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Sample records for ocean freshwater export

  1. Modeling the variability of the liquid freshwater export from the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Alexandra

    In this thesis an analysis of the variability of the liquid freshwater (FW) export from the Arctic Ocean on annual and seasonal timescales is presented. Due to missing long-term observations, the variability of the liquid FW export is not well known or understood. Model simulations are therefore currently the only way to study the variability of the FW export from the Arctic. To investigate the role of the atmospheric forcing for the variability of the liquid FW export, a model simulation for 1950--2007 from the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) is analyzed. It is shown that large-scale atmospheric circulation changes generally control the variability of the FWexport through changes in the FW storage in the Beaufort Gyre. These changes have a large influence on the variability of the FW export through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), whereas the Fram Strait FW export is also influenced by changes in the FW storage in the Eurasian basin. In order to better understand the differences between the mechanisms driving the export variability through Fram Strait and the CAA, passive dye tracers are added to the ocean module of a state-of-the-art global general circulation model, the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3). These tracers allow the identification of FW from different sources, and therefore the individual investigation of the export variability of FW from individual sources. It is shown that the Fram Strait FW export is made up mainly of Eurasian runoff and Pacific FW, whereas the FW exported through the CAA comes primarily from Pacific FW and North American runoff. The variability of the FW exports from individual sources is largely in phase in the CAA, as the CAA FW export is mainly driven by velocity anomalies, not FW concentration anomalies. In Fram Strait on the other hand, FW concentration anomalies contribute as much to the FW export variability as velocity anomalies. The variability of the Fram Strait FW

  2. Freshwater and its role in the Arctic Marine System: Sources, disposition, storage, export, and physical and biogeochemical consequences in the Arctic and global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmack, E. C.; Yamamoto-Kawai, M.; Haine, T. W. N.; Bacon, S.; Bluhm, B. A.; Lique, C.; Melling, H.; Polyakov, I. V.; Straneo, F.; Timmermans, M.-L.; Williams, W. J.

    2016-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean is a fundamental node in the global hydrological cycle and the ocean's thermohaline circulation. We here assess the system's key functions and processes: (1) the delivery of fresh and low-salinity waters to the Arctic Ocean by river inflow, net precipitation, distillation during the freeze/thaw cycle, and Pacific Ocean inflows; (2) the disposition (e.g., sources, pathways, and storage) of freshwater components within the Arctic Ocean; and (3) the release and export of freshwater components into the bordering convective domains of the North Atlantic. We then examine physical, chemical, or biological processes which are influenced or constrained by the local quantities and geochemical qualities of freshwater; these include stratification and vertical mixing, ocean heat flux, nutrient supply, primary production, ocean acidification, and biogeochemical cycling. Internal to the Arctic the joint effects of sea ice decline and hydrological cycle intensification have strengthened coupling between the ocean and the atmosphere (e.g., wind and ice drift stresses, solar radiation, and heat and moisture exchange), the bordering drainage basins (e.g., river discharge, sediment transport, and erosion), and terrestrial ecosystems (e.g., Arctic greening, dissolved and particulate carbon loading, and altered phenology of biotic components). External to the Arctic freshwater export acts as both a constraint to and a necessary ingredient for deep convection in the bordering subarctic gyres and thus affects the global thermohaline circulation. Geochemical fingerprints attained within the Arctic Ocean are likewise exported into the neighboring subarctic systems and beyond. Finally, we discuss observed and modeled functions and changes in this system on seasonal, annual, and decadal time scales and discuss mechanisms that link the marine system to atmospheric, terrestrial, and cryospheric systems.

  3. Arctic freshwater export: Status, mechanisms, and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haine, Thomas W. N.; Curry, Beth; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Hansen, Edmond; Karcher, Michael; Lee, Craig; Rudels, Bert; Spreen, Gunnar; de Steur, Laura; Stewart, Kial D.; Woodgate, Rebecca

    2015-02-01

    Large freshwater anomalies clearly exist in the Arctic Ocean. For example, liquid freshwater has accumulated in the Beaufort Gyre in the decade of the 2000s compared to 1980-2000, with an extra ≈ 5000 km3 - about 25% - being stored. The sources of freshwater to the Arctic from precipitation and runoff have increased between these periods (most of the evidence comes from models). Despite flux increases from 2001 to 2011, it is uncertain if the marine freshwater source through Bering Strait for the 2000s has changed, as observations in the 1980s and 1990s are incomplete. The marine freshwater fluxes draining the Arctic through Fram and Davis straits are also insignificantly different. In this way, the balance of sources and sinks of freshwater to the Arctic, Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), and Baffin Bay shifted to about 1200 ± 730 km3 yr- 1 freshening the region, on average, during the 2000s. The observed accumulation of liquid freshwater is consistent with this increased supply and the loss of freshwater from sea ice. Coupled climate models project continued freshening of the Arctic during the 21st century, with a total gain of about 50,000 km3 for the Arctic, CAA, and Baffin Bay (an increase of about 50%) by 2100. Understanding of the mechanisms controlling freshwater emphasizes the importance of Arctic surface winds, in addition to the sources of freshwater. The wind can modify the storage, release, and pathways of freshwater on timescales of O(1-10) months. Discharges of excess freshwater through Fram or Davis straits appear possible, triggered by changes in the wind, but are hard to predict. Continued measurement of the fluxes and storage of freshwater is needed to observe changes such as these.

  4. Changing Arctic Ocean freshwater pathways.

    PubMed

    Morison, James; Kwok, Ron; Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Alkire, Matt; Rigor, Ignatius; Andersen, Roger; Steele, Mike

    2012-01-04

    Freshening in the Canada basin of the Arctic Ocean began in the 1990s and continued to at least the end of 2008. By then, the Arctic Ocean might have gained four times as much fresh water as comprised the Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s, raising the spectre of slowing global ocean circulation. Freshening has been attributed to increased sea ice melting and contributions from runoff, but a leading explanation has been a strengthening of the Beaufort High--a characteristic peak in sea level atmospheric pressure--which tends to accelerate an anticyclonic (clockwise) wind pattern causing convergence of fresh surface water. Limited observations have made this explanation difficult to verify, and observations of increasing freshwater content under a weakened Beaufort High suggest that other factors must be affecting freshwater content. Here we use observations to show that during a time of record reductions in ice extent from 2005 to 2008, the dominant freshwater content changes were an increase in the Canada basin balanced by a decrease in the Eurasian basin. Observations are drawn from satellite data (sea surface height and ocean-bottom pressure) and in situ data. The freshwater changes were due to a cyclonic (anticlockwise) shift in the ocean pathway of Eurasian runoff forced by strengthening of the west-to-east Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation characterized by an increased Arctic Oscillation index. Our results confirm that runoff is an important influence on the Arctic Ocean and establish that the spatial and temporal manifestations of the runoff pathways are modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, rather than the strength of the wind-driven Beaufort Gyre circulation.

  5. Atmospheric and oceanic freshwater transport during weak Atlantic overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Gerrit

    2003-10-01

    Oceanic and atmospheric freshwater transports are analyzed in a numerical experiment where induced freshwater in the North Atlantic slowed the thermohaline circulation (THC). During times of weak Atlantic overturning circulation, it is found that the Intertropical Convergence Zone moves southward and trade winds at tropical latitudes increase, resulting in enhanced water vapor export out of the Atlantic catchment area. The experiment reveals furthermore that the oceanic freshwater transport amounts to a stabilizing effect of similar magnitude to the atmospheric effect. It is argued that the modeled response can be used as a fingerprint for the detection of THC changes documented in the paleoclimatic record or related recent climate change.

  6. Evaluation and control mechanisms of volume and freshwater export through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago in a high-resolution pan-Arctic ice-ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeehan, Timothy; Maslowski, Wieslaw

    2012-03-01

    This study examined the 1979-2004 volume and freshwater fluxes through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) and into the Labrador Sea using a high resolution (˜9 km) coupled ice-ocean model of the pan-Arctic region to provide a reference, compare with limited observational estimates, and investigate control mechanisms of this exchange. The 26-year mean volume and freshwater fluxes through Nares Strait were 0.77 Sv ± 0.17 Sv and 10.38 mSv ± 1.67 mSv respectively, while those through Lancaster Sound amounted to 0.76 Sv ± 0.12 Sv and 48.45 mSv ± 7.83 mSv respectively. The 26-year mean volume and freshwater fluxes through Davis Strait were 1.55 Sv ± 0.29 Sv and 62.66 mSv ± 11.67 mSv while the modeled Fram Strait branch provided very little (˜2%) freshwater into the Labrador Sea compared to the total CAA input. Compared to available observations, the model provides reasonable volume and freshwater fluxes, as well as sea ice thickness and concentration in the CAA. In Nares Strait and Lancaster Sound, volume flux anomalies were controlled by the sea surface height (SSH) gradient anomalies along the straits and freshwater anomalies were highly correlated with the volume anomalies. At least half of the variance in the time series of SSH gradient anomaly was due to SSH anomalies in northern Baffin Bay. The West Greenland Current (WGC) exhibits seasonality, with cross shelf flow (into the Labrador Sea) peaking in January/February/March, while reducing the northward flow across eastern Davis Strait. We hypothesize that the eddy-reduced northward flow of WGC results in the lower volume and SSH in Baffin Bay. This maximizes the SSH gradients between the Arctic Ocean and Baffin Bay, leading to maximum winter volume fluxes through Nares Strait and Lancaster Sound. Model limitations include the insufficient spatial resolution of atmospheric forcing (especially to account for the effects of local topography), the representation of river runoff into Hudson Bay and coastal

  7. Arctic Ocean basin liquid freshwater storage trend 1992-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, B.; Karcher, M.; Kauker, F.; Schauer, U.; Toole, J. M.; Krishfield, R. A.; Pisarev, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Su, J.

    2014-02-01

    Freshwater in the Arctic Ocean plays an important role in the regional ocean circulation, sea ice, and global climate. From salinity observed by a variety of platforms, we are able, for the first time, to estimate a statistically reliable liquid freshwater trend from monthly gridded fields over all upper Arctic Ocean basins. From 1992 to 2012 this trend was 600±300 km3 yr-1. A numerical model agrees very well with the observed freshwater changes. A decrease in salinity made up about two thirds of the freshwater trend and a thickening of the upper layer up to one third. The Arctic Ocean Oscillation index, a measure for the regional wind stress curl, correlated well with our freshwater time series. No clear relation to Arctic Oscillation or Arctic Dipole indices could be found. Following other observational studies, an increased Bering Strait freshwater import to the Arctic Ocean, a decreased Davis Strait export, and enhanced net sea ice melt could have played an important role in the freshwater trend we observed.

  8. The response of the central Arctic Ocean stratification to freshwater perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemberton, P.; Nilsson, J.

    2016-01-01

    Using a state-of-the-art coupled ice-ocean-circulation model, we perform a number of sensitivity experiments to examine how the central Arctic Ocean stratification responds to changes in river runoff and precipitation. The simulations yield marked changes in the cold halocline and the Arctic Atlantic layer. Increased precipitation yields a warming of the Atlantic layer, which primarily is an advective signal, propagated through the St. Anna Trough, reflecting air-sea heat flux changes over the Barents Sea. As the freshwater supply is increased, the anticyclonic Beaufort Gyre is weakened and a greater proportion of the Arctic Ocean freshwater is exported via the Fram Strait, with nearly compensating export decreases through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The corresponding reorganization of the freshwater pool appears to be controlled by advective processes, rather than by the local changes in the surface freshwater flux. A simple conceptual model of the Arctic Ocean, based on a geostrophically controlled discharge of the low-salinity water, is introduced and compared with the simulations. Key predictions of the conceptual model are that the halocline depth should decrease with increasing freshwater input and that the Arctic Ocean freshwater storage should increase proportionally to the square root of the freshwater input, which are in broad qualitative agreement with the sensitivity experiments. However, the model-simulated rate of increase of the freshwater storage is weaker, indicating that effects related to wind forcing and rerouting of the freshwater-transport pathways play an important role for the dynamics of the Arctic Ocean freshwater storage.

  9. Arctic Ocean Freshwater: How Robust are Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, A.; Aksenov, Y.; deCuevas, B. A.; deSteur, L.; Haekkinen, S.; Hansen, E.; Herbaut, C.; Houssais, M.-N.; Karcher, M.; Kauker, F.; Lique, C.; Nguyen, A.; Pemberton, P.; Worthen, D.; Zhang, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic freshwater (FW) has been the focus of many modeling studies, due to the potential impact of Arctic FW on the deep water formation in the North Atlantic. A comparison of the hindcasts from ten ocean-sea ice models shows that the simulation of the Arctic FW budget is quite different in the investigated models. While they agree on the general sink and source terms of the Arctic FW budget, the long-term means as well as the variability of the FW export vary among models. The best model-to-model agreement is found for the interannual and seasonal variability of the solid FW export and the solid FW storage, which also agree well with observations. For the interannual and seasonal variability of the liquid FW export, the agreement among models is better for the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) than for Fram Strait. The reason for this is that models are more consistent in simulating volume flux anomalies than salinity anomalies and volume-flux anomalies dominate the liquid FW export variability in the CAA but not in Fram Strait. The seasonal cycle of the liquid FW export generally shows a better agreement among models than the interannual variability, and compared to observations the models capture the seasonality of the liquid FW export rather well. In order to improve future simulations of the Arctic FW budget, the simulation of the salinity field needs to be improved, so that model results on the variability of the liquid FW export and storage become more robust.

  10. Arctic Ocean freshwater: How robust are model simulations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, A.; Aksenov, Y.; de Cuevas, B. A.; de Steur, L.; Häkkinen, S.; Hansen, E.; Herbaut, C.; Houssais, M.-N.; Karcher, M.; Kauker, F.; Lique, C.; Nguyen, A.; Pemberton, P.; Worthen, D.; Zhang, J.

    The Arctic freshwater (FW) has been the focus of many modeling studies, due to the potential impact of Arctic FW on the deep water formation in the North Atlantic. A comparison of the hindcasts from ten ocean-sea ice models shows that the simulation of the Arctic FW budget is quite different in the investigated models. While they agree on the general sink and source terms of the Arctic FW budget, the long-term means as well as the variability of the FW export vary among models. The best model-to-model agreement is found for the interannual and seasonal variability of the solid FW export and the solid FW storage, which also agree well with observations. For the interannual and seasonal variability of the liquid FW export, the agreement among models is better for the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) than for Fram Strait. The reason for this is that models are more consistent in simulating volume flux anomalies than salinity anomalies and volume-flux anomalies dominate the liquid FW export variability in the CAA but not in Fram Strait. The seasonal cycle of the liquid FW export generally shows a better agreement among models than the interannual variability, and compared to observations the models capture the seasonality of the liquid FW export rather well. In order to improve future simulations of the Arctic FW budget, the simulation of the salinity field needs to be improved, so that model results on the variability of the liquid FW export and storage become more robust.

  11. Assimilation impacts on Arctic Ocean circulation, heat and freshwater budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Hao; Mugford, Ruth I.; Haines, Keith; Smith, Gregory C.

    We investigate the Arctic basin circulation, freshwater content (FWC) and heat budget by using a high-resolution global coupled ice-ocean model implemented with a state-of-the-art data assimilation scheme. We demonstrate that, despite a very sparse dataset, by assimilating hydrographic data in and near the Arctic basin, the initial warm bias and drift in the control run is successfully corrected, reproducing a much more realistic vertical and horizontal structure to the cyclonic boundary current carrying the Atlantic Water (AW) along the Siberian shelves in the reanalysis run. The Beaufort Gyre structure and FWC and variability are also more accurately reproduced. Small but important changes in the strait exchange flows are found which lead to more balanced budgets in the reanalysis run. Assimilation fluxes dominate the basin budgets over the first 10 years (P1: 1987-1996) of the reanalysis for both heat and FWC, after which the drifting Arctic upper water properties have been restored to realistic values. For the later period (P2: 1997-2004), the Arctic heat budget is almost balanced without assimilation contributions, while the freshwater budget shows reduced assimilation contributions compensating largely for surface salinity damping, which was extremely strong in this run. A downward trend in freshwater export at the Canadian Straits and Fram Strait is found in period P2, associated with Beaufort Gyre recharge. A detailed comparison with observations and previous model studies at the individual Arctic straits is also included.

  12. Global estimation of freshwater fluxes and freshwater oceanic transport from satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, C.; Peterson, P.; Jones, C.

    1996-12-01

    The exchange of moisture and heat fluxes across the ocean-atmosphere interface exerts a strong influence on the oceanic and atmospheric circulations, and therefore on the maintenance of the climate system equilibrium. Observational measurements of these fluxes over large areas of the ocean`s surface are limited by the lack of in-situ data. This paper reports research efforts to estimate the freshwater budget and freshwater oceanic transport using remotely sensed data. Six years (1988--1993) of surface evaporation estimated with satellite and in-situ data re combined with satellite-derived precipitation to compute the freshwater budget and freshwater oceanic transport. The interannual variability of the freshwater budget and oceanic transport eliminates are examined for two contrasting events: the La Nina of 1988--89 and the El Nino condition during 1991--92, one of the longest El Nino episodes on record. Possible implications for future climate change are discussed.

  13. Plankton networks driving carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Lionel; Chaffron, Samuel; Bittner, Lucie; Eveillard, Damien; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Roux, Simon; Darzi, Youssef; Audic, Stephane; Berline, Léo; Brum, Jennifer R; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Espinoza, Julio Cesar Ignacio; Malviya, Shruti; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Dimier, Céline; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Picheral, Marc; Poulain, Julie; Searson, Sarah; Stemmann, Lars; Not, Fabrice; Hingamp, Pascal; Speich, Sabrina; Follows, Mick; Karp-Boss, Lee; Boss, Emmanuel; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stephane; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Iudicone, Daniele; Sullivan, Matthew B; Raes, Jeroen; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Gorsky, Gabriel

    2016-04-28

    The biological carbon pump is the process by which CO2 is transformed to organic carbon via photosynthesis, exported through sinking particles, and finally sequestered in the deep ocean. While the intensity of the pump correlates with plankton community composition, the underlying ecosystem structure driving the process remains largely uncharacterized. Here we use environmental and metagenomic data gathered during the Tara Oceans expedition to improve our understanding of carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean. We show that specific plankton communities, from the surface and deep chlorophyll maximum, correlate with carbon export at 150 m and highlight unexpected taxa such as Radiolaria and alveolate parasites, as well as Synechococcus and their phages, as lineages most strongly associated with carbon export in the subtropical, nutrient-depleted, oligotrophic ocean. Additionally, we show that the relative abundance of a few bacterial and viral genes can predict a significant fraction of the variability in carbon export in these regions.

  14. Plankton networks driving carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-04-01

    The biological carbon pump is the process by which CO2 is transformed to organic carbon via photosynthesis, exported through sinking particles, and finally sequestered in the deep ocean. While the intensity of the pump correlates with plankton community composition, the underlying ecosystem structure driving the process remains largely uncharacterized. Here we use environmental and metagenomic data gathered during the Tara Oceans expedition to improve our understanding of carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean. We show that specific plankton communities, from the surface and deep chlorophyll maximum, correlate with carbon export at 150 m and highlight unexpected taxa such as Radiolaria and alveolate parasites, as well as Synechococcus and their phages, as lineages most strongly associated with carbon export in the subtropical, nutrient-depleted, oligotrophic ocean. Additionally, we show that the relative abundance of a few bacterial and viral genes can predict a significant fraction of the variability in carbon export in these regions.

  15. Plankton networks driving carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean

    PubMed Central

    Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Roux, Simon; Darzi, Youssef; Audic, Stephane; Berline, Léo; Brum, Jennifer; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Espinoza, Julio Cesar Ignacio; Malviya, Shruti; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Dimier, Céline; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Picheral, Marc; Poulain, Julie; Searson, Sarah; Stemmann, Lars; Not, Fabrice; Hingamp, Pascal; Speich, Sabrina; Follows, Mick; Karp-Boss, Lee; Boss, Emmanuel; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stephane; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G.; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Iudicone, Daniele; Sullivan, Matthew B.; Raes, Jeroen; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Gorsky, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The biological carbon pump is the process by which CO2 is transformed to organic carbon via photosynthesis, exported through sinking particles, and finally sequestered in the deep ocean. While the intensity of the pump correlates with plankton community composition, the underlying ecosystem structure driving the process remains largely uncharacterised. Here we use environmental and metagenomic data gathered during the Tara Oceans expedition to improve our understanding of carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean. We show that specific plankton communities, from the surface and deep chlorophyll maximum, correlate with carbon export at 150 m and highlight unexpected taxa such as Radiolaria, alveolate parasites, as well as Synechococcus and their phages, as lineages most strongly associated with carbon export in the subtropical, nutrient-depleted, oligotrophic ocean. Additionally, we show that the relative abundance of just a few bacterial and viral genes can predict most of the variability in carbon export in these regions. PMID:26863193

  16. Plankton networks driving carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Lionel; Chaffron, Samuel; Bittner, Lucie; Eveillard, Damien; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Roux, Simon; Darzi, Youssef; Audic, Stephane; Berline, Léo; Brum, Jennifer R; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Espinoza, Julio Cesar Ignacio; Malviya, Shruti; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Dimier, Céline; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Picheral, Marc; Poulain, Julie; Searson, Sarah; Stemmann, Lars; Not, Fabrice; Hingamp, Pascal; Speich, Sabrina; Follows, Mick; Karp-Boss, Lee; Boss, Emmanuel; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stephane; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Iudicone, Daniele; Sullivan, Matthew B; Raes, Jeroen; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Gorsky, Gabriel

    2016-04-28

    The biological carbon pump is the process by which CO2 is transformed to organic carbon via photosynthesis, exported through sinking particles, and finally sequestered in the deep ocean. While the intensity of the pump correlates with plankton community composition, the underlying ecosystem structure driving the process remains largely uncharacterized. Here we use environmental and metagenomic data gathered during the Tara Oceans expedition to improve our understanding of carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean. We show that specific plankton communities, from the surface and deep chlorophyll maximum, correlate with carbon export at 150 m and highlight unexpected taxa such as Radiolaria and alveolate parasites, as well as Synechococcus and their phages, as lineages most strongly associated with carbon export in the subtropical, nutrient-depleted, oligotrophic ocean. Additionally, we show that the relative abundance of a few bacterial and viral genes can predict a significant fraction of the variability in carbon export in these regions. PMID:26863193

  17. Arctic Ocean freshwater as a trigger for abrupt climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Raymond; Condron, Alan; Coletti, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    The cause of the Younger Dryas cooling remains unresolved despite decades of debate. Current arguments focus on either freshwater from Glacial Lake Agassiz drainage through the St Lawrence or the MacKenzie river systems. High resolution ocean modeling suggests that freshwater delivered to the North Atlantic from the Arctic Ocean through Fram Strait would have had more of an impact on Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) than freshwater from the St Lawrence. This has been interpreted as an argument for a MacKenzie River /Lake Agassiz freshwater source. However, it is important to note that although the modeling identifies Fram Strait as the optimum location for delivery of freshwater to disrupt the AMOC, this does not mean the freshwater source came from Lake Agassiz. Another potential source of freshwater is the Arctic Ocean ice cover itself. During the LGM, ice cover was extremely thick - many tens of meters in the Canada Basin (at least), resulting in a hiatus in sediment deposition there. Extreme ice thickness was related to a stagnant circulation, very low temperatures and continuous accumulation of snow on top of a base of sea-ice. This resulted in a large accumulation of freshwater in the Arctic Basin. As sea-level rose and a more modern circulation regime became established in the Arctic, this freshwater was released from the Arctic Ocean through Fram Strait, leading to extensive sea-ice formation in the North Atlantic (Greenland Sea) and a major reduction in the AMOC. Here we present new model results and a review of the paleoceanographic evidence to support this hypothesis. The bottom line is that the Arctic Ocean was likely a major player in causing abrupt climate change in the past, via its influence on the AMOC. Although we focus here on the Younger Dryas, the Arctic Ocean has been repeatedly isolated from the world ocean during glacial periods of the past. When these periods of isolation ended, it is probable that there were significant

  18. Freshwater budget of the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean, from salinity, δ18O, and nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto-Kawai, M.; McLaughlin, F. A.; Carmack, E. C.; Nishino, S.; Shimada, K.

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of freshwater components (e.g., meteoric, sea ice, and Pacific water) in the Canada Basin is quantified using salinity, δ18O, and nutrient data collected in 2003 and 2004. The penetration depth of sea ice meltwater is limited to the upper 30 m, and brine, rejected during sea ice formation, is observed from 30 to 250 m depth. The fraction of meteoric water is high in the upper 50 m and decreases with depth. Pacific water entering via Bering Strait is the main source of freshwater below 50 m depth. Bering Strait throughflow, which transports Pacific water with salinity 32.5 together with meteoric water supplied upstream of the Bering Strait, contributes up to 75% of freshwater input (>3200 km3 a-1) to the Canada Basin. The mean residence time of Pacific water in the Canada Basin is estimated to be 11 years. Precipitation and river runoff from both North American and Eurasian continents add >800 km3 a-1 and sea ice formation removes <900 km3 a-1 (<0.6 m a-1) of fresh water. The export of ice and liquid fresh water from the Canada Basin contributes ˜40% of the freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean to the North Atlantic Ocean.

  19. On the Relative Importance of Freshwater Fluxes and Variability From the Arctic Ocean into the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslowski, W.; Clement Kinney, J. L.; Jakacki, J.

    2007-12-01

    We use a high resolution coupled ice-ocean model of the Pan-Arctic region forced with realistic atmospheric data to investigate the variability of freshwater content within the Arctic Ocean as well as sea ice and liquid freshwater fluxes into the North Atlantic during 1979-2004. Modeled fluxes are validated against recently published estimates. Results are analyzed to compare the relative contribution of the total combined liquid and solid freshwater flux through the two main pathways: Fram-Denmark Strait (FDS) and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago- Davis-Hudson Strait (CAADHS). Our results suggest the relative importance of the freshwater flux through CAADHS into the Labrador Sea. This implies the need for ocean models to adequately represent mass and property fluxes through the narrow and shallow passages of the Canadian Archipelago and Davis and Hudson Straits. We argue that this requirement must be satisfied to advance studies of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) and especially its variability. Given the recent record sea ice melt in the Arctic Ocean, it is critical that global ocean and climate models improve their skill in simulating and predicting effects of changing exports from the Arctic Ocean into the North Atlantic.

  20. Sources and fate of freshwater exported in the East Greenland Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Paul A.; Heywood, Karen J.; Meredith, Michael P.; Naveira-Garabato, Alberto C.; Marca, Alina D.; Falkner, Kelly K.

    2009-10-01

    Monitoring the sources and fate of freshwater in the East Greenland Current (EGC) is important, as this water has the potential to suppress deep convection in the Nordic and Labrador Seas if the outflow of freshwater from the Arctic Ocean increases in response to climate change. Here, hydrographic, oxygen isotope ratio and dissolved barium concentration sections across Denmark Strait collected in 1998 and 1999 are used to determine the freshwater composition of the EGC at these times. Comparison of meltwater fluxes at Denmark Strait and Fram Strait indicates a net melting of sea ice into the EGC between these two locations, with a significant proportion of sea ice drifting into the Nordic Seas or on to the East Greenland Shelf. We conclude that the phase of freshwater exiting the Arctic Ocean through Fram Strait is important in determining its possible impact on deep water formation in the Nordic and Labrador Seas.

  1. Arctic Ocean freshwater content changes and their causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V.; Polyakov, I. V.; Alexeev, V.; Belchansky, G. I.; Dmitrenko, I. A.; Kirillov, S.; Korablev, A.; Steele, M.; Timokhov, L. A.; Yashayaev, I.

    2006-12-01

    Recent observations show dramatic changes of the Arctic atmosphere-ice-ocean system. Here we demonstrate, through the analysis of a vast collection of previously unsynthesized observational data, that over the 20th century the central Arctic Ocean became increasingly saltier whereas long-term freshwater content (FWC) trends over the Siberian shelf show general freshening tendency. These FWC trends are modulated by strong decadal and multidecadal fluctuations with sustained and widespread spatiotemporal patterns. Associated with the multidecadal variability, the FWC record shows two periods in the 1920-30s and in recent decades when the central Arctic Ocean was saltier and two periods in the earlier century and in the 1940-70s when it was fresher. The FWC anomalies excited on arctic shelves (including anomalies resulting from river discharge inputs) and those caused by net atmospheric precipitation were too small to trigger long-term FWC variations in the central Arctic Ocean; to the contrary, they act to moderate the observed long-term central- basin FWC changes. Variability of the intermediate Atlantic Water did not have strong impact on changes of the upper Arctic Ocean water masses. Ice-ocean interactions were the key processes in shaping long-term upper Arctic Ocean FWC changes. The combined effect of ice production and melt resulted in a cumulative loss of 15 thousand cubic km of fresh water over the last 21 years. Strength of the outflow of the arctic waters (not FWC anomalies) dominates the supply of Arctic fresh water to sub-polar basins. Finally, since the high- latitude fresh water plays a crucial role in establishing and regulating global thermohaline circulation, the multi- decadal fluctuations of the freshwater content discussed here should be considered when assessing long-term climate change and variability.

  2. Mass, heat and freshwater fluxes in the South Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng

    1986-01-01

    Six hydrographic sections were used to examine the circulation and property fluxes in the South Indian Ocean from 10 to 32 deg S. The calculations were made by applying an inverse method to the data. In the interior of the South Indian Ocean, the geostrophic flow is generally northward. At 18 deg S, the northward interior mass flux is balanced by the southward Ekman mass flux at the surface, whereas at 32 deg S the northward interior mass flux is balanced by the southward mass flux of the Agulhas Current. There is a weak, southward mass flux of 6 x 10 to the 9th kg/s in the Mozambique Channel. The rate of water exchange between the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean is dependent on the choice of the initial reference level used in the inverse calculation. The choice of 1500 m, the depth of the deep oxygen minimum, has led to a flux of water from the Pacific Ocean to the Indian Ocean at a rate of 6.6 x 10 to the 9th kg/s. Heat flux calculations indicate that the Indian Ocean is exporting heat to the rest of the world's oceans at a rate of -0.69 x 10 to the 15th W at 18 deg S and -0.25 x 10 to the 15th W at 32 deg S (negative values being southward).

  3. Monitoring and Predicting the Export and Fate of Global Ocean Net Primary Production: The EXPORTS Field Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exports Science Definition Team

    2016-04-01

    Ocean ecosystems play a critical role in the Earth's carbon cycle and its quantification on global scales remains one of the greatest challenges in global ocean biogeochemistry. The goal of the EXport Processes in the Ocean from Remote Sensing (EXPORTS) science plan is to develop a predictive understanding of the export and fate of global ocean primary production and its implications for the Earth's carbon cycle in present and future climates. NASA's satellite ocean-color data record has revolutionized our understanding of global marine systems. EXPORTS is designed to advance the utility of NASA ocean color assets to predict how changes in ocean primary production will impact the global carbon cycle. EXPORTS will create a predictive understanding of both the export of organic carbon from the euphotic zone and its fate in the underlying "twilight zone" (depths of 500 m or more) where variable fractions of exported organic carbon are respired back to CO2. Ultimately, it is the sequestration of deep organic carbon transport that defines the impact of ocean biota on atmospheric CO2 levels and hence climate. EXPORTS will generate a new, detailed understanding of ocean carbon transport processes and pathways linking upper ocean phytoplankton processes to the export and fate of organic matter in the underlying twilight zone using a combination of field campaigns, remote sensing and numerical modeling. The overarching objective for EXPORTS is to ensure the success of future satellite missions by establishing mechanistic relationships between remotely sensed signals and carbon cycle processes. Through a process-oriented approach, EXPORTS will foster new insights on ocean carbon cycling that will maximize its societal relevance and be a key component in the U.S. investment to understand Earth as an integrated system.

  4. Freshwater and heat transports from global ocean synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivieso, M.; Haines, K.; Zuo, H.; Lea, D.

    2014-01-01

    An eddy-permitting ¼° global ocean reanalysis based on the Operational Met Office FOAM data assimilation system has been run for 1989-2010 forced by ERA-Interim meteorology. Freshwater and heat transports are compared with published estimates globally and in each basin, with special focus on the Atlantic. The meridional transports agree with observations within errors at most locations, but where eddies are active the transports by the mean flow are nearly always in better agreement than the total transports. Eddy transports are down gradient and are enhanced relative to a free run. They may oppose or reinforce mean transports and provide 40-50% of the total transport near midlatitude fronts, where eddies with time scales <1 month provide up to 15%. Basin-scale freshwater convergences are calculated with the Arctic/Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans north of 32°S, all implying net evaporation of 0.33 ± 0.04 Sv, 0.65 ± 0.07 Sv, and 0.09 ± 0.04 Sv, respectively, within the uncertainty of observations in the Atlantic and Pacific. The Indian is more evaporative and the Southern Ocean has more precipitation (1.07 Sv). Air-sea fluxes are modified by assimilation influencing turbulent heat fluxes and evaporation. Generally, surface and assimilation fluxes together match the meridional transports, indicating that the reanalysis is close to a steady state. Atlantic overturning and gyre transports are assessed with overturning freshwater transports southward at all latitudes. At 26°N eddy transports are negligible, overturning transport is 0.67 ± 0.19 Sv southward and gyre transport is 0.44 ± 0.17 Sv northward, with divergence between 26°N and the Bering Strait of 0.13 ± 0.23 Sv over 2004-2010.

  5. Fate of terrestrial colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Arctic Ocean: exported or removed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granskog, M. A.; Stedmon, C. A.; Dodd, P. A.; Amon, R. M. W.; Pavlov, A. K.; de Steur, L.; Hansen, E.

    2012-04-01

    Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) was measured with hydrographic parameters (salinity, d18O and inorganic nutrients) across Fram Strait. East Greenland Current (EGC) surface waters showed a pronounced CDOM absorption maximum between 30 and 120 m depth associated with both river and sea ice brine-enriched water, characteristic of polar mixed layer water and upper halocline water. Lowest CDOM was found in the Atlantic inflow within the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC). Although applied elsewhere in the Arctic, we show that the salinity-CDOM relationship not suitable for evaluating the mixing behavior of CDOM (conservative vs. non-conservative) in Fram Strait. The strong correlation between meteoric water and optical properties of CDOM are indicative of the terrigenous origin of CDOM in the EGC and marine origin in WSC. Based on CDOM absorption in Polar Water and comparison with an Arctic river discharge weighted mean, we estimate that a 68% integrated loss of CDOM absorption across 250-600 nm has occurred, with a preferential removal of absorption at longer wavelengths reflecting the loss of high molecular weight material. Budget calculations of CDOM exports through Fram Strait using modeled volume transports indicate that the net southward export of CDOM in Fram Strait equals to 8 to 14% of the total riverine CDOM inputs to the Arctic Ocean, thus physical export is not a major sink of CDOM. We propose that CDOM can aid in discriminating glacial melt waters from Arctic riverine freshwater on the east Greenland shelf.

  6. Time and space variability of freshwater content, heat content and seasonal ice melt in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Meri; Rudels, Bert; Zhou, Jinping

    2010-05-01

    The Arctic Ocean water column is strongly stratified in salinity due to large freshwater input from river runoff, net precipitation and the inflow of low salinity Pacific water through Bering Strait: The strong stability allows sea ice to form in winter and to be exported. In summer seasonal ice melt adds freshwater to the stability in the upper part of the water column. The distribution of heat, relative to -1.9C, and freshwater, relative to 34.9, in the upper 1000m of the water column and in different areas of the Arctic Ocean, as well as the amount and distribution of seasonal ice melt have been determined from hydrographic data obtained from ice breaker cruises conducted in the Arctic Ocean during the last 15 years. The water column is subdivided into six layers: the Polar Mixed Layer, the upper halocline (S<34), the lower halocline (S>34, T<0C), two Atlantic layers (T>0C) separated at the temperature maximum, and the intermediate layer (T<0C) down to 1000m. The time variability of thickness, freshwater content and heat content in these layers is then determined for the Nansen Basin, the Gakkel Ridge, the Amundsen Basin, the Lomonosov Ridge, the Makarov Basin, the northern Canada Basin and the southern Canada Basin. The temporal variations in freshwater content are largest in the uppermost layers, the Polar Mixed Layer and the upper halocline and magnify towards Bering Strait. The seasonal ice melt is estimated from the freshwater stored in the Polar Surface Layer above the temperature minimum indicating the depth of the local winter convection and homogenisation. The melt water content is computed relative to the salinity at the temperature minimum. The required latent heat of melting and the sensible heat stored above the temperature minimum are compared with the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis heat input data. The estimated freshwater input is 1-2m, in Nansen Basin usually below 1m and over the Lomonosov Ridge and in the Makarov Basin sometimes above 2m. This is close

  7. Temperature effects on export production in the open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Edward A.; Falkowski, Paul G.; Smith, Walker O.; Ducklow, Hugh; McCarthy, James J.

    2000-12-01

    A pelagic food web model was formulated with the goal of developing a quantitative understanding of the relationship between total production, export production, and environmental variables in marine ecosystems. The model assumes that primary production is partitioned through both large and small phytoplankton and that the food web adjusts to changes in the rate of allochthonous nutrient inputs in a way that maximizes stability, i.e., the ability of the system to return to steady state following a perturbation. The results of the modeling exercise indicate that ef ratios, defined as new production/total production = export production/total production, are relatively insensitive to total production rates at temperatures greater than ˜25°C and lie in the range 0.1-0.2. At moderate to high total production rates, ef ratios are insensitive to total production and negatively correlated with temperature. The maximum ef ratios are ˜0.67 at high rates of production and temperatures of 0°-10°C. At temperatures less than ˜20°C, there is a transition from low ef ratios to relatively high ef ratios as total production increases from low to moderate values. This transition accounts for the hyperbolic relationship often presumed to exist between ef ratios and total production. At low rates of production the model predicts a negative correlation between production and ef ratios, a result consistent with data collected at station ALOHA (22°45'N, 158°W) in the North Pacific subtropical gyre. The predictions of the model are in excellent agreement with results reported from the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) and from other field work. In these studies, there is virtually no correlation between total production and ef ratios, but temperature alone accounts for 86% of the variance in the ef ratios. Model predictions of the absolute and relative abundance of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms are in excellent agreement with data reported from field studies

  8. Thorium-234 as a tracer of particle dynamics and upper ocean export in the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, S. A.; Pike, S.; Buesseler, K. O.

    2015-06-01

    The flux of sinking particles is an important removal mechanism of carbon and other chemical species from the surface ocean as part of the biological pump. Euphotic zone export of 234Th was measured on GEOTRACES transects of the Atlantic Ocean to evaluate basin-scale export variability. High-resolution sampling through the entire water-column allowed for the identification of unique 234Th features in intermediate and deep waters. These data will be important for describing distributions and estimating the fluxes of trace elements measured by other investigators in the GEOTRACES program. This extensive data set will also be useful when combined with other particulate and radioisotope data for improving our understanding of particle cycling and the relation of particle flux to particle composition and abundance.

  9. Fueling export production: nutrient return pathways from the deep ocean and their dependence on the Meridional Overturning Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palter, J. B.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Simeon, J.; Slater, R. D.

    2010-11-01

    In the Southern Ocean, mixing and upwelling in the presence of heat and freshwater surface fluxes transform subpycnocline water to lighter densities as part of the upward branch of the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC). One hypothesized impact of this transformation is the restoration of nutrients to the global pycnocline, without which biological productivity at low latitudes would be significantly reduced. Here we use a novel set of modeling experiments to explore the causes and consequences of the Southern Ocean nutrient return pathway. Specifically, we quantify the contribution to global productivity of nutrients that rise from the ocean interior in the Southern Ocean, the northern high latitudes, and by mixing across the low latitude pycnocline. In addition, we evaluate how the strength of the Southern Ocean winds and the parameterizations of subgridscale processes change the dominant nutrient return pathways in the ocean. Our results suggest that nutrients upwelled from the deep ocean in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and subducted in Subantartic Mode Water support between 33 and 75% of global export production between 30° S and 30° N. The high end of this range results from an ocean model in which the MOC is driven primarily by wind-induced Southern Ocean upwelling, a configuration favored due to its fidelity to tracer data, while the low end results from an MOC driven by high diapycnal diffusivity in the pycnocline. In all models, nutrients exported in the SAMW layer are utilized and converted rapidly (in less than 40 years) to remineralized nutrients, explaining previous modeling results that showed little influence of the drawdown of SAMW surface nutrients on atmospheric carbon concentrations.

  10. A conceptual model of ocean freshwater flux derived from sea surface salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, V.; Wang, J.; Willis, J. K.

    2014-09-01

    A conceptual model is proposed to express freshwater flux (evaporation minus precipitation) as a function of sea surface salinity (and vice versa). The model is formulated using an idealized one-dimensional diffusion equation for the ocean surface layer. It is shown to provide good agreement with existing freshwater flux estimates and salinity observations. It also has the potential to enhance our capability of monitoring and modeling global freshwater fluxes and salinity as a data retrieval algorithm for remote sensing. The model may improve physical parameterization in coupled ocean-atmosphere models to study the global water cycle.

  11. High Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.

    2006-01-27

    This paper investigates ballasting and remineralization controls of carbon sedimentation in the twilight zone (100-1000 m) of the Southern Ocean. Size-fractionated (<1 {micro}m, 1-51 {micro}m, >51 {micro}m) suspended particulate matter was collected by large volume in-situ filtration from the upper 1000 m in the Subantarctic (55 S, 172 W) and Antarctic (66 S, 172 W) zones of the Southern Ocean during the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) in January-February 2002. Particles were analyzed for major chemical constituents (POC, P, biogenic Si, CaCO3), and digital and SEM image analyses of particles were used to aid in the interpretation of the chemical profiles. Twilight zone waters at 66 S in the Antarctic had a steeper decrease in POC with depth than at 55 S in the Subantarctic, with lower POC concentrations in all size fractions at 66 S than at 55 S, despite up to an order of magnitude higher POC in surface waters at 66 S. The decay length scale of >51 {micro}m POC was significantly shorter in the upper twilight zone at 66 S ({delta}{sub e}=26 m) compared to 55 S ({delta}{sub e}=81 m). Particles in the carbonate-producing 55 S did not have higher excess densities than particles from the diatom-dominated 66 S, indicating that there was no direct ballast effect that accounted for deeper POC penetration at 55 S. An indirect ballast effect due to differences in particle packaging and porosities cannot be ruled out, however, as aggregate porosities were high ({approx}97%) and variable. Image analyses point to the importance of particle loss rates from zooplankton grazing and remineralization as determining factors for the difference in twilight zone POC concentrations at 55 S and 66 S, with stronger and more focused shallow remineralization at 66 S. At 66 S, an abundance of large (several mm long) fecal pellets from the surface to 150 m, and almost total removal of large aggregates by 200 m, reflected the actions of a single or few zooplankton species capable of

  12. On the relationship between Nd isotopic composition and ocean overturning circulation in idealized freshwater discharge events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempfer, Johannes; Stocker, Thomas F.; Joos, Fortunat; Dutay, Jean-Claude

    2012-09-01

    Using a cost-efficient climate model, the effect of changes in overturning circulation on neodymium isotopic composition,ɛNd, is systematically examined for the first time. Idealized sequences of abrupt climate changes are induced by the application of periodic freshwater fluxes to the North Atlantic (NA) and the Southern Ocean (SO), thus mainly affecting either the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) or Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). Variations in ɛNd reflect weakening and strengthening of the formation of NADW and AABW, changes in ɛNdof end-members are relatively small. Relationships betweenɛNd and the strength of NADW or AABW are more pronounced for AABW than for NADW. Atlantic patterns of variations in ɛNd systematically differ between NA and SO experiments. Additionally, the signature of changes in ɛNd in the Atlantic and the Pacific is alike in NA but opposite in SO experiments. Discrimination between NA and SO experiments is therefore possible based on the Atlantic pattern of variations in ɛNd and the contrariwise behavior of ɛNd in the Atlantic and the Pacific. In further experiments we examined the effect of variations in magnitudes of particle export fluxes. Within the examined range, and although settling particles represent the only sink of Nd, their effects on ɛNd are relatively small. Our results confirm the large potential of ɛNd as a paleocirculation tracer but also indicate its limitations of quantitative reconstructions of changes in the Atlantic Meridional Ocean Circulation.

  13. What causes the inverse relationship between primary production and export efficiency in the Southern Ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moigne, Frédéric A. C.; Henson, Stephanie A.; Cavan, Emma; Georges, Clément; Pabortsava, Katsiaryna; Achterberg, Eric P.; Ceballos-Romero, Elena; Zubkov, Mike; Sanders, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    The ocean contributes to regulating atmospheric CO2 levels, partly via variability in the fraction of primary production (PP) which is exported out of the surface layer (i.e., the e ratio). Southern Ocean studies have found that contrary to global-scale analyses, an inverse relationship exists between e ratio and PP. This relationship remains unexplained, with potential hypotheses being (i) large export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in high PP areas, (ii) strong surface microbial recycling in high PP regions, and/or (iii) grazing-mediated export that varies inversely with PP. We find that the export of DOC has a limited influence in setting the negative e ratio/PP relationship. However, we observed that at sites with low PP and high e ratios, zooplankton-mediated export is large and surface microbial abundance low suggesting that both are important drivers of the magnitude of the e ratio in the Southern Ocean.

  14. Iron defecation by sperm whales stimulates carbon export in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Trish J; Roudnew, Ben; Gill, Peter; Seymour, Justin; Seuront, Laurent; Johnson, Genevieve; Mitchell, James G; Smetacek, Victor

    2010-11-22

    The iron-limited Southern Ocean plays an important role in regulating atmospheric CO(2) levels. Marine mammal respiration has been proposed to decrease the efficiency of the Southern Ocean biological pump by returning photosynthetically fixed carbon to the atmosphere. Here, we show that by consuming prey at depth and defecating iron-rich liquid faeces into the photic zone, sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) instead stimulate new primary production and carbon export to the deep ocean. We estimate that Southern Ocean sperm whales defecate 50 tonnes of iron into the photic zone each year. Molar ratios of C(export):Fe(added) determined during natural ocean fertilization events are used to estimate the amount of carbon exported to the deep ocean in response to the iron defecated by sperm whales. We find that Southern Ocean sperm whales stimulate the export of 4 × 10(5) tonnes of carbon per year to the deep ocean and respire only 2 × 10(5) tonnes of carbon per year. By enhancing new primary production, the populations of 12 000 sperm whales in the Southern Ocean act as a carbon sink, removing 2 × 10(5) tonnes more carbon from the atmosphere than they add during respiration. The ability of the Southern Ocean to act as a carbon sink may have been diminished by large-scale removal of sperm whales during industrial whaling.

  15. Hydrographic changes in the Lincoln Sea in the Arctic Ocean with focus on an upper ocean freshwater anomaly between 2007 and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steur, L.; Steele, M.; Hansen, E.; Morison, J.; Polyakov, I.; Olsen, S. M.; Melling, H.; McLaughlin, F. A.; Kwok, R.; Smethie, W. M.; Schlosser, P.

    2013-09-01

    Hydrographic data from the Arctic Ocean show that freshwater content in the Lincoln Sea, north of Greenland, increased significantly from 2007 to 2010, slightly lagging changes in the eastern and central Arctic. The anomaly was primarily caused by a decrease in the upper ocean salinity. In 2011 upper ocean salinities in the Lincoln Sea returned to values similar to those prior to 2007. Throughout 2008-2010, the freshest surface waters in the western Lincoln Sea show water mass properties similar to fresh Canada Basin waters north of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. In the northeastern Lincoln Sea fresh surface waters showed a strong link with those observed in the Makarov Basin near the North Pole. The freshening in the Lincoln Sea was associated with a return of a subsurface Pacific Water temperature signal although this was not as strong as observed in the early 1990s. Comparison of repeat stations from the 2000s with the data from the 1990s at 65°W showed an increase of the Atlantic temperature maximum which was associated with the arrival of warmer Atlantic water from the Eurasian Basin. Satellite-derived dynamic ocean topography of winter 2009 showed a ridge extending parallel to the Canadian Archipelago shelf as far as the Lincoln Sea, causing a strong flow toward Nares Strait and likely Fram Strait. The total volume of anomalous freshwater observed in the Lincoln Sea and exported by 2011 was close to 1100±250km3, approximately 13% of the total estimated FW increase in the Arctic in 2008.

  16. 3D Dynamics of Freshwater Lenses in the Near-Surface Layer of the Tropical Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander; Dean, Cayla

    2015-04-01

    Convective rains in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) produce lenses of freshened water on the ocean surface. These lenses are localized in space and typically involve both salinity and temperature anomalies. Due to significant density anomalies, strong pressure gradients develop, which result in lateral spreading of freshwater lenses in a form resembling gravity currents. Gravity currents inherently involve three-dimensional dynamics. As a type of organized structure, gravity currents in the upper layer of the ocean may also interact with, and be shaped by, the ambient oceanic environment and atmospheric conditions. Among the important factors are the background stratification, wind stress, wind/wave mixing and spatially coherent organized motions in the near-surface layer of the ocean. Under certain conditions, a resonant interaction between a propagating freshwater lens and internal waves in the underlying pycnocline (e.g., barrier layer) may develop, whereas interaction with wind stress may produce an asymmetry in the freshwater lens and associated mixing. These two types of interactions working in concert may explain the series of sharp frontal interfaces, which have been observed in association with freshwater lenses during TOGA COARE. In this work, we have conducted a series of numerical experiments using computational fluid dynamics tools. These numerical simulations were designed to elucidate the relationship between vertical mixing and horizontal advection of salinity under various environmental conditions and potential impact on the Aquarius and SMOS satellite image formation. Available near-surface data from field experiments served as a guidance for numerical simulations. The results of this study indicate that 3D dynamics of freshwater lenses are essential within a certain range of wind/wave conditions and the freshwater influx in the surface layer of the ocean.

  17. Global assessment of ocean carbon export by combining satellite observations and food-web models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, D. A.; Buesseler, K. O.; Doney, S. C.; Sailley, S. F.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Boyd, P. W.

    2014-03-01

    The export of organic carbon from the surface ocean by sinking particles is an important, yet highly uncertain, component of the global carbon cycle. Here we introduce a mechanistic assessment of the global ocean carbon export using satellite observations, including determinations of net primary production and the slope of the particle size spectrum, to drive a food-web model that estimates the production of sinking zooplankton feces and algal aggregates comprising the sinking particle flux at the base of the euphotic zone. The synthesis of observations and models reveals fundamentally different and ecologically consistent regional-scale patterns in export and export efficiency not found in previous global carbon export assessments. The model reproduces regional-scale particle export field observations and predicts a climatological mean global carbon export from the euphotic zone of ~6 Pg C yr-1. Global export estimates show small variation (typically < 10%) to factor of 2 changes in model parameter values. The model is also robust to the choices of the satellite data products used and enables interannual changes to be quantified. The present synthesis of observations and models provides a path for quantifying the ocean's biological pump.

  18. Where is mineral ballast important for surface export of particulate organic carbon in the ocean?

    PubMed Central

    Le Moigne, Frédéric A C; Pabortsava, Katsiaryna; Marcinko, Charlotte L J; Martin, Patrick; Sanders, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Correlations between particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral fluxes in the deep ocean have inspired the inclusion of “ballast effect” parameterizations in carbon cycle models. A recent study demonstrated regional variability in the effect of ballast minerals on the flux of POC in the deep ocean. We have undertaken a similar analysis of shallow export data from the Arctic, Atlantic, and Southern Oceans. Mineral ballasting is of greatest importance in the high-latitude North Atlantic, where 60% of the POC flux is associated with ballast minerals. This fraction drops to around 40% in the Southern Ocean. The remainder of the export flux is not associated with minerals, and this unballasted fraction thus often dominates the export flux. The proportion of mineral-associated POC flux often scales with regional variation in export efficiency (the proportion of primary production that is exported). However, local discrepancies suggest that regional differences in ecology also impact the magnitude of surface export. We propose that POC export will not respond equally across all high-latitude regions to possible future changes in ballast availability. PMID:26074644

  19. Ocean export production and foraminiferal stable isotopes in the Antarctic Southern Ocean across the mid-Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenfratz, A. P.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Jaccard, S.; Hodell, D. A.; Vance, D.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Greaves, M.; Haug, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in buoyancy forcing in the Antarctic Zone (AZ) of the Southern Ocean are believed to play an instrumental role in modulating atmospheric CO2 concentrations during glacial cycles by regulating the transfer of carbon between the ocean interior and the atmosphere. Indeed, a million-year-spanning high-resolution excess Barium record from the AZ of the South Atlantic (ODP 1094), which traces changes in export production, shows decreased export production during cold periods suggesting decreased overturning. Here, we extend this AZ export production record back to 1.6 Myr. In addition, we present new carbon and oxygen isotope records of benthic and planktic foraminifera from the same site, complemented by Mg/Ca measurements in some intervals. The interpretation of these new data in the context of other South Atlantic records contributes to a better understanding of Southern Ocean hydrography and its role in modulating glacial/interglacial cycles over the past 1.6 Myr.

  20. Export pathways of mode waters, intermediate waters, and carbon out of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.; Meijers, A.; Haynes, P.; Karczewska, E.; Mazloff, M. R.; Sallee, J. B.; Shuckburgh, E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent observational evidence suggests that the water masses that ventilate the Southern Ocean thermocline (e.g. mode water, intermediate water) are formed and subducted via narrow, intense export windows [Sallée et al., 2010]. The idea that ventilation is localized is somewhat at odds with the more traditional picture of water mass formation as a broad circumpolar process. In this work, we aim to (i.) identify the primary mode and intermediate water export pathways out of the Southern Ocean and (ii.) to better understand the factors that control the location and intensity of these pathways. We examine the three-dimensional structure of the mode and intermediate water export routes on decadal to centennial timescales using both passive tracers and Lagrangian floats in an eddy-permitting Southern Ocean model. We find windows of strong mode water export in the Indian and Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean and identify two potential tracks along which anthropogenic carbon dioxide and other tracers may be subducted. Our results suggest that the Pacific export pathway is especially intense, i.e. a large proportion of mode waters from both the Indian and Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean enter subtropical latitudes via the Pacific pathway. Reference Sallée, J., K. Speer, S. Rintoul, and S. Wijffels (2010), Southern Ocean thermocline ventilation, Journal of Physical Oceanography, 40, 509-529.

  1. Efficient export of carbon to the deep ocean through dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Hopkinson, Charles S; Vallino, Joseph J

    2005-01-13

    Oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) constitutes one of the largest pools of reduced carbon in the biosphere. Estimated DOC export from the surface ocean represents 20% of total organic carbon flux to the deep ocean, which constitutes a primary control on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. DOC is the carbon component of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and an accurate quantification of DOM pools, fluxes and their controls is therefore critical to understanding oceanic carbon cycling. DOC export is directly coupled with dissolved organic nitrogen and phosphorus export. However, the C:N:P stoichiometry (by atoms) of DOM dynamics is poorly understood. Here we study the stoichiometry of the DOM pool and of DOM decomposition in continental shelf, continental slope and central ocean gyre environments. We find that DOM is remineralized and produced with a C:N:P stoichiometry of 199:20:1 that is substantially lower than for bulk pools (typically >775:54:1), but greater than for particulate organic matter (106:16:1--the Redfield ratio). Thus for a given mass of new N and P introduced into surface water, more DOC can be exported than would occur at the Redfield ratio. This may contribute to the excess respiration estimated to occur in the interior ocean. Our results place an explicit constraint on global carbon export and elemental balance via advective pathways. PMID:15650735

  2. Estimating the global oceanic net freshwater flux from Argo and comparing it with satellite-based freshwater flux products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Li; Hackert, Eric; Arkin, Phillip; Busalacchi, Antonio J.

    2014-11-01

    Following the idea that analysis of in situ information in the salt budget could be used as a surrogate for global "ocean rain gauge," the annual mean oceanic net freshwater flux (E-P) was estimated from the Argo profiles and the wind stress data on a global scale. The comparison between the independent E-P estimation from Argo and the E-P product sets, including the combination of precipitation from TRMM, GPCP, CMAP and evaporation from OAFlux, GSSTF3 and IFREMER and E-P set from NEWS formed from satellite, generally show similar spatial patterns, particularly on the large scale. However, there are differences among the different satellite-based E-P estimates and between satellite estimates and independent in situ estimates. Based on the pattern correlation and the RMSD, the evaporation and precipitation from OAFlux and TRMM agrees best with the E-P estimated from the independent Argo-based estimates.

  3. Innate immune responses to gut microbiota differ between oceanic and freshwater threespine stickleback populations

    PubMed Central

    Milligan-Myhre, Kathryn; Small, Clayton M.; Mittge, Erika K.; Agarwal, Meghna; Currey, Mark; Cresko, William A.; Guillemin, Karen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Animal hosts must co-exist with beneficial microbes while simultaneously being able to mount rapid, non-specific, innate immune responses to pathogenic microbes. How this balance is achieved is not fully understood, and disruption of this relationship can lead to disease. Excessive inflammatory responses to resident microbes are characteristic of certain gastrointestinal pathologies such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The immune dysregulation of IBD has complex genetic underpinnings that cannot be fully recapitulated with single-gene-knockout models. A deeper understanding of the genetic regulation of innate immune responses to resident microbes requires the ability to measure immune responses in the presence and absence of the microbiota using vertebrate models with complex genetic variation. Here, we describe a new gnotobiotic vertebrate model to explore the natural genetic variation that contributes to differences in innate immune responses to microbiota. Threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, has been used to study the developmental genetics of complex traits during the repeated evolution from ancestral oceanic to derived freshwater forms. We established methods to rear germ-free stickleback larvae and gnotobiotic animals monoassociated with single bacterial isolates. We characterized the innate immune response of these fish to resident gut microbes by quantifying the neutrophil cells in conventionally reared monoassociated or germ-free stickleback from both oceanic and freshwater populations grown in a common intermediate salinity environment. We found that oceanic and freshwater fish in the wild and in the laboratory share many intestinal microbial community members. However, oceanic fish mount a strong immune response to residential microbiota, whereas freshwater fish frequently do not. A strong innate immune response was uniformly observed across oceanic families, but this response varied among families of freshwater fish. The

  4. Innate immune responses to gut microbiota differ between oceanic and freshwater threespine stickleback populations.

    PubMed

    Milligan-Myhre, Kathryn; Small, Clayton M; Mittge, Erika K; Agarwal, Meghna; Currey, Mark; Cresko, William A; Guillemin, Karen

    2016-02-01

    Animal hosts must co-exist with beneficial microbes while simultaneously being able to mount rapid, non-specific, innate immune responses to pathogenic microbes. How this balance is achieved is not fully understood, and disruption of this relationship can lead to disease. Excessive inflammatory responses to resident microbes are characteristic of certain gastrointestinal pathologies such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The immune dysregulation of IBD has complex genetic underpinnings that cannot be fully recapitulated with single-gene-knockout models. A deeper understanding of the genetic regulation of innate immune responses to resident microbes requires the ability to measure immune responses in the presence and absence of the microbiota using vertebrate models with complex genetic variation. Here, we describe a new gnotobiotic vertebrate model to explore the natural genetic variation that contributes to differences in innate immune responses to microbiota. Threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, has been used to study the developmental genetics of complex traits during the repeated evolution from ancestral oceanic to derived freshwater forms. We established methods to rear germ-free stickleback larvae and gnotobiotic animals monoassociated with single bacterial isolates. We characterized the innate immune response of these fish to resident gut microbes by quantifying the neutrophil cells in conventionally reared monoassociated or germ-free stickleback from both oceanic and freshwater populations grown in a common intermediate salinity environment. We found that oceanic and freshwater fish in the wild and in the laboratory share many intestinal microbial community members. However, oceanic fish mount a strong immune response to residential microbiota, whereas freshwater fish frequently do not. A strong innate immune response was uniformly observed across oceanic families, but this response varied among families of freshwater fish. The gnotobiotic

  5. Seasonal heat and freshwater cycles in the Arctic Ocean in CMIP5 coupled models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yanni; Carton, James A.; Chepurin, Gennady A.; Steele, Michael; Hakkinen, Sirpa

    2016-04-01

    This study examines the processes governing the seasonal response of the Arctic Ocean and sea ice to surface forcings as they appear in historical simulations of 14 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 coupled climate models. In both models and observations, the seasonal heat budget is dominated by a local balance between net surface heating and storage in the heat content of the ocean and in melting/freezing of sea ice. Observations suggest ocean heat storage is more important than sea ice melt, while in most of these models, sea ice melt dominates. Seasonal horizontal heat flux divergence driven by the seasonal cycle of volume transport is only important locally. In models and observations, the dominant terms in the basin-average seasonal freshwater budget are the storages of freshwater between the ocean and sea ice, and the exchange between the two. The largest external source term is continental discharge in early summer, which is an order of magnitude smaller. The appearance of sea ice (extent and volume) and also ocean stratification in both the heat and freshwater budgets provides two links between the budgets and provides two mechanisms for feedback. One consequence of such an interaction is the fact that models with strong/weak seasonal surface heating also have strong/weak seasonal haline and temperature stratification.

  6. Export of dissolved inorganic nutrients to the northern Indian Ocean from the Indian monsoonal rivers during discharge period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, M. S.; Prasad, M. H. K.; Rao, D. B.; Viswanadham, R.; Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Reddy, N. P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal regions are highly productive due to the nutrients largely supplied by rivers. To examine the contribution of dissolved inorganic nutrients (DIN) by Indian rivers to coastal waters, data were collected near the freshwater heads of 27 monsoonal rivers of peninsular India during three weeks in late July to mid-August, the middle of the principal runoff period of the southwest monsoon of 2011. Twelve researchers in four groups, equipped with car and portable laboratory equipment, sampled mid-stream of each estuary using mechanized boat, and filtered and partly analyzed the water in the evening. The estimated exports were 0.22 ± 0.05, 0.11 ± 0.03, and 1.03 ± 0.26 Tg yr-1 for dissolved inorganic nitrogen, phosphorus and silicate, respectively. Higher amounts of DIN reach the Bay of Bengal than the Arabian Sea due to the higher volume (∼76%) of discharge to the former. In contrast, the export of dissolved inorganic nitrogen is almost same to the Bay of Bengal (0.12 ± 0.03 Tg yr-1) and Arabian Sea (0.10 ± 0.02 Tg yr-1) principally due to the polluted Narmada and Tapti rivers in the northwest. Including input from the glacial rivers, Ganges, Brahmaputra and Indus, it is estimated that the northern Indian Ocean receives ∼1.84 ± 0.46, 0.28 ± 0.07 and 3.58 ± 0.89 Tg yr-1 of nitrate, phosphate and silicate, respectively, which are significantly lower than the earlier estimates of DIN export from the Indian rivers based on DIN measured in the mid or upstream rivers. Such low fluxes in this study were attributed to efficient retention/elimination of DIN (∼91%) before reaching the coastal ocean. Hence, this study suggests that the importance of sampling locations for estimating nutrient fluxes to the coastal ocean. Riverine DIN export of 1.84 ± 0.46 Tg yr-1 would support 12.2 ± 3.1 Tg C yr-1 of new production in coastal waters of the northern Indian Ocean that results in a removal of 12.2 ± 3.1 Tg atmospheric CO2 yr-1.

  7. Coralline algal Barium as indicator for 20th century northwestern North Atlantic surface ocean freshwater variability

    PubMed Central

    Hetzinger, S.; Halfar, J.; Zack, T.; Mecking, J. V.; Kunz, B. E.; Jacob, D. E.; Adey, W. H.

    2013-01-01

    During the past decades climate and freshwater dynamics in the northwestern North Atlantic have undergone major changes. Large-scale freshening episodes, related to polar freshwater pulses, have had a strong influence on ocean variability in this climatically important region. However, little is known about variability before 1950, mainly due to the lack of long-term high-resolution marine proxy archives. Here we present the first multidecadal-length records of annually resolved Ba/Ca variations from Northwest Atlantic coralline algae. We observe positive relationships between algal Ba/Ca ratios from two Newfoundland sites and salinity observations back to 1950. Both records capture episodical multi-year freshening events during the 20th century. Variability in algal Ba/Ca is sensitive to freshwater-induced changes in upper ocean stratification, which affect the transport of cold, Ba-enriched deep waters onto the shelf (highly stratified equals less Ba/Ca). Algal Ba/Ca ratios therefore may serve as a new resource for reconstructing past surface ocean freshwater changes. PMID:23636135

  8. Critical space scales for aggregation-mediated carbon export from ocean fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, Anya M.; Johnson, David

    2003-07-01

    Several experiments have attempted to test Martin's hypothesis that addition of soluble iron to iron-limited ocean regions will lead to an increase in carbon sequestration via phytoplankton growth and sedimentation. However, artificially iron-induced blooms do not always trigger increases in vertical carbon export. Here we show that to trigger export, a patch must be larger than a threshold size. Phytoplankton sink en masse only after reaching a critical concentration for aggregation, and concentration is dependent on the competitive balance between growth and horizontal turbulent diffusion, which in turn varies with patch length scale. We summarize this balance using a non-dimensional parameter, Q, and use a simple 2D model solving a growth-diffusion-export equation to show that export flux occurs from a fertilized patch when Q < 1, and that flux is maximized at a value of Q below this critical point. A simple nutrient limitation model generates predictions of particle export from patch fertilization experiments.

