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Sample records for ocean model simulation

  1. Early Eocene's climate and ocean circulation from coupled model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Tobias; Thomas, Maik

    2014-05-01

    While proxy data provide a snapshot of climate conditions at a specific location, coupled atmosphere-ocean models are able to expand this knowledge over the globe. Therefore, they are indispensable tools for understanding past climate conditions. We model the dynamical state of atmosphere and ocean during the Early Eocene and pre-industrial times, using the coupled atmosphere-ocean model ECHAM5/MPIOM with realistic reconstructions of vegetation and CO2. The resulting simulated climate variables are compared to terrestrial and oceanic proxies. The Early Eocene climate is in the global mean warmer (~13°C) and wetter (~1 mm/d) than in pre-industrial times. Especially temperatures in the Southern Ocean, the Greenland Sea and Arctic Ocean raise by up to 25K, being in accordance with surface temperature estimates from terrestrial and marine proxy data. The oceans are hereby rendered ice-free, leading to a decrease of polar albedo and thereby facilitating polar warming. This leads to a by 5K diminished equator-to-pole temperature gradient. Warmer temperatures as well as changed bathymetry have an effect on ocean dynamics in the Early Eocene. Although deep-water formation can be found in the Greenland Sea, Weddell Sea, and Tethys Sea, it is weaker than in the pre-industrial run and the resulting circulation is shallower. This is not only visible in water transport through sea gates but also in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), adopting its maximum at 700m depths in the Early Eocene, while maximum transport is reached in the pre-industrial control run at 1200m. Albeit a shallow and weak thermohaline circulation, a global ocean conveyor belt is being triggered, causing a transport from the areas of subduction through the Atlantic and Southern Oceans into the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

  2. Ocean Simulation Model for Internal Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    MODEL1.DAT U D 4°NZ Real U,V,W, (U(i),V(i),W(i), Z Z(i), i= 1 ,NZ) MODEL1.AUX U S 3°NZ Real NT,NX,NZ,DT, NTNX,NZDT, DXDZ,T0, LAT , DX,DZ,T0, LAT , LON,AZ LON...Oceanographic and Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, Mississippi 39529-5004. 9 1 .... .... . .. ...8 I I I II I I Foreword The effects of the...I A. Background 1 B. Project Objectives 1 C. Purpose of This Manual 1 II. Background and Derivation of Algorithms 2 A. Stochastic Representation of

  3. Arctic Ocean Freshwater: How Robust are Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, A.; Aksenov, Y.; deCuevas, B. A.; deSteur, L.; Haekkinen, S.; Hansen, E.; Herbaut, C.; Houssais, M.-N.; Karcher, M.; Kauker, F.; Lique, C.; Nguyen, A.; Pemberton, P.; Worthen, D.; Zhang, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic freshwater (FW) has been the focus of many modeling studies, due to the potential impact of Arctic FW on the deep water formation in the North Atlantic. A comparison of the hindcasts from ten ocean-sea ice models shows that the simulation of the Arctic FW budget is quite different in the investigated models. While they agree on the general sink and source terms of the Arctic FW budget, the long-term means as well as the variability of the FW export vary among models. The best model-to-model agreement is found for the interannual and seasonal variability of the solid FW export and the solid FW storage, which also agree well with observations. For the interannual and seasonal variability of the liquid FW export, the agreement among models is better for the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) than for Fram Strait. The reason for this is that models are more consistent in simulating volume flux anomalies than salinity anomalies and volume-flux anomalies dominate the liquid FW export variability in the CAA but not in Fram Strait. The seasonal cycle of the liquid FW export generally shows a better agreement among models than the interannual variability, and compared to observations the models capture the seasonality of the liquid FW export rather well. In order to improve future simulations of the Arctic FW budget, the simulation of the salinity field needs to be improved, so that model results on the variability of the liquid FW export and storage become more robust.

  4. Sensitivity of ocean model simulation in the coastal ocean to the resolution of the meteorological forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Shapiro, Georgy; Thain, Richard

    2013-04-01

    The quality of ocean simulations depends on a number of factors such as approximations in governing equations, errors introduced by the numerical scheme, uncertainties in input parameters, and atmospheric forcing. The identification of relations between the uncertainties in input and output data is still a challenge for the development of numerical models. The impacts of ocean variables on ocean models are still not well known (e.g., Kara et al., 2009). Given the considerable importance of the atmospheric forcing to the air-sea interaction, it is essential that researchers in ocean modelling work need a good understanding about how sensitive the atmospheric forcing is to variations of model results, which is beneficial to the development of ocean models. Also, it provides a proper way to choose the atmospheric forcing in ocean modelling applications. Our previous study (Shapiro et al, 2011) has shown that the basin-wide circulation pattern and the temperature structure in the Black Sea produced by the same model is significantly dependent on the source of the meteorological input, giving remarkably different responses. For the purpose of this study we have chosen the Celtic Sea where high resolution meteo data are available from the UK Met office since 2006. The Celtic Sea is tidally dominated water basin, with the tidal stream amplitude varying from 0.25m/s in the southwest to 2 m/s in the Bristol Channel. It is also filled with mesoscale eddies which contribute to the formation of the residual (tidally averaged) circulation pattern (Young et al, 2003). The sea is strongly stratified from April to November, which adds to the formation of density driven currents. In this paper we analyse how sensitive the model output is to variations in the spatial resolution of meteorological using low (1.6°) and high (0.11°) resolution meteo forcing, giving the quantitative relation between variations of met forcing and the resulted differences of model results, as well as

  5. Sensitivity of ocean model simulation in the coastal ocean to the resolution of the meteorological forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, G. I.; Cheng, F.; Thain, R.

    2012-04-01

    The quality of the ocean model simulation depends on a number of factors e.g. approximations in the governing equations, errors introduced by the numerical scheme, and uncertainties in input parameters such as atmospheric forcing. Our previous study (Shapiro et al., 2011) has shown that the basin-wide circulation pattern and the temperature structure in the Black Sea produced by the same model is significantly dependent on the source of the meteorological input. The horizontal resolution was approximately the same, however, the wind and cloudiness patterns provided by the reanalysis data obtained from National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP, USA) and Japanese 25 year Re-Analysis Project (JRA) were sometimes quite different, which resulted directly in different responses of the sea. For the purposes of this study we have chosen the Celtic Sea, where high resolution meteorological data are available from the UK Met office from 2006. The Celtic Sea is a tidally dominated water basin, with the tidal stream amplitude varying from 0.25 m/s in the southwest to 2 m/s in the Bristol Channel. It is also filled with mesoscale eddies which contribute to the formation of the residual (tidally averaged) circulation pattern (Young et al., 2004). The sea is strongly stratified from April to November, which adds to the formation of density driven currents. In this paper we analyse how sensitive the model output is to variations in the spatial resolution of meteorological parameters obtained from the same source, so that any difference in the ocean output is purely linked to variations in resolution. The original resolution of the meteorological parameters was 1/9 of a degree (about 12 km), which was subsampled to create resolutions up to 96 km. The effect of varying the resolution of the meteorological parameters is not obvious a priori. The length scales of most energetic dynamic features in both ocean and atmosphere are defined by the Rossby radius of deformation

  6. Ocean Dynamics Simulation during an Extreme Bora Event using a Two-Way Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licer, Matjaz; Smerkol, Peter; Fettich, Anja; Ravdas, Michalis; Papapostolou, Alexandros; Mantziafou, Anneta; Cedilnik, Jure; Strajnar, Benedikt; Jeromel, Maja; Pristov, Neva; Jerman, Jure; Petan, Saso; Malacic, Vlado; Sofianos, Sarantis

    2015-04-01

    The response of the Adriatic Sea to cold north-easterly Bora wind forcing has been modelled numerous times, but usually using one-way coupling techniques. One of the most significant events of the kind took place in February 2012, when hurricane force Bora was blowing over the Northern Adriatic almost continuously for over three weeks, causing extreme air-sea interactions leading to severe water cooling (below 4 degrees Celsius) and extensive dense water formation (with density anomalies above 30.5 kg/m3). The intensity of the atmosphere-ocean interactions during such conditions calls for a two-way atmosphere-ocean coupling approach. We compare the performances of a) fully two-way coupled atmosphere-ocean modelling system and b) one way coupled ocean model (forced by the atmospheric model hourly output) to the available in-situ measurements (coastal buoy, CTD). The models used were ALADIN (4.4 km resolution) on the atmospheric side and POM (1/30°× 1/30° resolution) on the ocean side. The atmosphere-ocean coupling was implemented using the OASIS3-MCT model coupling toolkit. We show that the atmosphere-ocean two-way coupling significantly improves the simulated temperature and density response of the ocean since it represents short-termed transient features much better than the offline version of the ocean model.

  7. Simulation of the tropical oceans with an ocean GCM coupled to an atmospheric mixed-layer model

    SciTech Connect

    Murtugudde, R.; Seager, R.; Busalacchi, A.

    1996-08-01

    A reduced gravity, primitive equation, ocean general circulation model (GCM) is coupled to an advective atmospheric mixed-layer (AML) model to demonstrate the importance of a nonlocal atmospheric mixed-layer parameterization for a proper simulation of surface heat fluxes and sea surface temperatures (SST). Seasonal variability of the model SSTs and the circulation are generally in good agreement with the observations in each of the tropical oceans. These results are compared to other simulations that use a local equilibrium mixed-layer model. Inclusion of the advective AML model is demonstrated to lead to a significant improvement in the SST simulation in all three oceans. Advection and diffusion of the air humidity play significant roles in determining SSTs even in the tropical Pacific where the local equilibrium assumption was previously deemed quite accurate. The main, and serious, model flaw is an inadequate representation of the seasonal cycle in the upwelling regions of the eastern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The results indicate that the feedback between mixed-layer depths and SSTs can amplify SST errors, implying that increased realism in the modeling of the ocean mixed layer increases the demand for realism in the representation of the surface heat fluxes. The performance of the GCM with a local-equilibrium mixed-layer model in the Atlantic is as poor as previous simple ocean model simulations of the Atlantic. The conclusion of earlier studies that the simple ocean model was at fault may, in fact, not be correct. Instead the local-equilibrium heat flux parameterization appears to have been the major source of error. Accurate SST predictions may, hence, be feasible by coupling the AML model to computationally efficient simple ocean models. 69 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transports as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, P.J.; Randall, D.A.; Boer, G.

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports on energy fluxes across the surface of the ocean as simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models in which ocean surface temperatures and sea-ice boundaries are prescribed. The oceanic meridional energy transport that would be required to balance these surface fluxes is computed, and is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean energy transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions.

  9. MJO simulation in a cloud-system-resolving global ocean-atmosphere coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Wataru; Onishi, Ryo; Fuchigami, Hiromitsu; Goto, Koji; Nishikawa, Shiro; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Takahashi, Keiko

    2016-09-01

    An observed Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) propagating from the central Indian Ocean to the western Pacific from 15 December 2006 to 10 January 2007 was successfully simulated by a cloud-system-resolving global ocean-atmosphere coupled model without parameterization of cumulus convection. We found that the ocean coupling has significant impacts on the MJO simulation, e.g., strength of the moisture convergence, and the timing and strength of the westerly wind burst over the Maritime Continent. The model also generally well simulated the decay of the MJO in the western Pacific, as well as the changes in sea surface temperature. These results demonstrate that the cloud-system-resolving global ocean-atmosphere coupled model can be used for realistic MJO simulation.

  10. Ocean Hydrodynamics Numerical Model in Curvilinear Coordinates for Simulating Circulation of the Global Ocean and its Separate Basins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Diansky, Nikolay; Zalesny, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    scope of the CMIP-5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project). On the base of the complex proposed the Pacific Ocean circulation eddy-resolving model was realized. The integration domain covers the Pacific from Equator to Bering Strait. The model horizontal resolution is 0.125 degree and it has 20 non-uniform sigma-levels in depth. The model adequately reproduces circulation large-scale structure and its variability: Kuroshio meandering, ocean synoptic eddies, frontal zones, etc. Kuroshio high variability is shown. The distribution of contaminant was simulated that is admittedly wasted near Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. The results demonstrate contaminant distribution structure and provide us understanding of hydrological fields formation processes in the North-West Pacific.

  11. Southern Ocean abyssal heat uptake in fine and coarse resolution climate model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsom, E. R.; Singh, H.; Bitz, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The recently observed warming of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) represents an important component of accumulated sea level rise and global ocean heat uptake. Yet in simulations of greenhouse warming with coarse resolution climate models (which parameterize ocean eddies), Southern Ocean heat uptake dominantly occurs within near-surface waters, which are subsequently transported northward and subducted at mid-latitudes. Here, we examine the response of the abyssal Southern Ocean to greenhouse forcing within a global climate model run with a fine resolution (eddy-resolving) ocean component, which more faithfully simulates AABW formation than its coarse resolution counterparts. We argue that AABW warming may play a more important role in Southern Ocean heat uptake than is suggested by the CMIP5 ensemble of coarse resolution models. We examine the heat uptake in the Southern Ocean using the Community Climate System Model version 3.5 (CCSM 3.5). The model was run at two resolutions in the ocean and sea ice components: coarse (1 degree), which is a standard resolution of many CMIP5 models, and fine (.1 degree), in which sea ice and AABW is formed more realistically. The atmosphere and land components were fixed throughout at .5 degrees resolution. Each version was forced identically with a 1% ramping of CO2 for 150 years. The fine resolution simulation produces more dense water in the control climate, which sinks to a more realistic depth. We attribute this to the improved simulation of sea ice formation regions granted by increasing the ocean model resolution. The reduction of AABW formation as the climate warms leads to a larger response at depth at fine resolution; below 2000 meters, the fine resolution simulation takes up two orders of magnitude more heat than at coarse resolution. We further propose a framework to weigh the amount of heat taken up at depth in the Southern Ocean by the timescale at which it is sequestered, giving more value to heating of regions with

  12. Evaluation of Arctic Sea Ice Thickness Simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Mark; Proshuntinsky, Andrew; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Nguyen, An T.; Lindsay, Ron; Haas, Christian; Zhang, Jinlun; Diansky, Nikolay; Kwok, Ron; Maslowski, Wieslaw; Hakkinen, Sirpa; Ashik, Igor; De Cuevas, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    Six Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project model simulations are compared with estimates of sea ice thickness derived from pan-Arctic satellite freeboard measurements (2004-2008); airborne electromagnetic measurements (2001-2009); ice draft data from moored instruments in Fram Strait, the Greenland Sea, and the Beaufort Sea (1992-2008) and from submarines (1975-2000); and drill hole data from the Arctic basin, Laptev, and East Siberian marginal seas (1982-1986) and coastal stations (1998-2009). Despite an assessment of six models that differ in numerical methods, resolution, domain, forcing, and boundary conditions, the models generally overestimate the thickness of measured ice thinner than approximately 2 mand underestimate the thickness of ice measured thicker than about approximately 2m. In the regions of flat immobile landfast ice (shallow Siberian Seas with depths less than 25-30 m), the models generally overestimate both the total observed sea ice thickness and rates of September and October ice growth from observations by more than 4 times and more than one standard deviation, respectively. The models do not reproduce conditions of fast ice formation and growth. Instead, the modeled fast ice is replaced with pack ice which drifts, generating ridges of increasing ice thickness, in addition to thermodynamic ice growth. Considering all observational data sets, the better correlations and smaller differences from observations are from the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II and Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System models.

  13. Onset time and strength of oceanic deep convection diagnosed from an ocean large-eddy simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Denbo, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    Deep convection has an important role in the large-scale thermohaline circulation, which in turn plays a central part in determining global climate. Manabe and Stouffer`s climate simulations have shown that the thermal and dynamic structure of the oceans have pronounced changes in model climates with increased CO{sub 2}. In their simulations, the addition of low-salinity surface water at high latitudes prevents the ventilation of the deep ocean, thus reducing or in some cases nearly extinguishing the thermohaline circulation. Siegenthaler and Sarmiento remarked that whereas the ocean is the largest of the rapidly exchanging global carbon reservoirs and a major sink for anthropogenic carbon, this uptake capacity become available only when the whole ocean is chemically equilibrated with the new atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. The dynamics of the oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2} is therefore strongly determined by the rate of downward transport of CO{sub 2}-laden water from surface to depth. The importance of deep convection in moderating the uptake of CO{sub 2} by the ocean and its role in the meridional circulation, which affects climate by transporting heat from the tropics to the polar regions, motivates this research. The experiments described here were designed to study the sensitivity of the onset time and strength of deep convection to changes in the heat flux, latent heat flux, and perturbations of the surface mixed-layer temperature and salinity.

  14. Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model Simulations of Precipitation in the Central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, Stephen D.; Mohr, Karen I.

    2015-01-01

    The meridional extent and complex orography of the South American continent contributes to a wide diversity of climate regimes ranging from hyper-arid deserts to tropical rainforests to sub-polar highland regions. In addition, South American meteorology and climate are also made further complicated by ENSO, a powerful coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. Modelling studies in this region have typically resorted to either atmospheric mesoscale or atmosphere-ocean coupled global climate models. The latter offers full physics and high spatial resolution, but it is computationally inefficient typically lack an interactive ocean, whereas the former offers high computational efficiency and ocean-atmosphere coupling, but it lacks adequate spatial and temporal resolution to adequate resolve the complex orography and explicitly simulate precipitation. Explicit simulation of precipitation is vital in the Central Andes where rainfall rates are light (0.5-5 mm hr-1), there is strong seasonality, and most precipitation is associated with weak mesoscale-organized convection. Recent increases in both computational power and model development have led to the advent of coupled ocean-atmosphere mesoscale models for both weather and climate study applications. These modelling systems, while computationally expensive, include two-way ocean-atmosphere coupling, high resolution, and explicit simulation of precipitation. In this study, we use the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST), a fully-coupled mesoscale atmosphere-ocean modeling system. Previous work has shown COAWST to reasonably simulate the entire 2003-2004 wet season (Dec-Feb) as validated against both satellite and model analysis data when ECMWF interim analysis data were used for boundary conditions on a 27-9-km grid configuration (Outer grid extent: 60.4S to 17.7N and 118.6W to 17.4W).

  15. Preliminary ice shelf-ocean simulation results from idealized standalone-ocean and coupled model intercomparison projects (MIPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asay-Davis, Xylar; Martin, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The second Ice Shelf-Ocean MIP (ISOMIP+) and the first Marine Ice Sheet-Ocean MIP (MISOMIP1) prescribe a set of idealized experiments for ocean models with ice-shelf cavities and coupled ice sheet-ocean models, respectively. ISOMIP+ and MISOMIP1 were designed together with the third Marine Ice Sheet MIP (MISMIP+) with three main goals, namely that the MIPs should provide: a controlled forum for researchers to compare their model results with those from other models during model development. a path for testing components in the process of developing coupled ice sheet-ocean models. a basic setup from which a large variety of parameter and process studies can usefully be performed. The experimental design for the three MIPs is currently under review in Geoscientific Model Development (Asay-Davis et al. 2015, doi:10.5194/gmdd-8-9859-2015). We present preliminary results from ISOMIP+ and MISOMIP1 experiments using several ocean-only and coupled ice sheet-ocean models. Among ocean models, we show that differences in model behavior are significant enough that similar results can only be achieved by tuning model parameters (e.g. boundary-layer transfer coefficients, drag coefficients, vertical mixing parameterizations) for each models. This tuning is constrained by a desired mean melt rate in quasi-steady state under specified forcing conditions, akin to how models would be tuned based on observations for non-idealized simulations. We also present a number of parameter studies based the MIP experiments. Again, using several models, we show that melt rates respond sub-linearly to both changes in the square root of the drag coefficient and the heat-transfer coefficient, and that melting is relatively insensitive to horizontal-mixing coefficients (perhaps because the resolution is sufficient to permit eddies) but more sensitive to vertical-mixing coefficients. We show that the choice of the equation of state (linear or nonlinear) does not have a significant impact as long as

  16. Simulating Late Ordovician deep ocean O2 with an earth system climate model. Preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Daniel F.; Montenegro, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    The geological record provides several lines of evidence that point to the occurrence of widespread and long lasting deep ocean anoxia during the Late Ordovician, between about 460-440 million years ago (ma). While a series of potential causes have been proposed, there is still large uncertainty regarding how the low oxygen levels came about. Here we use the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) with Late Ordovician paleogeography to verify the impacts of paleogeography, bottom topography, nutrient loading and cycling and atmospheric concentrations of O2 and CO2 on deep ocean oxygen concentration during the period of interest. Preliminary results so far are based on 10 simulations (some still ongoing) covering the following parameter space: CO2 concentrations of 2240 to 3780 ppmv (~8x to 13x pre-industrial), atmospheric O2 ranging from 8% to 12% per volume, oceanic PO4 and NO3 loading from present day to double present day, reductions in wind speed of 50% and 30% (winds are provided as a boundary condition in the UVic ESCM). For most simulations the deep ocean remains well ventilated. While simulations with higher CO2, lower atmospheric O2 and greater nutrient loading generate lower oxygen concentration in the deep ocean, bottom anoxia - here defined as concentrations <10 μmol L-1 - in these cases is restricted to the high-latitue northern hemisphere. Further simulations will address the impact of greater nutrient loads and bottom topography on deep ocean oxygen concentrations.

  17. ENSO Simulation in Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Models: Are the Current Models Better?

    SciTech Connect

    AchutaRao, K; Sperber, K R

    2005-04-29

    Maintaining a multi-model database over a generation or more of model development provides an important framework for assessing model improvement. Using control integrations, we compare the simulation of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and its extratropical impact, in models developed for the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report with models developed in the late 1990's (the so-called Coupled Model Intercomparison Project-2 [CMIP2] models). The IPCC models tend to be more realistic in representing the frequency with which ENSO occurs, and they are better at locating enhanced temperature variability over the eastern Pacific Ocean. When compared with reanalyses, the IPCC models have larger pattern correlations of tropical surface air temperature than do the CMIP2 models during the boreal winter peak phase of El Nino. However, for sea-level pressure and precipitation rate anomalies, a clear separation in performance between the two vintages of models is not as apparent. The strongest improvement occurs for the modeling groups whose CMIP2 model tended to have the lowest pattern correlations with observations. This has been checked by subsampling the multi-century IPCC simulations in a manner to be consistent with the single 80-year time segment available from CMIP2. Our results suggest that multi-century integrations may be required to statistically assess model improvement of ENSO. The quality of the El Nino precipitation composite is directly related to the fidelity of the boreal winter precipitation climatology, highlighting the importance of reducing systematic model error. Over North America distinct improvement of El Nino forced boreal winter surface air temperature, sea-level pressure, and precipitation rate anomalies in the IPCC models occurs. This improvement, is directly proportional to the skill of the tropical El Nino forced precipitation anomalies.

  18. Present-day Circum-Antarctic Simulations using the POPSICLES Coupled Ice Sheet-Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asay-Davis, X.; Martin, D. F.; Price, S. F.; Maltrud, M. E.; Collins, W.

    2014-12-01

    We present POPSICLES simulation results covering the full Antarctic Ice Sheet and the Southern Ocean spanning the period 1990 to 2010. Simulations are performed at 0.1o (~5 km) ocean resolution and with adaptive ice-sheet model resolution as fine as 500 m. We compare time-averaged melt rates below a number of major ice shelves with those reported by Rignot et al. (2013) as well as other recent studies. We also present seasonal variability and decadal trends in submarine melting from several Antarctic regions. Finally, we explore the influence on basal melting and system dynamics resulting from two different choices of climate forcing: a "normal-year" climatology and the CORE v. 2 forcing data (Large and Yeager 2008).POPSICLES couples the POP2x ocean model, a modified version of the Parallel Ocean Program (Smith and Gent, 2002), and the BISICLES ice-sheet model (Cornford et al., 2012). POP2x includes sub-ice-shelf circulation using partial top cells (Losch, 2008) and boundary layer physics following Holland and Jenkins (1999), Jenkins (2001), and Jenkins et al. (2010). Standalone POP2x output compares well with standard ice-ocean test cases (e.g., ISOMIP; Losch, 2008) and other continental-scale simulations and melt-rate observations (Kimura et al., 2013; Rignot et al., 2013). BISICLES makes use of adaptive mesh refinement and a 1st-order accurate momentum balance similar to the L1L2 model of Schoof and Hindmarsh (2009) to accurately model regions of dynamic complexity, such as ice streams, outlet glaciers, and grounding lines. Results of BISICLES simulations have compared favorably to comparable simulations with a Stokes momentum balance in both idealized tests (MISMIP-3D; Pattyn et al., 2013) and realistic configurations (Favier et al. 2014).A companion presentation, "Response of the Antarctic Ice Sheet to ocean forcing using the POPSICLES coupled ice sheet-ocean model" in session C024 covers the ice-sheet response to these melt rates in the coupled simulation

  19. Simulations of the Arctic Boundary Current in an eddy-resolving global ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Y.; Nurser, A. J. G.; Bacon, S.; Coward, A. C.

    2012-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is shielded from winds by sea ice and is strongly stratified, resulting in extremely low mixing rates. In this quiescent ocean, currents along the continental shelves become the principal dynamical features of the circulation. Observations and model results suggest the existence of a fast oceanic current in the Arctic Ocean, the Arctic Circumpolar Boundary Current (ACBC). The current flows counterclockwise (cyclonically) along the shelf break of the Siberian, Alaskan and Canadian Arctic shelves all way around the Arctic Ocean margins, leaving through western Fram Strait, and taking about two decades to complete the circuit (Aksenov et al., 2011). Simulations with an eddy-resolving global 1/12 degree NEMO model show that the ACBC consists of several jets with the fastest flow occurring at the shelf break. We compare the models results with observations and examine mechanisms driving the ACBC. Through the analysis of the NEMO simulations performed with eddy-resolving, eddy-permitting and non-eddying model configurations we investigate the effect of resolution on the current. Reference Aksenov, Y., V. V. Ivanov, A. J. G. Nurser, S. Bacon, I. V. Polyakov, A. C. Coward, A. C. Naveira-Garabato, and A. Beszczynska-Moeller (2011), The Arctic Circumpolar Boundary Current, J. Geophys. Res., 116, C09017, doi:10.1029/2010JC006637.

  20. Numerical simulation of Typhoon Muifa (2011) using a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Ling, Tiejun; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yunfei; Gao, Zhiyi; Wang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    The newly developed Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System is applied to investigate typhoon-ocean interactions in this study. The COAWST modeling system represents the state-of-the-art numerical simulation technique comprising several coupled models to study coastal and environmental processes. The modeling system is applied to simulate Typhoon Muifa (2011), which strengthened from a tropical storm to a super typhoon in the Northwestern Pacific, to explore the heat fluxes exchanged among the processes simulated using the atmosphere model WRF, ocean model ROMS and wave model SWAN. These three models adopted the same horizontal grid. Three numerical experiments with different coupling configurations are performed in order to investigate the impact of typhoon-ocean interaction on the intensity and ocean response to typhoon. The simulated typhoon tracks and intensities agree with observations. Comparisons of the simulated variables with available atmospheric and oceanic observations show the good performance of using the coupled modeling system for simulating the ocean and atmosphere processes during a typhoon event. The fully coupled simulation that includes a ocean model identifies a decreased SST as a result of the typhoon-forced entrainment. Typhoon intensity and wind speed are reduced due to the decrease of the sea surface temperature when using a coupled ocean model. The experiments with ocean coupled to atmosphere also results in decreased sea surface heat flux and air temperature. The heat flux decreases by about 29% compared to the WRF only case. The reduction of the energy induced by SST decreases, resulting in weakening of the typhoon. Coupling of the waves to the atmosphere and ocean model induces a slight increase of SST in the typhoon center area with the ocean-atmosphere interaction increased as a result of wave feedback to atmosphere.

  1. Fast Simulation Method for Ocean Wave Base on Ocean Wave Spectrum and Improved Gerstner Model with GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenqiao; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Tianchi

    2017-01-01

    For the randomness and complexity of ocean wave, and the simulation of large-scale ocean requires a great amount of computation, but the computational efficiency is low, the real-time ability is poor, a fast method of wave simulation is proposed based on the observation and research results of oceanography, it takes advantage of the grid which combined with the technique of LOD and projection, and use the height map of ocean which is formd by retrieval of ocean wave spectrum and directional spectrum to compute with FFT, and it uses the height map to cyclic mapping for the grid on GPU which combined with the technique of LOD and projection to get the dynamic height data and simulation of ocean. The experimental results show that the method is vivid and it conforms with randomness and complexity of ocean wave, it effectively improves the simulation speed of the wave and satisfied with the real-time ability and fidelity in simulation system of ocean.

  2. An integrated dynamic model of ocean mining system and fast simulation of its longitudinal reciprocating motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yu; Liu, Shao-jun

    2013-04-01

    An integrated dynamic model of China's deep ocean mining system is developed and the fast simulation analysis of its longitudinal reciprocating motion operation processes is achieved. The seafloor tracked miner is built as a three-dimensional single-body model with six-degree-of-freedom. The track-terrain interaction is modeled by partitioning the track-terrain interface into a certain number of mesh elements with three mutually perpendicular forces, including the normal force, the longitudinal shear force and the lateral shear force, acting on the center point of each mesh element. The hydrodynamic force of the miner is considered and applied. By considering the operational safety and collection efficiency, two new mining paths for the miner on the seafloor are proposed, which can be simulated with the established single-body dynamic model of the miner. The pipeline subsystem is built as a three-dimensional multi-body discrete element model, which is divided into rigid elements linked by flexible connectors. The flexible connector without mass is represented by six spring-damper elements. The external hydrodynamic forces of the ocean current from the longitudinal and lateral directions are both considered and modeled based on the Morison formula and applied to the mass center of each corresponding discrete rigid element. The mining ship is simplified and represented by a general kinematic point, whose heave motion induced by the ocean waves and the longitudinal and lateral towing motions are considered and applied. By integrating the single-body dynamic model of the miner and the multi-body discrete element dynamic model of the pipeline, and defining the kinematic equations of the mining ship, the integrated dynamic model of the total deep ocean mining system is formed. The longitudinal reciprocating motion operation modes of the total mining system, which combine the active straight-line and turning motions of the miner and the ship, and the passive towed motions

  3. Ensemble climate simulations using a fully coupled ocean-troposphere-stratosphere general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Huebener, H; Cubasch, U; Langematz, U; Spangehl, T; Niehörster, F; Fast, I; Kunze, M

    2007-08-15

    Long-term transient simulations are carried out in an initial condition ensemble mode using a global coupled climate model which includes comprehensive ocean and stratosphere components. This model, which is run for the years 1860-2100, allows the investigation of the troposphere-stratosphere interactions and the importance of representing the middle atmosphere in climate-change simulations. The model simulates the present-day climate (1961-2000) realistically in the troposphere, stratosphere and ocean. The enhanced stratospheric resolution leads to the simulation of sudden stratospheric warmings; however, their frequency is underestimated by a factor of 2 with respect to observations.In projections of the future climate using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change special report on emissions scenarios A2, an increased tropospheric wave forcing counteracts the radiative cooling in the middle atmosphere caused by the enhanced greenhouse gas concentration. This leads to a more dynamically active, warmer stratosphere compared with present-day simulations, and to the doubling of the number of stratospheric warmings. The associated changes in the mean zonal wind patterns lead to a southward displacement of the Northern Hemisphere storm track in the climate-change signal.

  4. Evaluation of Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment products on South Florida nested simulations with the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourafalou, Vassiliki H.; Peng, Ge; Kang, Heesook; Hogan, Patrick J.; Smedstad, Ole-Martin; Weisberg, Robert H.

    2009-02-01

    The South Florida Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (SoFLA-HYCOM) encompasses a variety of coastal regions (the broad Southwest Florida shelf, the narrow Atlantic Keys shelf, the shallow Florida Bay, and Biscayne Bay) and deep regions (the Straits of Florida), including Marine Protected Areas (the Florida Keys Marine Sanctuary and the Dry Tortugas Ecological Reserve). The presence of the strong Loop Current/Florida Current system and associated eddies connects the local and basin-wide dynamics. A multi-nested approach has been developed to ensure resolution of coastal-scale processes and proper interaction with the large scale flows. The simulations are free running and effects of data assimilation are introduced through boundary conditions derived from Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment products. The study evaluates the effects of boundary conditions on the successful hindcasting of circulation patterns by a nested model, applied on a dynamically and topographically complex shelf area. Independent (not assimilated) observations are employed for a quantitative validation of the numerical results. The discussion of the prevailing dynamics that are revealed in both modeled and observed patterns suggests the importance of topography resolution and local forcing on the inner shelf to middle shelf areas, while large scale processes are found to dominate the outer shelf flows. The results indicate that the successful hindcasting of circulation patterns in a coastal area that is characterized by complex topography and proximity to a large scale current system requires a dynamical downscaling approach, with simulations that are nested in a hierarchy of data assimilative outer models.

  5. Reconciling Glyoxal Observations Over Oceans with Model Simulations: A 3D sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myriokefalitakis, S.; Daskalakis, N.; Tsigaridis, K.; Baidar, S.; Dix, B. K.; Coburn, S.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R. M.; Kanakidou, M.

    2012-12-01

    Glyoxal, the smallest dicarbonyl can be observed from space, is expected to provide indications on volatile organic compounds (VOC) oxidation and secondary aerosol formation in the troposphere. Glyoxal (CHOCHO) is known to be both of natural origin as a by-product of biogenic VOC oxidation and also produced during anthropogenically emitted hydrocarbon tropospheric chemical transformations, like acetylene and aromatics. CHOCHO's short chemical lifetime in the boundary layer and the lower troposphere makes it an excellent indicator of photochemical hotspots and rapidly changing atmospheric conditions around the globe. Although over land CHOCHO atmospheric load is well established, concentrations over ocean deserts observed by satellite instruments and in-situ measurements remain a challenge for all state of the art chemistry transport models (CTM). High column amounts and concentrations of CHOCHO above oceans are observed close to upwelling areas and above regions with large concentrations of phytoplankton that suggest strong maritime biological activity. In addition, the short lifetime of CHOCHO limits long range transport from continental regions. The observed enhancement of CHOCHO load over the tropical ocean during the TORERO campaign corroborate with satellite retrieval points to the existence of primary and/or secondary tropical oceanic sources of CHOCHO; currently neglected or underestimated these chemical pathways by current knowledge. This hypothesis is investigated based on simulations using global TM4-ECPL CTM. The modeling focuses in the TORERO region and reconciles TORERO ship and aircraft observations with the model results.

