industry is a major user of a wide variety of chemicals and other toxic materials. In the recent past semiconductor manufacturers have located in many countries and brought a new set of challenging clinical problems to occupational physicians. California, an area with a significant history in the statistical study of health and safety in the microelectronics industry, presents some evidence of potential health hazards in the semiconductor manufacturing process. The Semiconductor Industry Study done in California in 1981 explains the application of many toxic materials in the semiconductor manufacturing process, including a variety of solvents, acids, and metals such as arsenic. The Study documents the extensive use of dopant gases, primarily arsine, phosphine and diborane. Further study is necessary to assure the health and safety of microelectronics workers, particularly in the application of dopant gases.

  14. Bioterrorism. Implications for the occupational and environmental health nurse.

    PubMed

    Gwerder, L J; Beaton, R; Daniell, W

    2001-11-01

    1. Bioterrorism is the intentional release of a biological agent--bacterial, viral, or genetically altered--to instill fear or create chaos, massive casualities, illness, and death in humans, animals, or plants. 2. The threat of bioterrorism is real. Although every community is vulnerable, terrorists seek densely populated, highly visible targets. 3. Occupational and environmental health nurses must to be able to recognize and report signs and symptoms of an early bioweapons outbreak in their workplaces and communities. Only thorough preparedness and planning will result in effective mitigation and treatment. 4. The Bioterrorism Readiness Plan (at http://www.apic.org and http://www.CDC.gov/ncidod/hip) is a template for health care professionals to help plan a realistic response to bioterrorism. It serves as a tool for successful collaboration and communication among all disciplines and public health agencies for the best possible outcomes. PMID:11760706

  15. Moldy buildings, health of their occupants and fungal prevention.

    PubMed

    Mihinova, D; Pieckova, E

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic fungi are important biological pollutants in the indoor environment, they are spread generally: on building materials, carpets, ceiling tiles, insulations, any surfaces, wallpapers, or in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. Molds are able to grow on any materials, as long as moisture and oxygen are available. Exposure to fungi in indoor environments (esp. in water-damaged buildings) can cause adverse health effects, such as allergy, asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonia, mucous membrane irritation, different toxic effects, or even mycoses (in immunocompromised individuals) - alone or in combination. As serious adverse health effects could be caused antifungal prevention is an absolute need.This review article summarizes the occurrence of fungi in the indoor environment of buildings and their contribution to occupants´ health problems, and preventive measures against molds (Tab. 1, Fig. 1, Ref. 48). PMID:22616593

  16. Occupational health needs of universities: a review with an emphasis on the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Venables, K M; Allender, S

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the needs of universities in relation to planning the provision of occupational health services, by detailing their occupational hazards and risks and other relevant factors. The paper presents the results of (1) an enquiry into publicly available data relevant to occupational health in the university sector in the United Kingdom, (2) a literature review on occupational health provision in universities, and (3) selected results from a survey of university occupational health services in the UK. Although the enquiry and survey, but not the literature review, were restricted to the UK, the authors consider that the results are relevant to other countries because of the broad similarities of the university sector between countries. These three approaches showed that the university sector is large, with a notably wide range of occupational hazards, and other significant factors which must be considered in planning occupational health provision for individual universities or for the sector as a whole. PMID:16497856

  17. Assessing the reproductive health of men with occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Steven M; Marlow, Katherine L

    2014-01-01

    The earliest report linking environmental (occupational) exposure to adverse human male reproductive effects dates back to1775 when an English physician, Percival Pott, reported a high incidence of scrotal cancer in chimney sweeps. This observation led to safety regulations in the form of bathing requirements for these workers. The fact that male-mediated reproductive harm in humans may be a result of toxicant exposures did not become firmly established until relatively recently, when Lancranjan studied lead-exposed workers in Romania in 1975, and later in 1977, when Whorton examined the effects of dibromochloropropane (DBCP) on male workers in California. Since these discoveries, several additional human reproductive toxicants have been identified through the convergence of laboratory and observational findings. Many research gaps remain, as the pool of potential human exposures with undetermined effects on male reproduction is vast. This review provides an overview of methods used to study the effects of exposures on male reproduction and their reproductive health, with a primary emphasis on the implementation and interpretation of human studies. Emphasis will be on occupational exposures, although much of the information is also useful in assessing environmental studies, occupational exposures are usually much higher and better defined.