  9. Mercury export to the Arctic Ocean from the Mackenzie River, Canada.

    PubMed

    Emmerton, Craig A; Graydon, Jennifer A; Gareis, Jolie A L; St Louis, Vincent L; Lesack, Lance F W; Banack, Janelle K A; Hicks, Faye; Nafziger, Jennifer

    2013-07-16

    Circumpolar rivers, including the Mackenzie River in Canada, are sources of the contaminant mercury (Hg) to the Arctic Ocean, but few Hg export studies exist for these rivers. During the 2007-2010 freshet and open water seasons, we collected river water upstream and downstream of the Mackenzie River delta to quantify total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations and export. Upstream of the delta, flow-weighted mean concentrations of bulk THg and MeHg were 14.6 ± 6.2 ng L(-1) and 0.081 ± 0.045 ng L(-1), respectively. Only 11-13% and 44-51% of bulk THg and MeHg export was in the dissolved form. Using concentration-discharge relationships, we calculated bulk THg and MeHg export into the delta of 2300-4200 kg yr(-1) and 15-23 kg yr(-1) over the course of the study. Discharge is not presently known in channels exiting the delta, so we assessed differences in river Hg concentrations upstream and downstream of the delta to estimate its influence on Hg export to the ocean. Bulk THg and MeHg concentrations decreased 19% and 11% through the delta, likely because of particle settling and other processes in the floodplain. These results suggest that northern deltas may be important accumulators of river Hg in their floodplains before export to the Arctic Ocean.

  10. Restricted Inter-ocean Exchange and Attenuated Biological Export Caused Enhanced Carbonate Preservation in the PETM Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Boudreau, B. P.; Dickens, G. R.; Sluijs, A.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) release during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 55.8 Myr BP) acidified the oceans, causing a decrease in calcium carbonate (CaCO3) preservation. During the subsequent recovery from this acidification, the sediment CaCO3 content came to exceed pre-PETM values, known as over-deepening or over-shooting. Past studies claim to explain these trends, but have failed to reproduce quantitatively the time series of CaCO3 preservation. We employ a simple biogeochemical model to recreate the CaCO3 records preserved at Walvis Ridge of the Atlantic Ocean. Replication of the observed changes, both shallowing and the subsequent over-deepening, requires two conditions not previously considered: (1) limited deep-water exchange between the Indo-Atlantic and Pacific oceans and (2) a ~50% reduction in the export of CaCO3 to the deep sea during acidification. Contrary to past theories that attributed over-deepening to increased riverine alkalinity input, we find that over-deepening is an emergent property, generated at constant riverine input when attenuation of CaCO3 export causes an unbalanced alkalinity input to the deep oceans (alkalinization) and the development of deep super-saturation. Restoration of CaCO3 export, particularly in the super-saturated deep Indo-Atlantic ocean, later in the PETM leads to greater accumulation of carbonates, ergo over-shooting, which returns the ocean to pre-PETM conditions over a time scale greater than 200 kyr. While this feedback between carbonate export and the riverine input has not previously been considered, it appears to constitute an important modification of the classic carbonate compensation concept used to explain oceanic response to acidification.

  11. On the temperature dependence of oceanic export efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cael, B. B.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-05-01

    Quantifying the fraction of primary production exported from the euphotic layer (termed the export efficiency ef) is a complicated matter. Studies have suggested empirical relationships with temperature which offer attractive potential for parameterization. Here we develop what is arguably the simplest mechanistic model relating the two, using established thermodynamic dependencies for primary production and respiration. It results in a single-parameter curve that constrains the envelope of possible efficiencies, capturing the upper bounds of several ef-T data sets. The approach provides a useful theoretical constraint on this relationship and extracts the variability in ef due to temperature but does not idealize out the remaining variability which evinces the substantial complexity of the system in question.

  12. Carbon export and transfer to depth across the Southern Ocean Great Calcite Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengard, S. Z.; Lam, P. J.; Balch, W. M.; Auro, M. E.; Pike, S.; Drapeau, D.; Bowler, B.

    2015-07-01

    Sequestration of carbon by the marine biological pump depends on the processes that alter, remineralize, and preserve particulate organic carbon (POC) during transit to the deep ocean. Here, we present data collected from the Great Calcite Belt, a calcite-rich band across the Southern Ocean surface, to compare the transformation of POC in the euphotic and mesopelagic zones of the water column. The 234Th-derived export fluxes and size-fractionated concentrations of POC, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), and biogenic silica (BSi) were measured from the upper 1000 m of 27 stations across the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Great Calcite Belt. POC export out of the euphotic zone was correlated with BSi export. PIC export was not, but did correlate positively with POC flux transfer efficiency. Moreover, regions of high BSi concentrations, which corresponded to regions with proportionally larger particles, exhibited higher attenuation of > 51 μm POC concentrations in the mesopelagic zone. The interplay among POC size partitioning, mineral composition, and POC attenuation suggests a more fundamental driver of POC transfer through both depth regimes in the Great Calcite Belt. In particular, we argue that diatom-rich communities produce large and labile POC aggregates, which not only generate high export fluxes but also drive more remineralization in the mesopelagic zone. We observe the opposite in communities with smaller calcifying phytoplankton, such as coccolithophores. We hypothesize that these differences are influenced by inherent differences in the lability of POC exported by different phytoplankton communities.

  13. Carbon export and transfer to depth across the Southern Ocean Great Calcite Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengard, S. Z.; Lam, P. J.; Balch, W. M.; Auro, M. E.; Pike, S.; Drapeau, D.; Bowler, B.

    2015-02-01

    Sequestration of carbon by the marine biological pump depends on the processes that alter, remineralize and preserve particulate organic carbon (POC) during transit to the deep ocean. Here, we present data collected from the Great Calcite Belt, a calcite-rich band across the Southern Ocean surface, to compare the transformation of POC in the euphotic and mesopelagic zones of the water column. The 234Th-derived export fluxes and size-fractionated concentrations of POC, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), and biogenic silica (BSi) were measured from the upper 1000 m of 27 stations across the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Great Calcite Belt. POC export out of the euphotic zone was correlated with BSi export. PIC export was not, but did correlate positively with POC flux transfer efficiency. Moreover, regions of high BSi concentrations, which corresponded to regions with proportionally larger particles, exhibited higher attenuation of >51 μm POC concentrations in the mesopelagic zone. The interplay among POC size partitioning, mineral composition and POC attenuation suggests a more fundamental driver of POC transfer through both depth regimes in the Great Calcite Belt. In particular, we argue that diatom-dominated communities produce large and labile POC aggregates, which generate high export fluxes but also drive more remineralization in the mesopelagic zone. We observe the opposite in communities with smaller calcifying phytoplankton, such as coccolithophores. We hypothesize that these differences are influenced by inherent differences in the lability of POC exported by different phytoplankton communities.

  14. Transient sensitivities of sea ice export through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago inferred from a coupled ocean/sea-ice adjoint model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbach, P.; Losch, M.; Menemenlis, D.; Campin, J.; Hill, C.

    2008-12-01

    The sensitivity of sea-ice export through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), measured in terms of its solid freshwater export through Lancaster Sound, to changes in various elements of the ocean and sea-ice state, and to elements of the atmospheric forcing fields through time and space is assessed by means of a coupled ocean/sea-ice adjoint model. The adjoint model furnishes full spatial sensitivity maps (also known as Lagrange multipliers) of the export metric to a variety of model variables at any chosen point in time, providing the unique capability to quantify major drivers of sea-ice export variability. The underlying model is the MIT ocean general circulation model (MITgcm), which is coupled to a Hibler-type dynamic/thermodynamic sea-ice model. The configuration is based on the Arctic face of the ECCO3 high-resolution cubed-sphere model, but coarsened to 36-km horizontal grid spacing. The adjoint of the coupled system has been derived by means of automatic differentiation using the software tool TAF. Finite perturbation simulations are performed to check the information provided by the adjoint. The sea-ice model's performance in the presence of narrow straits is assessed with different sea-ice lateral boundary conditions. The adjoint sensitivity clearly exposes the role of the model trajectory and the transient nature of the problem. The complex interplay between forcing, dynamics, and boundary condition is demonstrated in the comparison between the different calculations. The study is a step towards fully coupled adjoint-based ocean/sea-ice state estimation at basin to global scales as part of the ECCO efforts.

  15. Central Arctic Ocean freshwater during a period of anomalous melt and advection in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, Benjamin; Korhonen, Meri; Hoppmann, Mario; Ricker, Robert; Hendricks, Stefan; Krumpen, Thomas; Beckers, Justin; Schauer, Ursula

    2016-04-01

    During the recent decade the Arctic Ocean has shown several years of very low sea-ice extent and an increase in liquid freshwater. Yet, the processes underlying the interannual variability are still not fully understood. Hydrographic observations by ship campaigns and autonomous platforms reveal that summer 2015 showed above average liquid freshwater in the upper ocean of the central Arctic. Surface temperatures and sea level pressure were also higher than the average of the preceeding two decades. From hydrographic observations and atmospheric reanalysis data we show that this liquid freshwater anomaly is associated with above average sea-ice melt and intensified northward Ekman transport. We, further, found significant amounts of Pacific Water in the upper water column, from the mixed-layer to the upper halocline. Our results suggest that the freshening was due to both advection of low-salinity water from the direction of the Siberian shelves, the Beaufort Gyre and the Bering Strait, and enhance sea-ice melt.

  16. Definitional mission: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, S.R.; Ross, J.M.

    1990-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the commercial viability of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) electric power plant at the Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands. It was concluded that various technology improvements and economic factors have converged to present a feasible opportunity. United States industrial and research organizations are technically capable of developing a commercial OTEC industry for domestic and export markets. It is estimated that 100% of OTEC equipment and services could be supplied by United States firms. However, Japan has aggressively pursued OTEC development with an apparent goal of dominating the export market.

  17. Response Of Ocean Carbon Export To Different Model Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglar Yumruktepe, Veli; Salihoglu, Baris; Kideys, Ahmet E.

    2013-04-01

    Effects of climate change on the biological carbon pump (BCP) and vice-versa, and the influence of change in ecosystem structure on the dynamics of BCP are vital topics to understand the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and sequestration of greenhouse gases. Construction of a complete carbon budget, requires better understanding of air-sea exchanges and the processes controlling the vertical and horizontal transport of carbon in the ocean, particularly the biological carbon pump. Improved parameterization of carbon sequestration within ecosystem models is vital to better understand and predict changes in the global carbon cycle. However, due to the complexity of processes controlling particle aggregation, sinking and decomposition, existing ecosystem models necessarily parameterize carbon sequestration using simple algorithms. For this reason, the primary aim of this study is to provide new parameterizations of the downward flux of organic carbon, suitable for inclusion in numerical models. The study area was chosen to be the North Atlantic Basin (NA) and the surrounding shelf seas. In the scope of this study, first, the skill of existing models in representing particle fluxes were compared theoretically. The unique algorithms used in three state-of-the art ecosystem models ERSEM, PISCES and MEDUSA have been compared and tested against observational data collected at the PAP mooring site. For testing purposes, algorithms were inserted into a common 1D pelagic ecosystem model. Following comparison of existing algorithms, new experimental results obtained from targeted mesocosm experiments and open ocean observations, will be utilized to develop improved formulations. New algorithms will be compared to existing model formulations using a standard validation data set complied within the framework of BASIN. In order to assess algorithm response under differing hydrographic environments, each set of algorithms will be tested within a 1D framework at three sites

  18. Exploring changes in river nitrogen export to the world's oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwman, A. F.; van Drecht, G.; Knoop, J. M.; Beusen, A. H. W.; Meinardi, C. R.

    2005-03-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance of river nutrient loads and export to coastal marine systems is a major global problem affecting water quality and biodiversity. Nitrogen is the major nutrient in rivers. On the basis of projections for food production and wastewater effluents, the global river N flux to coastal marine systems is shown to increase by 13% in the coming 3 decades. While the river N flux will grow by about 10% in North America and Oceania and will decrease in Europe, a 27% increase is projected for developing countries, which is a continuation of the trend observed in the past decades. This is a consequence of increasing nitrogen inputs to surface water associated with urbanization, sanitation, development of sewerage systems, and lagging wastewater treatment, as well as increasing food production and associated inputs of N fertilizer, animal manure, atmospheric N deposition, and biological N fixation in agricultural systems. Growing river N loads will lead to increased incidence of problems associated with eutrophication in coastal seas.

  19. Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, R.G.M.; Aiken, G.R.; Butler, K.D.; Dornblaser, M.M.; Striegl, R.G.; Hernes, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    The quality and quantity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported by Arctic rivers is known to vary with hydrology and this exported material plays a fundamental role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon at high latitudes. We highlight the potential of optical measurements to examine DOM quality across the hydrograph in Arctic rivers. Furthermore, we establish chromophoric DOM (CDOM) relationships to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and lignin phenols in the Yukon River and model DOC and lignin loads from CDOM measurements, the former in excellent agreement with long-term DOC monitoring data. Intensive sampling across the historically under-sampled spring flush period highlights the importance of this time for total export of DOC and particularly lignin. Calculated riverine DOC loads to the Arctic Ocean show an increase from previous estimates, especially when new higher discharge data are incorporated. Increased DOC loads indicate decreased residence times for terrigenous DOM in the Arctic Ocean with important implications for the reactivity and export of this material to the Atlantic Ocean. Citation: Spencer, R. G. M., G. R. Aiken, K. D. Butler, M. M. Dornblaser, R. G. Striegl, and P. J. Hernes (2009), Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L06401, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL036831. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Large Freshwater Anomalies in the Arctic Ocean: Results from the 2008 IPY/NPEO Hydrographic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, M.; Morison, J.; Proshutinsky, A.; Steele, M.

    2008-12-01

    Based on an aerial hydrographic survey conducted in March and April, 2008, supplemented by unmanned drifting ice-tethered profilers (ITPs), we report that the precipitous decrease in minimum Arctic ice extent observed in the past few years has been accompanied by significant changes in upper ocean salinity, especially over the Canada Basin, where the anticyclonic Beaufort Gyre has traditionally maintained one of the major freshwater reservoirs of the world ocean. Our winter measurements corroborate and extend observations of increased summer freshwater content (FWC) first detected during the joint WHOI-IOS- JAMSTEC expedition in 2003 and monitored since. The survey comprised operations in the western Arctic that included 15 ice-landing stations and 8 airdropped expendable probes, plus 20 ice-landing stations in the eastern Arctic staged from ice station Barneo near the North Pole. We found that in the southeast quadrant of the Canada Basin, anomalous FWC (i.e., the change relative to PHC 3.0 winter [March-April-May] climatology based predominantly on conditions in the 1970s) has increased by as much as 11 m. Positive anomalies were found at all stations in the Pacific sector, including ITP profiles, but their magnitudes decreased to the west and north. In the eastern Arctic we found negative FWC anomalies on the Eurasian side of the Lomonosov Ridge, reaching values as low as -5 m. Smaller positive anomalies characterized water in the Makarov Basin. Freshening of the upper ocean over the Canada Basin has also substantially changed steric levels. A west- to-east line of stations extending about 800 km across the Basin, centered near 75°N, 150°W, nearly bisected the traditional Beaufort Gyre. In contrast to the domed climatological dynamic topography typical of the Gyre, the 2008 survey showed a monotonic rise in dynamic height as far east as 135°W, indicating a northward surface geostrophic flow component across the entire section, with large impact on freshwater

  1. Seasonal Variation, Export Dynamics and Consumption of Freshwater Invertebrates in an Estuarine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. D.; Williams, N. E.

    1998-03-01

    In the Aber Estuary, North Wales, significant numbers of freshwater benthic invertebrates occurred in the tidal freshwater area. Distinct seasonal patterns were observed in their longitudinal zonation which appeared to be unrelated to variations in tidal inundation. The December extension downstream of freshwater taxa is hypothesized to be in response to decreasing water temperatures. In April, larvae/nymphs of the Trichoptera (caddisflies), Ephemeroptera (mayflies) and Plecoptera (stoneflies) ranged as far as a site inundated by 80·9% of all high tides, and larval Elmidae and Chironomidae (midges) occurred at the most marine site (inundated twice daily by all high tides). In July, with the exception of the Chironomidae, the range of most aquatic insects had contracted to the upper estuary. Although, in general, densities of aquatic insects decreased towards the lower estuary, significant densities persisted there. For example, maxima of 3514 chironomid larvae and 48 caddisfly larvae m -2were recorded at the 80·9% inundation site. An estimated 31×10 6freshwater invertebrates (weighing 62·6 kg), per annum, passed from fresh water into salt water across any given transect along the estuary. In comparison, the annual influx of invertebrates carried upstream by incoming tides was estimated to be 1·9×10 6(6·2%; weighing 2·5 kg). Predominant in the downstream drift were the larvae/nymphs and/or pupae of chironomids, mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies. The ' reverse ' drift comprised mainly copepods, ostracods, amphipods and oligochaetes. Mites and the brackishwater amphipod Gammarus zaddachicommonly moved in both directions. Highest drift densities occurred in July, whereas the lowest densities occurred in late autumn and winter. Multiple regression analysis showed no relationship between total drift or ' reverse ' drift densities and any of the measured environmental variables. Many of the freshwater invertebrates appeared not to die upon passing into tidal

  2. Carbon export efficiency and phytoplankton community composition in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moigne, Frédéric A. C.; Poulton, Alex J.; Henson, Stephanie A.; Daniels, Chris J.; Fragoso, Glaucia M.; Mitchell, Elaine; Richier, Sophie; Russell, Benjamin C.; Smith, Helen E. K.; Tarling, Geraint A.; Young, Jeremy R.; Zubkov, Mike

    2015-06-01

    Arctic primary production is sensitive to reductions in sea ice cover, and will likely increase into the future. Whether this increased primary production (PP) will translate into increased export of particulate organic carbon (POC) is currently unclear. Here we report on the POC export efficiency during summer 2012 in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic Ocean. We coupled 234-thorium based estimates of the export flux of POC to onboard incubation-based estimates of PP. Export efficiency (defined as the fraction of PP that is exported below 100 m depth: ThE-ratio) showed large variability (0.09 ± 0.19-1.3 ± 0.3). The highest ThE-ratio (1.3 ± 0.3) was recorded in a mono-specific bloom of Phaeocystis pouchetii located in the ice edge. Blooming diatom dominated areas also had high ThE-ratios (0.1 ± 0.1-0.5 ± 0.2), while mixed and/or prebloom communities showed lower ThE-ratios (0.10 ± 0.03-0.19 ± 0.05). Furthermore, using oxygen saturation, bacterial abundance, bacterial production, and zooplankton oxygen demand, we also investigated spatial variability in the degree to which this sinking material may be remineralized in the upper mesopelagic (<300 m). Our results suggest that blooming diatoms and P. pouchetii can export a significant fraction of their biomass below the surface layer (100 m) in the open Arctic Ocean. Also, we show evidence that the material sinking from a P. pouchetii bloom may be remineralized (>100 m) at a similar rate as the material sinking from diatom blooms in the upper mesopelagic, contrary to previous findings.

  3. Strong hemispheric coupling of glacial climate through freshwater discharge and ocean circulation.

    PubMed

    Knutti, R; Flückiger, J; Stocker, T F; Timmermann, A

    2004-08-19

    The climate of the last glacial period was extremely variable, characterized by abrupt warming events in the Northern Hemisphere, accompanied by slower temperature changes in Antarctica and variations of global sea level. It is generally accepted that this millennial-scale climate variability was caused by abrupt changes in the ocean thermohaline circulation. Here we use a coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice model to show that freshwater discharge into the North Atlantic Ocean, in addition to a reduction of the thermohaline circulation, has a direct effect on Southern Ocean temperature. The related anomalous oceanic southward heat transport arises from a zonal density gradient in the subtropical North Atlantic caused by a fast wave-adjustment process. We present an extended and quantitative bipolar seesaw concept that explains the timing and amplitude of Greenland and Antarctic temperature changes, the slow changes in Antarctic temperature and its similarity to sea level, as well as a possible time lag of sea level with respect to Antarctic temperature during Marine Isotope Stage 3.

  4. Strong hemispheric coupling of glacial climate through freshwater discharge and ocean circulation.

    PubMed

    Knutti, R; Flückiger, J; Stocker, T F; Timmermann, A

    2004-08-19

    The climate of the last glacial period was extremely variable, characterized by abrupt warming events in the Northern Hemisphere, accompanied by slower temperature changes in Antarctica and variations of global sea level. It is generally accepted that this millennial-scale climate variability was caused by abrupt changes in the ocean thermohaline circulation. Here we use a coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice model to show that freshwater discharge into the North Atlantic Ocean, in addition to a reduction of the thermohaline circulation, has a direct effect on Southern Ocean temperature. The related anomalous oceanic southward heat transport arises from a zonal density gradient in the subtropical North Atlantic caused by a fast wave-adjustment process. We present an extended and quantitative bipolar seesaw concept that explains the timing and amplitude of Greenland and Antarctic temperature changes, the slow changes in Antarctic temperature and its similarity to sea level, as well as a possible time lag of sea level with respect to Antarctic temperature during Marine Isotope Stage 3. PMID:15318212

  5. A probabilistic assessment of calcium carbonate export and dissolution in the modern ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Gianna; Steinacher, Marco; Joos, Fortunat

    2016-05-01

    The marine cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is an important element of the carbon cycle and co-governs the distribution of carbon and alkalinity within the ocean. However, CaCO3 export fluxes and mechanisms governing CaCO3 dissolution are highly uncertain. We present an observationally constrained, probabilistic assessment of the global and regional CaCO3 budgets. Parameters governing pelagic CaCO3 export fluxes and dissolution rates are sampled using a Monte Carlo scheme to construct a 1000-member ensemble with the Bern3D ocean model. Ensemble results are constrained by comparing simulated and observation-based fields of excess dissolved calcium carbonate (TA*). The minerals calcite and aragonite are modelled explicitly and ocean-sediment fluxes are considered. For local dissolution rates, either a strong or a weak dependency on CaCO3 saturation is assumed. In addition, there is the option to have saturation-independent dissolution above the saturation horizon. The median (and 68 % confidence interval) of the constrained model ensemble for global biogenic CaCO3 export is 0.90 (0.72-1.05) Gt C yr-1, that is within the lower half of previously published estimates (0.4-1.8 Gt C yr-1). The spatial pattern of CaCO3 export is broadly consistent with earlier assessments. Export is large in the Southern Ocean, the tropical Indo-Pacific, the northern Pacific and relatively small in the Atlantic. The constrained results are robust across a range of diapycnal mixing coefficients and, thus, ocean circulation strengths. Modelled ocean circulation and transport timescales for the different set-ups were further evaluated with CFC11 and radiocarbon observations. Parameters and mechanisms governing dissolution are hardly constrained by either the TA* data or the current compilation of CaCO3 flux measurements such that model realisations with and without saturation-dependent dissolution achieve skill. We suggest applying saturation-independent dissolution rates in Earth system

  6. Effects of tides on Riverine and Glacial freshwater transport in the Arctic Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luneva, Maria; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Harle, James; Holt, Jason

    2016-04-01

    In this study we use a novel pan-Arctic sea NENO-shelf ice-ocean coupled model, to examine the effects of tides, river runoff and vertical mixing schemes on sea ice and the mixing of water masses. Several 20-year long (1990-2010) simulations were performed: with explicitly resolved tides and without any tidal dynamics, with climatology river runoff, Dai et al. ,2009 database and freshwater source from melting Greenland glaciers. We examine also three different turbulent closures structural functions, based on the k-epsilon version of the Generic Length Scale Model: by Canuto group (2001) and two by Kantha and Clayson (1994, 2004). The results have been compared with sea ice volume and concentration trends and temperature and salinity profiles from World Ocean Database . We compared the following characteristics: potential energy anomalies, depth of halocline, mixed layer depth , salinity at the subsurface layer.

  7. The competition of freshwater and radiation in forcing the ocean during El Nino

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, N.; Barnett, T.P.

    1995-05-01

    The relative roles of heat and freshwater fluxes in forcing the tropical Pacific on interannual timescales are investigated using sophisticated atmospheric and oceanic general circulation models. Interannual density flux anomalies due to anomalous precipitation and shortwave and longwave radiation are highly correlated since they all depend on clouds. Their respective contributions to the anomalous surface density flux are of comparable magnitude, with precipitation and longwave anomalies opposing shortwave radiation. This implies that anomalous radiation and precipitation associated with the eastward shift of the centers of deep convection during El Nino change the density flux little since they largely balance. This near cancellation also causes the evaporative component to dominate interannual anomalies of the density flux in the eastern Pacific and in the Indian Ocean and implies that anomalous net surface density fluxes there can be approximated by anomalous evaporation alone. However, in the central and western Pacific, evaporative anomalies are negatively correlated to shortwave anomalies as well, and interannual anomalies of the net density flux are therefore small and deviate considerable from the evaporative component alone. Forcing an oceanic circulation model with the interannual anomalies of the fluxes of heat and freshwater alone yields salinity and temperature anomalies of the same order as observed. Model salinity anomalies explain approximately half of the observations, while temperature anomalies have reversed signs compared to observations. This reflects the negative feedback between surface heat fluxes and the warming caused by interannual anomalies of the wind not included in this simulation. Over most of the tropical ocean, interannual anomalies of surface density are dominated by temperature anomalies. In the central Pacific salinity anomalies diminish up to half of the effect of temperature. 28 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Climate change increases riverine carbon outgassing while export to the ocean remains uncertain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langerwisch, F.; Walz, A.; Rammig, A.; Tietjen, B.; Thonicke, K.; Cramer, W.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon fluxes in the Amazon Basin are considerably influenced by annual flooding during which terrigenous organic material is imported to the river. This regular interaction affects carbon pools within the riverine system, terrestrial carbon, and carbon exported to the ocean and released to the atmosphere. The processes of generation, conversion, and transport of organic carbon in this coupled terrigenous-riverine system strongly interact and are climate-sensitive, yet their response to climate change is still largely unknown. To quantify climate change effects on carbon pools and on carbon fluxes within the river and to the ocean and the atmosphere, we developed the riverine carbon model RivCM, which is directly coupled to the well-established dynamic vegetation and hydrology model LPJmL. We show here that RivCM successfully reproduces observed values in exported carbon and riverine carbon concentration. We evaluate future changes in riverine carbon by applying RivCM for climate forcing from five climate models and three CO2 emission scenarios (SRES). We find that climate change causes a doubling of riverine organic carbon in the Southern and Western basin while reducing it by 20 % in the eastern and northern parts. In contrast, the amount of riverine inorganic carbon shows a 2- to 3-fold increase in the entire basin, independent of the SRES scenario. The export of carbon to the atmosphere increases as well with an average of about 30 %. In contrast, changes in future export of organic carbon to the Atlantic Ocean depend on the SRES scenario and are projected to either decrease by about 8.9 % (SRES A1B) or increase by about 9.1 % (SRES A2). Such changes in the terrigenous-riverine system could have local and regional impacts on the carbon budget of the whole Amazon Basin and parts of the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in the riverine carbon could lead to a shift in the riverine nutrient supply and pH, while changes in the exported carbon to the ocean leads to changes in

  9. The role of sea ice in shaping recent Arctic Ocean freshwater content changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, I. V.

    2006-12-01

    Over the past several decades, the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions have undergone substantial changes. Available records point to the fact that over the 20th century the central Arctic Ocean became increasingly saltier. These freshwater content (FWC) trends are modulated by strong decadal and multidecadal fluctuations with sustained and widespread spatiotemporal patterns. Ice-ocean interactions were the key processes in shaping long-term upper Arctic Ocean FWC changes. Ice production was the dominant contributor to the salinification over the recent decades; ice melting was the major moderator of the observed salinification of the upper Arctic Ocean. Their combined effect resulted in a cumulative loss of 15 thousand cubic km of fresh water over the last 21 years. Strength of the outflow of the arctic fresh water and ice dominates the supply of Arctic fresh water to sub-polar basins. This enhanced high-latitude forcing should be considered when assessing long-term climate change and variability in the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions.

  10. A probabilistic assessment of calcium carbonate export and dissolution in the modern ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, G.; Steinacher, M.; Joos, F.

    2015-12-01

    The marine cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is an important element of the carbon cycle and co-governs the distribution of carbon and alkalinity within the ocean. However, CaCO3 fluxes and mechanisms governing CaCO3 dissolution are highly uncertain. We present an observationally-constrained, probabilistic assessment of the global and regional CaCO3 budgets. Parameters governing pelagic CaCO3 export fluxes and dissolution rates are sampled using a Latin-Hypercube scheme to construct a 1000 member ensemble with the Bern3D ocean model. Ensemble results are constrained by comparing simulated and observation-based fields of excess dissolved calcium carbonate (TA*). The minerals calcite and aragonite are modelled explicitly and ocean-sediment fluxes are considered. For local dissolution rates either a strong, a weak or no dependency on CaCO3 saturation is assumed. Median (68 % confidence interval) global CaCO3 export is 0.82 (0.67-0.98) Gt PIC yr-1, within the lower half of previously published estimates (0.4-1.8 Gt PIC yr-1). The spatial pattern of CaCO3 export is broadly consistent with earlier assessments. Export is large in the Southern Ocean, the tropical Indo-Pacific, the northern Pacific and relatively small in the Atlantic. Dissolution within the 200 to 1500 m depth range (0.33; 0.26-0.40 Gt PIC yr-1) is substantially lower than inferred from the TA*-CFC age method (1 ± 0.5 Gt PIC yr-1). The latter estimate is likely biased high as the TA*-CFC method neglects transport. The constrained results are robust across a range of diapycnal mixing coefficients and, thus, ocean circulation strengths. Modelled ocean circulation and transport time scales for the different setups were further evaluated with CFC11 and radiocarbon observations. Parameters and mechanisms governing dissolution are hardly constrained by either the TA* data or the current compilation of CaCO3 flux measurements such that model realisations with and without saturation-dependent dissolution achieve

  11. Silicate deposition during decomposition of cyanobacteria may promote export of picophytoplankton to the deep ocean.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tiantian; Kisslinger, Kim; Lee, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    Marine particles transport organic matter through the water column to the sediment where the organic matter can be buried. This pathway is one of the few natural removal mechanisms of CO2 from the atmosphere over geological time. Picophytoplankton, major primary producers in the ocean, have until recently been thought unimportant regarding particle transport. Here we provide evidence that silicate is deposited on extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) associated with decomposing picophytoplankton. We also find that Si is enriched in a previously unexplored group of marine particles (called micro-blebs) from the deep-water column. The surprising similarity in morphology and composition between EPS-Si and micro-blebs suggests that EPS-Si may be a precursor of micro-blebs observed in the deep ocean. This previously unexplored source of silicon may be important to silicon cycling and may further enhance export of picophytoplankton to the deep ocean. PMID:24920300

  12. Magnitude of the freshwater turtle exports from the US: long term trends and early effects of newly implemented harvest management regimes.

    PubMed

    Mali, Ivana; Vandewege, Michael W; Davis, Scott K; Forstner, Michael R J

    2014-01-01

    Unregulated commercial harvest remains a major threat for turtles across the globe. Due to continuing demand from Asian markets, a significant number of turtles are exported from the United States of America (US). Beginning in 2007, several southeastern states in the US implemented restrictions on the commercial harvest of turtles, in order to address the unsustainable take. We have summarized freshwater turtle exports from the US between 2002 and 2012 and demonstrated that the magnitude of turtle exports from the US remained high although the exports decreased throughout the decade. Louisiana and California were the major exporters. The majority of exports were captive bred, and from two genera, Pseudemys and Trachemys. We review the changes over the decade and speculate that the increase in export of wild turtles out of Louisiana after 2007 could be a consequence of strict regulations in surrounding states (e.g., Alabama, Florida). We suggest that if wild turtle protection is a goal for conservation efforts, then these states should work together to develop comprehensive regulation reforms pertaining to the harvest of wild turtles. PMID:24475128

  13. Magnitude of the freshwater turtle exports from the US: long term trends and early effects of newly implemented harvest management regimes.

    PubMed

    Mali, Ivana; Vandewege, Michael W; Davis, Scott K; Forstner, Michael R J

    2014-01-01

    Unregulated commercial harvest remains a major threat for turtles across the globe. Due to continuing demand from Asian markets, a significant number of turtles are exported from the United States of America (US). Beginning in 2007, several southeastern states in the US implemented restrictions on the commercial harvest of turtles, in order to address the unsustainable take. We have summarized freshwater turtle exports from the US between 2002 and 2012 and demonstrated that the magnitude of turtle exports from the US remained high although the exports decreased throughout the decade. Louisiana and California were the major exporters. The majority of exports were captive bred, and from two genera, Pseudemys and Trachemys. We review the changes over the decade and speculate that the increase in export of wild turtles out of Louisiana after 2007 could be a consequence of strict regulations in surrounding states (e.g., Alabama, Florida). We suggest that if wild turtle protection is a goal for conservation efforts, then these states should work together to develop comprehensive regulation reforms pertaining to the harvest of wild turtles.

  14. Magnitude of the Freshwater Turtle Exports from the US: Long Term Trends and Early Effects of Newly Implemented Harvest Management Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Ivana; Vandewege, Michael W.; Davis, Scott K.; Forstner, Michael R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Unregulated commercial harvest remains a major threat for turtles across the globe. Due to continuing demand from Asian markets, a significant number of turtles are exported from the United States of America (US). Beginning in 2007, several southeastern states in the US implemented restrictions on the commercial harvest of turtles, in order to address the unsustainable take. We have summarized freshwater turtle exports from the US between 2002 and 2012 and demonstrated that the magnitude of turtle exports from the US remained high although the exports decreased throughout the decade. Louisiana and California were the major exporters. The majority of exports were captive bred, and from two genera, Pseudemys and Trachemys. We review the changes over the decade and speculate that the increase in export of wild turtles out of Louisiana after 2007 could be a consequence of strict regulations in surrounding states (e.g., Alabama, Florida). We suggest that if wild turtle protection is a goal for conservation efforts, then these states should work together to develop comprehensive regulation reforms pertaining to the harvest of wild turtles. PMID:24475128

  15. Annual cycles of deep-ocean biogeochemical export fluxes in subtropical and subantarctic waters, southwest Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nodder, Scott D.; Chiswell, Stephen M.; Northcote, Lisa C.

    2016-04-01

    The annual cycles of particle fluxes derived from moored sediment trap data collected during 2000-2012 in subtropical (STW) and subantarctic waters (SAW) east of New Zealand are presented. These observations are the most comprehensive export flux time series from temperate Southern Hemisphere latitudes to date. With high levels of variability, fluxes in SAW were markedly lower than in STW, reflecting the picophytoplankton-dominated communities in the iron-limited, high nutrient-low chlorophyll SAW. Austral spring chlorophyll blooms in surface STW were near synchronous with elevated fluxes of bio-siliceous, carbonate, and organic carbon-rich materials to the deep ocean, probably facilitated by diatom and/or coccolithophorid sedimentation. Lithogenic fluxes were also high in STW, compared to SAW, reflecting proximity to the New Zealand landmass. In contrast, the highest biogenic fluxes in SAW occurred in spring when surface chlorophyll concentrations were low, while highest annual chlorophyll concentrations were in summer with no associated flux increase. We hypothesize that the high spring export in SAW results from subsurface chlorophyll accumulation that is not evident from remote-sensing satellites. This material was also rich in biogenic silica, perhaps related to the preferential export of diatoms and other silica-producing organisms, such as silicoflagellates and radiolarians. Organic carbon fluxes in STW are similar to that of other mesotrophic to oligotrophic waters (˜6-7 mg C m-2 d-1), whereas export from SAW is below the global average (˜3 mg C m-2 d-1). Regional differences in flux across the SW Pacific and Tasman region reflect variations in physical processes and ecosystem structure and function.

  16. Production of giant marine diatoms and their export at oceanic frontal zones: Implications for Si and C flux from stratified oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, A. E. S.; Pearce, R. B.; Grigorov, I.; Rance, J.; Lange, C. B.; Quilty, P.; Salter, I.

    2006-12-01

    From a synthesis of recent oceanic observations and paleo-data it is evident that certain species of giant diatoms including Rhizosolenia spp. Thalassiothrix spp. and Ethmodiscus rex may become concentrated at oceanic frontal zones and subsequently form episodes of mass flux to the sediment. Within the nutrient bearing waters advecting towards frontal boundaries, these species are generally not dominant, but they appear selectively segregated at fronts, and thus may dominate the export flux. Ancient Thalassiothrix diatom mat deposits in the eastern equatorial Pacific and beneath the Polar Front in the Southern Ocean record the highest open ocean sedimentation rates ever documented and represent vast sinks of silica and carbon. Several of the species involved are adapted to a stratified water column and may thrive in Deep Chlorophyll Maxima. Thus in oceanic regions and/or at times prone to enhanced surface water stratification (e.g., during meltwater pulses) they provide a mechanism for generating substantial biomass at depth and its subsequent export with concomitant implications for Si export and C drawdown. This ecology has important implications for ocean biogeochemical models suggesting that more than one diatom "functional type" should be used. In spite of the importance of these giant diatoms for biogeochemical cycling, their large size coupled with the constraints of conventional oceanographic survey schemes and techniques means that they are undersampled. An improved insight into these key species will be an important prerequisite for enhancing our understanding of marine biogeochemical cycling and for assessing the impacts of climate change on ocean export production.

  17. Revisited phytoplanktonic carbon dependency of heterotrophic bacteria in freshwaters, transitional, coastal and oceanic waters.

    PubMed

    Fouilland, Eric; Mostajir, Behzad

    2010-09-01

    Positive relationships between heterotrophic bacteria and particulate phytoplankton production (respectively, BP and PPP) have been reported for several areas, suggesting that material produced by phytoplankton was a major substrate for bacterial growth. Since then, thousands of simultaneous measurements of both PPP and BP have been performed. A review of these data showed that BP may exceed PPP considerably (median ranged between 132% and 484%) in all aquatic systems with the lowest PPP. In oceanic waters, BP did not seem to be temporally synchronized with PPP and the median BP : PPP ratio is 15% with moderate PPP, but the immediate bacterial carbon (C) demand (including bacterial respiration) was greater than the corresponding total primary production (i.e. dissolved and particulate primary production) for >80% of both volumetric and areal datasets. In freshwaters, the strong covariation observed between BP and PPP seemed mainly due to a common response to sudden nutrient inputs into enclosed systems, leading to a similar range of production rates and temporal synchronicities. Indeed, phytoplankton exudates contributed directly to only 32% (median) of BP when C-tracking experiments were performed in freshwaters. Therefore, because direct C dependency of bacteria on phytoplankton is questionable, other C sources might be more significant for bacterial growth. PMID:20491928

  18. Correlations Between Sea-Surface Salinity Tendencies and Freshwater Fluxes in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhen; Adamec, David

    2007-01-01

    Temporal changes in sea-surface salinity (SSS) from 21 years of a high resolution model integration of the Pacific Ocean are correlated with the freshwater flux that was used to force the integration. The correlations are calculated on a 1 x10 grid, and on a monthly scale to assess the possibility of deducing evaporation minus precipitation (E-P) fields from the salinity measurements to be taken by the upcoming Aquarius/SAC-D mission. Correlations between the monthly mean E-P fields and monthly mean SSS temporal tendencies are mainly zonally-oriented, and are highest where the local precipitation is relatively high. Nonseasonal (deviations from the monthly mean) correlations are highest along mid-latitude storm tracks and are relatively small in the tropics. The response of the model's surface salinity to surface forcing is very complex, and retrievals of freshwater fluxes from SSS measurements alone will require consideration of other processes, including horizontal advection and vertical mixing, rather than a simple balance between the two.

  19. Oceanic Fluxes of Mass, Heat and Freshwater: A Global Estimate and Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDonald, Alison Marguerite

    1995-01-01

    Data from fifteen globally distributed, modern, high resolution, hydrographic oceanic transects are combined in an inverse calculation using large scale box models. The models provide estimates of the global meridional heat and freshwater budgets and are used to examine the sensitivity of the global circulation, both inter and intra-basin exchange rates, to a variety of external constraints provided by estimates of Ekman, boundary current and throughflow transports. A solution is found which is consistent with both the model physics and the global data set, despite a twenty five year time span and a lack of seasonal consistency among the data. The overall pattern of the global circulation suggested by the models is similar to that proposed in previously published local studies and regional reviews. However, significant qualitative and quantitative differences exist. These differences are due both to the model definition and to the global nature of the data set.

  20. Freshwater composition of the waters off southeast Greenland and their link to the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, David A.; Pickart, Robert S.; Peter Jones, E.; Azetsu-Scott, Kumiko; Jane Eert, A.; Ã`Lafsson, Jón

    2009-05-01

    The freshwater composition of waters on the southeast Greenland shelf and slope are described using a set of high-resolution transects occupied in summer 2004, which included hydrographic, velocity, nutrient, and chemical tracer measurements. The nutrient and tracer data are used to quantify the fractions of Pacific Water, sea ice melt, and meteoric water present in the upper layers of the East Greenland Current (EGC) and East Greenland Coastal Current (EGCC). The EGC/EGCC system dominates the circulation of this region and strongly influences the observed distribution of the three freshwater types. Sea ice melt and meteoric water fractions are surface intensified, reflecting their sources, and generally increase southward from Denmark Strait to Cape Farewell, as well as shoreward. Significant fractions of Pacific Water are found in the subsurface layers of the EGCC, supporting the idea that this inner shelf branch is directly linked to the EGC and thus to the Arctic Ocean. A set of historical sections is examined to investigate the variability of Pacific Water content in the EGC and EGCC from 1984 to 2004 in the vicinity of Denmark Strait. The fraction of Pacific Water increased substantially in the late 1990s and subsequently declined to low levels in 2002 and 2004, mirroring the reduction in Pacific Water content reported previously at Fram Strait. This variability is found to correlate significantly with the Arctic Oscillation index, lagged by 9 years, suggesting that the Arctic Ocean circulation patterns bring varying amounts of Pacific Water to the North Atlantic via the EGC/EGCC.

  1. Export flux of particles at the equator in the western and central Pacific ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodier, Martine; Le Borgne, Robert

    .9 mmol C m-2 day-1 at TS-I and 2.3 mmol C m-2 day-1 at TS-11 (corresponding to a 2.6-fold increase) and showed low depth changes at both stations. POC export flux (including active flux associated with the interzonal migrants) at the 0.1 % light level depth represented only 8% of primary production (1°C uptake) measured at TS-1 and 19% at TS-II. For the time and space scales considered in the present study, new primary production, as measured by the 15N method, was in good agreement with the total export flux in the HNLC situation, thus leading to negligible dissolved organic carbon (DOC) or nitrogen (DON) losses from the photic zone. Conversely, export flux was found to be only 50% (C units) and 60% (N) of new production in the oligotrophic system, either because of an overestimation by the 15N method or of a significant export of DOC and DON. Comparison with other oceanic regions shows that export flux in the warm pool was within the same range as in the central gyres. On the other hand, comparison with EgPac data in the central Pacific suggests that there is no straightforward relation between the magnitude of the export and surface nitrate concentrations.

  2. The wineglass effect shapes particle export to the deep ocean in mesoscale eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, Anya M.; Stemmann, Lars; Guidi, Lionel; Calil, Paulo H. R.; Hogg, Andrew Mc C.; Feng, Ming; Thompson, Peter A.; Picheral, Marc; Gorsky, Gaby

    2016-09-01

    Mesoscale eddies in the ocean strongly impact the distribution of planktonic particles, mediating carbon fluxes over ~1/3 of the world ocean. However, mechanisms controlling particle transport through eddies are complex and challenging to measure in situ. Here we show the subsurface distribution of eddy particles funneled into a wineglass shape down to 1000 m, leading to a sevenfold increase of vertical carbon flux in the eddy center versus the eddy flanks, the "wineglass effect". We show that the slope of the wineglass (R) is the ratio of particle sinking velocity to the radially inward velocity, such that R represents a tool to predict radial particle movement (here 0.05 m s-1). A simple model of eddy spindown predicts such an ageostrophic flow concentrating particles in the eddy center. We explore how size-specific particle flux toward the eddy center impacts eddies' biogeochemistry and export fluxes.

  3. Export fluxes in a naturally iron-fertilized area of the Southern Ocean - Part 2: Importance of diatom resting spores and faecal pellets for export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembauville, M.; Blain, S.; Armand, L.; Quéguiner, B.; Salter, I.

    2015-06-01

    The biological composition of the material exported to a moored sediment trap located under the winter mixed layer of the naturally fertilized Kerguelen Plateau in the Southern Ocean was studied over an annual cycle. Despite iron availability in spring, the annual particulate organic carbon (POC) export (98.2 mmol m-2) at 289 m was low, but annual biogenic silica export was significant (114 mmol m-2). This feature was related to the abundance of empty diatom cells and the ratio of full to empty cells exerted a first-order control in BSi : POC export stoichiometry of the biological pump. Chaetoceros Hyalochaete spp. and Thalassiosira antarctica resting spores were responsible for more than 60% of the annual POC flux that occurred during two very short export events of < 14 days in spring-summer. Relatively low diatom fluxes were observed over the remainder of the year. Faecal pellet contribution to annual carbon flux was lower (34%) and reached its seasonal maximum in autumn and winter (> 80%). The seasonal progression of faecal pellet types revealed a clear transition from small spherical shapes (small copepods) in spring, to larger cylindrical and ellipsoid shapes in summer (euphausiids and large copepods) and finally to large tabular shapes (salps) in autumn and winter. We propose in this high-biomass, low-export (HBLE) environment that small but highly silicified and fast-sinking resting spores are able to bypass the intense grazing pressure and efficient carbon transfer to higher trophic levels that are responsible for the low fluxes observed the during the remainder of the year. More generally our study also provides a statistical framework linking the ecological succession of diatom and zooplankton communities to the seasonality of carbon and silicon export within an iron-fertilized bloom region in the Southern Ocean.

  4. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity.

  5. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity. PMID:25453073

  6. 3D Dynamics of the Near-Surface Layer of the Ocean in the Presence of Freshwater Influx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, C.; Soloviev, A.

    2015-12-01

    Freshwater inflow due to convective rains or river runoff produces lenses of freshened water in the near surface layer of the ocean. These lenses are localized in space and typically involve both salinity and temperature anomalies. Due to significant density anomalies, strong pressure gradients develop, which result in lateral spreading of freshwater lenses in a form resembling gravity currents. Gravity currents inherently involve three-dimensional dynamics. The gravity current head can include the Kelvin-Helmholtz billows with vertical density inversions. In this work, we have conducted a series of numerical experiments using computational fluid dynamics tools. These numerical simulations were designed to elucidate the relationship between vertical mixing and horizontal advection of salinity under various environmental conditions and potential impact on the pollution transport including oil spills. The near-surface data from the field experiments in the Gulf of Mexico during the SCOPE experiment were available for validation of numerical simulations. In particular, we observed a freshwater layer within a few-meter depth range and, in some cases, a density inversion at the edge of the freshwater lens, which is consistent with the results of numerical simulations. In conclusion, we discuss applicability of these results to the interpretation of Aquarius and SMOS sea surface salinity satellite measurements. The results of this study indicate that 3D dynamics of the near-surface layer of the ocean are essential in the presence of freshwater inflow.

  7. Regional patterns in current and future export production in the central Arctic Ocean quantified from nitrate fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randelhoff, Achim; Guthrie, John D.

    2016-08-01

    Due to severe nutrient and light limitation, the central Arctic Ocean has been characterized as a region of low primary productivity, with high retention of carbon in the surface waters. Using an in-depth analysis of published and new measurements of turbulent microstructure and high-resolution profiles of nitrate concentration, we reassess the vertical supply of nitrate to the Polar Mixed Layer and the associated export of particulate organic matter across the nitracline. We estimate annual export production to be approximately 1.5-3 g C m-2, but regional differences in both current and future potential of export production are large, with the eastern Arctic being least constrained by vertical nutrient supply and the western Arctic the most. Future changes in export production are assessed using a 1-D budget model; increases in the Atlantic sector are possibly compensated by decreases in the rest of the central Arctic Ocean such that the net change might be insignificant.

  8. Biome-specific scaling of ocean productivity, temperature, and carbon export efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britten, Gregory L.; Primeau, François W.

    2016-05-01

    Mass conservation and metabolic theory place constraints on how marine export production (EP) scales with net primary productivity (NPP) and sea surface temperature (SST); however, little is empirically known about how these relationships vary across ecologically distinct ocean biomes. Here we compiled in situ observations of EP, NPP, and SST and used statistical model selection theory to demonstrate significant biome-specific scaling relationships among these variables. Multiple statistically similar models yield a threefold variation in the globally integrated carbon flux (~4-12 Pg C yr-1) when applied to climatological satellite-derived NPP and SST. Simulated NPP and SST input variables from a 4×CO2 climate model experiment further show that biome-specific scaling alters the predicted response of EP to simulated increases of atmospheric CO2. These results highlight the need to better understand distinct pathways of carbon export across unique ecological biomes and may help guide proposed efforts for in situ observations of the ocean carbon cycle.

  9. Satellite estimate of freshwater exchange between the Indonesian Seas and the Indian Ocean via the Sunda Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potemra, James T.; Hacker, Peter W.; Melnichenko, Oleg; Maximenko, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    The straits in Indonesia allow for low-latitude exchange of water between the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Collectively known as the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), this exchange is thought to occur primarily via the Makassar Strait and downstream via Lombok Strait, Ombai Strait, and Timor Passage. The Sunda Strait, between the islands of Sumatra and Java, is a very narrow (≈10 km) and shallow (≈20 m) gap, but it connects the Java Sea directly to the Indian Ocean. Flow through this strait is presumed to be small, given the size of the passage; however, recent observations from the Aquarius satellite indicate periods of significant freshwater transport, suggesting the Sunda Strait may play a more important role in Pacific to Indian Ocean exchange. The nature of this exchange is short-duration (several days) bursts of freshwater injected into the eastern Indian Ocean superimposed on a mean seasonal cycle. The mean volume transport is small averaging about 0.1 Sv toward the Indian Ocean, but the freshwater transport is nonnegligible (estimated at 5.8 mSv). Transport through the strait is hydraulically controlled and directly correlates to the along-strait pressure difference. The episodic low-salinity plumes observed by Aquarius do not, however, appear to be forced by this same mechanism but are instead controlled by convergence of flow at the exit of the Strait in the Indian Ocean. Numerical model results show the fate of this freshwater plume varies with season and is either advected to the northwest along the coast of Sumatra or southerly into the ITF pathway.

  10. Linkage between transient physical forcing and export flux of bioreactive materials to the deep oligotrophic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, M. H.; Dickey, T. D.; Weber, J. C.; Johnson, R. J.; Knap, A. H.

    2002-12-01

    Considerable attention has recently been focused on the role of eddies in affecting biogeochemical fluxes and budgets of the Sargasso Sea. The Bermuda Testbed Mooring (BTM) and Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) shipboard sampling evidenced a large phytoplankton bloom at the Bermuda time-series site in late fall 1996 which was strongly forced by the interplay between seasonal mixed layer destratification and perturbation of mixed layer dynamics due to the presence of a warm mesoscale feature, possibly an eddy remnant, which was characterized by a thick warm, low salinity thermostad more than 180m in depth.. Nutrients, chlorophyll and pigment profiles indicated high primary production stimulated by nutrient entrainment and intermittent deep mixing. Zooplankton biomass and 200 m export flux also were greatly elevated. Nearly coincident with the arrival of this feature in surface waters, the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) sediment traps recorded an abrupt, factor of 2.5 increase in mass flux at 3200 m depth. More dramatic was the increase in flux of labile bioreactive organic matter. Fluxes of primary phytoplankton and bacteria-derived compounds and their early degradation products increased by factors of 5-30 Their covariation indicated that the settling phytoplankton bloom material contained elevated bacterial populations and was undergoing active degradation when it entered the 3200 m trap cup. These results show that transient, physical forcing by warm mesoscale features - which include but are not limited to eddies - can have an enormous effect on the export flux of bioreactive organic material. The contribution to the longer term average is not presently known, but the occurrence of episodic high flux events throughout the OFP time-series record suggests that they may be responsible for a significant fraction of the total export of bioreactive carbon and associated elements to the deep oligotrophic ocean.

  11. Tropical Atlantic climate response to different freshwater input in high latitudes with an ocean-only general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Guang; Wan, Xiuquan; Liu, Zedong

    2016-10-01

    Tropical Atlantic climate change is relevant to the variation of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) through different physical processes. Previous coupled climate model simulation suggested a dipole-like SST structure cooling over the North Atlantic and warming over the South Tropical Atlantic in response to the slowdown of the AMOC. Using an ocean-only global ocean model here, an attempt was made to separate the total influence of various AMOC change scenarios into an oceanic-induced component and an atmospheric-induced component. In contrast with previous freshwater-hosing experiments with coupled climate models, the ocean-only modeling presented here shows a surface warming in the whole tropical Atlantic region and the oceanic-induced processes may play an important role in the SST change in the equatorial south Atlantic. Our result shows that the warming is partly governed by oceanic process through the mechanism of oceanic gateway change, which operates in the regime where freshwater forcing is strong, exceeding 0.3 Sv. Strong AMOC change is required for the gateway mechanism to work in our model because only when the AMOC is sufficiently weak, the North Brazil Undercurrent can flow equatorward, carrying warm and salty north Atlantic subtropical gyre water into the equatorial zone. This threshold is likely to be model-dependent. An improved understanding of these issues may have help with abrupt climate change prediction later.

  12. Simulating the natural variability of the freshwater budget of the Arctic ocean from the mid to late Holocene using LOVECLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, F. J.; Goosse, H.; Renssen, H.

    2012-04-01

    The influence of freshwater on the long term climatic variability of the Arctic region is currently of significant interest. Alterations to the natural variability of the oceanic, terrestrial and atmospheric sources of freshwater to the Arctic ocean, caused by anthropogenic induced warming, are likely to have far reaching effects on oceanic processes and climate. A number of these changes are already observable, such as an intensification of the hydrological cycle, a 7% increase in Eurasian river runoff (1936-1999), a 9% reduction of sea-ice extent per decade (1979-2006), a 120km northward migration of permafrost in Northern Canada (1968-1994), and air temperatures 6°C warmer, in parts, from 2007 to 2010, when compared to the 1958-1996 average. All of these changes add another layer of complexity to understanding the role of the freshwater budget, and this makes it difficult to say with any certainty how these future changes will impact freshwater fluxes of the Arctic gateways, such as the Bering Strait, Fram Strait, Canadian Arctic Archipelago and the Barents Sea inflow. Despite these difficulties, there have been studies that have integrated the available data, from both in situ measurements and modelling studies, and used this as a basis to form a picture of the current freshwater budget, and then project upon these hypotheses for the future (Holland et al., 2007). However, one particular aspect of these future projections that is lacking is the accountability of how much future variance is attributable to both natural variability and anthropogenic influences. Here we present results of a mid to late (6-0ka) Holocene transient simulation, using the earth model of intermediate complexity, LOVECLIM (Goosse et al., 2010). The model is forced with orbital and greenhouse gas forcings appropriate for the time period. The results will highlight the natural variability of the oceanic, terrestrial and atmospheric components of the freshwater budget, over decadal and

  13. Salinity changes in the World Ocean since 1950 in relation to changing surface freshwater fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skliris, Nikolaos; Marsh, Robert; Josey, Simon A.; Good, Simon A.; Liu, Chunlei; Allan, Richard P.

    2014-08-01

    Global hydrographic and air-sea freshwater flux datasets are used to investigate ocean salinity changes over 1950-2010 in relation to surface freshwater flux. On multi-decadal timescales, surface salinity increases (decreases) in evaporation (precipitation) dominated regions, the Atlantic-Pacific salinity contrast increases, and the upper thermocline salinity maximum increases while the salinity minimum of intermediate waters decreases. Potential trends in E-P are examined for 1950-2010 (using two reanalyses) and 1979-2010 (using four reanalyses and two blended products). Large differences in the 1950-2010 E-P trend patterns are evident in several regions, particularly the North Atlantic. For 1979-2010 some coherency in the spatial change patterns is evident but there is still a large spread in trend magnitude and sign between the six E-P products. However, a robust pattern of increased E-P in the southern hemisphere subtropical gyres is seen in all products. There is also some evidence in the tropical Pacific for a link between the spatial change patterns of salinity and E-P associated with ENSO. The water cycle amplification rate over specific regions is subsequently inferred from the observed 3-D salinity change field using a salt conservation equation in variable isopycnal volumes, implicitly accounting for the migration of isopycnal surfaces. Inferred global changes of E-P over 1950-2010 amount to an increase of 1 ± 0.6 % in net evaporation across the subtropics and an increase of 4.2 ± 2 % in net precipitation across subpolar latitudes. Amplification rates are approximately doubled over 1979-2010, consistent with accelerated broad-scale warming but also coincident with much improved salinity sampling over the latter period.

  14. Glacial freshwater discharge events recorded by authigenic neodymium isotopes in sediments from the Mendeleev Ridge, western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Kwangchul; Han, Yeongcheol; Huh, Youngsook; Nam, Seung-Il; Stein, Ruediger; Mackensen, Andreas; Matthiessen, Jens

    2013-05-01

    The freshwater budget of the Arctic Ocean is a key component governing the deep water formation in the North Atlantic and the global climate system. We analyzed the isotopic composition of neodymium (ɛNd) in authigenic phases of marine sediments on the Mendeleev Ridge in the western Arctic Ocean spanning an estimated time interval from present to about 75 ka BP. This continuous record was used to reconstruct the ɛNd of the polar deep water (PDW) and changes in freshwater sources to the PDW through time. Three deviations in ɛNd from a long term average of -10.2 were identified at estimated 46-51, 35-39 and 13-21 ka BP. The estimated 46-51 ka BP event can be traced to bursting of ice-dammed lakes accompanying the collapse of the Barents-Kara Ice Sheet, which would have released radiogenic Nd to the eastern Arctic Ocean. The cyclonic surface circulation in the eastern Arctic Ocean must have been stronger than at present for the event to be recorded on the Mendeleev Ridge. For the 35-39 and 13-21 ka BP events, it is likely that the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) supplied the unradiogenic freshwater. The configuration of the anticyclonic circulation in the western Arctic was probably similar to today or expanded eastward. Our simple mass balance calculations suggest that large amounts of freshwater were released but due to significant deep water formation within the Arctic Ocean, the effect on the formation of NADW was probably minor.

  15. On the climate response of the low-latitude Pacific Ocean to changes in the global freshwater cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.; Guilyardi, E.; Sutton, R. T.; Gregory, J. M.; Madec, G.

    2006-11-01

    Under global warming, the predicted intensification of the global freshwater cycle will modify the net freshwater flux at the ocean surface. Since the freshwater flux maintains ocean salinity structures, changes to the density-driven ocean circulation are likely. A modified ocean circulation could further alter the climate, potentially allowing rapid changes, as seen in the past. The relevant feedback mechanisms and timescales are poorly understood in detail, however, especially at low latitudes where the effects of salinity are relatively subtle. In an attempt to resolve some of these outstanding issues, we present an investigation of the climate response of the low-latitude Pacific region to changes in freshwater forcing. Initiated from the present-day thermohaline structure, a control run of a coupled ocean atmosphere general circulation model is compared with a perturbation run in which the net freshwater flux is prescribed to be zero over the ocean. Such an extreme experiment helps to elucidate the general adjustment mechanisms and their timescales. The atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are held constant, and we restrict our attention to the adjustment of the upper 1,000 m of the Pacific Ocean between 40°N and 40°S, over 100 years. In the perturbation run, changes to the surface buoyancy, near-surface vertical mixing and mixed-layer depth are established within 1 year. Subsequently, relative to the control run, the surface of the low-latitude Pacific Ocean in the perturbation run warms by an average of 0.6°C, and the interior cools by up to 1.1°C, after a few decades. This vertical re-arrangement of the ocean heat content is shown to be achieved by a gradual shutdown of the heat flux due to isopycnal (i.e. along surfaces of constant density) mixing, the vertical component of which is downwards at low latitudes. This heat transfer depends crucially upon the existence of density-compensating temperature and salinity gradients on isopycnal surfaces

  16. Enhanced Particulate Organic Carbon Export at Eddy Edges in the Oligotrophic Western North Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yung-Yen; Hung, Chin-Chang; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Chung, Wan-Chen; Wang, Yu-Huai; Lee, I-Huan; Chen, Kuo-Shu; Ho, Chuang-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscale eddies in the subtropical oligotrophic ocean are ubiquitous and play an important role in nutrient supply and oceanic primary production. However, it is still unclear whether these mesoscale eddies can efficiently transfer CO2 from the atmosphere to deep waters via biological pump because of the sampling difficulty due to their transient nature. In 2007, particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes, measured below the euphotic zone at the edge of warm eddy were 136–194 mg-C m−2 d−1 which was greatly elevated over that (POC flux = 26–35 mg-C m−2 d−1) determined in the nutrient-depleted oligotrophic waters in the Western North Pacific (WNP). In 2010, higher POC fluxes (83–115 mg-C m−2 d−1) were also observed at the boundary of mesoscale eddies in the WNP. The enhanced POC flux at the edge of eddies was mainly attributed to both large denuded diatom frustules and zooplankton fecal pellets based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination. The result suggests that mesoscale eddies in the oligotrophic waters in the subtropical WNP can efficiently increase the oceanic carbon export flux and the eddy edge is a crucial conduit in carbon sequestration to deep waters. PMID:26171611

  17. Climate change increases riverine carbon outgassing, while export to the ocean remains uncertain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langerwisch, F.; Walz, A.; Rammig, A.; Tietjen, B.; Thonicke, K.; Cramer, W.

    2016-07-01

    Any regular interaction of land and river during flooding affects carbon pools within the terrestrial system, riverine carbon and carbon exported from the system. In the Amazon basin carbon fluxes are considerably influenced by annual flooding, during which terrigenous organic material is imported to the river. The Amazon basin therefore represents an excellent example of a tightly coupled terrestrial-riverine system. The processes of generation, conversion and transport of organic carbon in such a coupled terrigenous-riverine system strongly interact and are climate-sensitive, yet their functioning is rarely considered in Earth system models and their response to climate change is still largely unknown. To quantify regional and global carbon budgets and climate change effects on carbon pools and carbon fluxes, it is important to account for the coupling between the land, the river, the ocean and the atmosphere. We developed the RIVerine Carbon Model (RivCM), which is directly coupled to the well-established dynamic vegetation and hydrology model LPJmL, in order to account for this large-scale coupling. We evaluate RivCM with observational data and show that some of the values are reproduced quite well by the model, while we see large deviations for other variables. This is mainly caused by some simplifications we assumed. Our evaluation shows that it is possible to reproduce large-scale carbon transport across a river system but that this involves large uncertainties. Acknowledging these uncertainties, we estimate the potential changes in riverine carbon by applying RivCM for climate forcing from five climate models and three CO2 emission scenarios (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios, SRES). We find that climate change causes a doubling of riverine organic carbon in the southern and western basin while reducing it by 20 % in the eastern and northern parts. In contrast, the amount of riverine inorganic carbon shows a 2- to 3-fold increase in the entire basin

  18. Chloropigment nitrogen isotopes: new insights on export production during oceanic anoxic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, M. B.; Robinson, R. S.; Pearson, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Mesozoic is marked by several widespread occurrences of intense organic matter burial, corresponding to proposed Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs). Sediments from the largest of these events, the Cenomanian-Turonian OAE 2, are characterized by lower nitrogen isotope ratios than are seen in modern marine settings. We use a high-resolution porphyrin nitrogen isotope record through OAE 2 to interpret nitrogen isotope depletion that is common during OAEs. Nitrogen isotope values of sedimentary chloropigments reflect a diagenetically unaltered signal of surface water nitrogen sources. Additionally, due to taxonomic differences in chlorophyll nitrogen fractionation, the nitrogen isotopic offset between chloropigments and bulk nitrogen can be used to estimate the relative contribution of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae to export production. Our porphyrin data show that eukaryotes contributed the quantitative majority of export production throughout OAE 2, suggesting that any explanation for the OAE nitrogen cycle and its isotopic values be consistent with a eukaryote-dominated ecosystem. We propose that new production during OAE 2 primarily was driven by direct assimilation of upwelled NH4+, supplemented by diazotrophy. A marine nitrogen reservoir dominated by NH4+, in combination with known kinetic isotope effects, could lead to eukaryotic biomass depleted in 15N.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Japanese Three-Spined Stickleback Clades Reveals the Pacific Ocean Lineage Has Adapted to Freshwater Environments while the Japan Sea Has Not

    PubMed Central

    Ravinet, Mark; Takeuchi, Naoko; Kume, Manabu; Mori, Seiichi; Kitano, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Divergent selection and adaptive divergence can increase phenotypic diversification amongst populations and lineages. Yet adaptive divergence between different environments, habitats or niches does not occur in all lineages. For example, the colonization of freshwater environments by ancestral marine species has triggered adaptive radiation and phenotypic diversification in some taxa but not in others. Studying closely related lineages differing in their ability to diversify is an excellent means of understanding the factors promoting and constraining adaptive evolution. A well-known example of the evolution of increased phenotypic diversification following freshwater colonization is the three-spined stickleback. Two closely related stickleback lineages, the Pacific Ocean and the Japan Sea occur in Japan. However, Japanese freshwater stickleback populations are derived from the Pacific Ocean lineage only, suggesting the Japan Sea lineage is unable to colonize freshwater. Using stable isotope data and trophic morphology, we first show higher rates of phenotypic and ecological diversification between marine and freshwater populations within the Pacific Ocean lineage, confirming adaptive divergence has occurred between the two lineages and within the Pacific Ocean lineage but not in the Japan Sea lineage. We further identified consistent divergence in diet and foraging behaviour between marine forms from each lineage, confirming Pacific Ocean marine sticklebacks, from which all Japanese freshwater populations are derived, are better adapted to freshwater environments than Japan Sea sticklebacks. We suggest adaptive divergence between ancestral marine populations may have played a role in constraining phenotypic diversification and adaptive evolution in Japanese sticklebacks. PMID:25460163

  20. Comparative analysis of Japanese three-spined stickleback clades reveals the Pacific Ocean lineage has adapted to freshwater environments while the Japan Sea has not.