  6. Delicacy, Imprecision, and Uncertainty of Oceanic Simulations: An Investigation with the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Simulation (LES) for boundary layer turbulence, with measurement comparisons where feasible. The targeted phenomena are submesoscale wakes, fronts, and... submesoscale surface fronts, filaments, and eddies; topographic current separation, form stress, and submesoscale vortex generation; surface waves and... Submesoscale cold filaments in the Gulf Stream, in preparation. Gula. J., M. J. Molemaker, and J. C. McWilliams, 2013d: Submesoscale instabilities on the

  7. A model to simulate nonhydrostatic internal gravity waves in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitousek, S.; Fringer, O. B.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Internal gravity waves in the ocean are primarily generated due to tidal flow over topography that generates internal tides, or internal waves of tidal frequency. As they propagate, internal tides steepen into trains of internal solitary waves that eventually break upon interacting with shallow coastal topography. Modeling internal solitary waves is difficult because they have length scales that are short relative to the internal tide, and so many grid points in three dimensions are needed to accurately resolve their evolution. Because internal solitary waves arise from a balance between nonlinear advection of momentum and nonhydrostatic dispersion, they must be simulated with nonhydrostatic ocean models. Such models are expensive because computation of the nonhydrostatic pressure requires solution of a three-dimensional Poisson equation that can incur an order of magnitude increase in the computational cost. Finally, because internal solitary waves can propagate over long distances with little to no dissipation or mixing of the thermocline upon which they propagate, the numerical model must minimize spurious vertical numerical diffusion of the density field. We will discuss development of a new ocean model designed to accurately simulate internal solitary waves. Horizontally unstructured, finite-volume grids are employed to enable resolution of the multiscale nature of internal solitary waves by refining the grid where they are likely to form. To resolve the nonlinear-nonhydrostatic balance in the waves, the model computes the nonhydrostatic pressure, but with a preconditioner that ensures minimal overhead where the nonhydrotatic pressure is not needed. Finally, to minimize spurious numerical diffusion, we employ an Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE), or hybrid, vertical coordinate system in which the vertical direction is discretized with boundary-following (sigma or s), Cartesian (z), or density-following (isopycnal) coordinates. Because isopycnal coordinates

  8. Tropical cyclone-ocean interaction in Typhoon Megi (2010)—A synergy study based on ITOP observations and atmosphere-ocean coupled model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chun-Chieh; Tu, Wei-Tsung; Pun, Iam-Fei; Lin, I.-I.; Peng, Melinda S.

    2016-01-01

    A mesoscale model coupling the Weather Research and Forecasting model and the three-dimensional Price-Weller-Pinkel ocean model is used to investigate the dynamical ocean response to Megi (2010). It is found that Megi induces sea surface temperature (SST) cooling very differently in the Philippine Sea (PS) and the South China Sea (SCS). The results are compared to the in situ measurements from the Impact of Typhoons on the Ocean in the Pacific (ITOP) 2010 field experiment, satellite observations, and ocean analysis field from Eastern Asian Seas Ocean Nowcast/Forecast System of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. The uncoupled and coupled experiments simulate relatively accurately the track and intensity of Megi over PS; however, the simulated intensity of Megi over SCS varies significantly among the experiments. Only the experiment coupled with three-dimensional ocean processes, which generates rational SST cooling, reasonably simulates the storm intensity in SCS. Our results suggest that storm translation speed and upper ocean thermal structure are two main factors responsible for Megi's distinct different impact over PS and over SCS. In addition, it is shown that coupling with one-dimensional ocean process (i.e., only vertical mixing process) is not enough to provide sufficient ocean response, especially under slow translation speed (~2-3 m s-1), during which vertical advection (or upwelling) is significant. Therefore, coupling with three-dimensional ocean processes is necessary and crucial for tropical cyclone forecasting. Finally, the simulation results show that the stable boundary layer forms on top of the Megi-induced cold SST area and increases the inflow angle of the surface wind.

  9. Development of a Coupled Ocean-Hydrologic Model to Simulate Pollutant Transport in Singapore Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, V. P.

    2015-12-01

    Intensive agricultural, economic and industrial activities in Singapore and Malaysia have made our coastal areas under high risk of water pollution. A coupled ocean-hydrologic model is employed to perform three-dimensional simulations of flow and pollutant transport in Singapore coastal waters. The hydrologic SWAT model is coupled with the coastal ocean SUNTANS model by outputting streamflow and pollutant concentrations from the SWAT model and using them as inputs for the SUNTANS model at common boundary points. The coupled model is calibrated with observed sea surface elevations and velocities, and high correlation coefficients that exceed 0.97 and 0.91 are found for sea surface elevations and velocities, respectively. The pollutants are modeled as Gaussian passive tracers, and are released at five upstream locations in Singapore coastal waters. During the Northeast monsoon, pollutants released in Source 1 (Johor River), Source 2 (Tiram River), Source 3 (Layang River) and Source 4 (Layau River) enter the Singapore Strait after 4 days of release and reach Sentosa Island within 9 days. Meanwhile, pollutants released in Source 5 (Kallang River) reach Sentosa Island after 4 days. During the Southwest monsoon, the dispersion time is roughly doubled, with pollutants from Sources 1 - 4 entering the Singapore Strait only after 12 days of release due to weak currents.

  10. A mass-conserving advection scheme for offline simulation of scalar transport in coastal ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibrand, P. A.; Herzfeld, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a flux-form semi-Lagrangian (FFSL) advection scheme designed for offline scalar transport simulation with coastal ocean models using curvilinear horizontal coordinates. The scheme conserves mass, overcoming problems of mass conservation typically experienced with offline transport models, and permits long time steps (relative to the Courant number) to be used by the offline model. These attributes make the method attractive for offline simulation of tracers in biogeochemical or sediment transport models using archived flow fields from hydrodynamic models. We describe the FFSL scheme, and test it on two idealised domains and one real domain, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. For comparison, we also include simulations using a traditional semi-Lagrangian advection scheme for the offline simulations. We compare tracer distributions predicted by the offline FFSL transport scheme with those predicted by the original hydrodynamic model, assess the conservation of mass in all cases and contrast the computational efficiency of the schemes. We find that the FFSL scheme produced very good agreement with the distributions of tracer predicted by the hydrodynamic model, and conserved mass with an error of a fraction of one percent. In terms of computational speed, the FFSL scheme was comparable with the semi-Lagrangian method and an order of magnitude faster than the full hydrodynamic model, even when the latter ran in parallel on multiple cores. The FFSL scheme presented here therefore offers a viable mass-conserving and computationally-efficient alternative to traditional semi-Lagrangian schemes for offline scalar transport simulation in coastal models.

  11. Impacts of atmospheric and oceanic resolution on the tropical Pacific climatology simulated by GFDL's new climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenberg, A. T.; Vecchi, G. A.; Delworth, T. L.; Rosati, A.; Anderson, W.; Zeng, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    We examine impacts of atmospheric and oceanic grid refinement on simulations of the tropical Pacific climatology, using a series of high-resolution global coupled GCMs recently developed at GFDL. Starting from the CM2.1 model developed for CMIP3, the new models progressively refine the horizontal grid spacing in the atmosphere by a factor of five (CM2.5-FLOR), and additionally in the ocean by factors of four (CM2.5) and ten (CM2.6). The atmospheric refinement is found to substantially improve the coupled simulation's tropical Pacific climatology of SST, rainfall, surface pressure, winds, coastal upwelling, and upper-ocean temperature and salinity -- and also reduces the net air-sea heat flux into the ocean near the equator, indicating reduced ocean-dynamical cooling due to weaker trade winds. Oceanic refinement, in contrast, results in much less improvement to the simulated surface climatology -- and in some respects actually degrades the simulation, for example by over-intensifying the thermal stratification of the equatorial upper ocean. This suggests that in the more strongly-eddying regimes permitted by higher resolution, some of the ocean component's physical parameterizations may need retuning or reformulation. The causes of these various sensitivities are discussed, along with avenues toward future improvements.

  12. Towards better simulations of ice/ocean coupling in the Amundsen Sea Sector, West Antarctica, using a coupled ice-sheet ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Rignot, E. J.; Menemenlis, D.; Larour, E. Y.; Schodlok, M.; Seroussi, H.

    2015-12-01

    In the Amundsen Sea, warm Circumpolar Deep Water intrudes onto the continental shelf and flows into ice shelf cavities of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), resulting in high basal melt rates. Thinning of WAIS can have a large impact on ice sheet dynamics, sea-level rise, and local and global ocean circulation. Recent observations of rapid changes in Pine Island Glacier have motivated many model studies. However, it still remains difficult to simulate the evolution of glaciers in West Antarctica accurately. Part of the difficulty stems from poorly known boundary conditions, e.g., ocean bathymetry, bedrock, surface atmosphere, and lateral ocean. Another set of difficulties stems from assumptions and approximations used in the ocean and ice sheet models. Many ocean models investigate basal melting of ice shelves assuming constant ice shelf cavity shape, while many ice sheet models investigate the evolution of ice sheet using parametrized melt rate or melt rate obtained from ocean model separately. However, several recent studies show that glacier retreat is sensitive to basal melt and, in turn, basal melt is sensitive to ice shelf cavity shape. To simulate the evolution of ice shelves in West Antarctica in a more realistic set up, we use the ISSM ice sheet model coupled to the MITgcm ocean, sea ice, and ice shelf cavity model. We also incorporate oceanographic observations as well as refined geometries of glaciers and sea floor for more realistic boundary conditions. We simulate the evolution of glaciers in Amundsen Sea (i.e., Pine Island, Thwaites, and Getz Glaciers), and discuss its sensitivities to ocean parameters, ice sheet and ice shelf parameters, and bedrock topography.

  13. Simulation of the world ocean climate with a massively parallel numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, K. V.; Ibrayev, R. A.; Kalmykov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The INM-IO numerical World Ocean model is verified through the calculation of the model ocean climate. The numerical experiment was conducted for a period of 500 years following the CORE-I protocol. We analyze some basic elements of the large-scale ocean circulation and local and integral characteristics of the model solution. The model limitations and ways they are overcome are described. The results generally fit the level of leading models. This experiment is a necessary step preceding the transition to high-resolution diagnostic and prognostic calculations of the state of the World Ocean and its individual basins.

  14. Simulating the Response to Astronomical Forcing with a Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erb, M. P.; Broccoli, A. J.; Raney, B.

    2015-12-01

    Substantial variations in climate during the Quaternary Period have been reconstructed from a wide array of paleoclimate proxies, with much of the variance occurring on the same time scales as astronomical forcing. To understand the mechanisms that may be responsible for these variations, we employ a set of single-forcing simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model and systematically examine the climatic responses to changes in Earth's orbital parameters (i.e., perihelion date and axial tilt). We survey some of the highlights from our analysis of these simulations, including the response of tropical circulation to astronomical forcing and contributions of radiative feedbacks to the global and regional thermodynamic response.

  15. Intraseasonal eddies in the Sulawesi Sea simulated in an ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masumoto, Y.; Kagimoto, T.; Yoshida, M.; Fukuda, M.; Hirose, N.; Yamagata, T.

    The intraseasonal variability associated with mesoscale eddies in the Sulawesi Sea simulated in a high resolution ocean general circulation model is described in detail. The cyclonic eddies, with a diameter of about 400 km, are generated at the entrance of the Sulawesi Sea between the Mindanao and the Halmahera Islands with 40 days interval. They are associated with a high speed (> 20 cm/s) down to 1000 m level. The anticlockwise circulation in the Sulawesi Sea, reported so far in both models and observations, may be a long time-averaged image of the above energetic eddies. The intraseasonal eddies significantly affect the volume transport through passages in the northern part of the Indonesian archipelago. The intraseasonal transport variation, however, is highly damped within the Indonesian seas in the present model.

  16. Impact of air-sea coupling on the simulation of tropical cyclones in the North Indian Ocean using a simple 3-D ocean model coupled to ARW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, C. V.; Mohan, Greeshma M.; Naidu, C. V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the impact of air-sea coupling on tropical cyclone (TC) predictions is studied using a three-dimensional Price-Weller-Pinkel (3DPWP) ocean model coupled to the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting in six tropical storms in the North Indian Ocean, representing different intensities, seasonality, and varied oceanic conditions. A set of numerical experiments are conducted for each cyclone using sea surface temperature (SST) boundary conditions derived from Global Forecast System (GFS) SST, NOAA/National Centers for Environmental Prediction SST, and ocean coupling (3DPWP). Significant differences and improvements are found in the predicted intensity and track in the simulations, in which the cyclones' impact on SST is included. It has been found that while the uncoupled model using GFS SST considerably overestimated the intensity as well as produced large track errors, the ocean coupling substantially improved the track and intensity predictions. The improvements with 3DPWP are because of simulating the ocean-atmosphere feedback in terms of deepening of ocean mixed layer, reduction in enthalpy fluxes, and storm-induced SST cooling as seen in observations. The coupled model could simulate the cold wake in SST, asymmetries in the surface winds, enthalpy fluxes, size, and structure of the storm in better agreement with observations than the uncoupled model. The coupled model reduced the track errors by roughly 0.3-39% and intensity errors by 29-47% at 24-96 h predictions by controlling the northward deviation of storms tracks by SST cooling and associated changes in the dynamics. The vorticity changes associated with horizontal advection and stretching terms affect the tracks of the storms in the three simulations.

  17. Simulations of radiocarbon in a coarse-resolution world ocean model 2. Distributions of bomb-produced Carbon 14

    SciTech Connect

    Toggweiler, J. R.; Dixon, K.; Bryan, K.

    1989-06-15

    Part 1 of this study examined the ability of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) primitive equation ocean general circulation model to simulate the steady state distribution of naturally produced /sup 14/C in the ocean prior to the nuclear bomb tests of the 1950's and early 1960's. In part 2 begin with the steady state distributions of part 1 and subject the model to the pulse of elevated atmospheric /sup 14/C concentrations observed since the 1950's.

  18. Simulating Heinrich events in a coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice sheet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Ziemen, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Heinrich events are among the most prominent events of long-term climate variability recorded in proxies across the northern hemisphere. They are the archetype of ice sheet - climate interactions on millennial time scales. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms that cause Heinrich events are still under discussion, and their climatic consequences are far from being fully understood. We contribute to answering the open questions by studying Heinrich events in a coupled ice sheet model (ISM) atmosphere-ocean-vegetation general circulation model (AOVGCM) framework, where this variability occurs as part of the model generated internal variability without the need to prescribe external perturbations, as was the standard approach in almost all model studies so far. The setup consists of a northern hemisphere setup of the modified Parallel Ice Sheet Model (mPISM) coupled to the global coarse resolution AOVGCM ECHAM5/MPIOM/LPJ. The simulations used for this analysis were an ensemble covering substantial parts of the late Glacial forced with transient insolation and prescribed atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The modeled Heinrich events show a marked influence of the ice discharge on the Atlantic circulation and heat transport, but none of the Heinrich events during the Glacial did show a complete collapse of the North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. The simulated main consequences of the Heinrich events are a freshening and cooling over the North Atlantic and a drying over northern Europe.

  19. North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean Climate Change in Pliocene Simulations Using the GISS ModelE2-R GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, M. A.; Sohl, L. E.; Jonas, J.; Kelley, M.; Rind, D.

    2013-12-01

    As part of the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) Experiment 2, twelve research groups simulated the middle Pliocene climate using fully coupled versions of their ocean-atmosphere GCMs. Under the conditions prescribed by PlioMIP Experiment 2 (especially 25 meters of sea level rise, 405 ppm CO2, and reduced ice sheets) most coupled GCMs still underestimate ocean temperatures in the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean regions. The GISS ModelE (AR5-version) originally produced the coolest results in these regions out of all the Pliocene simulations, with a greatly decreased AMOC and colder temperatures than modern in a large portion of the North Atlantic. However, improvements in the formulation of mesoscale mixing in the GISS ModelE, which have been incorporated in a more recent model update, led to significant changes in the simulation of the Pliocene (Chandler et al., 2013), including a warmer North Atlantic ocean, decreased Arctic sea ice, increased Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) relative to the control run, and generally a more favorable comparison to proxy data. Despite these results, the relative role of the various forcings and the numerous boundary condition changes was not analyzed. Zhang et al. (2013) did show that the increase in ocean heat transport is small compared to the change in the AMOC and was not likely to be the direct cause of the North Atlantic warming. Furthermore, using a subset of the PlioMIP models they showed that the role of ocean heat flux in the models, in general, is not strongly correlated to either the strengthening of the Pliocene AMOC or the warming of the North Atlantic. We have now run a series of sensitivity tests with the newer version of the GISS model and will discuss the relative effects of Pliocene CO2, ice sheets (Greenland and Antarctica separately), orbit, vegetation and the change in the mesoscale mixing parameterization as a means of better understanding the role of various factors that

  20. Forcing of global ocean models using an atmospheric boundary layer model: assessing consequences for the simulation of the AMOC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Rafael; Boening, Claus

    2015-04-01

    Current practice in the atmospheric forcing of ocean model simulations can lead to unphysical behaviours. The problem lies in the bulk formulation of the turbulent air-sea fluxes in conjunction with a prescribed, and unresponsive, atmospheric state as given, e.g., by reanalysis products. This forcing formulation corresponds to assuming an atmosphere with infinite heat capacity, and effectively damps SST anomalies even on basin scales. It thus curtails an important negative feedback between meridional ocean heat transport and SST in the North Atlantic, rendering simulations of the AMOC in such models excessively sensitive to details in the freshwater fluxes. As a consequence, such simulations are known for spurious drift behaviors which can only partially controlled by introducing some (and sometimes strong) unphysical restoring of sea surface salinity. There have been several suggestions during the last 20 years for at least partially alleviating the problem by including some simplified model of the atmospheric boundary layer (AML) which allows a feedback of SST anomalies on the near-surface air temperature and humidity needed to calculate the surface fluxes. We here present simulations with a simple, only thermally active AML formulation (based on the 'CheapAML' proposed by Deremble et al., 2013) implemented in a global model configuration based on NEMO (ORCA05). In a suite of experiments building on the CORE-bulk forcing methodology, we examine some general features of the AML-solutions (in which only the winds are prescribed) in comparison to solutions with a prescribed atmosperic state. The focus is on the North Atlantic, where we find that the adaptation of the atmospheric temperature the simulated ocean state can lead to strong local modifications in the surface heat fluxes in frontal regions (e.g., the 'Northwest Corner'). We particularly assess the potential of the AML-forcing concept for obtaining AMOC-simulations with reduced spurious drift, without

  1. How well do global ocean biogeochemistry models simulate dissolved iron distributions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Aumont, Olivier; DeAth, Ros; Dunne, John P.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Galbraith, Eric; Misumi, Kazuhiro; Moore, J. Keith; Ridgwell, Andy; Sherman, Elliot; Stock, Charles; Vichi, Marcello; Völker, Christoph; Yool, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Numerical models of ocean biogeochemistry are relied upon to make projections about the impact of climate change on marine resources and test hypotheses regarding the drivers of past changes in climate and ecosystems. In large areas of the ocean, iron availability regulates the functioning of marine ecosystems and hence the ocean carbon cycle. Accordingly, our ability to quantify the drivers and impacts of fluctuations in ocean ecosystems and carbon cycling in space and time relies on first achieving an appropriate representation of the modern marine iron cycle in models. When the iron distributions from 13 global ocean biogeochemistry models are compared against the latest oceanic sections from the GEOTRACES program, we find that all models struggle to reproduce many aspects of the observed spatial patterns. Models that reflect the emerging evidence for multiple iron sources or subtleties of its internal cycling perform much better in capturing observed features than their simpler contemporaries, particularly in the ocean interior. We show that the substantial uncertainty in the input fluxes of iron results in a very wide range of residence times across models, which has implications for the response of ecosystems and global carbon cycling to perturbations. Given this large uncertainty, iron fertilization experiments based on any single current generation model should be interpreted with caution. Improvements to how such models represent iron scavenging and also biological cycling are needed to raise confidence in their projections of global biogeochemical change in the ocean.

  2. A study on air-sea interaction on the simulated seasonal climate in an ocean-atmosphere coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Suryun; Hong, Song-You; Park, Suhee

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effects of air-sea interaction upon simulated tropical climatology, focusing on the boreal summer mean precipitation and the embedded intra-seasonal oscillation (ISO) signal. Both the daily coupling of ocean-atmosphere and the diurnal variation of sea surface temperature (SST) at every time step by accounting for the ocean mixed layer and surface-energy budget at the ocean surface are considered. The ocean-atmosphere coupled model component of the global/regional integrated model system has been utilized. Results from the coupled model show better precipitation climatology than those from the atmosphere-only model, through the inclusion of SST-cloudiness-precipitation feedback in the coupled system. Cooling the ocean surface in the coupled model is mainly responsible for the improved precipitation climatology, whereas neither the coupling itself nor the diurnal variation in the SST influences the simulated climatology. However, the inclusion of the diurnal cycle in the SST shows a distinct improvement of the simulated ISO signal, by either decreasing or increasing the magnitude of spectral powers, as compared to the simulation results that exclude the diurnal variation of the SST in coupled models.

  3. A Realistically Perturbed Atmosphere and Ocean De-Aliasing Model for Future Gravity Mission Simulation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobslaw, Henryk; Forootan, Ehsan; Bergmann-Wolf, Inga; Neumayer, Karl-Hans; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Kusche, Jürgen; Flechtner, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Recently completed performance studies of future gravity mission concepts arrived at sometimes contradicting conclusions about the importance of non-tidal aliasing errors that remain in the finally retrieved gravity field time-series. In those studies, typically a fraction of the differences between two different models of atmosphere and ocean mass variability determined the magnitude of the aliasing errors. Since differences among arbitrary pairs of the numerical models available might lead to widely different aliasing errors and thus conclusions regarding limiting error contributors of a candidate mission, we present here for the first time a version of a realistically perturbed de-aliasing model that is consistent with the updated ESA Earth System Model for gravity mission simulation studies (Dobslaw et al., 2015). The error model is available over the whole 12-year period of the ESA ESM and consists of two parts: (i) a component containing signals from physical processes that are intentionally omitted from de-aliasing models, as for a example, variations in global eustatic sea-level; and (ii) a series of true errors that consist of in total five different components with realistically re-scaled variability at both small and large spatial scales for different frequency bands ranging from sub-daily to sub-monthly periods. Based on a multi-model ensemble of atmosphere and ocean mass variability available to us for the year 2006, we will demonstrate that our re-scaled true errors have plausible magnitudes and correlation characteristics in all frequency bands considered. The realism of the selected scaling coefficients for periods between 1 and 30 days is tested further by means of a variance component estimation based on the constrained daily GRACE solution series ITSG-GRACE2014. Initial full-scale simulation experiments are used to re-assess the relative importance of non-tidal de-aliasing errors for the GRACE-FO mission, which might be subsequently expanded to

  4. Simulation of Arctic and North Atlantic ocean water and ice seasonal characteristics by the INMIO-CICE coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, K. V.; Grankina, T. B.; Ibrayev, R. A.; Gromov, I. V.

    2016-11-01

    The first results of simulation of the seasonal variability of the Arctic and North Atlantic ocean waters and ice by a coupled model based on a full three-dimensional ocean dynamics model INMIO4.1 and a sea-ice model CICE5.1 are considered. The coupled model can be run on massively parallel computers under control of the Compact Modelling Framework CMF2.0. The numerical experiment is performed according to the CORE-II protocol with 1948 atmospheric forcing data. Possible causes of the deviation of the model solution from the ERA-20C reanalysis and WOA09 climatology are discussed.

  5. Wind driven general circulation of the Mediterranean Sea simulated with a Spectral Element Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molcard, A.; Pinardi, N.; Iskandarani, M.; Haidvogel, D. B.

    2002-05-01

    This work is an attempt to simulate the Mediterranean Sea general circulation with a Spectral Finite Element Model. This numerical technique associates the geometrical flexibility of the finite elements for the proper coastline definition with the precision offered by spectral methods. The model is reduced gravity and we study the wind-driven ocean response in order to explain the large scale sub-basin gyres and their variability. The study period goes from January 1987 to December 1993 and two forcing data sets are used. The effect of wind variability in space and time is analyzed and the relationship between wind stress curl and ocean response is stressed. Some of the main permanent structures of the general circulation (Gulf of Lions cyclonic gyre, Rhodes gyre, Gulf of Syrte anticylone) are shown to be induced by permanent wind stress curl structures. The magnitude and spatial variability of the wind is important in determining the appearance or disappearance of some gyres (Tyrrhenian anticyclonic gyre, Balearic anticyclonic gyre, Ionian cyclonic gyre). An EOF analysis of the seasonal variability indicates that the weakening and strengthening of the Levantine basin boundary currents is a major component of the seasonal cycle in the basin. The important discovery is that seasonal and interannual variability peak at the same spatial scales in the ocean response and that the interannual variability includes the change in amplitude and phase of the seasonal cycle in the sub-basin scale gyres and boundary currents. The Coriolis term in the vorticity balance seems to be responsible for the weakening of anticyclonic structures and their total disappearance when they are close to a boundary. The process of adjustment to winds produces a train of coastally trapped gravity waves which travel around the eastern and western basins, respectively in approximately 6 months. This corresponds to a phase velocity for the wave of about 1 m/s, comparable to an average velocity of

  6. A PARALLEL IMPLEMENTATION OF A SPECTRAL ELEMENT OCEAN MODEL FOR SIMULATING LOW-LATITUDE CIRCULATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    MA,H.; MCCAFFREY,J.; PIACSEK,S.

    1997-11-01

    This paper is about the parallel implementation of a high-resolution, spectral element, primitive equation model of a homogeneous equatorial ocean. The present work shows that the high-order domain decomposition methods can be efficiently implemented in a massively parallel computing environment to solve large-scale CFD problems, such as the general circulation of the ocean.

  7. Effects of Tropical Cyclones on Ocean Heat Transport as simulated by a High Resolution Coupled General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoccimarro, E.; Gualdi, S.; Bellucci, A.; Sanna, A.; Vichi, M.; Manzini, E.; Fogli, P.; Navarra, A.; Oddo, P.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) activity and their relationship with the Northern hemispheric Ocean Heat Transport (OHT) is investigated. The analysis has been performed using 20C3M (20th Century) and A1B (21st Century) IPCC scenario climate simulations obtained running a state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean-seaice coupled global model, with high-resolution in the atmosphere. The capability of the model to reproduce a realistic TC climatology has been assessed by comparing the model results from the simulation of the 20th Century with observations. The model is able to simulate tropical cyclone-like vortices with many features similar to the observed TCs. The simulated TC activity exhibits realistic structure, geographical distribution and interannual variability, indicating that the model is able to reproduce the major basic mechanisms that link the TC activity with the large scale circulation. The TC-induced ocean cooling is well represented and the TCs activity increases significantly the poleward OHT out of the tropics, but also increases the heat transport into the deep tropics. This effect, investigated looking at the 100 most intense Northern hemisphere TCs, is strongly correlated to the TC-induced momentum flux at the surface of the ocean. TCs frequency and intensity appear to be substantially stationary through the whole 1950- 2069 period. Also the effect of the TCs induced OHT) does not significantly change during the simulated period.

  8. The Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Model (OLAM): A Formulation for High Resolution Weather and Climate Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walko, R. L.; Avissar, R.

    2008-12-01

    Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). This presentation will highlight the major features of OLAM, focusing on aspects that enable the model to accurately adapt to high resolution. OLAM has been tested and validated in a number of simulations at both global and fine scales, and some of these results will be presented. Current development efforts will be described, including progress toward complete representation of the water cycle, including the groundwater reservoir, and the coupling of a dynamic ocean model.

  9. Effects of Precipitation on Ocean Mixed-Layer Temperature and Salinity as Simulated in a 2-D Coupled Ocean-Cloud Resolving Atmosphere Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K-M.; Adamec, D.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere model is used to investigate possible roles of convective scale ocean disturbances induced by atmospheric precipitation on ocean mixed-layer heat and salt budgets. The model couples a cloud resolving model with an embedded mixed layer-ocean circulation model. Five experiment are performed under imposed large-scale atmospheric forcing in terms of vertical velocity derived from the TOGA COARE observations during a selected seven-day period. The dominant variability of mixed-layer temperature and salinity are simulated by the coupled model with imposed large-scale forcing. The mixed-layer temperatures in the coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models show similar variations when salinity effects are not included. When salinity effects are included, however, differences in the domain-mean mixed-layer salinity and temperature between coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models could be as large as 0.3 PSU and 0.4 C respectively. Without fresh water effects, the nocturnal heat loss over ocean surface causes deep mixed layers and weak cooling rates so that the nocturnal mixed-layer temperatures tend to be horizontally-uniform. The fresh water flux, however, causes shallow mixed layers over convective areas while the nocturnal heat loss causes deep mixed layer over convection-free areas so that the mixed-layer temperatures have large horizontal fluctuations. Furthermore, fresh water flux exhibits larger spatial fluctuations than surface heat flux because heavy rainfall occurs over convective areas embedded in broad non-convective or clear areas, whereas diurnal signals over whole model areas yield high spatial correlation of surface heat flux. As a result, mixed-layer salinities contribute more to the density differences than do mixed-layer temperatures.

  10. Assessment of Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model Simulations of Winter Northern Hemisphere Atmospheric Blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Jessica; Osborn, Tim

    2010-05-01

    Characterized by their persistence and quasi-stationary features, large-scale atmospheric blocking are often responsible for extreme weather events, which can have enormous impacts on human life, economy and environment e.g. European heat wave in summer 2003. Therefore, diagnostics of the present-day climate and future projections of potential changes in blocking-related extreme events are essential for risk management and adaptation planning. This study focuses on assessing the ability of six coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs) to simulate large-scale winter atmospheric blocking in the Northern Hemisphere for the present-day climate (1957-1999). A modified version of the Tibaldi and Molteni (1990)'s blocking index, which measures the strength of the average westerly flow in the mid-latitudes, is applied to daily averaged 500 hPa geopotential height output from the climate models. ERA-40 re-analysis atmospheric data have also been used over the same time period to verify the models' results. The two preferred regions of blocking development, in the Euro-Atlantic and North Pacific, are well captured by most of the models. However, the prominent error in blocking simulations, according to a number of previous model assessments, consists of an underestimation of the total frequency of blocking episodes over both regions. A more detailed analysis of blocking frequency as a function of duration revealed that this error was due to an insufficient number of medium spells and long-lasting episodes, and a shift in blocking lifetime distributions towards shorter blocks, while short-lived blocking events (between 5 and 8 days) tend to be overestimated. The impact of models' systematic errors on blocking simulations has been analyzed, and results suggest that there is a primary need to reduce the time-mean bias to improve the representation of blocking in climate models. The underestimated high-frequency variability of the transient eddies embedded in

  11. Ocean Drilling Simulation Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telese, James A.; Jordan, Kathy

    The Ocean Drilling Project brings together scientists and governments from 20 countries to explore the earth's structure and history as it is revealed beneath the oceans' basins. Scientific expeditions examine rock and sediment cores obtained from the ocean floor to learn about the earth's basic processes. The series of activities in this…

  12. Efficient Flowline Simulations of Ice Shelf-Ocean Interactions: Sensitivity Studies with a Fully Coupled Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Ryan Thomas; Holland, David; Parizek, Byron R.; Alley, Richard B.; Nowicki, Sophie M. J.; Jenkins, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamic flowline and plume models for the ice shelf-ocean system simplify the ice and ocean dynamics sufficiently to allow extensive exploration of parameters affecting ice-sheet stability while including key physical processes. Comparison between geophysically and laboratory-based treatments of ice-ocean interface thermodynamics shows reasonable agreement between calculated melt rates, except where steep basal slopes and relatively high ocean temperatures are present. Results are especially sensitive to the poorly known drag coefficient, highlighting the need for additional field experiments to constrain its value. These experiments also suggest that if the ice-ocean interface near the grounding line is steeper than some threshold, further steepening of the slope may drive higher entrainment that limits buoyancy, slowing the plume and reducing melting; if confirmed, this will provide a stabilizing feedback on ice sheets under some circumstances.