  18. Assessing the reproductive health of men with occupational exposures

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Steven M; Marlow, Katherine L

    2014-01-01

    The earliest report linking environmental (occupational) exposure to adverse human male reproductive effects dates back to1775 when an English physician, Percival Pott, reported a high incidence of scrotal cancer in chimney sweeps. This observation led to safety regulations in the form of bathing requirements for these workers. The fact that male-mediated reproductive harm in humans may be a result of toxicant exposures did not become firmly established until relatively recently, when Lancranjan studied lead-exposed workers in Romania in 1975, and later in 1977, when Whorton examined the effects of dibromochloropropane (DBCP) on male workers in California. Since these discoveries, several additional human reproductive toxicants have been identified through the convergence of laboratory and observational findings. Many research gaps remain, as the pool of potential human exposures with undetermined effects on male reproduction is vast. This review provides an overview of methods used to study the effects of exposures on male reproduction and their reproductive health, with a primary emphasis on the implementation and interpretation of human studies. Emphasis will be on occupational exposures, although much of the information is also useful in assessing environmental studies, occupational exposures are usually much higher and better defined. PMID:24369130

  19. Possible Health Benefits From Reducing Occupational Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Joseph D.; Ray, Tapas K.; Park, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic fields (MF) from AC electricity are a Possible Human Carcinogen, based on limited epidemiologic evidence from exposures far below occupational health limits. Methods To help formulate government guidance on occupational MF, the cancer cases prevented and the monetary benefits accruing to society by reducing workplace exposures were determined. Life-table methods produced Disability Adjusted Life Years, which were converted to monetary values. Results Adjusted for probabilities of causality, the expected increase in a worker’s disability-free life are 0.04 year (2 weeks) from a 1 microtesla (μT) MF reduction in average worklife exposure, which is equivalent to $5,100/worker/μT in year 2010 U.S. dollars (95% confidence interval $1,000–$9,000/worker/μT). Where nine electrosteel workers had 13.8 μT exposures, for example, moving them to ambient MFs would provide $600,000 in benefits to society (uncertainty interval $0–$1,000,000). Conclusions When combined with the costs of controls, this analysis provides guidance for precautionary recommendations for managing occupational MF exposures. PMID:23129537

  20. The occupational health status of hired farm workers.

    PubMed

    Villarejo, D; Baron, S L

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. hired farm work force presently is two-thirds foreign-born: mostly young Mexican men with low educational attainment who neither read nor write English. Sixty percent earn so little that they and their families live in poverty. Four of ten migrate to find work, 33% are not authorized to work in the U.S., and 25% work for a labor market intermediary, usually a labor contractor. Few hired farm workers have health insurance of any kind and, despite low incomes, relatively few seek or receive government benefits. Government regulation of the workplace exempts agricultural employers from numerous provisions that apply to other industries; for example, agriculture is exempt from portions of the Fair Labor Standards Act, allowing children as young as age 12 to work in the fields, and employers with 10 or fewer employees are exempt from OSHA regulation. Only 12 states require farm employers to carry workers' compensation insurance. While hired farm workers face significant safety and health risks, there are major gaps in existing research covering this occupational group. An ad hoc task force convened by NIOSH developed a prioritized agenda for occupational safety research in this population: musculoskeletal disorders, pesticide-related conditions, traumatic injuries, respiratory conditions, dermatitis, infectious diseases, cancer, eye conditions, and mental health.

  1. Occupational exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and health risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, M S; Samet, J M

    1999-01-01

    This article addresses concepts of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure assessment relevant for health risk assessment based on human studies. We present issues that should be considered when selecting a method for ETS exposure assessment for the purposes of health risk assessment and review data on ETS exposure levels in the workplace and in home environments. Two types of estimates are needed for a quantitative risk assessment of the health effects resulting from occupational ETS exposure: (italic)a(/italic)) an unbiased estimate of the exposure-effect (or dose-response) relation between ETS and the health effect of interest, and (italic)b(/italic)) estimates of the distribution of ETS exposure in different workplaces. By combining the estimated exposure-effect relation with information on exposure distribution for a population of interest, we can calculate the proportions of disease cases attributable to occupational ETS exposure as well as the excess number of cases due to specified exposure conditions. Several dimensions of the exposure profile should be considered when assessing ETS exposure for estimating the exposure-effect relation, including the magnitude of exposure and the biologically relevant time specificity of exposure. The magnitude of exposure is determined by the ETS source strength, environmental factors modifying concentrations, and duration of exposure. Time specificity considerations include the latency period for each health outcome of interest, the time-exposure profile relevant for different disease mechanisms, and the sensitive age period with regard to health effects. The most appropriate indicator of ETS exposure depends on these factors and on the time period that can be assessed with different methods. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10592138

  2. [Guidelines for the prevention and control of tuberculosis in health care workers].