    PubMed

    Ravinet, Mark; Takeuchi, Naoko; Kume, Manabu; Mori, Seiichi; Kitano, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Divergent selection and adaptive divergence can increase phenotypic diversification amongst populations and lineages. Yet adaptive divergence between different environments, habitats or niches does not occur in all lineages. For example, the colonization of freshwater environments by ancestral marine species has triggered adaptive radiation and phenotypic diversification in some taxa but not in others. Studying closely related lineages differing in their ability to diversify is an excellent means of understanding the factors promoting and constraining adaptive evolution. A well-known example of the evolution of increased phenotypic diversification following freshwater colonization is the three-spined stickleback. Two closely related stickleback lineages, the Pacific Ocean and the Japan Sea occur in Japan. However, Japanese freshwater stickleback populations are derived from the Pacific Ocean lineage only, suggesting the Japan Sea lineage is unable to colonize freshwater. Using stable isotope data and trophic morphology, we first show higher rates of phenotypic and ecological diversification between marine and freshwater populations within the Pacific Ocean lineage, confirming adaptive divergence has occurred between the two lineages and within the Pacific Ocean lineage but not in the Japan Sea lineage. We further identified consistent divergence in diet and foraging behaviour between marine forms from each lineage, confirming Pacific Ocean marine sticklebacks, from which all Japanese freshwater populations are derived, are better adapted to freshwater environments than Japan Sea sticklebacks. We suggest adaptive divergence between ancestral marine populations may have played a role in constraining phenotypic diversification and adaptive evolution in Japanese sticklebacks.

  1. Persistent export of 231Pa from the deep central Arctic Ocean over the past 35,000 years.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Sharon S; McManus, Jerry F; Curry, William B; Brown-Leger, L Susan

    2013-05-30

    The Arctic Ocean has an important role in Earth's climate, both through surface processes such as sea-ice formation and transport, and through the production and export of waters at depth that contribute to the global thermohaline circulation. Deciphering the deep Arctic Ocean's palaeo-oceanographic history is a crucial part of understanding its role in climatic change. Here we show that sedimentary ratios of the radionuclides thorium-230 ((230)Th) and protactinium-231 ((231)Pa), which are produced in sea water and removed by particle scavenging on timescales of decades to centuries, respectively, record consistent evidence for the export of (231)Pa from the deep Arctic and may indicate continuous deep-water exchange between the Arctic and Atlantic oceans throughout the past 35,000 years. Seven well-dated box-core records provide a comprehensive overview of (231)Pa and (230)Th burial in Arctic sediments during glacial, deglacial and interglacial conditions. Sedimentary (231)Pa/(230)Th ratios decrease nearly linearly with increasing water depth above the core sites, indicating efficient particle scavenging in the upper water column and greater influence of removal by lateral transport at depth. Although the measured (230)Th burial is in balance with its production in Arctic sea water, integrated depth profiles for all time intervals reveal a deficit in (231)Pa burial that can be balanced only by lateral export in the water column. Because no enhanced sink for (231)Pa has yet been found in the Arctic, our records suggest that deep-water exchange through the Fram strait may export (231)Pa. Such export may have continued for the past 35,000 years, suggesting a century-scale replacement time for deep waters in the Arctic Ocean since the most recent glaciation and a persistent contribution of Arctic waters to the global ocean circulation.

  2. Persistent export of 231Pa from the deep central Arctic Ocean over the past 35,000 years.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Sharon S; McManus, Jerry F; Curry, William B; Brown-Leger, L Susan

    2013-05-30

    The Arctic Ocean has an important role in Earth's climate, both through surface processes such as sea-ice formation and transport, and through the production and export of waters at depth that contribute to the global thermohaline circulation. Deciphering the deep Arctic Ocean's palaeo-oceanographic history is a crucial part of understanding its role in climatic change. Here we show that sedimentary ratios of the radionuclides thorium-230 ((230)Th) and protactinium-231 ((231)Pa), which are produced in sea water and removed by particle scavenging on timescales of decades to centuries, respectively, record consistent evidence for the export of (231)Pa from the deep Arctic and may indicate continuous deep-water exchange between the Arctic and Atlantic oceans throughout the past 35,000 years. Seven well-dated box-core records provide a comprehensive overview of (231)Pa and (230)Th burial in Arctic sediments during glacial, deglacial and interglacial conditions. Sedimentary (231)Pa/(230)Th ratios decrease nearly linearly with increasing water depth above the core sites, indicating efficient particle scavenging in the upper water column and greater influence of removal by lateral transport at depth. Although the measured (230)Th burial is in balance with its production in Arctic sea water, integrated depth profiles for all time intervals reveal a deficit in (231)Pa burial that can be balanced only by lateral export in the water column. Because no enhanced sink for (231)Pa has yet been found in the Arctic, our records suggest that deep-water exchange through the Fram strait may export (231)Pa. Such export may have continued for the past 35,000 years, suggesting a century-scale replacement time for deep waters in the Arctic Ocean since the most recent glaciation and a persistent contribution of Arctic waters to the global ocean circulation. PMID:23719461

  3. ENSO Modulations due to Interannual Variability of Freshwater Forcing and Ocean Biology-induced Heating in the Tropical Pacific.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong-Hua; Gao, Chuan; Kang, Xianbiao; Zhi, Hai; Wang, Zhanggui; Feng, Licheng

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have identified clear climate feedbacks associated with interannual variations in freshwater forcing (FWF) and ocean biology-induced heating (OBH) in the tropical Pacific. The interrelationships among the related anomaly fields are analyzed using hybrid coupled model (HCM) simulations to illustrate their combined roles in modulating the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The HCM-based supporting experiments are performed to isolate the related feedbacks, with interannually varying FWF and OBH being represented individually or collectively, which allows their effects to be examined in a clear way. It is demonstrated that the interannual freshwater forcing enhances ENSO variability and slightly prolongs the simulated ENSO period, while the interannual OBH reduces ENSO variability and slightly shortens the ENSO period, with their feedback effects tending to counteract each other.

  4. Dominant eukaryotic export production during ocean anoxic events reflects the importance of recycled NH4+

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Meytal B.; Robinson, Rebecca S.; Husson, Jonathan M.; Carter, Susan J.; Pearson, Ann

    2012-01-01

    The Mesozoic is marked by several widespread occurrences of intense organic matter burial. Sediments from the largest of these events, the Cenomanian–Turonian Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE 2) are characterized by lower nitrogen isotope ratios than are seen in modern marine settings. It has remained a challenge to describe a nitrogen cycle that could achieve such isotopic depletion. Here we use nitrogen-isotope ratios of porphyrins to show that eukaryotes contributed the quantitative majority of export production throughout OAE 2, whereas cyanobacteria contributed on average approximately 20%. Such data require that any explanation for the OAE nitrogen cycle and its isotopic values be consistent with a eukaryote-dominated ecosystem. Our results agree with models that suggest the OAEs were high-productivity events, supported by vigorous upwelling. Upwelling of anoxic deep waters would have supplied reduced N species (i.e., ) to primary producers. We propose that new production during OAE 2 primarily was driven by direct -assimilation supplemented by diazotrophy, whereas chemocline denitrification and anammox quantitatively consumed and . A marine nitrogen reservoir dominated by , in combination with known kinetic isotope effects, could lead to eukaryotic biomass depleted in 15N. PMID:22315397

  5. Export fluxes in a naturally iron-fertilized area of the Southern Ocean - Part 1: Seasonal dynamics of particulate organic carbon export from a moored sediment trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembauville, M.; Salter, I.; Leblond, N.; Gueneugues, A.; Blain, S.

    2015-06-01

    A sediment trap moored in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen Plateau in the Southern Ocean provided an annual record of particulate organic carbon and nitrogen fluxes at 289 m. At the trap deployment depth, current speeds were typically low (~ 10 cm s-1) and primarily tidal-driven (M2 tidal component). Although advection was weak, the sediment trap may have been subject to hydrodynamical and biological (swimmer feeding on trap funnel) biases. Particulate organic carbon (POC) flux was generally low (< 0.5 mmol m-2 d-1), although two episodic export events (< 14 days) of 1.5 mmol m-2 d-1 were recorded. These increases in flux occurred with a 1-month time lag from peaks in surface chlorophyll and together accounted for approximately 40% of the annual flux budget. The annual POC flux of 98.2 ± 4.4 mmol m-2 yr-1 was low considering the shallow deployment depth but comparable to independent estimates made at similar depths (~ 300 m) over the plateau, and to deep-ocean (> 2 km) fluxes measured from similarly productive iron-fertilized blooms. Although undertrapping cannot be excluded in shallow moored sediment trap deployment, we hypothesize that grazing pressure, including mesozooplankton and mesopelagic fishes, may be responsible for the low POC flux beneath the base of the winter mixed layer. The importance of plankton community structure in controlling the temporal variability of export fluxes is addressed in a companion paper.

  6. Carbon export in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area of the Southern Ocean based on the 234Th approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planchon, F.; Ballas, D.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Bowie, A. R.; Davies, D.; Trull, T.; Laurenceau-Cornec, E. C.; Van Der Merwe, P.; Dehairs, F.

    2015-06-01

    This study examined upper-ocean particulate organic carbon (POC) export using the 234Th approach as part of the second KErguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study expedition (KEOPS2). Our aim was to characterize the spatial and the temporal variability of POC export during austral spring (October-November 2011) in the Fe-fertilized area of the Kerguelen Plateau region. POC export fluxes were estimated at high productivity sites over and downstream of the plateau and compared to a high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) area upstream of the plateau in order to assess the impact of iron-induced productivity on the vertical export of carbon. Deficits in 234Th activities were observed at all stations in surface waters, indicating early scavenging by particles in austral spring. 234Th export was lowest at the reference station R-2 and highest in the recirculation region (E stations) where a pseudo-Lagrangian survey was conducted. In comparison 234Th export over the central plateau and north of the polar front (PF) was relatively limited throughout the survey. However, the 234Th results support that Fe fertilization increased particle export in all iron-fertilized waters. The impact was greatest in the recirculation feature (3-4 fold at 200 m depth, relative to the reference station), but more moderate over the central Kerguelen Plateau and in the northern plume of the Kerguelen bloom (~2-fold at 200 m depth). The C : Th ratio of large (>53 μm) potentially sinking particles collected via sequential filtration using in situ pumping (ISP) systems was used to convert the 234Th flux into a POC export flux. The C : Th ratios of sinking particles were highly variable (3.1 ± 0.1 to 10.5 ± 0.2 μmol dpm-1) with no clear site-related trend, despite the variety of ecosystem responses in the fertilized regions. C : Th ratios showed a decreasing trend between 100 and 200 m depth suggesting preferential carbon loss relative to 234Th possibly due to heterotrophic degradation and

  7. Identification of types of businesses with potential interest in operating and/or exporting ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    This study describes the characteristics of three selected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)-based lines of business, examines other lines of business and identifies those with similar characteristics, and indicates the types of businesses/corporations that could be expected to have potential interest in operating and/or exporting OTEC plants. An OTEC line of business model is developed to assist companies in making an internal corporate assessment as to whether OTEC should be in their business plan.

  8. Pronounced Weakening of Deep Components of the AMOC During the Late Holocene Caused by Export of Arctic Sea-Ice and Freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppo, D.; Thornalley, D. J.; Moffa-Sanchez, P.; Hall, I. R.; Keigwin, L. D.; McCave, I. N. N.

    2015-12-01

    Several proxy and modelling studies suggest that there may have been considerable change in the operation of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during the last millennium. Yet despite its importance for regional and global climate, the recent history of the AMOC is poorly constrained, and comprehensive observational records only extend back a few decades at most. Observational data suggest that the export of large volumes of sea-ice and freshwater from the Arctic during the Great Salinity Anomaly of the late 1960s to early 1970s impacted North Atlantic circulation, and perhaps the strength of the AMOC, thus raising the possibility that more extreme events may have affected the AMOC during the pre-instrumental era. Firstly, we place the last millennium in a longer-term context by presenting Holocene grain-size records in depth transects from Blake Outer Ridge and Cape Hatteras, sampling the full-depth range of the Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC), part of the lower limb of the AMOC. These records complement a depth-transect of grain-size records sampling the Iceland-Scotland (I-S) overflow, and together enable us to provide a synthesis of Holocene changes in the deep components of the AMOC and the impact on the AMOC of long-term variability in the export of Arctic sea-ice and freshwater. We then present detailed grain-size records for the last 1,000 years, both in a depth transect of cores off Cape Hatteras, and from cores in the Iceland Basin, sampling the I-S overflow. Initial results suggest a pronounced reduction over the last ~100-200 years in the inferred flow strength at sites bathed by Labrador Sea Water (LSW), while sites south of Iceland show an exceptional weakening of the I-S overflow over the last ~300 years. We explore the possibility that these events are linked to the export of large volumes of sea-ice and freshwater from the Arctic during the end of the Little Ice Age.

  9. Trace element behaviour at cold seeps and the potential export of dissolved iron to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Nolwenn; Bayon, Germain; Ondréas, Hélène; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Freslon, Nicolas; Bollinger, Claire; Rouget, Marie-Laure; de Prunelé, Alexis; Ruffine, Livio; Olu-Le Roy, Karine; Sarthou, Géraldine

    2014-10-01

    Seawater samples were collected by submersible above methane seeps in the Gulf of Guinea (Regab and Baboon pockmarks) in order to investigate the behaviour of iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and rare earth elements (REE) during fluid seepage. Our aim was to determine whether cold seeps may represent potential sources of dissolved chemical species to the ocean. Dissolved (<0.45 μm filtered samples) and total dissolvable (unfiltered samples) concentrations were determined over ∼50 m long vertical transects above the seafloor and at various discrete locations within the pockmarks. We show that substantial amounts of Fe and Mn are released into seawater during seepage of methane-rich fluids. Mn is exported almost quantitatively in the dissolved form (more than 90% of total Mn; mean MnDISS∼12±11 nmol/kg). Although a significant fraction of Fe is bound to particulate phases, the dissolved iron pool still accounts on average for approximately 20 percent of total iron flux at vent sites (mean FeDISS∼22±11 nmol/kg). This dissolved Fe fraction also appears to remain stable in the water column. In contrast, there was no evidence for any significant benthic fluxes of pore water REE associated with fluid seepage at the studied sites. Overall, our results point towards distinct trace element behaviour during fluid seepage, with potential implications for the marine geochemical budget. The absence of any dissolved REE enrichments in bottom waters clearly indicates effective removal in sub-surface sediments. Most likely, precipitation of authigenic mineral phases at cold seeps (i.e. carbonates) represents a net sink for these elements. While Mn appears to behave near-conservatively during fluid seepage, the observed relative stability of dissolved Fe in the water column above seepage sites could be explained by complexation with strong organic ligands and/or the presence of Fe-bearing sulfide nanoparticles, as reported previously for submarine hydrothermal systems. Considering

  10. Arctic-HYCOS: a Large Sample observing system for estimating freshwater fluxes in the drainage basin of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietroniro, Al; Korhonen, Johanna; Looser, Ulrich; Hardardóttir, Jórunn; Johnsrud, Morten; Vuglinsky, Valery; Gustafsson, David; Lins, Harry F.; Conaway, Jeffrey S.; Lammers, Richard; Stewart, Bruce; Abrate, Tommaso; Pilon, Paul; Sighomnou, Daniel; Arheimer, Berit

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic region is an important regulating component of the global climate system, and is also experiencing a considerable change during recent decades. More than 10% of world's river-runoff flows to the Arctic Ocean and there is evidence of changes in its fresh-water balance. However, about 30% of the Arctic basin is still ungauged, with differing monitoring practices and data availability from the countries in the region. A consistent system for monitoring and sharing of hydrological information throughout the Arctic region is thus of highest interest for further studies and monitoring of the freshwater flux to the Arctic Ocean. The purpose of the Arctic-HYCOS project is to allow for collection and sharing of hydrological data. Preliminary 616 stations were identified with long-term daily discharge data available, and around 250 of these already provide online available data in near real time. This large sample will be used in the following scientific analysis: 1) to evaluate freshwater flux to the Arctic Ocean and Seas, 2) to monitor changes and enhance understanding of the hydrological regime and 3) to estimate flows in ungauged regions and develop models for enhanced hydrological prediction in the Arctic region. The project is intended as a component of the WMO (World Meteorological Organization) WHYCOS (World Hydrological Cycle Observing System) initiative, covering the area of the expansive transnational Arctic basin with participation from Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russian Federation, Sweden and United States of America. The overall objective is to regularly collect, manage and share high quality data from a defined basic network of hydrological stations in the Arctic basin. The project focus on collecting data on discharge and possibly sediment transport and temperature. Data should be provisional in near-real time if available, whereas time-series of historical data should be provided once quality assurance has been completed. The

  11. Oceanic spawning ecology of freshwater eels in the western North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Katsumi; Chow, Seinen; Otake, Tsuguo; Kurogi, Hiroaki; Mochioka, Noritaka; Miller, Michael J; Aoyama, Jun; Kimura, Shingo; Watanabe, Shun; Yoshinaga, Tatsuki; Shinoda, Akira; Kuroki, Mari; Oya, Machiko; Watanabe, Tomowo; Hata, Kazuhiro; Ijiri, Shigeho; Kazeto, Yukinori; Nomura, Kazuharu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    The natural reproductive ecology of freshwater eels remained a mystery even after some of their offshore spawning areas were discovered approximately 100 years ago. In this study, we investigate the spawning ecology of freshwater eels for the first time using collections of eggs, larvae and spawning-condition adults of two species in their shared spawning area in the Pacific. Ovaries of female Japanese eel and giant mottled eel adults were polycyclic, suggesting that freshwater eels can spawn more than once during a spawning season. The first collection of Japanese eel eggs near the West Mariana Ridge where adults and newly hatched larvae were also caught shows that spawning occurs during new moon periods throughout the spawning season. The depths where adults and newly hatched larvae were captured indicate that spawning occurs in shallower layers of 150-200 m and not at great depths. This type of spawning may reduce predation and facilitate reproductive success.

  12. Decadal predictability of extreme fresh water export events from the Arctic Ocean into the Nordic Seas and subpolar North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmith, Torben; Olsen, Steffen M.; Ringgaard, Ida M.; May, Wilhelm

    2016-04-01

    Abrupt fresh water releases originating in the Arctic Ocean have been documented to affect ocean circulation and climate in the North Atlantic area. Therefore, in this study, we investigate prospects for predicting such events up to one decade ahead. This is done in a perfect model setup by a combination of analyzing a 500 year control experiment and dedicated ensemble experiment aimed at predicting selected 10 year long segments of the control experiment. The selected segments are characterized by a large positive or negative trend in the total fresh water content in the Arctic Ocean. The analysis of the components (liquid fresh water and sea ice) reveals that they develop in a near random walk manner. From this we conclude that the main mechanism is integration of fresh water in the Beaufort Gyre through Ekman pumping from the randomly varying atmosphere. Therefore, the predictions from the ensemble experiments are on average not better than a damped persistence predictions. By running two different families of ensemble predictions, one starting from the 'observed' ocean globally, and one starting from climatology in the Arctic Ocean and from the observed ocean elsewhere, we conclude that the former outperforms the latter for the first few years as regards liquid fresh water and for the first year as regards sea ice. Analysis of the model experiments in terms of the fresh water export from the Arctic Ocean into Nordic seas and the subpolar North Atlantic reveals a very modest potential for predictability.

  13. Particulate export vs lateral advection in the Antarctic Polar Front (Southern Pacific Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesi, T.; Langone, L.; Ravaioli, M.; Capotondi, L.; Giglio, F.

    2012-04-01

    The overarching goal of our study was to describe and quantify the influence of lateral advection relative to the vertical export in the Antarctic Polar Front (Southern Pacific Ocean). In areas where lateral advection of particulate material is significant, budgets of bioactive elements can be inaccurate if fluxes through the water column and to the seabed are exclusively interpreted as passive sinking of particles. However, detailed information on the influence of lateral advection in the water column in the southern ocean is lacking. With this in mind, our study focused between the twilight zone (i.e. mesopelagic) and the benthic nepheloid layer to understand the relative importance of lateral flux with increasing water depth. Measurements were performed south of the Antarctic Polar Front for 1 year (January 10th 1999-January 3rd 2000) at 900, 1300, 2400, and 3700 m from the sea surface. The study was carried out using a 3.5 km long mooring line instrumented with sediment traps, current meters and sensors of temperature and conductivity. Sediment trap samples were characterized via several parameters including total mass flux, elemental composition (organic carbon, total nitrogen, biogenic silica, and calcium carbonate), concentration of metals (aluminum, iron, barium, and manganese), 210Pb activity, and foraminifera taxonomy. High fluxes of biogenic particles were observed in both summer 1999 and 2000 as a result of seasonal algal blooms associated with sea ice retreat and water column stratification. During no-productive periods, several high energy events occurred and resulted in advecting resuspended biogenic particles from flat-topped summits of the Pacific Antarctic Ridge. Whereas the distance between seabed and uppermost sediment traps was sufficient to avoid lateral advection processes, resuspension was significant in the lowermost sediment traps accounting for ~60 and ~90% of the material caught at 2400 and 3700 m, respectively. Samples collected during

  14. The relative contribution of fast and slow sinking particles to ocean carbon export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. S.; Sanders, R.; Marsay, C.; Le Moigne, F. A. C.; Achterberg, E. P.; Poulton, A. J.

    2012-03-01

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) generated by primary production and exported to depth, is an important pathway for carbon transfer to the abyss, where it is stored over climatically significant timescales. These processes constitute the biological carbon pump. A spectrum of particulate sinking velocities exists throughout the water column, however numerical models often simplify this spectrum into suspended, fast and slow sinking particles. Observational studies suggest the spectrum of sinking speeds in the ocean is strongly bimodal with >85% POC flux contained within two pools with sinking speeds of <10 m day-1 and >350 m day-1. We deployed a Marine Snow Catcher (MSC) to estimate the magnitudes of the suspended, fast and slow sinking pools and their fluxes at the Porcupine Abyssal Plain site (48°N, 16.5°W) in summer 2009. The POC concentrations and fluxes determined were 0.2 μg C L-1 and 54 mg C m-2 day-1 for fast sinking particles, 5 μg C L-1 and 92 mg C m-2 day-1 for slow sinking particles and 97 μg C L-1 for suspended particles. Our flux estimates were comparable with radiochemical tracer methods and neutrally buoyant sediment traps. Our observations imply: (1) biomineralising protists, on occasion, act as nucleation points for aggregate formation and accelerate particle sinking; (2) fast sinking particles alone were sufficient to explain the abyssal POC flux; and (3) there is no evidence for ballasting of the slow sinking flux and the slow sinking particles were probably entirely remineralised in the twilight zone.

  15. Trajectory Shifts in the Arctic and Subarctic Freshwater Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Bruce J.; McClelland, James; Curry, Ruth; Holmes, Robert M.; Walsh, John E.; Aagaard, Knut

    2006-08-01

    Manifold changes in the freshwater cycle of high-latitude lands and oceans have been reported in the past few years. A synthesis of these changes in freshwater sources and in ocean freshwater storage illustrates the complementary and synoptic temporal pattern and magnitude of these changes over the past 50 years. Increasing river discharge anomalies and excess net precipitation on the ocean contributed ~20,000 cubic kilometers of fresh water to the Arctic and high-latitude North Atlantic oceans from lows in the 1960s to highs in the 1990s. Sea ice attrition provided another ~15,000 cubic kilometers, and glacial melt added ~2000 cubic kilometers. The sum of anomalous inputs from these freshwater sources matched the amount and rate at which fresh water accumulated in the North Atlantic during much of the period from 1965 through 1995. The changes in freshwater inputs and ocean storage occurred in conjunction with the amplifying North Atlantic Oscillation and rising air temperatures. Fresh water may now be accumulating in the Arctic Ocean and will likely be exported southward if and when the North Atlantic Oscillation enters into a new high phase.

  16. Assessment of Global Oceanic Net Freshwater Flux Products Using Argo Salinity Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Arkin, P. A.; Hackert, E. C.; Busalacchi, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    The annual mean global upper ocean salt budget is investigated using the Argo profiling float data from 2006 to 2011, which provides a way to estimate the annual mean oceanic evaporation and precipitation (E-P) from the ocean salinity. Employing this "ocean rain gauge" concept, E-P estimated from the salt budget is compared with the various satellite based oceanic precipitation and evaporation observational products. In this study, twelve sets of E-P from the evaporation and precipitation products including the precipitation datasets GPCP, CMAP and TRMM and the evaporation datasets OAFlux, GSSTF2b, IFREMER and RSS are compared to the E-P estimated from the salinity. We will describe the spatial patterns of the various E-P products derived from the satellite based data sets and compare these patterns to those derived from the oceanic salinity on the annual mean time scale. We will also examine time series of near-global integrated E-P derived from satellite products and compare them to time series based on oceanic salinity observations as well as continental discharge. This intercomparison of independently derived estimates of fresh water flux at the ocean surface will improve our understanding of errors in remotely sensed estimates of evaporation and precipitation.

  17. The freshwater lens of Benjamín Aceval, Chaco, Paraguay: a terrestrial analogue of an oceanic island lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houben, Georg; Noell, Ursula; Vassolo, Sara; Grissemann, Christoph; Geyh, Mebus; Stadler, Susanne; Dose, Eduardo J.; Vera, Sofia

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of a freshwater lens in the Paraguayan Chaco, 900 km away from the ocean, is reported. It is located underneath sandstone hills, surrounded by lowlands with predominantly saline groundwater. Its geometry was delineated using geoelectrical and electromagnetic investigations. The unusual height of the fresh groundwater level can be attributed to the presence of a confining layer at depth. The lens receives its recharge exclusively from rainfall during the hot and humid summer months. It predominantly contains water predating the atmospheric atomic bomb tests, some of it probably up to a thousand or more years old. The water balance shows that extraction currently does not exceed recharge in normal years. However, the available volume of groundwater leaves little room for a further increase of extraction in the future. Recharge is augmented by return flow from thousands of latrines and cess pits, and this has lead to widespread contamination of the groundwater by faecal bacteria.

  18. Carbon export in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area of the Southern Ocean based on the 234Th approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planchon, F.; Ballas, D.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Bowie, A. R.; Davies, D.; Trull, T.; Laurenceau, E.; Van Der Merwe, P.; Dehairs, F.

    2014-11-01

    The Kerguelen Plateau region in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean supports annually a large-scale phytoplankton bloom which is naturally fertilized with iron. As part of the second KErguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study expedition (KEOPS2) in austral spring (October-November 2011), we examined upper-ocean Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) export using the 234Th approach. We aimed at characterizing the spatial and the temporal variability of POC export production at high productivity sites over and downstream the Kerguelen plateau. Export production is compared to a High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll area upstream of the plateau in order to assess the impact of iron-induced productivity on the vertical export of carbon. Deficits in 234Th activities relative to its parent nuclide 238U were observed at all stations in surface waters, indicating that scavenging by particles occurred during the early stages of the phytoplankton bloom. 234Th export was lowest at reference station R-2 (412 ± 134 dpm m-2 d-1) and highest inside a~permanent meander of the Polar Front (PF) at stations E (1995 ± 176 dpm m-2 d-1, second visit E-3) where a detailed time series was obtained as part of a~pseudo-lagrangian study. 234Th export over the central plateau was relatively limited at station A3 early (776 ± 171 dpm m-2 d-1, first visit A3-1) and late in the survey (993 ± 223 dpm m-2 d-1, second visit A3-2), but it was higher at high biomass stations TNS-8 (1372 ± 255 dpm m-2 d-1) and E-4W (1068 ± 208 dpm m-2 d-1) in waters which could be considered as derived from plateau. Limited 234Th export of 973 ± 207 dpm m-2 d-1 was also found in the northern branch of the Kerguelen bloom located downstream of the island, north of the PF (station F-L). The 234Th results support that Fe fertilization increased particle export in all iron fertilized waters. The impact was greatest in the recirculation feature (3-4 fold at 200 m depth), but more moderate over the central Kerguelen plateau

  19. The alpha/beta ocean distinction: A perspective on freshwater fluxes, convection, nutrients and productivity in high-latitude seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmack, Eddy C.

    2007-11-01

    Stratification is perhaps the most important attribute of oceans with regards to climate and biology. Two simple aspects of the ocean's climate system appear to have a surprisingly important role in transforming waters that feed the global thermohaline circulation, dominating patterns of biogeochemical flux and establishing macroecological domains. First, largely because of meridional distillation (mainly due to the atmospheric transport of freshwater across the Isthmus of Panama) the North Pacific is fresher than the North Atlantic. Second, largely because of zonal distillation (e.g., warming and evaporation at low latitudes and poleward transport of latent heat and moisture by the atmosphere) the upper layers of subtropical seas are permanently stratified by temperature ( NT2= gαd T/d z>0; here called alpha oceans), while the upper layers of high-latitude seas are permanently stratified by salinity ( NS2= gβd S/d z>0; here called beta oceans). The physical basis for the boundary separating alpha and beta oceans is unclear, but may lie in the thermodynamical equations published by Fofonoff [1961. Energy transformations in the sea. Fisheries Research Board of Canada, Report Series 109, 82pp]. Nevertheless, it is clear that the resulting thermohaline distributions establish a 'downhill journey' of low-salinity (and nutrient-rich) waters from the North Pacific to the Arctic and then into the North Atlantic. The Arctic Ocean—itself—acts a double estuary, whereby waters entering from the North Atlantic become either denser through cooling (negative estuary) or lighter by freshening (positive estuary) as they circulate within the basin and then return to the North Atlantic as a variety of components of the ocean's conveyor. Intermediate and deep waters generally form within cyclonic beta oceans in close proximity to alphas systems. Similar patterns of stratification, nutrients and biogeographical boundaries persist in the Southern Hemisphere. It is thus argued

  20. Response of the Arctic Freshwater Budget to Extreme NAO Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condron, A.; Winsor, P.

    2007-12-01

    Freshwater release from the Arctic to the deepwater convective regions of the Labrador and Nordic Seas is understood to play an important role in steering decadal global climate variability. An observed freshening of the North Atlantic since the mid-1960s appears to be related to changes in the export of freshwater from the Arctic, and the persistence of a high North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) during this period. However, the specific response of the Arctic freshwater budget to the NAO is unclear. To investigate this response we use a high resolution (1/3 degree) regional version of the ocean-only MITgcm forced for 12 years with daily NCEP reanalysis data from 1992-2001. At this resolution the model resolves the major Arctic transport pathways, including the Bering Strait and Canadian Archipelago. We ran the model twice, keeping all reanalysis fields the same in both cases, but repeat the wind field of two contrasting NAO years in each run for the extreme negative and positive NAO phases of 1969 and 1989, respectively. Our results highlight a clear response in the Arctic freshwater budget to NAO forcing. Repeat NAO negative wind forcing results in virtually all freshwater being retained in the Arctic. In contrast, repeat NAO positive forcing increases the freshwater export out of the Arctic, primarily via the Fram Strait (54%) and Canadian Archipelago (29%), and results in a total loss in freshwater storage of 14000 km3. We find that the freshwater export via these two pathways increases by virtually the same amount (approx 700 km3 per yr) between the two forcing scenarios, highlighting the important role that the Canadian Archipelago plays in redistributing the freshwater of the Arctic.

  1. Controls on the Flux, Age, and Composition of Terrestrial Organic Carbon Exported by Rivers to the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galy, Valier; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Eglinton, Timothy; Holmes, Robert; Soule, Adam; Goetz, Scott; Laporte, Nadine; Wollheim, Wilfred

    2010-05-01

    Export of organic carbon, alkalinity and silicate-derived Ca and Mg ions to the ocean exerts critical controls on the sequestration of atmospheric carbon. As this export is mediated to a significant extent by river systems, understanding processes that control transport of land-derived matter to the coastal ocean is of fundamental importance to successful models of past and future climates. Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the Woods Hole Research Center and the University of New Hampshire have formed a river research consortium that aims at investigating large river systems with a holistic approach. The National Science Foundation is funding this initiative through its Emerging Topics in Biogeochemical Cycles (ETBC) program. Our project focuses on the biogeochemistries of the Lena and Kolyma rivers in the Russian Arctic, the Yangtze river in China, the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers in India and Bangladesh, the Congo river in central Africa as well as the Fraser river basin in western Canada. Campaign-style sampling using a uniform sampling strategy is complemented by time-series sampling that is accomplished through collaborations with scientists at local institutions such as the East China Normal University in Shanghai (Yangtze), the University of the Fraser Valley in Abbotsford (Fraser), schools and research institutions in eastern Russia (Lena and Kolyma) and the University of Nancy, France (Ganges, Brahmaputra). We combine a standardized sampling approach for organic and inorganic constituents with spatial analyzes of digital, mostly satellite-based data products with the aim of obtaining an integrated understanding of the response of river ecosystems to past, ongoing and future environmental changes. We will present first results with a special emphasis on the age of terrestrial organic carbon exported by the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system.

  2. Kara Sea freshwater transport through Vilkitsky Strait: Variability, forcing, and further pathways toward the western Arctic Ocean from a model and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janout, Markus A.; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Hölemann, Jens A.; Rabe, Benjamin; Schauer, Ursula; Polyakov, Igor V.; Bacon, Sheldon; Coward, Andrew C.; Karcher, Michael; Lenn, Yueng-Djern; Kassens, Heidemarie; Timokhov, Leonid

    2015-07-01

    Siberian river water is a first-order contribution to the Arctic freshwater budget, with the Ob, Yenisey, and Lena supplying nearly half of the total surface freshwater flux. However, few details are known regarding where, when, and how the freshwater transverses the vast Siberian shelf seas. This paper investigates the mechanism, variability, and pathways of the fresh Kara Sea outflow through Vilkitsky Strait toward the Laptev Sea. We utilize a high-resolution ocean model and recent shipboard observations to characterize the freshwater-laden Vilkitsky Strait Current (VSC), and shed new light on the little-studied region between the Kara and Laptev Seas, characterized by harsh ice conditions, contrasting water masses, straits, and a large submarine canyon. The VSC is 10-20 km wide, surface intensified, and varies seasonally (maximum from August to March) and interannually. Average freshwater (volume) transport is 500 ± 120 km3 a-1 (0.53 ± 0.08 Sv), with a baroclinic flow contribution of 50-90%. Interannual transport variability is explained by a storage-release mechanism, where blocking-favorable summer winds hamper the outflow and cause accumulation of freshwater in the Kara Sea. The year following a blocking event is characterized by enhanced transports driven by a baroclinic flow along the coast that is set up by increased freshwater volumes. Eventually, the VSC merges with a slope current and provides a major pathway for Eurasian river water toward the western Arctic along the Eurasian continental slope. Kara (and Laptev) Sea freshwater transport is not correlated with the Arctic Oscillation, but rather driven by regional summer pressure patterns.

  3. Climate change and ocean acidification impacts on lower trophic levels and the export of organic carbon to the deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yool, A.; Popova, E. E.; Coward, A. C.; Bernie, D.; Anderson, T. R.

    2013-02-01

    Most future projections forecast significant and ongoing climate change during the 21st century, but with the severity of impacts dependent on efforts to restrain or reorganise human activity to limit carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. A major sink for atmospheric CO2, and a key source of biological resources, the World Ocean is widely anticipated to undergo profound physical and - via ocean acidification - chemical changes as direct and indirect results of these emissions. Given strong biophysical coupling, the marine biota is also expected to experience strong changes in response to this anthropogenic forcing. Here we examine the large-scale response of ocean biogeochemistry to climate and acidification impacts during the 21st century for Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 2.6 and 8.5 using an intermediate complexity global ecosystem model, Medusa-2.0. The primary impact of future change lies in stratification-led declines in the availability of key nutrients in surface waters, which in turn leads to a global decrease (1990s vs. 2090s) in ocean productivity (-6.3%). This impact has knock-on consequences for the abundances of the low trophic level biogeochemical actors modelled by Medusa-2.0 (-5.8%), and these would be expected to similarly impact higher trophic level elements such as fisheries. Related impacts are found in the flux of organic material to seafloor communities (-40.7% at 1000 m), and in the volume of ocean suboxic zones (+12.5%). A sensitivity analysis removing an acidification feedback on calcification finds that change in this process significantly impacts benthic communities, suggesting that a better understanding of the OA-sensitivity of calcifying organisms, and their role in ballasting sinking organic carbon, may significantly improve forecasting of these ecosystems. For all processes, there is geographical variability in change, and changes are much more pronounced under RCP 8.5 than the RCP 2.6 scenario.

  4. Do the Amazon and Orinoco freshwater plumes really matter for hurricane-induced ocean surface cooling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, O.; Jouanno, J.; Durand, F.

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies suggested that the plume of low-saline waters formed by the discharge of the Amazon and Orinoco rivers could favor Atlantic Tropical Cyclone (TC) intensification by weakening the cool wake and its impact on the hurricane growth potential. The main objective of this study is to quantify the effects of the Amazon-Orinoco river discharges in modulating the amplitude of TC-induced cooling in the western Tropical Atlantic. Our approach is based on the analysis of TC cool wake statistics obtained from an ocean regional numerical simulation with ¼º horizontal resolution over the 1998-2012 period, forced with realistic TC winds. In both model and observations, the amplitude of TC-induced cooling in plume waters (0.3-0.4ºC) is reduced significantly by around 50-60% compared to the cooling in open ocean waters out of the plume (0.6-0.7ºC). A twin simulation without river runoff shows that TC-induced cooling over the plume region (defined from the reference experiment) is almost unchanged (˜0.03ºC) despite strong differences in salinity stratification and the absence of barrier layers. This argues for a weaker than thought cooling inhibition effect of salinity stratification and barrier layers in this region. Indeed, results suggest that haline stratification and barrier layers caused by the river runoff may explain only ˜10% of the cooling difference between plume waters and open ocean waters. Instead, the analysis of the background oceanic conditions suggests that the regional distribution of the thermal stratification is the main factor controlling the amplitude of cooling in the plume region.

  5. Climate change and ocean acidification impacts on lower trophic levels and the export of organic carbon to the deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yool, A.; Popova, E. E.; Coward, A. C.; Bernie, D.; Anderson, T. R.

    2013-09-01

    Most future projections forecast significant and ongoing climate change during the 21st century, but with the severity of impacts dependent on efforts to restrain or reorganise human activity to limit carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. A major sink for atmospheric CO2, and a key source of biological resources, the World Ocean is widely anticipated to undergo profound physical and - via ocean acidification - chemical changes as direct and indirect results of these emissions. Given strong biophysical coupling, the marine biota is also expected to experience strong changes in response to this anthropogenic forcing. Here we examine the large-scale response of ocean biogeochemistry to climate and acidification impacts during the 21st century for Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 2.6 and 8.5 using an intermediate complexity global ecosystem model, MEDUSA-2.0. The primary impact of future change lies in stratification-led declines in the availability of key nutrients in surface waters, which in turn leads to a global decrease (1990s vs. 2090s) in ocean productivity (-6.3%). This impact has knock-on consequences for the abundance of the low trophic level biogeochemical actors modelled by MEDUSA-2.0 (-5.8%), and these would be expected to similarly impact higher trophic level elements such as fisheries. Related impacts are found in the flux of organic material to seafloor communities (-40.7% at 1000 m), and in the volume of ocean suboxic zones (+12.5%). A sensitivity analysis removing an acidification feedback on calcification finds that change in this process significantly impacts benthic communities, suggesting that a~better understanding of the OA-sensitivity of calcifying organisms, and their role in ballasting sinking organic carbon, may significantly improve forecasting of these ecosystems. For all processes, there is geographical variability in change - for instance, productivity declines -21% in the Atlantic and increases +59% in the Arctic - and changes are

  6. Flux and age of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A carbon isotopic study of the five largest arctic rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, P.A.; McClelland, J.W.; Holmes, R.M.; Zhulidov, A.V.; Mull, K.; Peterson, B.J.; Striegl, R.G.; Aiken, G.R.; Gurtovaya, T.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The export and A ??14C-age of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was determined for the Yehisey, Lena, Ob', Mackenzie, and Yukon rivers for 2004-2005. Concentrations of DOC elevate significantly with increasing discharge in these rivers, causing approximately 60% of the annual export to occur during a 2-month period following spring ice breakup. We present a total annual flux from the five rivers of ???16 teragrams (Tg), and conservatively estimate that the total input of DOC to the Arctic Ocean is 25-36 Tg, which is ???5-20% greater than previous fluxes. These fluxes are also ???2.5 ?? greater than temperate rivers with similar watershed sizes and water discharge. ??14C-DOC shows a clear relationship with hydrology. A small pool of DOC slightly depleted in ??14C is exported with base flow. The large pool exported with spring thaw is enriched in ??14C with respect to current-day atmospheric ??14C-CO2 values. A simple model predicts that ???50% of DOC exported during the arctic spring thaw is 1-5 years old, ???25% is 6-10 years in age, and 15% is 11-20 years old. The dominant spring melt period, a historically undersampled period export a large amount of young and presumably semilabile DOC to the Arctic Ocean. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. North Atlantic Deep Water export to the Southern Ocean over the past 14 Myr: Evidence from Nd and Pb isotopes in ferromanganese crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, M.; Whiteley, N.; Kasten, S.; Hein, J.R.; O'Nions, K.

    2002-01-01

    The intensity of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) production has been one of the most important parameters controlling the global thermohaline ocean circulation system and climate. Here we present a new approach to reconstruct the overall strength of NADW export from the North Atlantic to the Southern Ocean over the past 14 Myr applying the deep water Nd and Pb isotope composition as recorded by ferromanganese crusts and nodules. We present the first long-term Nd and Pb isotope time series for deep Southern Ocean water masses, which are compared with previously published time series for NADW from the NW Atlantic Ocean. These data suggest a continuous and strong export of NADW, or a precursor of it, into the Southern Ocean between 14 and 3 Ma. An increasing difference in Nd and Pb isotope compositions between the NW Atlantic and the Southern Ocean over the past 3 Myr gives evidence for a progressive overall reduction of NADW export since the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (NHG). The Nd isotope data allow us to assess at least semiquantitatively that the amount of this reduction has been in the range between 14 and 37% depending on location.

  8. Controls on the Flux, Age, and Composition of Terrestrial Organic Carbon Exported by Rivers to the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Eglinton, T. I.; Holmes, R. M.; Galy, V.; Soule, S.; Goetz, S. J.; Laporte, N. T.; Wollheim, W. M.

    2009-12-01

    Export of organic carbon, alkalinity and silicate-derived Ca and Mg ions to the ocean exerts important controls on the sequestration of atmospheric carbon. As this export is mediated to a significant extent by river systems, understanding processes that control transport of land-derived matter to the coastal ocean is of fundamental importance to successful models of past and future climates. Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the Woods Hole Research Center and the University of New Hampshire have formed a river research consortium that aims at investigating large river systems with a holistic approach. The National Science Foundation is funding this initiative through its Emerging Topics in Biogeochemical Cycles (ETBC) program. Our project focuses on the biogeochemistries of the Lena and Kolyma rivers in the Russian Arctic, the Yangtze river in China, the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers in India and Bangladesh, the Congo river in central Africa as well as the Fraser river basin in western Canada. Campaign-style sampling using a uniform sampling strategy is complemented by time-series sampling that is accomplished through collaborations with scientists at local institutions such as the East China Normal University in Shanghai (Yangtze), the University of the Fraser Valley in Abbotsford (Fraser), schools and research institutions in eastern Russia (Lena and Kolyma) and the University of Nancy, France (Ganges, Brahmaputra). We combine a standardized sampling approach for organic and inorganic constituents with spatial analyzes of digital, mostly satellite-based data products with the aim of obtaining an integrated understanding of the response of river ecosystems to past, ongoing and future environmental changes. We will present first results from the Ganges-Brahmaputra, Kolyma as well as the Fraser River systems.

  9. The influence of freshwater and material export on sedimentary facies and benthic processes within the Fly Delta and adjacent Gulf of Papua (Papua New Guinea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alongi, D. M.; Christoffersen, P.; Tirendi, F.; Robertson, A. I.

    1992-02-01

    cm -2) and infauna (range: 86-5555 individuals m -2; 0.10-5.85 g AFDW m -2) were generally lower in the delta than in the gulf. The infauna was dominated by nematodes, copepods, foraminifera and small, tube-building, deposit- and suspension-feeding polychaetes and amphipods. Rates of bacterial productivity were very erratic with sediment depth across stations, ranging from 0-2108 mg C m -2 day -1 (DNA synthesis) and from 0-228 mg C m -2 day -1 (protein synthesis), respectively. Rates of benthic respiration and DOC flux across the sediment-water interface were generally high, ranging from 63-780 mg C m -2 day -1 and from -797 to 514 mg C m -2 day -1, respectively. Epibenthos were more diverse (at the phyletic level) at the mid-shelf than inshore, composed mainly of sponges, crabs, crinoids, echinoids, bivalves, hydroids and asteroids. Demersal nekton abundance was low, dominated by the leatherjacket, Paramonacanthus filicauda, the pony fish, Leiognathus splendens and the grunter, Pomadasys argyreus, suggesting limited transfer of infaunal biomass to higher trophic levels. The response of the benthic regime to the export of freshwater and material from the Fly River generally conforms to the RHOADSet al. [(1985) Continental Shelf Research, 4, 189-213] model of benthic response to effluent derived from the Changjiang River in the East China Sea and is similar to infaunal and sedimentary patterns off the Amazon. Nutrient release from the delta sediments contributes little to water-column production, but in the gulf, nutrient efflux from the benthos contributes, on average, 38 and 61% of the annual N and P requirements of phytoplankton production, reflecting closer benthic-pelagic coupling and enrichment of biological productivity in the Gulf of Papua due to nutrient export from the Fly River.

  10. Simulated 21st century's increase in oceanic suboxia by CO2-enhanced biotic carbon export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oschlies, Andreas; Schulz, Kai G.; Riebesell, Ulf; Schmittner, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The primary impacts of anthropogenic CO2 emissions on marine biogeochemical cycles predicted so far include ocean acidification, global warming induced shifts in biogeographical provinces, and a possible negative feedback on atmospheric CO2 levels by CO2-fertilized biological production. Here we report a new potentially significant impact on the oxygen-minimum zones of the tropical oceans. Using a model of global climate, ocean circulation, and biogeochemical cycling, we extrapolate mesocosm-derived experimental findings of a pCO2-sensitive increase in biotic carbon-to-nitrogen drawdown to the global ocean. For a simulation run from the onset of the industrial revolution until A.D. 2100 under a "business-as-usual" scenario for anthropogenic CO2 emissions, our model predicts a negative feedback on atmospheric CO2 levels, which amounts to 34 Gt C by the end of this century. While this represents a small alteration of the anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon cycle, the model results reveal a dramatic 50% increase in the suboxic water volume by the end of this century in response to the respiration of excess organic carbon formed at higher CO2 levels. This is a significant expansion of the marine "dead zones" with severe implications not only for all higher life forms but also for oxygen-sensitive nutrient recycling and, hence, for oceanic nutrient inventories.

  11. Impact of freshwater on a subarctic coastal ecosystem under seasonal sea ice (southeastern Hudson Bay, Canada) II. Production and export of microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, L.; Robineau, B.; Gosselin, M.; Michel, C.; Ingram, R. G.; Fortier, L.; Therriault, J. C.; Demers, S.; Monti, D.

    1996-02-01

    In the under-ice plume of the Grande rivière de la Baleine (Great Whale River) and offshore waters of southeastern Hudson Bay (Canada), several environmental factors influence the distribution, growth, taxonomic composition and sedimentation of algae found in the sea ice, at the ice-water interface and in the underlying water column. During the spring and early summer, these factors include: salinity of bottom ice, water turbidity, nutrients and vertical stability of the water column. In the present study, relationships between three predictor variables (water salinity, river runoff and seasonal air temperature index) and biological variables are used to assess the impact of freshwater on production and export of microalgae. Relationships are derived from existing data, which were collected between 1978 and 1990. Correlations with water salinity are positive for some variables (salinity of bottom ice, phosphate, ammonium, Σ:Si, and algae in bottom ice and at the interface) and negative for others (coefficient of light attenuation, silicate, ΣN:P, ΣSi:P and water column phytoplankton). Using together salinity and the seasonal index leads to improved proportions of explained variance for nitrate, ammonium, ΣN:P and phytoplankton. The amount of sedimenting algae is positively correlated with runoff, and chemical composition (C/N) of the sedimenting material is negatively correlated with salinity. The empirical relationships are applied to the results of a model of river plume dynamics, for three runoff conditions. Seasonally averaged total Chl. a concentrations, derived from the model, are higher for maximum river runoff than for mean or minimum conditions. This is because, in the studied environment, areal concentrations of phytoplankton are higher than those of ice algae, especially under condition of maximum runoff.

  12. Export fluxes in a naturally fertilized area of the Southern Ocean, the Kerguelen Plateau: ecological vectors of carbon and biogenic silica to depth (Part 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembauville, M.; Blain, S.; Armand, L.; Quéguiner, B.; Salter, I.

    2014-12-01

    The chemical (particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, biogenic silica) and biological (diatoms and faecal pellets) composition of the material exported to a moored sediment trap located under the winter mixed layer of the naturally-fertilized Kerguelen Plateau in the Southern Ocean was studied over an annual cycle. Despite iron availability in spring, the annual particulate organic carbon (POC) export (98.2 mmol m-2) at 289 m was low but annual biogenic silica export was significant (114 mmol m-2). This feature was related to the abundance of empty diatom frustules and the ratio of full : empty cell exerted a first order control in BSi : POC export stoichiometry of biological pump. Chaetoceros Hyalochaete spp. and Thalassiosira antarctica resting spores were found to be responsible for more than 60% of the annual POC that occurred during two very short export events (<14 days in spring-summer) representing the majority of captured export. Low diatom fluxes were observed over the remainder of the year. Faecal pellet contribution to annual carbon flux was low (34%) and reached it's seasonal maximum in autumn and winter (>80%). The seasonal progression of faecal pellet types revealed a clear transition from small spherical shapes (small copepods) in spring, larger cylindrical and ellipsoid shapes in summer (euphausiids and large copepods) and finally large tabular shapes (salps) in autumn and winter. We propose that in this High Biomass, Low Export (HBLE) environment, small, highly silicified, fast-sinking resting spores are able to bypass the high grazing pressure and efficient carbon transfer to higher trophic levels that are responsible for the low fluxes observed the during the remainder of the year. Our study also provides a statistical framework linking the ecological succession of diatom and zooplankton communities to the seasonality of carbon and silicon export within an iron-fertilized bloom region in the Southern Ocean.

  13. Freshwater variability in the Arctic: Tracing freshwater sources and quantities from 2005 to 2011 in a transect from Ellesmere Island, Canada to the North Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motz, E. A.; Smethie, W. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Switchyard project has gathered data across the Canadian Basin to determine the Arctic Ocean's fractional freshwater composition from three sources: Pacific water, meteoric water (river runoff and precipitation), and sea ice melt water. With a database of the project extending to 2005 as well as using earlier projects' data to date back further, we can view trends and visualize changes in the freshwater content of the Arctic Ocean. In the past decade the Arctic has experienced increases in freshwater with the largest increases from meteoric fractions. In 2008 there was a major increase in meteoric water and decreases in Pacific freshwater fractions. This could be related to the extreme decrease in summer sea ice of 2007. Freshwater inventories across the Canadian Basin vary over the years and show a relationship in the mixed layer of increasing when the Arctic Oscillation (AO) is positive and freshwater is released from the Beaufort Gyre.1 Increases in the quantity of freshwater in the Arctic could lead to greater freshwater exports to the North Atlantic Ocean. This can inhibit the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water and so affect the global thermohaline circulation which moderates much of our planet's climate.2 1 Jones et al. 2008, Pacific freshwater, river water and sea ice meltwater across Arctic Ocean basins: Results from the 2005 Beringia Expedition, Journal of Geophysical Research vol 113, C08012, doi:10.1029/2007JC004124. 32Morison et al. 1998, Hydrography of the upper Arctic Ocean measured from the nuclear submarine U.S.S. Pargo, Deep Sea Research Part I, vol 45, 15-38.

  14. Projected Impact of Climate Change on the Water and Salt Budgets of the Arctic Ocean by a Global Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James R.; Russell, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The annual flux of freshwater into the Arctic Ocean by the atmosphere and rivers is balanced by the export of sea ice and oceanic freshwater. Two 150-year simulations of a global climate model are used to examine how this balance might change if atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) increase. Relative to the control, the last 50-year period of the GHG experiment indicates that the total inflow of water from the atmosphere and rivers increases by 10% primarily due to an increase in river discharge, the annual sea-ice export decreases by about half, the oceanic liquid water export increases, salinity decreases, sea-ice cover decreases, and the total mass and sea-surface height of the Arctic Ocean increase. The closed, compact, and multi-phased nature of the hydrologic cycle in the Arctic Ocean makes it an ideal test of water budgets that could be included in model intercomparisons.

  15. Time and space variability of freshwater content, heat content and seasonal ice melt in the Arctic Ocean from 1991 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, M.; Rudels, B.; Marnela, M.; Wisotzki, A.; Zhao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in the hydrography of the Arctic Ocean have recently been reported. The upper ocean has been freshening and pulses of warm Atlantic Water have been observed to spread into the Arctic Ocean. Although these changes have been intensively studied, salinity and temperature variations have less frequently been considered together. Here hydrographic observations, obtained by icebreaker expeditions conducted between 1991 and 2011, are analyzed and discussed. Five different water masses in the upper 1000 m of the water column are examined in five sub-basins of the Arctic Ocean. This allows for studying the variations of the distributions of the freshwater and heat contents in the Arctic Ocean not only in time but also laterally and vertically. In addition, the seasonal ice melt contribution is separated from the permanent, winter, freshwater content of the Polar Mixed Layer. Because the positions of the icebreaker stations vary between the years, the icebreaker observations are at each specific point in space and time compared with the Polar Science Center Hydrographic Climatology to separate the effects of space and time variability on the observations. The hydrographic melt water estimate is discussed and compared with the potential ice melt induced by atmospheric heat input estimated from the ERA-Interim and NCEP/NCAR reanalyses. After a period of increased salinity in the upper ocean during the 1990s, both the Polar Mixed Layer and the upper halocline have been freshening. The increase in freshwater content in the Polar Mixed Layer is primarily driven by a decrease in salinity, not by changes in Polar Mixed Layer depth, whereas the freshwater is accumulating in the upper halocline mainly through the increasing thickness of the halocline. This is especially evident in the Northern Canada Basin, where the most substantial freshening is observed. The warming, and to some extent also the increase in salinity, of the Atlantic Water during the early 1990s extended

  16. Projected decreases in future marine export production: the role of the carbon flux through the upper ocean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufkötter, C.; Vogt, M.; Gruber, N.; Aumont, O.; Bopp, L.; Doney, S. C.; Dunne, J. P.; Hauck, J.; John, J. G.; Lima, I. D.; Seferian, R.; Völker, C.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate projections of marine particle export production (EP) are crucial for predicting the response of the marine carbon cycle to climate change, yet models show a wide range in both global EP and their responses to climate change. This is, in part, due to EP being the net result of a series of processes, starting with net primary production (NPP) in the sunlit upper ocean, followed by the formation of particulate organic matter and the subsequent sinking and remineralization of these particles, with each of these processes responding differently to changes in environmental conditions. Here, we compare future projections in EP over the 21st century, generated by four marine ecosystem models under IPCC's high emission scenario RCP8.5, and determine the processes driving these changes. The models simulate small to modest decreases in global EP between -1 and -12 %. Models differ greatly with regard to the drivers causing these changes. Among them, the formation of particles is the most uncertain process with models not agreeing on either magnitude or the direction of change. The removal of the sinking particles by remineralization is simulated to increase in the low and intermediate latitudes in three models, driven by either warming-induced increases in remineralization or slower particle sinking, and show insignificant changes in the remaining model. Changes in ecosystem structure, particularly the relative role of diatoms matters as well, as diatoms produce larger and denser particles that sink faster and are partly protected from remineralization. Also this controlling factor is afflicted with high uncertainties, particularly since the models differ already substantially with regard to both the initial (present-day) distribution of diatoms (between 11-94 % in the Southern Ocean) and the diatom contribution to particle formation (0.6-3.8 times lower/higher than their contribution to biomass). As a consequence, changes in diatom concentration are a strong driver

  17. Projected decreases in future marine export production: the role of the carbon flux through the upper ocean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufkötter, Charlotte; Vogt, Meike; Gruber, Nicolas; Aumont, Olivier; Bopp, Laurent; Doney, Scott C.; Dunne, John P.; Hauck, Judith; John, Jasmin G.; Lima, Ivan D.; Seferian, Roland; Völker, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Accurate projections of marine particle export production (EP) are crucial for predicting the response of the marine carbon cycle to climate change, yet models show a wide range in both global EP and their responses to climate change. This is, in part, due to EP being the net result of a series of processes, starting with net primary production (NPP) in the sunlit upper ocean, followed by the formation of particulate organic matter and the subsequent sinking and remineralisation of these particles, with each of these processes responding differently to changes in environmental conditions. Here, we compare future projections in EP over the 21st century, generated by four marine ecosystem models under the high emission scenario Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 8.5 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and determine the processes driving these changes. The models simulate small to modest decreases in global EP between -1 and -12 %. Models differ greatly with regard to the drivers causing these changes. Among them, the formation of particles is the most uncertain process with models not agreeing on either magnitude or the direction of change. The removal of the sinking particles by remineralisation is simulated to increase in the low and intermediate latitudes in three models, driven by either warming-induced increases in remineralisation or slower particle sinking, and show insignificant changes in the remaining model. Changes in ecosystem structure, particularly the relative role of diatoms matters as well, as diatoms produce larger and denser particles that sink faster and are partly protected from remineralisation. Also this controlling factor is afflicted with high uncertainties, particularly since the models differ already substantially with regard to both the initial (present-day) distribution of diatoms (between 11-94 % in the Southern Ocean) and the diatom contribution to particle formation (0.6-3.8 times higher than their

  18. Revisiting atmospheric dust export to the Southern Hemisphere ocean: Biogeochemical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagener, Thibaut; Guieu, CéCile; Losno, RéMi; Bonnet, Sophie; Mahowald, Natalie

    2008-06-01

    Aerosol concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere are largely undersampled. This study presents a chemical and physical description of dust particles collected on board research vessels in the southeast Pacific (SEPS) and the Southern Ocean (SOKS). Concentrations of dust were 6.1 ± 2.4 ng m-3 for SEPS and 13.0 ± 6.3 ng m-3 for SOKS. Dust fluxes, derived from those concentrations, were 9.9 ± 3.7 μg m-2 d-1 for SEPS and 38 ± 14 μg m-2 d-1 for SOKS and are shown to be representative of actual fluxes in those areas. Dust and iron deposition are up to 2 orders of magnitude lower than former predictions. A map of dust deposition on the Southern Hemisphere is proposed by incorporating those in situ measurements into a dust model. This study confirms that dust deposition is not the dominant source of iron to the large high-nutrient low-chlorophyll Southern Ocean.

  19. Atmospheric freshwater fluxes and their effect on the global thermohaline circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zaucker, F.; Stocker, T.F.; Broecker, W.S.

    1994-06-15

    Atmospheric water vapor fluxes were derived from a 1-year data set of horizontal wind speed and specific humidity assimilated from meteorological observations by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). Vertically integrated horizontal freshwater fluxes were compared to those of two data sets based on a climatology and on simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). Zonal transports agree fairly well at all latitudes outside the tropics, where fluxes are about double for the AGCM data set. Meridional fluxes of the AGCM and ECMWF data sets show close agreement, while the climatological fluxes are generally smaller with a considerable northward shift in the southern hemisphere. Atmosphere-to-ocean freshwater fluxes were derived from the three data sets. Not only is there substantial disagreement between the data sets, but their zonal averages over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean basins show little resemblance to the respective restoring freshwater fluxes from a 2-dimensional ocean model. If the ocean model is forced with the observed and modeled atmospheric fluxes, we find that the mode of ocean circulation is determined mostly the net flux to the high-latitude oceans and the amount of freshwater exported from the Atlantic basin. The latitudinal structure of the freshwater fluxes in low-latitudes and midlatitudes has little influence on the modeled thermohaline circulation. The fluxes derived from the climatology and ECMWF permit North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation, but a strong freshwater input to the Southern Ocean inhibits Antarctic Bottom Water formation. The AGCM transports so much moisture to the Arctic Ocean that NADW formation is shut down, resulting in a ocean circulation mode of southern sinking in all three ocean basins.

  20. Downward particle flux and carbon export in the Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean; the role of zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miquel, J.-C.; Gasser, B.; Martín, J.; Marec, C.; Babin, M.; Fortier, L.; Forest, A.

    2015-08-01

    As part of the international, multidisciplinary project Malina, downward particle fluxes were investigated by means of a drifting multi-sediment trap mooring deployed at three sites in the Canadian Beaufort Sea in late summer 2009. Mooring deployments lasted between 28 and 50 h and targeted the shelf-break and the slope along the Beaufort-Mackenzie continental margin, as well as the edge between the Mackenzie Shelf and the Amundsen Gulf. Besides analyses of C and N, the collected material was investigated for pigments, phyto- and microzooplankton, faecal pellets and swimmers. The measured fluxes were relatively low, in the range of 11-54 mg m-2 d-1 for the total mass, 1-15 mg C m-2 d-1 for organic carbon and 0.2-2.5 mg N m-2 d-1 for nitrogen. Comparison with a long-term trap data set from the same sampling area showed that the short-term measurements were at the lower end of the high variability characterizing a rather high flux regime during the study period. The sinking material consisted of aggregates and particles that were characterized by the presence of hetero- and autotrophic microzooplankters and diatoms and by the corresponding pigment signatures. Faecal pellets contribution to sinking carbon flux was important, especially at depths below 100 m, where they represented up to 25 % of the total carbon flux. The vertical distribution of different morphotypes of pellets showed a marked pattern with cylindrical faeces (produced by calanoid copepods) present mainly within the euphotic zone, whereas elliptical pellets (produced mainly by smaller copepods) were more abundant at mesopelagic depths. These features, together with the density of matter within the pellets, highlighted the role of the zooplankton community in the transformation of carbon issued from the primary production and the transition of that carbon from the productive surface zone to the Arctic Ocean's interior. Our data indicate that sinking carbon flux in this late summer period is primarily

  1. Downward particle flux and carbon export in the Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean; the Malina experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miquel, J.-C.; Gasser, B.; Martín, J.; Marec, C.; Babin, M.; Fortier, L.; Forest, A.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the international, multidisciplinary project Malina, downward particle fluxes were investigated by means of a drifting multi-sediment trap mooring deployed at three sites in the Canadian Beaufort Sea in late summer 2009. Mooring deployments lasted for 28-50 h and targeted the shelf-break and the slope along the Beaufort-Mackenzie continental margin, as well as the edge between the Mackenzie Shelf and the Amundsen Gulf. Besides analyses of C and N, the collected material was investigated for pigments, phyto- and microzooplankton, faecal pellets and swimmers. The measured fluxes were relatively low, in the range of 11-54 mg m-2 d-1 for the total mass, 1-15 mg C m-2 d-1 for organic carbon and 0.2-2.5 mg N m-2 d-1 for nitrogen. Comparison with a long-term trap dataset from the same sampling area showed that the short-term measurements were at the lower end of the high variability characterizing a rather high flux regime during the study period. The sinking material consisted of aggregates and particles that were characterized by the presence of hetero- and autotrophic microzooplankters and diatoms and by the corresponding pigment signatures. Faecal pellets contribution to sinking carbon flux was important, especially at depth where they represented up to 25% of the total carbon flux. The vertical distribution of different morphotypes of pellets showed a marked pattern with cylindrical faeces (produced by calanoid copepods) present mainly within the euphotic zone, whereas elliptical pellets (produced mainly by smaller copepods) were more abundant at mesopelagic depths. These features, together with the density of matter within the pellets, highlighted the role of the zooplankton community in the transformation of carbon issued from the primary production and the transition of that carbon from the productive surface zone to the Arctic Ocean's interior. Our data indicate that sinking carbon flux in this late summer period is primarily the result of a

  2. Export Fluxes in Contrasting Environments of the South-East Pacific Ocean Derived From Drifting Sediment traps (BIOSOPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miquel, J.; Gasser, B.; Claustre, H.

    2006-12-01

    The South-East Pacific presents contrasting oceanographic environments related to different oceanographic features such as High Nutrient Low Chlorophyl (HNLC) zones, upwelling of eastern boundaries or ultra- oligotrophy of the central gyre. This results in significant differences in particle production in surface waters and export to the deeper ocean. During the BIOSOPE (BIogeochemistry and Optics SOuth Pacific Experiment) cruise held in October-December 2004, particle flux in upper waters was assessed using drifting sediment traps. Traps were deployed at 2 depths (below the maximum chl.a and at the base of the euphotic layer) in six geographical areas, ranging from the oligotrophic central gyre through the mesotrophic area off Marquesas Islands to the eutrophic waters off the South-American coast. For all analyzed parameters fluxes were contrastingly different at the various sites, with lowest fluxes at the central gyre area and highest fluxes at the upwelling sites. Mass flux ranged from 2-7 mg m-2 d-1 to 410-630 mg m-2 d-1, POC flux from less than 1 mg POC m-2 d-1 up to 63 mg POC m^{- 2} d-1, and Th-234 from 35-47 dpm m-2 d-1 to >5000 dpm m-2 d-1. Fluxes were always lower at the deeper horizon except for Th-234 flux which was variable. Also, fluxes were very different at the two upwelling sites studied. The relation between the environmental and trophic characteristics of the sites visited and the two orders of magnitude in fluxes observed is discussed.