  13. Behaviour of oceanic 137Cs following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident for four years simulated numerically by a regional ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torn, M. S.; Koven, C. D.; Riley, W. J.; Zhu, B.; Hicks Pries, C.; Phillips, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    A series of accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F NPP) following the earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011 resulted in the release of radioactive materials to the ocean by two major pathways, direct release from the accident site and atmospheric deposition.We reconstructed spatiotemporal variability of 137Cs activity in the regional ocean for four years by numerical model, such as a regional scale and the North Pacific scale oceanic dispersion models, an atmospheric transport model, a sediment transport model, a dynamic biological compartment model for marine biota and river runoff model. Direct release rate of 137Cs were estimated for four years after the accident by comparing simulated results and observed activities very close to the site. The estimated total amounts of directly release was 3.6±0.7 PBq. Directly release rate of 137Cs decreased exponentially with time by the end of December 2012 and then, was almost constant. Decrease rate were quite small after 2013. The daily release rate of 137Cs was estimated to be the order of magnitude of 1010 Bq/day by the end of March 2015. The activity of directly released 137Cs was detectable only in the coastal zone after December 2012. Simulated 137Cs activities attributable to direct release were in good agreement with observed activities, a result that implies the estimated direct release rate was reasonable. There is no observed data of 137Cs activity in the ocean from 11 to 21 March 2011. Observed data of marine biota should reflect the history of 137Cs activity in this early period. We reconstructed the history of 137Cs activity in this early period by considering atmospheric deposition, river input, rain water runoff from the 1F NPP site. The comparisons between simulated 137Cs activity of marine biota by a dynamic biological compartment and observed data also suggest that simulated 137Cs activity attributable to atmospheric deposition was underestimated in this early period. The

  14. Behaviour of oceanic 137Cs following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident for four years simulated numerically by a regional ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumune, D.; Tsubono, T.; Aoyama, M.; Misumi, K.; Tateda, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A series of accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F NPP) following the earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011 resulted in the release of radioactive materials to the ocean by two major pathways, direct release from the accident site and atmospheric deposition.We reconstructed spatiotemporal variability of 137Cs activity in the regional ocean for four years by numerical model, such as a regional scale and the North Pacific scale oceanic dispersion models, an atmospheric transport model, a sediment transport model, a dynamic biological compartment model for marine biota and river runoff model. Direct release rate of 137Cs were estimated for four years after the accident by comparing simulated results and observed activities very close to the site. The estimated total amounts of directly release was 3.6±0.7 PBq. Directly release rate of 137Cs decreased exponentially with time by the end of December 2012 and then, was almost constant. Decrease rate were quite small after 2013. The daily release rate of 137Cs was estimated to be the order of magnitude of 1010 Bq/day by the end of March 2015. The activity of directly released 137Cs was detectable only in the coastal zone after December 2012. Simulated 137Cs activities attributable to direct release were in good agreement with observed activities, a result that implies the estimated direct release rate was reasonable. There is no observed data of 137Cs activity in the ocean from 11 to 21 March 2011. Observed data of marine biota should reflect the history of 137Cs activity in this early period. We reconstructed the history of 137Cs activity in this early period by considering atmospheric deposition, river input, rain water runoff from the 1F NPP site. The comparisons between simulated 137Cs activity of marine biota by a dynamic biological compartment and observed data also suggest that simulated 137Cs activity attributable to atmospheric deposition was underestimated in this early period. The

  15. One-Dimensional Coupled Ecosystem-Carbon Flux Model for the Simulation of Biogeochemical Parameters at Ocean Weather Station P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorini, S.; McClain, C.; Christian, J.; Wong, C. S.

    2000-01-01

    In this Technical Publication, we describe the model functionality and analyze its application to the seasonal and interannual variations of phytoplankton, nutrients, pCO2 and CO2 concentrations in the eastern subarctic Pacific at Ocean Weather Station P (OWSP, 50 deg. N 145 deg. W). We use a verified one-dimensional ecosystem model, coupled with newly incorporated carbon flux and carbon chemistry components, to simulate 22 years (1958-1980) of pCO2 and CO2 variability at Ocean Weather Station P (OWS P). This relatively long period of simulation verifies and extends the findings of previous studies using an explicit approach for the biological component and realistic coupling with the carbon flux dynamics. The slow currents and the horizontally homogeneous ocean in the subarctic Pacific make OWS P one of the best available candidates for modeling the chemistry of the upper ocean in one dimension. The chlorophyll and ocean currents composite for 1998 illustrates this premise. The chlorophyll concentration map was derived from SeaWiFS data and the currents are from an OGCM simulation (from R. Murtugudde).

  16. Ocean circulation: its effects on seasonal sea-ice simulations.

    PubMed

    Hibler, W D; Bryan, K

    1984-05-04

    A diagnostic ice-ocean model of the Arctic, Greenland, and Norwegian seas is constructed and used to examine the role of ocean circulation in seasonal sea-ice simulations. The model includes lateral ice motion and three-dimensional ocean circulation. The ocean portion of the model is weakly forced by observed temperature and salinity data. Simulation results show that including modeled ocean circulation in seasonal sea-ice simulations substantially improves the predicted ice drift and ice margin location. Simulations that do not include lateral ocean movment predict a much less realistic ice edge.

  17. Mesoscale Ocean Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Brodie; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Bachman, Scott; Bryan, Frank

    2015-11-01

    The highest resolution global climate models (GCMs) can now resolve the largest scales of mesoscale dynamics in the ocean. This has the potential to increase the fidelity of GCMs. However, the effects of the smallest, unresolved, scales of mesoscale dynamics must still be parametrized. One such family of parametrizations are mesoscale ocean large eddy simulations (MOLES), but the effects of including MOLES in a GCM are not well understood. In this presentation, several MOLES schemes are implemented in a mesoscale-resolving GCM (CESM), and the resulting flow is compared with that produced by more traditional sub-grid parametrizations. Large eddy simulation (LES) is used to simulate flows where the largest scales of turbulent motion are resolved, but the smallest scales are not resolved. LES has traditionally been used to study 3D turbulence, but recently it has also been applied to idealized 2D and quasi-geostrophic (QG) turbulence. The MOLES presented here are based on 2D and QG LES schemes.

  18. Simulation of the spatiotemporal variability of the World Ocean sea surface hight by the INM climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, N. G.; Volodin, E. M.; Gritsun, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    The results of simulations of the World Ocean sea surface hight (SSH) in by various versions of the Climate Model of the Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences, are compared with the CNES-CLS09 fields of the mean dynamic topography (deviation of the ocean level from the geoid). Three models with different ocean blocks are considered which slightly differ in numerical schemes and have various horizontal spatial resolution, i.e., the INMCM4 model, which participated in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP Phase 5, resolution of 1° × 1/2°); the INMCM5 model, which participates in the next project, CMIP6 (resolution of 1/2° × 1/4°); and the advanced INMCM-ER eddy-resolving model (resolution of 1/6° × 1/8°). It is shown that an increase in the spatial resolution improves the reproduction of ocean currents (with Agulhas and Kuroshio currents as examples) and their variability. A probable cause of relatively high errors in the reproduction of the SSH of Southern and Indian oceans is discussed.

  19. El Nino-southern oscillation simulated in an MRI atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, T.; Tokioka, T.; Endoh, M.; Kitamura, Y. )

    1992-11-01

    A coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (GCM) was time integrated for 30 years to study interannual variability in the tropics. The atmospheric component is a global GCM with 5 levels in the vertical and 4[degrees]latitude X 5[degrees] longitude grids in the horizontal including standard physical processes (e.g., interactive clouds). The oceanic component is a GCM for the Pacific with 19 levels in the vertical and 1[degrees]x 2.5[degrees] grids in the horizontal including seasonal varying solar radiation as forcing. The model succeeded in reproducing interannual variations that resemble the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) with realistic seasonal variations in the atmospheric and oceanic fields. The model ENSO cycle has a time scale of approximately 5 years and the model El Nino (warm) events are locked roughly in phase to the seasonal cycle. The cold events, however, are less evident in comparison with the El Nino events. The time scale of the model ENSO cycle is determined by propagation time of signals from the central-eastern Pacific to the western Pacific and back to the eastern Pacific. Seasonal timing is also important in the ENSO time scale: wind anomalies in the central-eastern Pacific occur in summer and the atmosphere ocean coupling in the western Pacific operates efficiently in the first half of the year.

  20. High Resolution Parallel Coastal Ocean Modeling: a Large Eddy Simulation Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    2796 m and the associated Voronoi triangulation for which the isobaths coincide with triangle faces. An alternative is to employ BatTri ( Bilgili ...ocean model, Mon. Weath. Rev., 125, 2293-2315. Bilgili , A. and K. Smith, 2001. BATTRI: 2-D finite element grid generator, Numerical Methods La

  1. Land-Ocean Difference of the Warm Rain Formation Process in Satellite Observations, Ground-Based Observations, and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.; Suzuki, K.; Stephens, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the difference in the warm rain formation process between over land and over ocean using a combination of CloudSat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations. Previous studies (Nakajima et al. 2010; Suzuki et al. 2010) have devised a novel methodology for combining the CloudSat and MODIS satellite observations to investigate the microphysical processes. The statistics constructed with the methodology, referred to as the Contoured Frequency by Optical Depth Diagram (CFODD), provides a lifecycle view of warm clouds. Following the previous studies, we conduct detailed analyses of CFODD with a particular focus on comparisons between land and ocean. Our result shows that the coalescence process starts faster in the oceanic warm clouds than continental warm clouds. Also, oceanic clouds tend to produce more drizzle than continental clouds. Moreover, it is found that the difference between oceanic and continental cloud-to-precipitation process can be explained by different environmental conditions. For example, the cloud-to-precipitation processes in continental clouds are more similar to those in oceanic clouds over unstable environments than those over stable environments. Furthermore, ground-based measurement data obtained from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data and a cloud model simulation are analyzed to test how vertical velocity affects the warm rain formation process. Our result suggests that although the intensities of convective updrafts in warm clouds have been paid less attention, intensities of convective updrafts play a critical role in the warm rain formation process.

  2. Atlantic-Arctic exchange in a series of ocean model simulations (CORE-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Christina; Behrens, Erik; Biastoch, Arne

    2014-05-01

    In this study we aim to improve the understanding of exchange processes between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean. The Nordic Sea builds an important connector between these regions, by receiving and modifying warm and saline Atlantic waters, and by providing dense overflow as a backbone of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Using a hierarchy of global ocean/sea-ice models, the specific role of the Nordic Seas, both providing a feedback with the AMOC, but also as a modulator of the Atlantic water flowing into the Arctic Ocean, is examined. The models have been performed under the CORE-II protocol, in which atmospheric forcing of the past 60 years was applied in a subsequent series of 5 iterations. During the course of this 300-year long integration, the AMOC shows substantial changes, which are correlated with water mass characteristics in the Denmark Strait overflow characteristics. Quantitative analyses using Lagrangian trajectories explore the impact of these trends on the Arctic Ocean through the Barents Sea and the Fram Strait.

  3. Simulation of glacial ocean biogeochemical tracer and isotope distributions based on the PMIP3 suite of climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatiwala, Samar; Muglia, Juan; Kvale, Karin; Schmittner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In the present climate system, buoyancy forced convection at high-latitudes together with internal mixing results in a vigorous overturning circulation whose major component is North Atlantic Deep Water. One of the key questions of climate science is whether this "mode" of circulation persisted during glacial periods, and in particular at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21000 years before present). Resolving this question is both important for advancing our understanding of the climate system, as well as a critical test of numerical models' ability to reliably simulate different climates. The observational evidence, based on interpreting geochemical tracers archived in sediments, is conflicting, as are simulations carried out with state-of-the-art climate models (e.g., as part of the PMIP3 suite), which, due to the computational cost involved, do not by and large include biogeochemical and isotope tracers that can be directly compared with proxy data. Here, we apply geochemical observations to evaluate the ability of several realisations of an ocean model driven by atmospheric forcing from the PMIP3 suite of climate models to simulate global ocean circulation during the LGM. This results in a wide range of circulation states that are then used to simulate biogeochemical tracer and isotope (13C, 14C and Pa/Th) distributions using an efficient, "offline" computational scheme known as the transport matrix method (TMM). One of the key advantages of this approach is the use of a uniform set of biogeochemical and isotope parameterizations across all the different circulations based on the PMIP3 models. We compare these simulated distributions to both modern observations and data from LGM ocean sediments to identify similarities and discrepancies between model and data. We find, for example, that when the ocean model is forced with wind stress from the PMIP3 models the radiocarbon age of the deep ocean is systematically younger compared with reconstructions. Changes in

  4. Natural Air-Sea Flux of CO2 in Simulations of the NASA-GISS Climate Model: Sensitivity to the Physical Ocean Model Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanou, A.; Gregg, Watson W.; Romanski, J.; Kelley, M.; Bleck, R.; Healy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Russell, G.; Schmidt, G. A.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.

    2013-01-01

    Results from twin control simulations of the preindustrial CO2 gas exchange (natural flux of CO2) between the ocean and the atmosphere are presented here using the NASA-GISS climate model, in which the same atmospheric component (modelE2) is coupled to two different ocean models, the Russell ocean model and HYCOM. Both incarnations of the GISS climate model are also coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (NOBM) which estimates prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2. Model intercomparison is carried out at equilibrium conditions and model differences are contrasted with biases from present day climatologies. Although the models agree on the spatial patterns of the air-sea flux of CO2, they disagree on the strength of the North Atlantic and Southern Ocean sinks mainly because of kinematic (winds) and chemistry (pCO2) differences rather than thermodynamic (SST) ones. Biology/chemistry dissimilarities in the models stem from the different parameterizations of advective and diffusive processes, such as overturning, mixing and horizontal tracer advection and to a lesser degree from parameterizations of biogeochemical processes such as gravitational settling and sinking. The global meridional overturning circulation illustrates much of the different behavior of the biological pump in the two models, together with differences in mixed layer depth which are responsible for different SST, DIC and nutrient distributions in the two models and consequently different atmospheric feedbacks (in the wind, net heat and freshwater fluxes into the ocean).

  5. Physical-Biological-Optics Model Development and Simulation for the Pacific Ocean and Monterey Bay, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    contains color images. 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 10 19a...including the color dissolved organic carbon (CDOC) in the modified CoSiNE model to mimic color dissolved organic matter (CDOM) dynamics in the ocean...distribution of underwater light field that can substantially affect phytoplankton photosynthesis and shortwave radiation near the surface. To

  6. Numerical simulation of the world ocean circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takano, K.; Mintz, Y.; Han, Y. J.

    1973-01-01

    A multi-level model, based on the primitive equations, is developed for simulating the temperature and velocity fields produced in the world ocean by differential heating and surface wind stress. The model ocean has constant depth, free slip at the lower boundary, and neglects momentum advection; so that there is no energy exchange between the barotropic and baroclinic components of the motion, although the former influences the latter through temperature advection. The ocean model was designed to be coupled to the UCLA atmospheric general circulation model, for the study of the dynamics of climate and climate changes. But here, the model is tested by prescribing the observed seasonally varying surface wind stress and the incident solar radiation, the surface air temperature and humidity, cloudiness and the surface wind speed, which, together with the predicted ocean surface temperature, determine the surface flux of radiant energy, sensible heat and latent heat.

  7. Simulating pathways of subsurface oil in the Faroe-Shetland Channel using an ocean general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Main, C E; Yool, A; Holliday, N P; Popova, E E; Jones, D O B; Ruhl, H A

    2017-01-15

    Little is known about the fate of subsurface hydrocarbon plumes from deep-sea oil well blowouts and their effects on processes and communities. As deepwater drilling expands in the Faroe-Shetland Channel (FSC), oil well blowouts are a possibility, and the unusual ocean circulation of this region presents challenges to understanding possible subsurface oil pathways in the event of a spill. Here, an ocean general circulation model was used with a particle tracking algorithm to assess temporal variability of the oil-plume distribution from a deep-sea oil well blowout in the FSC. The drift of particles was first tracked for one year following release. Then, ambient model temperatures were used to simulate temperature-mediated biodegradation, truncating the trajectories of particles accordingly. Release depth of the modeled subsurface plumes affected both their direction of transport and distance travelled from their release location, and there was considerable interannual variability in transport.

  8. Numerical simulation of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu concentrations by an ocean general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Aoyama, Michio; Hirose, Katsumi

    2003-01-01

    We simulated the spatial distributions and the temporal variations of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu concentrations in the ocean by using the ocean general circulation model which was developed by National Center of Atmospheric Research. These nuclides are introduced into seawaters from global fallout due to atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The distribution of radioactive deposition on the world ocean is estimated from global precipitation data and observed values of annual deposition of radionuclides at the Meteorological Research Institute in Japan and several observed points in New Zealand. Radionuclides from global fallout have been transported by advection, diffusion and scavenging, and this concentration reduces by radioactive decay in the ocean. We verified the results of the model calculations by comparing simulated values of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu in seawater with the observed values included in the Historical Artificial Radionuclides in the HAM database, which has been constructed by the Meteorological Research Institute. The vertical distributions of the calculated 137Cs concentrations were in good agreement and are in good agreement with the observed profiles in the 1960s up to 250 m, in the 1970s up to 500 m, in the 1980s up to 750 m and in the 1990s up to 750 m. However, the calculated 137Cs concentrations were underestimated compared with the observed 137Cs at the deeper layer. This may suggest other transport processes of 137Cs to deep waters. The horizontal distributions of 137Cs concentrations in surface water could be simulated. A numerical tracer release experiment was performed to explain the horizontal distribution pattern. A maximum (239,240)Pu concentration layer occurs at an intermediate depth for both observed and calculated values, which is formed by particle scavenging. The horizontal distributions of the calculated (239,240)Pu concentrations in surface water could be simulated by considering the scavenging effect.

  9. Model simulations on the long-term dispersal of Cs-137 released into the Pacific Ocean off Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Erik; Schwarzkopf, Franziska U.; Lübbecke, Joke F.; Böning, Claus W.

    2013-04-01

    A sequence of global ocean circulation models, with horizontal mesh sizes of 0.5°, 0.25° and 0.1°, are used to estimate the long-term dispersion by ocean currents and mesoscale eddies of a slowly decaying tracer (half-life of 30 years, comparable to that of Cs-137) from the local waters off the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plants. The tracer was continuously injected into the coastal waters over some weeks; its subsequent spreading and dilution in the Pacific Ocean was then simulated for 10 years. The simulations do not include any data assimilation, and thus, do not account for the actual state of the local ocean currents during the release of highly contaminated water from the damaged plants in March-April 2011. An ensemble differing in initial current distributions illustrates their importance for the tracer patterns evolving during the first months, but suggests a minor relevance for the large-scale tracer distributions after 2-3 years. By then the tracer cloud has penetrated to depths of more than 400 m, spanning the western and central North Pacific between 25°N and 55°N, leading to a rapid dilution of concentrations. The rate of dilution declines in the following years, while the main tracer patch propagates eastward across the Pacific Ocean, reaching the coastal waters of North America after about 5-6 years. Tentatively assuming a value of 10 PBq for the net Cs-137 input during the first weeks after the Fukushima incident, the simulation suggests a rapid dilution of peak radioactivity values to about 10 Bq m³ during the first two years, followed by a gradual decline to 1-2 Bq m³ over the next 4-7 years. The total peak radioactivity levels would then still be about twice the pre-Fukushima values.

  10. Model simulations on the long-term dispersal of 137Cs released into the Pacific Ocean off Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Erik; Schwarzkopf, Franziska U.; Lübbecke, Joke F.; Böning, Claus W.

    2012-09-01

    A sequence of global ocean circulation models, with horizontal mesh sizes of 0.5°, 0.25° and 0.1°, are used to estimate the long-term dispersion by ocean currents and mesoscale eddies of a slowly decaying tracer (half-life of 30 years, comparable to that of 137Cs) from the local waters off the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plants. The tracer was continuously injected into the coastal waters over some weeks; its subsequent spreading and dilution in the Pacific Ocean was then simulated for 10 years. The simulations do not include any data assimilation, and thus, do not account for the actual state of the local ocean currents during the release of highly contaminated water from the damaged plants in March-April 2011. An ensemble differing in initial current distributions illustrates their importance for the tracer patterns evolving during the first months, but suggests a minor relevance for the large-scale tracer distributions after 2-3 years. By then the tracer cloud has penetrated to depths of more than 400 m, spanning the western and central North Pacific between 25°N and 55°N, leading to a rapid dilution of concentrations. The rate of dilution declines in the following years, while the main tracer patch propagates eastward across the Pacific Ocean, reaching the coastal waters of North America after about 5-6 years. Tentatively assuming a value of 10 PBq for the net 137Cs input during the first weeks after the Fukushima incident, the simulation suggests a rapid dilution of peak radioactivity values to about 10 Bq m-3 during the first two years, followed by a gradual decline to 1-2 Bq m-3 over the next 4-7 years. The total peak radioactivity levels would then still be about twice the pre-Fukushima values.

  11. MODFLOW2005 model used to simulate the effects of groundwater withdrawals from aquifers in Ocean County and vicinity, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cauller, Stephen; Voronin, Lois M.; Chepiga, Mary

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional groundwater flow model was developed to simulate the effects of withdrawals on the groundwater-flow systems of five aquifers in and around Ocean County, New Jersey—the unconfined Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system and Vincentown aquifer, and three confined aquifers--the Rio Grande water-bearing zone, the Atlantic City 800-foot sand, and the Piney Point aquifer. A transient model was used to simulate conditions that represent no groundwater withdrawals, 2000–2003 groundwater withdrawals, and maximum-allocation groundwater withdrawals. Particle-tracking analysis, using results from two steady-state simulations, determine flow paths and travel times to near-shore wells screened in the unconfined Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system, the Rio Grande water-bearing zone, and the Atlantic City 800-foot sand. Sources of water to wells in both unconfined and confined aquifers and travel times based on particle-tracking analysis are used to assess the susceptibility of selected wells to saltwater intrusion from bay or ocean water. This USGS data release contains all of the input and output files for the simulations described in the associated model documentation report (https://dx.doi.org/10.3133/sir20165035).

  12. Simulation of global warming with a simple coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Xiangze; Zhang Xuehong

    1994-12-31

    A highly simplified ocean-atmosphere coupling system is established based on a two-dimensional oceanic thermohaline circulation model and an energy balance atmospheric model. Transient responses of the coupled system to a radiation forcing corresponding to the doubling of the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration have been investigated with an emphasis on the role of the model`s thermohaline circulation in the warming processes of the system. The results show that there are some significant differences between the Pacific and the Atlantic in their transient responses. On the whole, the warming in the Atlantic is slower in the surface and faster in the deep layers than those in the Pacific due to the process of the deep water formation in the northern North Atlantic, where the active convection and the downward vertical advection transport the surface thermal anomalies into the lower layers efficiently. On a hundred-year time scale, the thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic is weakened. As a result, the warming in the upper layer of the northern North Atlantic will be further delayed because of the reduction of the northward heat transport.

  13. Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

    2013-01-17

    The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

  14. Impact of sea spray on upper ocean temperature during typhoon passage: simulation with a 1-D turbulent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lianxin; Zhang, Xuefeng; Han, Guijun; Wu, Xinrong; Cui, Xiaojian; Shao, Caixia; Sun, Chunjian; Zhang, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Xidong; Fu, Hongli

    2015-09-01

    At the interface between the lower atmosphere and sea surface, sea spray might significantly influence air-sea heat fluxes and subsequently, modulate upper ocean temperature during a typhoon passage. The effects of sea spray were introduced into the parameterization of sea surface roughness in a 1-D turbulent model, to investigate the effects of sea spray on upper ocean temperature in the Kuroshio Extension area, for the cases of two real typhoons from 2006, Yagi and Soulik. Model output was compared with data from the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO), and Reynolds and AMSRE satellite remote sensing sea surface temperatures. The results indicate drag coefficients that include the spray effect are closer to observations than those without, and that sea spray can enhance the heat fluxes (especially latent heat flux) considerably during a typhoon passage. Consequently, the model results with heat fluxes enhanced by sea spray simulate better the cooling process of the SST and upper-layer temperature profiles. Additionally, results from the simulation of the passage of typhoon Soulik (that passed KEO quickly), which included the sea spray effect, were better than for the simulated passage of typhoon Yagi (that crossed KEO slowly). These promising 1-D results could provide insight into the application of sea spray in general circulation models for typhoon studies.

  15. Can an Atmospherically Forced Ocean Model Accurately Simulate Sea Surface Temperature During ENSO Events?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Mateger, Herley E. Hurlburt, Alan J. Walloraft H a inleficed to offer this paper to the (Nanm of Confe ounce) (Dafe. P/ace and Classification of...temperature during ENSO events? By A. BIROL KARA.HARLEY E. HURLBURT*. CHARLIE N. BARRON. ALAN J. WALLCRAFT andE. JOSEPH METZGER, Naval Research...Quantifying SST errors from an OGCM in relation to atmospheric forcing variables. Ocean Modell. 29, 43-57. Urge. W. G., McWilliams , J. C. and Doney. S. C

  16. Simulated Annual and Seasonal Arctic Ocean and Sea-Ice Variability From a High Resolution, Coupled Ice-Ocean Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    for their valuable insights and assistance. Without the help of Drs. Don Stark, Waldemar Walczowski , Julie McClean, and Yuxia Zhang here at the...Bert Semtner, Dr. Don Stark, Dr. Yuxia Zhang, and Dr. Waldemar Walczowski along with myself and collaborators from other institutions. The research... Walczowski and A. J. Semtner, On large scale shifts in the Arctic Ocean and sea ice conditions during 1979-1998, in press Annals Glac., 2001. Matishov

  17. Simulations of radiocarbon in a coarse-resolution world ocean model: 2. Distributions of bomb-produced carbon 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toggweiler, J. R.; Dixon, K.; Bryan, K.

    1989-06-01

    Part 1 of this study examined the ability of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) primitive equation ocean general circulation model to simulate the steady state distribution of naturally produced 14C in the ocean prior to the nuclear bomb tests of the 1950s and early 1960s. In part 2 we begin with the steady state distributions of part 1 and subject the model to the pulse of elevated atmospheric 14C concentrations observed since the 1950s. This study focuses on the processes and time scales which govern the transient distributions of bomb 14C in the upper kilometer of the ocean. Model projections through 1990 are compared with observations compiled by the Geochemical Ocean Sections Study (GEOSECS) in 1972, 1974, and 1978; the Transient Tracers in the Ocean (TTO) expedition in 1981, and the French INDIGO expeditions in 1985-1987. In their analysis of the GEOSECS 14C observations, Broecker et al. (1985) noted that much of the bomb 14C which entered the ocean's equatorial belts prior to GEOSECS accumulated in the adjacent subtropical zones. Broecker et al. argued that this displacement of bomb 14C inventories was caused by the wind-driven upwelling and surface divergence in the tropics combined with convergent flow and downwelling in the subtropics. Similar displacements were invoked to shift bomb 14C from the Antarctic circumpolar region into the southern temperate zone. The GFDL model successfully reproduces the observed GEOSECS inventories, but then predicts a significantly different pattern of bomb 14C uptake in the decade following GEOSECS. The post-GEOSECS buildup of bomb 14C inventories is largely confined to the subthermocline layers of the North Atlantic, the lower thermocline of the southern hemisphere, and down to 2000 m in the circumpolar region. A great deal of attention is devoted to detailed comparisons between the model and the available radiocarbon data. A number of flaws in the model are highlighted by this analysis. The Subantarctic

  18. Effect of the Mesoscale on Southern Ocean Water Mass Structure and Properties - Assessment Based on a Suite of Model Simulations of Varying Resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenger, I.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Dufour, C. O.; de Souza, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean is crucial in taking up excess heat and anthropogenic carbon. At the same time, it is an ocean region which is typically poorly simulated by models used for climate projections. One major source of uncertainty is the representation of the effects of ocean mesoscale processes, which are subgrid scale in current climate simulations. This project examines a suite of three simulations carried out with the same coupled climate model but varying spatial resolutions of the ocean: it consists of a coarse 1º-resolution where eddy effects are parameterized, a modest-eddying 0.25º-simulation lacking an eddy parameterization, and an actively-eddying 0.1º-simulation. Differences between the simulations are analyzed in a water mass framework, which is a "natural" approach given that water masses are inherently linked to ocean circulation and are sensitive to changes of their formation processes. The questions that will be examined are: first if the mesoscale processes in the Southern Ocean act to thin intermediate waters and second if they add zonal structure to the water masses. We will further examine the skill of the coarse resolution ocean model to reproduce these hypothesized effects of the mesoscale with a state-of-the-art parameterization.

  19. Multistatistics Metric Evaluation of Ocean General Circulation Model Sea Surface Temperature: Application of 0.08 deg Pacific Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Joseph Metzger, Harley E. Hurlburt, Alan J. Wallcraft, 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 73-5732-18-5 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...l029/ 2O07JCO04250. Large, W. G., J. C. McWilliams , and S. C. Doncy (1994), Oceanic vertical mixing: A review and a model with a nonlocal boundary

  20. Computational modeling of pitching cylinder-type ocean wave energy converters using 3D MPI-parallel simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freniere, Cole; Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    Ocean Wave Energy Converters (WECs) are devices that convert energy from ocean waves into electricity. To aid in the design of WECs, an advanced computational framework has been developed which has advantages over conventional methods. The computational framework simulates the performance of WECs in a virtual wave tank by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations in 3D, capturing the fluid-structure interaction, nonlinear and viscous effects. In this work, we present simulations of the performance of pitching cylinder-type WECs and compare against experimental data. WECs are simulated at both model and full scales. The results are used to determine the role of the Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) number. The KC number is representative of viscous drag behavior on a bluff body in an oscillating flow, and is considered an important indicator of the dynamics of a WEC. Studying the effects of the KC number is important for determining the validity of the Froude scaling and the inviscid potential flow theory, which are heavily relied on in the conventional approaches to modeling WECs. Support from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. A two-dimensional ocean model for long-term climatic simulations: Stability and coupling to atmospheric and sea ice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, L. D. Danny

    1992-06-01

    A two-dimensional (latitude-depth) deep ocean model is presented which is coupled to a sea ice model and an Energy Balance Climate Model (EBCM), the latter having land-sea and surface-air resolution. The processes which occur in the ocean model are thermohaline overturning driven by the horizontal density gradient, shallow wind-driven overturning cells, convective overturning, and vertical and horizontal diffusion of heat and salt. The density field is determined from the temperature and salinity fields using a nonlinear equation of state. Mixed layer salinity is affected by evaporation, precipitation, runoff from continents, and sea ice freezing and melting, as well as by advective, convective, and diffusive exchanges with the deep ocean. The ocean model is first tested in an uncoupled mode, in which hemispherically symmetric mixed layer temperature and salinity, or salinity flux, are specified as upper boundary conditions. An experiment performed with previous models is repeated in which a mixed layer salinity perturbation is introduced in the polar half of one hemisphere after switching from a fixed salinity to a fixed salinity flux boundary condition. For small values of the vertical diffusion coefficient KV, the model undergoes self-sustained oscillations with a period of about 1500 years. With larger values of KV, the model locks into either an asymmetric mode with a single overturning cell spanning both hemispheres, or a symmetric quiescent state with downwelling near the equator, upwelling at high latitudes, and a warm deep ocean (depending on the value of KV). When the ocean model is forced with observed mixed layer temperature and salinity, no oscillations occur. The model successfully simulates the very weak meridional overturning and strong Antarctic Circumpolar Current at the latitudes of the Drake Passage. The coupled EBCM-deep ocean model displays internal oscillations with a period of 3000 years if the ocean fraction is uniform with latitude and KV

  2. Assimilation of simulated satellite altimetric data and ARGO temperature data into a double-gyre NEMO ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yajing; Barth, Alexander; Laenen, François; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, data assimilation, adressing the problem of producing useful analyses and forecasts given imperfect dynamical models and observations, has shown increasing interest in the atmosphere and ocean science community. The efficiency of data assimilation in improving the model prediction has been proven by numerous work. However, it is still a challenge to design operational data assimilation schemes which can be operated with realistic ocean models, with reasonable quality and at acceptable cost. In this work, several experiments, assimilating the simulated altimetry and temperature observations into a double-gyre NEMO ocean model, are performed with objective to investigate the impact of different assimilation setups, including changing the observation distribution, the ensemble size and the localisation scale, on the quality of the analysis. The double-gyre NEMO ocean model corresponds to an idealized configuration of the NEMO model: a square and 5000-meter deep flat bottom ocean at mid latitudes (the so called square-box or SQB configuration). The main physical parameters governing the dominant characteristics of the flow are the initial stratification, the wind stress, the bottom friction and the lateral mixing parameterization. The domain extends from 24N to 44N, over 30° in longitude (60W - 30W) with 11 vertical levels between 152 m and 4613 m in depth. The minimum horizontal resolution of the model is 1/4°. The observations are generated from the model simulations (the truth) by adding spatially uncorrelated gaussian noise with given standard deviation. Two types of observation are considered : sea surface height (SSH) and temperature. The observation grid of the SSH is simulated from the ENVISAT and Jason-1 satellite tracks, and that of the temperature is generated in order to mimic the ARGO float profile. The observation localisation is performed in order to avoid spurious correlation at large distance. For this, the observations are weighted

  3. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  4. Irreducible imprecision in atmospheric and oceanic simulations

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, James C.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric and oceanic computational simulation models often successfully depict chaotic space–time patterns, flow phenomena, dynamical balances, and equilibrium distributions that mimic nature. This success is accomplished through necessary but nonunique choices for discrete algorithms, parameterizations, and coupled contributing processes that introduce structural instability into the model. Therefore, we should expect a degree of irreducible imprecision in quantitative correspondences with nature, even with plausibly formulated models and careful calibration (tuning) to several empirical measures. Where precision is an issue (e.g., in a climate forecast), only simulation ensembles made across systematically designed model families allow an estimate of the level of relevant irreducible imprecision. PMID:17502623

  5. Modeling of Present-Day Atmosphere and Ocean Non-Tidal De-Aliasing Errors for Future Gravity Mission Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann-Wolf, I.; Dobslaw, H.; Mayer-Gürr, T.

    2015-12-01

    A realistically perturbed synthetic de-aliasing model consistent with the updated Earth System Model of the European Space Agency (Dobslaw et al., 2015) is now available for the years 1995 -- 2006. The data-set contains realizations of (i) errors at large spatial scales assessed individually for periods between 10 -- 30, 3 -- 10, and 1 -- 3 days, the S1 atmospheric tide, and sub-diurnal periods; (ii) errors at small spatial scales typically not covered by global models of atmosphere and ocean variability; and (iii) errors due to physical processes not represented in currently available de-aliasing products. The error magnitudes for each of the different frequency bands are derived from a small ensemble of four atmospheric and oceanic models. In order to demonstrate the plausibility of the error magnitudes chosen, we perform a variance component estimation based on daily GRACE normal equations from the ITSG-Grace2014 global gravity field series recently published by the University of Graz. All 12 years of the error model are used to calculate empirical error variance-covariance matrices describing the systematic dependencies of the errors both in time and in space individually for five continental and four oceanic regions, and daily GRACE normal equations are subsequently employed to obtain pre-factors for each of those matrices. For the largest spatial scales up to d/o = 40 and periods longer than 24 h, errors prepared for the updated ESM are found to be largely consistent with noise of a similar stochastic character contained in present-day GRACE solutions. Differences and similarities identified for all of the nine regions considered will be discussed in detail during the presentation.Dobslaw, H., I. Bergmann-Wolf, R. Dill, E. Forootan, V. Klemann, J. Kusche, and I. Sasgen (2015), The updated ESA Earth System Model for future gravity mission simulation studies, J. Geod., doi:10.1007/s00190-014-0787-8.