    PubMed

    Casas, Irma; Dominguez, Jose; Rodríguez, Soledad; Matllo, Joan; Altet, Neus

    2015-12-21

    Tuberculosis remains one of the communicable diseases that cause increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. With an incidence rate of 13,04 per 100,000 population, Spain ranks third among the most affected European countries. These data show a tendency to decrease meaning that it may go unnoticed with the potential to miss the appropriate preventive measures in a suspected case. In centers where patients are treated with tuberculosis, health care worker presents risk of transmission. This risk is higher in some areas or work units. The Occupational health physicians' services, which monitorize the health of health care workers, use different strategies in order to prevent and detect tuberculosis infection. The national guidelines include the tuberculin skin test as a screening test for tuberculosis infection with mention of new diagnostic tests based on the in vitro detection of gamma interferon (IGRA) for certain cases. The purpose of this guide is to establish common criteria for IGRA tests, as a supplementary aid to the tuberculin skin test in health care workers, from the evidence available today. Recommendations for its use have been adapted to the different situations faced by the professionals involved in monitoring the health of health workers.

  3. [Guidelines for the prevention and control of tuberculosis in health care workers].

    PubMed

    Casas, Irma; Dominguez, Jose; Rodríguez, Soledad; Matllo, Joan; Altet, Neus

    2015-12-21

    Tuberculosis remains one of the communicable diseases that cause increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. With an incidence rate of 13,04 per 100,000 population, Spain ranks third among the most affected European countries. These data show a tendency to decrease meaning that it may go unnoticed with the potential to miss the appropriate preventive measures in a suspected case. In centers where patients are treated with tuberculosis, health care worker presents risk of transmission. This risk is higher in some areas or work units. The Occupational health physicians' services, which monitorize the health of health care workers, use different strategies in order to prevent and detect tuberculosis infection. The national guidelines include the tuberculin skin test as a screening test for tuberculosis infection with mention of new diagnostic tests based on the in vitro detection of gamma interferon (IGRA) for certain cases. The purpose of this guide is to establish common criteria for IGRA tests, as a supplementary aid to the tuberculin skin test in health care workers, from the evidence available today. Recommendations for its use have been adapted to the different situations faced by the professionals involved in monitoring the health of health workers. PMID:26520610

  4. Occupational and environmental health hazards in the plastics industry.

    PubMed Central

    Eckardt, R E

    1976-01-01

    A brief description of the potential occupational health hazards encountered in the manufacture of plastics (polymers) is given. In general, these hazards are due to the monomers used to make the various plastics, to unreacted monomer contained within the finished products, and to the fillers, stabilizers, pigments, inhibitors, and initiators used in fabricating the finished products. They run the gamut from angiosarcomas of the liver due to vinyl chloride, to dermatitis and asthma-like reactions due to the initiators used with epoxy resins. PMID:140799

  5. Developments in electrochemical sensors for occupational and environmental health applications.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Kevin

    2003-08-15

    This paper provides an overview of recent advances in electrochemical sensors for industrial hygiene monitoring applications. Currently available instrument technologies as well as new devices under development are both exemplified. Progress in ruggedization and miniaturization of electroanalytical devices has led to significant improvements for on-site monitoring applications, e.g. in harsh environments and in biological monitoring. Sensor arrays and modified electrodes offer considerable promise for improved electrochemical sensing, i.e. through multi-species detection and enhanced selectivity. On-site electroanalytical detection and measurement in the field may become more widely used for applications in occupational health monitoring.

  6. Understanding genetics: a primer for occupational health practice.

    PubMed

    Wright, Lynette

    2005-12-01

    Because biologic diversity is essential for life, genes have developed many versions that may be further modified by interaction with other genes and with environmental factors. Polymorphic alterations of genetic material influence drug responses, predisposition or resistance to disease, and susceptibility to environmental toxicity. The occupational health professional should be aware of rapidly changing genetic tests, be able to distinguish between screening and diagnostic modalities, be able to access genetic resources to find the latest protocols, and should consider the ethical, legal, and social implications of genetic testing in the workplace. PMID:16401061

  7. Standardization of health data – ICAR guidelines including health key

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systematic improvement of animal health requires knowledge about the status quo and reliable measures to characterize it. In dairy herds, health monitoring has gained importance to ensure sustainable and cost-efficient milk production in accordance with public expectations. In this context, standard...