  3. A record of barite accumulation rate for marine export productivity changes in the tropical Indian Ocean during the Mid-Pliocene--Early-Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liping; Ma, Zhongwu; Ding, Xuan

    2016-04-01

    One of the most interesting features in the marine oxygen isotope records is the gradual shift towards heavier 18O from the Mid-Pliocene, which ends with the initiation of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (NHG) around 2.7 Ma. The lack of significant change in sea surface temperature in the tropical Indian Ocean as revealed in the previous studies does not rule out their possible contributions to this dramatic climate change during the Mid-Pliocene transition. Changing circulation systems in the region will control the supply of nutrients for the water masses which in turn determine the marine productivity. In the areas of high productivity, ocean export productivity may potentially provide a mechanism of CO2 draw-down into the deep ocean, through which contributing to the lowering of the global temperature. In this study, we present a record of barite accumulation rate (BAR) for DSDP Site 214 drilled on the Ninetyeast Ridge. Here we use the marine barite, which is formed during the decay of organism in the twilight zone, as a proxy for ocean export productivity. Our results show that the BAR of Site 214 varies between 0.25 and 1.25 mg/cm2/kyr during the period between 4 Ma and 2 Ma. Five intervals of increased BAR from 3.6 Ma to 2.4 Ma are identified with the most distinct peak centred around 3 Ma. The overall pattern does not follow either the oxygen isotope record for the Site or the sea surface temperature and subsurface temperature reconstructed with the Mg/Ca of foraminifera. This suggests that regional changes in ocean circulation and water masses may have played more important role than temperature in controlling the productivity change in the tropical Indian Ocean. The relative higher productivity around 3 Ma may imply a biogenetic process towards the intensification of NHGs.

  4. Quantifying the ocean, freshwater and human effects on year-to-year variability of one-sea-winter Atlantic salmon angled in multiple Norwegian rivers.

    PubMed

    Otero, Jaime; Jensen, Arne J; L'Abée-Lund, Jan Henning; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Storvik, Geir O; Vøllestad, Leif Asbjørn

    2011-01-01

    Many Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, populations are decreasing throughout the species' distributional range probably due to several factors acting in concert. A number of studies have documented the influence of freshwater and ocean conditions, climate variability and human impacts resulting from impoundment and aquaculture. However, most previous research has focused on analyzing single or only a few populations, and quantified isolated effects rather than handling multiple factors in conjunction. By using a multi-river mixed-effects model we estimated the effects of oceanic and river conditions, as well as human impacts, on year-to-year and between-river variability across 60 time series of recreational catch of one-sea-winter salmon (grilse) from Norwegian rivers over 29 years (1979-2007). Warm coastal temperatures at the time of smolt entrance into the sea and increased water discharge during upstream migration of mature fish were associated with higher rod catches of grilse. When hydropower stations were present in the course of the river systems the strength of the relationship with runoff was reduced. Catches of grilse in the river increased significantly following the reduction of the harvesting of this life-stage at sea. However, an average decreasing temporal trend was still detected and appeared to be stronger in the presence of salmon farms on the migration route of smolts in coastal/fjord areas. These results suggest that both ocean and freshwater conditions in conjunction with various human impacts contribute to shape interannual fluctuations and between-river variability of wild Atlantic salmon in Norwegian rivers. Current global change altering coastal temperature and water flow patterns might have implications for future grilse catches, moreover, positioning of aquaculture facilities as well as the implementation of hydropower schemes or other encroachments should be made with care when implementing management actions and searching for solutions to

  5. Freshwater fluxes in the Weddell Gyre: results from δ18O

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Peter J.; Meredith, Michael P.; Jullion, Loïc; Naveira Garabato, Alberto; Torres-Valdés, Sinhue; Holland, Paul; Leng, Melanie J.; Venables, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    Full-depth measurements of δ18O from 2008 to 2010 enclosing the Weddell Gyre in the Southern Ocean are used to investigate the regional freshwater budget. Using complementary salinity, nutrients and oxygen data, a four-component mass balance was applied to quantify the relative contributions of meteoric water (precipitation/glacial input), sea-ice melt and saline (oceanic) sources. Combination of freshwater fractions with velocity fields derived from a box inverse analysis enabled the estimation of gyre-scale budgets of both freshwater types, with deep water exports found to dominate the budget. Surface net sea-ice melt and meteoric contributions reach 1.8% and 3.2%, respectively, influenced by the summer sampling period, and −1.7% and +1.7% at depth, indicative of a dominance of sea-ice production over melt and a sizable contribution of shelf waters to deep water mass formation. A net meteoric water export of approximately 37 mSv is determined, commensurate with local estimates of ice sheet outflow and precipitation, and the Weddell Gyre is estimated to be a region of net sea-ice production. These results constitute the first synoptic benchmarking of sea-ice and meteoric exports from the Weddell Gyre, against which future change associated with an accelerating hydrological cycle, ocean climate change and evolving Antarctic glacial mass balance can be determined. PMID:24891394

  6. Discrepant estimates of primary and export production from satellite algorithms, a biogeochemical model, and geochemical tracer measurements in the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palevsky, Hilary I.; Quay, Paul D.; Nicholson, David P.

    2016-08-01

    Estimates of primary and export production (PP and EP) based on satellite remote sensing algorithms and global biogeochemical models are widely used to provide year-round global coverage not available from direct observations. However, observational data to validate these approaches are limited. We find that no single satellite algorithm or model can reproduce seasonal and annual geochemically determined PP, export efficiency (EP/PP), and EP rates throughout the North Pacific basin, based on comparisons throughout the full annual cycle at time series stations in the subarctic and subtropical gyres and basin-wide regions sampled by container ship transects. The high-latitude regions show large PP discrepancies in winter and spring and strong effects of deep winter mixed layers on annual EP that cannot be accounted for in current satellite-based approaches. These results underscore the need to evaluate satellite- and model-based estimates using multiple productivity parameters measured over broad ocean regions throughout the annual cycle.

  7. Changes in freshwater carbon exports from Canadian terrestrial basins to lakes and estuaries under a 2×CO2 atmospheric scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clair, T. A.; Ehrman, J. M.; Higuchi, K.

    1999-12-01

    Rain water running through soils and wetlands will leach decomposing plant organic matter into streams and lakes in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In streams, lakes and eventually estuaries, DOC can be mineralized to CO2, precipitated to sediments or taken up in biological matter, and is thus an important part of many aquatic ecosystems. Using hydrological, climatological and geographical data from 32 sites located in Canada, we developed a neural network model which allowed us to estimate DOC export from the Canadian land mass. We reapplied the model to the 32 sites plus a further 43 basins to estimate area normalized exports for various regions of the country. We estimated that 14.3×106 t of DOC are currently exported from Canadian terrestrial ecosystems. We then modified climatological inputs to the model to reflect the predicted temperature and precipitation conditions under a doubled atmospheric CO2 regime. Our model suggests that DOC exports will increase by approximately 14% under a doubled CO2 atmosphere, mostly owing to increases in runoff. Our analysis also shows that DOC export is greatest in the spring in southern Canada and summer in the north.

  8. Export of newly formed LSW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Katharina; Klein, Birgit; Karstensen, Johannes; Fischer, Jürgen; Baumann, Till; Kanzow, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation represents the strongest mechanism for oceanic northward heat transport. This is accomplished by moving warm water northward in the upper ocean compensated by a deep return flow of cold and dense North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). Labrador Sea Water (LSW) constitutes the shallowest component of NADW. Since LSW is also supposed to be the most sensitive NADW component to climate change it is of particular interest. LSW is formed by deep convection not only in the centre of the Labrador Sea but also near its western boundary. Recent studies have suggested that LSW formed in the boundary region enters its export route from the Labrador Sea, the Deep Western Boundary Current, faster than LSW originating from the central Labrador Sea. In this study the spatial and temporal evolution of the export of newly formed LSW is investigated. For this purpose hydrographic mooring data from an array located at the western bounndary at 53°N starting in the late 1990s until 2014 and data from the Argo float network is used. The averaged seasonal salinity cycle at the array, particularly at the moorings further onshore, shows a pronounced freshwater signal in May indicating the arrival of newly formed LSW in the boundary current. In order to learn more about its preceding pathway and the corresponding export timescale the mooring data is complemented by data from Argo floats. Besides the annual cycles of LSW formation and export, their interannual variations are important aspects affecting the large-scale circulation. For instance, in years of relatively strong convection, as in 2008 and 2012, LSW is observed to pass the boundary current array at 53°N earlier, i.e. in February and March, respectively, than in years with weak convection, as in 2007 or 2010. Besides seasonal variations in the boundary current, a possible explanation for the earlier freshwater signal in years of enhanced convection might be a shift in convection sites

  9. Climate Change Response of Ocean Net Primary Production (NPP) and Export Production (EP) Regulated by Stratification Increases in The CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, W.; Randerson, J. T.; Moore, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean warming due to rising atmospheric CO2 has increasing impacts on ocean ecosystems by modifying the ecophysiology and distribution of marine organisms, and by altering ocean circulation and stratification. We explore ocean NPP and EP changes at the global scale with simulations performed in the framework of the fifth Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5). Global NPP and EP are reduced considerably by the end of the century for the representative concentration pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario, although models differ in their significantly in their direct temperature impacts on production and remineralization. The Earth system models used here project similar NPP trends albeit the magnitudes vary substantially. In general, projected changes in the 2090s for NPP range between -2.3 to -16.2% while export production reach -7 to -18% relative to 1990s. This is accompanied by increased stratification by 17-30%. Results indicate that globally reduced NPP is closely related to increased ocean stratification (R2=0.78). This is especially the case for global export production, that seems to be mostly controlled by the increased stratification (R2=0.95). We also identify phytoplankton community impacts on these patterns, that vary across the models. The negative response of NPP to climate change may be through bottom-up control, leading to a reduced capacity of oceans to regulate climate through the biological carbon pump. There are large disagreements among the CMIP5 models in terms of simulated nutrient and oxygen concentrations for the 1990s, and their trends over time with climate change. In addition, potentially important marine biogeochemical feedbacks on the climate system were not well represented in the CMIP5 models, including important feedbacks with aerosol deposition and the marine iron cycle, and feedbacks involving the oxygen minimum zones and the marine nitrogen cycle. Thus, these substantial reductions in primary productivity and export production over

  10. Freshwater movement patterns by juvenile Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. before they migrate to the ocean: Oh the places you'll go!

    PubMed

    Shrimpton, J M; Warren, K D; Todd, N L; McRae, C J; Glova, G J; Telmer, K H; Clarke, A D

    2014-10-01

    Juvenile movement patterns for coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch and Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha from two large interior rivers of British Columbia, Canada, were examined. Otoliths from post-spawned fishes were collected on spawning grounds and elemental signatures were determined through transects from sectioned otoliths using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Large variations in otolith elemental signatures were found during the freshwater life stage indicative of movement downstream to rivers and tributaries that differed in elemental signature. This study highlights that downstream movements occur before migration to the ocean during the parr-smolt transformation. Extensive downstream movements of parr appear to be a successful life-history strategy based on variations observed in the otolith elemental signatures of spawners. Movements downstream in parr and the remarkable homing ability of adults also suggest that imprinting to natal streams must occur prior to the parr-smolt transformation. PMID:25053226

  11. Ba/Ca in Planktonic Foraminifera as a Recorder of Freshwater Input to the Ocean: Proxy Refinement in the Gulf of Papua, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, K.

    2015-12-01

    In the study of paleoclimate, the past several decades have seen large strides in the advancement of proxies designed to reconstruct changes in sea surface temperature (SST); however, techniques for reconstructing ocean salinity are less well developed. The ratio of Ba/Ca in planktic foraminiferal tests has shown initial promise as a tool for reconstructing salinity in continental margin sites near river mouths. In these environments, Ba/Ca shows an inverse correlation with salinity, and often a less clear correlation to nutrients or indicators of productivity, as is more typical in open-ocean settings. An ideal area in which to apply and test foraminiferal Ba/Ca as a proxy for freshwater input is the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP), where temperatures are relatively stable, but large variations in precipitation are today driven by the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and strength of the Australian-Indonesian monsoon. Foraminiferal Ba/Ca in sediments proximal to a river mouth should therefore reflect changes in riverine input, which in turn reflect variations in precipitation on different timescales. We present here planktic foraminiferal δ18O, Ba/Ca, and Mg/Ca records spanning the last glacial-interglacial transition from marine sediment cores in the Gulf of Papua, located in the WPWP. The δ18O records show an increase in the magnitude of glacial-interglacial (G-IG) δ18O change (∆18O) moving away from the coastline and the mouth of the primary local freshwater source, the Fly River. The reduced amplitude in G-IG ∆18O in the cores closer to shore, manifested by more negative δ18O values before ~20 kyr ago, is likely due to freshwater input from the Fly River, with the effects diminishing with distance from the Fly River source. Temperature and sea level are also changing over the deglaciation, however, contributing to the signal recorded in the calcite δ18O. We use planktic Mg/Ca analyses and independent records of sea level change to isolate the

  12. Changes in the Composition of the Fram Strait Freshwater Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Paul; Granskog, Mats; Fransson, Agneta; Chierici, Melissa; Stedmon, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Fram Strait is the largest gateway and only deep connection between the Arctic Ocean and the subpolar oceans. Monitoring the exchanges through Fram Strait allows us to detect and understand current changes occurring in the Arctic Ocean and to predict the effects of those changes on the Arctic and Subarctic climate and ecosystems. Polar water, recirculating Atlantic Water and deeper water masses exported from the Arctic Ocean through western Fram Strait are monitored year-round by an array of moored instruments along 78°50'N, continuously maintained by the Norwegian Polar Institute since the 1990s. Complimentary annual hydrographic sections have been repeated along the same latitude every September. This presentation will focus on biogeochemical tracer measurements collected along repeated sections from 1997-2015, which can be used to identify freshwater from different sources and reveal the causes of variations in total volume of freshwater exported e. g.: pulses of freshwater from the Pacific. Repeated tracer sections across Fram Strait reveal significant changes in the composition of the outflow in recent years, with recent sections showing positive fractions of sea ice meltwater at the surface near the core of the EGC, suggesting that more sea ice melts back into the surface than previously. The 1997-2015 time series of measurements reveals a strong anti-correlation between run-off and net sea ice meltwater inventories, suggesting that run-off and brine may be delivered to Fram Strait together from a common source. While the freshwater outflow at Fram Strait typically exhibits a similar run-off to net sea ice meltwater ratio to the central Arctic Ocean and Siberian shelves, we find that the ratio of run-off to sea ice meltwater at Fram Strait is decreasing with time, suggesting an increased surface input of sea ice meltwater in recent years. In 2014 and 2015 measurements of salinity, δ18O and total alkalinity were collected from sea ice cores as well as the

  13. Recognition of extensive freshwater and brackish marshes and of multiple transgressions and regressions: The Holocene wetlands of the Delaware Bay and Atlantic Ocean coasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, H.I. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Extensive and closely spaced cores (204) were analyzed to find detailed facies (microfacies) and paleoenvironments in the subsurface sediments along the Delaware Bay and Atlantic Ocean. To determine detailed facies and paleoenvironments, several composite methods were employed: traditional lithological analysis, botanical identification, macro- and micro-paleontological analysis, grain size analysis, organic and inorganic content, water content, mineral composition, particulate plant, and C-14 dating. Twenty-two sedimentary microfacies were identified in the surface and subsurface sediments of the study area. Most of the lower section of the Holocene sediments contained freshwater and brackish marsh microfacies which alternated or intercalated with fluvial microfacies or brackish tidal flat/tidal stream microfacies. After tides encroached upon the freshwater marshes and swamps, several events of transgression and regression were recorded in the stratigraphic section. Finally, saline paleoenvironments predominated at the top section of subsurface sediments. Within saline facies, three subgroups of salt marsh microfacies were identified: high salt marsh sub-microfacies, middle salt marsh sub-microfacies were identified: high salt marsh sub-microfacies, middle salt marsh sub-microfacies, and low salt marsh sub-microfacies. The major controlling factors of these paleoenvironmental changes were local relative sea-level fluctuations, sediment supply, pre-Holocene configuration, fluvial activity, groundwater influence, climatic change, sediment compaction, tectonics, isostasy and biological competition. Ten events of transgression and regression in some areas were found in about 2,000 years, but other areas apparently contained no evidence of multiple events of transgression and regression. Some other areas showed one or two distinctive events of transgression and regression. Therefore, further investigation is necessary to understand the details of these records.

  14. Preferential remineralization of dissolved organic phosphorus and non-Redfield DOM dynamics in the global ocean: Impacts on marine productivity, nitrogen fixation, and carbon export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letscher, Robert T.; Moore, J. Keith

    2015-03-01

    Selective removal of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from the marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool has been reported in several regional studies. Because DOM is an important advective/mixing pathway of carbon (C) export from the ocean surface layer and its non-Redfieldian stoichiometry would affect estimates of marine export production per unit N and P, we investigated the stoichiometry of marine DOM and its remineralization globally using a compiled DOM data set. Marine DOM is enriched in C and N compared to Redfield stoichiometry, averaging 317:39:1 and 810:48:1 for C:N:P within the degradable and total bulk pools, respectively. Dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) is found to be preferentially remineralized about twice as rapidly with respect to the enriched C:N stoichiometry of marine DOM. Biogeochemical simulations with the Biogeochemical Elemental Cycling model using Redfield and variable DOM stoichiometry corroborate the need for non-Redfield dynamics to match the observed DOM stoichiometry. From our model simulations, preferential DOP remineralization is found to increase the strength of the biological pump by ~9% versus the case of Redfield DOM cycling. Global net primary productivity increases ~10% including an increase in marine nitrogen fixation of ~26% when preferential DOP remineralization and direct utilization of DOP by phytoplankton are included. The largest increases in marine nitrogen fixation, net primary productivity, and carbon export are observed within the western subtropical gyres, suggesting the lateral transfer of P in the form of DOP from the productive eastern and poleward gyre margins may be important for sustaining these processes downstream in the subtropical gyres.

  15. Freshwater Macroinvertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalepa, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of freshwater biology particularly freshwater macroinvertebrates and their effect on water pollution, covering publications of 1976-77. A list of 158 references is also presented. (HM)

  16. Sensitivity analysis of an Ocean Carbon Cycle Model in the North Atlantic: an investigation of parameters affecting the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and export of detritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, V.; Kettle, H.; Merchant, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    The sensitivity of the biological parameters in a nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model in the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and detrital export is analysed. The NPZD model is the Hadley Centre Ocean Carbon Cycle model (HadOCC) from the UK Met Office, used in the Hadley Centre Coupled Model 3 (HadCM3) and FAst Met Office and Universities Simulator (FAMOUS) GCMs. Here, HadOCC is coupled to the 1-D General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) and forced with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting meteorology to undertake a sensitivity analysis of its twenty biological parameters. Analyses are performed at three sites in the EuroSITES European Ocean Observatory Network: the Central Irminger Sea (60° N 40° W), the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (49° N 16° W) and the European Station for Time series in the Ocean Canary Islands (29° N 15° W) to assess variability in parameter sensitivities at different locations in the North Atlantic Ocean. Reasonable changes to the values of key parameters are shown to have a large effect on the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production, and export of biological detritus to the deep ocean. Changes in the values of key parameters have a greater effect in more productive regions than in less productive areas. We perform the analysis using one-at-a-time perturbations and using a statistical emulator, and compare results. The most sensitive parameters are generic to many NPZD ocean ecosystem models. The air-sea CO2 flux is most influenced by variation in the parameters that control phytoplankton growth, detrital sinking and carbonate production by phytoplankton (the rain ratio). Primary production is most sensitive to the parameters that define the shape of the photosythesis-irradiance curve. Export production is most sensitive to the parameters that control the rate of detrital sinking and the remineralisation of detritus.

  17. Deep and bottom water export from the Southern Ocean to the Pacific over the past 38 million years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van de Flierdt, T.; Frank, M.; Halliday, A.N.; Hein, J.R.; Hattendorf, B.; Gunther, D.; Kubik, P.W.

    2004-01-01

    The application of radiogenic isotopes to the study of Cenozoic circulation patterns in the South Pacific Ocean has been hampered by the fact that records from only equatorial Pacific deep water have been available. We present new Pb and Nd isotope time series for two ferromanganese crusts that grew from equatorial Pacific bottom water (D137-01, "Nova," 7219 m water depth) and southwest Pacific deep water (63KD, "Tasman," 1700 m water depth). The crusts were dated using 10Be/9Be ratios combined with constant Co-flux dating and yield time series for the past 38 and 23 Myr, respectively. The surface Nd and Pb isotope distributions are consistent with the present-day circulation pattern, and therefore the new records are considered suitable to reconstruct Eocene through Miocene paleoceanography for the South Pacific. The isotope time series of crusts Nova and Tasman suggest that equatorial Pacific deep water and waters from the Southern Ocean supplied the dissolved trace metals to both sites over the past 38 Myr. Changes in the isotopic composition of crust Nova are interpreted to reflect development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and changes in Pacific deep water circulation caused by the build up of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Nd isotopic composition of the shallower water site in the southwest Pacific appears to have been more sensitive to circulation changes resulting from closure of the Indonesian seaway. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Seasonality and long term trends in dissolved carbon export from large rivers to the Arctic Ocean, and potential effects on coastal ocean acidification (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, S. E.; Kokelj, S. V.; Raymond, P. A.; Striegl, R. G.; McClelland, J. W.; Holmes, R. M.; Spencer, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    Large Arctic rivers show marked seasonality in constituent flux as a result of variations in flowpath throughout the yearly cycle. Here, we use measurements collected from the mouths of the six largest rivers draining to the Arctic Ocean to explore seasonal variation in dissolved inorganic and dissolved organic carbon (DIC, DOC) flux, and the effect of this flux on nearshore ocean processes. This work uses data from the Yukon and Mackenzie Rivers in North America, and the Kolyma, Lena, Yenisey, and Ob' in Siberia. Mean monthly concentrations of riverine DIC vary synchronously across all rivers, peaking under ice and reaching a low point immediately after the spring freshet. Monthly climatologies for DIC, in addition to similarly constructed climatologies for Ca2+, show that the input of riverwater universally causes aragonite to be undersaturated in riverine-influenced nearshore regions, with an effect that is greater for the Siberian coast than for western North America, and greater in the spring-winter than in the late summer and fall. Because seasonal trends and geographic variation in DOC concentration are opposite to that for DIC in these large rivers, degradation of DOC to CO2 in the nearshore Arctic should accentuate seasonal and spatial patterns in aragonite undersaturation in Arctic coastal regions. Datasets that extend DIC and DOC concentration measurements back to the early 1970's (DIC) and early 1980's (DOC) near the mouth of the Mackenzie River in the western Canadian Arctic indicate that the summertime concentration and flux of these constituents has been increasing over time in this region. While evidence from other regions of the pan-Arctic, and data gathered from smaller sub-catchment studies indicate that this trend is not universal for DOC, there is growing evidence for a consistent increase in summertime DIC flux across both time and gradients of decreasing permafrost extent. These changes, in turn, could have broad implications for both

  19. Export fluxes in a naturally fertilized area of the Southern Ocean, the Kerguelen Plateau: seasonal dynamic reveals long lags and strong attenuation of particulate organic carbon flux (Part 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembauville, M.; Salter, I.; Leblond, N.; Gueneugues, A.; Blain, S.

    2014-12-01

    A sediment trap moored in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen plateau in the Southern Ocean provided an annual record of particulate organic carbon and nitrogen fluxes at 289 m. At the trap deployment depth current speeds were low (∼10 cm s-1) and primarily tidal-driven (M2 tidal component) providing favorable hydrodynamic conditions for the collection of flux. Particulate organic carbon (POC) flux was generally low (<0.5 mmol m-2 d-1) although two episodic export events (<14 days) of 1.5 mmol m-2 d-1 were recorded. These increases in flux occurred with a 1 month time lag from peaks in surface chlorophyll and together accounted for approximately 40% of the annual flux budget. The annual POC flux of 98.2 ± 4.4 mmol m-2 yr-1 was relatively low considering the shallow deployment depth, but similar to deep-ocean (>2 km) fluxes measured from similarly productive iron-fertilized blooms. Comparison of the sediment trap data with complementary estimates of biomass accumulation and export indicate that ∼90% of the flux was lost between 200 and 300 m. We hypothesize that grazing pressure, including mesozooplankton and mesopelagic fishes, may be responsible for rapid flux attenuation and the High Biomass Low Export regime characterizing the Kerguelen bloom. The importance of plankton community structure in controlling the temporal variability of export fluxes is addressed in a companion paper.

  20. Particulate organic carbon export fluxes on Chukchi Shelf, western Arctic Ocean, derived from 210Po/210Pb disequilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jianhua; Yu, Wen; Lin, Wuhui; Men, Wu; Chen, Liqi

    2015-05-01

    Fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) were derived from 210Po/210Pb disequilibrium during the 4th Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE-4) from July 1 to September 28, 2010. Average residence times of particulate 210Po in the euphotic zone were -16.00 a to 1.54 a, which are higher than those of dissolved 210Po (-6.89 a to -0.70 a). Great excesses of dissolved 210Po were observed at all stations, with an average 210Po/210Pb ratio of 1.91±0.20, resulting from 210Pb atmospheric deposition after sea ice melt. POC fluxes from the euphotic zone were estimated by two methods (E and B) in the irreversible scavenging model. Estimated POC fluxes were 945-126 mmol C/(m2·a) and 1 848-109 mmol C/(m2·a) by methods E and B, respectively, both decreasing from low to high latitude. The results are comparable to previous works for the same region, indicating efficient biological pumping in the Chukchi Sea. The results can improve understanding of the carbon cycle in the western Arctic Ocean.

  1. An approach to estimate the freshwater contribution from glacial melt and precipitation in East Greenland shelf waters using colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stedmon, Colin A.; Granskog, Mats A.; Dodd, Paul A.

    2015-02-01

    Changes in the supply and storage of freshwater in the Arctic Ocean and its subsequent export to the North Atlantic can potentially influence ocean circulation and climate. In order to understand how the Arctic freshwater budget is changing and the potential impacts, it is important to develop and refine empirical approaches for tracing freshwater contributions. This in turn can help develop and validate model simulations. Arctic rivers are an important source of freshwater and stable oxygen isotope measurements are used to separate contributions from meteoric water (river, glacial, and precipitation) and sea ice melt. We develop this approach further and investigate the use of an additional tracer, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), which is largely specific to freshwater originating from Arctic rivers. A robust relationship between the freshwater contribution from meteoric water and CDOM is derived from 4 years of measurements in Fram Strait (2009-2012), combined with measurements from the East Greenland shelf and Dijmpha Sound (NE Greenland). Results confirm a high contribution of riverine CDOM in Arctic halocline waters with salinities >31.5 and indicate the importance of shelf processes (riverine input and sea ice formation), while previously, these waters where thought to be derived from open sea processes (cooling and sea ice formation) in the northern Barents and Kara Seas. In Greenlandic coastal waters the meteoric water contribution is influenced by Greenland ice sheet meltwater and deviations from the CDOM-meteoric water relationships found are applied to quantify meltwater contribution along the East Greenland shelf waters (0-13%).

  2. Hosed vs. unhosed: interruptions of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation in a global coupled model, with and without freshwater forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Nicolas; Galbraith, Eric D.

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that glacial periods were punctuated by abrupt climate changes, with large impacts on air temperature, precipitation, and ocean circulation across the globe. However, the long-held idea that freshwater forcing, caused by massive iceberg discharges, was the driving force behind these changes has been questioned in recent years. This throws into doubt the abundant literature on modelling abrupt climate change through "hosing" experiments, whereby the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is interrupted by an injection of freshwater to the North Atlantic: if some, or all, abrupt climate change was not driven by freshwater input, could its character have been very different than the typical hosed experiments? Here, we describe spontaneous, unhosed oscillations in AMOC strength that occur in a global coupled ocean-atmosphere model when integrated under a particular background climate state. We compare these unhosed oscillations to hosed oscillations under a range of background climate states in order to examine how the global imprint of AMOC variations depends on whether or not they result from external freshwater input. Our comparison includes surface air temperature, precipitation, dissolved oxygen concentrations in the intermediate-depth ocean, and marine export production. The results show that the background climate state has a significant impact on the character of the freshwater-forced AMOC interruptions in this model, with particularly marked variations in tropical precipitation and in the North Pacific circulation. Despite these differences, the first-order patterns of response to AMOC interruptions are quite consistent among all simulations, implying that the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere dynamics associated with an AMOC weakening dominate the global response, regardless of whether or not freshwater input is the cause. Nonetheless, freshwater addition leads to a more complete shutdown of the AMOC than occurs in the unhosed oscillations

  3. Primary production and carbon export rates across the subpolar N. Atlantic Ocean basin based on triple oxygen isotope and dissolved O2 and Ar gas measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quay, P.; Stutsman, J.; Steinhoff, T.

    2012-06-01

    Gross photosynthetic O2 production (GOP) rates in the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean were estimated using the measured isotopic composition of dissolved oxygen in the surface layer on samples collected on nine transits of a container ship between Great Britain and Canada during March 2007 to June 2008. The mean basin-wide GOP rate of 226 ± 48 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 during summer was double the winter rate of 107 ± 41 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. Converting these GOP rates to equivalent 14C-based PP (14C-PPeqv) yielded rates of 1005 ± 216 and 476 ± 183 mg C m-2 d-1 in summer and winter, respectively, that generally agreed well with previous 14C-based PP estimates in the region. The 14C-PPeqv estimates were 1-1.6× concurrent satellite-based PP estimates along the cruise track. A net community production rate (NCP) of 87 ± 12 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 (62 ± 9 mmol C m-2 d-1) and NCP/GOP of 0.35 ± 0.06 in the mixed layer was estimated from O2/Ar and 17Δ measurements (61°N 26°W) during spring bloom conditions in May 2008. Contrastingly, a much lower long-term annual mean NCP or organic carbon export rate of 2.8 ± 2.7 mol C m-2 yr-1 (8 ± 7 mmol C m-2 d-1) and NCP/GOP of 0.07 ± 0.06 at the winter mixed layer depth was estimated from 15 years of surface O2 data in the subpolar N. Atlantic collected during the CARINA program.

  4. Increased nitrogen export from eastern North America to the Atlantic Ocean due to climatic and anthropogenic changes during 1901-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qichun; Tian, Hanqin; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Hopkinson, Charles S.; Lu, Chaoqun; Najjar, Raymond G.

    2015-06-01

    We used a process-based land model, Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model 2.0, to examine how climatic and anthropogenic changes affected riverine fluxes of ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and particulate organic nitrogen (PON) from eastern North America, especially the drainage areas of the Gulf of Maine (GOM), Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB), and South Atlantic Bight (SAB) during 1901-2008. Model simulations indicated that annual fluxes of NH4+, NO3-, DON, and PON from the study area during 1980-2008 were 0.019 ± 0.003 (mean ± 1 standard deviation) Tg N yr-1, 0.18 ± 0.035 Tg N yr-1, 0.10 ± 0.016 Tg N yr-1, and 0.043 ± 0.008 Tg N yr-1, respectively. NH4+, NO3-, and DON exports increased while PON export decreased from 1901 to 2008. Nitrogen export demonstrated substantial spatial variability across the study area. Increased NH4+ export mainly occurred around major cities in the MAB. NO3- export increased in most parts of the MAB but decreased in parts of the GOM. Enhanced DON export was mainly distributed in the GOM and the SAB. PON export increased in coastal areas of the SAB and northern parts of the GOM but decreased in the Piedmont areas and the eastern parts of the MAB. Climate was the primary reason for interannual variability in nitrogen export; fertilizer use and nitrogen deposition tended to enhance the export of all nitrogen species; livestock farming and sewage discharge were also responsible for the increases in NH4+ and NO3- fluxes; and land cover change (especially reforestation of former agricultural land) reduced the export of the four nitrogen species.

  5. Modeling the influence of atmospheric leading modes on the variability of the Arctic freshwater cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederdrenk, L.; Sein, D.; Mikolajewicz, U.

    2013-12-01

    Global general circulation models show remarkable differences in modeling the Arctic freshwater cycle. While they agree on the general sinks and sources of the freshwater budget, they differ largely in the magnitude of the mean values as well as in the variability of the freshwater terms. Regional models can better resolve the complex topography and small scale processes, but they are often uncoupled, thus missing the air-sea interaction. Additionally, regional models mostly use some kind of salinity restoring or flux correction, thus disturbing the freshwater budget. Our approach to investigate the Arctic hydrologic cycle and its variability is a regional atmosphere-ocean model setup, consisting of the global ocean model MPIOM with high resolution in the Arctic coupled to the regional atmosphere model REMO. The domain of the atmosphere model covers all catchment areas of the rivers draining into the Arctic. To account for all sinks and sources of freshwater in the Arctic, we include a discharge model providing terrestrial lateral waterflows. We run the model without salinity restoring but with freshwater correction, which is set to zero in the Arctic. This allows for the analysis of a closed freshwater budget in the Artic region. We perform experiments for the second half of the 20th century and use data from the global model MPIOM/ECHAM5 performed with historical conditions, that was used within the 4th Assessment Report of the IPCC, as forcing for our regional model. With this setup, we investigate how the dominant modes of large-scale atmospheric variability impact the variability in the freshwater components. We focus on the two leading empirical orthogonal functions of winter mean sea level pressure, as well as on the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Siberian High. These modes have a large impact on the Arctic Ocean circulation as well as on the solid and liquid export through Fram Strait and through the Canadian archipelago. However, they cannot explain

  6. Freshwater Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  7. Freshwater macroinvertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Quigley, M.A.

    1982-06-01

    Major aspects of the biology of freshwater macroinvertebrates with emphasis on man-induced environmental changes were reviewed in this report with 183 references. The effects of both chemical and physical environmental alteration are examined. The population dynamics of the macroinvertebrates are controlled by factors such as food and feeding habits, periodicity and drift, productivity and animal-sediment interactions.(KRM)

  8. The influence of large-scale environmental changes on carbon export in the North Pacific Ocean using satellite and shipboard data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goes, Joaquim I.; Gomes, Helga do R.; Limsakul, Atsamon; Saino, Toshiro

    2004-01-01

    The subarctic Pacific Ocean experiences strong climate-modulated seasonal, interannual to decadal variations in meteorological and physical oceanographic conditions, which can have a profound influence on biological processes and carbon cycling in the region. Inorganic nitrate, a major nutrient controlling phytoplankton growth, is key to understanding the export of organic matter out of the euphotic zone. Its supply to the region is driven largely by winter convective mixing. Using satellite data for a 5-year period beginning in 1997, we provide evidence of strong interannual variations in the supply of inorganic nitrate and new production in the subarctic Pacific in association with the El-Niño of 1997 and the transition to La-Niña conditions thereafter. These satellite based climatologies allowed us to view and describe large changes in nitrate distribution and new production along the entire breadth of the subarctic Pacific basin. In addition, our accessibility to a 25-year database of shipboard measurements focused primarily in the Oyashio waters, a region representative of the western subarctic Pacific, enabled us to demonstrate that El-Niño/La-Niña changes in this region differed from those observed in the eastern subarctic Pacific. Thus, in addition to the primary motive of verifying the changes that we observed in our satellite-derived maps, this exercise allowed us to obtain a clear picture of the mechanistic connections between the atmosphere and the oceans and the biological response to these changes. The results from this study make a compelling case that the primary driver for the observed interannual variations in biological production in the western subarctic Pacific is the strength of the wintertime monsoonal winds. This anomalous intensification of the southeastward wind stress appears to be particularly strong during El-Niño years when the Aleutian Low intensifies and moves southeastwards, causing disturbances in the pressure gradient between

  9. El Niño-Southern Oscillation determines the salinity of the freshwater lens under a coral atoll in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velde, M.; Javaux, M.; Vanclooster, M.; Clothier, B. E.

    2006-11-01

    The freshwater resources of coral atolls occur mainly as lenses floating on salt water underneath the islands. The size and shape of these lenses are determined by hydrogeologic characteristics, the rainfall recharge rate and its temporal variation, plus extractions (Underwood et al., 1992; Jones and Banner, 2003; Jocson et al., 2002). In the South Pacific, rainfall exhibits seasonal as well as interannual variability related to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) (Ropelewski and Halpert, 1987). We used electric conductivity measurements from pumped wells on Tongatapu to show a moderate ENSO control on the temporal fluctuation of the pumped freshwater salinity. The salinity dynamics depended on low or increased rainfall recharge during respectively dry El Niño periods or wet La Niña events. ENSO events cause a large variation around the mean salinity and determine the relative salinity over the time-scale of several years, while a smaller variation is introduced by seasonal rainfall. The Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) (Troup, 1965; Stone et al., 1996) was used to predict freshwater salinity with a lag time of 10 months.

  10. Variation in freshwater input to the Eastern US coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D.; Yoon, Y.; Beighley, E., II; Hughes, R.; Kimbro, D.

    2014-12-01

    Phragmites is one of the most invasive plants in North American wetlands. Although its spread in coastal marshes has been linked by independent studies to urbanization, eutrophication, and salinity change, there is good evidence that these factors may interactively determine invasion success and in turn, the ecosystem services provided by marshes. We hypothesize that the invasion of Phragmites is linked to changes in freshwater inputs due to climate and/or land use change. El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), originating in the sea surface temperature anomalies (warm or cold) in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, is a notable and prominent signal in inter-annual climatic variation. Recent studies shows that the probability of strong El Nino events may increase in the future. In this study, we will investigate the teleconnections between freshwater inputs to the coastal zone along the eastern U.S. and ENSO indices, and attempt to explore the predictability of temporal and spatial variation of freshwater inputs based on ENSO conditions. To quantify changes in freshwater input in this region, hydrologic modeling, remote sensing and field measurements are combined. The Hillslope River Routing (HRR) model is used to simulate hourly streamflow from all watersheds from southern Florida to northern Maine draining into the Atlantic Ocean. The modeling effort utilizes satellite precipitation (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Product 3B42v7: 2001-current with a 3-hr temporal resolution and 0.25 degree spatial resolution), land surface temperature and vegetation measures (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS, products: 2001-current with a monthly temporal resolution and 0.05 degree spatial resolution). To account for land cover change, annual MODIS land cover data and time varying population statics are merged to estimate annual land cover characteristics for each sub-catchment within the study region. Static datasets for soils and ground elevations are

  11. Short-term degradation of terrestrial DOM in the coastal ocean: Implications for nutrient subsidies and marine microbial community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, A. A.; Tank, S. E.; Kellogg, C.

    2015-12-01

    The export of riverine dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the coastal ocean provides an important link between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The coastal temperate rainforests of British Columbia contain extensive freshwater networks that export significant amounts of water and DOM to the ocean, representing significant cross-system hydrologic and biogeochemical linkages. To better understand the importance of these linkages and implications for ecosystem structure and function, we used an experimental approach to investigate the role of microbial and photodegradation transformations of DOM exported from small coastal catchments to the marine environment. At two time periods (August 2014, March 2015), stream water from the outlets of two coastal watersheds was filtered (<0.2 μm), and treated with microbial inoculums from across a salinity gradient (i.e., freshwater, estuarine, and marine). Treatments were incubated in the ocean under light and dark conditions for 8 days. At 0, 3 and 8 days, samples were analyzed for DOC, TDN, DIN, and DON. Changes in DOM composition were determined with optical characterization techniques such as absorbance (SUVA, S, Sr) and fluorescence (EEM). Microbial community response was measured using cell counts and DNA/RNA amplicon sequencing to determine changes in bacterial abundance and community composition. General patterns indicated that microbial communities from the high salinity treatment (i.e. most marine) were the most effective at utilizing freshwater DOM, especially under light conditions. In some treatments, DOM appeared as a potential source of inorganic nitrogen with corresponding shifts in microbial community composition. Incubations using inoculum from low and mid salinity levels demonstrated smaller changes, indicating that DOM exported from these streams may not be extensively utilized until exposed to higher salinity environments further from stream outlets. These results suggest a role for terrestrial sourced

  12. Interannual variations of freshwater in Hornsund

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dølven, Knut Ola; Falck, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Hornsund is a fjord situated at the south-west coast of Spitsbergen. The main goal of this study is to calculate and describe the interannual variations of freshwater content in Hornsund. In addition to this, we aim to trace the freshwater sources to the fjord and calculate the fractional contributions from these by using oxygen isotope data. The mixing between these freshwater sources and oceanic waters is described as well as the general summer hydrography of the fjord. Calculation of freshwater content is based on Conductivity-Temperature-Depth data obtained in July of 2001 to 2014. Oxygen isotope data are obtained in Autumn 2013/2014 and Spring 2014. The freshwater in Hornsund is assumed to be provided by either meteoric freshwater sources (glacial melt/precipitation/river-runoff) or the melting of sea ice. Both sources can be produced locally or advected into the fjord. The fraction of the ¹⁸O isotope (δ¹⁸O) is an effective tracer for freshwater sources in the Arctic due to the progressive depletion of this isotope in water molecules during poleward atmospheric transport (Ostlund and Hut, 1984). Calculation of fractional contribution from the two freshwater sources is done based on a method presented in Ostlund and Hut (1984), where the mass-balance, salinity-balance and δ¹⁸O-balance are utilized to calculate the fractions of seawater, meteoric water and sea ice meltwater. Preliminary results show freshwater content varying between 0.211km³ and 1.068km³, based on a reference salinity of 34.2. In Autumn 2013, meteoric water was the largest contributor of freshwater to the fjord. However, there was a significant contribution of sea ice meltwater which had a deeper vertical distribution than the meteoric water. References: H. G. Ostlund and G. Hut. 1984. Arctic Ocean water mass balance from isotope data. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 89(C4):6373-6381

  13. Seawater-overwash impacts on freshwater-lens water supplies of low-lying oceanic islands: example from Roi-Namur Island, Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, C. I.; Gingerich, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    Low-lying oceanic islands host thin freshwater lenses subject to long-term aquifer salinization by seawater overwash. The lens is often the sole-source water supply for inhabitants. As maximum elevation for these islands is only a few meters above sea level, overwash can occur during high tides and storm surges. Sea level rise due to climate change will make overwash events even more common. The thin freshwater lenses, a few meters thick, are underlain by seawater, so pumping must be done carefully, often with horizontal skimming wells. Even a small amount of downward seawater infiltration from an overwash event can render the water supply non-potable. Where permeability is high, seawater infiltrates quickly, but seawater that infiltrates lower-permeability zones may remain for many months causing groundwater to remain non-potable, leaving residents without a reliable freshwater source. Initial post-overwash salinization is driven by the higher density of the invading saltwater, which sinks and mixes into the fresher water in potentially-complex patterns determined by: distribution of flooding and post-flood ponding, locations of permeable paths, and the inherently complex flow fields generated when fluid of higher density overlies lower-density fluid. The flow patterns cannot generally be measured or predicted in detail. This study develops basic understanding of overwash salinization processes impacting water supply on low-level islands, using a rare example of a monitored seawater overwash event that occurred in December 2008 at Roi-Namur Island in Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, in which the salinity evolution of well water was measured. Due to typical lack of field data on such islands, a set of plausible alternative simulation-model descriptions of the hydrogeology and overwash event are created for analysis of the monitored salinization and recovery. Despite inability to know the 'true and complete' description of the event and the

  14. Impact of natural (waves and currents) and anthropogenic (trawl) resuspension on the export of particulate matter to the open ocean: Application to the Gulf of Lion (NW Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, B.; Durrieu de Madron, X.; Estournel, C.; Ulses, C.; Le Corre, G.

    2008-08-01

    Modern sediment deposits on continental margins form a vast reservoir of particulate matter that is regularly affected by resuspension processes. Resuspension by bottom trawling on shelves with strong fishing activity can modify the scale of natural disturbance by waves and currents. Recent field data show that the impact of bottom trawls on fine sediment resuspension per unit surface is comparable with that of the largest storms. We assessed the impact of both natural and anthropogenic processes on the dispersal of riverborne particles and shelf sediments on the Gulf of Lion shelf. We performed realistic numerical simulations of resuspension and transport forced by currents and waves or by a fleet of bottom trawlers. Simulations were conducted for a 16-month period (January 1998-April 1999) to characterise the seasonal variability. The sediment dynamics takes into account bed armoring, ripple geometry and the cohesive and non-cohesive characteristics of the sediments. Essential but uncertain parameters (clay content, erosion fluxes and critical shear stress for cohesive sediment) were set with existing data. Resuspension by waves and currents was controlled by shear stress, whereas resuspension by trawls was controlled by density and distribution of the bottom trawler fleet. Natural resuspension by waves and currents mostly occurred during short seasonal episodes, and was concentrated on the inner shelf. Trawling-induced resuspension, in contrast, occurred regularly throughout the year and was concentrated on the outer shelf. The total annual erosion by trawls (5.6×10 6 t y -1, t for metric tonnes) was four orders of magnitude lower than the erosion induced by waves and currents (35.3×10 9 t y -1). However the net resuspension (erosion/deposition budget) for trawling (0.4×10 6 t y -1) was only one order of magnitude lower than that for waves and currents (9.2×10 6 t y -1). Off-shelf export concerned the finest fraction of the sediment (clays and fine silts

  15. Dom Export from Coastal Temperate Bog Forest Watersheds to Marine Ecosystems: Improving Understanding of Watershed Processes and Terrestrial-Marine Linkages on the Central Coast of British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, A. A.; Giesbrecht, I.; Tank, S. E.; Hunt, B. P.; Lertzman, K. P.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal temperate bog forests of British Columbia, Canada, export high amounts of dissolved organic matter (DOM) relative to the global average. Little is known about the factors influencing the quantity and quality of DOM exported from these forests or the role of this terrestrially-derived DOM in near-shore marine ecosystems. The objectives of this study are to better understand patterns and controls of DOM being exported from bog forest watersheds and its potential role in near-shore marine ecosystems. In 2013, the Kwakshua Watershed Ecosystems Study at Hakai Beach Institute (Calvert Island, BC) began year-round routine collection and analysis of DOM, nutrients, and environmental variables (e.g. conductivity, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen) of freshwater grab samples from the outlets of seven watersheds draining directly to the ocean, as well as near-shore marine samples adjacent to freshwater outflows. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) varied across watersheds (mean= 11.45 mg L-1, sd± 4.22) and fluctuated synchronously with seasons and storm events. In general, higher DOC was associated with lower specific UV absorbance (SUVA254; mean= 4.59 L mg-1 m-1, sd± 0.55). The relationship between DOC and SUVA254 differed between watersheds, suggesting exports in DOM are regulated by individual watershed attributes (e.g. landscape classification, flow paths) as well as precipitation. We are using LiDAR and other remote sensing data to examine watershed controls on DOC export. At near-shore marine sites, coupled CTD (Conductivity Temperature Depth) and optical measures (e.g. spectral slopes, slope ratios (SR), EEMs), showed a clear freshwater DOM signature within the system following rainfall events. Ongoing work will explore the relationship between bog forest watershed attributes and DOM flux and composition, with implications for further studies on biogeochemical cycling, carbon budgets, marine food webs, and climate change.

  16. 48 CFR 52.247-51 - Evaluation of Export Offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evaluation of Export....247-51 Evaluation of Export Offers. As prescribed in 47.305-6(e), insert the following provision: Evaluation of Export Offers (JAN 2001) (a) Port handling and ocean charges—other than DOD water...

  17. Arctic freshwater synthesis: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prowse, T.; Bring, A.; Mârd, J.; Carmack, E.

    2015-11-01

    In response to a joint request from the World Climate Research Program's Climate and Cryosphere Project, the International Arctic Science Committee, and the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, an updated scientific assessment has been conducted of the Arctic Freshwater System (AFS), entitled the Arctic Freshwater Synthesis (AFSΣ). The major reason for joint request was an increasing concern that changes to the AFS have produced, and could produce even greater, changes to biogeophysical and socioeconomic systems of special importance to northern residents and also produce extra-Arctic climatic effects that will have global consequences. Hence, the key objective of the AFSΣ was to produce an updated, comprehensive, and integrated review of the structure and function of the entire AFS. The AFSΣ was organized around six key thematic areas: atmosphere, oceans, terrestrial hydrology, terrestrial ecology, resources and modeling, and the review of each coauthored by an international group of scientists and published as separate manuscripts in this special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences. This AFSΣ—Introduction reviews the motivations for, and foci of, previous studies of the AFS, discusses criteria used to define the domain of the AFS, and details key characteristics of the definition adopted for the AFSΣ.

  18. Sea-ice transport driving Southern Ocean salinity and its recent trends.

    PubMed

    Haumann, F Alexander; Gruber, Nicolas; Münnich, Matthias; Frenger, Ivy; Kern, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Recent salinity changes in the Southern Ocean are among the most prominent signals of climate change in the global ocean, yet their underlying causes have not been firmly established. Here we propose that trends in the northward transport of Antarctic sea ice are a major contributor to these changes. Using satellite observations supplemented by sea-ice reconstructions, we estimate that wind-driven northward freshwater transport by sea ice increased by 20 ± 10 per cent between 1982 and 2008. The strongest and most robust increase occurred in the Pacific sector, coinciding with the largest observed salinity changes. We estimate that the additional freshwater for the entire northern sea-ice edge entails a freshening rate of -0.02 ± 0.01 grams per kilogram per decade in the surface and intermediate waters of the open ocean, similar to the observed freshening. The enhanced rejection of salt near the coast of Antarctica associated with stronger sea-ice export counteracts the freshening of both continental shelf and newly formed bottom waters due to increases in glacial meltwater. Although the data sources underlying our results have substantial uncertainties, regional analyses and independent data from an atmospheric reanalysis support our conclusions. Our finding that northward sea-ice freshwater transport is also a key determinant of the mean salinity distribution in the Southern Ocean further underpins the importance of the sea-ice-induced freshwater flux. Through its influence on the density structure of the ocean, this process has critical consequences for the global climate by affecting the exchange of heat, carbon and nutrients between the deep ocean and surface waters. PMID:27582222

  19. Sea-ice transport driving Southern Ocean salinity and its recent trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haumann, F. Alexander; Gruber, Nicolas; Münnich, Matthias; Frenger, Ivy; Kern, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Recent salinity changes in the Southern Ocean are among the most prominent signals of climate change in the global ocean, yet their underlying causes have not been firmly established. Here we propose that trends in the northward transport of Antarctic sea ice are a major contributor to these changes. Using satellite observations supplemented by sea-ice reconstructions, we estimate that wind-driven northward freshwater transport by sea ice increased by 20 ± 10 per cent between 1982 and 2008. The strongest and most robust increase occurred in the Pacific sector, coinciding with the largest observed salinity changes. We estimate that the additional freshwater for the entire northern sea-ice edge entails a freshening rate of -0.02 ± 0.01 grams per kilogram per decade in the surface and intermediate waters of the open ocean, similar to the observed freshening. The enhanced rejection of salt near the coast of Antarctica associated with stronger sea-ice export counteracts the freshening of both continental shelf and newly formed bottom waters due to increases in glacial meltwater. Although the data sources underlying our results have substantial uncertainties, regional analyses and independent data from an atmospheric reanalysis support our conclusions. Our finding that northward sea-ice freshwater transport is also a key determinant of the mean salinity distribution in the Southern Ocean further underpins the importance of the sea-ice-induced freshwater flux. Through its influence on the density structure of the ocean, this process has critical consequences for the global climate by affecting the exchange of heat, carbon and nutrients between the deep ocean and surface waters.

  20. Sea-ice transport driving Southern Ocean salinity and its recent trends.

    PubMed

    Haumann, F Alexander; Gruber, Nicolas; Münnich, Matthias; Frenger, Ivy; Kern, Stefan

    2016-08-31

    Recent salinity changes in the Southern Ocean are among the most prominent signals of climate change in the global ocean, yet their underlying causes have not been firmly established. Here we propose that trends in the northward transport of Antarctic sea ice are a major contributor to these changes. Using satellite observations supplemented by sea-ice reconstructions, we estimate that wind-driven northward freshwater transport by sea ice increased by 20 ± 10 per cent between 1982 and 2008. The strongest and most robust increase occurred in the Pacific sector, coinciding with the largest observed salinity changes. We estimate that the additional freshwater for the entire northern sea-ice edge entails a freshening rate of -0.02 ± 0.01 grams per kilogram per decade in the surface and intermediate waters of the open ocean, similar to the observed freshening. The enhanced rejection of salt near the coast of Antarctica associated with stronger sea-ice export counteracts the freshening of both continental shelf and newly formed bottom waters due to increases in glacial meltwater. Although the data sources underlying our results have substantial uncertainties, regional analyses and independent data from an atmospheric reanalysis support our conclusions. Our finding that northward sea-ice freshwater transport is also a key determinant of the mean salinity distribution in the Southern Ocean further underpins the importance of the sea-ice-induced freshwater flux. Through its influence on the density structure of the ocean, this process has critical consequences for the global climate by affecting the exchange of heat, carbon and nutrients between the deep ocean and surface waters.

  1. Sea-ice transport driving Southern Ocean salinity and its recent trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haumann, F. Alexander; Gruber, Nicolas; Münnich, Matthias; Frenger, Ivy; Kern, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Recent salinity changes in the Southern Ocean are among the most prominent signals of climate change in the global ocean, yet their underlying causes have not been firmly established. Here we propose that trends in the northward transport of Antarctic sea ice are a major contributor to these changes. Using satellite observations supplemented by sea-ice reconstructions, we estimate that wind-driven northward freshwater transport by sea ice increased by 20 ± 10 per cent between 1982 and 2008. The strongest and most robust increase occurred in the Pacific sector, coinciding with the largest observed salinity changes. We estimate that the additional freshwater for the entire northern sea-ice edge entails a freshening rate of ‑0.02 ± 0.01 grams per kilogram per decade in the surface and intermediate waters of the open ocean, similar to the observed freshening. The enhanced rejection of salt near the coast of Antarctica associated with stronger sea-ice export counteracts the freshening of both continental shelf and newly formed bottom waters due to increases in glacial meltwater. Although the data sources underlying our results have substantial uncertainties, regional analyses and independent data from an atmospheric reanalysis support our conclusions. Our finding that northward sea-ice freshwater transport is also a key determinant of the mean salinity distribution in the Southern Ocean further underpins the importance of the sea-ice-induced freshwater flux. Through its influence on the density structure of the ocean, this process has critical consequences for the global climate by affecting the exchange of heat, carbon and nutrients between the deep ocean and surface waters.

  2. Freshwater Flow Charts - 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiper, G V

    2003-11-21

    This report covers the following: (1) Explanation of Charts Showing Freshwater Flow in 1995; (2) Estimated U.S. Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); (3) Estimated California Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); (4) Estimated New Mexico Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); and (5) Web locations and credits.

  3. Arctic Outflow West Of Greenland: Nine Years Of Volume And Freshwater Transports From Observations In Davis Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, B.; Lee, C.; Petrie, B.; Moritz, R. E.; Kwok, R.

    2014-12-01

    Recent Arctic changes suggest alterations in the export of freshwater from the Arctic to the North Atlantic, with conceivable impacts on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning circulation. Approximately 50% of the Arctic outflow exits west of Greenland, traveling through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) and into Baffin Bay before crossing Davis Strait. The CAA outflow contributes over 50% of the net southward freshwater outflow through Davis Strait. The remainder is deeper outflow from Baffin Bay, flow from the West Greenland Current and runoff from West Greenland and CAA glaciers. Since September 2004, an observational program in Davis Strait has quantified volume and freshwater transport variability. The year-round program includes velocity, temperature and salinity measurements from 15 moorings spanning the full width (330 km) of the strait accompanied by autonomous Seagliders surveys (average profile separation = 4 km) and autumn ship-based hydrographic sections. Over the shallow Baffin Island and West Greenland shelves, moored instrumentation provides temperature and salinity measurements near the ice-ocean interface. From 2004-2013, the average net volume and liquid freshwater transports are -1.6 ± 0.2 Sv, -94 ± 7 mSv, respectively (salinity referenced to 34.8 and negative indicates southward transport); sea ice contributes an additional -10 ± 1 mSv. Over this period, volume and liquid freshwater transports show significant interannual variability and no clear trends, but a comparison with reanalyzed 1987-90 data indicate a roughly 40% decrease in net southward liquid volume transport and a corresponding an almost 30% decrease in freshwater transport. Connections between the Arctic are also captured, e.g., a unique yearlong Davis Strait freshening event starting September 2009 that was likely driven by an earlier freshening (January 2009 - April/May 2010) in the Canadian Arctic. The Davis Strait autumn 2009 salinity minimum was fresher (by about 0

  4. Southern Ocean deep convection in global climate models: A driver for variability of subpolar gyres and Drake Passage transport on decadal timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Erik; Rickard, Graham; Morgenstern, Olaf; Martin, Torge; Osprey, Annette; Joshi, Manoj

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the individual and joint decadal variability of Southern Ocean state quantities, such as the strength of the Ross and Weddell Gyres, Drake Passage transport, and sea ice area, using the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research UK Chemistry and Aerosols (NIWA-UKCA) model and CMIP5 models. Variability in these quantities is stimulated by strong deep reaching convective events in the Southern Ocean, which produce an Antarctic Bottom Water-like water mass and affect the large-scale meridional density structure in the Southern Ocean. An increase in the (near) surface stratification, due to freshwater forcing, can be a precondition for subsequent strong convection activity. The combination of enhanced-gyre driven sea ice and freshwater export, as well as ongoing subsurface heat accumulation, lead to a time lag between changes in oceanic freshwater and heat content. This causes an ongoing weakening of the stratification until sudden strong mixing events emerge and the heat is released to the atmosphere. We find that strong convection reduces sea ice cover, weakens the subpolar gyres, increases the meridional density gradient and subsequently results in a positive Drake Passage transport anomaly. Results of available CMIP5 models confirm that variability in sea ice, Drake Passage transport, and the Weddell Gyre strength is enhanced if models show strong open ocean convective events. Consistent relationships between convection, sea ice, Drake Passage transport, and Ross Gyre strength variability are evident in most models, whether or not they host open ocean convection.

  5. 76 FR 38620 - International Fisheries; Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Bluefin Tuna Import, Export, Re-Export

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... fish are tagged) (73 FR 31380, June 2, 2008). Improperly documented bluefin tuna may be prohibited from...; Bluefin Tuna Import, Export, Re-Export AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic... commission standards. SUMMARY: Through the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic...

  6. A subtropical fate awaited freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz

    SciTech Connect

    Condron, Alan; Winsor, Peter

    2011-02-10

    The 8.2 kyr event is the largest abrupt climatic change recorded in the last 10,000 years, and is widely hypothesized to have been triggered by the release of thousands of kilometers cubed of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean. Using a high-resolution (1/6°) global, ocean-ice circulation model we present an alternative view that freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz would have remained on the continental shelf as a narrow, buoyant, coastal current, and would have been transported south into the subtropical North Atlantic. The pathway we describe is in contrast to the conceptual idea that freshwater from this lake outburst spread over most of the sub-polar North Atlantic, and covered the deep, open-ocean, convection regions. This coastally confined freshwater pathway is consistent with the present-day routing of freshwater from Hudson Bay, as well as paleoceanographic evidence of this event. In this study, using a coarse-resolution (2.6°) version of the same model, we demonstrate that the previously reported spreading of freshwater across the sub-polar North Atlantic results from the inability of numerical models of this resolution to accurately resolve narrow coastal flows, producing instead a diffuse circulation that advects freshwater away from the boundaries. To understand the climatic impact of freshwater released in the past or future (e.g. Greenland and Antarctica), the ocean needs to be modeled at a resolution sufficient to resolve the dynamics of narrow, coastal buoyant flows.

  7. Temporal and spatial variability in export production in the SE Pacific Ocean: evidence from siliceous plankton fluxes and surface sediment assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Oscar E.; Hebbeln, Dierk; Wefer, Gerold

    2001-12-01

    Flux of siliceous plankton and taxonomic composition of diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages were determined from sediment trap samples collected in coastal upwelling-influenced waters off northern Chile (30°S, CH site) under "normal" or non-El Niño (1993-94) and El Niño conditions (1997-98). In addition, concentration of biogenic opal and siliceous plankton, and diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages preserved in surface sediments are provided for a wide area between 27° and 43°S off Chile. Regardless of the year, winter upwelling determines the maximum production pattern of siliceous microorganisms, with diatoms numerically dominating the biogenic opal flux. During the El Niño year the export is markedly lower: on an annual basis, total mass flux diminished by 60%, and diatom and silicoflagellate export by 75%. Major components of the diatom flora maintain much of their regular seasonal cycle of flux maxima and minima during both sampling periods. Neritic resting spores (RS) of Chaetoceros dominate the diatom flux, mirroring the influence of coastal-upwelled waters at the CH trap site. Occurrence of pelagic diatoms species Fragilariopsis doliolus, members of the Rhizosoleniaceae, Azpeitia spp. and Nitzschia interruptestriata, secondary components of the assemblage, reflects the intermingling of warmer waters of the Subtropical Gyre. Dictyocha messanensis dominates the silicoflagellate association almost year-around, but Distephanus pulchra delivers ca. 60% of its annual production in less than three weeks during the winter peak. The siliceous thanatocoenosis is largely dominated by diatoms, whose assemblage shows significant qualitative and quantitative variations from north to south. Between 27° and 35°S, the dominance of RS Chaetoceros, Thalassionema nitzschioides var. nitzschioides and Skeletonema costatum reflects strong export production associated with occurrence of coastal upwelling. Both highest biogenic opal content and diatom concentration

  8. The interaction between sea ice and salinity-dominated ocean circulation: implications for halocline stability and rapid changes of sea ice cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Mari F.; Nilsson, Johan; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.

    2016-02-01

    Changes in the sea ice cover of the Nordic Seas have been proposed to play a key role for the dramatic temperature excursions associated with the Dansgaard-Oeschger events during the last glacial. In this study, we develop a simple conceptual model to examine how interactions between sea ice and oceanic heat and freshwater transports affect the stability of an upper-ocean halocline in a semi-enclosed basin. The model represents a sea ice covered and salinity stratified Nordic Seas, and consists of a sea ice component and a two-layer ocean. The sea ice thickness depends on the atmospheric energy fluxes as well as the ocean heat flux. We introduce a thickness-dependent sea ice export. Whether sea ice stabilizes or destabilizes against a freshwater perturbation is shown to depend on the representation of the diapycnal flow. In a system where the diapycnal flow increases with density differences, the sea ice acts as a positive feedback on a freshwater perturbation. If the diapycnal flow decreases with density differences, the sea ice acts as a negative feedback. However, both representations lead to a circulation that breaks down when the freshwater input at the surface is small. As a consequence, we get rapid changes in sea ice. In addition to low freshwater forcing, increasing deep-ocean temperatures promote instability and the disappearance of sea ice. Generally, the unstable state is reached before the vertical density difference disappears, and the temperature of the deep ocean do not need to increase as much as previously thought to provoke abrupt changes in sea ice.

  9. Quantifying the drivers of ocean-atmosphere CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Williams, Richard G.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    A mechanistic framework for quantitatively mapping the regional drivers of air-sea CO2 fluxes at a global scale is developed. The framework evaluates the interplay between (1) surface heat and freshwater fluxes that influence the potential saturated carbon concentration, which depends on changes in sea surface temperature, salinity and alkalinity, (2) a residual, disequilibrium flux influenced by upwelling and entrainment of remineralized carbon- and nutrient-rich waters from the ocean interior, as well as rapid subduction of surface waters, (3) carbon uptake and export by biological activity as both soft tissue and carbonate, and (4) the effect on surface carbon concentrations due to freshwater precipitation or evaporation. In a steady state simulation of a coarse-resolution ocean circulation and biogeochemistry model, the sum of the individually determined components is close to the known total flux of the simulation. The leading order balance, identified in different dynamical regimes, is between the CO2 fluxes driven by surface heat fluxes and a combination of biologically driven carbon uptake and disequilibrium-driven carbon outgassing. The framework is still able to reconstruct simulated fluxes when evaluated using monthly averaged data and takes a form that can be applied consistently in models of different complexity and observations of the ocean. In this way, the framework may reveal differences in the balance of drivers acting across an ensemble of climate model simulations or be applied to an analysis and interpretation of the observed, real-world air-sea flux of CO2.

  10. Greenland Ice Sheet nutrient export: Towards a reaction-transport model of fjord dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, James; Arndt, Sandra; Wadham, Jemma; Bingham, Rory

    2015-04-01

    Glacial runoff has the potential to deliver large quantities of dissolved and particulate bioavailable nutrients to surrounding marine environments. The marine waters bordering the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) host some of the most productive ecosystems in the world, and possess high socio-economic value from fisheries. Furthermore, the productivity of phytoplankton in the North Atlantic sequesters CO2 from the atmosphere with a potentially important effect on the global coastal ocean CO2 budget. Providing a link between glacier and coastal ocean, fjords are critical components of the marine coastal system in this region, acting as both transfer routes and sinks for glacial nutrient export. As such they have the potential to act as significant biogeochemical processors, yet are currently underexplored. We propose to close this knowledge gap by developing a coupled 2D physical-biogeochemical model of the Godthåbsfjord system to quantitatively assess the impact of nutrients exported from the GrIS on fjord primary productivity and biogeochemical dynamics. Here, we present the first results of the hydrodynamic model. Hydrodynamic circulation patterns and freshwater transit times are explored to provide a first understanding of the glacier-fjord-ocean continuum. The hydrodynamic model will be dynamically coupled to a biogeochemical model with the view to providing a comprehensive understanding of the fate of nutrients exported from the GrIS. This will be extended to address the future sensitivity of these coastal systems to a warming climate, knowledge of which is critical when assessing the role of these dynamic and unique environments.