  6. A regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model developed for CORDEX East Asia: assessment of Asian summer monsoon simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Liwei; Zhou, Tianjun

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a developed regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model FROALS was applied to the CORDEX East Asia domain. The performance of FROALS in the simulation of Asian summer monsoon during 1989-2010 was assessed using the metrics developed by the CLIVAR Asian-Australian Monsoon Panel Diagnostics Task Team. The results indicated that FROALS exhibited good performance in simulating Asian summer monsoon climatology. The simulated JJA mean SST biases were weaker than those of the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble mean (MMEM). The skill of FROALS approached that of CMIP5 MMEM in terms of the annual cycle of Asian summer monsoon. The simulated monsoon duration matched the observed counterpart well (with a spatial pattern correlation coefficient of 0.59). Some biases of CMIP5 MMEM were also found in FROALS, highlighting the importance of local forcing and model physics within the Asian monsoon domain. Corresponding to a strong East Asian summer monsoon, an anomalous anticyclone was found over western North Pacific in both observation and simulation. However, the simulated strength was weaker than the observed due to the responses to incorrect sea surface anomalies over the key regions. The model also accurately captured the spatial pattern of the intraseasonal variability variance and the extreme climate indices of Asian summer monsoons, although with larger amplitude. The results suggest that FROALS could be used as a dynamical downscaling tool nested within the global climate model with coarse resolution to develop high-resolution regional climate change projections over the CORDEX East Asia domain.

  7. Internal atmospheric noise characteristics in twentieth century coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colfescu, Ioana; Schneider, Edwin K.

    2016-11-01

    The statistical characteristics of the atmospheric internal variability (hereafter internal atmospheric noise) for surface pressure (PS) in twentieth century simulations of a coupled general circulation model are documented. The atmospheric noise is determined from daily post-industrial (1871-1998) Community Climate System Model 3 simulations by removing the SST and externally forced responses from the total fields. The forced responses are found from atmosphere-only simulations forced by the SST and external forcing of the coupled runs. However, we do not address the influence of the SST variability on the synoptic scale high frequency weather noise.The spatial patterns of the main seasonal modes of atmospheric noise variability are found for boreal winter and summer from empirical orthogonal function analyses performed globally and for various regions, including the North Atlantic, the North Pacific, and the equatorial Pacific. The temporal characteristics of the modes are illustrated by power spectra and probability density functions (PDF) of the principal components (PC). Our findings show that, for two different realizations of noise, the variability is dominated by large scale spatial structures of the atmospheric noise that resemble observed patterns, and that their relative amplitudes in the CGCM and AGCM simulations are very similar. The regional expression of the dominant global mode, a seasonally dependent AO-like or AAO-like pattern is also found in the regional analyses, with similar time dependence. The PCs in the CGCM and the corresponding SST forced AGCM simulations are uncorrelated, but the spectra and PDFs of the CGCM and AGCM PCs are similar.The temporal structures of the noise PCs are white at timescales larger than few months, so that these modes can be thought of as stochastic forcings (in time) for the climate system. The PDFs of the noise PCs are not statistically distinguishable from Gaussian distributions with the same standard deviation

  8. Evaluation of Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment Products on South Florida Nested Simulations with the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    locations, both in the mcan/std values and in comparing individual events. Expl (BCs from GoM- Frcc ) has generally good comparison everywhere, but at C19...lower) for year 2004 Correlation Magnitude Correlation Phase (dag) 0.25 0.5 0.75 180 between the nested SoFLA expl and the outer GoM- Frcc simulation...regional, data assimilative GoM-NCODA (cxps. 2 and 2.1) did not have smaller errors compared to the ones nested in the non-assimilative GoM- Frcc (cxps

  9. Mesoscale ocean dynamics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    mHolm, D.; Alber, M.; Bayly, B.; Camassa, R.; Choi, W.; Cockburn, B.; Jones, D.; Lifschitz, A.; Margolin, L.; Marsden, L.; Nadiga, B.; Poje, A.; Smolarkiewicz, P.; Levermore, D.

    1996-05-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The ocean is a very complex nonlinear system that exhibits turbulence on essentially all scales, multiple equilibria, and significant intrinsic variability. Modeling the ocean`s dynamics at mesoscales is of fundamental importance for long-time-scale climate predictions. A major goal of this project has been to coordinate, strengthen, and focus the efforts of applied mathematicians, computer scientists, computational physicists and engineers (at LANL and a consortium of Universities) in a joint effort addressing the issues in mesoscale ocean dynamics. The project combines expertise in the core competencies of high performance computing and theory of complex systems in a new way that has great potential for improving ocean models now running on the Connection Machines CM-200 and CM-5 and on the Cray T3D.

  10. Tropical Oceanic Precipitation Processes over Warm Pool: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.- K.; Johnson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Rainfall is a key link in the hydrologic cycle as well as the primary heat source for the atmosphere, The vertical distribution of convective latent-heat release modulates the large-scale circulations of the tropics, Furthermore, changes in the moisture distribution at middle and upper levels of the troposphere can affect cloud distributions and cloud liquid water and ice contents. How the incoming solar and outgoing longwave radiation respond to these changes in clouds is a major factor in assessing climate change. Present large-scale weather and climate models simulate cloud processes only crudely, reducing confidence in their predictions on both global and regional scales. One of the most promising methods to test physical parameterizations used in General Circulation Models (GCMS) and climate models is to use field observations together with Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The CRMs use more sophisticated and physically realistic parameterizations of cloud microphysical processes, and allow for their complex interactions with solar and infrared radiative transfer processes. The CRMs can reasonably well resolve the evolution, structure, and life cycles of individual clouds and cloud systems, The major objective of this paper is to investigate the latent heating, moisture and momenti,im budgets associated with several convective systems developed during the TOGA COARE IFA - westerly wind burst event (late December, 1992). The tool for this study is the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (CCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysical scheme, The model domain contains 256 x 256 grid points (using 2 km resolution) in the horizontal and 38 grid points (to a depth of 22 km depth) in the vertical, The 2D domain has 1024 grid points. The simulations are performed over a 7 day time period. We will examine (1) the precipitation processes (i.e., condensation/evaporation) and their interaction with warm pool; (2) the heating and moisture budgets in the convective and

  11. Evaluation of precipitation over an oceanic region of Japan in convection-permitting regional climate model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Akihiko; Sasaki, Hidetaka; Kawase, Hiroaki; Nosaka, Masaya

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the performance of a convection-permitting regional climate model with respect to precipitation in the present climate around the southwestern oceanic region of Japan. The effects of explicit representation of convective processes without cumulus parameterization can be properly estimated by using a model domain without complex topography or convoluted coastlines. The amounts of annual and monthly precipitation and the frequencies of daily and hourly precipitation were well reproduced by the convection-permitting model with a 2-km grid spacing, and its performance was better than that of a model with a coarser mesh. In particular, the frequencies of hourly precipitation in the convection-permitting simulation matched the observed frequencies for precipitation intensities below 20 mm h-1. Above intensities of 20 mm h-1, however, the convection-permitting model tended to overestimate the frequency of hourly precipitation. To explore the mechanism of this overestimation of heavy hourly precipitation, the sensitivity of the frequency distribution of precipitation to the horizontal resolution was tested by changing the horizontal grid spacing of the model from 2 to 4 km and then 1.5 km. The results showed that the overestimation was increased when the horizontal resolution was coarser, owing to spurious grid-scale precipitation, which causes heavy precipitation to be highly concentrated in a single grid. This spurious grid-scale precipitation may be caused by insufficient representation of convective downdrafts in convection-permitting simulations by models with coarser resolutions.

  12. Development and Utilization of Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS) & Delicacy, Imprecision, and Uncertainty of Oceanic Simulations: An Investigation with ROMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    the following circulation regimes and phenomena: decadal Pacific circulation; equilibrium regional circulations along the U.S. West Coast, central...are submesoscale wakes, fronts, and eddies; nearshore currents; internal tides; regional and Pacific eddy-resolving circulations and their low...evaluate model sensitivity with respect to plausible variations in several test configurations: flow past idealized sea mounts; realistic Pacific basin

  13. Large eddy simulation in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is a relative newcomer to oceanography. In this review, both applications of traditional LES to oceanic flows and new oceanic LES still in an early stage of development are discussed. The survey covers LES applied to boundary layer flows, traditionally an area where LES has provided considerable insight into the physics of the flow, as well as more innovative applications, where new SGS closure schemes need to be developed. The merging of LES with large-scale models is also briefly reviewed.

  14. Simulation of ocean variability in the last 40 years with a high-resolution Mediterranean basin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, B. W.; Vichi, M.; Oddo, P.; Mattia, G.; Zavatarelli, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Mediterranean Sea high-resolution model developed at INGV was run for the period 1958 - 2001 forced by the ECMWF ERA40 atmospheric forcing functions. The model is the NEMO primitive equation model with the Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) grid at 1/16 degree horizontal resolution and 72 vertical levels, optimized for long-term simulations in the framework of the EU FP6 project SESAME. The open boundary data in the Atlantic box are derived from global ocean analyses produced in the framework of the EU FP5 ENACT project and forced with the same ERA40 atmospheric data. The presentation focuses on the analysis of the simulated ocean variability in the last 40 years with emphasis on the reproduction of climatological features and biases with respect to the observations. In this work, we focused on dense water formation processes in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea in related to the larger scale climatic conditions. Eastern Mediterranean Transient (hereafter EMT) was captured and evaluated by the deep and intermediate water mass pathway and the amount of their formation rate. Analysis of the main driving mechanism of this EMT was also studied. During the pre-EMT period, about 0.2 Sv of intermediate water formed in the Levantine basin at depth around 300 m and about 0.1 Sv of the deep water formed in the Ionian basin. However, during EMT, the intermediate water and the deep water paths were modified in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea because of the deep water and the intermediate water formed only in the Aegean Sea. From our results, we conclude that the general driving mechanism of EMT is mainly affected by the atmospheric forcing and the locations of dense water formation are affected by the freshwater budget. Our results demonstrate the model skills in capturing the major climatic state and variability in the basin, which will allow us to use this model for studying the impacts on marine biogeochemistry as planned in the SESAME project.

  15. Simulation Tool for GNSS Ocean Surface Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høeg, Per; von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Durgonics, Tibor

    2015-04-01

    GNSS coherent and incoherent reflected signals have the potential of deriving large scale parameters of ocean surfaces, as barotropic variability, eddy currents and fronts, Rossby waves, coastal upwelling, mean ocean surface heights, and patterns of the general ocean circulation. In the reflection zone the measurements may derive parameters as sea surface roughness, winds, waves, heights and tilts from the spectral measurements. Previous measurements from the top of mountains and airplanes have shown such results leading. The coming satellite missions, CYGNSS, COSMIC-2, and GEROS on the International Space Station, are focusing on GNSS ocean reflection measurements. Thus, simulation studies highlighting the assumptions for the data retrievals and the precision and the accuracy of such measurements are of interest for assessing the observational method. The theory of propagation of microwaves in the atmosphere is well established, and methods for propagation modeling range from ray tracing to numerical solutions to the wave equation. Besides ray tracing there are propagation methods that use mode theory and a finite difference solution to the parabolic equation. The presented propagator is based on the solution of the parabolic equation. The parabolic equation in our simulator is solved using the split-step sine transformation. The Earth's surface is modeled with the use of an impedance model. The value of the Earth impedance is given as a function of the range along the surface of the Earth. This impedance concept gives an accurate lower boundary condition in the determination of the electromagnetic field, and makes it possible to simulate reflections and the effects of transitions between different mediums. A semi-isotropic Philips spectrum is used to represent the air-sea interaction. Simulated GPS ocean surface reflections will be presented and discussed based on different ocean characteristics. The spectra of the simulated surface reflections will be analyzed

  16. Tropical Oceanic Precipitation Processes Over Warm Pool: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Johnson, D.; Simpson, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rainfall is a key link in the hydrologic cycle as well as the primary heat source for the atmosphere. The vertical distribution of convective latent-heat release modulates the large-scale circulations of the topics. Furthermore, changes in the moisture distribution at middle and upper levels of the troposphere can affect cloud distributions and cloud liquid water and ice contents. How the incoming solar and outgoing longwave radiation respond to these changes in clouds is a major factor in assessing climate change. Present large-scale weather and climate model simulate processes only crudely, reducing confidence in their predictions on both global and regional scales. One of the most promising methods to test physical parameterizations used in General Circulation Models (GCMs) and climate models is to use field observations together with Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The CRMs use more sophisticated and physically realistic parameterizations of cloud microphysical processes, and allow for their complex interactions with solar and infrared radiative transfer processes. The CRMs can reasonably well resolve the evolution, structure, and life cycles of individual clouds and clouds systems. The major objective of this paper is to investigate the latent heating, moisture and momentum budgets associated with several convective systems developed during the TOGA COARE IFA - westerly wind burst event (late December, 1992). The tool for this study is the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysics scheme.

  17. An Ecosystem Model for the Simulation of Physical and Biological Oceanic Processes-IDAPAK User's Guide and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Arrigo, Kevin; Murtugudde, Ragu; Signorini, Sergio R.; Tai, King-Sheng

    1998-01-01

    This TM describes the development, testing, and application of a 4-component (phytoplankton, zooplankton, nitrate, and ammonium) ecosystem model capable of simulating oceanic biological processes. It also reports and documents an in-house software package (Interactive Data Analysis Package - IDAPAK) for interactive data analysis of geophysical fields, including those related to the forcing, verification, and analysis of the ecosystem model. Two regions were studied in the Pacific: the Warm Pool (WP) in the Equatorial Pacific (165 deg. E at the equator) and at Ocean Weather Station P (OWS P) in the Northeast Pacific (50 deg. N, 145 deg. W). The WP results clearly indicate that the upwelling at 100 meters correlates well with surface blooms. The upwelling events in late 1987 and 1990 produced dramatic increases in the surface layer values of all 4 ecosystem components, whereas the spring-summer deep mixing events, do not seem to incur a significant response in any of the ecosystem quantities. The OWS P results show that the monthly profiles of temperature, the annual cycles of solar irradiance, and 0- to 50-m integrated nitrate accurately reproduce observed values. Annual primary production is 190 gC/m(exp 2)/yr, which is consistent with recent observations but is much greater than earlier estimates.

  18. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect

    Caldeira, K.; Hoffert, M.I.; Siegenthaler, U.

    1994-02-01

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  19. Daily simulation using a three-dimensional atmosphere-ocean regional coupled model, CReSS-NHOES over the CINDY/DYNAMO observation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, T.; Yoshioka, M. K.; Aiki, H.; Kato, M.; Masunaga, H.; Smedstad, L. F.; Katsumata, M.; Yoneyama, K.; Higuchi, A.; Tsuboki, K.; Uyeda, H.

    2012-12-01

    We develop a three-dimensional atmosphere-ocean regional coupled-model with cloud-permitting scale; the atmosphere part is Cloud Resolving Storm Simulator (CReSS) and the ocean one is Non Hydrostatic Ocean model for the Earth Simulator (NHOES). This study shows results of daily simulation over the CINDY/DYNAMO observation region using CReSS-NHOES. Three types of sensitivity experiment are carried out to clarify the effect of the two-way coupled simulation and horizontal grid resolutions. One is the CReSS-NHOES two-way coupled simulation with horizontal grid spacing of 0.045 degree (approximately 4.8 km). Another two simulations are the CReSS simulations without coupling NHOES with horizontal grid spacing of 0.045 and 0.0225 degrees (approximately 2.4 km). The Global Spectral Model (GSM: Horizontal grid resolution is approximately 50 km) data provided by Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) are used as the initial and boundary conditions of the atmosphere in CReSS and CReSS-NHOES. Three-dimensional Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) data provided by Naval Research Laboratory are used as the initial and boundary conditions of the ocean in CReSS-NHOES. The daily simulation is carried out for 36 hours from 12 UTC from October 1, 2011 to January 31, 2012 almost every day. We reproduce approximately 30-day surface pressure perturbation that should be related to the Madden-Julian Oscillation, half-day surface pressure perturbation that is related to the atmospheric tide, and the existence of low equivalent potential temperature airmass in the middle troposphere at a fixed observation point of the R/V Mirai (80.5E, 8S). However, the sharp vertical gradient of temperature and salinity at the bottom of the ocean mixed layer at the same point cannot be reproduced. The sensitivity of the coupling of the ocean model is not critical, because the difference of area-averaged sea surface temperature, sensible and latent heat fluxes from the sea surface is quite small. This should be

  20. Simulation of Lake Victoria Circulation Patterns Using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Sven; Tomasson, Tumi; Taabu-Munyaho, Anthony; Sitoki, Lewis; Stefansson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Lake Victoria provides important ecosystem services including transport, water for domestic and industrial uses and fisheries to about 33 million inhabitants in three East African countries. The lake plays an important role in modulating regional climate. Its thermodynamics and hydrodynamics are also influenced by prevailing climatic and weather conditions on diel, seasonal and annual scales. However, information on water temperature and circulation in the lake is limited in space and time. We use a Regional Oceanographic Model System (ROMS) to simulate these processes from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2014. The model is based on real bathymetry, river runoff and atmospheric forcing data using the bulk flux algorithm. Simulations show that the water column exhibits annual cycles of thermo-stratification (September–May) and mixing (June–August). Surface water currents take different patterns ranging from a lake-wide northward flow to gyres that vary in size and number. An under flow exists that leads to the formation of upwelling and downwelling regions. Current velocities are highest at the center of the lake and on the western inshore waters indicating enhanced water circulation in those areas. However, there is little exchange of water between the major gulfs (especially Nyanza) and the open lake, a factor that could be responsible for the different water quality reported in those regions. Findings of the present study enhance understanding of the physical processes (temperature and currents) that have an effect on diel, seasonal, and annual variations in stratification, vertical mixing, inshore—offshore exchanges and fluxes of nutrients that ultimately influence the biotic distribution and trophic structure. For instance information on areas/timing of upwelling and vertical mixing obtained from this study will help predict locations/seasons of high primary production and ultimately fisheries productivity in Lake Victoria. PMID:27030983

  1. Simulation of Lake Victoria Circulation Patterns Using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS).

    PubMed

    Nyamweya, Chrispine; Desjardins, Christopher; Sigurdsson, Sven; Tomasson, Tumi; Taabu-Munyaho, Anthony; Sitoki, Lewis; Stefansson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Lake Victoria provides important ecosystem services including transport, water for domestic and industrial uses and fisheries to about 33 million inhabitants in three East African countries. The lake plays an important role in modulating regional climate. Its thermodynamics and hydrodynamics are also influenced by prevailing climatic and weather conditions on diel, seasonal and annual scales. However, information on water temperature and circulation in the lake is limited in space and time. We use a Regional Oceanographic Model System (ROMS) to simulate these processes from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2014. The model is based on real bathymetry, river runoff and atmospheric forcing data using the bulk flux algorithm. Simulations show that the water column exhibits annual cycles of thermo-stratification (September-May) and mixing (June-August). Surface water currents take different patterns ranging from a lake-wide northward flow to gyres that vary in size and number. An under flow exists that leads to the formation of upwelling and downwelling regions. Current velocities are highest at the center of the lake and on the western inshore waters indicating enhanced water circulation in those areas. However, there is little exchange of water between the major gulfs (especially Nyanza) and the open lake, a factor that could be responsible for the different water quality reported in those regions. Findings of the present study enhance understanding of the physical processes (temperature and currents) that have an effect on diel, seasonal, and annual variations in stratification, vertical mixing, inshore-offshore exchanges and fluxes of nutrients that ultimately influence the biotic distribution and trophic structure. For instance information on areas/timing of upwelling and vertical mixing obtained from this study will help predict locations/seasons of high primary production and ultimately fisheries productivity in Lake Victoria.

  2. Earth and ocean modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knezovich, F. M.

    1976-01-01

    A modular structured system of computer programs is presented utilizing earth and ocean dynamical data keyed to finitely defined parameters. The model is an assemblage of mathematical algorithms with an inherent capability of maturation with progressive improvements in observational data frequencies, accuracies and scopes. The Eom in its present state is a first-order approach to a geophysical model of the earth's dynamics.

  3. Responses of the Tropical Pacific to Wind Forcing as Observed by Spaceborne Sensors and Simulated by an Ocean General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Qenqing; Atlas, Robert

    1996-01-01

    In this study, satellite observations, in situ measurements, and model simulations are combined to assess the oceanic response to surface wind forcing in the equatorial Pacific. The surface wind fields derived from observations by the spaceborne special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) and from the operational products of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) are compared. When SSM/I winds are used to force a primitive-equation ocean general circulation model (OGCM), they produce 3 C more surface cooling than ECMWF winds for the eastern equatorial Pacific during the cool phase of an El Nino-Southern Oscillation event. The stronger cooling by SSM/I winds is in good agreement with measurements at the moored buoys and observations by the advanced very high resolution radiometer, indicating that SSM/I winds are superior to ECMWF winds in forcing the tropical ocean. In comparison with measurements from buoys, tide gauges, and the Geosat altimeter, the OGCM simulates the temporal variations of temperature, steric, and sea level changes with reasonable realism when forced with the satellite winds. There are discrepancies between model simulations and observations that are common to both wind forcing fields, one of which is the simulation of zonal currents; they could be attributed to model deficiencies. By examining model simulations under two winds, vertical heat advection and uplifting of the thermocline are found to be the dominant factors in the anomalous cooling of the ocean mixed layer.

  4. A study of biases in simulation of the Indian Ocean basin mode and its capacitor effect in CMIP3/CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Weichen; Huang, Gang; Hu, Kaiming; Gong, Hainan; Wen, Guanhuan; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Based on 15 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) phase 3 (CMIP3) and 32 CMIP phase 5 (CMIP5) models, a detailed diagnosis was carried out to understand what compose the biases in simulation of the Indian Ocean basin mode (IOBM) and its capacitor effect. Cloud-radiation-SST (CRS) feedback and wind-evaporation-SST (WES) feedback are the two major atmospheric processes for SST changes. Most CMIP models simulate a stronger CRS feedback and a weaker WES feedback. During boreal fall of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation developing year and the following spring, there are weak biases of suppressed rainfall anomalies over the Maritime Continent and anomalous anticyclone over South Indian Ocean. Most CMIP models simulate reasonable short wave radiation (SWR) and weaker latent heat flux (LHF) anomalies. This leads to a weak bias of atmospheric processes. During winter, however, the rainfall anomalies are stronger due to west bias, and the anomalous anticyclone is comparable to observations. As such, most models simulate stronger SWR and reasonable LHF anomalies, leading to a strong bias of atmospheric processes. The thermocline feedback is stronger in most models. Though there is a deep bias of climatology thermocline, most models capture reasonable sea surface height-induced SST anomalies. Therefore, the effect of oceanic processes offset the weak bias of atmospheric processes in spring, and the tropical Indian Ocean warming persists into summer. However, anomalous northwest Pacific (NWP) anticyclone is weaker due to weak and west bias of the capacitor effect. The unrealistic western Pacific SST anomalies in models favor the westward extension of Rossby wave from the Pacific, weakening the effect of Kelvin wave from the Indian Ocean. Moreover, the western Pacific warming forces the NWP anticyclone move farther north than observations, suggesting a major forcing from the Pacific. Compared to CMIP3, CMIP5 models simulate the feedbacks more realistically and display

  5. Spontaneous abrupt climate change due to an atmospheric blocking-sea-ice-ocean feedback in an unforced climate model simulation.

    PubMed

    Drijfhout, Sybren; Gleeson, Emily; Dijkstra, Henk A; Livina, Valerie

    2013-12-03

    Abrupt climate change is abundant in geological records, but climate models rarely have been able to simulate such events in response to realistic forcing. Here we report on a spontaneous abrupt cooling event, lasting for more than a century, with a temperature anomaly similar to that of the Little Ice Age. The event was simulated in the preindustrial control run of a high-resolution climate model, without imposing external perturbations. Initial cooling started with a period of enhanced atmospheric blocking over the eastern subpolar gyre. In response, a southward progression of the sea-ice margin occurred, and the sea-level pressure anomaly was locked to the sea-ice margin through thermal forcing. The cold-core high steered more cold air to the area, reinforcing the sea-ice concentration anomaly east of Greenland. The sea-ice surplus was carried southward by ocean currents around the tip of Greenland. South of 70 °N, sea ice already started melting and the associated freshwater anomaly was carried to the Labrador Sea, shutting off deep convection. There, surface waters were exposed longer to atmospheric cooling and sea surface temperature dropped, causing an even larger thermally forced high above the Labrador Sea. In consequence, east of Greenland, anomalous winds changed from north to south, terminating the event with similar abruptness to its onset. Our results imply that only climate models that possess sufficient resolution to correctly represent atmospheric blocking, in combination with a sensitive sea-ice model, are able to simulate this kind of abrupt climate change.

  6. Inter-comparison of the mean circulation in the Coral and Solomon Sea simulated by high resolution ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, C.; Durand, F.; Gasparin, F.; Melet, A.; Ganachaud, A.

    2010-12-01

    Of primary importance to the properties of water masses transported by the northern limb of the South Pacific subtropical gyre toward the equatorial band, the transfer within the Coral and, ultimately, the Solomon Sea is perturbed by the labyrinthine topography of the region. It results in highly energetic currents and complex pathways through the Vanuatu Archipelago and New Caledonia, at the entrance of the Coral Sea, and through the Solomon Sea once the flow has bifurcated northward along the coasts of Australia and of the Louisiade Archipelago of Papua New Guinea. In the Coral Sea, the existence of the North Vanuatu Jet and North Caledonian Jet is now well established but their variations as well as their detailed characteristics, including for instance their vertical extension, remain largely unknown. In this study, recourse to ocean simulations is made in order to highlight the representation of such complex circulation of the south western Pacific Ocean and to analyze the long term variability and physical mechanism implied in the jet dynamics. A brief overview of recent observations collected through the comprehensive observational SPICE program (CLIVAR/WCRP) will first be presented in order to set the context. Then, 6 different state-of-the-art numerical experiments with high horizontal resolution, ranging from 1/10 to 1/12 degree, and realistic topography regionally focused on the Coral and Solomon Sea or extracted from global experiments, are analyzed. Here, we will consider OGCMs forced by realistic and observed atmospheric fields but each model has its own strategy in terms of diffusion, topography representation and boundaries condition when appropriate. The focus is set primarily on the annual mean circulation of the upper ocean layers (above the 1000-m depth) and on the water mass transports simulated in the vicinity of the various topographic obstacles. The results will underline that most of high resolution numerical models have reached a high

  7. Shallow Ocean Bottom BRDF Prediction, Modeling, and Inversion via Simulation with Surface/Volume Data Derived from X-ray Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Shallow Ocean Bottom BRDF Prediction, Modeling, and Inversion via Simulation with Surface/Volume Data Derived from X-ray Tomography G. C...Prediction, Modeling, and Inversion via Simulation with Surface/Volume Data Derived from X-ray Tomography 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...focus Xray Computerized Tomography (MXCT) instrument at NRL SSC. The MXCT instrument requires preparation of the sample by embedding it in an epoxy

  8. Invigorating ocean boundary current systems around Australia during 1979-2014: As simulated in a near-global eddy-resolving ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ming; Zhang, Xuebin; Oke, Peter; Monselesan, Didier; Chamberlain, Matthew; Matear, Richard; Schiller, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Ocean boundary currents, transporting water masses and marine biota along the coastlines, are important for regional climate and marine ecosystem functions. In this study, we review the dominant multi-decadal trends of ocean boundary currents around Australia. Using an eddy-resolving global ocean circulation model, this study has revealed that the major ocean boundary current systems around Australia, the East Australian Current (EAC), the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), the Leeuwin Current, the South Australian Current and the Flinders Current, have strengthened during 1979-2014, consistent with existing observations. Eddy energetics in the EAC, the ITF/South Equatorial Current in the southeast Indian Ocean, and the Leeuwin Current have also enhanced during the same period. The multi-decadal strengthening of the ocean boundary current systems are primarily driven by large scale wind patterns associated with the dominant modes of climate variability and change - the phase shift of the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation/Pacific Decadal Oscillation strengthens the ITF and the Leeuwin Current/South Australian Current; and the poleward shift and strengthening of surface winds in the subtropical gyres reinforce the EAC and the Flinders Current. The invigorating ocean boundary current systems have induced extreme oceanographic conditions along the Australian coastlines in recent years, including the poleward shift of marine ecosystems off the east coast of Australia and the consecutive Ningaloo Niño - marine heatwave events off the west coast during 2011-2013. Understanding long-term trends and decadal variations of the ocean boundary currents is crucial to project future changes of the coastal marine systems under the influence of human-induced greenhouse gas forcing.

  9. Simulations of the carbon cycle in the oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This study includes models of oceanic CO{sub 2} uptake. This perturbation simulation of carbon dioxide uptake gives strong support to estimates of oceanic uptake of fossil CO{sub 2} of order 2 GtC/yr. over the last decade. Carbon and carbon-nitrogen models are considered.

  10. Simulations of the carbon cycle in the oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This study includes models of oceanic CO{sub 2} uptake. This perturbation simulation of carbon dioxide uptake gives strong support to estimates of oceanic uptake of fossil CO{sub 2} of order 2 GtC/yr. over the last decade. Carbon and carbon-nitrogen models are considered.

  11. Open ocean tide modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parke, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Two trends evident in global tidal modelling since the first GEOP conference in 1972 are described. The first centers on the incorporation of terms for ocean loading and gravitational self attraction into Laplace's tidal equations. The second centers on a better understanding of the problem of near resonant modelling and the need for realistic maps of tidal elevation for use by geodesists and geophysicists. Although new models still show significant differences, especially in the South Atlantic, there are significant similarities in many of the world's oceans. This allows suggestions to be made for future locations for bottom pressure gauge measurements. Where available, estimates of M2 tidal dissipation from the new models are significantly lower than estimates from previous models.

  12. Adaptive wavelet simulation of global ocean dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevlahan, N. K.-R.; Dubos, T.; Aechtner, M.

    2015-07-01

    In order to easily enforce solid-wall boundary conditions in the presence of complex coastlines, we propose a new mass and energy conserving Brinkman penalization for the rotating shallow water equations. This penalization does not lead to higher wave speeds in the solid region. The error estimates for the penalization are derived analytically and verified numerically for linearized one dimensional equations. The penalization is implemented in a conservative dynamically adaptive wavelet method for the rotating shallow water equations on the sphere with bathymetry and coastline data from NOAA's ETOPO1 database. This code could form the dynamical core for a future global ocean model. The potential of the dynamically adaptive ocean model is illustrated by using it to simulate the 2004 Indonesian tsunami and wind-driven gyres.

  13. Climate and Habitability of Kepler 452b Simulated with a Fully Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongyun; Wang, Yuwei; Liu, Yonggang; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of Kepler 452b is a milestone in searching for habitable exoplanets. While it has been suggested that Kepler 452b is the first Earth-like exoplanet discovered in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star, its climate states and habitability require quantitative studies. Here, we first use a three-dimensional fully coupled atmosphere–ocean climate model to study the climate and habitability of an exoplanet around a Sun-like star. Our simulations show that Kepler 452b is habitable if CO2 concentrations in its atmosphere are comparable or lower than that in the present-day Earth atmosphere. However, our simulations also suggest that Kepler 452b can become too hot to be habitable if there is the lack of silicate weathering to limit CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. We also address whether Kepler 452b could retain its water inventory after 6.0 billion years of lifetime. These results in the present Letter will provide insights about climate and habitability for other undiscovered exoplanets similar to Kepler 452b, which may be observable by future observational missions.

  14. Simulating transoceanic migrations of young loggerhead sea turtles: merging magnetic navigation behavior with an ocean circulation model.

    PubMed

    Putman, Nathan F; Verley, Philippe; Shay, Thomas J; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2012-06-01

    Young loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) from eastern Florida, USA, undertake a transoceanic migration in which they gradually circle the Sargasso Sea before returning to the North American coast. Loggerheads possess a 'magnetic map' in which regional magnetic fields elicit changes in swimming direction along the migratory pathway. In some geographic areas, however, ocean currents move more rapidly than young turtles can swim. Thus, the degree to which turtles can control their migratory movements has remained unclear. In this study, the movements of young turtles were simulated within a high-resolution ocean circulation model using several different behavioral scenarios, including one in which turtles drifted passively and others in which turtles swam briefly in accordance with experimentally derived data on magnetic navigation. Results revealed that small amounts of oriented swimming in response to regional magnetic fields profoundly affected migratory routes and endpoints. Turtles that engaged in directed swimming for as little as 1-3 h per day were 43-187% more likely than passive drifters to reach the Azores, a productive foraging area frequented by Florida loggerheads. They were also more likely to remain within warm-water currents favorable for growth and survival, avoid areas on the perimeter of the migratory route where predation risk and thermal conditions pose threats, and successfully return to the open-sea migratory route if carried into coastal areas. These findings imply that even weakly swimming marine animals may be able to exert strong effects on their migratory trajectories and open-sea distributions through simple navigation responses and minimal swimming.

  15. Performance of Mixed Layer Models in Simulating SST in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-23

    the SST drop (,,7’C) occurring in the eastern equatorial Pacific Antarctic for computational efficiency. Hereinafter, the [Harrison and Vecchi, 2001...based Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/1) clearly HYCOM simulations introduces some error ( z50 W m2) relative to the shortwave radiation measured by...Thi6baux, J., E. Rogers, W. Wang, and B. Katz (2003), A new high-resolu- tion blended real-time global sea surface temperature analysis, Bull. Am. E

  16. Validation of simulated sea-ice concentrations from sea ice-ocean models and polynya classification methods in the Laptev Sea area using satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, S.; Willmes, S.; Heinemann, G.