  8. Health Occupations. Medical Technologists, Technicians, and Assistants; Dispensing Opticians; Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians; Medical Record Personnel. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on health occupations, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include dispensing opticians, electrocardiograph…

  9. Occupational safety and health in the United kingdom: securing future workplace health and wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Harrison, John

    2012-01-01

    The industrial revolution that took place in the United Kingdom (UK) between 1760 and 1830 lead to profound social change, with rapid urbanisation associated with squalid living conditions and epidemics of infectious diseases. The next 150 yr or so saw the introduction of many specific acts of health and safety legislation. In 1974 new overarching primary legislation was introduced that would produce a step change in the evolution of health and safety enforcement. In 2004, a new strategy was launched designed to promote a vision embedding health and safety as a cornerstone of a civilised society and to achieve a record of workplace health and safety that leads the world. Good progress in controlling many safety hazards and improving occupational hygiene has been made. There has been a fall in numbers of a wide range of injuries and diseases or illnesses since 2000. The challenge will be to maintain these favourable trends and prepare for new and emerging diseases at a time when resources are diminishing. The importance of occupational health within the UK health and safety strategy has been recognised over the last decade. Occupational health is developing a new paradigm which combines classical health risk management with assessment of workability, rehabilitation back to work and promotion of health and wellbeing. There is an increasing recognition that being in supported employment is good for health and reduces health inequalities.

  10. The characterization of airborne occupational safety and health hazards in selected small businesses; manufacturing wood pallets.

    PubMed

    Malkin, Robert; Lentz, Thomas J; Topmiller, Jennifer; Hudock, Stephen D; Niemeier, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) investigated occupational safety and health concerns in the small business wood pallet manufacturing industry because of an injury rate (2000) 226% greater than that for general industry. NIOSH investigators conducted walk-through evaluations at seven wood pallet manufacturing companies, and returned to four of them to take environmental measurements. Carbon monoxide (CO) levels, noise levels, and total particulate were measured, ergonomic observations made, and occupational safety practices analyzed at each of the four facilities where measurements were taken. The focus of this study is the evaluation of airborne particulate and carbon monoxide exposures for the purpose of determining areas of potentially high exposures. This knowledge can guide the plant owner or health professional to determine whether further measurements are necessary and where they might be needed. Safety factors and physical stressors (noise and ergonomic stressors) were described in a previously published companion paper. Although we did not take 8 h samples, we did find certain exposures that were potentially of concern to the small business owner. The main findings of this investigation were as follows: 1) CO levels in three plants, for the time periods measured, were less than the OSHA permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 50 parts per million (ppm) for an 8-h TWA. Three measurements, all from one plant, were due to a older and defective forklift and were above 50 ppm. 2) Total dust measures ranged from 0.86 to 1.67 mg/m3, taken adjacent to an operating machine cutting hardwood and measured up to 6 min. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) guideline for hardwood dust is 1.0 mg/m3, again for an 8-h TWA. PMID:16610535

  11. Health Promotion Board–Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yung Seng; Biddle, Stuart; Chan, Mei Fen; Cheng, Anton; Cheong, Magdalin; Chong, Yap Seng; Foo, Ling Li; Lee, Chung Horn; Lim, Su Chi; Ong, Wee Sian; Pang, Jonathan; Pasupathy, Shanker; Sloan, Robert; Seow, Mollie; Soon, Grace; Tan, Benedict; Tan, Thiam Chye; Teo, Soo Lay; Tham, Kwang Wei; van Dam, Rob M; Wang, John

    2016-01-01

    The Health Promotion Board (HPB) has developed the Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) on Obesity to provide health professionals in Singapore with recommendations for evidence-based interventions for obesity. This article summarises the introduction, epidemiology and executive summary of the key recommendations from the HPB-MOH CPG on Obesity for the information of SMJ readers. The chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Health Promotion Board website: http://www.hpb.gov.sg/cpg-obesity. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines. PMID:27353244

  12. Frequent flyer business travelers. The role of the occupational health nurse.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Olga S; Randolph, Susan A; Ostendorf, Judith S

    2005-03-01

    When managing frequent flyer business travelers, occupational health nurses focus on health promotion and health protection goals. The three types of prevention (i.e., primary, secondary, tertiary) follow a timeline beginning with complete prevention, and proceeding through and ending with management of a disease process. Occupational health nurses design and implement practice strategies based on this progression. Travel health nursing is rapidly expanding as the number of travelers, immunizations, and modes of transportation increase. Physicians focus on disease, industrial hygienists focus on hazard exposure, and safety professionals address occupational issues related to illnesses and injuries. Occupational health nurses are the professionals who focus on all three areas, in addition to health promotion and health protection. Frequent flyer business travelers have specific and complex needs that occupational health nurses are in a unique position to address.