  11. Transport and degradation of dissolved organic matter and associated freshwater pathways in the Laptev Sea (Siberian Arctic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelemann, Jens; Janout, Markus; Koch, Boris; Bauch, Dorothea; Hellmann, Sebastian; Eulenburg, Antje; Heim, Birgit; Kassens, Heidemarie; Timokhov, leonid

    2016-04-01

    The Siberian shelves are seasonally ice-covered and characterized by large freshwater runoff rates from some of the largest rivers on earth. These rivers also provide a considerable amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the Arctic Ocean. With an annual load of about 6 Tg DOC a-1 the Lena River contributes nearly 20 percent of the annual DOC discharge to the Arctic Ocean. We present a comprehensive dataset collected during multiple Laptev Sea expeditions carried out in spring, summer and fall (2010-15) in order to explore the processes controlling the dispersal and degradation of DOM during the river water's passage across the shelf. Our investigations are focused on CDOM (Colored Dissolved Organic Matter), which resembles the DOC concentration, interacts with solar radiation and forms a major fraction of the organic matter pool. Our results show an inverse correlation between salinity and CDOM, which emphasizes its terrigenous source. Further, the spectral slope of CDOM absorption indicates that photochemical bleaching is the main process that reduces the CDOM absorption (~ 20%) in freshwater along its transport across the shelf. The distribution of the Lena river water is primarily controlled by winds in summer. During summers with easterly or southerly winds, the plume remains on the central and northern Laptev shelf, and is available for export into the Arctic Basin. The CDOM-rich river water increases the absorption of solar radiation and enhances warming of a shallow surface layer. This emphasizes the importance of CDOM for sea surface temperatures and lateral ice melt on the shelf and adjacent basin. DOC concentrations in freshwater vary seasonally and become larger with increasing discharge. Our data indicate that the CDOM concentrations are highest during the freshet when landfast ice is still present. Subsequent mixing with local sea ice meltwater lowers CDOM to values that are characteristic for the Lena freshwater during the rest of the year.

  12. A 50 % increase in the mass of terrestrial particles delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Canadian Arctic Ocean) over the last 10 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doxaran, D.; Devred, E.; Babin, M.

    2015-06-01

    Global warming has a significant impact on the regional scale on the Arctic Ocean and surrounding coastal zones (i.e., Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Norway and Russia). The recent increase in air temperature has resulted in increased precipitation along the drainage basins of Arctic rivers. It has also directly impacted land and seawater temperatures with the consequence of melting permafrost and sea ice. An increase in freshwater discharge by main Arctic rivers has been clearly identified in time series of field observations. The freshwater discharge of the Mackenzie River has increased by 25% since 2003. This may have increased the mobilization and transport of various dissolved and particulate substances, including organic carbon, as well as their export to the ocean. The release from land to the ocean of such organic material, which has been sequestered in a frozen state since the Last Glacial Maximum, may significantly impact the Arctic Ocean carbon cycle as well as marine ecosystems. In this study we use 11 years of ocean color satellite data and field observations collected in 2009 to estimate the mass of terrestrial suspended solids and particulate organic carbon delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean). Our results show that during the summer period, the concentration of suspended solids at the river mouth, in the delta zone and in the river plume has increased by 46, 71 and 33%, respectively, since 2003. Combined with the variations observed in the freshwater discharge, this corresponds to a more than 50% increase in the particulate (terrestrial suspended particles and organic carbon) export from the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea.

  13. A 50% increase in the amount of terrestrial particles delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Canadian Arctic Ocean) over the last 10 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doxaran, D.; Devred, E.; Babin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Global warming has a significant impact at the regional scale on the Arctic Ocean and surrounding coastal zones (i.e., Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Norway and Russia). The recent increase in air temperature has resulted in increased precipitations along the drainage basins of Arctic Rivers. It has also directly impacted land and seawater temperatures with the consequence of melting the permafrost and sea-ice. An increase in freshwater discharge by main Arctic rivers has been clearly identified in time series of field observations. The freshwater discharge of the Mackenzie River has increased by 25% since 2003. This may have increased the mobilization and transport of various dissolved and particulate substances, including organic carbon, as well as their export to the ocean. The release from land to the ocean of such organic material, which was sequestered as frozen since the last glacial maximum, may significantly impact the Arctic Ocean carbon cycle as well as marine ecosystems. In this study we use 11 years of ocean-colour satellite data and field observations collected in 2009 to estimate the amount of terrestrial suspended solids and particulate organic carbon delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean). Our results show that during the summer period the concentration of suspended solids at the river mouth, in the delta zone and in the river plume has increased by 46, 71 and 33%, respectively, since 2003. Combined with the variations observed in the freshwater discharge, this corresponds to a more than 50% increase in the particulate (terrestrial suspended particles and organic carbon) export from the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea.

  14. 48 CFR 52.247-51 - Evaluation of Export Offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: Evaluation of Export Offers (JAN 2001) (a) Port handling and ocean charges—other than DOD water terminals. Port handling and ocean charges in tariffs on file with the Bureau of Domestic Regulation, Federal... at the port of loading, and ocean shipping costs from the United States port of loading...

  15. 48 CFR 52.247-51 - Evaluation of Export Offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: Evaluation of Export Offers (JAN 2001) (a) Port handling and ocean charges—other than DOD water terminals. Port handling and ocean charges in tariffs on file with the Bureau of Domestic Regulation, Federal... at the port of loading, and ocean shipping costs from the United States port of loading...

  16. Forcing of the deep ocean circulation in simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Meissner, K. J.; Eby, M.; Weaver, A. J.

    2002-05-01

    From the interpretation of different proxy data it is widely believed that the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation during the maximum of the last ice age ~21,000 years ago was considerably weaker than today. Recent equilibrium simulations with a coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice model successfully simulated a reduction in North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation consistent with reconstructions. Here we examine the influence of different air-sea fluxes on simulated changes in the deep ocean circulation between the Last Glacial Maximum and present day. We find that changes in the oceanic surface freshwater fluxes are the dominant forcing mechanism for the reduced Atlantic overturning. Diminished export of freshwater out of the Atlantic drainage basin through the atmosphere decreases surface salinities in the North Atlantic, leading to less NADW formation in the colder climate. Changes in heat fluxes, which lead to increased sea surface densities in the North Atlantic and therefore to an enhanced overturning, are of secondary importance. Wind stress variations seem to play a negligible role. The degree to which the Atlantic freshwater export and hence the NADW formation are reduced depends on the formulation of the atmospheric hydrological cycle and on the strength of the overturning in the present-day simulation. Simulated changes in sea surface properties for a large variety of overturning strengths are compared with different reconstruction data sets. The results depend strongly on the data set used. Sea surface temperature reconstructions from Climate: Long-Range Investigation, Mapping, and Prediction (CLIMAP) and earlier salinity reconstructions based on planktonic foraminifera are most consistent with a significant reduction of the circulation, while recent reconstructions using dinocyst assemblages allow no unequivocal conclusion.

  17. Variability in drift ice export from the Arctic Ocean to the North Icelandic Shelf over the last 8000 years: A multi-proxy evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabedo-Sanz, Patricia; Belt, Simon T.; Jennings, Anne E.; Andrews, John T.; Geirsdóttir, Áslaug

    2016-08-01

    North Iceland represents a climatically sensitive region, in part, due to its location at the confluence of southward flowing and drift ice-laden polar waters from the Arctic Ocean delivered by the East Greenland Current, and the relatively warm and saline Irminger Current, a northerly flowing branch of the North Atlantic Current. Despite its pivotal location, there is a paucity of high resolution and long-term sea ice records for the region, with some disparities in certain previous investigations. Here, the identification of the biomarker IP25 as a reliable proxy for drift ice for North Iceland has been confirmed by measuring its abundance in surface sediments from the region and comparison of outcomes with documentary records of sea ice and other proxy data. By analysing IP25 in a well-dated marine sediment core from the North Icelandic Shelf (NIS) (MD99-2269), we also provide a high resolution (ca. 25 yr) record of drift sea ice for the region and complement this with a lower resolution record (ca. 100 yr) obtained from a second core site, located further east (JR51-GC35). Statistical treatment of equi-spaced time series reveals strong linear correlations between IP25 and a further drift ice proxy (quartz) in each core. Thus, linear regression analysis between both proxies gave correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.74 and 0.66 for MD99-2269 (25 yr) and JR51-GC35 (100 yr), respectively. Further, the individual proxies were well correlated between the two cores, with R = 0.91 and 0.77 for IP25 and quartz, respectively. The IP25-based sea ice record for MD99-2269, combined with other new biomarker and foraminifera data, and previously published proxy data for primary productivity and sea surface temperature, suggest that the paleoceanographic evolution for the NIS over the last 8 ka can be classified into three main intervals. The early mid Holocene (ca 8-6.2 cal ka BP) was characterized by relatively low or absent drift ice, low primary productivity and relatively

  18. The Central American Seaway and the Late Neogene ocean conveyor belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Birgit; Krebs-Kanzow, Uta; Park, Wonsun

    2013-04-01

    'The great ocean conveyor belt' depicts the large scale exchange of water mass properties between today's oceans. Over the past million years the tectonic evolution of ocean passages altered this pan-oceanic communication. The last such tectonic transformation was the closure of the Central American Seaway (CAS) which represented a low latitude gateway between Pacific and Atlantic prior to 4 million years ago. We use a coupled general circulation model and configure the topography for the past. The Central American Seaway modifies the global ocean circulation and the ocean conveyor belt which implies drastic changes in water mass properties and inter basin heat and freshwater transports. Compared to an experiment with modern basin geometry, a 1000-meter deep passage at the location of today's Isthmus of Panama results in a fundamental change in the warm water route of the conveyor belt while the cold path remains qualitatively unchanged. A transport of 10 Sv from Pacific to Atlantic is associated with the meridional transport in the South Atlantic changing from 10Sv northward to 2 Sv southward. Both Indonesian throughflow and export of warm water from the Indian Ocean across 30S are reduced by about 7 Sv. Analysing transports in density classes we are able to propose a sketch of the late Neogene conveyor belt.

  19. Could massive Arctic sea ice export to the North Atlantic be the real cause of abrupt climate change during the last deglaciation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, A. J.; Condron, A.

    2015-12-01

    Using a coupled ocean-sea ice model (MITgcm), we investigate whether the break-up and mobilization of thick, multiyear, Arctic sea ice might have supplied enough freshwater to the Nordic Seas to reduce North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation and weaken the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Numerical simulations of a Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) environment show the potential for sea ice to grow to ~30m thick, storing ~1.41x105 km3 of freshwater as sea ice in the Arctic (this is ~10 times the volume of freshwater stored in the modern-day Arctic). Releasing this volume of sea ice from the Arctic in 1-yr is equivalent to a high-latitude freshwater forcing of ~4.5 Sv, which is comparable (or larger) in magnitude to most meltwater floods emanating from land-based glacial lakes (e.g. Agassiz) during the last deglaciation. Opening of the Bering Strait and Barents Sea are two plausible mechanisms that may have initiated sea ice mobilization. Opening Bering Strait increases sea ice transport through the Fram Strait by 7% and results in a 22% weakening of AMOC for 2000 years and a >3°C warming in the Arctic basin at 800 m depth. Opening Barents Sea to simulate a collapse of the Fennoscandian ice sheet has little impact on Arctic sea ice and freshwater export to the North Atlantic, but weakens AMOC ~8%. In a simulation with both straits open there is a transition to near-modern sea ice circulation pattern and a 24% reduction in AMOC. Experiments with the Bering Strait open and sea ice artificially capped to 10 m show barely any difference to those when sea ice can grow to ~30m, suggesting that changes in topography have a much greater impact on AMOC than the freshwater forcing from sea ice melting in the Nordic Seas.

  20. Speciation and dynamics of dissolved inorganic nitrogen export in the Danshui River, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.-Y.; Shih, Y.-T.; Huang, J.-C.; Kao, S.-J.; Shiah, F.-K.; Liu, K.-K.

    2014-10-01

    Human-induced excess nitrogen outflowing from land through rivers to oceans has resulted in serious impacts on terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Oceania, which occupies < 2.5% of the global land surface, delivers 12% of the freshwater and dissolved materials to the ocean on a global scale. However, there are few empirical data sets on riverine dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) fluxes in the region, and their dynamics are poorly understood. In this study, a river monitoring network covering different types of land uses and population densities was implemented to investigate the mechanism of DIN export. The results show that DIN concentration/yield varied from ∼20 μM/∼300 kg-N km-2 yr-1 to ∼378 μM/∼10 000 kg-N km-2 yr-1 from the relatively pristine headwaters to the populous estuary. Agriculture and population density control DIN export in less densely populated regions and urban areas, respectively, and runoff controls DIN at the watershed scale. Compared to documented estimates from global models, the observed DIN export from the Danshui River is 2.3 times larger, which results from the region-specific response of DIN yield to dense population and abundant runoff. The dominating DIN species change gradually from NO3- in the headwaters (∼97%) to NH4+ in the estuary (∼60%) following the urbanization gradient. The prominent existence of NH4+ is probably the result of the anaerobic water body and short residence time, unlike in large river basins. Given the analogous watershed characteristics of the Danshui River to the rivers in Oceania, our study could serve as a first example to examine riverine DIN fluxes in Oceania.

  1. The Arctic Ocean in summer: A quasi-synoptic inverse estimate of boundary fluxes and water mass transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, T.; Bacon, S.; Naveira Garabato, A. C.; Aksenov, Y.; Laxon, S. W.; Fahrbach, E.; Beszczynska-MöLler, A.; Hansen, E.; Lee, C. M.; Ingvaldsen, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The first quasi-synoptic estimates of Arctic Ocean and sea ice net fluxes of volume, heat and freshwater are calculated by application of an inverse model to data around the ocean boundary. Hydrographic measurements from four gateways to the Arctic (Bering, Davis, and Fram Straits and the Barents Sea Opening) completely enclose the ocean, and were made within the same 32-day period in summer 2005. The inverse model is formulated as a set of full-depth and density-layer-specific volume and salinity transport conservation equations, with conservation constraints also applied to temperature, but only in non-outcropping layers. The model includes representations of Fram Strait sea ice export and of interior Arctic Ocean diapycnal fluxes. The results show that in summer 2005 the transport-weighted mean properties are, for water entering the Arctic: potential temperature 4.49°C, salinity 34.50 and potential density (σ0) 27.34 kg m-3; and for water leaving the Arctic, including sea ice: 0.25°C, 33.81, and 27.13 kg m-3, respectively. The net effect of the Arctic in summer is to freshen and cool the inflows by 0.69 in salinity and 4.23°C, respectively, and to decrease density by 0.21 kg m-3. The volume transport into the Arctic of waters above ˜1000 m depth is 9.2 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1), and the export (similarly) is 9.3 Sv. The net oceanic and sea ice freshwater flux is 187 ± 48 mSv. The net heat flux (including sea ice) is 189 ± 37 TW, representing loss from the ocean to the atmosphere.

  2. Changes in the North Pacific Ocean biological pump from MIS 5e to MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, G.

    2009-12-01

    Diatom isotope records from the North Pacific Ocean provide an important means by which to further investigate past climatic and oceanographic changes in a region marked by depleted concentrations of foraminifera and other carbonates within the sedimentary record. Combined measurements of diatom oxygen (δ18Odiatom) and silicon (δ30Sidiatom) from ODP Site 882 indicate significant changes in both freshwater input to the region and the biological pump between MIS 5e and MIS 3. Unchanging values of δ18Odiatom and low/moderate values of δ30Sidiatom suggest relatively stable oceanographic conditions during MIS 5e until a marked, freshwater induced, decrease in δ18Odiatom at the MIS 5e/d boundary. Increases in opal concentrations and δ30Sidiatom to values of 1.2-1.3‰ between MIS 5d and MIS 5b indicate a subsequent increase in nutrient utilisation and export production. With these changes coinciding with a progressive long-term decrease in atmospheric pCO2, the North West Pacific Ocean may have assisted in lowering pCO2 and driving the climatic system into the glacial conditions that prevailed during the last glacial. Subsequent changes in δ30Sidiatom/nutrient utilisation from MIS 5a to MIS 3 covary with δ18Odiatom inferred changes in freshwater input to the region, indicating a long-term regulation of the regional biological pump via a strengthening/weakening of the halocline stratification.

  3. When can ocean acidification impacts be detected from decadal alkalinity measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. R.; Frölicher, T. L.; Dunne, J. P.; Rodgers, K. B.; Slater, R. D.; Sarmiento, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    We use a large initial condition suite of simulations (30 runs) with an Earth system model to assess the detectability of biogeochemical impacts of ocean acidification (OA) on the marine alkalinity distribution from decadally repeated hydrographic measurements such as those produced by the Global Ship-Based Hydrographic Investigations Program (GO-SHIP). Detection of these impacts is complicated by alkalinity changes from variability and long-term trends in freshwater and organic matter cycling and ocean circulation. In our ensemble simulation, variability in freshwater cycling generates large changes in alkalinity that obscure the changes of interest and prevent the attribution of observed alkalinity redistribution to OA. These complications from freshwater cycling can be mostly avoided through salinity normalization of alkalinity. With the salinity-normalized alkalinity, modeled OA impacts are broadly detectable in the surface of the subtropical gyres by 2030. Discrepancies between this finding and the finding of an earlier analysis suggest that these estimates are strongly sensitive to the patterns of calcium carbonate export simulated by the model. OA impacts are detectable later in the subpolar and equatorial regions due to slower responses of alkalinity to OA in these regions and greater seasonal equatorial alkalinity variability. OA impacts are detectable later at depth despite lower variability due to smaller rates of change and consistent measurement uncertainty.

  4. Methanotrophy controls groundwater methane export from a barrier island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutte, Charles A.; Wilson, Alicia M.; Evans, Tyler; Moore, Willard S.; Joye, Samantha B.

    2016-04-01

    Methane concentrations can be high in coastal groundwater, resulting in methane export driven by submarine groundwater discharge. However, the magnitude of this methane flux depends significantly on the rate of methanotrophy, the often overlooked process of microbial methane consumption that occurs within coastal aquifer sediments. Here we describe a zone of methanogenesis within the freshwater lens of a barrier island aquifer and investigate the methane source/sink behavior of the barrier island system as a whole. The median concentration of methane dissolved in fresh groundwater beneath the center of the island was 0.6 mM, supported by high rates of potential methanogenesis (22 mmol m-2 day-1). However, rates of microbial methane consumption were also elevated in surrounding sediments (18 mmol m-2 day-1). Groundwater flowing from the zone of methanogenesis to the point of discharge into the ocean had a long residence time within methanotrophic sediments (∼195 days) such that the majority of the methane produced within the barrier island aquifer was likely consumed there.

  5. A subtropical fate awaited freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz

    DOE PAGES

    Condron, Alan; Winsor, Peter

    2011-02-10

    The 8.2 kyr event is the largest abrupt climatic change recorded in the last 10,000 years, and is widely hypothesized to have been triggered by the release of thousands of kilometers cubed of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean. Using a high-resolution (1/6°) global, ocean-ice circulation model we present an alternative view that freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz would have remained on the continental shelf as a narrow, buoyant, coastal current, and would have been transported south into the subtropical North Atlantic. The pathway we describe is in contrast to the conceptual idea that freshwater from this lake outburstmore » spread over most of the sub-polar North Atlantic, and covered the deep, open-ocean, convection regions. This coastally confined freshwater pathway is consistent with the present-day routing of freshwater from Hudson Bay, as well as paleoceanographic evidence of this event. In this study, using a coarse-resolution (2.6°) version of the same model, we demonstrate that the previously reported spreading of freshwater across the sub-polar North Atlantic results from the inability of numerical models of this resolution to accurately resolve narrow coastal flows, producing instead a diffuse circulation that advects freshwater away from the boundaries. To understand the climatic impact of freshwater released in the past or future (e.g. Greenland and Antarctica), the ocean needs to be modeled at a resolution sufficient to resolve the dynamics of narrow, coastal buoyant flows.« less

  6. Evolution of the Freshwater Eels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Jun; Tsukamoto, Katsumi

    The freshwater anguillid eels have an unusual life history and world-wide distribution. Questions about the phylogenetic relationships of this group and how their long spawning migrations and larval phase may contribute to their global distribution have not been addressed. This paper is first presentation of molecular phylogeny of Anguilla species, and based on this phylogenetic tree we suggest new aspect of the evolution of this group. Namely, ancestral eels originated during the Eocene or earlier, in the western Pacific Ocean near present-day Indonesia. A group derived from this ancestor dispersed westward, probably by larval transport in the global circum-equatorial current through the northern edge of the Tethys Sea. This group split into the ancestor of the European and American eels, which entered into the Atlantic Ocean, and a second group, which dispersed southward and split into the east African species and Australian species. Thus the world-wide distribution of the eel family can be understood from knowledge of continental drift, ocean currents, a specialized larva and evolutionary forces favoring dispersal and speciation of segregated gene pool.

  7. Ocean nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.; Hurd, Catriona L.

    Nutrients provide the chemical life-support system for phytoplankton in the ocean. Together with the carbon fixed during photosynthesis, nutrients provide the other elements, such as N and P, needed to synthesize macromolecules to build cellular constituents such as ribosomes. The makeup of these various biochemicals, such as proteins, pigments, and nucleic acids, together determine the elemental stoichiometry of an individual phytoplankton cell. The stoichiometry of different phytoplankton species or groups will vary depending on the proportions of distinct cellular machinery, such as for growth or resource acquisition, they require for their life strategies. The uptake of nutrients by phytoplankton helps to set the primary productivity, and drives the biological pump, of the global ocean. In the case of nitrogen, the supply of nutrients is categorized as either new or regenerated. The supply of new nitrogen, such as nitrate upwelled from the ocean' interior or biological nitrogen fixation, is equal to the vertical export of particular organic matter from the upper ocean on a timescale of years. Nutrients such as silica can also play a structural role in some phytoplankton groups, such as diatoms, where they are used to synthesize a siliceous frustule that offers some mechanical protection from grazers. In this chapter, we also explore nutrient uptake kinetics, patterns in nutrient distributions in space and time, the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, the atmospheric supply of nutrients, departures from the Redfield ratio, and whether nutrient distributions and cycling will be altered in the future

  8. Freshwater mussels of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, James D.; Butler, Robert S.; Warren, Gary L.; Johnson, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    An exhaustive guide to all aspects of the freshwater mussel fauna in Florida,Freshwater Mussels of Florida covers the ecology, biology, distribution, and conservation of the many species of bivalve mollusks in the Sunshine State. In the past three decades, researchers, the public, businesses that depend on wildlife, and policy makers have given more attention to the threatened natural diversity of the Southeast, including freshwater mussels. This compendium meets the increasingly urgent need to catalog this imperiled group of aquatic organisms in the United States.

  9. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  10. Evidence of local short-distance spawning migration of tropical freshwater eels, and implications for the evolution of freshwater eel migration

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Takaomi

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater eels have fascinated biologists for centuries due to the spectacular long-distance migrations between the eels’ freshwater habitats and their spawning areas far out in the ocean and the mysteries of their ecology. The spawning areas of Atlantic eels and Japanese eel were located far offshore in the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, respectively, and their reproduction took place thousands of kilometers away from their growth habitats. Phylogenetic studies have revealed that freshwater eels originated in the Indonesian region. However, remarkably little is known about the life histories of tropical freshwater eels despite the fact that tropical eels are key to understanding the nature of primitive forms of catadromous migration. This study found spawning-condition tropical freshwater eels in Lake Poso, central Sulawesi, Indonesia, with considerably high gonadosomatic index values and with histologically fully developed gonads. This study provides the first evidence that under certain conditions, freshwater eels have conditions that are immediately able to spawn even in river downstream. The results suggest that, in contrast to the migrations made by the Atlantic and Japanese eels, freshwater eels originally migrated only short distances of <100 kilometers to local spawning areas adjacent to their freshwater growth habitats. Ancestral eels most likely underwent a catadromous migration from local short-distance movements in tropical coastal waters to the long-distance migrations characteristic of present-day temperate eels, which has been well established as occurring in subtropical gyres in both hemispheres. PMID:25614795

  11. Observing the Arctic Ocean under melting ice - the UNDER-ICE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagen, Hanne; Ullgren, Jenny; Geyer, Florian; Bergh, Jon; Hamre, Torill; Sandven, Stein; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Falck, Eva; Gammelsrød, Tor; Worcester, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean is gradually diminishing in area and thickness. The variability of the ice cover is determined by heat exchange with both the atmosphere and the ocean. A cold water layer with a strong salinity gradient insulates the sea ice from below, preventing direct contact with the underlying warm Atlantic water. Changes in water column stratification might therefore lead to faster erosion of the ice. As the ice recedes, larger areas of surface water are open to wind mixing; the effect this might have on the water column structure is not yet clear. The heat content in the Arctic strongly depends on heat transport from other oceans. The Fram Strait is a crucial pathway for the exchange between the Arctic and the Atlantic Ocean. Two processes of importance for the Arctic heat and freshwater budget and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation take place here: poleward heat transport by the West Spitzbergen Current and freshwater export by the East Greenland Current. A new project, Arctic Ocean under Melting Ice (UNDER-ICE), aims to improve our understanding of the ocean circulation, water mass distribution, fluxes, and mixing processes, sea ice processes, and net community primary production in ice-covered areas and the marginal ice zone in the Fram Strait and northward towards the Gakkel Ridge. The interdisciplinary project brings together ocean acoustics, physical oceanography, marine biology, and sea ice research. A new programme of observations, integrated with satellite data and state-of-the-art numerical models, will be started in order to improve the estimates of heat, mass, and freshwater transport between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean. On this poster we present the UNDER-ICE project, funded by the Research Council of Norway and GDF Suez E&P Norge AS for the years 2014-2017, and place it in context of the legacy of earlier projects in the area, such as ACOBAR. A mooring array for acoustic tomography combined with

  12. Information to help reduce environmental impacts from freshwater oil spills

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, D.E.; Steen, A.E.

    1995-12-31

    The American Petroleum Institute (API) has been working since 1990 to provide information to help the response community minimize the impact of spills to pared jointly with the US inland freshwater. Projects have included a manual, pre National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), to give guidance on the cleanup techniques that will minimize environmental impacts on spills in freshwater habitats. Nearing completion are a literature review and annotated bibliography of the environmental and human health effects of oil spilled in freshwater habitats. The use of chemical treating agents for freshwater spill applications is being studied with input from other industry and government groups. A project has begun, with funding from API, the Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research and Development Program, NOAA, the Marine Spill Response Corporation (MSRC), and the US Department of Energy, to evaluate in situ burning of oil spilled in marshes.

  13. Effects of Acid rain on freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Schindler, D W

    1988-01-01

    Acid-vulnerable areas are more numerous and widespread than believed 7 years ago. Lakes and streams in acid-vulnerable areas of northeastern North America have suffered substantial declines in acid-neutralizing capacity, the worst cases resulting in biological damage. Many invertebrates are very sensitive to acidification, with some disappearing at pH values as high as 6.0. However, the recent rate of acidification of lakes is slower than once predicted, in part the result of decreases in sulfur oxide emissions. A discussion of some of the processes that have contributed to the acidification of lakes as well as those that have protected acid-sensitive freshwaters is presented. The author is in the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Freshwater Institute, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N6, Canada.

  14. Multimodel simulations of Arctic Ocean sea surface height variability in the period 1970-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldunov, Nikolay V.; Serra, Nuno; Köhl, Armin; Stammer, Detlef; Henry, Olivier; Cazenave, Anny; Prandi, Pierre; Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Gao, Yongqi; Johannessen, Johnny

    2014-12-01

    The performance of several numerical ocean models is assessed with respect to their simulation of sea surface height (SSH) in the Arctic Ocean, and the main patterns of SSH variability and their causes over the past 40 years (1970-2009) are analyzed. In comparison to observations, all tested models broadly reproduce the mean SSH in the Arctic and reveal a good correlation with both tide gauge data and SSH anomalies derived from satellite observations. Although the models do not represent the positive Arctic SSH trend observed over the last two decades, their interannual-to-decadal SSH variability is in reasonable agreement with available measurements. Focusing on results from one of the models for a detailed analysis, it is shown that the decadal-scale SSH variability over shelf areas and deep parts of the Arctic Ocean have pronounced differences that are determined mostly by salinity variations. A further analysis of the three time periods 1987-1992, 1993-2002, and 2003-2009, corresponding to the transition times between cyclonic and anticyclonic regimes of the atmospheric circulation over the Arctic, revealed an unusual increase of SSH in the Amerasian basin during 2003-2009. Results from this model support the recent finding that the increase is caused mainly by changes in freshwater content brought about by the freshwater export through the Canadian Arctic Archiplago and increased Ekman pumping in the Amerasian basin and partly by lateral freshwater transport changes, leading to a redistribution of low-salinity shelf water. Overall, we show that present-day models can be used for investigating the reasons for low-frequency SSH variability in the region.

  15. Modeling ocean and sea ice dynamics of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago: Aspects of forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wekerle, Claudia; Wang, Qiang; Danilov, Sergey; Myers, Paul G.; Jung, Thomas; Schröter, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) is one of the main pathways for freshwater exiting the Arctic Ocean. Freshwater exported to the North Atlantic may influence the deep water formation in the Labrador Sea, and thus the meridional overturning circulation. Modeling ocean and sea ice conditions of the CAA is difficult because of narrow straits and complex coastlines. The Finite-Element Sea-ice Ocean circulation Model (FESOM) configured on a global mesh is applied to assess the volume, freshwater and sea ice transports through the CAA. With a mesh resolution of 5 km in the CAA we are able to accurately resolve complex coastlines. Outside the CAA the mesh is refined to 24 km north of 55°N with a global background resolution of 1.5°. In this study, first, it is shown that the transports modeled with FESOM correlate well with the available observational data. Second, the model is used to learn about the impact of different atmospheric forcing datasets differing in spatial and temporal resolution (CORE 2 and the Reforecast dataset from Environment Canada). The CORE 2 dataset is on the T62 grid, which is coarse compared to the Reforecast dataset with grid resolution of 0.45° longitude and 0.3° latitude. The temporal resolution of the Reforecast dataset is higher than the CORE 2 dataset (one hourly and 6-hourly data, respectively, for wind, surface temperature and specific humidity fields). The representation of sea ice in the CAA can be improved by using the high resolution atmospheric forcing.

  16. Vectors of invasions in freshwater invertebrates and fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Pam L.; Canning-Clode, João

    2015-01-01

    Without human assistance, the terrestrial environment and oceans represent barriers to the dispersal of freshwater aquatic organisms. The ability to overcome such barriers depends on the existence of anthropogenic vectors that can transport live organisms to new areas, and the species’ biology to survive the transportation and transplantation into the new environment (Johnson et al., 2006).

  17. Freshwater Education: The Need, The Tools, and The "Vital Link."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shroeder, Linda

    1984-01-01

    Freshwater education programs are beginning to instill in young people a sense of awareness and a sense of responsibility regarding the future of water resources. Several of these programs are discussed, including Project COAST (Coastal, Oceanic, and Aquatic Studies) and "Acid Precipitation Learning Materials, Grades 7-12." (JN)

  18. Ocean acidification in the Western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, W.; Chen, B.; Chen, L.

    2011-12-01

    We report carbonate chemistry and ocean acidification status in the western Arctic Ocean from 65-88οN based on data collected in summer 2008 and 2010. In the marginal seas, surface waters have high pH and high carbonate saturation state (Ω) due to intensive biological uptake of CO2. In the southern Canada Basin, surface waters have low pH and low Ω due to the uptake of atmospheric CO2 and sea-ice melt. In the northern Arctic Ocean basin, there is no serious ocean acidification in surface water due to heavy ice-coverage but pH and Ω in the subsurface waters at the oxygen minimum and nutrient maximum zone (at 100-150 m) are low due mostly to respiration-derived CO2 and an increased biological production and export in surface waters. Such multitude responses of ocean carbonate chemistry (northern vs. southern basin, basins vs. margins, and surface vs. subsurface) to climate changes are unique to the Arctic Ocean system. We will explore biogeochemical control mechanisms on carbonate chemistry and ocean acidification in the Arctic Ocean environments in the context of recent warming and sea-ice retreat.

  19. Industrialisation, Exports and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabolo, Yves

    1980-01-01

    After reviewing trends in industrial production, exports, and employment in the Third World since 1960, the author discusses industrialization strategies based on the local processing of raw materials for export. Such processing has proved to be a major factor in job creation. (Author/SK)

  20. JPL Export Compliance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momjian, E.; Lam, C.

    2000-01-01

    The transfer of commodities, software, or technlogies to foreign persons is subject to U.S. export control laws and regulations. These export controls are applicable, regardless of whether the transfer occurs in the U.S. or outside of the U.S.

  1. Freshwater Marsh. Habitat Pac.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of an overview, three lesson plans and student data sheets, and a poster. The overview describes how the freshwater marsh is an important natural resource for plant, animal, and human populations and how the destruction of marshes causes…

  2. 76 FR 23598 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI..., Officers: AiChu Sun-Franck, Sec./Dir. Of Ocean Export Operations (Qualifying Individual), Bryan D....

  3. 77 FR 12583 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI..., Dulles, VA 20166, Officers: Philippe Pierson, Vice President of Ocean Exports (Qualifying...

  4. Freshwater aspects of anadromous salmonid enhancement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, Rowan W.

    1982-01-01

    Freshwater enhancement of anadromous salmonid populations has been practiced in the United States and Canada since the late 1800's. Reduction of natural spawning habitat and increasing fishing pressure make artificial enhancement a possible alternative to declining populations. Enhancement of anadromous salmonids involved improvement of the natural environment and reducing natural mortality. Methods of enhancement include fishways, spawning and rearing channels, stream rehabilitation, lake fertilization, environmental management, and artificial propagation techniques. Five Pacific salmon species and steelhead trout are commonly enhanced, primarily in watershed entering the Pacific Ocean and Great Lakes. Enhancement efforts contribute heavily to a commercial and sport industry realizing over $1.5 billion.

  5. Freshwater runoff and salinity distribution in the Loxahatchee River estuary, southeastern Florida, 1980-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.M.; McPherson, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    During a recent study, freshwater mixed with seawater over a distance of 5 to 10 river miles in the Loxahatchee River estuary. Large freshwater inflows vertically stratified the estuary and shifted the mixing zone seaward. In the northwest fork of the estuary, the saltwater-freshwater interface moved daily about 0.5 to 1.5 river miles as a result of tides and annually about 3 to 5 miles as a result of seasonal changes in freshwater inflow. In the southwest fork, saltwater movement upstream was blocked by a gate and dam structure in Canal-18, 4.7 miles upstream from the Atlantic Ocean. Although Canal-18 discharged about one-third of the total freshwater tributary inflow to the estuary, the effects of canal discharge on salinity were limited to relatively brief periods. Much of the time, no freshwater was discharged. 15 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. 75 FR 34100 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ...: Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat from the People's Republic of China, 62 FR 48218 (September 15, 1997). On... Republic of China; Preliminary Results of New Shipper Review, 64 FR 8543 (February 22, 1999) (1999 Crawfish... Administration of Export Commodities. See 1999 Crawfish NSR Preliminary Results, 64 FR at 8544. Xiping...

  7. Oceanic transport of surface meltwater from the southern Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hao; Castelao, Renato M.; Rennermalm, Asa K.; Tedesco, Marco; Bracco, Annalisa; Yager, Patricia L.; Mote, Thomas L.

    2016-07-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has undergone accelerating mass losses during recent decades. Freshwater runoff from ice melt can influence fjord circulation and dynamics and the delivery of bioavailable micronutrients to the ocean. It can also have climate implications, because stratification in the adjacent Labrador Sea may influence deep convection and the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Yet, the fate of the meltwater in the ocean remains unclear. Here, we use a high-resolution ocean model to show that only 1-15% of the surface meltwater runoff originating from southwest Greenland is transported westwards. In contrast, up to 50-60% of the meltwater runoff originating from southeast Greenland is transported westwards into the northern Labrador Sea, leading to significant salinity and stratification anomalies far from the coast. Doubling meltwater runoff, as predicted in future climate scenarios, results in a more-than-double increase in anomalies offshore that persists further into the winter. Interannual variability in offshore export of meltwater is tightly related to variability in wind forcing. The new insight that meltwaters originating from the west and east coasts have different fates indicates that future changes in mass loss rates and surface runoff will probably impact the ocean differently, depending on their Greenland origins.

  8. Oceanic Transport of Surface Meltwater from the Southern Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Hao; Castelao, Renato M.; Rennermalm, Asa K.; Tedesco, Marco; Bracco, Annalisa; Yager, Patricia L.; Mote, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has undergone accelerating mass losses during recent decades. Freshwater runoff from ice melt can influence fjord circulation and dynamic1 and the delivery of bioavailable micronutrients to the ocean. It can also have climate implications, because stratification in the adjacent Labrador Sea may influence deep convection and the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Yet, the fate of the meltwater in the ocean remains unclear. Here, we use a high-resolution ocean model to show that only 1-15% of the surface meltwater runoff originating from southwest Greenland is transported westwards. In contrast, up to 50-60% of the meltwater runoff originating from southeast Greenland is transported westwards into the northern Labrador Sea, leading to significant salinity and stratification anomalies far from the coast. Doubling meltwater runoff, as predicted in future climate scenarios, results in a more-than-double increase in anomalies offshore that persists further into the winter. Interannual variability in offshore export of meltwater is tightly related to variability in wind forcing. The new insight that meltwaters originating from the west and east coasts have different fates indicates that future changes in mass loss rates and surface runoff will probably impact the ocean differently, depending on their Greenland origins.

  9. Impacts of permafrost degradation on the riverine delivery of organic matter, inorganic nutrients, and major ions to the Arctic Ocean (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, K. E.

    2009-12-01

    Over the next century, near-surface permafrost across the circumpolar Arctic is expected to degrade significantly, particularly for land areas south of 70°N. This is likely to cause widespread impacts on the riverine delivery of organic matter, inorganic nutrients, and major ions to the Arctic Ocean. These interacting processes can be highly complex and undoubtedly exhibit spatial and temporal variability associated with current permafrost conditions, sensitivity to permafrost thaw, mode of permafrost degradation, and/or environmental characteristics of watersheds. Here, we present measurements of biogeochemical constituents from nearly 100 streams and rivers across West Siberia, a region that contains the world's largest stores of peat carbon, exports massive volumes of freshwater to the Arctic Ocean, and is warming faster than the Arctic as a whole. These measurements show that cold, permafrost-influenced watersheds release little dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), or total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) to streams, regardless of the extent of peatland cover. However, considerably higher concentrations are found in warm, permafrost-free watersheds, rising sharply as a function of peatland cover. This suggests that by the year 2100, impacts of warming and permafrost degradation may cause ~29-53% increases in DOC, DON, and TDP fluxes to the Arctic Ocean. Additionally, measurements of total inorganic solutes (TIS) in permafrost-free watersheds currently exhibit six times higher concentrations than in permafrost-influenced watersheds, suggesting that should permafrost in the region completely disappear, TIS export from the West Siberian region to the Arctic Ocean would increase by ~59%. Such increases in the export of biogeochemical constituents could have important implications for future biological productivity in arctic Eurasian shelf waters and the Arctic Ocean basin interior.

  10. Anticipated Improvements to Net Surface Freshwater Fluxes from GPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.

    2005-01-01

    Evaporation and precipitation over the oceans play very important roles in the global water cycle, upper-ocean heat budget, ocean dynamics, and coupled ocean-atmosphere dynamics. In the conventional representation of the terrestrial water cycle, the assumed role of the oceans is to act as near-infinite reservoirs of water with the main drivers of the water cycle being land- atmosphere interactions in which excess precipitation (P) over evaporation (E) is returned to the oceans as surface runoff and baseflow. Whereas this perspective is valid for short space and time scales -- fundamental principles, available observed estimates, and results from models indicate that the oceans play a far more important role in the large-scale water cycle at seasonal and longer timescales. Approximately 70-80% of the total global evaporation and precipitation occurs over oceans. Moreover, latent heat release into the atmosphere over the oceans is the major heat source driving global atmospheric circulations, with the moisture transported by circulations from oceans to continents being the major source of water precipitating over land. Notably, the major impediment in understanding and modeling the oceans role in the global water cycle is the lack of reliable net surface freshwater flux estimates (E - P fluxes) at the salient spatial and temporal resolutions, i.e., consistent coupled weekly to monthly E - P gridded datasets.

  11. Acidification of freshwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Cresser, M.S.; Edwards, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    This volume gives an account that draws not only on the main branches of chemistry but also on soil physics, chemistry, hydrology, meteorology, geography, geology, plant physiology, soil microbiology and zoology. The author examine the numerous interacting physical, chemical, and biological, processes that regulate the acidity of freshwaters, a phenomenon that has various causes, including precipitation; acidifying pollutions; and the interaction of plants, soils and water. The relative importance of the different processes is examined.

  12. Interannual variability of the Arctic freshwater cycle in the second half of the twentieth century in a regionally coupled climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederdrenk, Anne Laura; Sein, Dmitry V.; Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    We use a regionally coupled ocean-sea ice-atmosphere-hydrological discharge model to investigate the influence of changes in the atmospheric large-scale circulation on the interannual variability of the Arctic freshwater (FW) components. This model includes all sinks and sources of FW and allows for the analysis of a closed FW cycle in the Arctic. We show that few atmospheric winter modes explain large parts of the interannual variability of the Arctic FW cycle. A strong Icelandic low causing anomalous strong westerlies over the North Atlantic leads to warmer and wetter conditions over Eurasia. The ocean circulation is then characterized by a strong transpolar drift leading to increased export of FW in liquid and solid form into the North Atlantic. In contrast to this, a weaker than usual Icelandic low and a strong Siberian high is associated with a strong Beaufort Gyre and thus an accumulation of FW within the Arctic Ocean. Not only specific winter conditions but also increased precipitation in late spring and summer, caused by enhanced cyclone activity over land, lead to increased Eurasian runoff, which is responsible for most of the variability in Arctic river runoff.

  13. Freshwater wetlands and wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Sharitz, R.R.; Gibbons, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    This volume is a product of the Freshwater Wetlands and Wildlife symposium held in Charleston, South Carolina, on March 24--27, 1986 and contains 94 papers. The stimulus for the symposium came from our interest in augmenting the findings of the long-term research programs on freshwater wetlands and wildlife that have been carried out on the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The symposium provided a forum on an international scale for the exchange of data about freshwater ecosystems: their functions, uses, and their future. The papers in this volume address issues related to natural, man-managed, and degraded ecosystems. The volume is divided into two sections. The first section deals with the functions and values of wetlands, including their use as habitat for plants and animals, their role in trophic dynamics, and their basic processes. The second section treats the subject of their status and management, including techniques for assessing their value, laws for protecting them, and plans for properly managing them. Individual papers will be indexed and entered separately on the energy data base.

  14. Anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon fluxes from land to ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, Pierre; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Ciais, Philippe; MacKenzie, Fred T.; Gruber, Nicolas; Janssens, Ivan A.; Laruelle, Goulven G.; Lauerwald, Ronny; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Andersson, Andreas J.; Arndt, Sandra; Arnosti, Carol; Borges, Alberto V.; Dale, Andrew W.; Gallego-Sala, Angela; Goddéris, Yves; Goossens, Nicolas; Hartmann, Jens; Heinze, Christoph; Ilyina, Tatiana; Joos, Fortunat; Larowe, Douglas E.; Leifeld, Jens; Meysman, Filip J. R.; Munhoven, Guy; Raymond, Peter A.; Spahni, Renato; Suntharalingam, Parvadha; Thullner, Martin

    2013-08-01

    A substantial amount of the atmospheric carbon taken up on land through photosynthesis and chemical weathering is transported laterally along the aquatic continuum from upland terrestrial ecosystems to the ocean. So far, global carbon budget estimates have implicitly assumed that the transformation and lateral transport of carbon along this aquatic continuum has remained unchanged since pre-industrial times. A synthesis of published work reveals the magnitude of present-day lateral carbon fluxes from land to ocean, and the extent to which human activities have altered these fluxes. We show that anthropogenic perturbation may have increased the flux of carbon to inland waters by as much as 1.0 Pg C yr-1 since pre-industrial times, mainly owing to enhanced carbon export from soils. Most of this additional carbon input to upstream rivers is either emitted back to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide (~0.4 Pg C yr-1) or sequestered in sediments (~0.5 Pg C yr-1) along the continuum of freshwater bodies, estuaries and coastal waters, leaving only a perturbation carbon input of ~0.1 Pg C yr-1 to the open ocean. According to our analysis, terrestrial ecosystems store ~0.9 Pg C yr-1 at present, which is in agreement with results from forest inventories but significantly differs from the figure of 1.5 Pg C yr-1 previously estimated when ignoring changes in lateral carbon fluxes. We suggest that carbon fluxes along the land-ocean aquatic continuum need to be included in global carbon dioxide budgets.

  15. EFFECT OF RESIDENCE TIME ON ANNUAL EXPORT AND DENITRIFICATION OF NITROGEN IN ESTUARIES: A MODEL ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple model of annual average response of an estuary to mean nitrogen loading rate and freshwater residence time was developed and tested. It uses nitrogen inputs from land, deposition from the atmosphere, and first-order calculations of internal loss rate and export to perfor...

  16. Ocean Observations of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Don

    2016-01-01

    The ocean influences climate by storing and transporting large amounts of heat, freshwater, and carbon, and exchanging these properties with the atmosphere. About 93% of the excess heat energy stored by the earth over the last 50 years is found in the ocean. More than three quarters of the total exchange of water between the atmosphere and the earth's surface through evaporation and precipitation takes place over the oceans. The ocean contains 50 times more carbon than the atmosphere and is at present acting to slow the rate of climate change by absorbing one quarter of human emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning, cement production, deforestation and other land use change.Here I summarize the observational evidence of change in the ocean, with an emphasis on basin- and global-scale changes relevant to climate. These include: changes in subsurface ocean temperature and heat content, evidence for regional changes in ocean salinity and their link to changes in evaporation and precipitation over the oceans, evidence of variability and change of ocean current patterns relevant to climate, observations of sea level change and predictions over the next century, and biogeochemical changes in the ocean, including ocean acidification.

  17. How is the ocean filled?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbie, Geoffrey; Huybers, Peter

    2011-03-01

    The ocean surface rapidly exchanges heat, freshwater, and gases with the atmosphere, but once water sinks into the ocean interior, the inherited properties of seawater are closely conserved. Previous water-mass decompositions have described the oceanic interior as being filled by just a few different property combinations, or water masses. Here we apply a new inversion technique to climatological tracer distributions to find the pathways by which the ocean is filled from over 10,000 surface regions, based on the discretization of the ocean surface at 2° by 2° resolution. The volume of water originating from each surface location is quantified in a global framework, and can be summarized by the estimate that 15% of the surface area fills 85% of the ocean interior volume. Ranked from largest to smallest, the volume contributions scaled by surface area follow a power-law distribution with an exponent of -1.09 ± 0.03 that appears indicative of the advective-diffusive filling characteristics of the ocean circulation, as demonstrated using a simple model. This work quantifies the connection between the surface and interior ocean, allowing insight into ocean composition, atmosphere-ocean interaction, and the transient response of the ocean to a changing climate.

  18. Effects of pollution on freshwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, G.L.; Harden, M.J.; Leonard, E.N.; Roush, T.H; Spehar, D.L.; Stephan, C.E.; Pickering, Q.H.; Buikema, A.L. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    This review includes subjects in last year's reviews on effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates and effects of pollution on freshwater fish and amphibians. This review also includes information on the effects of pollution on freshwater plants. 625 references.

  19. Landscape scale controls on the vascular plant component of dissolved organic carbon across a freshwater delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckard, Robert S.; Hernes, Peter J.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Kendall, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Lignin phenol concentrations and compositions were determined on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) extracts (XAD resins) within the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (the Delta), the tidal freshwater portion of the San Francisco Bay Estuary, located in central California, USA. Fourteen stations were sampled, including the following habitats and land-use types: wetland, riverine, channelized waterway, open water, and island drains. Stations were sampled approximately seasonally from December, 1999 through May, 2001. DOC concentrations ranged from 1.3 mg L-1 within the Sacramento River to 39.9 mg L-1 at the outfall from an island drain (median 3.0 mg L-1), while lignin concentrations ranged from 3.0 μL-1 within the Sacramento River to 111 μL-1 at the outfall from an island drain (median 11.6 μL-1). Both DOC and lignin concentrations varied significantly among habitat/land-use types and among sampling stations. Carbon-normalized lignin yields ranged from 0.07 mg (100 mg OC)-1 at an island drain to 0.84 mg (100 mg OC)-1 for a wetland (median 0.36 mg (100 mg OC)-1), and also varied significantly among habitat/land-use types. A simple mass balance model indicated that the Delta acted as a source of lignin during late autumn through spring (10-83% increase) and a sink for lignin during summer and autumn (13-39% decrease). Endmember mixing models using S:V and C:V signatures of landscape scale features indicated strong temporal variation in sources of DOC export from the Delta, with riverine source signatures responsible for 50% of DOC in summer and winter, wetland signatures responsible for 40% of DOC in summer, winter, and late autumn, and island drains responsible for 40% of exported DOC in late autumn. A significant negative correlation was observed between carbon-normalized lignin yields and DOC bioavailability in two of the 14 sampling stations. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to describe organic vascular plant DOC sources at the level of localized

  20. High export of dissolved silica from the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meire, L.; Meire, P.; Struyf, E.; Krawczyk, D. W.; Arendt, K. E.; Yde, J. C.; Juul Pedersen, T.; Hopwood, M. J.; Rysgaard, S.; Meysman, F. J. R.

    2016-09-01

    Silica is an essential element for marine life and plays a key role in the biogeochemistry of the ocean. Glacial activity stimulates rock weathering, generating dissolved silica that is exported to coastal areas along with meltwater. The magnitude of the dissolved silica export from large glacial areas such as the Greenland Ice Sheet is presently poorly quantified and not accounted for in global budgets. Here we present data from two fjord systems adjacent to the Greenland Ice Sheet which reveal a large export of dissolved silica by glacial meltwater relative to other macronutrients. Upscaled to the entire Greenland Ice Sheet, the export of dissolved silica equals 22 ± 10 Gmol Si yr-1. When the silicate-rich meltwater mixes with upwelled deep water, either inside or outside Greenland's fjords, primary production takes place at increased silicate to nitrate ratios. This likely stimulates the growth of diatoms relative to other phytoplankton groups.

  1. Carbon export algorithm advancements in models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çağlar Yumruktepe, Veli; Salihoğlu, Barış

    2015-04-01

    The rate at which anthropogenic CO2 is absorbed by the oceans remains a critical question under investigation by climate researchers. Construction of a complete carbon budget, requires better understanding of air-sea exchanges and the processes controlling the vertical and horizontal transport of carbon in the ocean, particularly the biological carbon pump. Improved parameterization of carbon sequestration within ecosystem models is vital to better understand and predict changes in the global carbon cycle. Due to the complexity of processes controlling particle aggregation, sinking and decomposition, existing ecosystem models necessarily parameterize carbon sequestration using simple algorithms. Development of improved algorithms describing carbon export and sequestration, suitable for inclusion in numerical models is an ongoing work. Existing unique algorithms used in the state-of-the art ecosystem models and new experimental results obtained from mesocosm experiments and open ocean observations have been inserted into a common 1D pelagic ecosystem model for testing purposes. The model was implemented to the timeseries stations in the North Atlantic (BATS, PAP and ESTOC) and were evaluated with datasets of carbon export. Targetted topics of algorithms were PFT functional types, grazing and vertical movement of zooplankton, and remineralization, aggregation and ballasting dynamics of organic matter. Ultimately it is intended to feed improved algorithms to the 3D modelling community, for inclusion in coupled numerical models.

  2. Marine and freshwater toxins.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, James M

    2006-01-01

    In a very busy and exciting year, 2005 included First Action approval of a much needed official method for paralytic shellfish toxins and multiple international toxin symposia highlighted by groundbreaking research. These are the first-year milestones and activities of the Marine and Freshwater Toxins Task Force and Analytical Community. Inaugurated in 2004 and described in detail in last year's General Referee Report (1) this international toxins group has grown to 150 members from many regions and countries. Perhaps most important they are now making important and global contributions to food safety and to providing alternatives to animal-based assays. Official Method 2005.06 was first approved in late 2004 by the Task Force and subsequently Official First Action in 2005 (2) by the Methods Committee on Natural Toxins and Food Allergens and the Official Methods Board. This nonproprietary method (3) is a precolumn oxidation, liquid chromatographic method that makes good use of fluorescence detection to provide high sensitivity detection of the saxitoxins. It has also proven to be rugged enough for regulatory use and the highest level of validation. As pointed out in the report of method principle investigator and Study Director James Lawrence, approval of 2005.06 now provides the first official alternative to the mouse bioassay after many decades of shellfish monitoring. This past year in April 2005 the group also held their first international conference, "Marine and Freshwater Toxins Analysis: Ist Joint Symposium and AOAC Task Force Meeting," in Baiona, Spain. The 4-day conference consisted of research and stakeholder presentations and symposium-integrated subgroup sessions on ciguatoxins, saxitoxin assays and liquid chromatography (LC) methods for saxitoxins and domoic acids, okadaiates and azaspiracids, and yessotoxins. Many of these subgroups were recently formed in 2005 and are working towards their goals of producing officially validated analytical methods

  3. Sperm in "parhenogenetic" freshwater gastrotrichs.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M J; Levy, D P

    1979-07-20

    Freshwater members of the phylum Gastrotricha have been considered obligate parthenogens. In Lepidodermelia squammata, the species for which there is most evidence for parthenogenesis, sperm have been discovered. This finding will necessitate reexamination of the nature of sexuality and life cycles and of the concept of "species" in freshwater gastrotrichs. PMID:17747043

  4. Sperm in "parhenogenetic" freshwater gastrotrichs.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M J; Levy, D P

    1979-07-20

    Freshwater members of the phylum Gastrotricha have been considered obligate parthenogens. In Lepidodermelia squammata, the species for which there is most evidence for parthenogenesis, sperm have been discovered. This finding will necessitate reexamination of the nature of sexuality and life cycles and of the concept of "species" in freshwater gastrotrichs.

  5. Freshwater transport from the Pacific to the Bering Sea through Amukta Pass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, Carol; Stabeno, Phyllis J.

    2009-07-01

    Flow through the Aleutian Passes connects the North Pacific to the Bering Sea and ultimately the Arctic. Moorings spanning the width of Amukta Pass, deployed 2001-2008, allow quantitative assessment of volume and freshwater transports. Volume transport through Amukta Pass averages 4.7 Sv, with maximum transport in January, minimum in September, and a secondary maximum in July. Average freshwater transport through Amukta Pass is ˜5800 km3 yr-1 with a seasonal cycle similar to that of volume transport. Combining this estimate with first-order estimates of freshwater transports in the other eastern passes in the Aleutian chain suggests that total freshwater transport is more than five times the cross-shelf flux of freshwater needed to supply transport through Bering Strait into the Arctic. Ongoing measurements in the Aleutian Passes are critical to understanding the influence of these waters on the Bering Sea and the Arctic Ocean.

  6. Modeling ocean circulation and biogeochemical variability in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Z.; He, R.; Fennel, K.; Cai, W.-J.; Lohrenz, S.; Hopkinson, C.

    2013-05-01

    A three-dimensional coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied to simulate and examine temporal and spatial variability of circulation and biogeochemical cycling in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The model is driven by realistic atmospheric forcing, open boundary conditions from a data assimilative global ocean circulation model, and observed freshwater and terrestrial nutrient input from major rivers. A 7 yr model hindcast (2004-2010) was performed, and validated against satellite observed sea surface height, surface chlorophyll, and in-situ observations including coastal sea-level, ocean temperature, salinity, and nutrient concentration. The model hindcast revealed clear seasonality in nutrient, phytoplankton and zooplankton distributions in the GoM. An Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis indicated a phase-locked pattern among nutrient, phytoplankton and zooplankton concentrations. The GoM shelf nutrient budget was also quantified, revealing that on an annual basis ~80% of nutrient input was denitrified on the shelf and ~17% was exported to the deep ocean.

  7. Modeling ocean circulation and biogeochemical variability in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Z.; He, R.; Fennel, K.; Cai, W.-J.; Lohrenz, S.; Hopkinson, C.

    2013-11-01

    A three-dimensional coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied to simulate and examine temporal and spatial variability of circulation and biogeochemical cycling in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The model is driven by realistic atmospheric forcing, open boundary conditions from a data assimilative global ocean circulation model, and observed freshwater and terrestrial nitrogen input from major rivers. A 7 yr model hindcast (2004-2010) was performed, and validated against satellite observed sea surface height, surface chlorophyll, and in situ observations including coastal sea level, ocean temperature, salinity, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentration. The model hindcast revealed clear seasonality in DIN, phytoplankton and zooplankton distributions in the GoM. An empirical orthogonal function analysis indicated a phase-locked pattern among DIN, phytoplankton and zooplankton concentrations. The GoM shelf nitrogen budget was also quantified, revealing that on an annual basis the DIN input is largely balanced by the removal through denitrification (an equivalent of ~ 80% of DIN input) and offshore exports to the deep ocean (an equivalent of ~ 17% of DIN input).

  8. Particulate organic carbon and nitrogen export from major Arctic rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, J. W.; Holmes, R. M.; Peterson, B. J.; Raymond, P. A.; Striegl, R. G.; Zhulidov, A. V.; Zimov, S. A.; Zimov, N.; Tank, S. E.; Spencer, R. G. M.; Staples, R.; Gurtovaya, T. Y.; Griffin, C. G.

    2016-05-01

    Northern rivers connect a land area of approximately 20.5 million km2 to the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas. These rivers account for ~10% of global river discharge and transport massive quantities of dissolved and particulate materials that reflect watershed sources and impact biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. In this paper, multiyear data sets from a coordinated sampling program are used to characterize particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate nitrogen (PN) export from the six largest rivers within the pan-Arctic watershed (Yenisey, Lena, Ob', Mackenzie, Yukon, Kolyma). Together, these rivers export an average of 3055 × 109 g of POC and 368 × 109 g of PN each year. Scaled up to the pan-Arctic watershed as a whole, fluvial export estimates increase to 5767 × 109 g and 695 × 109 g of POC and PN per year, respectively. POC export is substantially lower than dissolved organic carbon export by these rivers, whereas PN export is roughly equal to dissolved nitrogen export. Seasonal patterns in concentrations and source/composition indicators (C:N, δ13C, Δ14C, δ15N) are broadly similar among rivers, but distinct regional differences are also evident. For example, average radiocarbon ages of POC range from ~2000 (Ob') to ~5500 (Mackenzie) years before present. Rapid changes within the Arctic system as a consequence of global warming make it challenging to establish a contemporary baseline of fluvial export, but the results presented in this paper capture variability and quantify average conditions for nearly a decade at the beginning of the 21st century.

  9. Analysis of the Arctic system for freshwater cycle intensification: Observations and expectations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawlins, M.A.; Steele, M.; Holland, M.M.; Adam, J.C.; Cherry, J.E.; Francis, J.A.; Groisman, P.Y.; Hinzman, L.D.; Huntington, T.G.; Kane, D.L.; Kimball, J.S.; Kwok, R.; Lammers, R.B.; Lee, C.M.; Lettenmaier, D.P.; McDonald, K.C.; Podest, E.; Pundsack, J.W.; Rudels, B.; Serreze, M.C.; Shiklomanov, A.; Skagseth, O.; Troy, T.J.; Vorosmarty, C.J.; Wensnahan, M.; Wood, E.F.; Woodgate, R.; Yang, D.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, T.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrologic cycle intensification is an expected manifestation of a warming climate. Although positive trends in several global average quantities have been reported, no previous studies have documented broad intensification across elements of the Arctic freshwater cycle (FWC). In this study, the authors examine the character and quantitative significance of changes in annual precipitation, evapotranspiration, and river discharge across the terrestrial pan-Arctic over the past several decades from observations and a suite of coupled general circulation models (GCMs). Trends in freshwater flux and storage derived from observations across the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas are also described. With few exceptions, precipitation, evapotranspiration, and river discharge fluxes from observations and the GCMs exhibit positive trends. Significant positive trends above the 90% confidence level, however, are not present for all of the observations. Greater confidence in the GCM trends arises through lower interannual variability relative to trend magnitude. Put another way, intrinsic variability in the observations tends to limit confidence in trend robustness. Ocean fluxes are less certain, primarily because of the lack of long-term observations. Where available, salinity and volume flux data suggest some decrease in saltwater inflow to the Barents Sea (i.e., a decrease in freshwater outflow) in recent decades. A decline in freshwater storage across the central Arctic Ocean and suggestions that large-scale circulation plays a dominant role in freshwater trends raise questions as to whether Arctic Ocean freshwater flows are intensifying. Although oceanic fluxes of freshwater are highly variable and consistent trends are difficult to verify, the other components of the Arctic FWC do show consistent positive trends over recent decades. The broad-scale increases provide evidence that the Arctic FWC is experiencing intensification. Efforts that aim to develop an adequate

  10. Southern Ocean nutrient trapping and the efficiency of the biological pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primeau, FrançOis W.; Holzer, Mark; Devries, Timothy

    2013-05-01

    We present a data-assimilated model of the ocean's phosphorus cycle that is constrained by climatological phosphate, temperature, salinity, sea-surface height, surface heat and freshwater fluxes, as well as chlorofluorocarbon-11(CFC-11) and natural Δ14C. Export production is estimated to be 5.8±2.0×1012 mol P/yr of which (26±6)% originates in the Southern Ocean (SO) south of 40°S. The biological pump efficiency, defined as the proportion of the ocean's phosphate inventory that is regenerated, is (39±7)%. Dividing the SO south of 40°S into a sub-Antarctic zone (SANTZ) and an Antarctic zone (ANTZ) separated by the latitude of maximum Ekman divergence, we estimate that the SANTZ and ANTZ account, respectively, for (23±5)% and (3±1)% of global export production, (17±4)% and (3±1)% of the regenerated nutrient inventory, and (31±1)% and (43±5)% of the preformed nutrient inventory. Idealized SO nutrient depletion experiments reveal a large-scale transfer of nutrients into circumpolar and deep waters and from the preformed to the regenerated pool. In accord with the concept of the biogeochemical divide, we find that nutrient drawdown in the ANTZ is more effective than in the SANTZ for increasing the efficiency of the biological pump, while having a smaller impact on production in regions north of 40°S. Complete SO nutrient drawdown would allow the biological pump to operate at 94% efficiency by short circuiting the transport of nutrients in northward Ekman currents, leading to a trapping of nutrients in circumpolar and deep waters that would decrease production outside the SO by approximately 44% while increasing it in the SO by more than 725%.

  11. The Ocean-Atmosphere Hydrothermohaline Conveyor Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döös, Kristofer; Kjellsson, Joakim; Zika, Jan; Laliberté, Frédéric; Brodeau, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    The ocean thermohaline circulation is linked to the hydrothermal circulation of the atmosphere. The ocean thermohaline circulation is expressed in potential temperature-salinity space and comprises a tropical upper-ocean circulation, a global conveyor belt cell and an Antarctic Bottom Water cell. The atmospheric hydrothermal circulation in a potential temperature-specific humidity space unifies the tropical Hadley and Walker cells as well as the midlatitude eddies into a single, global circulation. Superimposed, these thermohaline and hydrothermal stream functions reveal the possibility of a close connection between some parts of the water and air mass conversions. The exchange of heat and fresh water through the sea surface (precipiation-evaporation) and incoming solar radiation act to make near-surface air warm and moist while making surface water warmer and saltier as both air and water travel towards the Equator. In the tropics, air masses can undergo moist convection releasing latent heat by forming precipitation, thus acting to make warm surface water fresher. We propose that the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship for moist near-surface air acts like a lower bound for the atmospheric hydrothermal cell and an upper bound for the ocean thermohaline Conveyor-Belt cell. The analysis is made by combining and merging the overturning circulation of the ocean and atmosphere by relating the salinity of the ocean to the humidity of the atmosphere, where we set the heat and freshwater transports equal in the two stream functions By using simulations integrated with our Climate-Earth system model EC-Earth, we intend to produce the "hydrothermohaline" stream function of the coupled ocean-atmosphere overturning circulation in one single picture. We explore how the oceanic thermohaline Conveyor Belt can be linked to the global atmospheric hydrothermal circulation and if the water and air mass conversions in humidity-temperature-salinity space can be related and linked to each

  12. The puzzle of oceanic oxygen utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeve, Wolfgang; Kähler, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The biological carbon pump is an important component of the oceanic carbon cycle and expected to respond to the anthropogenic perturbation of climate and ocean chemistry. Yet, large uncertainties exist in the quantification of the strength of the biological carbon pump of today's ocean. The export of organic matter from the ocean's euphotic zone is a critical benchmark number of this strength. Local measurements of the export flux are highly uncertain, due f.e. to severe methodological issues and undersampling of the ocean. Uncertainties in the contribution of dissolved organic matter to export further add when it comes to a global assessment. The vertical integral of oxygen utilization in the interior of the ocean is considered an independent and save estimate of export production, which accounts for particles as well as dissolved export pathways. For that purpose regional oxygen utilization rates (OUR) have been computed from apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) and an estimate of the time elapsed since the last contact with the atmosphere. Surprisingly the assumptions underlying this concept have not been tested rigorously. Using global ocean biogeochemical models we compare OUR computed from AOU and an ideal age tracer with an independent and perfect estimate of ocean respiration available in the model. Consistently in three different global models, we find that OUR underestimates true respiration by a factor of about three. Most of the differences between respiration and OUR are observed in the upper 1000m of the ocean. In addition to this underestimate in bulk global numbers, we find also important qualitative differences between the two independent approaches. For example, the contribution of dissolved organic matter driving oxygen utilization is largely underestimated when based on bulk tracer concentrations (AOU, DOC), which is the usual approach applied to observations. Also, diagnosing the global importance of denitrification relative to oxic metabolism is

  13. Ocean Response to Possible Southern Meltwater Pulses During Eocene-Oligocene Cooling Climate Trend: A Sensitivity Ocean Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, B. J.; Seidov, D.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding ocean circulation and sea level change in the past (and foreseeable future) is one of the focal points of paleoceanography. Sea level may change due to several primary causes, including the meltdown of the major ice sheets, sea ice melting, and changes in the thermohaline structure of the oceans. The sensitivity of the past ocean circulation to meltwater impacts may have been different from the present-day. We still have only a vague understanding of how ocean basin geography may influence the freshwater impacts in different oceans; the role of geography is important for reconstructing variability of past climates with substantially different land-sea distributions. As freshwater impacts in past geologic eras having different basins configurations may have been different from the present-day pattern, the sensitivity of the ocean circulation to sea surface density impacts and climate change could have been different as well. We use the Eocene-Oligocene geometry and climate to address the past ocean and sea level long-term internal variability because this time slice provides a substantially different geometry and for a strong sea ice impact that can be seen in the geologic record. The Eocene epoch is crucial as a transition from the warm Cretaceous ocean to cooler oceans that may have been subject to bi-polar millennial-scale oscillations of the deep ocean circulation caused by freshwater pulses of the developing southern cryosphere. In a series of numerical experiments, sea ice melting and sea water freezing around Antarctica were simulated by superimposing freshwater layers over zonally-averaged sea surface salinity. Eocene sea surface temperature and sea surface salinity are specified based on the paleoclimatic record and modeling. In our simulations, the Eocene ocean circulation is indeed sensitive to freshwater impacts in the Southern Hemisphere. There are noticeable sea level changes caused by the restructuring of the deep ocean thermal and

  14. Southern Ocean biological impacts on global ocean oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, David P.; Kriest, Iris; Koeve, Wolfgang; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Southern Ocean (SO) physical and biological processes are known to have a large impact on global biogeochemistry. However, the role that SO biology plays in determining ocean oxygen concentrations is not completely understood. These dynamics are investigated here by shutting off SO biology in two marine biogeochemical models. The results suggest that SO biological processes reduce the ocean's oxygen content, mainly in the deep ocean, by 14 to 19%. However, since these processes also trap nutrients that would otherwise be transported northward to fuel productivity and subsequent organic matter export, consumption, and the accompanying oxygen consumption in midlatitude to low-latitude waters, SO biology helps to maintain higher oxygen concentrations in these subsurface waters. Thereby, SO biology can influence the size of the tropical oxygen minimum zones. As a result of ocean circulation the link between SO biological processes and remote oxygen changes operates on decadal to centennial time scales.