    2009-04-01

    The Laptev Sea represents one of the most significant areas of net ice production in the Arctic. Most of the ice production takes place in a polynya forming at the fast ice edge during strong offshore wind conditions. The simulation of these polynya events is a challenge for current sea ice-ocean models, and validation of simulated sea-ice concentrations is necessary for model improvements. High-quality data sets of sea-ice concentration from remote sensing data are covering the period from 1978 to the present. These data sets are well suited for the validation of model results of sea ice-ocean models. Based on the brightness temperature observations obtained from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E), the ARTIST (Arctic Radiation and Turbulence Interaction Study) Sea Ice (ASI) algorithm is used to calculate mean daily sea-ice concentrations. Here we use AMSR-E data for the validation of sea-ice concentrations in the Laptev Sea, which are simulated by the coupled sea ice-ocean models North Atlantic - Arctic Ocean - Sea-Ice Model (NAOSIM) and Finite Element Sea Ice Ocean Model (FESOM). The general distribution of the sea-ice concentrations, the simulation of the polynya events and the position of polynyas are examined for the period October 2007 to April 2008. In addition, the polynya signature simulation method (PSSM) was applied to classify open water, thin ice and thick ice. The results of the validation show that the simulated distributions of the sea-ice fields show similar structures, but an underestimation of sea ice concentration. The simulation of the polynya-events from the two models agrees reasonably well with satellite data. However, because of the absent fast ice edge in both models, the position of the polynyas is shifted to the coast line. Therefore it would be necessary to include the fast ice edge for simulating polynyas at the right position. Further investigations about the position of the polynyas will be performed with simulation

  17. Simulated Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation in the 20th century with an ocean model forced by reanalysis-based atmospheric data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Chun; Drange, Helge; Gao, Yongqi; Bentsen, Mats

    2016-04-01

    Global ocean hindcast simulations for the period 1871-2009 have been run with the ocean-sea ice component of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM-O), forced by an adjusted version of the Twentieth Century Reanalysis version 2 data set (20CRv2 data set), as well as by the commonly used second version of atmospheric forcing data set for the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase-II (CORE-II) for the period 1948-2007 (hereafter CORE.v2 data set). The simulated Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the 20CR and the CORE simulations have comparable variability as well as mean strength during the last three decades of the integration. The simulated AMOC undergoes, however, distinctly different evolutions during the period 1948-1970, with a sharply declining strength in CORE but a gradual increase in 20CR. Sensitivity experiments suggest that differences in the wind forcing between CORE and 20CR have major impact on the simulated AMOCs during this period. It is furthermore found that differences in the air temperature between the two data sets do contribute to the differences in AMOC, but to a much lesser degree than the wind. An additional factor for the diverging AMOC in the two decades following 1948 is the inevitable switching of atmospheric forcing fields in 1948 in the CORE.v2-based runs due to the cyclic spin-up procedure of the ocean model. The latter is a fundamental issue for any ocean hindcast simulation. The ocean initial state mainly influence the actual value but to a lesser degree also the temporal evolution (variability) of AMOC. It may take about two decades for the AMOC to adjust to a new atmospheric state during the spin-up, although a dynamically balanced ocean initial state tends to reduce the adjustment time and the magnitude of the deviation, implying that an ocean model run with atmospheric forcing fields extending back in time, like 20CRv2, can be used to extend the reliable duration of CORE-type of simulations.

  18. Simulated Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation in the 20th century with an ocean model forced by reanalysis-based atmospheric data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Chun; Drange, Helge; Gao, Yongqi; Bentsen, Mats

    2016-04-01

    Global ocean hindcast simulations for the period 1871--2009 have been run with the ocean-sea ice component of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM-O), forced by an adjusted version of the Twentieth Century Reanalysis version 2 data set (20CRv2 data set), as well as by the commonly used second version of atmospheric forcing data set for the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase-II (CORE-II) for the period 1948--2007 (hereafter CORE.v2 data set). The simulated Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the 20CR and the CORE simulations have comparable variability as well as mean strength during the last three decades of the integration. The simulated AMOC undergoes, however, distinctly different evolutions during the period 1948--1970, with a sharply declining strength in CORE but a gradual increase in 20CR. Sensitivity experiments suggest that differences in the wind forcing between CORE and 20CR have major impact on the simulated AMOCs during this period. It is furthermore found that differences in the air temperature between the two data sets do contribute to the differences in AMOC, but to a much lesser degree than the wind. An additional factor for the diverging AMOC in the two decades following 1948 is the inevitable switching of atmospheric forcing fields in 1948 in the CORE.v2-based runs due to the cyclic spin-up procedure of the ocean model. The latter is a fundamental issue for any ocean hindcast simulation. The ocean initial state mainly influence the actual value but to a lesser degree also the temporal evolution (variability) of AMOC. It may take about two decades for the AMOC to adjust to a new atmospheric state during the spin-up, although a dynamically balanced ocean initial state tends to reduce the adjustment time and the magnitude of the deviation, implying that an ocean model run with atmospheric forcing fields extending back in time, like 20CRv2, can be used to extend the reliable duration of CORE-type of simulations.

  19. Repulsive magnetic levitation-based ocean wave energy harvester with variable resonance: Modeling, simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Masoud; Wang, Ya

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates a magnetic levitation characteristic used in a vibration based energy harvester, called repulsive magnetic scavenger (RMS). The RMS is capable of harvesting ocean wave energy with a unique repelling permanent magnet array, which provides a stronger and more uniform magnetic field, compared to its attracting magnetic counterparts. The levitating magnets are stacked together around a threaded rod so that the same pole is facing each other. Two fixed magnets placed with one at each end of the RMS provides a collocated harvesting and braking mechanism in the face of high amplitude vibrations. Magnets in the levitated magnet stack are separated by pole pieces which are made of metals to intensify the magnetic field strength. The effect of the thickness and the use of different materials with different permeability for pole pieces is also studied to obtain an optimal energy harvesting efficiency. Moreover, the procedure to find the restoring force applied to the levitating magnet stack is demonstrated. Then, the Duffing vibration equation of the harvester is solved and the frequency response function is calculated for various force amplitudes and electrical damping so as to investigate the effect of these parameters on the response of the system. Furthermore, the effect of the maximum displacement of the moving magnet stack on the natural frequency of the device is studied. And finally, Faraday's law is employed to estimate the output voltage and power of the system under the specified input excitation force. Experiments show that the output emf voltage of the manufactured prototype reaches up to 42 V for an excitation force with the frequency of 9 Hz and the maximum amplitude of 3.4 g.

  20. Physical-Biological-Optics Model Development and Simulation for the Pacific Ocean and Monterey Bay, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    advanced ROMS-CoSiNE-Optics model in a full three-dimensional environment. We collaborate with Dr. Curt Mobley at Sequoia Scientific to implement...projects. Besides working closely with the modeling group at the NRL and their BioSpace project, we are collaborating with Dr. Curtis Mobley of Sequoia

  1. Improved Climate Simulations through a Stochastic Parameterization of Ocean Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Paul; Howe, Nicola; Gregory, Jonathan; Smith, Robin; Joshi, Manoj

    2016-04-01

    In climate simulations, the impacts of the sub-grid scales on the resolved scales are conventionally represented using deterministic closure schemes, which assume that the impacts are uniquely determined by the resolved scales. Stochastic parameterization relaxes this assumption, by sampling the sub-grid variability in a computationally inexpensive manner. This presentation shows that the simulated climatological state of the ocean is improved in many respects by implementing a simple stochastic parameterization of ocean eddies into a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model. Simulations from a high-resolution, eddy-permitting ocean model are used to calculate the eddy statistics needed to inject realistic stochastic noise into a low-resolution, non-eddy-permitting version of the same model. A suite of four stochastic experiments is then run to test the sensitivity of the simulated climate to the noise definition, by varying the noise amplitude and decorrelation time within reasonable limits. The addition of zero-mean noise to the ocean temperature tendency is found to have a non-zero effect on the mean climate. Specifically, in terms of the ocean temperature and salinity fields both at the surface and at depth, the noise reduces many of the biases in the low-resolution model and causes it to more closely resemble the high-resolution model. The variability of the strength of the global ocean thermohaline circulation is also improved. It is concluded that stochastic ocean perturbations can yield reductions in climate model error that are comparable to those obtained by refining the resolution, but without the increased computational cost. Therefore, stochastic parameterizations of ocean eddies have the potential to significantly improve climate simulations. Reference PD Williams, NJ Howe, JM Gregory, RS Smith, and MM Joshi (2016) Improved Climate Simulations through a Stochastic Parameterization of Ocean Eddies. Journal of Climate, under revision.

  2. Ocean Wave Simulation Based on Wind Field.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyi; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Ocean wave simulation has a wide range of applications in movies, video games and training systems. Wind force is the main energy resource for generating ocean waves, which are the result of the interaction between wind and the ocean surface. While numerous methods to handle simulating oceans and other fluid phenomena have undergone rapid development during the past years in the field of computer graphic, few of them consider to construct ocean surface height field from the perspective of wind force driving ocean waves. We introduce wind force to the construction of the ocean surface height field through applying wind field data and wind-driven wave particles. Continual and realistic ocean waves result from the overlap of wind-driven wave particles, and a strategy was proposed to control these discrete wave particles and simulate an endless ocean surface. The results showed that the new method is capable of obtaining a realistic ocean scene under the influence of wind fields at real time rates.

  3. Comparison of tropical pacific temperature and current simulations with two vertical mixing schemes embedded in an ocean general circulation model and reference to observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Chao, YI; Ma, Chung-Chun; Mechoso, Carlos R.

    1995-01-01

    The Pacanowski-Philander (PP) and Mellor-Yamada (MY) parameterization models of vertical mixing by turbulent processes were embedded in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory high-resolution ocean general circulation model of the tropical Pacific Ocean. All other facets of the numerical simulations were the same. Simulations were made for the 1987-1988 period. At the equator the MY simulation produced near-surface temperatures more uniform with depth, a deeper thermocline, a deeper core speed of the Equatorial Undercurrent, and a South Equatorial Current with greater vertical thickness compared with that computed with the PP method. Along 140 deg W, between 5 deg N and 10 deg N, both simulations were the same. Moored buoy current and temperature observations had been recorded by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory at three sites (165 deg E, 140 deg W, 110 deg W) along the equator and at three sites (5 deg N, 7 deg N, 9 deg N) along 140 deg W. Simulated temperatures were lower than those observed in the near-surface layer and higher than those observed in the thermocline. Temperature simulations were in better agreement with observations compared to current simulations. At the equator, PP current and temperature simulations were more representative of the observations than MY simulations.

  4. Simulating Ocean Fertilization: Effectiveness and Unintended Consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Caldeira, K

    2002-11-03

    The primary objectives of this project are to assess, and improve our understanding of: (1) The effectiveness of various proposals to intentionally store carbon in the ocean through fertilization of the surface ocean with iron and/or macronutrients; and (2) Biologically relevant consequences of long-term and extensive ocean fertilization. The PISCES ocean biogeochemistry model, developed at the MPI in Hamburg, Germany, and IPSL in Saclay, France will be used in this study. This model considers Fe, N, P, O{sub 2}, Si, alkalinity, and carbon, in organic and inorganic, dissolved and particulate forms. The model represents diatoms, coccolithophorids, nitrogen fixers, and two classes of zooplankton. This model will be incorporated into the LLNL ocean GCM, which is already being applied to other problems in ocean carbon sequestration. After coupling the ocean biogeochemistry and circulation models, the reliability of this model will be evaluated by comparison to observations. These include observations of natural ecological and biogeochemical variation and observations of small-scale iron fertilization experiments (e.g. SOFeX, IRONEx). This strategy will produce a tested model with predictive capability that we will use to address the following important questions: What is the long-term effectiveness of ocean carbon sequestration via different ocean fertilization strategies? What are the long-term environmental consequences of prolonged or widespread ocean fertilization? What processes need to be included in the models, to better reproduce effects observed in iron fertilization experiments? What should the next experiment measure to better aid the models?

  5. Climate warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2 - Simulations with a multilayer coupled atmosphere-ocean seasonal energy balance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Peng; Chou, Ming-Dah; Arking, Albert

    1987-01-01

    The transient response of the climate to increasing CO2 is studied using a modified version of the multilayer energy balance model of Peng et al. (1982). The main characteristics of the model are described. Latitudinal and seasonal distributions of planetary albedo, latitude-time distributions of zonal mean temperatures, and latitudinal distributions of evaporation, water vapor transport, and snow cover generated from the model and derived from actual observations are analyzed and compared. It is observed that in response to an atmospheric doubling of CO2, the model reaches within 1/e of the equilibrium response of global mean surface temperature in 9-35 years for the probable range of vertical heat diffusivity in the ocean. For CO2 increases projected by the National Research Council (1983), the model's transient response in annually and globally averaged surface temperatures is 60-75 percent of the corresponding equilibrium response, and the disequilibrium increases with increasing heat diffusivity of the ocean.

  6. LLNL Ocean General Circulation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wickett, M. E.; Caldeira, K.; Duffy, P.

    2005-12-29

    The LLNL OGCM is a numerical ocean modeling tool for use in studying ocean circulation over a wide range of space and time scales, with primary applications to climate change and carbon cycle science.

  7. Global model simulations of the impact of ocean-going ships on aerosols, clouds, and the radiation budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, A.; Eyring, V.; Hendricks, J.; Jöckel, P.; Lohmann, U.

    2007-07-01

    International shipping contributes significantly to the fuel consumption of all transport related activities. Specific emissions of pollutants such as sulfur dioxide (SO2) per kg of fuel emitted are higher than for road transport or aviation. Besides gaseous pollutants, ships also emit various types of particulate matter. The aerosol impacts the Earth's radiation budget directly by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation and indirectly by changing cloud properties. Here we use ECHAM5/MESSy1-MADE, a global climate model with detailed aerosol and cloud microphysics, to show that emissions from ships significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration of low maritime water clouds. Whereas the cloud liquid water content remains nearly unchanged in these simulations, effective radii of cloud droplets decrease, leading to cloud optical thickness increase up to 5-10%. The sensitivity of the results is estimated by using three different emission inventories for present day conditions. The sensitivity analysis reveals that shipping contributes with 2.3% to 3.6% to the total sulfate burden and 0.4% to 1.4% to the total black carbon burden in the year 2000. In addition to changes in aerosol chemical composition, shipping increases the aerosol number concentration, e.g. up to 25% in the size range of the accumulation mode (typically >0.1 μm) over the Atlantic. The total aerosol optical thickness over the Indian Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Northeastern Pacific increases up to 8-10% depending on the emission inventory. Changes in aerosol optical thickness caused by the shipping induced modification of aerosol particle number concentration and chemical composition lead to a change of the net top of the atmosphere (ToA) clear sky radiation of about -0.013 W/m2 to -0.036 W/m2 on global annual average. The estimated all-sky direct aerosol effect calculated from these changes ranges between -0.009 W/m2 and -0.014 W/m2. The indirect aerosol effect of ships

  8. Effects of ocean grid resolution on tropical cyclone-induced upper ocean responses using a global ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Sriver, Ryan L.

    2016-11-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) have the potential to influence regional and global climate through interactions with the upper ocean. Here we present results from a suite of ocean-only model experiments featuring the Community Earth System Model, in which we analyze the effect of tropical cyclone wind forcing on the global ocean using three different horizontal ocean grid resolutions (3°, 1°, and 0.1°). The ocean simulations are forced with identical atmospheric inputs from the Coordinated Ocean-Ice Reference Experiments version 2 (COREv2) normal year forcing conditions, featuring global blended TC winds from a fully coupled CESM simulation with a 25 km atmosphere. The simulated TC climatology shows good agreement with observational estimates of annual TC statistics, including annual frequency, intensity distributions, and geographic distributions. Each ocean simulation is composed of a 5 year spin-up with COREv2 normal year forcing, followed by 18 months with blended TC winds. In addition, we conduct corresponding control simulations for each grid resolution configuration without blended TC winds. We find that ocean horizontal and vertical grid resolutions affect TC-induced heat and momentum fluxes, poststorm cold wake features, and ocean subsurface temperature profiles. The responses are amplified for smaller grid spacing. Moreover, analyses show that the annually accumulated TC-induced ocean heat uptake is also sensitive to ocean grid resolution, which may have important implications for modeled ocean heat budgets and variability.

  9. Global model simulations of the impact of ocean-going ships on aerosols, clouds, and the radiation budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, A.; Eyring, V.; Hendricks, J.; Jöckel, P.; Lohmann, U.

    2007-10-01

    International shipping contributes significantly to the fuel consumption of all transport related activities. Specific emissions of pollutants such as sulfur dioxide (SO2) per kg of fuel emitted are higher than for road transport or aviation. Besides gaseous pollutants, ships also emit various types of particulate matter. The aerosol impacts the Earth's radiation budget directly by scattering and absorbing the solar and thermal radiation and indirectly by changing cloud properties. Here we use ECHAM5/MESSy1-MADE, a global climate model with detailed aerosol and cloud microphysics to study the climate impacts of international shipping. The simulations show that emissions from ships significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration of low marine water clouds by up to 5% to 30% depending on the ship emission inventory and the geographic region. Whereas the cloud liquid water content remains nearly unchanged in these simulations, effective radii of cloud droplets decrease, leading to cloud optical thickness increase of up to 5-10%. The sensitivity of the results is estimated by using three different emission inventories for present-day conditions. The sensitivity analysis reveals that shipping contributes to 2.3% to 3.6% of the total sulfate burden and 0.4% to 1.4% to the total black carbon burden in the year 2000 on the global mean. In addition to changes in aerosol chemical composition, shipping increases the aerosol number concentration, e.g. up to 25% in the size range of the accumulation mode (typically >0.1 μm) over the Atlantic. The total aerosol optical thickness over the Indian Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Northeastern Pacific increases by up to 8-10% depending on the emission inventory. Changes in aerosol optical thickness caused by shipping induced modification of aerosol particle number concentration and chemical composition lead to a change in the shortwave radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (ToA) under clear-sky condition of

  10. Simulation of medicanes over the Mediterranean Sea in a regional climate model ensemble: impact of ocean-atmosphere coupling and increased resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Miguel Ángel; González-Alemán, Juan Jesús; Romera, Raquel; Domínguez, Marta; Gil, Victoria; Sánchez, Enrique; Gallardo, Clemente; Miglietta, Mario Marcello; Walsh, Kevin J. E.; Sein, Dmitry V.; Somot, Samuel; Dell'Aquila, Alessandro; Teichmann, Claas; Ahrens, Bodo; Buonomo, Erasmo; Colette, Augustin; Bastin, Sophie; van Meijgaard, Erik; Nikulin, Grigory

    2016-11-01

    Medicanes are cyclones over the Mediterranean Sea having a tropical-like structure but a rather small size, that can produce significant damage due to the combination of intense winds and heavy precipitation. Future climate projections, performed generally with individual atmospheric climate models, indicate that the intensity of the medicanes could increase under climate change conditions. The availability of large ensembles of high resolution and ocean-atmosphere coupled regional climate model (RCM) simulations, performed in MedCORDEX and EURO-CORDEX projects, represents an opportunity to improve the assessment of the impact of climate change on medicanes. As a first step towards such an improved assessment, we analyze the ability of the RCMs used in these projects to reproduce the observed characteristics of medicanes, and the impact of increased resolution and air-sea coupling on their simulation. In these storms, air-sea interaction plays a fundamental role in their formation and intensification, a different mechanism from that of extra-tropical cyclones, where the baroclinic instability mechanism prevails. An observational database, based on satellite images combined with high resolution simulations (Miglietta et al. in Geophys Res Lett 40:2400-2405, 2013), is used as a reference for evaluating the simulations. In general, the simulated medicanes do not coincide on a case-by-case basis with the observed medicanes. However, observed medicanes with a high intensity and relatively long duration of tropical characteristics are better replicated in simulations. The observed spatial distribution of medicanes is generally well simulated, while the monthly distribution reveals the difficulty of simulating the medicanes that first appear in September after the summer minimum in occurrence. Increasing the horizontal resolution has a systematic and generally positive impact on the frequency of simulated medicanes, while the general underestimation of their intensity is

  11. Drivers of uncertainty in simulated ocean circulation and heat uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Markus B.; Zanna, Laure

    2017-02-01

    The impact of uncertainties in air-sea fluxes and ocean model parameters on the ocean circulation and ocean heat uptake (OHU) is assessed in a novel modeling framework. We use an ocean-only model forced with the simulated sea surface fields of the CMIP5 climate models. The simulations are performed using control and 1% CO2 warming scenarios. The ocean-only ensemble adequately reproduces the mean Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and the zonally integrated OHU. The ensemble spread in AMOC strength, its weakening, and Atlantic OHU due to different air-sea fluxes is twice as large as the uncertainty range related to vertical and mesocale eddy diffusivities. The sensitivity of OHU to uncertainties in air-sea fluxes and model parameters differs vastly across basins, with the Southern Ocean exhibiting strong sensitivity to air-sea fluxes and model parameters. This study clearly demonstrates that model biases in air-sea fluxes are one of the key sources of uncertainty in climate simulations.

  12. Continuous assimilation of simulated Geosat altimetric sea level into an eddy-resolving numerical ocean model. I - Sea level differences. II - Referenced sea level differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Warren B.; Tai, Chang-Kou; Holland, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The optimal interpolation method of Lorenc (1981) was used to conduct continuous assimilation of altimetric sea level differences from the simulated Geosat exact repeat mission (ERM) into a three-layer quasi-geostrophic eddy-resolving numerical ocean box model that simulates the statistics of mesoscale eddy activity in the western North Pacific. Assimilation was conducted continuously as the Geosat tracks appeared in simulated real time/space, with each track repeating every 17 days, but occurring at different times and locations within the 17-day period, as would have occurred in a realistic nowcast situation. This interpolation method was also used to conduct the assimilation of referenced altimetric sea level differences into the same model, performing the referencing of altimetric sea sevel differences by using the simulated sea level. The results of this dynamical interpolation procedure are compared with those of a statistical (i.e., optimum) interpolation procedure.

  13. Toward Submesocale Ocean Modelling and Observations for Global Ocean Forecast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drillet, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mercator Ocean is the French oceanographic operational center involved in the development an operation of global high resolution ocean forecasting systems; it is part of the European Copernicus Marine service initiated during MyOcean project. Mercator Ocean currently delivers daily 1/12° global ocean forecast based on the NEMO model which allows for a good representation of mesoscale structures in main areas of the global ocean. Data assimilation of altimetry provides a precise initialization of the mesoscale structures while in situ observations, mainly based on the ARGO network, and satellite Sea Surface Temperature constrain water mass properties from the surface to intermediate depths. One of the main improvements scheduled in the coming years is the transitioning towards submesoscale permitting horizontal resolution (1/36°). On the basis of numerical simulations in selected areas and standard diagnostics developed to validate operational systems, we will discuss : i) The impact of the resolution increase at the basin scale. ii) Adequacy of numerical schemes, vertical resolution and physical parameterization. iii) Adequacy of currently implemented data assimilation procedures in particular with respect to new high resolution data set such as SWOT.

  14. Climate Modeling: Ocean Cavities below Ice Shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Mark Roger

    2016-09-12

    The Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME), a new initiative by the U.S. Department of Energy, includes unstructured-mesh ocean, land-ice, and sea-ice components using the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) framework. The ability to run coupled high-resolution global simulations efficiently on large, high-performance computers is a priority for ACME. Sub-ice shelf ocean cavities are a significant new capability in ACME, and will be used to better understand how changing ocean temperature and currents influence glacial melting and retreat. These simulations take advantage of the horizontal variable-resolution mesh and adaptive vertical coordinate in MPAS-Ocean, in order to place high resolution below ice shelves and near grounding lines.

  15. A novel isotopic fractionation during dissolved oxygen consumption in mesopelagic waters inferred from observation and model simulation of dissolved oxygen δ18O in open oceanic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, N.; Oka, A.; Gamo, T.

    2012-12-01

    Oxygen isotopic ratio (δ18O) of dissolved oxygen is a useful for bioactive tracer of the subsurface aphotic (mesopelagic) ocean since it varies nonlinearly related to oxygen consumption via stoichiometry of organic matter decomposition. Therefore, along with global circulation model (GCM), observed δ18O and their vertical/geographical distribution can be effectively used to quantitatively determine how marine biological and ocean physical processes contribute to varying dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the ocean, in particular mesopelagic zone where pronounced biological activity alters DO concentration significantly. In the central north Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean, including Arabian Sea, one of the few regions in the open ocean which has oxygen minimum zone (OMZ, a layer with severely depleted DO), vertical profiles of DO and δ18O were observed. These observed data are compared with a GCM simulation in which a constant isotopic fractionation factor of DO by marine biological respiration and a fixed Redfield molar ratio between P and O are assumed. Even in the Arabian Sea OMZ, relationship between DO and δ18O was found to be similar to those observed in other open oceans, indicating that no specific oxygen consumption process occurred in the OMZ. Using the GCM model, we attempted to reproduce the observed overall relationship between DO and δ18O, but it failed when we adopted the previously reported isotopic fractionation factor: Discrepancy became larger when oxygen saturation level decreased, in particular in thermocline water (at 20% oxygen saturation level, modeled δ18O was heavier than observed values by +7‰). Sensitivity simulations with the GCM model revealed that (1) simply changing the intensity of oxygen consumption by respiration/organic matter decomposition nor physical processes (diffusion and/or advection) could explain the observed relationship between DO and δ18O, (2) applying a smaller isotopic fractionation for deep waters

  16. Dispersal of deep-sea larvae from the intra-American seas: simulations of trajectories using ocean models.

    PubMed

    Young, Craig M; He, Ruoying; Emlet, Richard B; Li, Yizhen; Qian, Hui; Arellano, Shawn M; Van Gaest, Ahna; Bennett, Kathleen C; Wolf, Maya; Smart, Tracey I; Rice, Mary E

    2012-10-01

    Using data on ocean circulation with a Lagrangian larval transport model, we modeled the potential dispersal distances for seven species of bathyal invertebrates whose durations of larval life have been estimated from laboratory rearing, MOCNESS plankton sampling, spawning times, and recruitment. Species associated with methane seeps in the Gulf of Mexico and/or Barbados included the bivalve "Bathymodiolus" childressi, the gastropod Bathynerita naticoidea, the siboglinid polychaete tube worm Lamellibrachia luymesi, and the asteroid Sclerasterias tanneri. Non-seep species included the echinoids Cidaris blakei and Stylocidaris lineata from sedimented slopes in the Bahamas and the wood-dwelling sipunculan Phascolosoma turnerae, found in Barbados, the Bahamas, and the Gulf of Mexico. Durations of the planktonic larval stages ranged from 3 weeks in lecithotrophic tubeworms to more than 2 years in planktotrophic starfish. Planktotrophic sipunculan larvae from the northern Gulf of Mexico were capable of reaching the mid-Atlantic off Newfoundland, a distance of more than 3000 km, during a 7- to 14-month drifting period, but the proportion retained in the Gulf of Mexico varied significantly among years. Larvae drifting in the upper water column often had longer median dispersal distances than larvae drifting for the same amount of time below the permanent thermocline, although the shapes of the distance-frequency curves varied with depth only in the species with the longest larval trajectories. Even species drifting for >2 years did not cross the ocean in the North Atlantic Drift.

  17. Dense water formation and BiOS-induced variability in the Adriatic Sea simulated using an ocean regional circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunić, Natalija; Vilibić, Ivica; Šepić, Jadranka; Somot, Samuel; Sevault, Florence

    2016-08-01

    A performance analysis of the NEMOMED8 ocean regional circulation model was undertaken for the Adriatic Sea during the period of 1961-2012, focusing on two mechanisms, dense water formation (DWF) and the Adriatic-Ionian Bimodal Oscillating System (BiOS), which drive interannual and decadal variability in the basin. The model was verified based on sea surface temperature and sea surface height satellite measurements and long-term in situ observations from several key areas. The model qualitatively reproduces basin-scale processes: thermohaline-driven cyclonic circulation and freshwater surface outflow along the western Adriatic coast, dense water dynamics, and the inflow of Ionian and Levantine waters to the Adriatic. Positive temperature and salinity biases are reported; the latter are particularly large along the eastern part of the basin, presumably because of the inappropriate introduction of eastern Adriatic rivers into the model. The highest warm temperature biases in the vertical direction were found in dense-water-collecting depressions in the Adriatic, indicating either an inappropriate quantification of DWF processes or temperature overestimation of modelled dense water. The decadal variability in the thermohaline properties is reproduced better than interannual variability, which is considerably underestimated. The DWF rates are qualitatively well reproduced by the model, being larger when preconditioned by higher basin-wide salinities. Anticyclonic circulation in the northern Ionian Sea was modelled only during the Eastern Mediterranean Transient. No other reversals of circulation that could be linked to BiOS-driven changes were modelled.

  18. The VIIRS Ocean Data Simulator Enhancements and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Wayne D.; Patt, Fredrick S.; Franz, Bryan A.; Turpie, Kevin R.; McClain, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    The VIIRS Ocean Science Team (VOST) has been developing an Ocean Data Simulator to create realistic VIIRS SDR datasets based on MODIS water-leaving radiances. The simulator is helping to assess instrument performance and scientific processing algorithms. Several changes were made in the last two years to complete the simulator and broaden its usefulness. The simulator is now fully functional and includes all sensor characteristics measured during prelaunch testing, including electronic and optical crosstalk influences, polarization sensitivity, and relative spectral response. Also included is the simulation of cloud and land radiances to make more realistic data sets and to understand their important influence on nearby ocean color data. The atmospheric tables used in the processing, including aerosol and Rayleigh reflectance coefficients, have been modeled using VIIRS relative spectral responses. The capabilities of the simulator were expanded to work in an unaggregated sample mode and to produce scans with additional samples beyond the standard scan. These features improve the capability to realistically add artifacts which act upon individual instrument samples prior to aggregation and which may originate from beyond the actual scan boundaries. The simulator was expanded to simulate all 16 M-bands and the EDR processing was improved to use these bands to make an SST product. The simulator is being used to generate global VIIRS data from and in parallel with the MODIS Aqua data stream. Studies have been conducted using the simulator to investigate the impact of instrument artifacts. This paper discusses the simulator improvements and results from the artifact impact studies.

  19. View-Dependent Tessellation and Simulation of Ocean Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Centelles, Anna; Ramos, Francisco; Chover, Miguel; Sbert, Mateu

    2014-01-01

    Modeling and rendering realistic ocean scenes have been thoroughly investigated for many years. Its appearance has been studied and it is possible to find very detailed simulations where a high degree of realism is achieved. Nevertheless, among the solutions to ocean rendering, real-time management of the huge heightmaps that are necessary for rendering an ocean scene is still not solved. We propose a new technique for simulating the ocean surface on GPU. This technique is capable of offering view-dependent approximations of the mesh while maintaining coherence among the extracted approximations. This feature is very important as most solutions previously presented must retessellate from the initial mesh. Our solution is able to use the latest extracted approximation when refining or coarsening the mesh. PMID:24672405

  20. Modeling ocean deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Hogan, P.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Montenegro, L. M.

    The goal of this study is to assess models for Deep Convection with special emphasis on their use in coarse resolution ocean general circulation models. A model for deep convection must contain both vertical transport and lateral advection by mesoscale eddies generated by baroclinic instabilities. The first process operates mostly in the initial phases while the second dominates the final stages. Here, the emphasis is on models for vertical mixing. When mesoscales are not resolved, they are treated with the Gent and McWilliams parameterization. The model results are tested against the measurements of Lavender, Davis and Owens, 2002 (LDO) in the Labrador Sea. Specifically, we shall inquire whether the models are able to reproduce the region of " deepest convection," which we shall refer to as DC (mixed layer depths 800-1300 m). The region where it was measured by Lavender et al. (2002) will be referred to as the LDO region. The main results of this study can be summarized as follows. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the GISS vertical mixing model predicts DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 10 m 2 s -1, a value that is quite close to the one suggested by heuristic studies. No parameter was changed from the original GISS model. However, the GISS model also predicts some DC in a region to the east of the LDO region. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the KPP model (everything else being the same) does not predict DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 0.5 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 which is the background value. The KPP model yields DC only to the east of the LDO region. 1° × 1° resolution. In this case, a MY2.5 mixing scheme predicts DC in the LDO region. However, it also predicts DC to the west, north and south of it, where it is not observed. The behavior of the KPP and MY models are somewhat anti-symmetric. The MY models yield too low a mixing in stably stratified flows since they

  1. An overlooked problem in model simulations of the thermohaline circulation and heat transport in the Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Boening, C.W.; Holland, W.R.; Bryan, F.O.; Danabasoglu, G.; Mcwilliams, J.C. |

    1995-03-01

    Many models of the large-scale thermohaline circulation in the ocean exhibit strong zonally integrated upwelling in the midlatitude North Atlantic that significantly decreases the amount of deep water that is carried from the formation regions in the subpolar North Atlantic toward low latitudes and across the equator. In an analysis of results from the Community Modeling Effort using a suite of models with different horizontal resolution, wind and thermohaline forcing, and mixing parameters, it is shown that the upwelling is always concentrated in the western boundary layer between roughly 30 deg and 40 deg N. The vertical transport across 1000 m appears to be controlled by local dynamics and strongly depends on the horizontal resolution and mixing parameters of the model. It is suggested that in models with a realistic deep-water formation rate in the subpolar North Atlantic, the excessive upwelling can be considered as the prime reason for the typically too low meridional overturning rates and northward heat transports in the subtropical North Atlantic. A new isopycnal advection and mixing parameterization of tracer transports by mesoscale eddies yield substantial improvements in these integral measures of the circulation.

  2. Has coarse ocean resolution biased simulations of transient climate sensitivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winton, Michael; Anderson, Whit G.; Delworth, Thomas L.; Griffies, Stephen M.; Hurlin, William J.; Rosati, Anthony

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the influence of ocean component resolution on simulation of climate sensitivity using variants of the GFDL CM2.5 climate model incorporating eddy-resolving (1/10°) and eddy-parameterizing (1°) ocean resolutions. Two parameterization configurations of the coarse-resolution model are used yielding a three-model suite with significant variation in the transient climate response (TCR). The variation of TCR in this suite and in an enhanced group of 10 GFDL models is found to be strongly associated with the control climate Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) magnitude and its decline under forcing. We find that it is the AMOC behavior rather than resolution per se that accounts for most of the TCR differences. A smaller difference in TCR stems from the eddy-resolving model having more Southern Ocean surface warming than the coarse models.