  13. Occupational safety among dental health-care workers

    PubMed Central

    Shimoji, Shigehiro; Ishihama, Kohji; Yamada, Hidefumi; Okayama, Masaki; Yasuda, Kouichi; Shibutani, Tohru; Ogasawara, Tadashi; Miyazawa, Hiroo; Furusawa, Kiyofumi

    2010-01-01

    Compared to other health-care workers, dental health-care workers come in close contact with patients and use a variety of sharp and high-speed rotating instruments. It is important to understand the characteristics of the occupational accidents that occur. We reviewed incident reports from April 1, 2005, to March 31, 2010, at Matsumoto Dental University Hospital. In addition, questionnaires dealing with identification of occupational safety issues, especially splash exposures, were conducted for dentists, dental hygienists, and nurses. Thirty-two occupational injuries were reported during the study period, including 23 sharp instrument injuries (71.9%), 6 splash exposures (18.8%), and 3 others. Of the six splash exposures, only two cases involved potential contamination with blood or other potentially infectious patient material. Of the 66 workers who experienced sharps injuries, 20 workers (30.3%, 20/66) reported them to the hospital work safety team. The questionnaire revealed high incident of splash exposures and conjunctiva exposures: 87.9% (51/58) and 60.3% (35/58) in dentists and 88.6% (39/44) and 61.4% (27/44) in dental hygienists. The compliance rate for routine use of protective eyewear was 60.3% (35/58) for dentists and 34.1% (15/44) for hygienists. Of the presented informational items included in the questionnaire, those that strongly persuaded respondents to use protective eyewear were ‘splatters from the patient’s mouth contain blood’ (90%, 99/110) and ‘dental operations at our clinic are performed based only on a questionnaire without serious examinations for HBV, HCV, and HIV’ (71.8%, 79/110). The reason of low compliance of protective eyewear among dentists might relate to fine dental procedures. Appropriate information is important for the motive of wearing personal protective equipment, and an early educational program may have a potential to increase compliance with the use of that equipment. PMID:23745061

  14. Actionable Recommendations in the Bright Futures Child Health Supervision Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, J.L.; Downs, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background With the growing use of electronic health record systems, there is a demand for an electronic version of the leading American pediatric preventive care guideline, Bright Futures. As computer implementation requires actionable recommendations, it is important to assess to what degree Bright Futures meets criteria for actionability. Objectives We aimed to 1) determine the number of actionable recommendations in the current edition of Bright Futures and 2) to recommend a specific format for representing an important class of guidelines in a way that better facilitates computer implementation. Methods We consolidated all action statements in Bright Futures into recommendations. We then used two dimensions (decidability and executability) in the Guideline Implementability Appraisal v 2.0 (GLIA) to determine the actionability of the recommendations. Decidability means the recommendation states precisely under what conditions to perform those actions. Executability means actions are stated specifically, unambiguously and in sufficient detail. The results were presented in a figure titled Service Interval Diagram (SID), describing actionable recommendations, age intervals during which they are applicable, and how frequently they should occur in that interval. Results We consolidated 2161 action items into 245 recommendations and identified 52 that were actionable (21%). Almost exclusively, these recommendations addressed screening, such as newborn metabolic screening, or child safety, such as car seat use. A limited number (n=13) of recommendations for other areas of anticipatory guidance were also actionable. No recommendations on child discipline, family function or mental health met our criteria for actionability. The SID representing these recommendations is presented in a figure. Conclusion Only a portion of the Bright Futures Guidelines meets criteria for actionability. Substantial work lies ahead to develop most recommendations for anticipatory

  15. Education on occupational health and health related habits among dental students in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Matoš, Krešimir; Jurec, Zrinka; Galić, Ivan; Vodanović, Marin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Occupational diseases are diseases caused by occupational exposures at the workplace, while diseases related to work are diseases caused by many factors, wherein the harmful work conditions are one of the possible causes. Dental medicine is a profession with a high risk of developing occupational diseases. The aim of this paper was to present the results of a survey about occupational health risks and health related habits among dental students at the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb and to show how this survey led to an improvement in education by introducing a new course into the dental curriculum. Participants and methods Students of all years at the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb (total of 663) were offered to participate in a survey about occupational health risks and health related habits. Results A questionnaire was completed by 351 students. 28.0% of male students and 22.5% of female students were smokers. During the first two years of study, up to 84.6% of students consumed alcoholic beverages at least once a week. Prior to enrollment in the university, 85.3% male and 77.6% female students were engaged in sports. The significant drop in the number of students who participated in sports was noticed in the first study year in both sexes. Student awareness of the health risks related to dental profession increases with the year of study. Most students believe that occupational diseases can be prevented. Conclusion The results have shown that students enter the School of Dental Medicine with a relatively low level of awareness of the health hazards of dental profession. Although the level of awareness increases with years of study, harmful habits such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and the lack of physical activity also remain present in the later years of study. PMID:27688426