  15. Carbon fluxes in the Arabian Sea: Export versus recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixen, Tim; Gaye, Birgit; Ramaswamy, Venkitasubramani

    2016-04-01

    The organic carbon pump strongly influences the exchange of carbon between the ocean and the atmosphere. It is known that it responds to global change but the magnitude and the direction of change are still unpredictable. Sediment trap experiments carried out at various sites in the Arabian Sea between 1986 and 1998 have shown differences in the functioning of the organic carbon pump (OCP). An OCP driven by eukaryotic phytoplankton operated in the upwelling region off Oman and during the spring bloom in the northern Arabian Sea. Cyanobacteria capable of fixing nitrogen seem to dominate the phytoplankton community during all other seasons. The export driven by cyanobacteria was much lower than the export driven by eukaryotic phytoplankton. Productivity and nutrient availability seems to be a main factor controlling fluxes during blooms of eukaryotic phytoplankton. The ballast effect caused by inputs of dust into the ocean and its incorporation into sinking particles seems to be the main factor controlling the export during times when cyanobacteria dominate the phytoplankton community. C/N ratios of organic matter exported from blooms dominated by nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria are enhanced and, furthermore, indicate a more efficient recycling of nutrients at shallower water depth. This implies that the bacterial-driven OCP operates more in a recycling mode that keeps nutrients closer to the euphotic zone whereas the OCP driven by eukaryotic phytoplankton reduces the recycling of nutrients by exporting them into greater water-depth.

  16. The Southern Ocean silica cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tréguer, Paul J.

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Ocean is a major opal sink and plays a key role in the silica cycle of the world ocean. So far however, a complete cycle of silicon in the Southern Ocean has not been published. On one hand, Southern Ocean surface waters receive considerable amounts of silicic acid (dissolved silica, DSi) from the rest of the world ocean through the upwelling of the Circumpolar Deep Water, fed by contributions of deep waters of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. On the other hand, the Southern Ocean exports a considerable flux of the silicic acid that is not used by diatoms in surface waters through the northward pathways of the Sub-Antarctic Mode Water, of the Antarctic Intermediate Water, and of the Antarctic Bottom Water. Thus the Southern Ocean is a source of DSi for the rest of the world ocean. Here we show that the Southern Ocean is a net importer of DSi: because there is no significant external input of DSi, the flux of DSi imported through the Circumpolar Deep Water pathway compensates the sink flux of biogenic silica in sediments.

  17. Mercury Isotopic Evidence for Contrasting Mercury Transport Pathways to Coastal versus Open Ocean Fisheries (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J. D.; Senn, D. B.; Chesney, E. J.; Bank, M. S.; Maage, A.; Shine, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Mercury stable isotopes provide a new method for tracing the sources and chemical transformations of Hg in the environment. In this study we used Hg isotopes to investigate Hg sources to coastal versus migratory open-ocean species of fish residing in the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM). We report Hg isotope ratios as δ202Hg (mass dependent fractionation relative to NIST 3133) and Δ201Hg (mass independent fractionation of odd isotopes). In six coastal and two open ocean species (blackfin and yellowfin tuna), Hg isotopic compositions fell into two non-overlapping ranges. The tuna had significantly higher δ202Hg (0.1 to 0.7‰) and Δ201Hg (1.0 to 2.2‰) than the coastal fish (δ202Hg = 0 to -1.0‰; Δ201Hg = 0.4 to 0.5‰). The observations can be best explained by largely disconnected food webs with isotopically distinct MeHg sources. The ratio Δ199Hg/Δ201Hg in nGOM fish is 1.30±0.10 which is consistent with laboratory studies of photochemical MeHg degradation and with ratios measured in freshwater fish (Bergquist and Blum, 2007). The magnitude of mass independent fractionation of Hg in the open-ocean fish suggests that this source of MeHg was subjected to extensive photodegradation (~50%) before entering the base of the open-ocean food web. Given the Mississippi River’s large, productive footprint in the nGOM and the potential for exporting prey and MeHg to the adjacent oligotrophic GOM, the different MeHg sources are noteworthy and consistent with recent evidence in other systems of important open-ocean MeHg sources. Bergquist, B. A. and Blum, J. D., 2007. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of Hg isotopes by photoreduction in aquatic systems. Science 318, 417-420.

  18. The Southern Ocean biogeochemical divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, I.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Toggweiler, J. R.; Sarmiento, J. L.

    2006-06-01

    Modelling studies have demonstrated that the nutrient and carbon cycles in the Southern Ocean play a central role in setting the air-sea balance of CO2 and global biological production. Box model studies first pointed out that an increase in nutrient utilization in the high latitudes results in a strong decrease in the atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2). This early research led to two important ideas: high latitude regions are more important in determining atmospheric pCO2 than low latitudes, despite their much smaller area, and nutrient utilization and atmospheric pCO2 are tightly linked. Subsequent general circulation model simulations show that the Southern Ocean is the most important high latitude region in controlling pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 because it serves as a lid to a larger volume of the deep ocean. Other studies point out the crucial role of the Southern Ocean in the uptake and storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and in controlling global biological production. Here we probe the system to determine whether certain regions of the Southern Ocean are more critical than others for air-sea CO2 balance and the biological export production, by increasing surface nutrient drawdown in an ocean general circulation model. We demonstrate that atmospheric CO2 and global biological export production are controlled by different regions of the Southern Ocean. The air-sea balance of carbon dioxide is controlled mainly by the biological pump and circulation in the Antarctic deep-water formation region, whereas global export production is controlled mainly by the biological pump and circulation in the Subantarctic intermediate and mode water formation region. The existence of this biogeochemical divide separating the Antarctic from the Subantarctic suggests that it may be possible for climate change or human intervention to modify one of these without greatly altering the other.

  19. The Southern Ocean biogeochemical divide.

    PubMed

    Marinov, I; Gnanadesikan, A; Toggweiler, J R; Sarmiento, J L

    2006-06-22

    Modelling studies have demonstrated that the nutrient and carbon cycles in the Southern Ocean play a central role in setting the air-sea balance of CO(2) and global biological production. Box model studies first pointed out that an increase in nutrient utilization in the high latitudes results in a strong decrease in the atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2). This early research led to two important ideas: high latitude regions are more important in determining atmospheric pCO2 than low latitudes, despite their much smaller area, and nutrient utilization and atmospheric pCO2 are tightly linked. Subsequent general circulation model simulations show that the Southern Ocean is the most important high latitude region in controlling pre-industrial atmospheric CO(2) because it serves as a lid to a larger volume of the deep ocean. Other studies point out the crucial role of the Southern Ocean in the uptake and storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and in controlling global biological production. Here we probe the system to determine whether certain regions of the Southern Ocean are more critical than others for air-sea CO(2) balance and the biological export production, by increasing surface nutrient drawdown in an ocean general circulation model. We demonstrate that atmospheric CO(2) and global biological export production are controlled by different regions of the Southern Ocean. The air-sea balance of carbon dioxide is controlled mainly by the biological pump and circulation in the Antarctic deep-water formation region, whereas global export production is controlled mainly by the biological pump and circulation in the Subantarctic intermediate and mode water formation region. The existence of this biogeochemical divide separating the Antarctic from the Subantarctic suggests that it may be possible for climate change or human intervention to modify one of these without greatly altering the other.

  20. Methane cycling in a tidal freshwater swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Megonigal, J.P.; Schlesinger, W.H. )

    1993-06-01

    Previous studies of methanogenesis in a tidal freshwater swamp on the North Carolina coast have found that potential rates of methane production overestimate observed rates of methane flux, especially during summer months. This research investigates three possibilities for the unexplained losses: methane oxidation, lateral export of dissolved methane to the adjacent river, and ebullition. It is possible that each of these sinks increase during the summer. The potential for methane oxidation was demonstrated in intact soil cores incubated for 21 hours under a 0.5% CH[sub 3]F atmosphere. Methane flux increased from 10+/-27 (mean+/-sd) to 60+/-3 mg m[sup [minus]2] d[sup [minus]1] in treated cores; control core fluxes were 15+/-3 and 19+/-3 mg m[sup [minus]2] d[sup [minus]1] over the same periods. Incubations of slightly unsaturated soils with [sup 14]CH[sub 4] confirmed rapid potential rates of methane oxidation.

  1. Forests fuel fish growth in freshwater deltas

    PubMed Central

    Tanentzap, Andrew J.; Szkokan-Emilson, Erik J.; Kielstra, Brian W.; Arts, Michael T.; Yan, Norman D.; Gunn, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are fuelled by biogeochemical inputs from surrounding lands and within-lake primary production. Disturbances that change these inputs may affect how aquatic ecosystems function and deliver services vital to humans. Here we test, using a forest cover gradient across eight separate catchments, whether disturbances that remove terrestrial biomass lower organic matter inputs into freshwater lakes, thereby reducing food web productivity. We focus on deltas formed at the stream-lake interface where terrestrial-derived particulate material is deposited. We find that organic matter export increases from more forested catchments, enhancing bacterial biomass. This transfers energy upwards through communities of heavier zooplankton, leading to a fourfold increase in weights of planktivorous young-of-the-year fish. At least 34% of fish biomass is supported by terrestrial primary production, increasing to 66% with greater forest cover. Habitat tracers confirm fish were closely associated with individual catchments, demonstrating that watershed protection and restoration increase biomass in critical life-stages of fish. PMID:24915965

  2. Forests fuel fish growth in freshwater deltas.

    PubMed

    Tanentzap, Andrew J; Szkokan-Emilson, Erik J; Kielstra, Brian W; Arts, Michael T; Yan, Norman D; Gunn, John M

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are fuelled by biogeochemical inputs from surrounding lands and within-lake primary production. Disturbances that change these inputs may affect how aquatic ecosystems function and deliver services vital to humans. Here we test, using a forest cover gradient across eight separate catchments, whether disturbances that remove terrestrial biomass lower organic matter inputs into freshwater lakes, thereby reducing food web productivity. We focus on deltas formed at the stream-lake interface where terrestrial-derived particulate material is deposited. We find that organic matter export increases from more forested catchments, enhancing bacterial biomass. This transfers energy upwards through communities of heavier zooplankton, leading to a fourfold increase in weights of planktivorous young-of-the-year fish. At least 34% of fish biomass is supported by terrestrial primary production, increasing to 66% with greater forest cover. Habitat tracers confirm fish were closely associated with individual catchments, demonstrating that watershed protection and restoration increase biomass in critical life-stages of fish. PMID:24915965

  3. Contribution of glacier runoff to freshwater discharge into the Gulf of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, E.G.; Hood, E.; Smikrud, K.

    2010-01-01

    Watersheds along the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) are undergoing climate warming, glacier volume loss, and shifts in the timing and volume of freshwater delivered to the eastern North Pacific Ocean. We estimate recent mean annual freshwater discharge to the GOA at 870 km3 yr-1. Small distributed coastal drainages contribute 78% of the freshwater discharge with the remainder delivered by larger rivers penetrating coastal ranges. Discharge from glaciers and icefields accounts for 47% of total freshwater discharge, with 10% coming from glacier volume loss associated with rapid thinning and retreat of glaciers along the GOA. Our results indicate the region of the GOA from Prince William Sound to the east, where glacier runoff contributes 371 km3 yr -1, is vulnerable to future changes in freshwater discharge as a result of glacier thinning and recession. Changes in timing and magnitude of freshwater delivery to the GOA could impact coastal circulation as well as biogeochemical fluxes to near-shore marine ecosystems and the eastern North Pacific Ocean. Copyright ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. A new source of freshwater for Antarctica's coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-06-01

    Research into submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), predominantly regarding its prevalence as a source of freshwater and nutrients to coastal ecosystems, has recently grown in prominence. Using a new groundwater discharge sensor specifically designed for use in the cold polar ocean, Uemura et al. measured the flows of freshwater streaming through the Antarctic subsurface and into the surrounding coastal waters. The researchers found that SGD rates measured in Lützow-Holm Bay in eastern Antarctica showed important differences from SGD rates measured elsewhere on Earth. At midlatitudes, discharge rates drop with increasing ocean depth, while the Antarctic flows were relatively consistent despite differences in depth among the seven survey sites scattered throughout the bay. In addition, the measured average flow rates, ranging from 0.85 × 10-7 to 9.5 × 10-7 meters per second, were 10-100 times higher than flow rates at similar depths made at midlatitudes. The authors also found that SDG rates oscillated with a period of 12.8 hours, peaking at low tide. Further, the discharge rates roughly tracked the size of the tide, having higher peaks in spring, when tides were strongest. The researchers propose that the most likely source of the freshwater flow is meltwater formed beneath the massive glaciers surrounding the bay. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL046394, 2011)

  5. Contrasting size evolution in marine and freshwater diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Litchman, E.; Klausmeier, C. A.; Yoshiyama, K.

    2009-01-01

    Diatoms are key players in the global carbon cycle and most aquatic ecosystems. Their cell sizes impact carbon sequestration and energy transfer to higher trophic levels. We report fundamental differences in size distributions of marine and freshwater diatoms, with marine diatoms significantly larger than freshwater species. An evolutionary game theoretical model with empirical allometries of growth and nutrient uptake shows that these differences can be explained by nitrogen versus phosphorus limitation, nutrient fluctuations and mixed layer depth differences. Constant and pulsed phosphorus supply select for small sizes, as does constant nitrogen supply. In contrast, intermediate frequency nitrogen pulses common in the ocean select for large sizes or the evolutionarily stable coexistence of large and small sizes. Size-dependent sinking interacts with mixed layer depth (MLD) to further modulate optimal sizes, with smaller sizes selected for by strong sinking and shallow MLD. In freshwaters, widespread phosphorus limitation, together with strong sinking and shallow MLD produce size distributions with smaller range, means and upper values, compared with the ocean. Shifting patterns of nutrient limitation and mixing may alter diatom size distributions, affecting global carbon cycle and the structure and functioning of aquatic ecosystems. PMID:19202058

  6. [Geographic variations in freshwater molluscs].

    PubMed

    Vinarskiĭ, M V

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of geographic variation is known in practically all taxa of living beings. However, the reality of this phenomenon in freshwater molluscs (snails and bivalves) has many times been questioned in the past. It was accepted that these animals do not demonstrate spatially-oriented variation, where specific "local race" is arisen in each specific habitat. Till the beginning of 1970s, there was no statistical evidence that geographic clines in freshwater molluscs really exist. However, a few species of freshwater molluscs has been studied in this respect so far, therefore it is almost impossible to draw any general patterns of geographical variation in this group of animals. Most species of freshwater molluscs studied to the date exhibit statistically significant decrease of their body size in the south-north direction. Perhaps, it may be explained by decrease of the duration of the growth season in high latitudes. Some species of freshwater snails demonstrate clinal changes in shell proportions. This allows to reject subspecies separation within these species since diagnostic characters of such "subspecies" may blur when geographic variation is taken into consideration. The data on geographic variation in anatomical traits in freshwater molluscs is much more scarce. At least one species of pond snails (Lymnaea terebra) demonstrates clinal variation in proportions of the copulative apparatus in the south-north direction. Further studies of geographic variation in freshwater molluscs should reveal whether it is truly adaptive, i.e. whether geographical clines have underlying genetic basis. Otherwise, the clines may arise as a result of direct modifying effect of a habitat.

  7. Measuring Ocean Literacy: What teens understand about the ocean using the Survey of Ocean Literacy and Engagement (SOLE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greely, T. M.; Lodge, A.

    2009-12-01

    Ocean issues with conceptual ties to science and global society have captured the attention, imagination, and concern of an international audience. Climate change, over fishing, marine pollution, freshwater shortages and alternative energy sources are a few ocean issues highlighted in our media and casual conversations. The ocean plays a role in our life in some way everyday, however, disconnect exists between what scientists know and the public understands about the ocean as revealed by numerous ocean and coastal literacy surveys. While the public exhibits emotive responses through care, concern and connection with the ocean, there remains a critical need for a baseline of ocean knowledge. However, knowledge about the ocean must be balanced with understanding about how to apply ocean information to daily decisions and actions. The present study analyzed underlying factors and patterns contributing to ocean literacy and reasoning within the context of an ocean education program, the Oceanography Camp for Girls. The OCG is designed to advance ocean conceptual understanding and decision making by engagement in a series of experiential learning and stewardship activities from authentic research settings in the field and lab. The present study measured a) what understanding teens currently hold about the ocean (content), b) how teens feel toward the ocean environment (environmental attitudes and morality), and c) how understanding and feelings are organized when reasoning about ocean socioscientific issues (e.g. climate change, over fishing, energy). The Survey of Ocean Literacy and Engagement (SOLE), was used to measure teens understanding about the ocean. SOLE is a 57-item survey instrument aligned with the Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts of Ocean Literacy (NGS, 2007). Rasch analysis was used to refine and validate SOLE as a reasonable measure of ocean content knowledge (reliability, 0.91). Results revealed that content knowledge and environmental

  8. Improving estuarine net flux estimates for dissolved cadmium export at the annual timescale: Application to the Gironde Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrin, Aymeric; Schäfer, Jörg; Blanc, Gérard; Strady, Emilie; Masson, Matthieu; Bossy, Cécile; Castelle, Sabine; Girardot, Naïg; Coynel, Alexandra

    2009-10-01

    Dissolved Cd (Cd D) concentrations along the salinity gradient were measured in surface water of the Gironde Estuary during 15 cruises (2001-2007), covering a wide range of contrasting situations in terms of hydrology, turbidity and season. During all situations dissolved Cd concentrations displayed maximum values in the mid-salinity range, reflecting Cd addition by chloride-induced desorption and complexation. The daily net Cd D fluxes from the Gironde Estuary to the coastal ocean were estimated using Boyle's method. Extrapolating Cd D concentrations in the high salinity range to the freshwater end member using a theoretical dilution line produced 15 theoretical Cd concentrations (Cd D0), each representative of one distinct situation. The obtained Cd D0 concentrations were relatively similar (˜201 ± 28 ng L -1) when freshwater discharge Q was >500 m 3 s -1 (508 ≤ Q ≤ 2600 m 3 s -1), but were highly variable (340 ± 80 ng L -1; 247-490 ng L -1) for low discharge situations (169 ≤ Q ≤ 368 m 3 s -1). The respective daily Cd D net fluxes were 5-39 kg day -1, mainly depending on freshwater discharge. As this observation invalidates the existing method of estimating annual Cd D net fluxes, we proposed an empirical model, using representative Cd D0 values and daily freshwater discharges for the 2001-2007 period. Subsequent integration produced reliable Cd D net flux estimates for the Gironde Estuary at the annual timescale that ranged between 3.8-5.0 t a -1 in 2005 and 6.0-7.2 t a -1 in 2004, depending on freshwater discharge. Comparing Cd D net fluxes with the incoming Cd D fluxes suggested that the annual net Cd D addition in the Gironde Estuary ranged from 3.5 to 6.7 t a -1, without any clear temporal trend during the past seven years. The annual Cd D net fluxes did not show a clearly decreasing trend in spite of an overall decrease by a factor ˜6 in Cd gross fluxes during the past decade. Furthermore, in six years out of seven (except 2003), the annual Cd

  9. On the formulation of sea-ice models. Part 2: Lessons from multi-year adjoint sea-ice export sensitivities through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbach, Patick; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Losch, Martin; Campin, Jean-Michel; Hill, Chris

    The adjoint of an ocean general circulation model is at the heart of the ocean state estimation system of the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) project. As part of an ongoing effort to extend ECCO to a coupled ocean/sea-ice estimation system, a dynamic and thermodynamic sea-ice model has been developed for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm). One key requirement is the ability to generate, by means of automatic differentiation (AD), tangent linear (TLM) and adjoint (ADM) model code for the coupled MITgcm ocean/sea-ice system. This second part of a two-part paper describes aspects of the adjoint model. The adjoint ocean and sea-ice model is used to calculate transient sensitivities of solid (ice and snow) freshwater export through Lancaster Sound in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA). The adjoint state provides a complementary view of the dynamics. In particular, the transient, multi-year sensitivity patterns reflect dominant pathways and propagation timescales through the CAA as resolved by the model, thus shedding light on causal relationships, in the model, across the Archipelago. The computational cost of inferring such causal relationships from forward model diagnostics alone would be prohibitive. The role of the exact model trajectory around which the adjoint is calculated (and therefore of the exactness of the adjoint) is exposed through calculations using free-slip vs no-slip lateral boundary conditions. Effective ice thickness, sea surface temperature, and precipitation sensitivities, are discussed in detail as examples of the coupled sea-ice/ocean and atmospheric forcing control space. To test the reliability of the adjoint, finite-difference perturbation experiments were performed for each of these elements and the cost perturbations were compared to those "predicted" by the adjoint. Overall, remarkable qualitative and quantitative agreement is found. In particular, the adjoint correctly

  10. A twentieth-century reanalysis forced ocean model to reconstruct the North Atlantic climate variation during the 1920s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, W. A.; Matei, D.; Bersch, M.; Jungclaus, J. H.; Haak, H.; Lohmann, K.; Compo, G. P.; Sardeshmukh, P. D.; Marotzke, J.

    2015-04-01

    The observed North Atlantic multi-decadal variability for the period 1872-2009 is reconstructed with the Max Planck Institute ocean model, which is forced with an ensemble of the atmospheric twentieth century reanalysis. Special emphasis is put on the early part of the experiments, which includes a prominent climate variation during the 1920s. The experiments are in agreement with selected hydrographic records, indicating a transition from cold and fresh North Atlantic water properties, prior to the 1920 climate variation, towards warm and saline waters afterwards. Examining the variation reveals that sea level pressure (SLP) anomalies prior to the 1900s resemble a negative phase of North Atlantic Oscillation and associated weak winds result in a weak North Atlantic Current (NAC) and sub-polar gyre (SPG). This leads to a reduced transport of warm and saline waters into the higher latitudes. Simultaneously, Arctic freshwater release results in the accumulation of cold and fresh water properties, which cover the upper layers in the Labrador Sea and subsequently suppress convection. From the 1910s, the Arctic freshwater export is reduced, and, NAC and SPG are strengthened as a result of an increased SLP gradient over the North Atlantic. Concurrently, Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) increase. The intensified NAC, SPG, and AMOC redistribute sub-tropical water into the North Atlantic and Nordic Seas, thereby increasing observed and modelled temperature and salinity during the 1920s.

  11. 27 CFR 28.144 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... export” on each container of beer concentrate, before removal from the brewery for any exportation... transferred from a brewery to a foreign-trade zone for export or for storage pending exportation; or (3)...

  12. 27 CFR 28.144 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... export” on each container of beer concentrate, before removal from the brewery for any exportation... transferred from a brewery to a foreign-trade zone for export or for storage pending exportation; or (3)...

  13. 27 CFR 28.144 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... export” on each container of beer concentrate, before removal from the brewery for any exportation... transferred from a brewery to a foreign-trade zone for export or for storage pending exportation; or (3)...

  14. 27 CFR 28.144 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... export” on each container of beer concentrate, before removal from the brewery for any exportation... transferred from a brewery to a foreign-trade zone for export or for storage pending exportation; or (3)...

  15. 7 CFR 1218.6 - Exporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.6 Exporter. Exporter means a person involved in exporting blueberries from another country to the United States....

  16. 7 CFR 1218.6 - Exporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.6 Exporter. Exporter means a person involved in exporting blueberries from another country to the United States....

  17. 7 CFR 1218.6 - Exporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.6 Exporter. Exporter means a person involved in exporting blueberries from another country to the United States....

  18. 7 CFR 1218.6 - Exporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.6 Exporter. Exporter means a person involved in exporting blueberries from another country to the United States....

  19. 7 CFR 1218.6 - Exporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.6 Exporter. Exporter means a person involved in exporting blueberries from another country to the United States....

  20. Exporting Alaska's oil and gas

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, S.F.; Copulos, M.; Watkins, D.J.

    1983-02-22

    Federal legislation that prohibits the commercial export of oil and gas is creating a glut and discouraging oil production in California, while raising energy costs by shipping the fuel to the East and Gulf Coasts. The historical security reasons for blocking the export of Alaskan oil no longer exist, yet they continue to impose costs for the taxpayer. The optimum solution appears to be to export liquefied natural gas, using a pipeline paralleling the oil pipeline to Valdez. This would encourage the use and manufacture in Alaska of urea and ammonia fertilizer for export to the Far East, which would enhance US/Japan relations. The possibility of exports of additional oil, bringing a higher return for producers, will encourage production, reduce the need for OPEC oil, and moderate world oil prices. 5 references.

  1. Dissolved organic carbon export and internal cycling in small, headwater lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stets, Edward G.; Striegl, Rob; Aiken, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon (C) cycling in freshwater lakes is intense but poorly integrated into our current understanding of overall C transport from the land to the oceans. We quantified dissolved organic carbon export (DOCX) and compared it with modeled gross DOC mineralization (DOCR) to determine whether hydrologic or within-lake processes dominated DOC cycling in a small headwaters watershed in Minnesota, USA. We also used DOC optical properties to gather information about DOC sources. We then compared our results to a data set of approximately 1500 lakes in the Eastern USA (Eastern Lake Survey, ELS, data set) to place our results in context of lakes more broadly. In the open-basin lakes in our watershed (n = 5), DOCX ranged from 60 to 183 g C m−2 lake area yr−1, whereas DOCR ranged from 15 to 21 g C m−2 lake area yr−1, emphasizing that lateral DOC fluxes dominated. DOCX calculated in our study watershed clustered near the 75th percentile of open-basin lakes in the ELS data set, suggesting that these results were not unusual. In contrast, DOCX in closed-basin lakes (n = 2) was approximately 5 g C m−2 lake area yr−1, whereas DOCR was 37 to 42 g C m−2 lake area yr−1, suggesting that internal C cycling dominated. In the ELS data set, median DOCX was 32 and 12 g C m−2 yr−1 in open-basin and closed-basin lakes, respectively. Although not as high as what was observed in our study watershed, DOCX is an important component of lake C flux more generally, particularly in open-basin lakes.

  2. Inhabitants of the Fresh-Water Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Joseph; Schroeder, Marlene

    This learner's guide is designed to assist middle school students in studying freshwater organisms. Following a brief introduction to freshwater ecology, simple line drawings facilitate the identification of plants and animals common to Florida's freshwater ecosystems. Emphasis of the short text which accompanies each illustration is upon the…

  3. Methods for preparing synthetic freshwaters.

    PubMed

    Smith, E J; Davison, W; Hamilton-Taylor, J

    2002-03-01

    Synthetic solutions that emulate the major ion compositions of natural waters are useful in experiments aimed at understanding biogeochemical processes. Standard recipes exist for preparing synthetic analogues of seawater, with its relatively constant composition, but, due to the diversity of freshwaters, a range of compositions and recipes is required. Generic protocols are developed for preparing synthetic freshwaters of any desired composition. The major problems encountered in preparing hard and soft waters include dissolving sparingly soluble calcium carbonate, ensuring that the ionic components of each concentrated stock solution cannot form an insoluble salt and dealing with the supersaturation of calcium carbonate in many hard waters. For acidic waters the poor solubility of aluminium salts requires attention. These problems are overcome by preparing concentrated stock solutions according to carefully designed reaction paths that were tested using a combination of experiment and equilibrium modeling. These stock solutions must then be added in a prescribed order to prepare a final solution that is brought into equilibrium with the atmosphere. The example calculations for preparing hard, soft and acidic freshwater surrogates with major ion compositions the same as published analyses, are presented in a generalized fashion that should allow preparation of any synthetic freshwater according to its known analysis. PMID:11902783

  4. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B.; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage. PMID:26116678

  5. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments.

    PubMed

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-09-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage.

  6. 7 CFR 923.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.15 Export. Export means to ship...

  7. 7 CFR 923.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.15 Export. Export means to ship...

  8. 7 CFR 923.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.15 Export. Export means to ship...

  9. 7 CFR 923.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.15 Export. Export means to ship...

  10. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two estuaries in the northwest Atlantic Ocean reveals that black carbon (BC) is a significant component of previously uncharacterized DOM, suggesting that river-estuary systems are important exporters of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon to the ocean.

  11. Ocean tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendershott, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    A review of recent developments in the study of ocean tides and related phenomena is presented. Topics briefly discussed include: the mechanism by which tidal dissipation occurs; continental shelf, marginal sea, and baroclinic tides; estimation of the amount of energy stored in the tide; the distribution of energy over the ocean; the resonant frequencies and Q factors of oceanic normal modes; the relationship of earth tides and ocean tides; and numerical global tidal models.

  12. The Arctic Ocean Perennial Ice Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.; Cunningham, G. F.; Yueh, S.

    1998-01-01

    This study shows that: 1) the NSCAT backscatter fields provide an estimate of the PIZ coverage of the Arctic Ocean; and, 2) the decrease in PIZ area over the winter gives an indication of the PIZ area exported through Fram Strait.

  13. Influence of the freshwater forcing pathway on the AMOC during 8.2k event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, A.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Small, J.; Rosenbloom, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    The collapse of the proglacial lakes Agassiz and Ojibway and the discharge of the lake water into the Hudson Bay were identified as the cause of the cold event occurred around 8.2 thousand years before present day (8.2kybp). This event has been widely studied using coupled climate models by adding freshwater forcing into the subpolar North Atlantic. However, results from the coarse resolution coupled models differ from that of a high resolution forced standalone ocean model simulation. Here we use a state-of-art fully coupled high-resolution climate model with 1/10 degree horizontal resolution for the ocean and sea ice, and ¼ degree for the atmosphere and land components to study the influence of the freshwater forcing to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). In this simulation, 2 Sv freshwater is added into the North Atlantic along a narrow band of west Baffin Bay to North of Labrador Sea for two years, then the freshwater forcing is switched off. Our preliminary results show that AMOC weakens by over 30% within the first 10 years, and recovers afterwards. The added freshwater were partly transported into the subpolar North Atlantic and partly into the subtropical gyre. The latter part was carried by Gulf Stream into the subpolar North Atlantic about 25 years later.

  14. Effects of acidification on olfactory-mediated behaviour in freshwater and marine ecosystems: a synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Antoine O. H. C.; Munday, Philip L.; Brown, Grant E.; Ferrari, Maud C. O.

    2013-01-01

    For many aquatic organisms, olfactory-mediated behaviour is essential to the maintenance of numerous fitness-enhancing activities, including foraging, reproduction and predator avoidance. Studies in both freshwater and marine ecosystems have demonstrated significant impacts of anthropogenic acidification on olfactory abilities of fish and macroinvertebrates, leading to impaired behavioural responses, with potentially far-reaching consequences to population dynamics and community structure. Whereas the ecological impacts of impaired olfactory-mediated behaviour may be similar between freshwater and marine ecosystems, the underlying mechanisms are quite distinct. In acidified freshwater, molecular change to chemical cues along with reduced olfaction sensitivity appear to be the primary causes of olfactory-mediated behavioural impairment. By contrast, experiments simulating future ocean acidification suggest that interference of high CO2 with brain neurotransmitter function is the primary cause for olfactory-mediated behavioural impairment in fish. Different physico-chemical characteristics between marine and freshwater systems are probably responsible for these distinct mechanisms of impairment, which, under globally rising CO2 levels, may lead to strikingly different consequences to olfaction. While fluctuations in pH may occur in both freshwater and marine ecosystems, marine habitat will remain alkaline despite future ocean acidification caused by globally rising CO2 levels. In this synthesis, we argue that ecosystem-specific mechanisms affecting olfaction need to be considered for effective management and conservation practices. PMID:23980246

  15. Effects of acidification on olfactory-mediated behaviour in freshwater and marine ecosystems: a synthesis.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Antoine O H C; Munday, Philip L; Brown, Grant E; Ferrari, Maud C O

    2013-01-01

    For many aquatic organisms, olfactory-mediated behaviour is essential to the maintenance of numerous fitness-enhancing activities, including foraging, reproduction and predator avoidance. Studies in both freshwater and marine ecosystems have demonstrated significant impacts of anthropogenic acidification on olfactory abilities of fish and macroinvertebrates, leading to impaired behavioural responses, with potentially far-reaching consequences to population dynamics and community structure. Whereas the ecological impacts of impaired olfactory-mediated behaviour may be similar between freshwater and marine ecosystems, the underlying mechanisms are quite distinct. In acidified freshwater, molecular change to chemical cues along with reduced olfaction sensitivity appear to be the primary causes of olfactory-mediated behavioural impairment. By contrast, experiments simulating future ocean acidification suggest that interference of high CO2 with brain neurotransmitter function is the primary cause for olfactory-mediated behavioural impairment in fish. Different physico-chemical characteristics between marine and freshwater systems are probably responsible for these distinct mechanisms of impairment, which, under globally rising CO2 levels, may lead to strikingly different consequences to olfaction. While fluctuations in pH may occur in both freshwater and marine ecosystems, marine habitat will remain alkaline despite future ocean acidification caused by globally rising CO2 levels. In this synthesis, we argue that ecosystem-specific mechanisms affecting olfaction need to be considered for effective management and conservation practices.

  16. Effects of acidification on olfactory-mediated behaviour in freshwater and marine ecosystems: a synthesis.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Antoine O H C; Munday, Philip L; Brown, Grant E; Ferrari, Maud C O

    2013-01-01

    For many aquatic organisms, olfactory-mediated behaviour is essential to the maintenance of numerous fitness-enhancing activities, including foraging, reproduction and predator avoidance. Studies in both freshwater and marine ecosystems have demonstrated significant impacts of anthropogenic acidification on olfactory abilities of fish and macroinvertebrates, leading to impaired behavioural responses, with potentially far-reaching consequences to population dynamics and community structure. Whereas the ecological impacts of impaired olfactory-mediated behaviour may be similar between freshwater and marine ecosystems, the underlying mechanisms are quite distinct. In acidified freshwater, molecular change to chemical cues along with reduced olfaction sensitivity appear to be the primary causes of olfactory-mediated behavioural impairment. By contrast, experiments simulating future ocean acidification suggest that interference of high CO2 with brain neurotransmitter function is the primary cause for olfactory-mediated behavioural impairment in fish. Different physico-chemical characteristics between marine and freshwater systems are probably responsible for these distinct mechanisms of impairment, which, under globally rising CO2 levels, may lead to strikingly different consequences to olfaction. While fluctuations in pH may occur in both freshwater and marine ecosystems, marine habitat will remain alkaline despite future ocean acidification caused by globally rising CO2 levels. In this synthesis, we argue that ecosystem-specific mechanisms affecting olfaction need to be considered for effective management and conservation practices. PMID:23980246

  17. Productivity and salinity structuring of the microplankton revealed by comparative freshwater metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Eiler, Alexander; Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Katarzyna; Martínez-García, Manuel; McMahon, Katherine D; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Andersson, Siv G E; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the diversity and structuring of freshwater microbial communities beyond the patterns revealed by tracing their distribution in the landscape with common taxonomic markers such as the ribosomal RNA. To address this gap in knowledge, metagenomes from temperate lakes were compared to selected marine metagenomes. Taxonomic analyses of rRNA genes in these freshwater metagenomes confirm the previously reported dominance of a limited subset of uncultured lineages of freshwater bacteria, whereas Archaea were rare. Diversification into marine and freshwater microbial lineages was also reflected in phylogenies of functional genes, and there were also significant differences in functional beta-diversity. The pathways and functions that accounted for these differences are involved in osmoregulation, active transport, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Moreover, predicted genes orthologous to active transporters and recalcitrant organic matter degradation were more common in microbial genomes from oligotrophic versus eutrophic lakes. This comparative metagenomic analysis allowed us to formulate a general hypothesis that oceanic- compared with freshwater-dwelling microorganisms, invest more in metabolism of amino acids and that strategies of carbohydrate metabolism differ significantly between marine and freshwater microbial communities. PMID:24118837

  18. An electromagnetic geophysical survey of the freshwater lens of Isla de Mona, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, R.T.; Troester, J.W.; Martinez, M.I.

    1998-01-01

    An electromagnetic reconnaissance of the freshwater lens of Isla de Mona, Puerto Rico was conducted with both terrain conductivity (TC) and transient electromagnetic (TEM) surface geophysical techniques. These geophysical surveys were limited to the southern and western parts of the island because of problems with access and cultural metallic objects such as reinforced concrete roadways on the eastern part of the island. The geophysical data were supplemented with the location of a freshwater spring found by scuba divers at a depth of about 20 m below sea level along the northern coast of the island. The geophysical data suggest that the freshwater lens has a maximum thickness of 20 m in the southern half of the island. The freshwater lens is not thickest at the center of the island but nearer the southwestern edge in Quaternary deposits and the eastern edge of the island in the Tertiary carbonates. This finding indicates that the groundwater flow paths on Isla de Mona are not radially summetrical from the center of the island to the ocean. The asymmetry of the freshwater lens indicates that the differences in hydraulic conductivity are a major factor in determining the shape of the freshwater lens. The porosity of the aquifer, as determined by the geophysical data is about 33%.

  19. The effect of Congo River freshwater discharge on Eastern Equatorial Atlantic climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materia, Stefano; Gualdi, Silvio; Navarra, Antonio; Terray, Laurent

    2012-11-01

    The surface ocean explains a considerable part of the inter-annual Tropical Atlantic variability. The present work makes use of observational datasets to investigate the effect of freshwater flow on sea surface salinity (SSS) and temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Guinea. In particular, the Congo River discharges a huge amount of freshwater into the ocean, affecting SSS in the Eastern Equatorial Atlantic (EEA) and stratifying the surface layers. The hypothesis is that an excess of river runoff emphasize stratification, influencing the ocean temperature. In fact, our findings show that SSTs in the Gulf of Guinea are warmer in summers following an anomalously high Congo spring discharge. Vice versa, when the river discharges low freshwater, a cold anomaly appears in the Gulf. The response of SST is not linear: temperature anomalies are considerable and long-lasting in the event of large freshwater flow, while in dry years they are less remarkable, although still significant. An excess of freshwater seems able to form a barrier layer, which inhibits vertical mixing and the entrainment of the cold thermocline water into the surface. Other processes may contribute to SST variability, among which the net input of atmospheric freshwater falling over EEA. Likewise the case of continental runoff from Congo River, warm anomalies occur after anomalously rainy seasons and low temperatures follow dry seasons, confirming the effect of freshwater on SST. However, the two sources of freshwater anomaly are not in phase, so that it is possible to split between atypical SST following continental freshwater anomalies and rainfall anomalies. Also, variations in air-sea fluxes can produce heating and cooling of the Gulf of Guinea. Nevertheless, atypical SSTs cannot be ascribed to fluxes, since the temperature variation induced by them is not sufficient to explain the SST anomalies appearing in the Gulf after anomalous peak discharges. The interaction processes between river runoff, sea

  20. Multi-Model approach to reconstruct the Mediterranean Freshwater Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Dirk; Marzocchi, Alice; Flecker, Rachel; Lunt, Dan; Hilgen, Frits; Meijer, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Today the Mediterranean Sea is isolated from the global ocean by the Strait of Gibraltar. This restricted nature causes the Mediterranean basin to react more sensitively to climatic and tectonic related phenomena than the global ocean. Not just eustatic sea-level and regional river run-off, but also gateway tectonics and connectivity between sub-basins are leaving an enhanced fingerprint in its geological record. To understand its evolution, it is crucial to understand how these different effects are coupled. The Miocene-Pliocene sedimentary record of the Mediterranean shows alternations in composition and colour and has been astronomically tuned. Around the Miocene-Pliocene Boundary the most extreme changes occur in the Mediterranean Sea. About 6% of the salt in the global ocean deposited in the Mediterranean Region, forming an approximately 2 km thick salt layer, which is still present today. This extreme event is named the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.97-5.33 Ma). The gateway and climate evolution is not well constrained for this time, which makes it difficult to distinguish which of the above mentioned drivers might have triggered the MSC. We, therefore, decided to tackle this problem via a multi-model approach: (1) We calculate the Mediterranean freshwater evolution via 30 atmosphere-ocean-vegetation simulations (using HadCM3L), to which we fitted to a function, using a regression model. This allows us to directly relate the orbital curves to evaporation, precipitation and run off. The resulting freshwater evolution can be directly correlated to other sedimentary and proxy records in the late Miocene. (2) By feeding the new freshwater evolution curve into a box/budget model we can predict the salinity and strontium evolution of the Mediterranean for a certain Atlantic-Mediterranean gateway. (3) By comparing these results to the known salinity thresholds of gypsum and halite saturation of sea water, but also to the late Miocene Mediterranean strontium

  1. 9 CFR 91.19 - Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inspection of ocean vessels prior to... Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading. It shall be the responsibility of the owners or the masters of an ocean vessel intended for use in exporting livestock to present the vessel to an inspector at...

  2. 9 CFR 91.19 - Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection of ocean vessels prior to... Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading. It shall be the responsibility of the owners or the masters of an ocean vessel intended for use in exporting livestock to present the vessel to an inspector at...

  3. 9 CFR 91.19 - Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inspection of ocean vessels prior to... Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading. It shall be the responsibility of the owners or the masters of an ocean vessel intended for use in exporting livestock to present the vessel to an inspector at...

  4. 9 CFR 91.19 - Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inspection of ocean vessels prior to... Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading. It shall be the responsibility of the owners or the masters of an ocean vessel intended for use in exporting livestock to present the vessel to an inspector at...

  5. 9 CFR 91.19 - Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inspection of ocean vessels prior to... Inspection of ocean vessels prior to loading. It shall be the responsibility of the owners or the masters of an ocean vessel intended for use in exporting livestock to present the vessel to an inspector at...

  6. 7 CFR 1280.218 - Exporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... exporting live lambs shall remit to the Board an assessment on such lambs at the time of export at the rate established in § 1280.217(e). An exporter directly exporting his or her own lambs shall remit an assessment...

  7. 19 CFR 10.430 - Export requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Export Requirements § 10.430 Export requirements. (a) Submission of certification to CBP. An exporter or producer in the United States that signs a certification of origin for a good exported from the United States to Chile must provide a copy of the certification (or such other medium or format approved by...

  8. 19 CFR 10.430 - Export requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Export Requirements § 10.430 Export requirements. (a) Submission of certification to CBP. An exporter or producer in the United States that signs a certification of origin for a good exported from the United States to Chile must provide a copy of the certification (or such other medium or format approved by...

  9. 19 CFR 10.430 - Export requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Export Requirements § 10.430 Export requirements. (a) Submission of certification to CBP. An exporter or producer in the United States that signs a certification of origin for a good exported from the United States to Chile must provide a copy of the certification (or such other medium or format approved by...

  10. 19 CFR 10.430 - Export requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Export Requirements § 10.430 Export requirements. (a) Submission of certification to CBP. An exporter or producer in the United States that signs a certification of origin for a good exported from the United States to Chile must provide a copy of the certification (or such other medium or format approved by...

  11. 19 CFR 10.430 - Export requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Export Requirements § 10.430 Export requirements. (a) Submission of certification to CBP. An exporter or producer in the United States that signs a certification of origin for a good exported from the United States to Chile must provide a copy of the certification (or such other medium or format approved by...

  12. 40 CFR 92.909 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Export exemptions. 92.909 Section 92....909 Export exemptions. (a) A new locomotive or locomotive engine intended solely for export, and so... from EPA standards. (c) It is a condition of any exemption for the purpose of export under paragraph...

  13. 40 CFR 94.909 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Export exemptions. 94.909 Section 94... Export exemptions. (a) A new engine intended solely for export, and so labeled or tagged on the outside... of export under paragraph (a) of this section, that such exemption is void ab initio with respect...

  14. 40 CFR 89.909 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Export exemptions. 89.909 Section 89....909 Export exemptions. (a) A new nonroad engine intended solely for export, and so labeled or tagged..., 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460. New nonroad engines exported to such countries...

  15. Freshwater Biodiversity and Insect Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Klaas-Douwe B.; Monaghan, Michael T.; Pauls, Steffen U.

    2016-01-01

    Inland waters cover less than one percent of Earth’s surface, but harbor more than six percent of all insect species: nearly 100,000 species from 12 orders spend one or more life stages in freshwater. Little is known about how this remarkable diversity arose, although allopatric speciation and ecological adaptation are thought to be primary mechanisms. Freshwater habitats are exceptionally susceptible to environmental change, and exhibit marked ecological gradients. The amphibiotic lifestyles of aquatic insects result in complex contributions of extinction and allopatric and non-allopatric speciation in species diversification. In contrast to the lack of evolutionary studies, the ecology and habitat preferences of aquatic insects have been intensively studied, in part because of their widespread use as bio-indicators. The combination of phylogenetics with the extensive ecological data provides a promising avenue for future research, making aquatic insects highly suitable models for the study of ecological diversification. PMID:24160433

  16. Water quality for freshwater fish

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, G. )

    1994-01-01

    This timely and up-to-date volume brings together recent critical reviews on water quality requirements for freshwater fish commissioned by the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission, an agency of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. It provides a unique and authoritative source of critically evaluated water quality data concerning the effects of chromium, nickel, aluminum and nitrite on freshwater fish and includes an assessment of the toxicity of mixtures. The reports presented in this volume cover all stages of the life cycle and relevant trophic levels, including aquatic invertebrates and plants and potential bioaccumulation through the food chain. An extensive bibliography is provided for each chapter as well as a glossary of terms and a list of fish species mentioned in the text. This compilation of papers is the definitive reference volume for chemists, biologists, ecologists and toxicologists as well as for water resource managers concerned with management and control of pollution in fresh waters.

  17. Catchment controls on solute export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, Andreas; Schmidt, Christian; Selle, Benny; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamics of solute export from catchments can be classified in terms of chemostatic and chemodynamic export regimes by an analysis of concentration-discharge relationships. Previous studies hypothesized that distinct export regimes emerge from the presence of solute mass stores within the catchment and their connectivity to the stream. However, so far a direct link of solute export to identifiable catchment characteristics is missing. Here we investigate long-term time series of stream water quality and quantity of nine neighboring catchments in Central Germany ranging from relatively pristine mountain catchments to agriculturally dominated lowland catchments, spanning large gradients in land use, geology, and climatic conditions. Given the strong collinearity of catchment characteristics we used partial least square regression analysis to quantify the predictive power of these characteristics for median concentrations and the metrics of export regime. We can show that median concentrations and metrics of the export regimes of major ions and nutrients can indeed be inferred from catchment characteristics. Strongest predictors for median concentrations were the share of arable land, discharge per area, runoff coefficient and available water capacity in the root zone of the catchments. The available water capacity in the root zone, the share of arable land being artificially drained and the topographic gradient were found to be the most relevant predictors for the metrics of export regime. These catchment characteristics can represent the size of solute mass store such as the fraction of arable land being a measure for the store of nitrate. On the other hand, catchment characteristics can be a measure for the connectivity of these solute stores to the stream such as the fraction of tile drained land in the catchments. This study demonstrates the potential of data-driven, top down analyses using simple metrics to classify and better understand dominant controls of

  18. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  19. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  20. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  1. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  2. Freshwater exhange in the Sunda Strait estimated by Aquarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potemra, J. T.; Hacker, P. W.; Maximenko, N. A.; Melnichenko, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Pacific and Indian Oceans are connected at a low latitude via the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF). Through direct observations it is now understood that approximately 10 to 15 Sv of water are transported from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean. The implications of this transport, including impacts to water mass formation, heat and freshwater budgets and potential feedbacks to the atmosphere are still under investigation. One of the complexities in this region is the large number of smaller straits and passages between islands that may or may not play an important role in ITF processes. Many of these straits are more narrow than the typical resolution of ocean circulation models, and therefore are not properly simulated. For mass transport this is likely not an issue, since recent observations suggest that most of the mass transport flows via the Makassar Strait and then exits to the Indian Ocean via the Lombok, Ombai and Timor passages. This study, however, focuses on the fresh water transport between the Indonesian Seas and the Indian Ocean in particular via the Sunda Strait. There are very few direct observations of the upper ocean stratification in this region. Conversely, the recent launch of the Aquarius mission provides a unique opportunity to study the transport of fresh water, as indicated by sea surface salinity variability, between the Java Sea and the eastern Indian Ocean. Numerical model results, Argo measurements and Aquarius-derived sea surface salinity are used to examine the annual variability of fresh water exchange via the Sunda Strait. Model mass transport is typically low, averaging less than 1 Sv, but fresh water transport could have important implications for stratification along the Sumatra/Java southern coast and thus impact coastal wave propagation. The satellite derived sea surface salinity will be used to show the importance of seasonal variations in this region.

  3. Regional hydroclimate response to freshwater fluxes from the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet during the Last Termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschitiello, F.; Dokken, T. M.; Pausata, F. S. R.; Smittenberg, R.; Wohlfarth, B.

    2015-12-01

    Resolving the effects of freshwater forcing during the last glacial-interglacial transition, the Last Termination, is critical to our comprehension of rapid climate change. In particular, the role of Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS) and freshwater from the eastern seaboard of the North Atlantic has been entirely disregarded in the context of the abrupt regional hydroclimate shifts that characterized this period. Here we infer freshwater input variations from the FIS to the Nordic Seas based on two accurately dated hydroclimate reconstructions from lake sediment records from Southern Sweden and one SST reconstruction from the Nordic Seas. The records indicate a number of abrupt freshwater discharges into the Nordic Seas at the start of the Bølling interstadial and during the Allerød interstadial. We observe that these intervals of enhanced FIS freshwater outflow correspond to different modalities of hydroclimate regime shifts in Greenland. Using a set of climate model simulations, we show that the dominant Greenland hydroclimate state can be influenced by the degree of FIS freshwater recirculation in the Nordic Seas, which redirects the excess of sea ice partitioned into the Barents Sea towards the eastern Greenland Current. The tradeoff between buildup and recirculation of sea ice in the Nordic Seas generate large-scale sea-level pressure anomalies that may explain the sign and magnitude of the isotopic and temperature changes inferred from Greenland and North European reconstructions. We conclude that air-sea interactions in the North Atlantic are more sensitive to Fennoscandian freshwater forcing than previously thought. These results could help to solve the problematic relationship between origin, timing and magnitude of freshwater perturbations and abrupt deglacial changes in North Atlantic Ocean circulation in numerical simulations.

  4. The Arctic Ocean carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGilchrist, G. A.; Naveira Garabato, A. C.; Tsubouchi, T.; Bacon, S.; Torres-Valdés, S.; Azetsu-Scott, K.

    2014-04-01

    We present observation based estimates of the transport of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) across the four main Arctic Ocean gateways (Davis Strait, Fram Strait, Barents Sea Opening and Bering Strait). Combining a recently derived velocity field at these boundaries with measurements of DIC, we calculated a net summertime pan-Arctic export of 231±49 Tg C yr-1. On an annual basis, we estimate that at least 166±60 Tg C yr-1 of this is due to uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere, although time-dependent changes in carbon storage are not quantified. To further understand the region's role as a carbon sink, we calculated the volume-conserved net DIC transport from beneath a prescribed mixed layer depth of 50 m, referred to as ‘interior transport', revealing an export of 61±23 Tg C yr-1. Applying a carbon framework to infer the sources of interior transport implied that this export is primarily due to the sinking and remineralisation of organic matter, highlighting the importance of the biological pump. Furthermore, we qualitatively show that the present day Arctic Ocean is accumulating anthropogenic carbon beneath the mixed layer, imported in Atlantic Water.

  5. Influence of net freshwater supply on salinity in Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nuttle, W.K.; Fourqurean, J.W.; Cosby, B.J.; Zieman, J.C.; Robblee, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    An annual water budget for Florida Bay, the large, seasonally hypersaline estuary in the Everglades National Park, was constructed using physically based models and long-term (31 years) data on salinity, hydrology, and climate. Effects of seasonal and interannual variations of the net freshwater supply (runoff plus rainfall minus evaporation) on salinity variation within the bay were also examined. Particular attention was paid to the effects of runoff, which are the focus of ambitious plans to restore and conserve the Florida Bay ecosystem. From 1965 to 1995 the annual runoff from the Everglades into the bay was less than one tenth of the annual direct rainfall onto the bay, while estimated annual evaporation slightly exceeded annual rainfall. The average net freshwater supply to the bay over a year was thus approximately zero, and interannual variations in salinity appeared to be affected primarily by interannual fluctuations in rainfall. At the annual scale, runoff apparently had little effect on the bay as a whole during this period. On a seasonal basis, variations in rainfall, evaporation, and runoff were not in phase, and the net freshwater supply to the bay varied between positive and negative values, contributing to a strong seasonal pattern in salinity, especially in regions of the bay relatively isolated from exchanges with the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean. Changes in runoff could have a greater effect on salinity in the bay if the seasonal patterns of rainfall and evaporation and the timing of the runoff are considered. One model was also used to simulate spatial and temporal patterns of salinity responses expected to result from changes in net freshwater supply. Simulations in which runoff was increased by a factor of 2 (but with no change in spatial pattern) indicated that increased runoff will lower salinity values in eastern Florida Bay, increase the variability of salinity in the South Region, but have little effect on salinity in the Central

  6. Will ocean acidification affect marine microbes?

    PubMed

    Joint, Ian; Doney, Scott C; Karl, David M

    2011-01-01

    The pH of the surface ocean is changing as a result of increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)), and there are concerns about potential impacts of lower pH and associated alterations in seawater carbonate chemistry on the biogeochemical processes in the ocean. However, it is important to place these changes within the context of pH in the present-day ocean, which is not constant; it varies systematically with season, depth and along productivity gradients. Yet this natural variability in pH has rarely been considered in assessments of the effect of ocean acidification on marine microbes. Surface pH can change as a consequence of microbial utilization and production of carbon dioxide, and to a lesser extent other microbially mediated processes such as nitrification. Useful comparisons can be made with microbes in other aquatic environments that readily accommodate very large and rapid pH change. For example, in many freshwater lakes, pH changes that are orders of magnitude greater than those projected for the twenty second century oceans can occur over periods of hours. Marine and freshwater assemblages have always experienced variable pH conditions. Therefore, an appropriate null hypothesis may be, until evidence is obtained to the contrary, that major biogeochemical processes in the oceans other than calcification will not be fundamentally different under future higher CO(2)/lower pH conditions.

  7. Quantifying Greenland freshwater flux underestimates in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Christopher M.; Piecuch, Christopher G.; Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

    2016-05-01

    Key processes regulating the mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not represented in current-generation climate models. Here using output from 19 different climate models forced with a high-end business-as-usual emissions pathway, we compare modeled freshwater fluxes (FWF) to a parameterization based on midtropospheric temperature. By the mid 21st century, parameterized GIS FWF is 478 ± 215 km3 yr-1 larger than modeled—over 3 times the 1992-2011 rate of GIS mass loss. By the late 21st century, ensemble mean parameterized GIS FWF anomalies are comparable to FWF anomalies over the northern North Atlantic Ocean, equivalent to approximately 11 cm of global mean sea level rise. The magnitude and spread of these underestimates underscores the need for assessments of the coupled response of the ocean to increased FWF that recognize: (1) the widely varying freshwater budgets of each model and (2) uncertainty in the relationship between GIS FWF and atmospheric temperature.

  8. Circulation and transformation of Atlantic water in the Eurasian Basin and the contribution of the Fram Strait inflow branch to the Arctic Ocean heat budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudels, Bert; Korhonen, Meri; Schauer, Ursula; Pisarev, Sergey; Rabe, Benjamin; Wisotzki, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    The inflows of Atlantic water from the Nordic Seas to the Arctic Ocean through Fram Strait and over the Barents Sea are examined and their pathways and transformations in the Eurasian Basin are described based primarily on hydrographic observations from two cruises with RV Polarstern in 2007 and 2011. The contrast between the high salinity Atlantic water core in the Nansen Basin and the lower Atlantic water salinity in the Amundsen Basin, combined with a salinity minimum below the Atlantic layer, suggest that the Fram Strait branch mainly remains in the Nansen Basin, while the Barents Sea branch continues along the continental slope, enters the Amundsen Basin and provides most of the Atlantic water in the Makarov and Canada basins. To examine the consequences of such a circulation pattern recently published estimates of the in- and outflows of volume and liquid freshwater through the Barents Sea, Bering Strait and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago as well as river runoff, net precipitation and ice export are reviewed and added together. To achieve volume and freshwater balances net outflows through Fram Strait of 2.3 Sv and 100 mSv respectively are required. This is reasonably close to the recently reported Fram Strait transport estimates. The net outflows are separated into two parts, upper layer transports, less dense than the entering Atlantic water, and lower layer transports, as dense as or denser than the Atlantic water. The largest net volume outflow occurs in the lower layer, 1.65 Sv, while the liquid freshwater is almost exclusively exported in the 0.64 Sv net outflow in upper layer, leading to unrealistically low salinities in the upper layer compared with observations. Atlantic water is north of Svalbard transformed into less saline surface water through melting of sea ice, which can supply the necessary higher salinity (halocline) water to the upper layer. 1.23 Sv of halocline water of salinity 34.2 must be added to obtain a more realistic salinity of 33

  9. Rapid seawater circulation through animal burrows in mangrove forests - A significant source of saline groundwater to the tropical coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. F.; Stieglitz, T. C.; Hancock, G. J.

    2010-12-01

    A common approach for quantifying rates of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to the coastal ocean is to use geochemical tracers that are part of the U- and Th-decay chains such as Rn-222 and short lived radium isotopes. These radionuclides are naturally enriched in groundwater relative to seawater and have well understood chemistries within the marine environment. They occur in both fresh (continental) and saline (marine) groundwaters and thus the water source is often ambiguous. Stieglitz (2005, Marine Pollution Bulletin 51, 51-59) has shown that some coastal areas within the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon (Australia) are enriched in the SGD tracer, Rn-222; he attributed this to four possible processes including the tidal flushing of mangrove forest floors. Here, we present a detailed investigation into the tidal circulation of seawater through animal burrows using Rn-222 and isotopes of radium in the Coral Creek mangrove forest, Hinchinbrook Island, Queensland, Australia. The study was conducted at the end of the dry season in a creek with no freshwater inputs. Significant export of radionuclides and salt from the forest into the creek indicates continuous tidally driven circulation through the burrows. Results demonstrate that the forest sediment is efficiently flushed, with a water flux of about 30 L/m2/ day of forest floor, which is equivalent to flushing about 10% of the total burrow volume per tidal cycle. Annual average circulation flux through mangrove forest floors are of the same order as annual river discharge in the central GBR. However, unlike the river discharge, the tidal circulation should be relatively stable throughout the year. This work documents the importance of animal burrows in maintaining productive sediments in these systems, and illustrates the physical process that supports large exports of organic and inorganic matter from mangrove forests to the coastal zone. It also illustrates the importance of considering saline groundwater

  10. Changes in the global freshwater N and P cycles over the 20th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beusen, Arthur; van Beek, Rens; Bouwman, Lex; Mogollón, José; Middelburg, Jack

    2016-04-01

    Dramatic world-wide changes occurred during the 20th century in both nutrient delivery and in-stream retention. In this paper, we use a combined nutrient-input, hydrology, in-stream nutrient retention model to quantitatively track the changes in the global freshwater N and P cycles over the 20th century. Global nutrient delivery almost doubled due to expanding agriculture and increasing wastewater discharge. Nutrient retention also increased by a factor of two as a result of the rapidly growing number of dams and reservoirs. This increase in nutrient retention could not balance the increase in nutrient delivery to rivers. River export to coastal seas increased during the 20th century from 19 to 37 Tg yr-1 of N and 2 to 4 Tg yr-1 of P. There are important differences in riverine N:P export ratios in various parts of the world resulting from the interplay of multiple processes and economic activities in different river basins. Increasing nutrient loading of freshwater systems is a threat to water quality. Furthermore, the global river export increase in the molar N:P ratio during recent decades may affect the ecology within both the river basins and the coastal system. This ratio change may be driven by the recent stagnation of P fertilizer use in most industrialized countries, in comparison to the ever increasing N fertilizer use.

  11. Pacific patterns of dust deposition, iron supply and export production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winckler, G.; Anderson, R. F.; Park, J.; Schwartz, R.; Pahnke, K.; Struve, T.; Lamy, F.; Gersonde, R.

    2015-12-01

    The scarcity of iron limits marine export production and carbon uptake in about a quarter of the global ocean where the surface concentration of nitrate and phosphate is high, as biological utilization of these macronutrients is incomplete. Of these high nutrient low chlorophyll (HNLC) regions, the Southern Ocean is the region where variations in iron availability can have the largest effect on Earth's carbon cycle through its fertilizing effect on marine ecosystems, both in the modern and in the past. Recent work in the Subantarctic South Atlantic (Martínez-Garcia et al., 2009, 2014, Anderson et al., 2014) suggests that dust-driven iron fertilization lowered atmospheric CO2 by up to 40 ppm in the latter half of each glacial cycle of the late Pleistocene, with the increase in Subantarctic productivity consuming a greater fraction of the surface nutrients and thus driving more storage of carbon in the ocean interior. The other sectors of the Southern Ocean remain poorly constrained, including the Pacific Sector, that accounts for the largest surface area of the Subantarctic Southern Ocean. Here we report records of dust deposition, iron supply and export production from a set of cores from the Subantarctic Pacific (PS75, Lamy et al 2014) and initial results about the origin of dust transported to the Subantarctic Pacific Ocean from radiogenic isotopes and rare earth elements. We test how tightly dust and biological productivity are coupled over glacial/interglacial and millennial timescales in the Subantarctic Pacific and place the region in a context of global patterns of biological productivity, nutrient utilization and iron fertilization by dust, including comparisons to the other Pacific HNLC regions, the Subarctic North Pacific and equatorial Pacific.

  12. The Impact of Land Use Change on Primary Stream Organic and Inorganic Carbon Export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, S. A.; Bauer, J. E.; Grottoli, A. G.; Huey Sanders, T. M.; Matsui, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial land use may impact both the amounts of and characteristics of organic and inorganic carbon (OC and IC, respectively) entering aquatic ecosystems. Better understanding of how different land uses alter carbon characteristics and export fluxes from watersheds may lead to better management practices for retaining OC in terrestrial habitats and therefore mitigate CO2 emissions from freshwater ecosystems where terrestrial OC may be more rapidly respired. We examined the fluxes and δ13C and ∆14C signatures of dissolved IC (DIC), dissolved OC (DOC), and particulate OC (POC) exported from 6 watersheds with differing land use at the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed (NAEW) in Coshocton county in northeastern Ohio to assess whether differences in land use are related to variability in the export fluxes and isotopic characteristics of OC and IC pools. We used a Bayesian mixing model (MixSIR) to determine how the relative contributions of potential carbon sources to DIC, DOC, and POC change as a function of watershed land use. Mixing model results from each season were used to approximate relative annual contributions of potential sources to DIC, DOC, and POC export fluxes from each watershed. We found that agricultural land uses (i.e., corn, under both conventional till and no-till management) experienced the greatest degree of disturbance and had the greatest carbon export fluxes. However, the relative extent to which soil OC contributed to export fluxes compared to corn biomass varied as a function of tillage practices. In addition, nonparametric multidimensional scaling (NMDS), based on the δ13C and ∆14C data and mixing model results for DIC, DOC and POC export fluxes, separated non-corn watersheds into 2 further classes of disturbance: moderate disturbance (pasture and mixed land use) and low disturbance (forest). These findings suggest that land use has a measurable impact on the concentration and characteristics of watershed C export fluxes.