  3. Biogeochemical Reactions Under Simulated Europa Ocean Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amashukeli, X.; Connon, S. A.; Gleeson, D. F.; Kowalczyk, R. S.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2007-12-01

    Galileo data have demonstrated the probable presence of a liquid water ocean on Europa, and existence of salts and carbon dioxide in the satellite's surface ice (e.g., Carr et al., 1998; McCord et al., 1999, Pappalardo et al., 1999; Kivelson et al., 2000). Subsequently, the discovery of chemical signatures of extinct or extant life in Europa's ocean and on its surface became a distinct possibility. Moreover, understanding of Europa's potential habitability is now one of the major goals of the Europa Orbiter Flagship mission. It is likely, that in the early stages of Europa's ocean formation, moderately alkaline oceanic sulfate-carbonate species and a magnetite-silicate mantel could have participated in low-temperature biogeochemical sulfur, iron and carbon cycles facilitated by primitive organisms (Zolotov and Shock, 2004). If periodic supplies of fresh rock and sulfate-carbonate ions are available in Europa's ocean, then an exciting prospect exists that life may be present in Europa's ocean today. In our laboratory, we began the study of the plausible biogeochemical reactions under conditions appropriate to Europa's ocean using barophilic psychrophilic organisms that thrive under anaerobic conditions. In the near absence of abiotic synthetic pathways due to low Europa's temperatures, the biotic synthesis may present a viable opportunity for the formation of the organic and inorganic compounds under these extreme conditions. This work is independent of assumptions regarding hydrothermal vents at Europa's ocean floor or surface-derived oxidant sources. For our studies, we have fabricated a high-pressure (5,000 psi) reaction vessel that simulates aqueous conditions on Europa. We were also successful at reviving barophilic psychrophilic strains of Shewanella bacterium, which serve as test organisms in this investigation. Currently, facultative barophilic psychrophilic stains of Shewanella are grown in the presence of ferric food source; the strains exhibiting iron

  4. An observing system simulation for Southern Ocean carbon dioxide uptake.

    PubMed

    Majkut, Joseph D; Carter, Brendan R; Frölicher, Thomas L; Dufour, Carolina O; Rodgers, Keith B; Sarmiento, Jorge L

    2014-07-13

    The Southern Ocean is critically important to the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2. Up to half of the excess CO2 currently in the ocean entered through the Southern Ocean. That uptake helps to maintain the global carbon balance and buffers transient climate change from fossil fuel emissions. However, the future evolution of the uptake is uncertain, because our understanding of the dynamics that govern the Southern Ocean CO2 uptake is incomplete. Sparse observations and incomplete model formulations limit our ability to constrain the monthly and annual uptake, interannual variability and long-term trends. Float-based sampling of ocean biogeochemistry provides an opportunity for transforming our understanding of the Southern Ocean CO2 flux. In this work, we review current estimates of the CO2 uptake in the Southern Ocean and projections of its response to climate change. We then show, via an observational system simulation experiment, that float-based sampling provides a significant opportunity for measuring the mean fluxes and monitoring the mean uptake over decadal scales.

  5. A dynamic model of oceanic sulfur (DMOS) applied to the Sargasso Sea: Simulating the dimethylsulfide (DMS) summer paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallina, S. M.; Simó, R.; Anderson, T. R.; Gabric, A.; Cropp, R.; Pacheco, J. M.

    2008-03-01

    A new one-dimensional model of DMSP/DMS dynamics (DMOS) is developed and applied to the Sargasso Sea in order to explain what drives the observed dimethylsulfide (DMS) summer paradox: a summer DMS concentration maximum concurrent with a minimum in the biomass of phytoplankton, the producers of the DMS precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). Several mechanisms have been postulated to explain this mismatch: a succession in phytoplankton species composition towards higher relative abundances of DMSP producers in summer; inhibition of bacterial DMS consumption by ultraviolet radiation (UVR); and direct DMS production by phytoplankton due to UVR-induced oxidative stress. None of these hypothetical mechanisms, except for the first one, has been tested with a dynamic model. We have coupled a new sulfur cycle model that incorporates the latest knowledge on DMSP/DMS dynamics to a preexisting nitrogen/carbon-based ecological model that explicitly simulates the microbial-loop. This allows the role of bacteria in DMS production and consumption to be represented and quantified. The main improvements of DMOS with respect to previous DMSP/DMS models are the explicit inclusion of: solar-radiation inhibition of bacterial sulfur uptakes; DMS exudation by phytoplankton caused by solar-radiation-induced stress; and uptake of dissolved DMSP by phytoplankton. We have conducted a series of modeling experiments where some of the DMOS sulfur paths are turned "off" or "on," and the results on chlorophyll-a, bacteria, DMS, and DMSP (particulate and dissolved) concentrations have been compared with climatological data of these same variables. The simulated rate of sulfur cycling processes are also compared with the scarce data available from previous works. All processes seem to play a role in driving DMS seasonality. Among them, however, solar-radiation-induced DMS exudation by phytoplankton stands out as the process without which the model is unable to produce realistic DMS simulations

  6. Assessment of surface air temperature over the Arctic Ocean in reanalysis and IPCC AR4 model simulations with IABP/POLES observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiping; Zhang, Zhanhai; Hu, Yongyun; Chen, Liqi; Dai, Yongjiu; Ren, Xiaobo

    2008-05-01

    The surface air temperature (SAT) over the Arctic Ocean in reanalyses and global climate model simulations was assessed using the International Arctic Buoy Programme/Polar Exchange at the Sea Surface (IABP/POLES) observations for the period 1979-1999. The reanalyses, including the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Reanalysis II (NCEP2) and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast 40-year Reanalysis (ERA40), show encouraging agreement with the IABP/POLES observations, although some spatiotemporal discrepancies are noteworthy. The reanalyses have warm annual mean biases and underestimate the observed interannual SAT variability in summer. Additionally, NCEP2 shows an excessive warming trend. Most model simulations (coordinated by the International Panel on Climate Change for its Fourth Assessment Report) reproduce the annual mean, seasonal cycle, and trend of the observed SAT reasonably well, particularly the multi-model ensemble mean. However, large discrepancies are found. Some models have the annual mean SAT biases far exceeding the standard deviation of the observed interannul SAT variability and the across-model standard deviation. Spatially, the largest inter-model variance of the annual mean SAT is found over the North Pole, Greenland Sea, Barents Sea and Baffin Bay. Seasonally, a large spread of the simulated SAT among the models is found in winter. The models show interannual variability and decadal trend of various amplitudes, and can not capture the observed dominant SAT mode variability and cooling trend in winter. Further discussions of the possible attributions to the identified SAT errors for some models suggest that the model's performance in the sea ice simulation is an important factor.

  7. Large-Eddy Simulations of Tropical Convective Systems, the Boundary Layer, and Upper Ocean Coupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    the Boundary Layer , and Upper Ocean Coupling Eric D. Skyllingstad College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University 104 COAS...NWP) models to more accurately simulate the interaction of tropical deep convection and atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers . OBJECTIVES...Investigate tropical convection and upper ocean circulations on scales from 100 m to 200 km. Elucidate specifically how the ocean mixed layer responds

  8. Estimation of Fresh Water and Salt Transports in the Northern Indian Ocean Using Aquarius and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addezio, J. M.; Bulusu, S.; Murty, V. S. N.; Nyadjro, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Northern Indian Ocean presents a unique dipolar Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) structure with the salty Arabian Sea (AS) on the west and the fresher Bay of Bengal (BoB) on the east. By using a combination of observational data, reanalyses, and model studies, the salinity structure of this dichotomous yet interconnected region is quantified. At the surface, the largest driver of salinity interseasonal variability is caused by the monsoonal winds and their ability to transport volume between the two water masses. Time-depth profiles reveal a rich vertical salinity profile. The AS presents with a mild salinity inversion, with salty waters above fresher ones for the majority of each annual cycle. This vertical gradient is approximately 1 psu between the surface and 200m depth. In the BoB the opposite occurs, where larger volumes of precipitation and river runoff create a lens of freshwater from the surface to approximately 50m depth year around. Salt and freshwater fluxes at the surface show a strong zonal component between the two basins along Sri Lanka twice a year. Within the basins, meridional fluxes dominate especially along the coastal regions where the EICC and WICC flow. Meridional depth-integrated salt, freshwater, and volume transports along a slice of each basin at 6°N reveal the approximate time its takes for each basin to return to equilibrium after strong transports during each monsoonal seasons advect salt and/or freshwater into or out of each respective region.

  9. Global climate simulations at 3000-year intervals for the last 21 000 years with the GENMOM coupled atmosphere–ocean model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alder, Jay R.; Hostetler, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    We apply GENMOM, a coupled atmosphere–ocean climate model, to simulate eight equilibrium time slices at 3000-year intervals for the past 21 000 years forced by changes in Earth–Sun geometry, atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs), continental ice sheets, and sea level. Simulated global cooling during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is 3.8 ◦C and the rate of post-glacial warming is in overall agreement with recently published temperature reconstructions. The greatest rate of warming occurs between 15 and 12 ka (2.4 ◦C over land, 0.7 ◦C over oceans, and 1.4 ◦C globally) in response to changes in radiative forcing from the diminished extent of the Northern Hemisphere (NH) ice sheets and increases in GHGs and NH summer insolation. The modeled LGM and 6 ka temperature and precipitation climatologies are generally consistent with proxy reconstructions, the PMIP2 and PMIP3 simulations, and other paleoclimate data–model analyses. The model does not capture the mid-Holocene “thermal maximum” and gradual cooling to preindustrial (PI) global temperature found in the data. Simulated monsoonal precipitation in North Africa peaks between 12 and 9 ka at values ∼ 50 % greater than those of the PI, and Indian monsoonal precipitation peaks at 12 and 9 ka at values ∼ 45 % greater than the PI. GENMOM captures the reconstructed LGM extent of NH and Southern Hemisphere (SH) sea ice. The simulated present-day Antarctica Circumpolar Current (ACC) is ∼ 48 % weaker than the observed (62 versus 119 Sv). The simulated present-day Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) of 19.3 ± 1.4 Sv on the Bermuda Rise (33◦ N) is comparable with observed value of 18.7 ± 4.8 Sv. AMOC at 33◦ N is reduced by ∼ 15 % during the LGM, and the largest post-glacial increase (∼ 11 %) occurs during the 15 ka time slice.

  10. Simulations and Observations of GNSS Ocean Surface Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, P.; Benzon, H.

    2013-12-01

    GNSS coherent and incoherent reflected signals have the potential of deriving large scale parameters of ocean and ice surfaces, as barotropic variability, eddy currents and fronts, Rossby waves, coastal upwelling, mean ocean surface heights, and patterns of the general ocean circulation. In the reflection zone the measurements may derive parameters as sea surface roughness, winds, waves, heights and tilts from the spectral measurements. Previous measurements from mountain tops and airplanes have shown results leading to some of these parameters. Coming satellite missions, as CYGNSS, COSMIC-2, and GEROS on the International Space Station, have underlined the need for simulation studies highlighting the assumptions for the data retrievals and the precision and the accuracy of such measurements. Forward simulation of the measured signals has often been used in the development of retrieval algorithms. The retrieval algorithms are used in the calculations of the geophysical parameters. This presentation describes a wave propagator that can be used to simulate GNSS reflected signals from ocean surfaces. The theory of propagation of microwaves in the atmosphere is well established, and methods for propagation modeling range from ray tracing to numerical solutions to the wave equation. Besides ray tracing there are propagation methods that use mode theory and a finite difference solution to the parabolic equation. The presented propagator is based on the solution of the parabolic equation. The parabolic equation in our simulator is solved using the split-step sine transformation. The Earth's surface is modeled with the use of an impedance model. The value of the Earth impedance is given as a function of the range along the surface of the Earth. This impedance concept gives an accurate lower boundary condition in the determination of the electromagnetic field, and makes it possible to simulate reflections and the effects of transitions between different mediums. A semi

  11. Tropical Weather System and Ocean Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    September issue. The draft of a second article on the ocean model has been completed. Both articles are included as Appendices in this final report. We have...of the study result will be given. The interactions between atmospheric vortex pairs are simulated and studied with a nondivergent barotropic model...relative movements -" -J of the vortices are sensitive to the separation distance " /91

  12. Development and Utilization of the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    simulation studies with the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS). The targeted problems are submesoscale wakes, fronts, and eddies; nearshore currents...2005: Routes to dissipation in the ocean: The 2D/3D turbulence conundrum. In: Marine Turbulence : Theories, Observations, and Models , Eds. H...Development and Utilization of the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS) James C. McWilliams Department of Atmospheric Sciences and Institute

  13. Dissipation effects in North Atlantic Ocean modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, D. E.; Mehra, A.; Haney, R. L.; Bowman, M. J.; Tseng, Y. H.

    2004-03-01

    Numerical experiments varying lateral viscosity and diffusivity between 20 and 150 m2/s in a North Atlantic Ocean (NAO) model having 4th-order accurate numerics, in which the dense deep current system (DCS) from the northern seas and Arctic Ocean is simulated directly show that Gulf Stream (GS) separation is strongly affected by the dissipation of the DCS. This is true even though the separation is highly inertial with large Reynolds number for GS separation flow scales. We show that realistic NAO modeling requires less than 150 m2/s viscosity and diffusivity in order to maintain the DCS material current with enough intensity to get realistic GS separation near Cape Hatteras (CH). This also demands accurate, low dissipation numerics, because of the long transit time (1-10 years) of DCS material from its northern seas and Arctic Ocean source regions to the Cape Hatteras region and the small lateral and vertical scales of DCS.

  14. Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS)-Modular Ocean Model v4 (MOM4) coupled model

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Sun, Rui; Han, J.; Pan, H. L.; Park, S.; Hannay, Cecile; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Teixeira, J.

    2014-07-25

    We present a diagnostic analysis of the marine low cloud climatology simulated by two state-of-the-art coupled atmosphere-ocean models: the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global Forecasting System (GFS). In both models, the shallow convection and boundary layer turbulence parameterizations have been recently updated: both models now use a mass-flux scheme for the parameterization of shallow convection, and a turbulence parameterization capable of handling Stratocumulus (Sc)-topped Planetary Boundary Layers (PBLs). For shallow convection, both models employ a convective trigger function based on the concept of convective inhibition and both include explicit convective overshooting/penetrative entrainment formulation. For Sc-topped PBL, both models treat explicitly turbulence mixing and cloud-top entrainment driven by cloud-top radiative cooling. Our focus is on the climatological transition from Sc to shallow Cumulus (Cu)-topped PBL in the subtropical eastern oceans. We show that in the CESM the coastal Sc-topped PBLs in the subtropical Eastern Pacific are well-simulated but the climatological transition from Sc to shallow Cu is too abrupt and happens too close to the coast. By contrast, in the GFS coupled simulation the coastal Sc amount and PBL depth are severely underestimated while the transition from Sc to shallow Cu is ³delayed² and offshore Sc cover is too extensive in the subtropical Eastern Pacific. We discuss the possible connections between such differences in the simulations and differences in the parameterizations of shallow convection and boundary layer turbulence in the two models.

  15. Four simple ocean carbon models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the key processes that determine oceanic CO2 uptake and sets this description within the context of four simple ocean carbon models. These models capture, in varying degrees, these key processes and establish a clear foundation for more realistic models that incorporate more directly the underlying physics and biology of the ocean rather than relying on simple parametric schemes. The purpose of this paper is more pedagogical than purely scientific. The problems encountered by current attempts to understand the global carbon cycle not only require our efforts but set a demand for a new generation of scientist, and it is hoped that this paper and the text in which it appears will help in this development.

  16. Pathways of Atlantic Waters into the Arctic Ocean: Eddy-permitting ocean and sea ice simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wekerle, Claudia; von Appen, Wilken-Jon; Danilov, Sergey; Jung, Thomas; Kanzow, Torsten; Schauer, Ursula; Timmermann, Ralph; Wang, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Fram Strait is the only deep gateway connecting the central Arctic with the North Atlantic. Boundary currents on each side are responsible for the exchange of water masses between the Arctic and North Atlantic. The East Greenland Current (EGC) carries fresh and cold Arctic waters and sea ice southward, whereas the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) carries warm Atlantic Waters (AW) into the Arctic Ocean. The complex topography in Fram Strait leads to a branching of the northward flowing WSC, with one branch recirculating between 78°N and 81°N which then joins the EGC. To date, the dynamics as well as the precise location of this recirculation are unclear. The goal of this research project is to quantify the amount and variability of AW which recirculates immediately in Fram Strait, and to investigate the role of atmospheric forcing and oceanic meso-scale eddies for the recirculation. We use simulations carried out with a global configuration of the Finite Element Sea ice-Ocean Model (FESOM) at eddy-permitting scales. The advantage of this model is the finite element discretization of the governing equations, which allows us to locally refine the mesh in areas of interest and keep it coarse in other parts of the global oceans without the need for traditional nesting. Here we will show the first results of the model validation. The model has ~9 km resolution in the Nordic Seas and Fram Strait and 1 deg south of 50°N. We assess the model capabilities in simulating the ocean circulation in the Nordic Seas and Fram Strait by comparing with the available observational data, e.g. with data from the Fram Strait oceanographic mooring array. The ocean volume and heat transport from the Atlantic Ocean into the Nordic Seas and at the Fram Strait are analyzed. Our results show that the model can capture some of the observed key ocean properties in our region of interest, while some tuning is required to further improve the model. In the next phase of this project we will focus

  17. Evaluating the deep-ocean circulation of a global ocean model using carbon isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, André; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Gebbie, Jake; Losch, Martin; Marchal, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    We study the sensitivity of a global three-dimensional biotic ocean carbon-cycle model to the parameterizations of gas exchange and biological productivity as well as to deep-ocean circulation strength, and we employ the carbon isotopic ratios δ13C and Δ14C of dissolved inorganic carbon for a systematic evaluation against observations. Radiocarbon (Δ14C) in particular offers the means to assess the model skill on a time scale of 100 to 1000 years relevant to the deep-ocean circulation. The carbon isotope ratios are included as tracers in the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The implementation involves the fractionation processes during photosynthesis and air-sea gas exchange. We present the results of sixteen simulations combining two different parameterizations of the piston velocity, two different parameterizations of biological productivity (including the effect of iron fertilization) and four different overturning rates. These simulations were first spun up to equilibrium (more than 10,000 years of model simulation) and then continued from AD 1765 to AD 2002. For the model evaluation, we followed the OCMIP-2 (Ocean Carbon-Cycle Model Intercomparision Project phase two) protocol, comparing the results to GEOSECS (Geochemical Ocean Sections Survey) and WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) δ13C and natural Δ14C data in the world ocean. The range of deep natural Δ14C (below 1000 m) for our single model (MITgcm) was smaller than for the group of different OCMIP-2 models. Furthermore, differences between different model parameterizations were smaller than for different overturning rates. We conclude that carbon isotope ratios are a useful tool to evaluate the deep-ocean circulation. Since they are also available from deep-sea sediment records, we postulate that the simulation of carbon isotope ratios in a global ocean model will aid in estimating the deep-ocean circulation and climate during present and past.

  18. Simulating Conditional Deterministic Predictability within Ocean Frontogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-26

    water into the euphotic zone along fronts (Thomas et al., 2008). The potential frontogenesis impact on the ocean (McWilliams et al., 2009a,b; Zhong...mixed layers are found in the frontal zone with filaments of small MLD. The shallow MLD features have corresponding features in the model SST, though...effect. The resultant ageostrophic secondary circulation is fronto- getic with subduction on the dense side of the front and upwelling with shallow mixed

  19. Ocean U.S. GODAE: Global Ocean Prediction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Ocean U.S. GODAE: Global Ocean Prediction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) By Eric P. Chassignet1 and Harley E. Hurlburt2 1 COAPS ...UAcademia:U Florida State University/Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies ( COAPS ); University of Miami/Rosenstiel School of Marine and

  20. Development and Utilization of Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS). Delicacy, Imprecision, and Uncertainty of Oceanic Simulations: An Investigation with the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS). Submesoscale Flows and Mixing in the Ocean Surface Layer Using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS). Eddy Effects in General Circulation, Spanning Mean Currents, Mesoscale Eddies, and Topographic Generation, including Submesoscale Nests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    the broad categories of front, filaments and vortical structures. We illustrate with a few examples. South of the Gulf Stream separation point at...2011: Currents connecting communities: the decay of nearshore community similarity with ocean circulation. Ecology 92, 1193-1200. Weir , B., Y...mesoscale structures such as the warm-core Gulf Stream Rings to the north and backward streamers off of meander crests . We focus on the submesoscale

  1. Simulating Tsunamis in the Indian Ocean with Real Bathymetry by using a High- Order Triangular Discontinuous Galerkin Oceanic Shallow Water Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    fault extent constrained by observed tsunami arrival time to the northwest, east and south of the slip zone indicates a fault zone of approximately...1000 kilometers by 200 kilometers. The epicenter location lies on the southern end of the fault zone . To accommodate trench curvature, this fault plane...Pollitz, and S. L. Bilek, ”Implications of the 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake on tsunami forecast and assessment models for great subduction

  2. Analysis of a Simulation of the Seasonal Cycle in the Tropical Pacific Ocean in an Eddy-Resolving Global Ocean Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    Mindanao and Halmahera are submerged. Borneo and much of the Philippines are joined to the East Asian land mass and the marginal seas in between are filled... Halmahera 29 to join in forming the beginning of the NEC. The importance of Halmahera in the current structure is seen in the historical ship drift...the islands of Mindanao and Halmahera were shoaled. This results in model currents for the western Pacific seen in the vector plot of Figure 3.23

  3. The effects of volcanic eruptions on simulated ocean heat content and thermal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, P.; Achutarao, K.; Barnett, T.; Gregory, J.; Pierce, D.; Santer, B.; Taylor, K.; Wigley, T.

    2006-12-01

    We examine the ocean heat content in a recent suite of coupled ocean-atmosphere model simulations of the 20th Century. Our results suggest that 20th Century increases in ocean heat content and sea-level (via thermal expansion) were substantially reduced by the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa. The volcanically-induced cooling of the ocean surface is subducted into deeper ocean layers, where it persists for decades. Temporary reductions in ocean heat content associated with the comparable eruptions of El Chichon (1982) and Pinatubo (1991) were much shorter lived because they occurred relative to a non-stationary background of large, anthropogenically-forced ocean warming. To understand the response of these simulations to volcanic loadings, we focus on multiple realizations of the 20th Century experiment with three models (NCAR CCSM3, GFDL 2.0, and GISS HYCOM). By comparing these runs to control simulations of each model, we track the three dimensional oceanic response to Krakatoa using S/N analysis. Inter-model differences in the oceanic thermal response to Krakatoa are large and arise from differences in external forcing, model physics, and experimental design. Our results suggest that inclusion of the effects of Krakatoa (and perhaps even earlier eruptions) is important for reliable simulation of 20th century ocean heat uptake and thermal expansion. Systematic experimentation will be required to quantify the relative importance of these factors.

  4. Ocean modeling in a global ocean observing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Neville R.

    1993-08-01

    The oceanographic community is currently contemplating the design of a global ocean climate observing system to help monitor, describe, and understand the seasonal to decadal climate changes of the ocean and to provide the observations needed for climate prediction. This review attempts to define a role for modeling within that system, the central theme being that the observational and modeling elements must be developed in concert, with the presence of one enhancing the value of the other. Three distinct categories of model-to-data interface are identified. In the first class, models and data collection develop separately, being joined only by intermittent validation steps. In the second, and by far most important, class the model and data collection evolve together, either in a time-space data assimilation and prediction system, or through the application of inverse methods. In the final category, model information feeds back to the observing system design, and vice versa, and the model assimilation system provides quality control on the data. The key role of (atmospheric) models in the determination of surface fluxes to drive ocean models is discussed. A nontrivial role is proposed for ocean models whereby they provide additional, and largely independent, constraints on atmospheric forecast system estimates. The role of ocean models in the analysis of surface and upper ocean fields needs to be developed, particularly with respect to salinity and nonphysical fields. The use of models in rationalizing the choice of observation platforms is discussed, together with some of the difficulties in interpreting such studies. The state of tropical ocean prediction is reviewed with particular emphasis on systems that assimilate subsurface temperature data. A range of thermocline models are also reviewed with the emphasis on subduction and the problem of initializing and constraining models that resolve mesoscale eddies. Some of the issues involved in matching the models to

  5. Modeling and Parameterization Study of Radiance in a Dynamic Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    simulation of nonlinear capillary-gravity waves (CGW) • develop numerical capabilities for free-surface turbulence ( FST ) and the resultant surface...based simulations and modeling to solve the problem of ocean RT in a dynamic SBL environment that includes CGW and FST . The complex dynamic...processes of the ocean SBL, the nonlinear CGW interactions, and the development and transport of FST are modeled using physics-based computations. The

  6. A Review of Ocean Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-23

    Dimensional Turbulence Kinetic Energy Equation 4-13 4.2.4 The Parameterization of Surface Fluxes 4-14 4.3 BULK MIXING-LAYER MODELS 4-16 4.3.1 Buoyancy...Momentum Conservation 4-54 4.4.2 Turbulence Flux Model 4-54 4.4.3 Diffusion Model Intercomparisons 4-65 4.5 DISCUSSION 4-74 REFERENCES 4-77 I I...mixed surface layer (Kise, 1979), and to forcing induced by mixed-layer turbulence (Bell, 1978). One-dimensional upper-ocean models are based on the

  7. Focusing simulations of synthetic aperture radar ocean images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayt, D. W.; Alphers, W.; Brüning, C.; Dewitt, R.; Henyey, F.; Kasilingam, D. P.; Keller, W. C.; Lyzenga, D. R.; Plant, W. J.; Schult, R. L.; Shemdin, O. H.; Wright, J. A.

    1990-09-01

    The SAR ocean images obtained in the Tower Ocean Wave and Radar Dependence Experiment (TOWARD) are carefully analyzed at different focus settings and compared with simulated results based on various theories for imaging surface waves. The agreement between the experimental data and all of the SAR simulations except one is found to be favorable. There is also surprisingly close agreement among the different theoretical models themselves, suggesting a closer fundamental similarity among the contending theories than was previously thought. It is shown that the width of the focusing curve has an inverse dependence on the SAR integration time. For the TOWARD conditions it is found that the image modulation due to azimuth-traveling surface waves is greater than that due to range-traveling waves.

  8. Quantifying the role of climate variability on extreme total water level impacts: An application of a full simulation model to Ocean Beach, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafin, K.; Ruggiero, P.; Stockdon, H. F.; Barnard, P.; Long, J.

    2014-12-01

    Many coastal communities worldwide are vulnerable to flooding and erosion driven by extreme total water levels (TWL), potentially dangerous events produced by the combination of large waves, high tides, and high non-tidal residuals. The West coast of the United States provides an especially challenging environment to model these processes due to its complex geological setting combined with uncertain forecasts for sea level rise (SLR), changes in storminess, and possible changes in the frequency of major El Niños. Our research therefore aims to develop an appropriate methodology to assess present-day and future storm-induced coastal hazards along the entire U.S. West coast, filling this information gap. We present the application of this framework in a pilot study at Ocean Beach, California, a National Park site within the Golden Gate National Recreation Area where existing event-scale coastal change data can be used for model calibration and verification. We use a probabilistic, full simulation TWL model (TWL-FSM; Serafin and Ruggiero, in press) that captures the seasonal and interannual climatic variability in extremes using functions of regional climate indices, such as the Multivariate ENSO index (MEI), to represent atmospheric patterns related to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In order to characterize the effect of climate variability on TWL components, we refine the TWL-FSM by splitting non-tidal residuals into low (monthly mean sea level anomalies) and high frequency (storm surge) components. We also develop synthetic climate indices using Markov sequences to reproduce the autocorrelated nature of ENSO behavior. With the refined TWL-FSM, we simulate each TWL component, resulting in synthetic TWL records providing robust estimates of extreme return level events (e.g., the 100-yr event) and the ability to examine the relative contribution of each TWL component to these extreme events. Extreme return levels are then used to drive storm impact models

  9. Ocean modelling on the CYBER 205 at GFDL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, M.

    1984-01-01

    At the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, research is carried out for the purpose of understanding various aspects of climate, such as its variability, predictability, stability and sensitivity. The atmosphere and oceans are modelled mathematically and their phenomenology studied by computer simulation methods. The present state-of-the-art in the computer simulation of large scale oceans on the CYBER 205 is discussed. While atmospheric modelling differs in some aspects, the basic approach used is similar. The equations of the ocean model are presented along with a short description of the numerical techniques used to find their solution. Computational considerations and a typical solution are presented in section 4.

  10. Simulated response of the Southern Ocean to wind changes: towards the role of mesoscale eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patara, Lavinia; Böning, Claus; Biastoch, Arne

    2013-04-01

    The role of ocean mesoscale eddies in the Southern Ocean response to recent wind changes is explored with a suite of realistic global ocean simulations at increasing horizontal resolution. Southern Ocean mesoscale eddies are known to be critical in the meridional redistribution of tracers, and are suggested to affect how the Southern Ocean responds to wind changes, takes up heat, and exchanges CO2 with the atmosphere. By employing the ocean general circulation model NEMO-LIM, ocean simulations with horizontal resolutions of 1/2°, 1/4°, and 1/12°, i.e. ranging from non-eddying to eddy-resolving, are performed and compared. In particular, a "two-way" nesting technique is used to refine the ocean grid up to 1/12° in the Southern Ocean. The ocean models are forced with the CORE v.2 atmospheric reanalysis during the period 1948-2007, and companion experiments under a repeated-annual-cycle forcing are used to detect model spurious drifts. First, we assess the effect of explicitly simulated eddies on ocean mean properties. Mesoscale eddies are shown to modify the mixed layer depth and the upper-ocean density, with potential effects on the formation properties of Subantarctic Mode Waters. Second, we explore the role of mesoscale eddies in affecting the ocean circulation sensitivity to the sustained increase of Southern Hemisphere winds during the past decades. Whereas the non-eddying simulations exhibit large increases of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current transport, the 1/4° and 1/12° models are less sensitive to the wind increase, in better agreement with available observations. These results show a clear effect of model resolution on the Southern Ocean response to climate variability and change.

  11. Adaptation of a general circulation model to ocean dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Rees, T. H.; Woodbury, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    A primitive-variable general circulation model of the ocean was formulated in which fast external gravity waves are suppressed with rigid-lid surface constraint pressires which also provide a means for simulating the effects of large-scale free-surface topography. The surface pressure method is simpler to apply than the conventional stream function models, and the resulting model can be applied to both global ocean and limited region situations. Strengths and weaknesses of the model are also presented.

  12. Ocean Response to Volcanic Eruptions in CMIP5 Coupled Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yanni; Carton, James; Chepurin, Gennady; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Robock, Alan; Sentman, Lori; Krasting, John

    2014-05-01

    Questions regarding the ocean response to changes in atmospheric aerosol loading have arisen in several contexts recent years. Here we exploit the availability of new simulations produced as part of CMIP5 to revisit the ocean response to the five largest tropical volcanoes of the last 135 years (Krakatau, Santa Maria, Agung, El Chichón, and Pinatubo) in a set of 36 historical climate simulations produced using eight widely used climate models. All models show an annual average reduction in net surface solar radiation of 1-5 W m-2, a drop in net surface heat flux of 1-3 W m-2, and a resulting decline in SST of 0.1-0.3 K. Sea ice extent and mass also increase by about 5%. For smaller eruptions SST may recover in a few years, but our results confirm the suggestion of previous studies that the impacts on ocean heat content of major eruptions may persist for decades. The increase in sea ice area and mass also persists well beyond the lifetime of stratospheric aerosols due to the reinforcing impact of solar albedo feedback and reductions in thermodynamic surface heat loss. The cool SST signal also penetrates into the subsurface ocean, lowering 0-1000m temperature by an average of roughly 0.03 K, and persisting for many decades, masking some of the anthropogenic warming signal. Indeed, comparisons of simulations with and without volcanic aerosols show that the concentration of eruptions in the early years of the 20th century and again in the near the end of the century may mask some of the acceleration of ocean heating that might otherwise have been observed. A number of previous studies have explored the connection between volcanic eruptions and interannual to decadal climate variability with contradictory results. Here we combine the use of extensive numbers of ensemble members with a Rotated Extended Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis to further discriminate the natural and forced response, the result of which is no compelling evidence of a link between the timing

  13. Modelling ocean circulation in Deep-ocean aquaplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinstry, A.

    2012-04-01

    Léger et al. (2004) and Küchner (2003) hypothesised that Ocean planets, Super-Earth planets with liquid-water oceans covering their whole surfaces may exist. Planets with liquid water surfaces could have ocean depths of 70-100 km with bottom pressures of 1-5 GPa. To date, no general circulation models have been run on such oceans, primarily because of a lack of equation of state for seawater at such depths. In this work a deep-water seawater Equation of State is implemented in the MITgcm ocean model. The EOS depends not only on the salinity and temperature but also on CO2 concentration. Several proposed ocean compositions, in particular magnesium and sodium sulphates salts ,H2O / ammonia mixes are investigated. While geothermal plumes in pure water systems will rise through an the whole ocean depths, saline-enriched plumes do not, due to differential thermal expansions for saline fluids leading to a loss of buoyancy (Melosh et al., 2004). Vance and Brown (2005) have shown that double-diffusive convection is expected to be a significant feature of such high-pressure oceans: depending on ocean composition, a double-diffusive layer will frustrate deep ocean convective processes and hence heat transfer. Convection happens separately in the warm, saline layers below and cooler, more dilute layer above. While this has been seen in isolated areas on Earth, such as the Red Sea, we explore the effects of heat and salin transfer through this layer on global circulation for deep ocean planet.

  14. Impact of mesoscale ocean currents on sea ice in high-resolution Arctic ice and ocean simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Maslowski, Wieslaw; Semtner, Albert J.