  16. Education on occupational health and health related habits among dental students in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Matoš, Krešimir; Jurec, Zrinka; Galić, Ivan; Vodanović, Marin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Occupational diseases are diseases caused by occupational exposures at the workplace, while diseases related to work are diseases caused by many factors, wherein the harmful work conditions are one of the possible causes. Dental medicine is a profession with a high risk of developing occupational diseases. The aim of this paper was to present the results of a survey about occupational health risks and health related habits among dental students at the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb and to show how this survey led to an improvement in education by introducing a new course into the dental curriculum. Participants and methods Students of all years at the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb (total of 663) were offered to participate in a survey about occupational health risks and health related habits. Results A questionnaire was completed by 351 students. 28.0% of male students and 22.5% of female students were smokers. During the first two years of study, up to 84.6% of students consumed alcoholic beverages at least once a week. Prior to enrollment in the university, 85.3% male and 77.6% female students were engaged in sports. The significant drop in the number of students who participated in sports was noticed in the first study year in both sexes. Student awareness of the health risks related to dental profession increases with the year of study. Most students believe that occupational diseases can be prevented. Conclusion The results have shown that students enter the School of Dental Medicine with a relatively low level of awareness of the health hazards of dental profession. Although the level of awareness increases with years of study, harmful habits such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and the lack of physical activity also remain present in the later years of study.

  17. A strategic response to the occupational health establishment.

    PubMed

    Sass, R

    1996-01-01

    The experiences of occupational health and safety "activists" in Canada reveal the limits of achieving reform in working conditions by technical efforts in combination with rank-and-file activation. The author argues that the way union "activists" approach occupational health and safety limits workers in dealing with their actual experiences and understanding about workplace hazards and risks, then discusses the condition for the awakening of their critical consciousness as a basis of acting on hazardous working conditions. The first movement in the way the worker apprehends the work environment is a movement of negation and is the prior condition to a critical and disclosive discourse about workplace hazards. It is the positive side of "No!" and the taking seriously of workers' rights. It is this negation of the negative that holds out the greatest hope for solidarity and a liberatory community in workplaces, since legislated workers' rights as the basis of protection have become a facade. Workers can respond with the power of saying "No!" in solidarity with suffering workers, and then work through appropriate principles, ends, or strategies avoiding entrapment by a "telos" in the first instance. By laying out these "ends" or a strategic paradigm, one introduces a "conversation stopper" for workers and atrophies their activation.

  18. Finnish Institute of Occupational Health Asbestos Program 1987-1992.

    PubMed

    Huuskonen, M S; Koskinen, K; Tossavainen, A; Karjalainen, A; Rinne, J P; Rantanen, J

    1995-07-01

    In 1987-1992, the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) implemented a nationwide asbestos program aimed at preventing asbestos-related risks in good cooperation with governmental authorities, industry, trade unions, the health care and insurance systems, and mass media. The goals were to minimize all exposure to asbestos, identify people exposed at work, and improve the diagnostics of asbestos diseases, especially cancers. The program entailed several concrete actions and extensive dissemination of information, training, services, and scientific research. As proposed by the State Asbestos Committee, new use of asbestos products was banned and strict regulations were applied to renovation and inspection of old buildings. The screening study of asbestos-induced diseases included 18,943 current and retired workers from house building, shipyard, and asbestos industries. Pleural and parenchymal changes were found in 4,133 persons (22%), who were referred to further clinical examinations as suspected cases of an occupational disease. It was estimated that past exposure of asbestos among the Finnish population of 5 million causes > 150 mesotheliomas and lung cancers annually, totalling > 2,000 asbestos-induced cancer deaths by the year 2010. Although several major control actions were made or started during the program, the bulk of the preventive work still lies ahead.

  19. Sentinel Health Events (occupational): a basis for physician recognition and public health surveillance.

    PubMed Central

    Rutstein, D D; Mullan, R J; Frazier, T M; Halperin, W E; Melius, J M; Sestito, J P

    1983-01-01

    A Sentinel Health Event (SHE) is a preventable disease, disability, or untimely death whose occurrence serves as a warning signal that the quality of preventive and/or therapeutic medical care may need to be improved. A SHE (Occupational) is a disease, disability, or untimely death which is occupationally related and whose occurrence may: 1) provide the impetus for epidemiologic or industrial hygiene studies; or 2) serve as a warning signal that materials substitution, engineering control, personal protection, or medical care may be required. The present SHE(O) list encompasses 50 disease conditions that are linked to the workplace. Only those conditions are included for which objective documentation of an associated agent, industry, and occupation exists in the scientific literature. The list will serve as a framework for developing a national system for occupational health surveillance that may be applied at the state and local level, and as a guide for practicing physicians caring for patients with occupational illnesses. We expect to update the list periodically to accommodate new occupational disease events which meet the criteria for inclusion. PMID:6881402

  20. [Can the occupational health physician promote work as a health factor?].