  13. The Microbiota of Freshwater Fish and Freshwater Niches Contain Omega-3 Fatty Acid-Producing Shewanella Species

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Joseph E.; Jensen, Brittany J.; Bishop, Sydney S.; Lokken, James P.; Dorff, Kellen J.; Ripley, Michael P.; Munro, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 30 years ago, it was discovered that free-living bacteria isolated from cold ocean depths could produce polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (20:5n-3) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (22:6n-3), two PUFA essential for human health. Numerous laboratories have also discovered that EPA- and/or DHA-producing bacteria, many of them members of the Shewanella genus, could be isolated from the intestinal tracts of omega-3 fatty acid-rich marine fish. If bacteria contribute omega-3 fatty acids to the host fish in general or if they assist some bacterial species in adaptation to cold, then cold freshwater fish or habitats should also harbor these producers. Thus, we undertook a study to see if these niches also contained omega-3 fatty acid producers. We were successful in isolating and characterizing unique EPA-producing strains of Shewanella from three strictly freshwater native fish species, i.e., lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), lean lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and walleye (Sander vitreus), and from two other freshwater nonnative fish, i.e., coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and seeforellen brown trout (Salmo trutta). We were also able to isolate four unique free-living strains of EPA-producing Shewanella from freshwater habitats. Phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses suggest that one producer is clearly a member of the Shewanella morhuae species and another is sister to members of the marine PUFA-producing Shewanella baltica species. However, the remaining isolates have more ambiguous relationships, sharing a common ancestor with non-PUFA-producing Shewanella putrefaciens isolates rather than marine S. baltica isolates despite having a phenotype more consistent with S. baltica strains. PMID:26497452

  14. The Microbiota of Freshwater Fish and Freshwater Niches Contain Omega-3 Fatty Acid-Producing Shewanella Species.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Frank E; McGraw, Joseph E; Jensen, Brittany J; Bishop, Sydney S; Lokken, James P; Dorff, Kellen J; Ripley, Michael P; Munro, James B

    2015-10-23

    Approximately 30 years ago, it was discovered that free-living bacteria isolated from cold ocean depths could produce polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (20:5n-3) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (22:6n-3), two PUFA essential for human health. Numerous laboratories have also discovered that EPA- and/or DHA-producing bacteria, many of them members of the Shewanella genus, could be isolated from the intestinal tracts of omega-3 fatty acid-rich marine fish. If bacteria contribute omega-3 fatty acids to the host fish in general or if they assist some bacterial species in adaptation to cold, then cold freshwater fish or habitats should also harbor these producers. Thus, we undertook a study to see if these niches also contained omega-3 fatty acid producers. We were successful in isolating and characterizing unique EPA-producing strains of Shewanella from three strictly freshwater native fish species, i.e., lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), lean lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and walleye (Sander vitreus), and from two other freshwater nonnative fish, i.e., coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and seeforellen brown trout (Salmo trutta). We were also able to isolate four unique free-living strains of EPA-producing Shewanella from freshwater habitats. Phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses suggest that one producer is clearly a member of the Shewanella morhuae species and another is sister to members of the marine PUFA-producing Shewanella baltica species. However, the remaining isolates have more ambiguous relationships, sharing a common ancestor with non-PUFA-producing Shewanella putrefaciens isolates rather than marine S. baltica isolates despite having a phenotype more consistent with S. baltica strains.

  15. The Microbiota of Freshwater Fish and Freshwater Niches Contain Omega-3 Fatty Acid-Producing Shewanella Species.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Frank E; McGraw, Joseph E; Jensen, Brittany J; Bishop, Sydney S; Lokken, James P; Dorff, Kellen J; Ripley, Michael P; Munro, James B

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 30 years ago, it was discovered that free-living bacteria isolated from cold ocean depths could produce polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (20:5n-3) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (22:6n-3), two PUFA essential for human health. Numerous laboratories have also discovered that EPA- and/or DHA-producing bacteria, many of them members of the Shewanella genus, could be isolated from the intestinal tracts of omega-3 fatty acid-rich marine fish. If bacteria contribute omega-3 fatty acids to the host fish in general or if they assist some bacterial species in adaptation to cold, then cold freshwater fish or habitats should also harbor these producers. Thus, we undertook a study to see if these niches also contained omega-3 fatty acid producers. We were successful in isolating and characterizing unique EPA-producing strains of Shewanella from three strictly freshwater native fish species, i.e., lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), lean lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and walleye (Sander vitreus), and from two other freshwater nonnative fish, i.e., coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and seeforellen brown trout (Salmo trutta). We were also able to isolate four unique free-living strains of EPA-producing Shewanella from freshwater habitats. Phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses suggest that one producer is clearly a member of the Shewanella morhuae species and another is sister to members of the marine PUFA-producing Shewanella baltica species. However, the remaining isolates have more ambiguous relationships, sharing a common ancestor with non-PUFA-producing Shewanella putrefaciens isolates rather than marine S. baltica isolates despite having a phenotype more consistent with S. baltica strains. PMID:26497452

  16. Consequences of future increased Arctic runoff on Arctic Ocean stratification, circulation, and sea ice cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nummelin, Aleksi; Ilicak, Mehmet; Li, Camille; Smedsrud, Lars H.

    2016-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean has important freshwater sources including river runoff, low evaporation, and exchange with the Pacific Ocean. In the future, we expect even larger freshwater input as the global hydrological cycle accelerates, increasing high-latitude precipitation, and river runoff. Previous modeling studies show some robust responses to high-latitude freshwater perturbations, including a strengthening of Arctic stratification and a weakening of the large-scale ocean circulation; some idealized modeling studies also document a stronger cyclonic circulation within the Arctic Ocean itself. With the broad range of scales and processes involved, the overall effect of increasing runoff requires an understanding of both the local processes and the broader linkages between the Arctic and surrounding oceans. Here we adopt a more comprehensive modeling approach by increasing river runoff to the Arctic Ocean in a coupled ice-ocean general circulation model, and show contrasting responses in the polar and subpolar regions. Within the Arctic, the stratification strengthens, the halocline and Atlantic Water layer warm, and the cyclonic circulation spins up, in agreement with previous work. In the subpolar North Atlantic, the model simulates a colder and fresher water column with weaker barotropic circulation. In contrast to the estuarine circulation theory, the volume exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the surrounding oceans does not increase with increasing runoff. While these results are robust in our model, we require experiments with other model systems and more complete observational syntheses to better constrain the sensitivity of the climate system to high-latitude freshwater perturbations.

  17. Carbon balances of freshwater ecosystems in summer and fall 2008 on Samoylov Island, Lena Delta, Siberia, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abnizova, A.; Siemens, J.; Langer, M.; Boike, J.

    2010-12-01

    A large number of freshwater ecosystems, such as lakes and ponds, exist in the northern areas of Canada, Alaska and Siberia and have been recently recognized as highly sensitive to changing climate. While numerous studies reported northern lakes as heterotrophic and supersaturated in carbon dioxide gas (CO2) environments, seasonal variability and differences in estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from various aquatic systems to the atmosphere is currently not well-known. We explored variability in freshwater carbon dynamics on Samoylov Island in the Lena Delta, Northern Siberia (72.2°N, 126.3°E). The landscape of the island represents polygonized tundra dominated by wet depressed polygonal centres (31%) and dry rims (53%) with thermokarst lakes and polygonized ponds occupying 10 and 6 %, respectively. We measured aquatic carbon components, physical and chemical characteristics and water budget components from 2 lakes, 2 ponds and 2 island outflows in the summer and early fall of 2008. Aquatic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pools were significantly smaller in the ponds compared to the lakes suggesting different carbon sources fuelling different CO2 production. The carbon budget showed that the lakes and ponds were either neutral or large sinks of aquatic DOC and DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon), representing less than 1 % of the hydrologically incoming DIC loads and close to 40 % of available DOC load in the system. Concentrations of DIC increased 4 times during freezeback (end of September) highlighting the role of ponds as transient carbon stores decoupling times of production and emission of CO2. The observed systems had low concentrations of CH4 and N2O during the study season. However, aerial survey of 42 ponds during the time of freezeback revealed that 6 of them were sources of CH4 and 10 ponds were sources of N2O. Overall, the export of terrestrially fixed carbon to the Arctic Ocean from the island via outflow channels was 354 kg of DOC per active

  18. Testing massive Arctic sea ice export as a trigger for abrupt climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, Anthony; Condron, Alan; Bradley, Raymond

    2014-05-01

    The discharge of freshwater from glacial lakes to the North Atlantic is repeatedly cited as the main trigger for abrupt centennial to millennial length climate change during the last deglaciation. Broecker et al., (1989) was a proponent of this idea suggesting that abrupt re-routing of pro-glacial lake freshwater to the North Atlantic through the St. Lawrence Valley weakened the strength of the AMOC. Yet, evidence for this is lacking, freshwater estimates in these lakes are relatively small and flood durations are rather short (<5 years), suggesting that floods may not have been the only mechanism driving these climate shifts. Using sophisticated ocean modeling, it has been shown that the release of freshwater originating from the Arctic is more effective at weakening the AMOC compared to freshwater released further south. Here we investigate whether the break-up and mobilization of thick Arctic sea-ice would have supplied enough freshwater to the Nordic Seas to sufficiently cause dampening of the AMOC and hinder NADW formation in the sub-polar North Atlantic. We use numerical climate models to assess 1) the maximum thickness of sea ice that can be formed during glacial periods and the volume of freshwater in the ice, 2) the mechanism which caused the collapse and mobilization of arctic sea-ice into the North Atlantic and 3) the impact of melting sea-ice on global ocean circulation. This hypothesis focuses on the potential impacts of sea-ice as a forcing mechanism for abrupt climate change events on geologic time scales.

  19. The marine hydrological cycle: The ocean's floods and droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Arnold L.

    2016-07-01

    The sea surface salinity (SSS) displays fluctuations that are not solely in response to local air-sea flux of freshwater but also reflect ocean circulation and mixing processes. Ponte and Vinogradova (2016), using Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean output, estimate the relative roles of these forces for the global ocean. They find that the governing forces vary greatly across ocean regimes. Their research identifies features that will be addressed with enhanced SSS observations from orbiting satellites and in situ global arrays, which promise new insight into the marine water cycle and its place in the global hydrological system.

  20. Recent increases in Arctic freshwater flux affects Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning circulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Dixon, Timothy H; Myers, Paul G; Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don; van den Broeke, M R

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is an important component of ocean thermohaline circulation. Melting of Greenland's ice sheet is freshening the North Atlantic; however, whether the augmented freshwater flux is disrupting the AMOC is unclear. Dense Labrador Sea Water (LSW), formed by winter cooling of saline North Atlantic water and subsequent convection, is a key component of the deep southward return flow of the AMOC. Although LSW formation recently decreased, it also reached historically high values in the mid-1990s, making the connection to the freshwater flux unclear. Here we derive a new estimate of the recent freshwater flux from Greenland using updated GRACE satellite data, present new flux estimates for heat and salt from the North Atlantic into the Labrador Sea and explain recent variations in LSW formation. We suggest that changes in LSW can be directly linked to recent freshening, and suggest a possible link to AMOC weakening. PMID:26796579

  1. Recent increases in Arctic freshwater flux affects Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning circulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Dixon, Timothy H.; Myers, Paul G.; Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is an important component of ocean thermohaline circulation. Melting of Greenland's ice sheet is freshening the North Atlantic; however, whether the augmented freshwater flux is disrupting the AMOC is unclear. Dense Labrador Sea Water (LSW), formed by winter cooling of saline North Atlantic water and subsequent convection, is a key component of the deep southward return flow of the AMOC. Although LSW formation recently decreased, it also reached historically high values in the mid-1990s, making the connection to the freshwater flux unclear. Here we derive a new estimate of the recent freshwater flux from Greenland using updated GRACE satellite data, present new flux estimates for heat and salt from the North Atlantic into the Labrador Sea and explain recent variations in LSW formation. We suggest that changes in LSW can be directly linked to recent freshening, and suggest a possible link to AMOC weakening. PMID:26796579

  2. Recent increases in Arctic freshwater flux affects Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning circulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Dixon, Timothy H; Myers, Paul G; Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don; van den Broeke, M R

    2016-01-22

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is an important component of ocean thermohaline circulation. Melting of Greenland's ice sheet is freshening the North Atlantic; however, whether the augmented freshwater flux is disrupting the AMOC is unclear. Dense Labrador Sea Water (LSW), formed by winter cooling of saline North Atlantic water and subsequent convection, is a key component of the deep southward return flow of the AMOC. Although LSW formation recently decreased, it also reached historically high values in the mid-1990s, making the connection to the freshwater flux unclear. Here we derive a new estimate of the recent freshwater flux from Greenland using updated GRACE satellite data, present new flux estimates for heat and salt from the North Atlantic into the Labrador Sea and explain recent variations in LSW formation. We suggest that changes in LSW can be directly linked to recent freshening, and suggest a possible link to AMOC weakening.

  3. Inland oil spills: Options for minimizing environmental impacts of freshwater spill response

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Selecting appropriate protection, response, and cleanup techniques, both before and following an oil spill, affects the ultimate environmental impact and cost resulting from a spill. The American Petroleum Institute (API) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) jointly developed this guide as a tool for contingency planners and field responders to identify response techniques that have minimal ecological impacts and also minimize the impact of the oil. The guide provides information on 29 response methods and classifies their relative environmental impact for combinations of four oil types and twelve freshwater environments and habitats. Spill topics of special concern in freshwater settings are also discussed, including public health, conditions under which oil might sink in freshwater, oil behavior in ice conditions, permafrost, and use of firefighting foams.

  4. Recent increases in Arctic freshwater flux affects Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qian; Dixon, Timothy H.; Myers, Paul G.; Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is an important component of ocean thermohaline circulation. Melting of Greenland's ice sheet is freshening the North Atlantic; however, whether the augmented freshwater flux is disrupting the AMOC is unclear. Dense Labrador Sea Water (LSW), formed by winter cooling of saline North Atlantic water and subsequent convection, is a key component of the deep southward return flow of the AMOC. Although LSW formation recently decreased, it also reached historically high values in the mid-1990s, making the connection to the freshwater flux unclear. Here we derive a new estimate of the recent freshwater flux from Greenland using updated GRACE satellite data, present new flux estimates for heat and salt from the North Atlantic into the Labrador Sea and explain recent variations in LSW formation. We suggest that changes in LSW can be directly linked to recent freshening, and suggest a possible link to AMOC weakening.

  5. Linking the 8.2 ka Event and its Freshwater Forcing in the Labrador Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Jeremy S.; Carlson, Anders E.; Winsor, Kelsey; Klinkhammer, Gary P.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Andrews, John T.; Strasser, C.

    2012-01-01

    The 8.2 ka event was the last deglacial abrupt climate event. A reduction in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) attributed to the drainage of glacial Lake Agassiz may have caused the event, but the freshwater signature of Lake Agassiz discharge has yet to be identified in (delta)18O of foraminiferal calcite records from the Labrador Sea, calling into question the connection between freshwater discharge to the North Atlantic and AMOC strength. Using Mg/Ca-paleothermometry, we demonstrate that approx. 3 C of near-surface ocean cooling masked an 1.0 % decrease in western Labrador Sea (delta)18O of seawater concurrent with Lake Agassiz drainage. Comparison with North Atlantic (delta)18O of seawater records shows that the freshwater discharge was transported to regions of deep-water formation where it could perturb AMOC and force the 8.2 ka event.

  6. The effects of freshwater flushing on marine heterotrophic protists--implications for ballast water management.

    PubMed

    Hülsmann, N; Galil, B S

    2001-11-01

    Survivorship of ballast-entrained marine heterotrophic protists was examined following freshwater flushing. The recovered taxa, including typical marine rhizopods such as Platyamoeba murchelanoi, Labyrinthula spp, Pontifex maximus, Thecamoeba orbis, and the ciliate Condylostoma arenarium, were reared in waters of various salinities. After 2 months, the original salinity subsample retained five protist taxa, the freshwater six, including the amoeba Cochliopodium bilimbosum, the brackish water 22 taxa, and the seawater 19 taxa. Since protists form a major component of marine microbial food webs, their survival may be instrumental in supporting complex ballast-entrained food webs. Our study raises questions as to the reliability of open-ocean exchange (OOE) or freshwater flushing as effective control measures.

  7. The sea level response to ice sheet freshwater forcing in the Community Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slangen, Aimée B. A.; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of a realistic ice sheet freshwater forcing on sea-level change in the fully coupled Community Earth System Model (CESM) showing not only the effect on the ocean density and dynamics, but also the gravitational response to mass redistribution between ice sheets and the ocean. We compare the ‘standard’ model simulation (NO-FW) to a simulation with a more realistic ice sheet freshwater forcing (FW) for two different forcing scenario’s (RCP2.6 and RCP8.5) for 1850–2100. The effect on the global mean thermosteric sea-level change is small compared to the total thermosteric change, but on a regional scale the ocean steric/dynamic change shows larger differences in the Southern Ocean, the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean (locally over 0.1 m). The gravitational fingerprints of the net sea-level contributions of the ice sheets are computed separately, showing a regional pattern with a magnitude that is similar to the difference between the NO-FW and FW simulations of the ocean steric/dynamic pattern. Our results demonstrate the importance of ice sheet mass loss for regional sea-level projections in light of the projected increasing contribution of ice sheets to future sea-level rise.

  8. What is the future fate of estuaries given nutrient over-enrichment, freshwater diversion and low flows?

    PubMed

    Flemer, David A; Champ, Michael A

    2006-03-01

    Freshwater inflow is central to the definition of estuaries and if we lose control of the quantity of freshwater flow or discharge (including seasonal timing) to estuaries, then freshwater water quality has the potential to become a moot issue in estuarine ecosystems (Definition of estuaries: estuaries (aestus = tide) are physico-chemically, geomorphically, and biotically diverse ecosystems. Although numerous definitions of estuaries exist, we prefer the following: an estuary is a partially enclosed coastal water body in which freshwater runoff, often seasonally and episodically pulsed, dilutes salty ocean water and the biotic structure is influenced by dynamic tidal action and associated salinity gradients and reef building organisms and wetlands influence development and evolution of ecological structure and function (see for expanded definition)). PMID:16426644

  9. Ocean Acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Rodriguez, Maria Debora

    The oceans play a central role in the maintenance of life on Earth. Oceans provide extensive ecosystems for marine animals and plants covering two-thirds of the Earth's surface, are essential sources of food, economic activity, and biodiversity, and are central to the global biogeochemical cycles. The oceans are the largest reservoir of carbon in the Planet, and absorb approximately one-third of the carbon emissions that are released to the Earth's atmosphere as a result of human activities. Since the beginning of industrialization, humans have been responsible for the increase in one greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2), from approximately 280 parts per million (ppm) at the end of the nineteenth century to the current levels of 390ppm. As well as affecting the surface ocean pH, and the organisms living at the ocean surface, these increases in CO2 are causing global mean surface temperatures to rise.

  10. Greenland freshwater pathways in the sub-Arctic Seas from model experiments with passive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukhovskoy, Dmitry S.; Myers, Paul G.; Platov, Gennady; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Curry, Beth; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Bamber, Jonathan L.; Chassignet, Eric; Hu, Xianmin; Lee, Craig M.; Somavilla, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating since the early 1990s, the Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss exerts a significant impact on thermohaline processes in the sub-Arctic seas. Surplus freshwater discharge from Greenland since the 1990s, comparable in volume to the amount of freshwater present during the Great Salinity Anomaly events, could spread and accumulate in the sub-Arctic seas, influencing convective processes there. However, hydrographic observations in the Labrador Sea and the Nordic Seas, where the Greenland freshening signal might be expected to propagate, do not show a persistent freshening in the upper ocean during last two decades. This raises the question of where the surplus Greenland freshwater has propagated. In order to investigate the fate, pathways, and propagation rate of Greenland meltwater in the sub-Arctic seas, several numerical experiments using a passive tracer to track the spreading of Greenland freshwater have been conducted as a part of the Forum for Arctic Ocean Modeling and Observational Synthesis effort. The models show that Greenland freshwater propagates and accumulates in the sub-Arctic seas, although the models disagree on the amount of tracer propagation into the convective regions. Results highlight the differences in simulated physical mechanisms at play in different models and underscore the continued importance of intercomparison studies. It is estimated that surplus Greenland freshwater flux should have caused a salinity decrease by 0.06-0.08 in the sub-Arctic seas in contradiction with the recently observed salinification (by 0.15-0.2) in the region. It is surmised that the increasing salinity of Atlantic Water has obscured the freshening signal.

  11. Continental freshwater discharge estimates from satellite observations and terrestrial water balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munier, S.; Cazenave, A. A.; Maisongrande, P.

    2011-12-01

    Freshwater discharge is a key component of the global water cycle. During the last few decades, remotely sensed hydro-climatic data has given the opportunity to overcome the numerous technical, political and economical challenges raised by ground-based observation networks. In the present study, we used satellite observations combined with atmospheric reanalysis in a coupled ocean-land-atmosphere water mass balance to estimate freshwater discharge over the last few years at basin, continental and global scales. Variations in terrestrial water storage (TWS) are provided by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission, whereas precipitation minus evapotranspiration (P-E) is computed from atmospheric reanalyses (NCEP-NCAR and ECMWF datasets). In order to assess the accuracy of freshwater discharge estimates, uncertainties in each terms of the water balance are explored. GRACE-derived TWS is compared to outputs of Land Surface Models (GLDAS, WGHM and ISBA), keeping in mind that LSMs generally do not account for human-induced effects on the hydrological cycle. Independently, reanalysis-based P-E is compared to remotely sensed and/or in situ observations of precipitation (GPCC, GPCP, CMAP), evaporation over oceans (OAFlux, HOAPS) and modeled evapotranspiration over land (Penman-Monteith and Priestley-Taylor). Finally, freshwater discharge estimates are compared to in situ discharge observations from GRDC and to estimates from previous global studies. Discrepancies between the different datasets, in terms of annual mean as well as seasonal and inter-annual variability, allowed us to draw uncertainty maps, then highlighting regions where freshwater discharge estimates are the most uncertain. Such results may help to focus future developments on hydrological modeling for further improvement in freshwater discharge estimates.

  12. New insights into the organic carbon export in the Mediterranean Sea from 3-D modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyennon, A.; Baklouti, M.; Diaz, F.; Palmieri, J.; Beuvier, J.; Lebaupin-Brossier, C.; Arsouze, T.; Béranger, K.; Dutay, J.-C.; Moutin, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is one of the most oligotrophic regions of the oceans, and nutrients have been shown to limit both phytoplankton and bacterial activities, resulting in a potential major role of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export in the biological pump. Strong DOC accumulation in surface waters is already well documented, though measurements of DOC stocks and export flux are still sparse and associated with major uncertainties. This study provides the first basin-scale overview and analysis of organic carbon stocks and export fluxes in the Mediterranean Sea through a modeling approach based on a coupled model combining a mechanistic biogeochemical model (Eco3M-MED) and a high-resolution (eddy-resolving) hydrodynamic simulation (NEMO-MED12). The model is shown to reproduce the main spatial and seasonal biogeochemical characteristics of the Mediterranean Sea. Model estimations of carbon export are also of the same order of magnitude as estimations from in situ observations, and their respective spatial patterns are mutually consistent. Strong differences between the western and eastern basins are evidenced by the model for organic carbon export. Though less oligotrophic than the eastern basin, the western basin only supports 39 % of organic carbon (particulate and dissolved) export. Another major result is that except for the Alboran Sea, the DOC contribution to organic carbon export is higher than that of particulate organic carbon (POC) throughout the Mediterranean Sea, especially in the eastern basin. This paper also investigates the seasonality of DOC and POC exports as well as the differences in the processes involved in DOC and POC exports in light of intracellular quotas. Finally, according to the model, strong phosphate limitation of both bacteria and phytoplankton growth is one of the main drivers of DOC accumulation and therefore of export.

  13. Davis Pond Freshwater Prediversion Biomonitoring Study: Freshwater Fisheries and Eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bourgeois, E. Beth; Jeske, Clint W.

    2008-01-01

    In January 2001, the construction of the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure was completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The diversion of freshwater from the Mississippi River is intended to mitigate saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico and to lessen the concomitant loss of wetland areas. In addition to the freshwater inflow, Barataria Bay basin would receive nutrients, increased flows of sediments, and water-borne and sediment-bound compounds. The purpose of this biomonitoring study was, therefore, to serve as a baseline for prediversion concentrations of selected contaminants in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestlings (hereafter referred to as eaglets), representative freshwater fish, and bivalves. Samples were collected from January through June 2001. Two similarly designed postdiversion studies, as described in the biological monitoring program, are planned. Active bald eagle nests targeted for sampling eaglet blood (n = 6) were generally located southwest and south of the diversion structure. The designated sites for aquatic animal sampling were at Lake Salvador, at Lake Cataouatche, at Bayou Couba, and along the Mississippi River. Aquatic animals representative of eagle prey were collected. Fish were from three different trophic levels and have varying feeding strategies and life histories. These included herbivorous striped mullet (Mugil cephalus), omnivorous blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), and carnivorous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Three individuals per species were collected at each of the four sampling sites. Freshwater Atlantic rangia clams (Rangia cuneata) were collected at the downstream marsh sites, and zebra mussels (Dreissena spp.) were collected on the Mississippi River. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) protocols served as guides for fish sampling and health assessments. Fish are useful for monitoring aquatic ecosystems because they accumulate

  14. 78 FR 31517 - Export Trade Certificate of Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Export Trade Certificate of Review to California Almond Export Association, LLC (``CAEA'') (Application... Review to California Almond Export Association, LLC on May 20, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  15. Late-winter conditions and freshwater transport in the East Greenland Current: highlights from an icebreaker based survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, J.; Björk, G.; Lake, I.; Nohr, C.; Rudels, B.; Winsor, P.

    2003-04-01

    General dynamical features of East Greenland Current (EGC) are synthesized from a survey conducted by the icebreaker Oden during the Swedish Arctic Ocean Expedition 2002. The data includes hydrography and ADCP observations in eight transects of the EGC, from the Fram Strait in the north to the Denmark Strait in the south. The survey reveals a strong confinement of the low-saline polar water in the EGC to the continental slope/shelf --- a feature of relevance for the overall stability of the thermohaline circulation in the Arctic Ocean. The southward transport of liquid freshwater in the EGC was found to vary dramatically between transects: from peak values on the order of 0.06 Sverdrup to virtually zero. The dynamical origin of the observed alongstream pulsations in freshwater transport is briefly discussed from a theoretical standpoint, emphasizing the potential for freshwater leakage into the deep-water producing areas in the Greenland Sea.

  16. Abbreviation of larval development and extension of brood care as key features of the evolution of freshwater Decapoda.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Günter

    2013-02-01

    The transition from marine to freshwater habitats is one of the major steps in the evolution of life. In the decapod crustaceans, four groups have colonized fresh water at different geological times since the Triassic, the freshwater shrimps, freshwater crayfish, freshwater crabs and freshwater anomurans. Some families have even colonized terrestrial habitats via the freshwater route or directly via the sea shore. Since none of these taxa has ever reinvaded its environment of origin the Decapoda appear particularly suitable to investigate life-history adaptations to fresh water. Evolutionary comparison of marine, freshwater and terrestrial decapods suggests that the reduction of egg number, abbreviation of larval development, extension of brood care and lecithotrophy of the first posthatching life stages are key adaptations to fresh water. Marine decapods usually have high numbers of small eggs and develop through a prolonged planktonic larval cycle, whereas the production of small numbers of large eggs, direct development and extended brood care until the juvenile stage is the rule in freshwater crayfish, primary freshwater crabs and aeglid anomurans. The amphidromous freshwater shrimp and freshwater crab species and all terrestrial decapods that invaded land via the sea shore have retained ocean-type planktonic development. Abbreviation of larval development and extension of brood care are interpreted as adaptations to the particularly strong variations of hydrodynamic parameters, physico-chemical factors and phytoplankton availability in freshwater habitats. These life-history changes increase fitness of the offspring and are obviously favoured by natural selection, explaining their multiple origins in fresh water. There is no evidence for their early evolution in the marine ancestors of the extant freshwater groups and a preadaptive role for the conquest of fresh water. The costs of the shift from relative r- to K-strategy in freshwater decapods are traded

  17. Fluid flow enhances the effectiveness of toxin export by aquatic microorganisms: a first-passage perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas; Clark, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    Aquatic microorganisms face a variety of challenges in the course of development. One central challenge is efficiently regulating the export of toxic molecules inside the developing embryo. The strategies employed should be robust with respect to the variable ocean environment and limit the chances that exported toxins are reabsorbed. In this talk we consider the first-passage problem for the uptake of exported toxins by a spherical embryo. A perturbative solution of the advection-diffusion equation reveals that a concentration boundary layer forms in the vicinity of the embryo, and that fluid flow enhances the effectiveness of toxin export. We highlight connections between the model results and recent experiments on the development of sea urchin embryos. We acknowledge financial support from the University of Michigan-Dearobrn CASL Faculty Summer Research Grant.

  18. A decrease in discharge-normalized DOC export by the Yukon River during summer through autumn

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striegl, R.G.; Aiken, G.R.; Dornblaser, M.M.; Raymond, P.A.; Wickland, K.P.

    2005-01-01

    Climate warming is having a dramatic effect on the vegetation distribution and carbon cycling of terrestrial subarctic and arctic ecosystems. Here, we present hydrologic evidence that warming is also affecting the export of dissolved organic carbon and bicarbonate (DOC and HCO3-) at the large basin scale. In the 831,400 km2 Yukon River basin, water discharge (Q) corrected DOC export significantly decreased during the growing season from 1978-80 to 2001-03, indicating a major shift in terrestrial to aquatic C transfer. We conclude that decreased DOC export, relative to total summer through autumn Q, results from increased flow path, residence time, and microbial mineralization of DOC in the soil active layer and groundwater. Counter to current predictions, we argue that continued warming could result in decreased DOC export to the Bering Sea and Arctic Ocean by major subarctic and arctic rivers, due to increased respiration of organic C on land. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Natural Gas Exports from Iran

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

  20. Swimming in the USA: Beachgoer Characteristics and Health Outcomes at U.S. Marine and Freshwater Beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Swimming in lakes and oceans is popular, but tittle is known about the demographic characteristics, behaviors, and health risks of beachgoers on a national level. Data from a prospective cohort study of beachgoers at multiple marine and freshwater beaches in the USA were used to ...

  1. Heat, salt, and freshwater budgets for a glacial fjord in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. H.; Straneo, F.

    2015-12-01

    Fjords link the ocean and outlet glaciers of the Greenland ice sheet. As the ice sheet loses mass - potentially triggered by submarine melting - measurements of ocean heat transport in fjords are increasingly being used to diagnose submarine melting and freshwater fluxes. The full budgets that underlie such methods, however, have been largely neglected. Here, we present complete heat, salt, and mass budgets for glacial fjords and new equations for inferring the freshwater fluxes of submarine melting and runoff. Building on estuarine studies of salt budgets, this method includes a decomposition of the fjord transports (into barotropic, exchange, and fluctuating components) that is crucial for conserving mass in the budgets and appropriately accounting for temporal variability. These methods are applied to moored records from Sermilik Fjord, near the terminus of Helheim Glacier, to evaluate the dominant balances in the fjord budgets and to estimate freshwater fluxes. We find two different regimes seasonally that align with the seasonal variations in fjord drivers: shelf variability from barrier winds and freshwater forcing. Our results highlight many important components of fjord budgets, particularly iceberg melting, heat/salt storage and barotropic fluxes, that have been neglected in previous estimates of submarine melting.

  2. Climate Change-Related Hydrologic Variation Affects Dissolved Organic Carbon Export to the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, T. G.; Balch, W. M.; Aiken, G.; Butler, K. D.; Billmire, M.; Roesler, C. S.; Camill, P.; Bourakovsky, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing climate change is affecting the timing and amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exported to the Gulf of Maine (GoM) through effects on hydrologic conditions. Climate warming in the northeast United States has resulted in decreases in snowfall amount and increases in the proportion of annual precipitation that falls as rain compared with snow. Warming has resulted in an increase in runoff during winter and earlier snowmelt and associated high spring flow. Increases in annual precipitation have resulted in increases in annual runoff. Increases in flashiness in some rivers have resulted in higher variability in daily runoff. DOC fluxes were estimated for water years 1950 through 2012 in eight rivers draining to the GoM that had long-term discharge data and data for DOC during all months of the year. These estimates used LOADEST to fit a seasonally-adjusted concentration - discharge relation. The adjusted maximum likelihood estimation (AMLE) method was used to estimate loads. One of several predefined regression models evaluated in LOADEST was selected based on the Akaike information criterion (AIC) for each river. This analysis assumed stationarity in the concentration - discharge relations. The proportion of total annual DOC exported during winter has increased. The proportion of DOC exported during March and April has also increased and the proportion exported during May has decreased in association with earlier snowmelt runoff and earlier recession to summer low flow. The total annual DOC exported by these rivers increased significantly from 1950 to 2012. The increase in flashiness has increased daily variability in DOC export in some rivers. Changes in the timing and amount of DOC exported to the near coastal ocean may influence marine biogeochemistry including the development of nuisance and harmful algal blooms, carbon sequestration, and the interpretation of satellite-derived ocean color. Terrestrially derived DOC exported to the marine environment

  3. Sustainable Management of Coastal Environments Through Coupled Terrestrial-Coastal Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohrenz, S. E.; Cai, W.; Tian, H.; He, R.; Xue, Z.; Fennel, K.; Hopkinson, C.; Howden, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Ecosystem Model (DLEM) to characterize changes in terrestrial hydrogeologic processes and link this to a coupled physical-biological model characterizing ecosystem dynamics in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Comparisons between observed and modeled exports of freshwater, dissolved inorganic nitrogen and dissolved inorganic carbon show good agreement. These export fluxes are then coupled to a 3-dimensional coupled physical-biogeochemical model adapted for the Gulf of Mexico. Extensive model validations have been performed against satellite observed surface chlorophyll, and in-situ measurements including temperature, salinity, nutrient, alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon. Significant seasonal and interannual variations in coastal circulation, nutrient and carbon contents, and plankton concentrations are reasonably well simulated by this model. This research will provide information that will contribute to determining an overall carbon balance in North America. Results would also benefit efforts to describe and predict how land use and land cover changes impact coastal water quality including possible effects of coastal eutrophication and hypoxia.

  4. RNA Export through the NPC in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Masumi; Inose, Haruko; Masuda, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, RNAs are transcribed in the nucleus and exported to the cytoplasm through the nuclear pore complex. The RNA molecules that are exported from the nucleus into the cytoplasm include messenger RNAs (mRNAs), ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs), small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), micro RNAs (miRNAs), and viral mRNAs. Each RNA is transported by a specific nuclear export receptor. It is believed that most of the mRNAs are exported by Nxf1 (Mex67 in yeast), whereas rRNAs, snRNAs, and a certain subset of mRNAs are exported in a Crm1/Xpo1-dependent manner. tRNAs and miRNAs are exported by Xpot and Xpo5. However, multiple export receptors are involved in the export of some RNAs, such as 60S ribosomal subunit. In addition to these export receptors, some adapter proteins are required to export RNAs. The RNA export system of eukaryotic cells is also used by several types of RNA virus that depend on the machineries of the host cell in the nucleus for replication of their genome, therefore this review describes the RNA export system of two representative viruses. We also discuss the NPC anchoring-dependent mRNA export factors that directly recruit specific genes to the NPC. PMID:25802992

  5. Scientific development of a massively parallel ocean climate model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Semtner, A.J.; Chervin, R.M.

    1996-09-01

    Over the last three years, very significant advances have been made in refining the grid resolution of ocean models and in improving the physical and numerical treatments of ocean hydrodynamics. Some of these advances have occurred as a result of the successful transition of ocean models onto massively parallel computers, which has been led by Los Alamos investigators. Major progress has been made in simulating global ocean circulation and in understanding various ocean climatic aspects such as the effect of wind driving on heat and freshwater transports. These steps have demonstrated the capability to conduct realistic decadal to century ocean integrations at high resolution on massively parallel computers.

  6. Transient Changes in the Biosphere as a Result of Freshwater Hosing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dePolo, P.; Morel, V.; Matsumoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    The influx of large amounts of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean over the course of deglaciation after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) has been linked with abrupt climactic shifts like the Heinrich 1 and the Younger Dryas stadials. Using the Minnesota Earth System Model for Ocean biogeochemistry (MESMO-2E), an earth system model of intermediate complexity, we evaluate the effects of a range of volumes of freshwater upon terrestrial and marine biota in equilibrated states of both LGM and modern pre-industrial boundary conditions. Preliminary analysis of the model outputs reveals a qualitative similarity between simulations that started from significantly different initial states. Additional sensitivity experiments determining the relative contributions of climate indicators (e.g. temperature and precipitation) to the success of marine and terrestrial biota will be presented.

  7. Single-cell genomics reveal low recombination frequencies in freshwater bacteria of the SAR11 clade

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The SAR11 group of Alphaproteobacteria is highly abundant in the oceans. It contains a recently diverged freshwater clade, which offers the opportunity to compare adaptations to salt- and freshwaters in a monophyletic bacterial group. However, there are no cultivated members of the freshwater SAR11 group and no genomes have been sequenced yet. Results We isolated ten single SAR11 cells from three freshwater lakes and sequenced and assembled their genomes. A phylogeny based on 57 proteins indicates that the cells are organized into distinct microclusters. We show that the freshwater genomes have evolved primarily by the accumulation of nucleotide substitutions and that they have among the lowest ratio of recombination to mutation estimated for bacteria. In contrast, members of the marine SAR11 clade have one of the highest ratios. Additional metagenome reads from six lakes confirm low recombination frequencies for the genome overall and reveal lake-specific variations in microcluster abundances. We identify hypervariable regions with gene contents broadly similar to those in the hypervariable regions of the marine isolates, containing genes putatively coding for cell surface molecules. Conclusions We conclude that recombination rates differ dramatically in phylogenetic sister groups of the SAR11 clade adapted to freshwater and marine ecosystems. The results suggest that the transition from marine to freshwater systems has purged diversity and resulted in reduced opportunities for recombination with divergent members of the clade. The low recombination frequencies of the LD12 clade resemble the low genetic divergence of host-restricted pathogens that have recently shifted to a new host. PMID:24286338

  8. Influence of water allocation and freshwater inflow on oyster production: a hydrodynamic-oyster population model for Galveston Bay, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Powell, Eric N; Klinck, John M; Hofmann, Eileen E; McManus, Margaret A

    2003-01-01

    A hydrodynamic-oyster population model was developed to assess the effect of changes in freshwater inflow on oyster populations in Galveston Bay, Texas, USA. The population model includes the effects of environmental conditions, predators, and the oyster parasite, Perkinsus marinus, on oyster populations. The hydrodynamic model includes the effects of wind stress, river runoff, tides, and oceanic exchange on the circulation of the bay. Simulations were run for low, mean, and high freshwater inflow conditions under the present (1993) hydrology and predicted hydrologies for 2024 and 2049 that include both changes in total freshwater inflow and diversions of freshwater from one primary drainage basin to another. Freshwater diversion to supply the Houston metropolitan area is predicted to negatively impact oyster production in Galveston Bay. Fecundity and larval survivorship both decline. Mortality from Perkinsus marinus increases, but to a lesser extent. A larger negative impact in 2049 relative to 2024 originates from the larger drop in fecundity under that hydrology. Changes in recruitment and mortality, resulting in lowered oyster abundance, occur because the bay volume available for mixing freshwater input from the San Jacinto and Buffalo Bayou drainage basins that drain metropolitan Houston is small in comparison to the volume of Trinity Bay that presently receives the bulk of the bay's freshwater inflow. A smaller volume for mixing results in salinities that decline more rapidly and to a greater extent under conditions of high freshwater discharge.Thus, the decline in oyster abundance results from a disequilibrium between geography and salinity brought about by freshwater diversion. Although the bay hydrology shifts, available hard substrate does not. The simulations stress the fact that it is not just the well-appreciated reduction in freshwater inflow that can result in decreased oyster production. Changing the location of freshwater inflow can also

  9. Global carbon export from the terrestrial biosphere controlled by erosion.

    PubMed

    Galy, Valier; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Eglinton, Timothy

    2015-05-14

    Riverine export of particulate organic carbon (POC) to the ocean affects the atmospheric carbon inventory over a broad range of timescales. On geological timescales, the balance between sequestration of POC from the terrestrial biosphere and oxidation of rock-derived (petrogenic) organic carbon sets the magnitude of the atmospheric carbon and oxygen reservoirs. Over shorter timescales, variations in the rate of exchange between carbon reservoirs, such as soils and marine sediments, also modulate atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. The respective fluxes of biospheric and petrogenic organic carbon are poorly constrained, however, and mechanisms controlling POC export have remained elusive, limiting our ability to predict POC fluxes quantitatively as a result of climatic or tectonic changes. Here we estimate biospheric and petrogenic POC fluxes for a suite of river systems representative of the natural variability in catchment properties. We show that export yields of both biospheric and petrogenic POC are positively related to the yield of suspended sediment, revealing that POC export is mostly controlled by physical erosion. Using a global compilation of gauged suspended sediment flux, we derive separate estimates of global biospheric and petrogenic POC fluxes of 157(+74)(-50) and 43(+61)(-25) megatonnes of carbon per year, respectively. We find that biospheric POC export is primarily controlled by the capacity of rivers to mobilize and transport POC, and is largely insensitive to the magnitude of terrestrial primary production. Globally, physical erosion rates affect the rate of biospheric POC burial in marine sediments more strongly than carbon sequestration through silicate weathering. We conclude that burial of biospheric POC in marine sediments becomes the dominant long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide sink under enhanced physical erosion.

  10. Global carbon export from the terrestrial biosphere controlled by erosion.

    PubMed

    Galy, Valier; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Eglinton, Timothy

    2015-05-14

    Riverine export of particulate organic carbon (POC) to the ocean affects the atmospheric carbon inventory over a broad range of timescales. On geological timescales, the balance between sequestration of POC from the terrestrial biosphere and oxidation of rock-derived (petrogenic) organic carbon sets the magnitude of the atmospheric carbon and oxygen reservoirs. Over shorter timescales, variations in the rate of exchange between carbon reservoirs, such as soils and marine sediments, also modulate atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. The respective fluxes of biospheric and petrogenic organic carbon are poorly constrained, however, and mechanisms controlling POC export have remained elusive, limiting our ability to predict POC fluxes quantitatively as a result of climatic or tectonic changes. Here we estimate biospheric and petrogenic POC fluxes for a suite of river systems representative of the natural variability in catchment properties. We show that export yields of both biospheric and petrogenic POC are positively related to the yield of suspended sediment, revealing that POC export is mostly controlled by physical erosion. Using a global compilation of gauged suspended sediment flux, we derive separate estimates of global biospheric and petrogenic POC fluxes of 157(+74)(-50) and 43(+61)(-25) megatonnes of carbon per year, respectively. We find that biospheric POC export is primarily controlled by the capacity of rivers to mobilize and transport POC, and is largely insensitive to the magnitude of terrestrial primary production. Globally, physical erosion rates affect the rate of biospheric POC burial in marine sediments more strongly than carbon sequestration through silicate weathering. We conclude that burial of biospheric POC in marine sediments becomes the dominant long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide sink under enhanced physical erosion. PMID:25971513

  11. Ocean water cycle: its recent amplification and impact on ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Nadya

    2016-04-01

    Oceans are the largest reservoir of the world's water supply, accounting for 97% of the Earth's water and supplying more than 75% of the evaporated and precipitated water in the global water cycle. Therefore, in order to predict the future of the global hydrological cycle, it is essential to understand the changes in its largest component, which is the flux of freshwater over the oceans. Here we examine the change in the ocean water cycle and the ocean's response to such changes that were happening during the last two decades. The analysis is based on a data-constrained ocean state estimate that synthesizes all of the information available in the surface fluxes, winds, observations of sea level, temperature, salinity, geoid, etc., as well as in the physical constraints, dynamics, and conservation statements that are embedded in the equations of the MIT general circulation model. Closeness to observations and dynamical consistency of the solution ensures a physically realistic correspondence between the atmospheric forcing and oceanic fluxes, including the ocean's response to freshwater input. The results show a robust pattern of change in the ocean water cycle in the last twenty years. The pattern of changes indicates a general tendency of drying of the subtropics, and wetting in the tropics and mid-to-high latitudes, following the "rich get richer and the poor get poorer" paradigm in many ocean regions. Using a closed property budget analysis, we then investigate the changes in the oceanic state (salinity, temperature, sea level) during the same twenty-year period. The results are discussed in terms of the origin of surface signatures, and differentiated between those that are attributed to short-term natural variability and those that result from an intensified hydrological cycle due to warming climate.

  12. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Fish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brungs, W. A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater fish, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) water quality; (2) pesticide pollutants; (3) chemical pollutants; (4) miscellaneous pollutants; and (5) physical factors of pollution on freshwater fish. A list of 338 references is also presented. (HM)

  13. Freshwater Biological Traits Database (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cover of the <span class=Freshwater Biological Traits Database Final Report"> This final report discusses the development of a database of freshwater biolo...

  14. Why are freshwater fish so threatened?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Closs, Gerard P.; Angermeier, Paul; Darwall, William R.T.; Balcombe, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding why so many freshwater fish species are threatened requires some understanding of their biology, diversity, distribution, biogeography and ecology, but also some appreciation of the social, economic and political forces that are causing humans to destroy the natural ecosystems upon which we all ultimately depend. To begin to understand the diversity of freshwater fishes, we first need to consider the processes that generated and continue to sustain the diversity of species we see today. Based on an understanding of how freshwater fish diversity is generated and sustained, we consider how vulnerable or resilient various freshwater fishes are to the range of anthropogenic impacts that impinge on freshwater ecosystems. Finally, we discuss how social, political and economic drivers influence human impacts on natural systems, and the changes needed to current models of development that can lead to a sustainable future for humans and the diverse range of freshwater fish species with which we share our planet. The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the key issues and threats driving the declines in freshwater fish diversity identified in Chapter 1; subsequent chapters provide more detail on the key issues and address our options for developing a sustainable future for freshwater fishes.

  15. Freshwater Ecology. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    Freshwater ecosystems include lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, and certain types of wetlands. This literature and resources guide is not intended to be a comprehensive bibliography on freshwater ecology; the guide is designed--as the name of the series implies--to put the reader or student "on target." Other literature guides related to freshwater…

  16. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    SciTech Connect

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the Southern

  17. Ocean surface conditions on the SE Greenland shelf during the last millennium - from abrupt changes to centennial variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettinen, Arto; Divine, Dmitry; Husum, Katrine; Koç, Nalan; Jennings, Anne

    2016-04-01

    August sea surface temperatures (aSST) and April sea-ice concentrations (aSIC) covering the last 2900 years have been reconstructed in order to investigate the variability of summer surface conditions along possible forcing factors on the SE Greenland shelf. In this diatom-based study, we focus on the interval ca. 870-1910 Common Era (CE) reconstructed at a high temporal resolution of 3-8 years. The results demonstrate both abrupt changes and a clear centennial-bicentennial variability for the last millennium. The Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) between 1000 and 1200 CE represents the warmest ocean surface conditions of the SE Greenland shelf over the late Holocene (880 BCE-1910 CE). MCA in the current record is characterized by abrupt, decadal to multidecadal changes, such as an abrupt warming of ~2.4 °C in 55 years around 1000 CE. Temperature changes of these magnitudes are rarely observed in other proxy records from the North Atlantic. Compared to regional air temperature reconstructions, our results indicate a lag of about 50 years in ocean surface warming either due to increased freshwater discharge from the Greenland ice sheet or intensified sea-ice export from the Arctic as a response to atmospheric warming at the beginning of the MCA. A cool phase, from 1200-1890 CE, associated with the Little Ice Age (LIA), ends with the rapid warming of aSST and diminished aSIC in the early 20th century. The phases of warm aSST and aSIC minima on the SE Greenland shelf and solar minima of the last millennium are antiphased, suggesting that solar forcing possibly amplified by atmospheric forcing has been behind the aSST variability on the SE Greenland over the last millennium. The results might indicate decreased sea ice formation on the SE Greenland shelf due to diminished freshwater input from the Greenland Ice Sheet during the cold climate periods. The results show that the SE Greenland shelf is a climatologically sensitive area where extremely rapid changes are

  18. Freshwater for resilience: a shift in thinking.

    PubMed Central

    Folke, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Humanity shapes freshwater flows and biosphere dynamics from a local to a global scale. Successful management of target resources in the short term tends to alienate the social and economic development process from its ultimate dependence on the life-supporting environment. Freshwater becomes transformed into a resource for optimal management in development, neglecting the multiple functions of freshwater in dynamic landscapes and its fundamental role as the bloodstream of the biosphere. The current tension of these differences in worldview is exemplified through the recent development of modern aquaculture contrasted with examples of catchment-based stewardship of freshwater flows in dynamic landscapes. In particular, the social and institutional dimension of catchment management is highlighted and features of social-ecological systems for resilience building are presented. It is concluded that this broader view of freshwater provides the foundation for hydrosolidarity. PMID:14728796

  19. Freshwater to seawater transitions in migratory fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zydlewski, Joseph; Michael P. Wilkie,

    2012-01-01

    The transition from freshwater to seawater is integral to the life history of many fishes. Diverse migratory fishes express anadromous, catadromous, and amphidromous life histories, while others make incomplete transits between freshwater and seawater. The physiological mechanisms of osmoregulation are widely conserved among phylogenetically diverse species. Diadromous fishes moving between freshwater and seawater develop osmoregulatory mechanisms for different environmental salinities. Freshwater to seawater transition involves hormonally mediated changes in gill ionocytes and the transport proteins associated with hypoosmoregulation, increased seawater ingestion and water absorption in the intestine, and reduced urinary water losses. Fishes attain salinity tolerance through early development, gradual acclimation, or environmentally or developmentally cued adaptations. This chapter describes adaptations in diverse taxa and the effects of salinity on growth. Identifying common strategies in diadromous fishes moving between freshwater and seawater will reveal the ecological and physiological basis for maintaining homeostasis in different salinities, and inform efforts to conserve and manage migratory euryhaline fishes.

  20. 7 CFR 922.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.15 Export. Export means to ship apricots beyond...

  1. 7 CFR 922.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.15 Export. Export means to ship apricots beyond...

  2. 7 CFR 922.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.15 Export. Export means to ship apricots beyond...

  3. 7 CFR 922.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.15 Export. Export means to ship apricots beyond...

  4. 7 CFR 922.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.15 Export. Export means to ship apricots beyond...

  5. 7 CFR 915.12 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 915.12 Export. Export means to ship avocados to any destination which...

  6. 78 FR 37518 - Order Denying Export Privileges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... with knowledge or reason to know that the item will be, or is intended to be, exported from the United... exported from the United States. For purposes of this paragraph, servicing means installation,...

  7. 7 CFR 915.12 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 915.12 Export. Export means to ship avocados to any destination which...

  8. 7 CFR 966.18 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.18 Export. Export means shipment of tomatoes beyond the boundaries of the...

  9. 7 CFR 966.18 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.18 Export. Export means shipment of tomatoes beyond the boundaries of the...

  10. 7 CFR 966.18 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.18 Export. Export means shipment of tomatoes beyond the boundaries of the...

  11. 7 CFR 966.18 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.18 Export. Export means shipment of tomatoes beyond the boundaries of the...

  12. 7 CFR 915.12 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 915.12 Export. Export means to ship avocados to any destination which...

  13. Export bill and scientific exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    President Ronald Reagan has signed into law the reauthorization of the Export Administration Act (EAA), first passed in 1979. The amended version of the law, signed July 12, includes a policy statement in support of “vigorous scientific enterprise. . .in accordance with applicable provisions of law. . .by means of publication, teaching, conferences, and other forms of scholarly exchange.”

  14. Nuclear Export of Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Katahira, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex. PMID:25836925

  15. Physicist sentenced for export violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-08-01

    J Reece Roth, a retired University of Tennessee plasma physicist convicted of violating the American Arms Export Control Act, is planning to appeal against a four-year prison sentence handed down last month. "It's an appeal against everything, including the verdict and the sentence," says his lawyer Thomas Dundon.

  16. 19 CFR 351.414 - Comparison of normal value with export price (constructed export price).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (constructed export price). 351.414 Section 351.414 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Calculation of Export Price, Constructed Export Price, Fair Value, and Normal Value § 351.414 Comparison of normal value with export price...

  17. 19 CFR 351.414 - Comparison of normal value with export price (constructed export price).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (constructed export price). 351.414 Section 351.414 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Calculation of Export Price, Constructed Export Price, Fair Value, and Normal Value § 351.414 Comparison of normal value with export price...

  18. The Oceanic Biogeochemical Cycle of Zinc and Its Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, D.; Little, S. H.; de Souza, G. F.; Cullen, J. T.; Lohan, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Zinc (Zn) is the most abundant trace metal in the phytoplankton that dominate vertical carbon export in the ocean, the diatoms. But the strong relationship between the vertical distributions of Zn and the silicon (Si) that makes up the opal hard parts of diatoms represents a long-standing puzzle. Zn is overwhelmingly co-located with phosphate in the organic matter of diatom cells, not with Si in opal, and is regenerated with phosphate in the upper ocean, not with Si in the deep. The resolution of this apparent paradox is key both to an understanding of the global oceanic cycling of Zn, and to the rates and mechanisms by which biologically-assimilated trace metals are returned to the photic zone. Here, we show that oceanic dissolved Zn exhibits significant isotopic variation in the upper ocean that is consistent with vertical cycling. However, we suggest that the isotopically homogeneous global deep ocean Zn pool is largely sourced from the Southern Ocean. This leads to a new view of the global oceanic cycling of this important trace metal, one that is consistent with the unique physiology of Southern Ocean diatoms, the coupling of Zn and Si in the global deep ocean, and the emerging paradigm for global ocean nutrient dynamics. Our data and interpretation imply a small Zn pool that is biologically cycled in the upper ocean, but is to a great extent decoupled from the much larger Southern-Ocean-dominated deep ocean pool.

  19. 7 CFR 927.12 - Export market.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Export market. 927.12 Section 927.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 927.12 Export market. Export market means any destination...

  20. 7 CFR 927.12 - Export market.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export market. 927.12 Section 927.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 927.12 Export market. Export market means any destination...

  1. 7 CFR 923.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 923.15 Section 923.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.15 Export. Export means to ship...

  2. 7 CFR 948.17 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 948.17 Section 948.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.17 Export. Export means the shipment of potatoes to any...

  3. 7 CFR 946.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 946.15 Section 946.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.15 Export. Export means shipment of potatoes beyond the boundaries...

  4. 7 CFR 959.18 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 959.18 Section 959.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Handling Definitions § 959.18 Export. Export means to ship onions to any destination which is not...

  5. 7 CFR 924.15 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 924.15 Section 924.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... WASHINGTON AND IN UMATILLA COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 924.15 Export. Export...

  6. 7 CFR 966.18 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 966.18 Section 966.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Handling Definitions § 966.18 Export. Export means shipment of tomatoes beyond the boundaries of the...

  7. 7 CFR 947.17 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export. 947.17 Section 947.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Definitions § 947.17 Export. Export means shipment of potatoes beyond the boundaries of continental...

  8. 19 CFR 351.520 - Export insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Export insurance. 351.520 Section 351.520 Customs... Identification and Measurement of Countervailable Subsidies § 351.520 Export insurance. (a) Benefit—(1) In general. In the case of export insurance, a benefit exists if the premium rates charged are inadequate...

  9. 19 CFR 351.520 - Export insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Export insurance. 351.520 Section 351.520 Customs... Identification and Measurement of Countervailable Subsidies § 351.520 Export insurance. (a) Benefit—(1) In general. In the case of export insurance, a benefit exists if the premium rates charged are inadequate...

  10. 19 CFR 351.520 - Export insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Export insurance. 351.520 Section 351.520 Customs... Identification and Measurement of Countervailable Subsidies § 351.520 Export insurance. (a) Benefit—(1) In general. In the case of export insurance, a benefit exists if the premium rates charged are inadequate...

  11. 19 CFR 351.520 - Export insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Export insurance. 351.520 Section 351.520 Customs... Identification and Measurement of Countervailable Subsidies § 351.520 Export insurance. (a) Benefit—(1) In general. In the case of export insurance, a benefit exists if the premium rates charged are inadequate...

  12. 19 CFR 351.520 - Export insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Export insurance. 351.520 Section 351.520 Customs... Identification and Measurement of Countervailable Subsidies § 351.520 Export insurance. (a) Benefit—(1) In general. In the case of export insurance, a benefit exists if the premium rates charged are inadequate...

  13. 27 CFR 7.60 - Exports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exports. 7.60 Section 7.60... TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF MALT BEVERAGES General Provisions § 7.60 Exports. This part shall not apply to malt beverages exported in bond....

  14. 40 CFR 211.208 - Export provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Export provisions. 211.208 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.208 Export provisions. (a) The outside of each package or container containing a hearing protective device intended solely for export must be so...

  15. 10 CFR 430.65 - Exported products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exported products. 430.65 Section 430.65 Energy DEPARTMENT... Enforcement § 430.65 Exported products. Pursuant to section 330 of the Act, this part shall not apply to any covered product if (a) such covered product is manufactured, sold, or held for sale for export from...

  16. 27 CFR 28.154 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Export marks. 28.154..., for Exportation or Transfer to a Foreign-Trade Zone § 28.154 Export marks. In addition to the marks... provisions of part 19 of this chapter, the proprietor shall mark the word “Export” on the Government side...

  17. 27 CFR 28.223 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Export marks. 28.223... Export marks. In addition to the marks and brands required to be placed on kegs, barrels, cases, crates... “Export” on each container or case before removal for export, for use on vessels or aircraft, or...

  18. 78 FR 4832 - Order Denying Export Privileges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Order Denying Export Privileges In the Matter of: Jerome Stuart Pendzich... violating Section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778 (2006 & Supp. IV 2010)) (``AECA'') . Specifically, Pendzich was convicted of knowingly and willfully attempting to export defense articles, that...

  19. 78 FR 58995 - Order Denying Export Privileges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... being that of August 8, 2013 (78 FR 49107 (August 12, 2013)), has continued the Regulations in effect... Bureau of Industry and Security Order Denying Export Privileges In the Matter of: Iman Kazerani, 153... was convicted of knowingly and willfully exporting and causing the exportation of laptop...

  20. 27 CFR 4.80 - Exports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exports. 4.80 Section 4.80... TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE General Provisions § 4.80 Exports. The regulations in this part shall not apply to wine exported in bond....

  1. 19 CFR 351.514 - Export subsidies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Export subsidies. 351.514 Section 351.514 Customs... Identification and Measurement of Countervailable Subsidies § 351.514 Export subsidies. (a) In general. The Secretary will consider a subsidy to be an export subsidy if the Secretary determines that eligibility...

  2. 40 CFR 90.909 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Export exemptions. 90.909 Section 90... of Nonroad Engines from Regulations § 90.909 Export exemptions. (a) A new nonroad engine intended solely for export, and so labeled or tagged on the outside of the container and on the engine itself,...

  3. 22 CFR 120.17 - Export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Export. 120.17 Section 120.17 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.17 Export. (a) Export means: (1) Sending or taking a defense article out of the United States in any manner, except...

  4. 27 CFR 28.193 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Export marks. 28.193... Drawback Filing of Notice and Removal § 28.193 Export marks. In addition to the marks and brands required... chapter, the exporter shall mark the word “Export” on the Government side of each case or Government...

  5. 15 CFR 2014.3 - Export certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export certificates. 2014.3 Section... STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE IMPLEMENTATION OF TARIFF-RATE QUOTA FOR IMPORTS OF LAMB MEAT § 2014.3 Export... determined by the United States Customs Service, that a valid export certificate is in effect with respect...

  6. 40 CFR 85.1709 - Export exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Export exemptions. 85.1709 Section 85... Engines § 85.1709 Export exemptions. (a) A new motor vehicle or new motor vehicle engine intended solely for export, and so labeled or tagged on the outside of the container and on the vehicle or...

  7. Observations of Ocean Primary Productivity Using MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esaias, Wayne E.; Abbott, Mark R.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Measuring the magnitude and variability of oceanic net primary productivity (NPP) represents a key advancement toward our understanding of the dynamics of marine ecosystems and the role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle. MODIS observations make two new contributions in addition to continuing the bio-optical time series begun with Orbview-2's SeaWiFS sensor. First, MODIS provides weekly estimates of global ocean net primary productivity on weekly and annual time periods, and annual empirical estimates of carbon export production. Second, MODIS provides additional insight into the spatial and temporal variations in photosynthetic efficiency through the direct measurements of solar-stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The two different weekly productivity indexes (first developed by Behrenfeld & Falkowski and by Yoder, Ryan and Howard) are used to derive daily productivity as a function of chlorophyll biomass, incident daily surface irradiance, temperature, euphotic depth, and mixed layer depth. Comparisons between these two estimates using both SeaWiFS and MODIS data show significant model differences in spatial distribution after allowance for the different integration depths. Both estimates are strongly dependence on the accuracy of the chlorophyll determination. In addition, an empirical approach is taken on annual scales to estimate global NPP and export production. Estimates of solar stimulated fluorescence efficiency from chlorophyll have been shown to be inversely related to photosynthetic efficiency by Abbott and co-workers. MODIS provides the first global estimates of oceanic chlorophyll fluorescence, providing an important proof of concept. MODIS observations are revealing spatial patterns of fluorescence efficiency which show expected variations with phytoplankton photo-physiological parameters as measured during in-situ surveys. This has opened the way for research into utilizing this information to improve our understanding of oceanic NPP

  8. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  9. Global deep ocean oxygenation by enhanced ventilation in the Southern Ocean under long-term global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, A.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Shigemitsu, M.; Oka, A.; Takahashi, K.; Ohgaito, R.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Global warming is expected to decrease ocean oxygen concentrations by less solubility of surface ocean and change in ocean circulation. The associated expansion of the oxygen minimum zone would have adverse impacts on marine organisms and ocean biogeochemical cycles. Oxygen reduction is expected to persist for a thousand years or more, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. However, long-term changes in ocean oxygen and circulation are still unclear. Here we simulate multimillennium changes in ocean circulation and oxygen under doubling and quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, using a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model and an offline biogeochemical model. In the first 500 years, global oxygen concentration decreases, consistent with previous studies. Thereafter, however, the oxygen concentration in the deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots at the end of the simulations, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. This is because, after the initial cessation, the recovery and overshooting of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea enhance ventilation and supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean. Another contributor to deep ocean oxygenation is seawater warming, which reduces the export production and shifts the organic matter remineralization to the upper water column. Our results indicate that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in deep ocean, which is opposite to the centennial-scale global oxygen reduction and general expectation.

  10. Enhanced sea-ice export from the Arctic to the GIN seas during the Younger Dryas: A "Canadian" source from radiogenic isotope signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Maccali, J.; Not, C.; Poirier, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) cooling event and the related slowing of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) have been linked to a large array of processes. The most widely supported causal mechanism involves an influx of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean linked to a partial drainage of glacial Lake Agassiz. Recently, a northward drainage route, through the Mackenzie River outlet into the Arctic Ocean, has been suggested from land-based studies [Murton et al., Nature 464, 740-743]. Sedimentological and geochemical analysis of cores raised from Lomonosov Ridge and the Fram Strait area, yield relatively robust evidence for enhanced ice-rafting deposition -IRD- (with a 5-fold increase -) during the critical interval. At Lomonosov, the corresponding sedimentary layer (from ca. 13 to 12 ka) is marked by a pulse of detrital carbonates in the silt to sand fractions, with approximately equal amounts of calcite and dolomite, pointing towards an Arctic Canadian sediment source area [Not & Hillaire-Marcel, Nature Communication, Jan. 31, 2012]. The layer also depicts a 5 fold increase 230Th-excess, which we link to an enhanced flux of scavenging particles. At both sites, the geochemical signatures of the YD-layer, based on elemental (Zr/Al) and isotopic (Sr, Nd and Pb) data on bulk sediments and residues ensuing from the removal of exchangeable fractions (Zr/Al, Nd, Pb, Sr), are used to identify detrital sediment source areas. Whereas three major source areas variably contributed to IRD during the MIS 3-Present interval (i.e., the Russian, Canadian and Greenland margins), the YD interval singles out by strongelemental and isotopic excursions, notably a peak in radiogenic Sr, indicating prominent supplies from the Canadian end-member. This suggests enhanced sea-ice production and drifting along the BeaufordGyre, then the Trans-Polar Drift. A major drainage event along the Mackenzie outlet area, as proposed in the above reference,would be a suitable trigger for

  11. 77 FR 21969 - Export Trade Certificate of Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... Export Trade Certificate of Review from Panama Poultry Export Quota, Inc. SUMMARY: The Export Trading... Poultry Export Quota, Inc. (``PAN-PEQ''), 1700 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20006... Poultry Export Quota, Inc. members include the following entities: USA Poultry & Egg Export...

  12. Estimates of micro-, nano-, and picoplankton contributions to particle export in the northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackinson, B. L.; Moran, S. B.; Lomas, M. W.; Stewart, G. M.; Kelly, R. P.

    2014-08-01

    The contributions of micro-, nano-, and picoplankton to particle export were estimated from measurements of size-fractionated particulate 234Th, organic carbon, and phytoplankton indicator pigments obtained during five cruises between 2010 and 2012 along Line P in the subarctic northeast Pacific Ocean. Sinking fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) and indicator pigments were calculated from 234Th-238U disequilibria and, during two cruises, measured by sediment trap at Ocean Station Papa. POC fluxes at 100 m ranged from 0.65-7.95 mmol m-2 d-1, similar in magnitude to previous results at Line P. Microplankton pigments dominate indicator pigment fluxes (averaging 69 ± 19% of total pigment flux), while nanoplankton pigments comprised the majority of pigment standing stocks (averaging 64 ± 23% of total pigment standing stock). Indicator pigment loss rates (the ratio of pigment export flux to pigment standing stock) point to preferential export of larger microplankton relative to smaller nano- and picoplankton. However, indicator pigments do not quantitatively trace particle export resulting from zooplankton grazing, which may be an important pathway for the export of small phytoplankton. These results have important implications for understanding the magnitude and mechanisms controlling the biological pump at Line P in particular, and more generally in oligotrophic gyres and high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions where small phytoplankton represent a major component of the autotrophic community.