    1999-08-01

    A high-resolution sea ice model is designed for simulating the Arctic. The grid resolution is ˜18 km, and the domain contains the main Arctic Ocean, Nordic Seas, Canadian Archipelago, and the subpolar North Atlantic. The model is based on a widely used dynamic and thermodynamic model with more efficient numerics. The oceanic forcing is from an Arctic Ocean model with the same horizontal resolution as the ice model and 30 levels. The atmospheric forcing is from 3-day average 1990-1994 European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts operational data. Results from the ice model are compared against satellite passive-microwave observations and drifting buoys. The model realistically simulates ice tongues and eddies in the Greenland Sea. The mesoscale ocean eddies along the East Greenland Current (EGC) are demonstrated to be responsible for the presence of ice eddies and tongues out of the Greenland Sea ice edge. Large shear and divergence associated with the mesoscale ice eddies and strong ice drift, such as the one above the EGC, result in thinner and less compact ice. The mesoscale ocean eddies along the Alaskan Chukchi shelf break, the Northwind Ridge, and the Alpha-Mendeleyev Ridge are major contributors to mesoscale reduction of ice concentration, in addition to atmospheric storms which usually lead to a broad-scale reduction of ice concentration. The existence of mesoscale ocean eddies greatly increases nonuniformity of ice motion, which means stronger ice deformation and more open water. An eddy-resolving coupled ice-ocean model is highly recommended to adequately simulate the small but important percentage of open water in the Arctic pack ice, which can significantly change the heat fluxes from ocean to atmosphere and affect the global climate.

  15. A Parallel Ocean Model With Adaptive Mesh Refinement Capability For Global Ocean Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Herrnstein, Aaron R.

    2005-12-01

    An ocean model with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability is presented for simulating ocean circulation on decade time scales. The model closely resembles the LLNL ocean general circulation model with some components incorporated from other well known ocean models when appropriate. Spatial components are discretized using finite differences on a staggered grid where tracer and pressure variables are defined at cell centers and velocities at cell vertices (B-grid). Horizontal motion is modeled explicitly with leapfrog and Euler forward-backward time integration, and vertical motion is modeled semi-implicitly. New AMR strategies are presented for horizontal refinement on a B-grid, leapfrog time integration, and time integration of coupled systems with unequal time steps. These AMR capabilities are added to the LLNL software package SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) and validated with standard benchmark tests. The ocean model is built on top of the amended SAMRAI library. The resulting model has the capability to dynamically increase resolution in localized areas of the domain. Limited basin tests are conducted using various refinement criteria and produce convergence trends in the model solution as refinement is increased. Carbon sequestration simulations are performed on decade time scales in domains the size of the North Atlantic and the global ocean. A suggestion is given for refinement criteria in such simulations. AMR predicts maximum pH changes and increases in CO2 concentration near the injection sites that are virtually unattainable with a uniform high resolution due to extremely long run times. Fine scale details near the injection sites are achieved by AMR with shorter run times than the finest uniform resolution tested despite the need for enhanced parallel performance. The North Atlantic simulations show a reduction in passive tracer errors when AMR is applied instead of a uniform coarse resolution. No

  16. North Atlantic Finite Element Ocean Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veluthedathekuzhiyil, Praveen

    This thesis presents a modified version of the Finite Element Ocean Model (FEOM) developed at Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) for the North Atlantic Ocean. A reasonable North Atlantic Ocean simulation is obtained against the observational data sets in a Control simulation (CS) where the surface boundary conditions are relaxed to a climatology. The vertical mixing in the model was tuned to represent convection in the model, also the horizontal mixing and diffusion coefficients to represent the changes in the resolution of the model’s unstructured grid. In addition, the open boundaries in the model are treated with a sponge layer where tracers are relaxed to climatology. The model is then further modified to accept the atmospheric flux forcing at the surface boundary with an added net heat flux correction and freshwater forcing from major rivers that are flowing into the North Atlantic Ocean. The impact of this boundary condition on the simulation results is then analyzed and shows many improvements albeit the drift in tracer properties around the Gulf Stream region remains as that of the CS case. However a comparison of the vertical sections at Cape Desolation and Cape Farewell with the available observational data sets shows many improvements in this simulation compared to that of the CS case. But the freshwater content in the Labrador Sea interior shows a continued drift as that of the CS case with an improvement towards the 10th model year. A detailed analysis of the boundary currents around the Labrador Sea shows the weak offshore transport of freshwater from the West Greenland Current (WGC) as one of the causes. To further improve the model and reasonably represent the boundary currents and associated sub-grid scale eddies in the model, a modified sub-grid scale parameterization based on Gent and McWilliams, (1990) is adopted. The sensitivity of using various approaches in the thickness diffusion parameter ( Kgm) for this

  17. Southern Ocean bottom water characteristics in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuzé, CéLine; Heywood, Karen J.; Stevens, David P.; Ridley, Jeff K.

    2013-04-01

    Southern Ocean deep water properties and formation processes in climate models are indicative of their capability to simulate future climate, heat and carbon uptake, and sea level rise. Southern Ocean temperature and density averaged over 1986-2005 from 15 CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) climate models are compared with an observed climatology, focusing on bottom water. Bottom properties are reasonably accurate for half the models. Ten models create dense water on the Antarctic shelf, but it mixes with lighter water and is not exported as bottom water as in reality. Instead, most models create deep water by open ocean deep convection, a process occurring rarely in reality. Models with extensive deep convection are those with strong seasonality in sea ice. Optimum bottom properties occur in models with deep convection in the Weddell and Ross Gyres. Bottom Water formation processes are poorly represented in ocean models and are a key challenge for improving climate predictions.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Salinity and Dissolved Oxygen at Perdido Bay and Adjacent Coastal Ocean

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Fluid Dynamic Code (EFDC), a numerical estuarine and coastal ocean circulation hydrodynamic model, was used to simulate the distribution of the salinity, temperature, nutrients and dissolved oxygen (DO) in Perdido Bay and adjacent Gulf of Mexico. External forcing fa...

  19. Simulating CO2 transport into the ocean from a CO2 lake at the seafloor using a z- and a σ-coordinate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygg, Kristin; Enstad, Lars Inge; Alendal, Guttorm

    2009-12-01

    The ocean takes up approximately 2 GT carbon per year due to the enhanced CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. Several options have been suggested in order to reduce the emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere, and among these are CO2 storage in the deep ocean. Topographic effects of dissolution and transport from a CO2 lake located at 3,000-m depth have been studied using the z-coordinate model Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) and the σ-coordinate model Bergen ocean model (BOM). Both models have been coupled with the general ocean turbulence model (GOTM) in order to account for vertical subgrid processes. The chosen vertical turbulence mixing scheme includes the damping effect from stable stratification on the turbulence intensity. Three different topographic scenarios are presented: a flat bottom and the CO2 lake placed within a trench with depths of 10 and 20 m. The flat case scenario gives good correlation with previous numerical studies of dissolution from a CO2 lake. When topography is introduced, it is shown that the z-coordinate model and the σ-coordinate model give different circulation patterns in the trench. This leads to different dissolution rates, 0.1 μmol cm - 2 s - 1 for the scenario of a 20-m-deep trench using BOM and 0.005-0.02 μmol cm - 2 s - 1 for the same scenario using the MITgcm. The study is also relevant for leakages of CO2 stored in geological formations and to the ocean.

  20. Development of ocean model LSOMG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachl, Libor; Martinec, Zdenek

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to present the ocean general circulation model LSOMG. It originates from the LSG (Maier-Reimer and Mikolajewicz, 1992) ocean model, however, significant number of changes has been made. LSOMG is a z-coordinate baroclinic ocean model which solves the primitive equations under the Boussinesq approximation. We intend to use the model for a various geophysical applications with the focus on paleoclimate studies. Hence, the model is not as complex as the current state-of-art climate models, such as the Modular Ocean Model or NEMO models. On the other hand, it is less computationally demanding. The changes and improvements in the code will be reported. One of the obvious changes is that the governing equations are no more discretized on the Arakawa E grid. The whole model has been rewritten on the Arakawa C grid. The main motivation is to avoid a coexistence of two solutions on the grid that evolve independently of each other. A more natural treatment of boundary conditions and simpler structure of the grid are additional advantages. Another significant change is the treatment of time tendencies. The system of equations is split to barotropic and baroclinic subsystems. Both subsystems may either be discretized at the same time points (as in the original LSG model), or their discretizations may be staggered in time as described in Griffies (2004). The original fully implicit barotropic time stepping scheme was found to significantly dissipate energy. Three different time stepping schemes are available instead. Namely, the predictor-corrector scheme of Griffies (2004), the generalized forward-backward scheme of Shchepetkin and McWilliams (2008) and the implicit free surface scheme of Campin et al. (2004). The first two schemes are intended to be used with the split-explicit model configuration for short-term studies whereas the third scheme is suitable for long-term studies, e.g. paleoclimate studies. The short-term studies may also

  1. Microscopic, Macroscopic, and Megascopic Melts: a simple model to synthesize simulation, spectroscopy, shock, and sink/float constraints on silicate melts and magma oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimow, P. D.; Thomas, C.; Wolf, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    Silicate melts are the essential agents of planetary differentiation and evolution. Their phase relations, element partitioning preferences, density, and transport properties determine the fates of heat and mass flow in the high-temperature interior of active planets. In the early Earth and in extrasolar super-Earth-mass terrestrial planets it is these properties at very high pressure (> 100 GPa) that control the evolution from possible magma oceans to solid-state convecting mantles. Yet these melts are complex, dynamic materials that present many challenges to experimental, theoretical, and computational understanding or prediction of their properties. There has been encouraging convergence among various approaches to understanding the structure and dynamics of silicate melts at multiple scales: nearest- and next-nearest neighbor structural information is derived from spectroscopic techniques such as high-resolution multinuclear NMR; first-principles molecular dynamics probe structure and dynamics at scales up to hundreds of atoms; Archimedean, ultrasonic, sink/float, and shock wave methods probe macroscopic properties (and occasionally dynamics); and deformation and diffusion experiments probe dynamics at macroscopic scale and various time scales. One challenge that remains to integrating all this information is a predictive model of silicate liquid structure that agrees with experiments and simulation both at microscopic and macroscopic scale. In addition to our efforts to collect macroscopic equation of state data using shock wave methods across ever-wider ranges of temperature, pressure, and composition space, we have introduced a simple model of coordination statistics around cations that can form the basis of a conceptual and predictive link across scales and methods. This idea is explored in this presentation specifically with regard to the temperature dependence of sound speed in ultramafic liquids. This is a highly uncertain quantity and yet it is key, in

  2. Mixing parametrizations for ocean climate modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Moshonkin, Sergey; Diansky, Nikolay; Zalesny, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    The algorithm is presented of splitting the total evolutionary equations for the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and turbulence dissipation frequency (TDF), which is used to parameterize the viscosity and diffusion coefficients in ocean circulation models. The turbulence model equations are split into the stages of transport-diffusion and generation-dissipation. For the generation-dissipation stage, the following schemes are implemented: the explicit-implicit numerical scheme, analytical solution and the asymptotic behavior of the analytical solutions. The experiments were performed with different mixing parameterizations for the modelling of Arctic and the Atlantic climate decadal variability with the eddy-permitting circulation model INMOM (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model) using vertical grid refinement in the zone of fully developed turbulence. The proposed model with the split equations for turbulence characteristics is similar to the contemporary differential turbulence models, concerning the physical formulations. At the same time, its algorithm has high enough computational efficiency. Parameterizations with using the split turbulence model make it possible to obtain more adequate structure of temperature and salinity at decadal timescales, compared to the simpler Pacanowski-Philander (PP) turbulence parameterization. Parameterizations with using analytical solution or numerical scheme at the generation-dissipation step of the turbulence model leads to better representation of ocean climate than the faster parameterization using the asymptotic behavior of the analytical solution. At the same time, the computational efficiency left almost unchanged relative to the simple PP parameterization. Usage of PP parametrization in the circulation model leads to realistic simulation of density and circulation with violation of T,S-relationships. This error is majorly avoided with using the proposed parameterizations containing the split turbulence model

  3. Development of a regional model for the North Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Hasibur; Ravichandran, M.; Sengupta, Debasis; Harrison, Matthew J.; Griffies, Stephen M.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a one-way nested Indian Ocean regional model. The model combines the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's (GFDL) Modular Ocean Model (MOM4p1) at global climate model resolution (nominally one degree), and a regional Indian Ocean MOM4p1 configuration with 25 km horizontal resolution and 1 m vertical resolution near the surface. Inter-annual global simulations with Coordinated Ocean-Ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II) surface forcing over years 1992-2005 provide surface boundary conditions. We show that relative to the global simulation, (i) biases in upper ocean temperature, salinity and mixed layer depth are reduced, (ii) sea surface height and upper ocean circulation are closer to observations, and (iii) improvements in model simulation can be attributed to refined resolution, more realistic topography and inclusion of seasonal river runoff. Notably, the surface salinity bias is reduced to less than 0.1 psu over the Bay of Bengal using relatively weak restoring to observations, and the model simulates the strong, shallow halocline often observed in the North Bay of Bengal. There is marked improvement in subsurface salinity and temperature, as well as mixed layer depth in the Bay of Bengal. Major seasonal signatures in observed sea surface height anomaly in the tropical Indian Ocean, including the coastal waveguide around the Indian peninsula, are simulated with great fidelity. The use of realistic topography and seasonal river runoff brings the three dimensional structure of the East India Coastal Current and West India Coastal Current much closer to observations. As a result, the incursion of low salinity Bay of Bengal water into the south-eastern Arabian Sea is more realistic.

  4. Extinction of the northern oceanic deep convection in an ensemble of climate model simulations of the 20th and 21st centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodeau, Laurent; Koenigk, Torben

    2016-05-01

    We study the variability and the evolution of oceanic deep convection in the northern North Atlantic and the Nordic Seas from 1850 to 2100 using an ensemble of 12 climate model simulations with EC-Earth. During the historical period, the model shows a realistic localization of the main sites of deep convection, with the Labrador Sea accounting for most of the deep convective mixing in the northern hemisphere. Labrador convection is partly driven by the NAO (correlation of 0.6) and controls part of the variability of the AMOC at the decadal time scale (correlation of 0.6 when convection leads by 3-4 years). Deep convective activity in the Labrador Sea starts to decline and to become shallower in the beginning of the twentieth century. The decline is primarily caused by a decrease of the sensible heat loss to the atmosphere in winter resulting from increasingly warm atmospheric conditions. It occurs stepwise and is mainly the consequence of two severe drops in deep convective activity during the 1920s and the 1990s. These two events can both be linked to the low-frequency variability of the NAO. A warming of the sub-surface, resulting from reduced convective mixing, combines with an increasing influx of freshwater from the Nordic Seas to rapidly strengthen the surface stratification and prevent any possible resurgence of deep convection in the Labrador Sea after the 2020s. Deep convection in the Greenland Sea starts to decline in the 2020s, until complete extinction in 2100. As a response to the extinction of deep convection in the Labrador and Greenland Seas, the AMOC undergoes a linear decline at a rate of about -0.3 Sv per decade during the twenty-first century.

  5. Surface Wind and Upper-Ocean Variability Associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation Simulated by the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Madden- Julian Oscillation Simulated by the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System 0601153N 73-4347-22-5 Toshiaki Shinoda, Tommy G...unlimited. Simulation of surface wind and upper-ocean variability associated with the Madden - Julian oscillation (MJO) by a regional coupled model, the...based on the comparison with the spatial variation of surface forcing fields. Indian Ocean, diurnal effects, Madden- Julian oscillation, coupled

  6. Simulations of Time Reversing Arrays in Shallow Ocean Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    shallow ocean. In particular, the influence of acoustic frequency, source array range, and propagation complexities in a dynamic mulitpath sound -channel on...environments [1], the current effort incorporates realistic oceanic sound propagation to a much greater degree through the use of modern computational tools...performance in a ocean sound channel is simulated with the wide-angle parabolic-equation code RAM (by Dr. Michael Collins of NRL). My students and I are

  7. Interactive Visual Analysis within Dynamic Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkiewicz, T.

    2012-12-01

    The many observation and simulation based ocean models available today can provide crucial insights for all fields of marine research and can serve as valuable references when planning data collection missions. However, the increasing size and complexity of these models makes leveraging their contents difficult for end users. Through a combination of data visualization techniques, interactive analysis tools, and new hardware technologies, the data within these models can be made more accessible to domain scientists. We present an interactive system that supports exploratory visual analysis within large-scale ocean flow models. The currents and eddies within the models are illustrated using effective, particle-based flow visualization techniques. Stereoscopic displays and rendering methods are employed to ensure that the user can correctly perceive the complex 3D structures of depth-dependent flow patterns. Interactive analysis tools are provided which allow the user to experiment through the introduction of their customizable virtual dye particles into the models to explore regions of interest. A multi-touch interface provides natural, efficient interaction, with custom multi-touch gestures simplifying the otherwise challenging tasks of navigating and positioning tools within a 3D environment. We demonstrate the potential applications of our visual analysis environment with two examples of real-world significance: Firstly, an example of using customized particles with physics-based behaviors to simulate pollutant release scenarios, including predicting the oil plume path for the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster. Secondly, an interactive tool for plotting and revising proposed autonomous underwater vehicle mission pathlines with respect to the surrounding flow patterns predicted by the model; as these survey vessels have extremely limited energy budgets, designing more efficient paths allows for greater survey areas.

  8. Global ocean modeling on the Connection Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Dukowicz, J.K.; Malone, R.C.

    1993-10-01

    The authors have developed a version of the Bryan-Cox-Semtner ocean model (Bryan, 1969; Semtner, 1976; Cox, 1984) for massively parallel computers. Such models are three-dimensional, Eulerian models that use latitude and longitude as the horizontal spherical coordinates and fixed depth levels as the vertical coordinate. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, with a turbulent eddy viscosity, and mass continuity equation are solved, subject to the hydrostatic and Boussinesq approximations. The traditional model formulation uses a rigid-lid approximation (vertical velocity = 0 at the ocean surface) to eliminate fast surface waves. These waves would otherwise require that a very short time step be used in numerical simulations, which would greatly increase the computational cost. To solve the equations with the rigid-lid assumption, the equations of motion are split into two parts: a set of twodimensional ``barotropic`` equations describing the vertically-averaged flow, and a set of three-dimensional ``baroclinic`` equations describing temperature, salinity and deviations of the horizontal velocities from the vertically-averaged flow.

  9. A Direct Simulation-Based Study of Radiance in a Dynamic Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    modeling of these hydrodynamic processes is coupled with the computation of radiative transport. (1) Radiative Transfer in CGW and FST: Monte Carlo ...JHU focuses on the study and development of (4) and (5). WORK COMPLETED • Development and validation of 3D Monte Carlo RT simulation for...atmosphere-ocean system: We developed a three-dimensional coupled atmosphere-ocean Monte Carlo radiative transfer (MIT-RT) simulation capability for both

  10. Computational ocean acoustics: Advances in 3D ocean acoustic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Jensen, Finn B.

    2012-11-01

    The numerical model of ocean acoustic propagation developed in the 1980's are still in widespread use today, and the field of computational ocean acoustics is often considered a mature field. However, the explosive increase in computational power available to the community has created opportunities for modeling phenomena that earlier were beyond reach. Most notably, three-dimensional propagation and scattering problems have been prohibitive computationally, but are now addressed routinely using brute force numerical approaches such as the Finite Element Method, in particular for target scattering problems, where they are being combined with the traditional wave theory propagation models in hybrid modeling frameworks. Also, recent years has seen the development of hybrid approaches coupling oceanographic circulation models with acoustic propagation models, enabling the forecasting of sonar performance uncertainty in dynamic ocean environments. These and other advances made over the last couple of decades support the notion that the field of computational ocean acoustics is far from being mature. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research, Code 321OA].

  11. Dynamic Simulations of Realistic Upper-Ocean Flow Processes to Support Measurement and Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    physics based wind force modeling for oceanic flows; investigate the impact of spatial and temporal variations of wind forcing on waves, currents, and...flow, which can compute wave breaking; and (iv) A novel dynamic sea-surface roughness model, which together with wind LES can yield accurate...modeling of wind forcing on upper ocean flows 2 dynamically according to environmental conditions. Enabled by these sophisticated simulation tools, we

  12. Modeling Coccolithophores in the Global Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, W.

    2006-12-01

    Coccolithophores are important ecological and geochemical components of the global oceans. A global three- dimensional model was used to simulate their distributions in a multi-phytoplankton context. The realism of the simulation was supported by comparisons of model surface nutrients and total chlorophyll with in situ and satellite observations. Nitrate, silica, and dissolved iron surface distributions were positively correlated with in situ data across major oceanographic basins. Global annual departures were +18.9% for nitrate (model high), +5.4% for silica, and +45.0% for iron. Total surface chlorophyll was also positively correlated with satellite and in situ data sets across major basins. Global annual departures were -8.0% with SeaWiFS (model low), +1.1% with Aqua, and -17.1% with in situ data. Global annual primary production estimates were within 1% and 9% of estimates derived from SeaWiFS and Aqua, respectively, using a common primary production algorithm. Coccolithophore annual mean relative abundances were 2.6% lower than observations, but were positively correlated across basins. Two of the other three phytoplankton groups, diatoms and cyanobacteria, were also positively correlated with observations. Distributions of coccolithophores were dependent upon interactions and competition with the other phytoplankton groups. In this model coccolithophores had a competitive advantage over diatoms and chlorophytes by virtue of a greater ability to utilize nutrients and light at low values. However, their higher sinking rates placed them at a disadvantage when nutrients and light were plentiful. In very low nutrient conditions, such as the mid-ocean gyres, coccolithophores were unable to compete with the efficient nutrient utilization capability and low sinking rate of cyanobacteria. Comparisons of simulated coccolithophore distributions with satellite-derived estimates of calcite concentration and coccolithophore blooms showed some agreement, but also areas of

  13. Modeling coccolithophores in the global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Casey, Nancy W.

    2007-03-01

    Coccolithophores are important ecological and geochemical components of the global oceans. A global three-dimensional model was used to simulate their distributions in a multi-phytoplankton context. The realism of the simulation was supported by comparisons of model surface nutrients and total chlorophyll with in situ and satellite observations. Nitrate, silica, and dissolved iron surface distributions were positively correlated with in situ data across major oceanographic basins. Global annual departures were +18.9% for nitrate (model high), +5.4% for silica, and +45.0% for iron. Total surface chlorophyll was also positively correlated with satellite and in situ data sets across major basins. Global annual departures were -8.0% with Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) (model low), +1.1% with Aqua, and -17.1% with in situ data. Global annual primary production estimates were within 1% and 9% of estimates derived from SeaWiFS and Aqua, respectively, using a common primary production algorithm. Coccolithophore annual mean relative abundances were 2.6% lower than observations, but were positively correlated across basins. Two of the other three phytoplankton groups, diatoms and cyanobacteria, were also positively correlated with observations. Distributions of coccolithophores were dependent upon interactions and competition with the other phytoplankton groups. In this model, coccolithophores had a competitive advantage over diatoms and chlorophytes by virtue of a greater ability to utilize nutrients and light at low values. However, their higher sinking rates placed them at a disadvantage when nutrients and light were plentiful. In very low nutrient conditions, such as the mid-ocean gyres, coccolithophores were unable to compete with the efficient nutrient utilization capability and low sinking rate of cyanobacteria. Comparisons of simulated coccolithophore distributions with satellite-derived estimates of calcite concentration and coccolithophore blooms

  14. Modeling oceanic and atmospheric vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Dritschel, D.G.; Legras, B. CNRS, Lab. de Meteorologie Dynamique, Paris )

    1993-03-01

    Numerical modeling and prediction of coherent structures in geophysical fluid dynamics is reviewed. Numerical computation is widely used in geophysical fluid dynamics due to the nonlinear behaviour of the systems studied and the complexity of the mathematical models used. Idealized systems and the determination of potential vorticity in simplified atmospheric models are discussed. Atmospheric vortex structures, their interactions, and the effects on weather are described. A quasigeostrophic model is used to illustrate the effect of trophospherically generated disturbances on the polar vortex using the contour dynamics numerical method. A comparison of numerical techniques for simulating the evolution of neighboring vortices of unequal size is given. Future developments in the use of numerical models in geophysical fluid dynamics and weather prediction are discussed. 15 refs.

  15. An Analysis of an Eddy-Resolving Global Ocean Model in the Tropical Indian Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    Ocean circulation. The seasonally-reversing Somali Current is simulated by the model, and includes seasonai undercurrents and a tvo-gyre system during...undercurrents and a two-gyre system during the southwest monson. Westward-flow occ,, rs beneath the Southwest Monsoon Current during June and July. The...25 F. THE SOMALI CURRENT SYSTEM ....................................... 28 G. THROUGHFLOW IN THE

  16. Modeling and Assimilating Ocean Color Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson

    2012-01-01

    Radiances are the source of information from ocean color sensors to produce estimates of biological and geochemical constituents. They potentially provide information on various other aspects of global biological and chemical systems, and there is considerable work involved in deriving new information from these signals. Each derived product, however, contains errors that are derived from the application of the radiances, above and beyond the radiance errors. A global biogeochemical model with an explicit spectral radiative transfer model is used to investigate the potential of assimilating radiances. The results indicate gaps in our understanding of radiative processes in the oceans and their relationships with biogeochemical variables. Most important, detritus optical properties are not well characterized and produce important effects of the simulated radiances. Specifically, there does not appear to be a relationship between detrital biomass and its optical properties, as there is for chlorophyll. Approximations are necessary to get beyond this problem. In this reprt we will discuss the challenges in modeling and assimilation water-leaving radiances and the prospects for improving our understanding of biogeochemical process by utilizing these signals.

  17. Simulation of the carbon cycle in the ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Fasham, M.J.R.

    1991-09-16

    A dual carbon-nitrogen biological model of the upper ocean has been developed, which has successfully allowed predictions of fluxes of carbon between atmosphere and the deep ocean to made. Regarding studying the carbon cycle in the ocean, the modelling has highlighted the need for a good understanding of the interactions between the carbon and nitrogen cycles, and also the importance of zooplankton grazing and levels of overwintering biological stocks. Problems have been encountered with the accuracy of prediction of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the surface ocean, and the sensitivity of the model to zooplankton parameters, and those parameters which effect overwintering stocks (e.g. mortality parameters). The model has recently been incorporated into a physical General Circulation Model of the Atlantic Ocean. Future work will involve assessing the performance of the biological model in General Circulation Models, and making necessary refinements in order to improve its predictive ability. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  18. Colombian ocean waves and coasts modeled by special functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duque Tisnés, Simón

    2013-06-01

    Modeling the ocean bottom and surface of both Atlantic and Pacific Oceans near the Colombian coast is a subject of increasing attention due to the possibility of finding oil deposits that haven't been discovered, and as a way of monitoring the ocean limits of Colombia with other countries not only covering the possibility of naval intrusion but as a chance to detect submarine devices that are used by illegal groups for different unwished purposes. In the development of this topic it would be necessary to use Standard Hydrodynamic Equations to model the mathematical shape of ocean waves that will take differential equations forms. Those differential equations will be solved using computer algebra software and methods. The mentioned solutions will involve the use of Special Functions such as Bessel Functions, Whittaker, Heun, and so on. Using the Special Functions mentioned above, the obtained results will be simulated by numerical methods obtaining the typical patterns around the Colombian coasts (both surface and bottom). Using this simulation as a non-perturbed state, any change in the patter could be taken as an external perturbation caused by a strange body or device in an specific area or region modeled, building this simulation as an ocean radar or an unusual object finder. It's worth mentioning that the use of stronger or more rigorous methods and more advanced Special Functions would generate better theoretical results, building a more accurate simulation model that would lead to a finest detection.

  19. A Coupled Ocean General Circulation, Biogeochemical, and Radiative Model of the Global Oceans: Seasonal Distributions of Ocean Chlorophyll and Nutrients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Busalacchi, Antonio (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A coupled ocean general circulation, biogeochemical, and radiative model was constructed to evaluate and understand the nature of seasonal variability of chlorophyll and nutrients in the global oceans. Biogeochemical processes in the model are determined from the influences of circulation and turbulence dynamics, irradiance availability. and the interactions among three functional phytoplankton groups (diatoms. chlorophytes, and picoplankton) and three nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, and silicate). Basin scale (greater than 1000 km) model chlorophyll results are in overall agreement with CZCS pigments in many global regions. Seasonal variability observed in the CZCS is also represented in the model. Synoptic scale (100-1000 km) comparisons of imagery are generally in conformance although occasional departures are apparent. Model nitrate distributions agree with in situ data, including seasonal dynamics, except for the equatorial Atlantic. The overall agreement of the model with satellite and in situ data sources indicates that the model dynamics offer a reasonably realistic simulation of phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics on synoptic scales. This is especially true given that initial conditions are homogenous chlorophyll fields. The success of the model in producing a reasonable representation of chlorophyll and nutrient distributions and seasonal variability in the global oceans is attributed to the application of a generalized, processes-driven approach as opposed to regional parameterization and the existence of multiple phytoplankton groups with different physiological and physical properties. These factors enable the model to simultaneously represent many aspects of the great diversity of physical, biological, chemical, and radiative environments encountered in the global oceans.

  20. Testing Components of New Community Isopycnal Ocean Circulation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Kirk

    2008-05-09

    The ocean and atmosphere are both governed by the same physical laws and models of the two media have many similarities. However, there are critical differences that call for special methods to provide the best simulation. One of the most important difference is that the ocean is nearly opaque to radiation in the visible and infra-red part of the spectrum. For this reason water mass properties in the ocean are conserved along trajectories for long distances and for long periods of time. For this reason isopycnal coordinate models would seem to have a distinct advantage in simulating ocean circulation. In such a model the coordinate surfaces are aligned with the natural paths of near adiabatic, density conserving flow in the main thermocline. The difficulty with this approach is at the upper and lower boundaries of the ocean, which in general do not coincide with density surfaces. For this reason hybrid coordinate models were proposed by Bleck and Boudra (1981) in which Cartesian coordinates were used near the ocean surface and isopycnal coordinates were used in the main thermocline. This feature is now part of the HICOM model (Bleck, 2002).

  1. Detailed source term estimation of the atmospheric release for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident by coupling simulations of an atmospheric dispersion model with an improved deposition scheme and oceanic dispersion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katata, G.; Chino, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Terada, H.; Ota, M.; Nagai, H.; Kajino, M.; Draxler, R.; Hort, M. C.; Malo, A.; Torii, T.; Sanada, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal variations in the amount of radionuclides released into the atmosphere during the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FNPS1) accident and their atmospheric and marine dispersion are essential to evaluate the environmental impacts and resultant radiological doses to the public. In this paper, we estimate the detailed atmospheric releases during the accident using a reverse estimation method which calculates the release rates of radionuclides by comparing measurements of air concentration of a radionuclide or its dose rate in the environment with the ones calculated by atmospheric and oceanic transport, dispersion and deposition models. The atmospheric and oceanic models used are WSPEEDI-II (Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information) and SEA-GEARN-FDM (Finite difference oceanic dispersion model), both developed by the authors. A sophisticated deposition scheme, which deals with dry and fog-water depositions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation, and subsequent wet scavenging due to mixed-phase cloud microphysics (in-cloud scavenging) for radioactive iodine gas (I2 and CH3I) and other particles (CsI, Cs, and Te), was incorporated into WSPEEDI-II to improve the surface deposition calculations. The results revealed that the major releases of radionuclides due to the FNPS1 accident occurred in the following periods during March 2011: the afternoon of 12 March due to the wet venting and hydrogen explosion at Unit 1, midnight of 14 March when the SRV (safety relief valve) was opened three times at Unit 2, the morning and night of 15 March, and the morning of 16 March. According to the simulation results, the highest radioactive contamination areas around FNPS1 were created from 15 to 16 March by complicated interactions among rainfall, plume movements, and the temporal variation of release rates. The simulation by WSPEEDI-II using the new source term reproduced the local and regional patterns of cumulative

  2. Low-order models of biogenic ocean mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, J. O.; Rosinelli, D.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic ocean mixing, the process whereby swimming animals may affect ocean circulation, has primarily been studied using order-of-magnitude theoretical estimates and a small number of field observations. We describe numerical simulations of arrays of simplified animal shapes migrating in inviscid fluid and at finite Reynolds numbers. The effect of density stratification is modeled in the fluid dynamic equations of motion by a buoyancy acceleration term, which arises due to perturbations to the density field by the migrating bodies. The effects of fluid viscosity, body spacing, and array configuration are investigated to identify scenarios in which a meaningful contribution to ocean mixing by swimming animals is plausible.

  3. Variability of Ocean Heat Uptake: Reconciling Observations and Models

    SciTech Connect

    AchutaRao, K M; Santer, B D; Gleckler, P J; Taylor, K; Pierce, D; Barnett, T; Wigley, T L

    2005-05-05

    This study examines the temporal variability of ocean heat uptake in observations and in climate models. Previous work suggests that coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models (A-OGCMs) may have underestimated the observed natural variability of ocean heat content, particularly on decadal and longer timescales. To address this issue, we rely on observed estimates of heat content from the 2004 World Ocean Atlas (WOA-2004) compiled by Levitus et al. (2005). Given information about the distribution of observations in WOA-2004, we evaluate the effects of sparse observational coverage and the infilling that Levitus et al. use to produce the spatially-complete temperature fields required to compute heat content variations. We first show that in ocean basins with limited observational coverage, there are important differences between ocean temperature variability estimated from observed and infilled portions of the basin. We then employ data from control simulations performed with eight different A-OGCMs as a test-bed for studying the effects of sparse, space- and time-varying observational coverage. Subsampling model data with actual observational coverage has a large impact on the inferred temperature variability in the top 300 and 3000 meters of the ocean. This arises from changes in both sampling depth and in the geographical areas sampled. Our results illustrate that subsampling model data at the locations of available observations increases the variability, reducing the discrepancy between models and observations.