    PubMed

    Cassina, T

    2010-01-01

    This report answers the question: "In carrying out his/her institutional tasks, can the Occupational Health Physician (MC--medico competente--in Italian) promote work as a health factor?" The answer is in the affirmative, with identification of the social and regulatory framework within which the occupational health physician operates, examples of professional activities directed towards this aim and stressing the fact that the physician requires clinical skills so that he/she can work actively in the process of diagnosis-treatment-rehabilitation of the sick worker. Furthermore technological and organizational knowledge of the enterprise is required together with knowledge of the "social safeguards", that are useful for both the worker and the enterprise that employs him/her. In the current social and regulatory context the occupational health physician can promote work as a health factor both through cooperation in the process of improvement of the workplace, and by actively participating in the most appropriate placement of "frail" workers' (elderly people, disease sufferers, the disabled). It is necessary for the occupational health physician to develop a close working cooperation with the business system to achieve these aims. PMID:21302372

  1. Salmon farming: occupational health in a new rural industry.

    PubMed

    Douglas, J D

    1995-04-01

    The medical hazards of salmon farming can be grouped into those related to marine safety, fish husbandry, fish-farm diving and disease treatments. The hostile water environment requires thermal protection and personal buoyancy aids as workers frequently fall in the water from boats or cages. Feedstuffs may generate respirable dust and attract rats, creating a risk of leptospirosis. Musculo-skeletal injuries are common from lifting nets. Fish-farm diving has particular risks which can be minimized. Organophosphorous pesticides are used to treat sea lice and employees require health surveillance. Fish immunization is required to reduce the incidence of Aeromonas salmonitica. Needlestick injuries when using oil-based vaccines are a serious hazard to employees. The occupational health problems of salmon farming are predictable and preventable with primary safety measures. This new industry is safer than land-based agriculture on current evidence. PMID:7718825

  2. Collaborative field research and training in occupational health and ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Kogi, K

    1998-01-01

    Networking collaborative research and training in Asian developing countries includes three types of joint activities: field studies of workplace potentials for better safety and health, intensive action training for improvement of working conditions in small enterprises, and action-oriented workshops on low-cost improvements for managers, workers, and farmers. These activities were aimed at identifying workable strategies for making locally adjusted improvements in occupational health and ergonomics. Many improvements have resulted as direct outcomes. Most these improvements were multifaceted, low-cost, and practicable using local skills. Three common features of these interactive processes seem important in facilitating realistic improvements: 1) voluntary approaches building on local achievements; 2) the use of practical methods for identifying multiple improvements; and 3) participatory steps for achieving low-cost results first. The effective use of group work tools is crucial. Stepwise training packages have thus proven useful for promoting local problem-solving interventions based on voluntary initiatives.

  3. Why breastfeeding matters to occupational health nurses and employers.

    PubMed

    Rietz, Melissa Foster; McCullagh, Marjorie C

    2010-11-01

    Women with children are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. work force. Employers must comply with the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, requiring them to provide acceptable facilities for breastfeeding employees. This article discusses resources for examining the economic costs and benefits of becoming a breastfeeding-friendly organization, current legislation affecting breastfeeding women in the workplace, resources related to breastfeeding, and recommendations for initiating and managing a workplace lactation program. Research demonstrating the effects of lactation programs on health care and employee replacement costs (i.e., recruiting, hiring, and training staff) is reviewed. Implementation issues are discussed, including providing breastfeeding women with sufficient time, adequate space, and support from employers and coworkers. The role of occupational health nurses in initiating and coordinating workplace lactation programs is also discussed.

  4. [Reformation of occupational health in France: state of the problem and new law].

    PubMed

    Denisov, É I

    2013-01-01

    The state of the problem and new law of France No 2011-867 on occupational health organization and two decrees are described. These introduce services of health at work mainly with prophylactic tasks and whose functions are performed by interdisciplinary teams including doctors, assistants and specialists on occupational risk prevention. The documents are based on ILO Convention No 161 "Occupational health services". PMID:24000725

  5. Occupational health for an ageing workforce: do we need a geriatric perspective?

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Gerald Choon-Huat; Koh, David

    2006-01-01

    Extending retirement ages and anti-age discrimination policies will increase the numbers of older workers in the future. Occupational health physicians may have to draw upon the principles and experience of geriatric medicine to manage these older workers. Examples of common geriatric syndromes that will have an impact on occupational health are mild cognitive impairment and falls at the workplace. Shifts in paradigms and further research into the occupational health problems of an ageing workforce will be needed. PMID:16722617

  6. 78 FR 48683 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Personal Protective Technology (PPT...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and... Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the... Personal Protective Equipment Action Plan AGENCY: The National Institute for Occupational Safety and...