  13. Estimates of micro-, nano-, and picoplankton contributions to particle export in the northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackinson, B. L.; Moran, S. B.; Lomas, M. W.; Stewart, G. M.; Kelly, R. P.

    2015-06-01

    The contributions of micro-, nano-, and picoplankton to particle export were estimated from measurements of size-fractionated particulate 234Th, organic carbon, and phytoplankton indicator pigments obtained during five cruises between 2010 and 2012 along Line P in the subarctic northeast Pacific Ocean. Sinking fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) and indicator pigments were calculated from 234Th-238U disequilibria and, during two cruises, measured by a sediment trap at Ocean Station Papa. POC fluxes at 100 m ranged from 0.65 to 7.95 mmol m-2 d-1, similar in magnitude to previous results at Line P. Microplankton pigments dominate indicator pigment fluxes (averaging 69 ± 19% of total pigment flux), while nanoplankton pigments comprised the majority of pigment standing stocks (averaging 64 ± 23% of total pigment standing stocks). Indicator pigment loss rates (the ratio of pigment export flux to pigment standing stocks) point to preferential export of larger microplankton relative to smaller nano- and picoplankton. However, indicator pigments do not quantitatively trace particle export resulting from zooplankton grazing, which may be an important pathway for the export of small phytoplankton. These results have important implications for understanding the magnitude and mechanisms controlling the biological pump at Line P in particular, and more generally in oligotrophic gyres and high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions where small phytoplankton represent a major component of the autotrophic community.

  14. Multi-decadal increases in dissolved organic carbon and alkalinity flux from the Mackenzie drainage basin to the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, Suzanne E.; Striegl, Robert G.; McClelland, James W.; Kokelj, Steven V.

    2016-05-01

    Riverine exports of organic and inorganic carbon (OC, IC) to oceans are intricately linked to processes occurring on land. Across high latitudes, thawing permafrost, alteration of hydrologic flow paths, and changes in vegetation may all affect this flux, with subsequent implications for regional and global carbon (C) budgets. Using a unique, multi-decadal dataset of continuous discharge coupled with water chemistry measurements for the Mackenzie River, we show major increases in dissolved OC (DOC) and IC (as alkalinity) fluxes since the early 1970s, for a watershed that covers 1.8 M km2 of northwestern Canada, and provides substantial inputs of freshwater and biogeochemical constituents to the Arctic Ocean. Over a 39-year period of record, DOC flux at the Mackenzie mouth increased by 39.3% (44.5 ± 22.6 Gmol), while alkalinity flux increased by 12.5% (61.5 ± 60.1 Gmol). Isotopic analyses and substantial increases in sulfate flux indicate that increases in alkalinity are driven by accelerating sulfide oxidation, a process that liberates IC from rock and soils in the absence of CO2 consumption. Seasonal and sub-catchment trends suggest that permafrost thaw plays an important role in the observed increases in DOC and alkalinity: sub-catchment increases for all constituents are confined to northern, permafrost-affected regions, while observed increases in autumn to winter are consistent with documented landscape-scale changes that have resulted from changing thaw dynamics. This increase in DOC and sulfide-derived alkalinity represents a substantial intensification of land-to-ocean C mobilization, at a level that is significant within the regional C budget. The change we observe, for example, is similar to current and projected future rates of CO2 consumption by weathering in the Mackenzie basin.

  15. Hotspots in ground and surface water carbon fluxes through a freshwater to marine (mangrove) transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, J.; Welti, N.; Hayes, M.; Lockington, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The transfer of carbon and water from coastal freshwater wetlands to intertidal and marine zones is significant for sustaining ecosystem processes, particularly within mangroves environments. Large increases in carbon and nutrient fluxes within spatially confined zones (hotspots) are significant as drivers for broader cycling. How these processes relate to the transfers between surface and groundwater systems, as well as the transition from freshwater to marine environments, remains poorly understood. We investigated the flux of carbon and water from a freshwater wetland, to a saltmarsh and then mangroves, both within the main surface channel and within a comprehensive shallow groundwater bore network. We were able to characterise the main spatial trends in water gradients and mixing (using salinity, hydraulic gradients, stable water isotopes, and temperature) over seasonal cycles. In addition, at the same time we investigated the changes in dissolved organic carbon concentration and quality (fluorescence, UV), as well as nutrients (NO3, NH4). This revealed the river and tidal channel to be a significant export pathway for organic carbon, which was generally highly aromatic and recalcitrant. However, we also found that isolated sections of the brackish groundwater mixing zone between freshwater and marine provided a consistently high DOC 'hotspot' of very high quality carbon. This hotspot has high lateral groundwater gradients and therefore likely transports this carbon to the rest of the mangrove subsurface, where it is rapidly assimilated. These results imply large spatial heterogeneity in the carbon cycling between freshwater and marine environments, and have significant implications for the processing of the organic matter, and therefore also the respiration of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4.

  16. Conservation and protection of Georgia's freshwater wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Georgia's freshwater wetlands are a valuable natural resource. Despite this fact, they are vanishing at an alarming rate. One objective of the research presented in this dissertation was to try to determine why freshwater wetlands have been so little esteemed historically that their destruction has until lately drawn little attention. In addition, it was hoped that this research would lead to conclusions about the extent of Georgia's freshwater wetlands and the status of their conservation and protection. A further goal of the study was to generate ideas about how better to protect this resource, and to examine policy issues that must be addressed in association with the problem. Interest in freshwater wetlands is part of a continuum of interests and events associated with environmental awareness that has its roots in the late 1800's and early 1900's. An understanding of the history of the environmental movement and the maturation of environmental philosophy provides needed background against which the issues associated with preservation of freshwater wetlands must be viewed. The first two chapters are thus devoted to an exploration of the history of environmental awareness and activism. In the third chapter, historical material about freshwater wetlands in the, US is presented. The final section is dedicated to a discussion of freshwater wetlands in Georgia. Georgia's boundaries encompass five physiographic provinces. Freshwater wetlands are found in all of these regions, but the type of wetland varies among them. In the northern part of the state, freshwater wetlands are scarce, but in the southern half of the state they are so common as to be considered a dominant feature of the landscape. Among the threats to Georgia's wetlands are urban development, agricultural conversion, impoundment, and pollution.

  17. Biodiversity and distribution of polar freshwater DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Aguirre de Cárcer, Daniel; López-Bueno, Alberto; Pearce, David A; Alcamí, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Viruses constitute the most abundant biological entities and a large reservoir of genetic diversity on Earth. Despite the recent surge in their study, our knowledge on their actual biodiversity and distribution remains sparse. We report the first metagenomic analysis of Arctic freshwater viral DNA communities and a comparative analysis with other freshwater environments. Arctic viromes are dominated by unknown and single-stranded DNA viruses with no close relatives in the database. These unique viral DNA communities mostly relate to each other and present some minor genetic overlap with other environments studied, including an Arctic Ocean virome. Despite common environmental conditions in polar ecosystems, the Arctic and Antarctic DNA viromes differ at the fine-grain genetic level while sharing a similar taxonomic composition. The study uncovers some viral lineages with a bipolar distribution, suggesting a global dispersal capacity for viruses, and seemingly indicates that viruses do not follow the latitudinal diversity gradient known for macroorganisms. Our study sheds light into the global biogeography and connectivity of viral communities. PMID:26601189

  18. Arctic Freshwater Synthesis: Summary of key emerging issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prowse, T.; Bring, A.; Mârd, J.; Carmack, E.; Holland, M.; Instanes, A.; Vihma, T.; Wrona, F. J.

    2015-10-01

    In response to a joint request from the World Climate Research Program's Climate and Cryosphere Project, the International Arctic Science Committee, and the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program an updated scientific assessment has been conducted of the Arctic Freshwater System (AFS), entitled the Arctic Freshwater Synthesis (AFSΣ). The major reason behind the joint request was an increasing concern that changes to the AFS have produced, and could produce even greater, changes to biogeophysical and socioeconomic systems of special importance to northern residents and also produce extra-Arctic climatic effects that will have global consequences. The AFSΣ was structured around six key thematic areas: atmosphere, oceans, terrestrial hydrology, terrestrial ecology, resources, and modeling, the review of each coauthored by an international group of scientists and published as separate manuscripts in this special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences. This AFSΣ summary manuscript reviews key issues that emerged during the conduct of the synthesis, especially those that are cross-thematic in nature, and identifies future research required to address such issues.

  19. Mercury Export from Mainland China to Adjacent Seas and Its Influence on the Marine Mercury Balance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Maodian; Chen, Long; Wang, Xuejun; Zhang, Wei; Tong, Yindong; Ou, Langbo; Xie, Han; Shen, Huizhong; Ye, Xuejie; Deng, Chunyan; Wang, Huanhuan

    2016-06-21

    Exports from mainland China are a significant source of mercury (Hg) in the adjacent seas (Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, East China Sea, and South China Sea) near China. A total of 240 ± 23 Mg was contributed in 2012 (30% from natural sources and 70% from anthropogenic sources), including Hg from rivers, industrial wastewater, domestic sewage, groundwater, nonpoint sources, and coastal erosion. Among the various sources, the Hg from rivers amounts to 160 ± 21 Mg and plays a dominant role. The Hg that is exported from mainland China increased from 1984 to 2013; the contributions from rivers, industrial wastewater, domestic sewage and groundwater increased, and the contributions from nonpoint sources and coastal erosion remained stable. A box model is constructed to simulate the mass balance of Hg in these seas and quantify the sources, sinks and Hg biogeochemical cycle in the seas. In total, 160 Mg of Hg was transported to the Pacific Ocean and other oceans from these seas through oceanic currents in 2012, which could have negative impacts on the marine ecosystem. A prediction of the changes in Hg exportation through 2030 shows that the impacts of terrestrial export might worsen without effective pollution reduction measures and that the Hg load in these seas will increase, especially in the seawater of the Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, and East China Sea and in the sea margin sediments of the Bohai Sea and East China Sea. PMID:27243109

  20. Mercury Export from Mainland China to Adjacent Seas and Its Influence on the Marine Mercury Balance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Maodian; Chen, Long; Wang, Xuejun; Zhang, Wei; Tong, Yindong; Ou, Langbo; Xie, Han; Shen, Huizhong; Ye, Xuejie; Deng, Chunyan; Wang, Huanhuan

    2016-06-21

    Exports from mainland China are a significant source of mercury (Hg) in the adjacent seas (Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, East China Sea, and South China Sea) near China. A total of 240 ± 23 Mg was contributed in 2012 (30% from natural sources and 70% from anthropogenic sources), including Hg from rivers, industrial wastewater, domestic sewage, groundwater, nonpoint sources, and coastal erosion. Among the various sources, the Hg from rivers amounts to 160 ± 21 Mg and plays a dominant role. The Hg that is exported from mainland China increased from 1984 to 2013; the contributions from rivers, industrial wastewater, domestic sewage and groundwater increased, and the contributions from nonpoint sources and coastal erosion remained stable. A box model is constructed to simulate the mass balance of Hg in these seas and quantify the sources, sinks and Hg biogeochemical cycle in the seas. In total, 160 Mg of Hg was transported to the Pacific Ocean and other oceans from these seas through oceanic currents in 2012, which could have negative impacts on the marine ecosystem. A prediction of the changes in Hg exportation through 2030 shows that the impacts of terrestrial export might worsen without effective pollution reduction measures and that the Hg load in these seas will increase, especially in the seawater of the Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, and East China Sea and in the sea margin sediments of the Bohai Sea and East China Sea.

  1. Temporal trends in deep ocean Redfield ratios.

    PubMed

    Pahlow, M; Riebesell, U

    2000-02-01

    The Redfield ratio [carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus (C:N:P)] of particle flux to the deep ocean is a key factor in marine biogeochemical cycling. Changes in oceanic carbon sequestration have been linked to variations in the Redfield ratio on geological time scales, but this ratio generally is assumed to be constant with time in the modern ocean. However, deep-water Redfield ratios in the northern hemisphere show evidence for temporal trends over the past five decades. The North Atlantic Ocean exhibits a rising N:P ratio, which may be related to increased deposition of atmospheric nitrous oxides from anthropogenic N emissions. In the North Pacific Ocean, increasing C:N and C:P ratios are accompanied by rising remineralization rates, which suggests intensified export production. Stronger export of carbon in this region may be due to enhanced bioavailability of aeolian iron. These findings imply that the biological part of the marine carbon cycle currently is not in steady state. PMID:10657291

  2. Contamination of the freshwater ecosystem by pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, Oliver B.

    1966-01-01

    A large part of our disquieting present-day pesticide problem is intimately tied to the freshwater ecosystem. Economic poisons are used in so many types of terrain to control so many kinds of organisms that almost all lakes and streams are likely to be contaminated. In addition to accidental contamination many pesticides are deliberately applied directly to fresh waters for suppression of aquatic animals or plants. The problem is intensified because of the extreme susceptibility of freshwater organisms. The complexity of freshwater environments and their variety makes it difficult to comprehend the total effect of pesticides.

  3. 19 CFR 351.402 - Calculation of export price and constructed export price; reimbursement of antidumping and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calculation of export price and constructed export... Export Price, Constructed Export Price, Fair Value, and Normal Value § 351.402 Calculation of export price and constructed export price; reimbursement of antidumping and countervailing duties....

  4. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned...

  5. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned...

  6. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned...

  7. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned...

  8. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned...

  9. Advancing understanding of the fluvial export of organic matter through high-resolution profiling of dissolved organic carbon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, S.; Drew, S.; Gilvear, D.; Murray, H.; Heal, K.

    2012-04-01

    Quantifying the natural variation (complexity) of a system remains an enduring scientific challenge in better understanding controls on surface water quality. This characterisation is needed in order to reveal controlling processes, such as dilution, and also to identify unusual load profiles. In trying to capture that natural variation we still rely largely on concentration time series (and associated export budgets) generated from manual spot sampling, or from samples collected by autosamplers - approaches which are unlikely to provide the high temporal resolution of parameter concentration required. Now however, advances in sensor technology are helping us address this challenge. Here we present detailed dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export profiles from a small upland river (9.4 km sq.), generated since June 2011 by semi-continuous logging of UV-vis absorption (200-750 nm, every 2.5 nm) every 30 minutes. Observed increases in the concentration of the DOC, [DOC], in freshwaters have prompted significant research to understand the cause and consequences of increased export: higher levels of DOC require additional water purification of potable sources; increased aquatic export may represent a reduction in terrestrial C-soil sequestration; changes in light penetration can affect the heterotrophic / autotrophic balance in surface waters and this has consequences for the food web structure; increased aquatic export may also result in increased carbon dioxide evasion. Additionally, C export is often linked to nutrient export: we have observed statistically significant stoichiometric relationships between DOC and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations, thus understanding better this parameters offers insight into export of other nutrient and the source of material from which these dissolved compounds are produced; this may be particulate. Our Scottish study site is interesting because there are multiple processes that can contribute to DOC and other nutrient

  10. Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is the smallest of the Earth's four major oceans, covering 14x10(exp 6) sq km located entirely within the Arctic Circle (66 deg 33 min N). It is a major player in the climate of the north polar region and has a variable sea ice cover that tends to increase its sensitivity to climate change. Its temperature, salinity, and ice cover have all undergone changes in the past several decades, although it is uncertain whether these predominantly reflect long-term trends, oscillations within the system, or natural variability. Major changes include a warming and expansion of the Atlantic layer, at depths of 200-900 m, a warming of the upper ocean in the Beaufort Sea, a considerable thinning (perhaps as high as 40%) of the sea ice cover, a lesser and uneven retreat of the ice cover (averaging approximately 3% per decade), and a mixed pattern of salinity increases and decreases.

  11. Lessons in divergence and convergence in marine and freshwater iron-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, D.; McBeth, J. M.; Fleming, E. J.; Moyer, C. L.

    2011-12-01

    Lithoautotrophic oxygen-dependent Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that grow at circumneutral pH are found in marine and freshwater habitats and play an important role in Fe-transformations. These obligately microaerophilic bacteria form unique biogenic Fe minerals that can become fossilized. Their obligate metabolism suggests they may been present during the late Archaean or early Proterozoic when oxygen was in low abundance and high Fe(II) concentrations existed in the ocean. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that members of the marine FeOB community belong to the Zetaproteobacteria, a novel class of Proteobacteria, whereas dominant freshwater FeOB belong to the class Betaproteobacteria. Despite different evolutionary histories, freshwater and marine strains share remarkable morphological and physiological similarities. As an illustration, this work describes the discovery of a sheathed FeOB that grows as a surface film on thick microbial mats composed of FeOB at hydrothermal vents associated with Loihi Seamount, an active undersea volcano. This uncultivated organism bears striking resemblance to the freshwater sheath forming Fe-oxidizer, Leptothrix ochracea; however by using different culture-independent techniques, including specific fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) probes to the SSU rRNA gene, we show that it is not L. ochracea, but a member of the Zetaproteobacteria. The strong morphological similarities between these organisms likely represent a case of convergent evolution. To further constrain relationships between members of the marine and freshwater groups of FeOB we surveyed four iron mat communities along a salinity gradient, from freshwater to near full strength seawater, in a tidal region of the Sheepscot river in Maine. The mat communities were examined microscopically, and all had abundant evidence for biogenically formed iron oxides. Community DNA was extracted from each site and community composition, as assessed by tagged pyrosequencing of V4

  12. Consequences of Future Increased Arctic Runoff on Arctic Ocean Stratification, Circulation, and Sea Ice Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Nummelin, A.; Ilicak, M.; Smedsrud, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice cover depends strongly on the stratification of the underlying ocean, which itself depends on processes over a range of spatial scales, from circulation to shelf processes and vertical mixing. Also important for the stratification are the freshwater sources to the Arctic Ocean, including river runoff, low evaporation, and exchange with the Pacific Ocean. In the future, we expect even larger freshwater input as the global hydrological cycle accelerates, increasing high latitude precipitation and river runoff. Previous modelling studies show some robust responses to high latitude freshwater perturbations, including a strengthening of Arctic stratification and a weakening of the large-scale ocean circulation; some idealized modelling studies also document a stronger cyclonic circulation within the Arctic Ocean itself. Here, we adopt a more comprehensive modelling approach to better understand both the local processes and the broader linkages between the Arctic and surrounding oceans. We increase river runoff to the Arctic Ocean in a coupled ice--ocean general circulation model, and show contrasting responses in the polar and subpolar regions. Within the Arctic, the stratification strengthens, the halocline and Atlantic Water layer warm, and the cyclonic circulation spins up, in agreement with previous work. In the subpolar gyre region of the North Atlantic, the model simulates a colder and fresher water column with weaker barotropic circulation. In contrast to the estuarine circulation theory, the volume exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the surrounding oceans does not increase with increasing runoff. Changes in atmosphere-ocean heat exchange outside the sea ice-covered regions of the Arctic can influence the ocean-ice heat exchange within the Arctic. While these results are robust in our model, we require experiments with other model systems and more complete observational syntheses to better constrain the sensitivity of the climate system to

  13. Antarctic icebergs melt over the Southern Ocean : Climatology and impact on sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Nacho; Le Sommer, Julien; Durand, Gael; Jourdain, Nicolas C.; Madec, Gurvan; Mathiot, Pierre; Tournadre, Jean

    2016-08-01

    Recent increase in Antarctic freshwater release to the Southern Ocean is suggested to contribute to change in water masses and sea ice. However, climate models differ in their representation of the freshwater sources. Recent improvements in altimetry-based detection of small icebergs and in estimates of the mass loss of Antarctica may help better constrain the values of Antarctic freshwater releases. We propose a model-based seasonal climatology of iceberg melt over the Southern Ocean using state-of-the-art observed glaciological estimates of the Antarctic mass loss. An improved version of a Lagrangian iceberg model is coupled with a global, eddy-permitting ocean/sea ice model and compared to small icebergs observations. Iceberg melt increases sea ice cover, about 10% in annual mean sea ice volume, and decreases sea surface temperature over most of the Southern Ocean, but with distinctive regional patterns. Our results underline the importance of improving the representation of Antarctic freshwater sources. This can be achieved by forcing ocean/sea ice models with a climatological iceberg fresh-water flux.

  14. Modeling the Arctic freshwater system and its integration in the global system: Lessons learned and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lique, Camille; Holland, Marika M.; Dibike, Yonas B.; Lawrence, David M.; Screen, James A.

    2016-03-01

    Numerous components of the Arctic freshwater system (atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, and terrestrial hydrology) have experienced large changes over the past few decades, and these changes are projected to amplify further in the future. Observations are particularly sparse, in both time and space, in the polar regions. Hence, modeling systems have been widely used and are a powerful tool to gain understanding on the functioning of the Arctic freshwater system and its integration within the global Earth system and climate. Here we present a review of modeling studies addressing some aspect of the Arctic freshwater system. Through illustrative examples, we point out the value of using a hierarchy of models with increasing complexity and component interactions, in order to dismantle the important processes at play for the variability and changes of the different components of the Arctic freshwater system and the interplay between them. We discuss past and projected changes for the Arctic freshwater system and explore the sources of uncertainty associated with these model results. We further elaborate on some missing processes that should be included in future generations of Earth system models and highlight the importance of better quantification and understanding of natural variability, among other factors, for improved predictions of Arctic freshwater system change.

  15. Sixth Australian conference on coastal and ocean engineering (Preprints)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on marine engineering. Topics considered at the conference included wave measurements and the utilization of wave data, field studies of currents and simulation of oil dispersion in the Central Great Barrier Reef, a practical method for determining the dispersion at an ocean outfall, water level variations in aquifers caused by ocean tides, and design procedures and parameters for marine facilities at coal export terminals.

  16. NAS Panel faults export controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    A study prepared by a top-level panel says that current export controls on militarily sensitive U.S. technology may be “overcorrecting” previous weaknesses in that system, resulting in “a complex and confusing control system” that makes it more difficult for U.S. businesses to compete in international markets. Moreover, this control system has “an increasingly corrosive effect” on U.S. relations with allies. The panel recommended that the United States concentrate more effort on bringing about uniformity in the export control policies of countries belonging to the Coordinating Committee on Multilateral Export Controls (CoCom), i.e., most of the member nations in NATO (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization) and Japan.The 21-member panel was appointed by the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP), a joint unit of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). The panel, composed of administrators, researchers, and former government officials, was chaired by AGU member Lew Allen, Jr., director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, Calif.) and former chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force. Their report was supported by NAS funds, by a number of private organizations (including AGU), by the U.S. Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and State, by the National Science Foundation, and by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Effect of tidal fluctuations on contaminant transfer to the ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Licata, I.L.; Langevin, C.D.; Dausman, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Variable-density groundwater flow was simulated to examine the effects that tide has on the coastward migration of a contaminant through a freshwater/saltwater interface and toward a coastal ocean boundary. Simulated ocean tides did not significantly affect the total contaminant mass input to the ocean; however, the difference in tidal and non-tidal simulated concentrations could be as much as 15%. It may be possible to numerically approximate the tidal-driven hydraulic transients in transport models that do not explicitly include tides by locally increasing dispersivity. Copyright ?? 2007 IAHS Press.

  18. Effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Buikema, A.L. Jr.; Fenfield, E.F.; Pittinger, C.A.

    1983-06-01

    A literature review of studies on the effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates is presented. PCBs, insecticides, and fungicides were the main pollutants studied, along with NH/sub 3/, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, and Zn. (JMT)

  19. Enhanced deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation with global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froelicher, T. L.; Jaccard, S.; Dunne, J. P.; Paynter, D.; Gruber, N.

    2014-12-01

    Twenty-first century coupled climate model simulations, observations from the recent past, and theoretical arguments suggest a consistent trend towards warmer ocean temperatures and fresher polar surface oceans in response to increased radiative forcing resulting in increased upper ocean stratification and reduced ventilation and oxygenation of the deep ocean. Paleo-proxy records of the warming at the end of the last ice age, however, suggests a different outcome, namely a better ventilated and oxygenated deep ocean with global warming. Here we use a four thousand year global warming simulation from a comprehensive Earth System Model (GFDL ESM2M) to show that this conundrum is a consequence of different rates of warming and that the deep ocean is actually better ventilated and oxygenated in a future warmer equilibrated climate consistent with paleo-proxy records. The enhanced deep ocean ventilation in the Southern Ocean occurs in spite of increased positive surface buoyancy fluxes and a constancy of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds - circumstances that would otherwise be expected to lead to a reduction in deep ocean ventilation. This ventilation recovery occurs through a global scale interaction of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation undergoing a multi-centennial recovery after an initial century of transient decrease and transports salinity-rich waters inform the subtropical surface ocean to the Southern Ocean interior on multi-century timescales. The subsequent upwelling of salinity-rich waters in the Southern Ocean strips away the freshwater cap that maintains vertical stability and increases open ocean convection and the formation of Antarctic Bottom Waters. As a result, the global ocean oxygen content and the nutrient supply from the deep ocean to the surface are higher in a warmer ocean. The implications for past and future changes in ocean heat and carbon storage will be discussed.

  20. Role of the Freshwater Forcing on the Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation in Climate Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, S.; Kitoh, A.

    2005-12-01

    Effects of the freshwater forcing changes on the thermohaline circulation (THC) differ depending on as to which regimes the circulation is in. This fact is obvious from the considerations based on the simple conceptual box models like Stommel 1961 or Rahmstorf 1996. However, the THC regime of the real Atlantic is not obvious including the problem as to whether such a simple view is applicable or not. In this study, the authors try to determine the Atlantic THC regime of the MRI-CGCM2 from an analysis of a partially coupled experiment, where the greenhouse gas concentrations are fixed to the present-day values but the ocean surface freshwater flux is taken from a transient global warming experiment. Such an experiment is thought to show the role of freshwater forcing more clearly then a fully coupled transient global warming simulation. Analyses show that the salt content of the northern North Atlantic increases in the case of global warming as a long-term response although the water flux over there makes the surface water fresher. It stabilize (or enhance) the Atlantic THC as a long-term response. This response of the THC to an increased freshwater forcing suggests that the THC of the MRI-CGCM2 is in the thermohaline driven regime in the context of the boxmodels. The freshwater flux adjustment used in the MRI-CGCM2 make the problem somewhat complicated. However, a consideration based on the box model and the Atlantic freshwater budget suggests that this result can be generalized to other AOGCMs and/or the real world.

  1. The model marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana likely descended from a freshwater ancestor in the genus Cyclotella

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Publication of the first diatom genome, that of Thalassiosira pseudonana, established it as a model species for experimental and genomic studies of diatoms. Virtually every ensuing study has treated T. pseudonana as a marine diatom, with genomic and experimental data valued for their insights into the ecology and evolution of diatoms in the world's oceans. Results The natural distribution of T. pseudonana spans both marine and fresh waters, and phylogenetic analyses of morphological and molecular datasets show that, 1) T. pseudonana marks an early divergence in a major freshwater radiation by diatoms, and 2) as a species, T. pseudonana is likely ancestrally freshwater. Marine strains therefore represent recent recolonizations of higher salinity habitats. In addition, the combination of a relatively nondescript form and a convoluted taxonomic history has introduced some confusion about the identity of T. pseudonana and, by extension, its phylogeny and ecology. We resolve these issues and use phylogenetic criteria to show that T. pseudonana is more appropriately classified by its original name, Cyclotella nana. Cyclotella contains a mix of marine and freshwater species and so more accurately conveys the complexities of the phylogenetic and natural histories of T. pseudonana. Conclusions The multitude of physical barriers that likely must be overcome for diatoms to successfully colonize freshwaters suggests that the physiological traits of T. pseudonana, and the genes underlying those traits, might differ from those of strictly marine diatoms. The freshwater ancestry of T. pseudonana might therefore confound generalizations about the physiological and metabolic properties of marine diatoms. The freshwater component of T. pseudonana's history merits careful consideration in the interpretation of experimental data collected for this important model species. PMID:21569560

  2. A Freshwater Starvation Mechanism for Dansgaard-Oeschger Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, E. W.; Hewitt, I.; Fowler, A.; Clark, C.; Evatt, G. W.; Munday, D. R.; Stokes, C.

    2014-12-01

    Many northern hemisphere climate records, particularly those from around the North Atlantic, show a series of rapid climate changes that recurred on centennial to millennial timescales throughout most of the last glacial period. These Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) sequences are observed most prominently in Greenland ice cores, although they have a global signature, including an out of phase Antarctic signal. They consist of warming jumps of order 10°C, occurring in typically 40 years, followed generally by a slow cooling (Greenland Interstadial, GI) lasting between a few centuries and a few millennia, and then a final rapid temperature drop into a cold Greenland Stadial (GS) that lasts for a similar period. The most distinctive feature of D-O cycles is the rapid warming event, often attributed to a sudden change in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Recent work has suggested that AMOC is most easily disrupted by freshwater delivered through the Arctic. We suggest that the proposed AMOC changes may have occurred as part of a natural oscillation, in which runoff from the Laurentide ice sheet into the Arctic is controlled by temperature around the North Atlantic. The Arctic buffers the salinity changes, but under warm conditions, high runoff eventually leads to water entering the North Atlantic with low enough salinity to switch AMOC into its weaker state. Under the colder conditions now prevailing, the Arctic is starved of runoff, and the salinity rises until a further switch occurs. Contrary to many previous studies, this mechanism does not require large freshwater pulses to the North Atlantic. Instead, steady changes in ice-sheet runoff, driven by the AMOC, lead to a naturally arising oscillator, in which the rapid warmings come about because the Arctic Ocean is starved of freshwater. The changing size of the ice sheets would have affected the magnitude and extent of runoff, and we suggest that this may provide a simple explanation

  3. Long-term ocean simulations in FESOM: evaluation and application in studying the impact of Greenland Ice Sheet melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuezhu; Wang, Qiang; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Danilov, Sergey; Schröter, Jens; Jung, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    The Finite Element Sea-ice Ocean Model (FESOM) is formulated on unstructured meshes and offers geometrical flexibility which is difficult to achieve on traditional structured grids. In this work, the performance of FESOM in the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean on large time scales is evaluated in a hindcast experiment. A water-hosing experiment is also conducted to study the model sensitivity to increased freshwater input from Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) melting in a 0.1-Sv discharge rate scenario. The variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the hindcast experiment can be explained by the variability of the thermohaline forcing over deep convection sites. The model also reproduces realistic freshwater content variability and sea ice extent in the Arctic Ocean. The anomalous freshwater in the water-hosing experiment leads to significant changes in the ocean circulation and local dynamical sea level (DSL). The most pronounced DSL rise is in the northwest North Atlantic as shown in previous studies, and also in the Arctic Ocean. The released GrIS freshwater mainly remains in the North Atlantic, Arctic Ocean and the west South Atlantic after 120 model years. The pattern of ocean freshening is similar to that of the GrIS water distribution, but changes in ocean circulation also contribute to the ocean salinity change. The changes in Arctic and sub-Arctic sea level modify exchanges between the Arctic Ocean and subpolar seas, and hence the role of the Arctic Ocean in the global climate. Not only the strength of the AMOC, but also the strength of its decadal variability is notably reduced by the anomalous freshwater input. A comparison of FESOM with results from previous studies shows that FESOM can simulate past ocean state and the impact of increased GrIS melting well.

  4. Estimated freshwater withdrawals in Washington, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, Ron C.; Welch, Wendy B.

    2015-03-18

    The amount of public- and self-supplied water used for domestic, irrigation, livestock, aquaculture, industrial, mining, and thermoelectric power was estimated for state, county, and eastern and western regions of Washington during calendar year 2010. Withdrawals of freshwater for offstream uses were estimated to be about 4,885 million gallons per day. The total estimated freshwater withdrawals for 2010 was approximately 15 percent less than the 2005 estimate because of decreases in irrigation and thermoelectric power withdrawals.

  5. The Ocean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broecker, Wallace S.

    1983-01-01

    The chemistry of the ocean, whose constituents interact with those of air and land to support life and influence climate, is known to have undergone changes since the last glacial epoch. Changes in dissolved oxygen, calcium ions, phosphate, carbon dioxide, carbonate ions, and bicarbonate ions are discussed. (JN)

  6. Freshwater Commercial Bycatch: an Understated Conservation Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, Graham D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-04-01

    Commercial fisheries bycatch in marine systems has been regarded as a global conservation concern by environmental groups, scientists, government, and the public for decades. Fortunately, some headway has been made to mitigate the negative impacts of bycatch in marine environments. In a survey of the literature, we found that despite freshwater commercial fisheries yields comprising 11% of the global commercial catch, bycatch research focusing on freshwater commercial fisheries represented only {approx}3% of the total bycatch literature. This paucity of research is particularly alarming given that freshwater animals and habitats are some of the world's most imperiled. The limited inland bycatch literature that does exist includes examples of population declines attributed to commercial bycatch (e.g., freshwater dolphins in the Yangtze River in China) and illustrates that in some systems bycatch can be substantial (e.g., lake trout bycatch in the Laurentian Great Lakes). Encouraging results from the marine realm can serve as models for bycatch research in freshwater, and lead to measurable gains in conservation of freshwater ecosystems. We summarize existing work on inland bycatch in an effort to draw attention to this understated and understudied conservation problem.

  7. Export of submicron particulate organic matter to mesopelagic depth in an oligotrophic gyre.

    PubMed

    Close, Hilary G; Shah, Sunita R; Ingalls, Anitra E; Diefendorf, Aaron F; Brodie, Eoin L; Hansman, Roberta L; Freeman, Katherine H; Aluwihare, Lihini I; Pearson, Ann

    2013-07-30

    Sixty percent of the world ocean by area is contained in oligotrophic gyres [Longhurst A (1995) Prog Oceanog 36:77-16], the biomass of which is dominated by picophytoplankton, including cyanobacteria and picoeukaryotic algae, as well as picoheterotrophs. Despite their recognized importance in carbon cycling in the surface ocean, the role of small cells and their detrital remains in the transfer of particulate organic matter (POM) to the deep ocean remains disputed. Because oligotrophic marine conditions are projected to expand under current climate trends, a better understanding of the role of small particles in the global carbon cycle is a timely goal. Here we use the lipid profiles, radiocarbon, and stable carbon isotopic signatures of lipids from the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre to show that in the surface ocean, lipids from submicron POM (here called extra-small POM) are distinct from larger classes of suspended POM. Remarkably, this distinct extra-small POM signature dominates the total lipids collected at mesopelagic depth, suggesting that the lipid component of mesopelagic POM primarily contains the exported remains of small particles. Transfer of submicron material to mesopelagic depths in this location is consistent with model results that claim the biological origin of exported carbon should be proportional to the distribution of cell types in the surface community, irrespective of cell size [Richardson TL, Jackson GA (2007) Science 315:838-840]. Our data suggest that the submicron component of exported POM is an important contributor to the global biological pump, especially in oligotrophic waters. PMID:23858459

  8. Tidal day organic and inorganic material flux of ponds in the Liberty Island freshwater tidal wetland.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Peggy W; Mayr, Shawn; Liu, Leji; Tang, Alison

    2015-01-01

    The loss of inorganic and organic material export and habitat produced by freshwater tidal wetlands is hypothesized to be an important contributing factor to the long-term decline in fishery production in San Francisco Estuary. However, due to the absence of freshwater tidal wetlands in the estuary, there is little information on the export of inorganic and organic carbon, nutrient or phytoplankton community biomass and the associated mechanisms. A single-day study was conducted to assess the potential contribution of two small vegetated ponds and one large open-water pond to the inorganic and organic material flux within the freshwater tidal wetland Liberty Island in San Francisco Estuary. The study consisted of an intensive tidal day (25.5 h) sampling program that measured the flux of inorganic and organic material at three ponds using continuous monitoring of flow, chlorophyll a, turbidity and salt combined with discrete measurements of phytoplankton community carbon, total and dissolved organic carbon and nutrient concentration at 1.5 h intervals. Vegetated ponds had greater material concentrations than the open water pond and, despite their small area, contributed up to 81% of the organic and 61% of the inorganic material flux of the wetland. Exchange between ponds was important to wetland flux. The small vegetated pond in the interior of the wetland contributed as much as 72-87% of the total organic carbon and chlorophyll a and 10% of the diatom flux of the wetland. Export of inorganic and organic material from the small vegetated ponds was facilitated by small-scale topography and tidal asymmetry that produced a 40% greater material export on ebb tide. The small vegetated ponds contrasted with the large open water pond, which imported 29-96% of the inorganic and 4-81% of the organic material into the wetland from the adjacent river. This study identified small vegetated ponds as an important source of inorganic and organic material to the wetland and the

  9. Commissioned Review. Carbon: freshwater plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J.E.; Sandquist, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    δ13C values for freshwater aquatic plant matter varies from −11 to −50‰ and is not a clear indicator of photosynthetic pathway as in terrestrial plants. Several factors affect δ13C of aquatic plant matter. These include: (1) The δ13C signature of the source carbon has been observed to range from +1‰ for HCO3− derived from limestone to −30‰ for CO2 derived from respiration. (2) Some plants assimilate HCO3−, which is –7 to –11‰ less negative than CO2. (3) C3, C4, and CAM photosynthetic pathways are present in aquatic plants. (4) Diffusional resistances are orders of magnitude greater in the aquatic environment than in the aerial environment. The greater viscosity of water acts to reduce mixing of the carbon pool in the boundary layer with that of the bulk solution. In effect, many aquatic plants draw from a finite carbon pool, and as in terrestrial plants growing in a closed system, biochemical discrimination is reduced. In standing water, this factor results in most aquatic plants having a δ13C value similar to the source carbon. Using Farquhar's equation and other physiological data, it is possible to use δ13C values to evaluate various parameters affecting photosynthesis, such as limitations imposed by CO2 diffusion and carbon source.

  10. The glacial iron cycle from source to export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkings, J.; Wadham, J. L.; Tranter, M.; Raiswell, R.; Benning, L. G.; Statham, P. J.; Tedstone, A. J.; Nienow, P. W.; Telling, J.; Bagshaw, E.; Simmons, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Nutrient availability limits primary production in large sectors of the world's oceans. Iron is the major limiting nutrient in around one third of the oceanic euphotic zone, most significantly in the Southern Ocean proximal to Antarctica. In these areas the availability of bioavailable iron can influence the amount of primary production, and thus the strength of the biological pump and associated carbon drawdown from the atmosphere. Despite experiencing widespread iron limitation, the Polar oceans are among the most productive on Earth. Due to the extreme cold, remoteness and their perceived "stasis", ice sheets have previously been though of as insignificant in global biogeochemical cycles. However, large marine algal blooms have been observed in iron-limited areas where glacial influence is large, and it is possible that these areas are stimulated by glacial bioavailable iron input. Here we discuss the importance of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets in the global iron cycle. Using field collected trace element data, bulk meltwater chemistry and mineralogical analysis, including photomicrographs, EELS and XANES, we present, for the first time, a conceptual model of the glacial iron cycle from source to export. Using this data we discuss the sources of iron in glacial meltwater, transportation and alteration through the glacial system, and subsequent export to downstream environments. Data collected in 2012 and 2013 from two different Greenlandic glacial catchments are shown, with the most detailed breakdown of iron speciation and concentrations in glacial areas yet reported. Furthermore, the first data from Greenlandic icebergs is presented, allowing meltwater-derived and iceberg-derived iron export to be compared, and the influence of both in marine productivity to be estimated. Using our conceptual model and flux estimates from our dataset, glacial iron delivery in both the northern and southern hemisphere is discussed. Finally, we compare our flux

  11. Dissolved Organic Carbon Export From the Penobscot River Basin to the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, T. G.; Aiken, G. R.

    2005-12-01

    Recent and historical water quality data collected from the Penobscot River in central Maine were analyzed to estimate the flux of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Historical data collected by the U.S. Geologic Survey during 1973 to 1981 as part of the National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) and recently collected data during 2004 and 2005 supported by NASA provide a framework for preliminary estimates of seasonal and interannual variability in DOC export. Monthly average concentrations were computed from samples collected during all seasons. Flux estimates were calculated using monthly average concentrations and average daily discharge. For snowmelt and storms measured during 2004 to 2005 DOC increased with increasing discharge, but the increase was distinctly muted during the snowmelt-dominated high spring flow compared with summer and fall storms. DOC export was highest during the spring snowmelt season in spite of relatively low concentrations, compared with late summer and fall because of the substantially higher spring discharge. DOC export tends to be lowest during July through August and increases progressively to moderately high levels during the fall. Export of DOC during the winter months is intermediate between summer and fall levels. Estimated DOC export varied substantially among years ranging from 4.0 t/sq km/yr during the driest year to 7.8 t/sq km/yr during the wettest year. Average annual DOC export per unit area for all years was 5.7 t/sq km/yr. Under wetter conditions flowpaths are thought to include more organic matter-rich surface soils. DOC export from the Penobscot River is substantially higher than estimated for most larger rivers in North America and smaller rivers draining to the Atlantic Ocean along the east coast of the United States. Preliminary evidence from analysis of DOC concentrations in tributaries to the Penobscot River indicates that wetland area and reservoir volume exert substantial control over DOC export in this

  12. Fennoscandian freshwater control on Greenland hydroclimate shifts at the onset of the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschitiello, Francesco; Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Watson, Jenny E.; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Salih, Abubakr A. M.; Brooks, Stephen J.; Whitehouse, Nicola J.; Karlatou-Charalampopoulou, Artemis; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Sources and timing of freshwater forcing relative to hydroclimate shifts recorded in Greenland ice cores at the onset of Younger Dryas, ~12,800 years ago, remain speculative. Here we show that progressive Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS) melting 13,100-12,880 years ago generates a hydroclimate dipole with drier-colder conditions in Northern Europe and wetter-warmer conditions in Greenland. FIS melting culminates 12,880 years ago synchronously with the start of Greenland Stadial 1 and a large-scale hydroclimate transition lasting ~180 years. Transient climate model simulations forced with FIS freshwater reproduce the initial hydroclimate dipole through sea-ice feedbacks in the Nordic Seas. The transition is attributed to the export of excess sea ice to the subpolar North Atlantic and a subsequent southward shift of the westerly winds. We suggest that North Atlantic hydroclimate sensitivity to FIS freshwater can explain the pace and sign of shifts recorded in Greenland at the climate transition into the Younger Dryas.

  13. Fennoscandian freshwater control on Greenland hydroclimate shifts at the onset of the Younger Dryas

    PubMed Central

    Muschitiello, Francesco; Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Watson, Jenny E.; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Salih, Abubakr A. M.; Brooks, Stephen J.; Whitehouse, Nicola J.; Karlatou-Charalampopoulou, Artemis; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Sources and timing of freshwater forcing relative to hydroclimate shifts recorded in Greenland ice cores at the onset of Younger Dryas, ∼12,800 years ago, remain speculative. Here we show that progressive Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS) melting 13,100–12,880 years ago generates a hydroclimate dipole with drier–colder conditions in Northern Europe and wetter–warmer conditions in Greenland. FIS melting culminates 12,880 years ago synchronously with the start of Greenland Stadial 1 and a large-scale hydroclimate transition lasting ∼180 years. Transient climate model simulations forced with FIS freshwater reproduce the initial hydroclimate dipole through sea-ice feedbacks in the Nordic Seas. The transition is attributed to the export of excess sea ice to the subpolar North Atlantic and a subsequent southward shift of the westerly winds. We suggest that North Atlantic hydroclimate sensitivity to FIS freshwater can explain the pace and sign of shifts recorded in Greenland at the climate transition into the Younger Dryas. PMID:26573386

  14. Fennoscandian freshwater control on Greenland hydroclimate shifts at the onset of the Younger Dryas.

    PubMed

    Muschitiello, Francesco; Pausata, Francesco S R; Watson, Jenny E; Smittenberg, Rienk H; Salih, Abubakr A M; Brooks, Stephen J; Whitehouse, Nicola J; Karlatou-Charalampopoulou, Artemis; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2015-11-17

    Sources and timing of freshwater forcing relative to hydroclimate shifts recorded in Greenland ice cores at the onset of Younger Dryas, ∼12,800 years ago, remain speculative. Here we show that progressive Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS) melting 13,100-12,880 years ago generates a hydroclimate dipole with drier-colder conditions in Northern Europe and wetter-warmer conditions in Greenland. FIS melting culminates 12,880 years ago synchronously with the start of Greenland Stadial 1 and a large-scale hydroclimate transition lasting ∼180 years. Transient climate model simulations forced with FIS freshwater reproduce the initial hydroclimate dipole through sea-ice feedbacks in the Nordic Seas. The transition is attributed to the export of excess sea ice to the subpolar North Atlantic and a subsequent southward shift of the westerly winds. We suggest that North Atlantic hydroclimate sensitivity to FIS freshwater can explain the pace and sign of shifts recorded in Greenland at the climate transition into the Younger Dryas.

  15. Fennoscandian freshwater control on Greenland hydroclimate shifts at the onset of the Younger Dryas.

    PubMed

    Muschitiello, Francesco; Pausata, Francesco S R; Watson, Jenny E; Smittenberg, Rienk H; Salih, Abubakr A M; Brooks, Stephen J; Whitehouse, Nicola J; Karlatou-Charalampopoulou, Artemis; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Sources and timing of freshwater forcing relative to hydroclimate shifts recorded in Greenland ice cores at the onset of Younger Dryas, ∼12,800 years ago, remain speculative. Here we show that progressive Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS) melting 13,100-12,880 years ago generates a hydroclimate dipole with drier-colder conditions in Northern Europe and wetter-warmer conditions in Greenland. FIS melting culminates 12,880 years ago synchronously with the start of Greenland Stadial 1 and a large-scale hydroclimate transition lasting ∼180 years. Transient climate model simulations forced with FIS freshwater reproduce the initial hydroclimate dipole through sea-ice feedbacks in the Nordic Seas. The transition is attributed to the export of excess sea ice to the subpolar North Atlantic and a subsequent southward shift of the westerly winds. We suggest that North Atlantic hydroclimate sensitivity to FIS freshwater can explain the pace and sign of shifts recorded in Greenland at the climate transition into the Younger Dryas. PMID:26573386

  16. 75 FR 53696 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Revocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... pertaining to the licensing of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries, 46 CFR part 515, effective on the... maintain a valid bond. License Number: 018694N. Name: Global Parcel System LLC. Address: 8304 Northwest.... License Number: 019584N. Name: Dakota Export, LLC. Address: 1413 7th Street, South Fargo, ND 58103....

  17. Convective Available Potential Energy of World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Thompson, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Here, for the first time, we propose the concept of Ocean Convective Available Potential Energy (OCAPE), which is the maximum kinetic energy (KE) per unit seawater mass achievable by ocean convection. OCAPE occurs through a different mechanism from atmospheric CAPE, and involves the interplay of temperature and salinity on the equation of state of seawater. The thermobaric effect, which arises because the thermal coefficient of expansion increases with depth, is an important ingredient of OCAPE. We develop an accurate algorithm to calculate the OCAPE for a given temperature and salinity profile. We then validate our calculation of OCAPE by comparing it with the conversion of OCAPE to KE in a 2-D numerical model. We propose that OCAPE is an important energy source of ocean deep convection and contributes to deep water formation. OCAPE, like Atmospheric CAPE, can help predict deep convection and may also provide a useful constraint for modelling deep convection in ocean GCMs. We plot the global distribution of OCAPE using data from the World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA09) and see many important features. These include large values of OCAPE in the Labrador, Greenland, Weddell and Mediterranean Seas, which are consistent with our present observations and understanding, but also identify some new features like the OCAPE pattern in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). We propose that the diagnosis of OCAPE can improve our understanding of global patterns of ocean convection and deep water formation as well as ocean stratification, the meridional overturning circulation and mixed layer processes. The background of this work is briefly introduced as below. Open-ocean deep convection can significantly modify water properties both at the ocean surface and throughout the water column (Gordon 1982). Open-ocean convection is also an important mechanism for Ocean Deep Water formation and the transport of heat, freshwater and nutrient (Marshall and Schott 1999). Open-ocean

  18. Model Sensitivity to North Atlantic Freshwater Forcing at 8.2 Ka

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrill, Carrie; Legrande, Allegra Nicole; Renssen, H.; Bakker, P.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.

    2013-01-01

    We compared four simulations of the 8.2 ka event to assess climate model sensitivity and skill in responding to North Atlantic freshwater perturbations. All of the simulations used the same freshwater forcing, 2.5 Sv for one year, applied to either the Hudson Bay (northeastern Canada) or Labrador Sea (between Canada's Labrador coast and Greenland). This freshwater pulse induced a decadal-mean slowdown of 10-25%in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) of the models and caused a large-scale pattern of climate anomalies that matched proxy evidence for cooling in the Northern Hemisphere and a southward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The multi-model ensemble generated temperature anomalies that were just half as large as those from quantitative proxy reconstructions, however. Also, the duration of AMOC and climate anomalies in three of the simulations was only several decades, significantly shorter than the duration of approx.150 yr in the paleoclimate record. Possible reasons for these discrepancies include incorrect representation of the early Holocene climate and ocean state in the North Atlantic and uncertainties in the freshwater forcing estimates.

  19. Baseline study of US industry solar exports

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobius, T M; Levi, R S; Bereny, J A

    1980-10-01

    This study is a detailed aggregate profile of US solar export activity in 1979 based on a survey of all segments of the solar industry. It identifies the dollar volume of exports by technology: (1) solar heating and cooling products; (2) wind products; (3) photovoltaics; (4) solar thermal electric; (5) OTEC and biomass; and (6) support products and services. The study offers to government and industry groups, for the first time, comprehensive information with which to formulate export goals and assistance measures based on the current realities of the solar export marketplace. Specific and aggregate recommendations which can lead to identification of realistic solar export opportunities and development of solar export markets are included.

  20. Price and Income Elasticities of Iranian Exports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atrkar Roshan, Sedigheh

    This study investigates the export demand elasticities at the aggregate and disaggregated levels over the period 1977 to 2001 for Iran. By utilizing an export demand model and using time series techniques that account for the nonstationarity in the data, the price and income elasticities of demand are estimated by commodity class. As the elasticities of demand for various categories of exports are different, while they are crucial for policy determination. Based upon the estimated results, price and income elasticities are almost similar to those obtained in earlier studies in the case of developing countries. The main findings of this paper demonstrate that, price elasticities are smaller than -1 for all exports categories, whereas the income elasticities are found to be greater than one. The results also suggested, the income elasticities of industrial goods are higher compared to other export categories, while the lower elasticities are found in primary exports. The price and income elasticity estimates have also good statistical properties.

  1. Nitrogen Cycle of the Open Ocean: From Genes to Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehr, Jonathan P.; Kudela, Raphael M.

    2011-01-01

    The marine nitrogen (N) cycle controls the productivity of the oceans. This cycle is driven by complex biogeochemical transformations, including nitrogen fixation, denitrification, and assimilation and anaerobic ammonia oxidation, mediated by microorganisms. New processes and organisms continue to be discovered, complicating the already complex picture of oceanic N cycling. Genomics research has uncovered the diversity of nitrogen metabolism strategies in phytoplankton and bacterioplankton. The elemental ratios of nutrients in biological material are more flexible than previously believed, with implications for vertical export of carbon and associated nutrients to the deep ocean. Estimates of nitrogen fixation and denitrification continue to be modified, and anaerobic ammonia oxidation has been identified as a new process involved in denitrification in oxygen minimum zones. The nitrogen cycle in the oceans is an integral feature of the function of ocean ecosystems and will be a central player in how oceans respond during global environmental change.

  2. Exchanges of volume, heat and freshwater through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago: a numerical study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivault, Nathan; Hu, Xianmin; Myers, Paul G.

    2016-04-01

    The Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) is a tangle of shallow basins interlinked by narrow straits. It is the main pathway of liquid freshwater from the Arctic Ocean to North Atlantic. It also receives runoff from the Mackenzie River and the glaciers of the different islands that composes the archipelago. This study is based on a set of numerical experiments using a regional configuration of the coupled ocean/sea-ice general circulation model NEMO. We consider a long-term hindcast (1958-2014) as well as the more recent period (2002-2014) using high resolution inter-annual forcing from Environment Canada. We used an improved mapping of runoff to ensure correct amounts of freshwater are added to the system. We evaluate the flow pathways through the CAA, as well as the transport of volume, heat and freshwater. Results are evaluated against observational sections. We also look at the variability and the dynamics driving it. Passive tracers are used to complement the analysis.

  3. A carbon budget for a naturally iron fertilized bloom in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Paul J.; Sanders, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Subantarctic islands in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) Southern Ocean are natural sources of iron and stimulate blooms in their proximity, such as the one observed close to the Crozet Islands (52°E, 46°S). During 2004/2005, particulate organic carbon (POC) export was measured using the 234Th technique in the Crozet bloom and compared with an HNLC control region. Initial results showed that iron release had no effect on daily POC export rates, thus any iron-driven enhancement in POC export was due to a longer export phase in the bloom region when compared to the control region. The duration of the export event was empirically estimated by closing the silicon budget, thus allowing seasonal POC export to be calculated by applying the export duration to the daily rates of POC export. This yields a seasonal estimate of POC export that is 3.6 times larger (range 1.9-7.1) in the iron-fertilized region than in the HNLC control region. These estimates of POC export were then compared to independent estimates of organic matter storage in the upper ocean, which are significant in both the HNLC and control regions. Overall, integrated POC export was significantly (approximately 50%) lower than estimated seasonal new production, the fraction of production that is supported by inputs of new nutrients. Finally, the sequestration efficiency, the numerical relationship between the supply of the limiting nutrient, iron, and the key ecosystem function of POC export at 100 m, is estimated to be 16,790 mol:mol.

  4. Uranium enrichment export control guide: Gaseous diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This document was prepared to serve as a guide for export control officials in their interpretation, understanding, and implementation of export laws that relate to the Zangger International Trigger List for gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment process components, equipment, and materials. Particular emphasis is focused on items that are especially designed or prepared since export controls are required for these by States that are party to the International Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.

  5. Physicist falls foul of US export law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2008-10-01

    A retired US plasma physicist is seeking to overturn his conviction last month of offences under the American Arms Export Control Act, which prohibits the export, without a government licence, of technology and data to foreign nationals or nations. A jury in Knoxville, Tennessee, found JReece Roth, 70, guilty of illegally exporting technical information about a military project to develop plasma technology for guiding spyplanes that operate as weapons or surveillance devices.

  6. China's export of labor and its management.

    PubMed

    Wang, S

    1995-01-01

    "This research note presents trends and data on China's labor export from 1979-1991. By 1990, China had deployed over 400,000 workers in 139 countries and regions, with labor export becoming an important source of foreign exchange. Data include China's contract value and number of workers annually; international distribution of Chinese workers; comparative figures for construction; contractors and labor cooperatives; and China's labor exports by corporation."

  7. How potentially predictable are midlatitude ocean currents?

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Masami; Sasai, Yoshikazu; Sasaki, Hideharu; Taguchi, Bunmei; Nakamura, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Predictability of atmospheric variability is known to be limited owing to significant uncertainty that arises from intrinsic variability generated independently of external forcing and/or boundary conditions. Observed atmospheric variability is therefore regarded as just a single realization among different dynamical states that could occur. In contrast, subject to wind, thermal and fresh-water forcing at the surface, the ocean circulation has been considered to be rather deterministic under the prescribed atmospheric forcing, and it still remains unknown how uncertain the upper-ocean circulation variability is. This study evaluates how much uncertainty the oceanic interannual variability can potentially have, through multiple simulations with an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model driven by the observed interannually-varying atmospheric forcing under slightly different conditions. These ensemble "hindcast" experiments have revealed substantial uncertainty due to intrinsic variability in the extratropical ocean circulation that limits potential predictability of its interannual variability, especially along the strong western boundary currents (WBCs) in mid-latitudes, including the Kuroshio and its eastward extention. The intrinsic variability also greatly limits potential predictability of meso-scale oceanic eddy activity. These findings suggest that multi-member ensemble simulations are essential for understanding and predicting variability in the WBCs, which are important for weather and climate variability and marine ecosystems. PMID:26831954

  8. How potentially predictable are midlatitude ocean currents?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Masami; Sasai, Yoshikazu; Sasaki, Hideharu; Taguchi, Bunmei; Nakamura, Hisashi

    2016-02-01

    Predictability of atmospheric variability is known to be limited owing to significant uncertainty that arises from intrinsic variability generated independently of external forcing and/or boundary conditions. Observed atmospheric variability is therefore regarded as just a single realization among different dynamical states that could occur. In contrast, subject to wind, thermal and fresh-water forcing at the surface, the ocean circulation has been considered to be rather deterministic under the prescribed atmospheric forcing, and it still remains unknown how uncertain the upper-ocean circulation variability is. This study evaluates how much uncertainty the oceanic interannual variability can potentially have, through multiple simulations with an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model driven by the observed interannually-varying atmospheric forcing under slightly different conditions. These ensemble “hindcast” experiments have revealed substantial uncertainty due to intrinsic variability in the extratropical ocean circulation that limits potential predictability of its interannual variability, especially along the strong western boundary currents (WBCs) in mid-latitudes, including the Kuroshio and its eastward extention. The intrinsic variability also greatly limits potential predictability of meso-scale oceanic eddy activity. These findings suggest that multi-member ensemble simulations are essential for understanding and predicting variability in the WBCs, which are important for weather and climate variability and marine ecosystems.

  9. How potentially predictable are midlatitude ocean currents?

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Masami; Sasai, Yoshikazu; Sasaki, Hideharu; Taguchi, Bunmei; Nakamura, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Predictability of atmospheric variability is known to be limited owing to significant uncertainty that arises from intrinsic variability generated independently of external forcing and/or boundary conditions. Observed atmospheric variability is therefore regarded as just a single realization among different dynamical states that could occur. In contrast, subject to wind, thermal and fresh-water forcing at the surface, the ocean circulation has been considered to be rather deterministic under the prescribed atmospheric forcing, and it still remains unknown how uncertain the upper-ocean circulation variability is. This study evaluates how much uncertainty the oceanic interannual variability can potentially have, through multiple simulations with an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model driven by the observed interannually-varying atmospheric forcing under slightly different conditions. These ensemble “hindcast” experiments have revealed substantial uncertainty due to intrinsic variability in the extratropical ocean circulation that limits potential predictability of its interannual variability, especially along the strong western boundary currents (WBCs) in mid-latitudes, including the Kuroshio and its eastward extention. The intrinsic variability also greatly limits potential predictability of meso-scale oceanic eddy activity. These findings suggest that multi-member ensemble simulations are essential for understanding and predicting variability in the WBCs, which are important for weather and climate variability and marine ecosystems. PMID:26831954

  10. Oceanic Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Instrument concepts which measure ocean temperature, chlorophyll, sediment and Gelbstoffe concentrations in three dimensions on a quantitative, quasi-synoptic basis were considered. Coastal zone color scanner chlorophyll imagery, laser stimulated Raman temperaure and fluorescence spectroscopy, existing airborne Lidar and laser fluorosensing instruments, and their accuracies in quantifying concentrations of chlorophyll, suspended sediments and Gelbstoffe are presented. Lidar applications to phytoplankton dynamics and photochemistry, Lidar radiative transfer and signal interpretation, and Lidar technology are discussed.

  11. 31 CFR 592.304 - Exporting authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions... a Participant from whose territory a shipment of rough diamonds is being exported as having...

  12. 31 CFR 592.304 - Exporting authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions... a Participant from whose territory a shipment of rough diamonds is being exported as having...

  13. 31 CFR 592.304 - Exporting authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions... a Participant from whose territory a shipment of rough diamonds is being exported as having...

  14. 31 CFR 592.304 - Exporting authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions... a Participant from whose territory a shipment of rough diamonds is being exported as having...

  15. 31 CFR 592.304 - Exporting authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions... a Participant from whose territory a shipment of rough diamonds is being exported as having...

  16. Guide to exporting for US solar companies

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.

    1981-06-01

    Reasons for US solar manufacturers to export are discussed; and, after a descision has been made to export solar equipment and technology, how to export and where to export are primary goals. The manual presents some basic information to answer the how and where. It provides information concerning the services which are currently available to facilitate entry into foreign markets and the basic social, economic, and solar insolation data on over 70 foreign markets are presented. Statistical profile information for the 70 countries include population; per capita income; primary languages, literacy rate; ratio of urban and rural areas; monetary unit; population density; GNP; energy production; energy consumption; energy reserves; trade with US. (MCW)

  17. Position of the freshwater-saltwater interface in a coastal confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. B.; White, S. M.; Wilson, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Delineating the position of the freshwater-saltwater interface is necessary for understanding submarine groundwater discharge and for assessing risks associated with saltwater intrusion, but most studies of the freshwater-saltwater interface focus on shallow surficial aquifers. Groundwater dynamics in coastal aquifers at depths greater than 5 m below land surface have rarely been assessed. The freshwater-saltwater interface in deeper confined aquifers is frequently positioned offshore, where it is difficult to locate or study. Our investigation was located at North Inlet, a wide, intertidal wetland southeast of Georgetown, SC. This site was ideal for studying the freshwater-saltwater interface at the embayment scale because the first major confined aquifer under the wetlands was accessible. Using electrical resistivity tomography, we were able to image the upper 20 to 30 m of sediment, including the first major confined aquifer. At North Inlet a 75 km2 island is bounded by extensive marsh and relict and modern barrier islands extending ~10 km seaward to the Atlantic Ocean. Surface and groundwater salinity throughout the marsh is 35 ppt. In order to get maximum depth penetration, surveys were conducted along dry land on the island and marsh surface with 10 m electrode spacing. Measured apparent resistivity varied in all surveys. A 20 Ohm-m resistivity layer at 25 m depth suggests that freshwater extends 335 m from the mainland. The presence of this freshwater indicates regional groundwater flow under the marsh or high rates of infiltration during precipitation events. Groundwater was saline to brackish (~10 Ohm-m) 1 km further out into the marsh at the next relict beach ridge at depths of 20 to 30 m. These results indicate that embayment scale groundwater flow plays an important role in providing low salinity pore-water to the marsh from beneath. The presence of fresh/brackish groundwater hundreds of meters from the mainland suggests that coastal confined aquifers

  18. Ocean transport and variability studies of the South Pacific, Southern, and Indian Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, John A.; Cresswell, G. R.; Nilsson, C. S.; Mcdougall, T. J.; Coleman, R.; Rizos, C.; Penrose, J.; Hunter, J. R.; Lynch, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to analyze ocean dynamics in the western South Pacific and the adjacent Southern Ocean and the eastern Indian Ocean. Specifically, our objectives for these three regions are, for the South Pacific Ocean: (1) To estimate the volume transport of the east Australian Current (EAC) along the Australian coast and in the Tasman Front, and to estimate the time variability (on seasonal and interannual time scales) of this transport. (2) To contribute to estimating the meridional heat and freshwater fluxes (and their variability) at about 30 deg S. Good estimates of the transport in the western boundary current are essential for accurate estimates of these fluxes. (3) To determine how the EAC transport (and its extension, the Tasman Front and the East Auckland Current) closes the subtropical gyre of the South Pacific and to better determine the structure at the confluence of this current and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. (4) To examine the structure and time variability of the circulation in the western South Pacific and the adjacent Southern Ocean, particularly at the Tasman Front. For the Indian Ocean: (5) To study the seasonal interannual variations in the strength of the Leeuwin Current. (6) To monitor the Pacific-Indian Ocean throughflow and the South Equatorial and the South Java Currents between northwest Australia and Indonesia. (7) To study the processes that form the water of the permanent oceanic thermocline and, in particular, the way in which new thermocline water enters the permanent thermocline in late winter and early spring as the mixed layer restratifies. For the Southern Ocean: (8) To study the mesoscale and meridional structure of the Southern Ocean between 150 deg E and 170 deg E; in particular, to describe the Antarctic frontal system south of Tasmania and determine its interannual variability; to estimate the exchanges of heat, salt, and other properties between the Indian and Pacific Oceans; and to investigate the

  19. Reconstructing Past Ocean Salinity ((delta)18Owater)

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T P; Pak, D K

    2005-11-23

    Temperature and salinity are two of the key properties of ocean water masses. The distribution of these two independent but related characteristics reflects the interplay of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the uneven distribution of heat loss and gain by the ocean, with that of precipitation, evaporation, and the freezing and melting of ice. Temperature and salinity to a large extent, determine the density of a parcel of water. Small differences in temperature and salinity can increase or decrease the density of a water parcel, which can lead to convection. Once removed from the surface of the ocean where 'local' changes in temperature and salinity can occur, the water parcel retains its distinct relationship between (potential) temperature and salinity. We can take advantage of this 'conservative' behavior where changes only occur as a result of mixing processes, to track the movement of water in the deep ocean (Figure 1). The distribution of density in the ocean is directly related to horizontal pressure gradients and thus (geostrophic) ocean currents. During the Quaternary when we have had systematic growth and decay of large land based ice sheets, salinity has had to change. A quick scaling argument following that of Broecker and Peng [1982] is: the modern ocean has a mean salinity of 34.7 psu and is on average 3500m deep. During glacial maxima sea level was on the order of {approx}120m lower than present. Simply scaling the loss of freshwater (3-4%) requires an average increase in salinity a similar percentage or to {approx}35.9psu. Because much of the deep ocean is of similar temperature, small changes in salinity have a large impact on density, yielding a potentially different distribution of water masses and control of the density driven (thermohaline) ocean circulation. It is partly for this reason that reconstructions of past salinity are of interest to paleoceanographers.

  20. 7 CFR 1493.80 - Evidence of export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... exported and the basis (e.g., FOB, CFR, CIF). Where the unit sales price at export differs from the unit... programs: Export Enhancement Program, Dairy Export Incentive Program, Sunflowerseed Oil Assistance Program, or Cottonseed Oil Assistance Program. (10) The exporter's statement, “All § 1493.90...