  7. 78 FR 60874 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Personal Protective Technology Program and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and..., Director, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... Conformity Assessment; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: The National Institute for Occupational Safety...

  8. Does Occupational Mobility Influence Health among Working Women? Comparing Objective and Subjective Measures of Work Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Lindsay R.; Shippee, Tetyana P.; Ferraro, Kenneth F.

    2012-01-01

    Occupational mobility is highly valued in American society, but is it consequential to women's health? Previous studies have yielded inconsistent results, but most measured occupational mobility by identifying transitions across occupational categories. Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, this study (1) compares objective and subjective…

  9. 78 FR 35935 - National Institute for Occupational Health (NIOSH)-Certified B Readers; Training and Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Health (NIOSH)--Certified B Readers; Training and Testing AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and...

  10. 29 CFR 1960.11 - Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.11 Evaluation of occupational safety and health performance. Each agency head shall ensure that any performance evaluation of any...

  11. 29 CFR 2200.108 - Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Miscellaneous Provisions § 2200.108 Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The seal of the Commission shall consist of: A gold...

  12. 29 CFR 2200.108 - Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Miscellaneous Provisions § 2200.108 Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The seal of the Commission shall consist of: A gold...

  13. 29 CFR 2200.108 - Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Miscellaneous Provisions § 2200.108 Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The seal of the Commission shall consist of: A gold...

  14. 29 CFR 2200.108 - Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Miscellaneous Provisions § 2200.108 Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The seal of the Commission shall consist of: A gold...

  15. 29 CFR 2200.108 - Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Miscellaneous Provisions § 2200.108 Official Seal of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The seal of the Commission shall consist of: A gold...

  16. Occupational stress, social support, and quality of life among Jordanian mental health nurses.

    PubMed

    Hamaideh, Shaher H

    2012-01-01

    Occupational stress affects physical and mental health of mental health nurses. This study measured levels of occupational stress and identified the variables that are associated with occupational stress among Jordanian mental health nurses. A descriptive design was conducted, using self-report questionnaires and demographic characteristics. Data were collected from 181 mental health nurses who were recruited from all mental health settings in Jordan. Jordanian mental health nurses showed high levels of occupational stress regarding "client-related difficulties," "lack of resources," and "workload." The highest level of social support as indicated by these Jordanian mental health nurses was from a spouse/partner followed by colleagues. Regarding quality of life (QOL), physical health scores were higher than mental health scores. Occupational stress correlated significantly and negatively with QOL-physical scores, QOL-mental scores, and social support scores, and correlated positively with being physically assaulted, verbally assaulted, and the respondent having the intention to leave his or her current job. Social support, QOL-mental scores, verbal assault, ward type, and intention to leave the current job were the best predictors of occupational stress among Jordanian mental health nurses. Mental health nurses are under significant occupational stress levels; therefore, comprehensive interventions aimed at minimizing the risk of occupational stress and improving social support and quality of life among mental health nurses are needed.

  17. [Individual autonomy and the principles of occupational health care].

    PubMed

    Makowska-Matuszkiewicz, E

    1997-01-01

    The effect of work-related diseases on the health condition of the population at large has increased the interest in etiology and epidemiology of these diseases and intensified activities aimed at providing effective treatment of occupational diseases, but first of all at preventing their occurrence. That is why workers are now recognised as the largest population group subjected to active counselling. In order to meet the recommendations of the International Labour Organization, Polish labour law has been modified so that every worker is guaranteed an opportunity to benefit from medical prevention within the range required by his/her working conditions. This concern for workers' health contributed to the fact that health has now become a supreme value to which all other values and human needs are submitted. The author discusses the issues of compulsory prophylactic examinations and protection against employment at a workplace that is inadmissible because of health reasons, in the perspective of the human right to keep his/her own ailments in secret and the right to freedom of choice concerning his/her own health and living and conditions.

  18. 77 FR 40622 - Mine Safety and Health Research Advisory Committee, National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    .../Southpointe, 1000 Corporate Drive, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania 15317. Telephone: (724) 743-5000, Fax: (724) 743..., safety culture, occupational health and safety management systems, preventing coal dust explosions,...

  19. Report on occupational safety and health to the Secretary of Labor for CY 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Summary and evaluation of NASA occupational safety and health activities focus on: policy; personnel; funding. Training activities, inspection, record-keeping, and interagency activities are included.

  20. 75 FR 8085 - National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Cell Research SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is requesting public comment on a revision to the definition of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in the ``National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research'' (Guidelines). On July 7, 2009, NIH issued Guidelines (...