  4. On effective resolution in ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soufflet, Yves; Marchesiello, Patrick; Lemarié, Florian; Jouanno, Julien; Capet, Xavier; Debreu, Laurent; Benshila, Rachid

    2016-02-01

    The increase of model resolution naturally leads to the representation of a wider energy spectrum. As a result, in recent years, the understanding of oceanic submesoscale dynamics has significantly improved. However, dissipation in submesoscale models remains dominated by numerical constraints rather than physical ones. Effective resolution is limited by the numerical dissipation range, which is a function of the model numerical filters (assuming that dispersive numerical modes are efficiently removed). We present a Baroclinic jet test case set in a zonally reentrant channel that provides a controllable test of a model capacity at resolving submesoscale dynamics. We compare simulations from two models, ROMS and NEMO, at different mesh sizes (from 20 to 2 km). Through a spectral decomposition of kinetic energy and its budget terms, we identify the characteristics of numerical dissipation and effective resolution. It shows that numerical dissipation appears in different parts of a model, especially in spatial advection-diffusion schemes for momentum equations (KE dissipation) and tracer equations (APE dissipation) and in the time stepping algorithms. Effective resolution, defined by scale-selective dissipation, is inadequate to qualify traditional ocean models with low-order spatial and temporal filters, even at high grid resolution. High-order methods are better suited to the concept and probably unavoidable. Fourth-order filters are suited only for grid resolutions less than a few kilometers and momentum advection schemes of even higher-order may be justified. The upgrade of time stepping algorithms (from filtered Leapfrog), a cumbersome task in a model, appears critical from our results, not just as a matter of model solution quality but also of computational efficiency (extended stability range of predictor-corrector schemes). Effective resolution is also shaken by the need for non scale-selective barotropic mode filters and requires carefully addressing the

  5. Scripps Ocean Modeling and Remote Sensing (SOMARS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-20

    Topics in this brief reports include: Kalman filtering of oceanographic data; Remote sensing of sea surface temperature; Altimetry and Surface heat fluxes; Ocean models of the marine mixed layer; Radar altimetry; Mathematical model of California current eddies.

  6. A predictive ocean oil spill model

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, J.; Barnette, D.; Papodopoulos, P.; Schaudt, K.; Szabo, D.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initially, the project focused on creating an ocean oil spill model and working with the major oil companies to compare their data with the Los Alamos global ocean model. As a result of this initial effort, Los Alamos worked closely with the Eddy Joint Industry Project (EJIP), a consortium oil and gas producing companies in the US. The central theme of the project was to use output produced from LANL`s global ocean model to look in detail at ocean currents in selected geographic areas of the world of interest to consortium members. Once ocean currents are well understood this information could be used to create oil spill models, improve offshore exploration and drilling equipment, and aid in the design of semi-permanent offshore production platforms.

  7. Nested ocean models: Work in progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, A. Louise

    1991-01-01

    The ongoing work of combining three existing software programs into a nested grid oceanography model is detailed. The HYPER domain decomposition program, the SPEM ocean modeling program, and a quasi-geostrophic model written in England are being combined into a general ocean modeling facility. This facility will be used to test the viability and the capability of two-way nested grids in the North Atlantic.

  8. Ocean foam generation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Bechis, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to determine the physical and microwave properties of ocean foam. Special foam generators were designed and fabricated, using porous glass sheets, known as glass frits, as the principal element. The glass frit was sealed into a water-tight vertical box, a few centimeters from the bottom. Compressed air, applied to the lower chamber, created ocean foam from sea water lying on the frit. Foam heights of 30 cm were readily achieved, with relatively low air pressures. Special photographic techniques and analytical procedures were employed to determine foam bubble size distributions. In addition, the percentage water content of ocean foam was determined with the aid of a particulate sampling procedure. A glass frit foam generator, with pore diameters in the range 70 - 100 micrometers, produced foam with bubble distributions very similar to those found on the surface of natural ocean foam patches.

  9. Tracer Modeling with the Hybrid Coordinates Ocean Model (hycom)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garraffo, Z. D.; Kim, H.; Li, B.; Mehra, A.; Rivin, I.; Spindler, T.; Tolman, H. L.

    2012-12-01

    A series of tracer simulations have been started at NCEP/NWS aiming to a variety of applications, from dispersion of contaminants in estimations motivated by the Japanese nuclear accident near Fukushima, to nutrient estimations. The tracer capabilities of HYCOM are used, in regional domains, nested to daily nowcast/forecast fields from 1/12 HYCOM (RTOFS-Global) model output. A Fukushima Cs-137 simulation is now run in operational mode (RTOFS_ET). The simulation was initialized at the time of the Fukushima nuclear accident, and includes atmospheric deposition of Cs-137 and coastal discharge from a high resolution coastal model (ROMS done at NOAA/NOS). Almost all tracer moved offshore before the end of the first year after the accident. The tracer initially deposited in the Pacific ocean through the atmosphere slowly moves eastward and to deeper waters following the 3D ocean circulation. A series of simulations were started for nutrient estimations in the Gulf Stream and Mid Atlantic Bight region. Initially the capabilities implemented in HYCOM are used. The work aims to monitoring nutrients in the chosen region. Work is done in collaboration with Victoria Coles of U. Maryland.

  10. Lagrangian predictability characteristics of an Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacorata, Guglielmo; Palatella, Luigi; Santoleri, Rosalia

    2014-11-01

    The Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) Ocean Model, provided by INGV, has been chosen as case study to analyze Lagrangian trajectory predictability by means of a dynamical systems approach. To this regard, numerical trajectories are tested against a large amount of Mediterranean drifter data, used as sample of the actual tracer dynamics across the sea. The separation rate of a trajectory pair is measured by computing the Finite-Scale Lyapunov Exponent (FSLE) of first and second kind. An additional kinematic Lagrangian model (KLM), suitably treated to avoid "sweeping"-related problems, has been nested into the MFS in order to recover, in a statistical sense, the velocity field contributions to pair particle dispersion, at mesoscale level, smoothed out by finite resolution effects. Some of the results emerging from this work are: (a) drifter pair dispersion displays Richardson's turbulent diffusion inside the [10-100] km range, while numerical simulations of MFS alone (i.e., without subgrid model) indicate exponential separation; (b) adding the subgrid model, model pair dispersion gets very close to observed data, indicating that KLM is effective in filling the energy "mesoscale gap" present in MFS velocity fields; (c) there exists a threshold size beyond which pair dispersion becomes weakly sensitive to the difference between model and "real" dynamics; (d) the whole methodology here presented can be used to quantify model errors and validate numerical current fields, as far as forecasts of Lagrangian dispersion are concerned.

  11. Multiresolution in CROCO (Coastal and Regional Ocean Community model)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debreu, Laurent; Auclair, Francis; Benshila, Rachid; Capet, Xavier; Dumas, Franck; Julien, Swen; Marchesiello, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    CROCO (Coastal and Regional Ocean Community model [1]) is a new oceanic modeling system built upon ROMS_AGRIF and the non-hydrostatic kernel of SNH, gradually including algorithms from MARS3D (sediments)and HYCOM (vertical coordinates). An important objective of CROCO is to provide the possibility of running truly multiresolution simulations. Our previous work on structured mesh refinement [2] allowed us to run two-way nesting with the following major features: conservation, spatial and temporal refinement, coupling at the barotropic level. In this presentation, we will expose the current developments in CROCO towards multiresolution simulations: connection between neighboring grids at the same level of resolution and load balancing on parallel computers. Results of preliminary experiments will be given both on an idealized test case and on a realistic simulation of the Bay of Biscay with high resolution along the coast. References: [1] : CROCO : http://www.croco-ocean.org [2] : Debreu, L., P. Marchesiello, P. Penven, and G. Cambon, 2012: Two-way nesting in split-explicit ocean models: algorithms, implementation and validation. Ocean Modelling, 49-50, 1-21.

  12. Modeling Mesoscale Eddies in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Yi

    1999-01-01

    Ocean modeling plays an important role in understanding the current climatic conditions and predicting the future climate change. Modeling the ocean at eddy-permitting and/or eddy resolving resolutions (1/3 degree or higher) has a two-fold objective. One part is to represent the ocean as realistically as possible, because mesoscale eddies have an impact on the large-scale circulation. The second objective is to learn how to represent effects of mesoscale eddies without explicitly resolving them. This is particularly important for climate models which cannot be run at eddy-resolving resolutions because of the computational constraints. At JPL, a 1/6 degree latitude by 1/6 degree longitude with 37 vertical levels Atlantic Ocean model has been developed. The model is based on the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Using the 256-processor Cray T3D, we have conducted a 40-year integration of this Atlantic eddy-resolving ocean model. A regional analysis demonstrate that many observed features associated with the Caribbean Sea eddies can be realistically simulated by this model. Analysis of this Atlantic eddy-resolving ocean model further suggests that these Caribbean Sea eddies are connected with eddies formed outside the Caribbean Sea at the confluence of the North Brazil Current (NBC) and the North Equatorial Countercurrent. The diagram of the model simulated surface current shows that the Caribbean eddies ultimately originate in the NBC retroflection region, traveling more than a year from the North Brazil coast through the Lesser Antilles into the Caribbean Sea and eventually into the Gulf of Mexico. Additional information is contained in the original.

  13. The impacts of precipitating cloud radiative effects on ocean surface evaporation, precipitation, and ocean salinity in coupled GCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-L. F.; Wang, Yi-Hui; Lee, Tong; Waliser, Duane; Lee, Wei-Liang; Yu, Jia-Yuh; Chen, Yi-Chun; Fetzer, Eric; Hasson, Audrey

    2016-08-01

    The coupled global climate model (GCM) fidelity in representing upper ocean salinity including near sea surface bulk salinity (SSS) is evaluated in this study, with a focus on the Pacific Ocean. The systematic biases in ocean surface evaporation (E) minus precipitation (P) and SSS are found to be fairly similar in the twentieth century simulations of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Phase 3 (CMIP3) and Phase 5 (CMIP5) relative to the observations. One of the potential causes of the CMIP model biases is the missing representation of the radiative effects of precipitating hydrometeors (i.e., snow) in most CMIP models. To examine the radiative effect of cloud snow on SSS, sensitivity experiments with and without such effect are conducted by the National Center for Atmospheric Research-coupled Community Earth System Model (CESM). This study investigates the difference in SSS between sensitivity experiments and its relationship with atmospheric circulation, E - P and air-sea heat fluxes. It is found that the exclusion of the cloud snow radiative effect in CESM produces weaker Pacific trade winds, resulting in enhanced precipitation, reduced evaporation, and a reduction of the upper ocean salinity in the tropical and subtropical Pacific. The latter results in an improved comparison with climatological upper ocean bulk salinity. The introduction of cloud snow also altered the budget terms that maintain the time-mean salinity in the mixed layer.

  14. Arctic pathways of Pacific Water: Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison experiments.

    PubMed

    Aksenov, Yevgeny; Karcher, Michael; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Gerdes, Rüdiger; de Cuevas, Beverly; Golubeva, Elena; Kauker, Frank; Nguyen, An T; Platov, Gennady A; Wadley, Martin; Watanabe, Eiji; Coward, Andrew C; Nurser, A J George

    2016-01-01

    Pacific Water (PW) enters the Arctic Ocean through Bering Strait and brings in heat, fresh water, and nutrients from the northern Bering Sea. The circulation of PW in the central Arctic Ocean is only partially understood due to the lack of observations. In this paper, pathways of PW are investigated using simulations with six state-of-the art regional and global Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs). In the simulations, PW is tracked by a passive tracer, released in Bering Strait. Simulated PW spreads from the Bering Strait region in three major branches. One of them starts in the Barrow Canyon, bringing PW along the continental slope of Alaska into the Canadian Straits and then into Baffin Bay. The second begins in the vicinity of the Herald Canyon and transports PW along the continental slope of the East Siberian Sea into the Transpolar Drift, and then through Fram Strait and the Greenland Sea. The third branch begins near the Herald Shoal and the central Chukchi shelf and brings PW into the Beaufort Gyre. In the models, the wind, acting via Ekman pumping, drives the seasonal and interannual variability of PW in the Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean. The wind affects the simulated PW pathways by changing the vertical shear of the relative vorticity of the ocean flow in the Canada Basin.

  15. Arctic pathways of Pacific Water: Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison experiments

    PubMed Central

    Karcher, Michael; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Gerdes, Rüdiger; de Cuevas, Beverly; Golubeva, Elena; Kauker, Frank; Nguyen, An T.; Platov, Gennady A.; Wadley, Martin; Watanabe, Eiji; Coward, Andrew C.; Nurser, A. J. George

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pacific Water (PW) enters the Arctic Ocean through Bering Strait and brings in heat, fresh water, and nutrients from the northern Bering Sea. The circulation of PW in the central Arctic Ocean is only partially understood due to the lack of observations. In this paper, pathways of PW are investigated using simulations with six state‐of‐the art regional and global Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs). In the simulations, PW is tracked by a passive tracer, released in Bering Strait. Simulated PW spreads from the Bering Strait region in three major branches. One of them starts in the Barrow Canyon, bringing PW along the continental slope of Alaska into the Canadian Straits and then into Baffin Bay. The second begins in the vicinity of the Herald Canyon and transports PW along the continental slope of the East Siberian Sea into the Transpolar Drift, and then through Fram Strait and the Greenland Sea. The third branch begins near the Herald Shoal and the central Chukchi shelf and brings PW into the Beaufort Gyre. In the models, the wind, acting via Ekman pumping, drives the seasonal and interannual variability of PW in the Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean. The wind affects the simulated PW pathways by changing the vertical shear of the relative vorticity of the ocean flow in the Canada Basin. PMID:27818853

  16. Arctic pathways of Pacific Water: Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Yevgeny; Karcher, Michael; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Gerdes, Rüdiger; de Cuevas, Beverly; Golubeva, Elena; Kauker, Frank; Nguyen, An T.; Platov, Gennady A.; Wadley, Martin; Watanabe, Eiji; Coward, Andrew C.; Nurser, A. J. George

    2016-01-01

    Pacific Water (PW) enters the Arctic Ocean through Bering Strait and brings in heat, fresh water, and nutrients from the northern Bering Sea. The circulation of PW in the central Arctic Ocean is only partially understood due to the lack of observations. In this paper, pathways of PW are investigated using simulations with six state-of-the art regional and global Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs). In the simulations, PW is tracked by a passive tracer, released in Bering Strait. Simulated PW spreads from the Bering Strait region in three major branches. One of them starts in the Barrow Canyon, bringing PW along the continental slope of Alaska into the Canadian Straits and then into Baffin Bay. The second begins in the vicinity of the Herald Canyon and transports PW along the continental slope of the East Siberian Sea into the Transpolar Drift, and then through Fram Strait and the Greenland Sea. The third branch begins near the Herald Shoal and the central Chukchi shelf and brings PW into the Beaufort Gyre. In the models, the wind, acting via Ekman pumping, drives the seasonal and interannual variability of PW in the Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean. The wind affects the simulated PW pathways by changing the vertical shear of the relative vorticity of the ocean flow in the Canada Basin.

  17. Visualization and analysis of eddies in a global ocean simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Sean J; Hecht, Matthew W; Petersen, Mark; Strelitz, Richard; Maltrud, Mathew E; Ahrens, James P; Hlawitschka, Mario; Hamann, Bernd

    2010-10-15

    Eddies at a scale of approximately one hundred kilometers have been shown to be surprisingly important to understanding large-scale transport of heat and nutrients in the ocean. Due to difficulties in observing the ocean directly, the behavior of eddies below the surface is not very well understood. To fill this gap, we employ a high-resolution simulation of the ocean developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Using large-scale parallel visualization and analysis tools, we produce three-dimensional images of ocean eddies, and also generate a census of eddy distribution and shape averaged over multiple simulation time steps, resulting in a world map of eddy characteristics. As expected from observational studies, our census reveals a higher concentration of eddies at the mid-latitudes than the equator. Our analysis further shows that mid-latitude eddies are thicker, within a range of 1000-2000m, while equatorial eddies are less than 100m thick.

  18. Simulating Fertilization of the Ocean as a Carbon Sequestration Strategy: Effectiveness and Unintended Consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Caldeira, K

    2002-03-20

    The primary objectives of this project are to assess, and improve our understanding of: (1) The effectiveness of various strategies to intentionally store carbon in the ocean through fertilization of the surface ocean with iron and/or macronutrients; and (2) Unanticipated environmental consequences of these ocean fertilization strategies. We propose to use what may be the best global ocean biogeochemical model in the world (PISCES) and apply it to perform the most realistic global-scale simulations of various iron fertilization scenarios. Versions of PISCES are currently used by MPI in Germany and IPSL in France. The model represents diatoms, coccolithophorids, and two classes of zooplankton. This model considers Fey N, P, O{sub 2}, Si, alkalinity, and carbon; for some of these it considers dissolved inorganic and organic, as well as particulate, forms. We would install the PISCES model with a minimum of modification into the LLNL ocean model, and perform an initial suite of simulations of both iron fertilization experiments (e.g., SOFeX) and proposed iron fertilization strategies. Based on the simulated experiments, we will analyze model deficiencies with respect to the observations and use this analysis to improve future versions of the model. The source code for and results from this set of models will be freely distributed, and thus should help groups performing related work elsewhere. This project the most-realistic ocean fertilization simulations yet performed in a global model, with an assessment of and improvement in the reliability of those predictions using results from iron fertilization experiments such as SOFeX. These results will help provide context and guidance for biological observations within the ocean carbon sequestration research program.

  19. Models for ecological models: Ocean primary productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wikle, Christopher K.; Leeds, William B.; Hooten, Mevin B.

    2016-01-01

    The ocean accounts for more than 70% of planet Earth's surface, and it processes are critically important to marine and terrestrial life.  Ocean ecosystems are strongly dependent on the physical state of the ocean (e.g., transports, mixing, upwelling, runoff, and ice dynamics(.  As an example, consider the Coastal Gulf of Alaska (CGOA) region.

  20. Short-term sea ice forecasts with the RASM-ESRL coupled model: A testbed for improving simulations of ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions in the marginal ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, A.; Cox, C. J.; Hughes, M.; Intrieri, J. M.; Persson, O. P. G.

    2015-12-01

    The dramatic decrease of Arctic sea-ice has led to a new Arctic sea-ice paradigm and to increased commercial activity in the Arctic Ocean. NOAA's mission to provide accurate and timely sea-ice forecasts, as explicitly outlined in the National Ocean Policy and the U.S. National Strategy for the Arctic Region, needs significant improvement across a range of time scales to improve safety for human activity. Unfortunately, the sea-ice evolution in the new Arctic involves the interaction of numerous physical processes in the atmosphere, ice, and ocean, some of which are not yet understood. These include atmospheric forcing of sea-ice movement through stress and stress deformation; atmospheric forcing of sea-ice melt and formation through energy fluxes; and ocean forcing of the atmosphere through new regions of seasonal heat release. Many of these interactions involve emerging complex processes that first need to be understood and then incorporated into forecast models in order to realize the goal of useful sea-ice forecasting. The underlying hypothesis for this study is that errors in simulations of "fast" atmospheric processes significantly impact the forecast of seasonal sea-ice retreat in summer and its advance in autumn in the marginal ice zone (MIZ). We therefore focus on short-term (0-20 day) ice-floe movement, the freeze-up and melt-back processes in the MIZ, and the role of storms in modulating stress and heat fluxes. This study uses a coupled ocean-atmosphere-seaice forecast model as a testbed to investigate; whether ocean-sea ice-atmosphere coupling improves forecasts on subseasonal time scales, where systematic biases develop due to inadequate parameterizations (focusing on mixed-phase clouds and surface fluxes), how increased atmospheric resolution of synoptic features improves the forecasts, and how initialization of sea ice area and thickness and snow depth impacts the skill of the forecasts. Simulations are validated with measurements at pan-Arctic land

  1. Optimal Combining Data for Improving Ocean Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    of regional circulation models for accurate estimating the upper ocean velocity field, subsurface thermohaline structure, and mixing characteristics...high resolution circulation model - Incorporating subgrid Lagrangian models identified via drifter data into circulation models for improving...velocity field obtained from a realistic circulation model. 2. Constructing and testing fusion algorithms for combining glider observations with

  2. Monte Carlo code for high spatial resolution ocean color simulations.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Kajiyama, Tamito; Cunha, José C

    2010-09-10

    A Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations has been developed to model in-water radiometric fields of downward and upward irradiance (E(d) and E(u)), and upwelling radiance (L(u)) in a two-dimensional domain with a high spatial resolution. The efficiency of the code has been optimized by applying state-of-the-art computing solutions, while the accuracy of simulation results has been quantified through benchmark with the widely used Hydrolight code for various values of seawater inherent optical properties and different illumination conditions. Considering a seawater single scattering albedo of 0.9, as well as surface waves of 5 m width and 0.5 m height, the study has shown that the number of photons required to quantify uncertainties induced by wave focusing effects on E(d), E(u), and L(u) data products is of the order of 10(6), 10(9), and 10(10), respectively. On this basis, the effects of sea-surface geometries on radiometric quantities have been investigated for different surface gravity waves. Data products from simulated radiometric profiles have finally been analyzed as a function of the deployment speed and sampling frequency of current free-fall systems in view of providing recommendations to improve measurement protocols.

  3. Modelling Ocean Surface Waves in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosekova, Lucia; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Coward, Andrew; Bertino, Laurent; Williams, Timothy; Nurser, George A. J.

    2015-04-01

    In the Polar Oceans, the surface ocean waves break up sea ice cover and create the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ), an area between the sea-ice free ocean and pack ice characterized by highly fragmented ice. This band of sea ice cover is undergoing dramatic changes due to sea ice retreat, with up to a 39% widening in the Arctic Ocean reported over the last three decades and projections predicting a continuing increase. The surface waves, sea ice and ocean interact in the MIZ through multiple complex feedbacks and processes which are not accounted for in any of the present-day climate models. To address this issue, we present a model development which implements surface ocean wave effects in the global Ocean General Circulation Model NEMO, coupled to the CICE sea ice model. Our implementation takes into account a number of physical processes specific to the MIZ dynamics. Incoming surface waves are attenuated due to reflection and energy dissipation induced by the presence of ice cover, which is in turn fragmented in response to external stresses. This process generates a distribution of floe sizes and impacts the dynamics of sea ice by the means of combined rheology that takes into account floe collisions and allows for a more realistic representation of the MIZ. We present results from the NEMO OGCM at 1 degree resolution with a wave-ice interaction module described above. The module introduces two new diagnostics previously unavailable in GCM's: surface wave spectra in sea ice covered areas, and floe size distribution due to wave-induced fragmentation. We discuss the impact of these processes on the ocean and sea ice state, including ocean circulation, mixing, stratification and the role of the MIZ in the ocean variability. The model predictions for the floe sizes in the summer Arctic Ocean range from 60 m in the inner MIZ to a few tens of meters near the open ocean, which agrees with estimates from the satellites. The extent of the MIZ throughout the year is also in

  4. A 1/16° eddying simulation of the global NEMO sea-ice-ocean system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovino, Doroteaciro; Masina, Simona; Storto, Andrea; Cipollone, Andrea; Stepanov, Vladimir N.

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of a global eddy-resolving simulation using the NEMO general circulation model is presented. The model has 1/16° horizontal spacing at the Equator, employs two displaced poles in the Northern Hemisphere, and uses 98 vertical levels. The simulation was spun up from rest and integrated for 11 model years, using ERA-Interim reanalysis as surface forcing. Primary intent of this hindcast is to test how the model represents upper ocean characteristics and sea ice properties. Analysis of the zonal averaged temperature and salinity, and the mixed layer depth indicate that the model average state is in good agreement with observed fields and that the model successfully represents the variability in the upper ocean and at intermediate depths. Comparisons against observational estimates of mass transports through key straits indicate that most aspects of the model circulation are realistic. As expected, the simulation exhibits turbulent behaviour and the spatial distribution of the sea surface height (SSH) variability from the model is close to the observed pattern. The distribution and volume of the sea ice are, to a large extent, comparable to observed values. Compared with a corresponding eddy-permitting configuration, the performance of the model is significantly improved: reduced temperature and salinity biases, in particular at intermediate depths, improved mass and heat transports, better representation of fluxes through narrow and shallow straits, and increased global-mean eddy kinetic energy (by ˜ 40 %). However, relatively minor weaknesses still exist such as a lower than observed magnitude of the SSH variability. We conclude that the model output is suitable for broader analysis to better understand upper ocean dynamics and ocean variability at global scales. This simulation represents a major step forward in the global ocean modelling at the Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Climate Change and constitutes the groundwork for future applications to short

  5. A three-dimensional numerical simulation of Typhoon Holly in the northwestern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Chul-Hoon; Yoon, Jong-Hwan

    2003-08-01

    A three-dimensional primitive equation model (the Princeton Ocean Model, often called POM) has been implemented for simulating Typhoon Holly generated in the tropical Pacific Ocean. This is the first time that a study of this type, previously used mostly for coastal, regional simulations, has been implemented for the northwestern Pacific Ocean, from 24°N to 52°N, including the East China Sea, the Yellow Sea, and the East (Japan) Sea. In the open ocean the model circulation, sea surface elevation, and temperature distribution with the passage of Holly are described; the results are in part compared with observation in the Korea (Tsushima) Strait. The model reproduces well several prominent features obtained in the observation such as a rapid increase of temperature in the Korea Strait during the passage of Typhoon Holly, in August 1984, and reasonably explains how they happened. Around the vicinity of the typhoon center, the model temperature field successfully presents "sea surface cooling" in the open ocean, having been frequently observed in the past. The model also suggests that a coastal jet around the Korea Strait and a cyclonic eddy field behind Holly in the East China Sea play an important role in the oceanic conditions although they have not yet been identified by observations.

  6. An isopycnic ocean carbon cycle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assmann, K. M.; Bentsen, M.; Segschneider, J.; Heinze, C.

    2010-02-01

    The carbon cycle is a major forcing component in the global climate system. Modelling studies, aiming to explain recent and past climatic changes and to project future ones, increasingly include the interaction between the physical and biogeochemical systems. Their ocean components are generally z-coordinate models that are conceptually easy to use but that employ a vertical coordinate that is alien to the real ocean structure. Here, we present first results from a newly-developed isopycnic carbon cycle model and demonstrate the viability of using an isopycnic physical component for this purpose. As expected, the model represents well the interior ocean transport of biogeochemical tracers and produces realistic tracer distributions. Difficulties in employing a purely isopycnic coordinate lie mainly in the treatment of the surface boundary layer which is often represented by a bulk mixed layer. The most significant adjustments of the ocean biogeochemistry model HAMOCC, for use with an isopycnic coordinate, were in the representation of upper ocean biological production. We present a series of sensitivity studies exploring the effect of changes in biogeochemical and physical processes on export production and nutrient distribution. Apart from giving us pointers for further model development, they highlight the importance of preformed nutrient distributions in the Southern Ocean for global nutrient distributions. The sensitivity studies show that iron limitation for biological particle production, the treatment of light penetration for biological production, and the role of diapycnal mixing result in significant changes of nutrient distributions and liniting factors of biological production.

  7. An Arctic Ice/Ocean Coupled Model with Wave Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    contemporary Arctic climate models. OBJECTIVES To make progress with our long-term goals, over the lifetime of the project we will – further our...performance of climate models in predicting the rate of disappearance of Arctic sea ice (Jeffries et al., 2013), are fuelling considerable interest in the...coupled climate models will also benefit, for although direct ocean wave effects are unlikely to be subsumed in global scale simulations because of

  8. The development of a coupled ice-ocean model for forecasting ice conditions in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedlinger, Shelley H.; Preller, Ruth H.

    1991-09-01

    A coupled ice-ocean model has been developed to investigate how a better simulation of ice-ocean interaction can improve sea ice forecasting capabilities. The coupling of the ice and ocean results in improved temporal variability of ocean circulation and heat and salt exchange between ice and ocean. The U.S. Navy's Polar Ice Prediction System is coupled to a diagnostic version of the Bryan-Cox three-dimensional ocean circulation model. A horizontal grid spacing of 127 km was used in the coupled model with 17 vertical levels from the surface to the ocean bottom. Atmospheric data from the Naval Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) for 1986 were used to force the model. The ice-ocean model simulation yielded realistic ice thickness distributions, ice drifts, and ocean currents. The model predicted accurate seasonal trends in ice growth and decay. Excess ice is often grown in the Greenland and Barents seas in fall and winter. This is due, in part, to the model's grid resolution which does not accurately resolve narrow currents, such as the West Spitsbergen Current. A sensitivity study of the heat transfer coefficients used in the ice model showed that the ice edge could be improved by using different coefficient values for thick ice, thin ice, and open water. Other sensitivity studies examined the effect of removing the "distorted" physics frequently used in the Bryan-Cox ocean circulation model and the effect of the vertical eddy momentum coefficient on the surface ocean circulation. An additional simulation was made using 1989 NOGAPS forcing to examine what type of variability could occur when using different years of NOGAPS forcing in the diagnostic ocean model. Significant differences occurred between the 1989 and 1986 ice thickness distributions as well as the oceanic heat fluxes. These differences show that the forecast system, which presently uses an ocean "climatology," can benefit from the variability allowed by the diagnostic ocean model.

  9. How do uncertainties in NCEP R2 and CFSR surface fluxes impact tropical ocean simulations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Caihong; Xue, Yan; Kumar, Arun; Behringer, David; Yu, Lisan

    2017-01-01

    NCEP/DOE reanalysis (R2) and Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) surface fluxes are widely used by the research community to understand surface flux climate variability, and to drive ocean models as surface forcings. However, large discrepancies exist between these two products, including (1) stronger trade winds in CFSR than in R2 over the tropical Pacific prior 2000; (2) excessive net surface heat fluxes into ocean in CFSR than in R2 with an increase in difference after 2000. The goals of this study are to examine the sensitivity of ocean simulations to discrepancies between CFSR and R2 surface fluxes, and to assess the fidelity of the two products. A set of experiments, where an ocean model was driven by a combination of surface flux components from R2 and CFSR, were carried out. The model simulations were contrasted to identify sensitivity to different component of the surface fluxes in R2 and CFSR. The accuracy of the model simulations was validated against the tropical moorings data, altimetry SSH and SST reanalysis products. Sensitivity of ocean simulations showed that temperature bias difference in the upper 100 m is mostly sensitive to the differences in surface heat fluxes, while depth of 20 °C (D20) bias difference is mainly determined by the discrepancies in momentum fluxes. D20 simulations with CFSR winds agree with observation well in the western equatorial Pacific prior 2000, but have large negative bias similar to those with R2 winds after 2000, partly because easterly winds over the central Pacific were underestimated in both CFSR and R2. On the other hand, the observed temperature variability is well reproduced in the tropical Pacific by simulations with both R2 and CFSR fluxes. Relative to the R2 fluxes, the CFSR fluxes improve simulation of interannual variability in all three tropical oceans to a varying degree. The improvement in the tropical Atlantic is most significant and is largely attributed to differences in surface winds.

  10. Impacts of Ocean Waves on the Atmospheric Surface Layer: Simulations and Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-06

    with the mean wind speed. The simulation model is based on (i) an asymptotic theory for the conservative dynamical effects of waves on the wave...their role in upper ocean dynamics . We note that low-Reynolds number direct numerical simulation (DNS) and LES have previously been used to examine...entrainment dynamics in the daytime convective atmospheric boundary layer (Sullivan et al. 1998). Thus our simulations show that surface waves can

  11. (CO sub 2 uptake in an Ocean Circulation Model)

    SciTech Connect

    Siegenthaler, U.C.

    1990-11-06

    The traveler collaborated with Drs. J. L. Sarmiento and J. C. Orr of the Program in Atmospheric Sciences at Princeton University to finish the article A Perturbation Simulation of CO{sub 2} Uptake in an Ocean Circulation Model,'' which has been submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research for publication. With F. Joos, a graduate student from the University of Bern, the traveler started writing a journal article describing a box model of the global carbon cycle that is an extension of the one-dimensional box-diffusion model. The traveler further collaborated with F. Joos and Dr. J. L. Sarmiento on modeling the potential enhancement of oceanic CO{sub 2} uptake by fertilizing the southern ocean with iron. A letter describing the results is currently being written for the journal Nature.

  12. Predictability of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, B. N.; Shukla, J.

    1991-01-01

    A study is presented to determine the limits on the predictability of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system. Following the classical methods developed for atmospheric predictability studies, the model used is one of the simplest that realistically reproduces many of the important features of the observed interannual variability of sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific Ocean when forced by observed wind stresses. As no reasonable analysis is available for all the fields, initial conditions for these prediction experiments were taken from a model control run in which the ocean model was forced by the observed surface winds. The atmospheric component of the coupled model is not capable of accurately simulating the large-scale components of the observed wind stress.

  13. A one ocean model of biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dor, Ronald K.; Fennel, Katja; Berghe, Edward Vanden

    2009-09-01

    The history of life is written in the ocean, and the history of the ocean is written in DNA. Geologists have shown us that hundreds of millions of years of ocean history can be revealed from records of a single phylum in cores of mud from abyssal plains. We are now accumulating genetic tools to unravel the relationships of hundreds of phyla to track this history back billions of years. The technologies demonstrated by the Census of Marine Life (CoML) mean that the ocean is no longer opaque or unknowable. The secrets of the largest component of the biosphere are knowable. The cost of understanding the history of ocean life is not cheap, but it is also not prohibitive. A transparent, open ocean is available for us to use to understand ourselves. This article develops a model of biodiversity equilibration in a single, physically static ocean as a step towards biodiversity in physically complex real oceans. It attempts to be quantitative and to simultaneously account for biodiversity patterns from bacteria to whales focusing on emergent properties rather than details. Biodiversity reflects long-term survival of DNA sequences, stabilizing "ecosystem services" despite environmental change. In the ocean, mechanisms for ensuring survival range from prokaryotes maintaining low concentrations of replicable DNA throughout the ocean volume, anticipating local change, to animals whose mobility increases with mass to avoid local change through movement. Whales can reach any point in the ocean in weeks, but prokaryotes can only diffuse. The high metabolic costs of mobility are offset by the dramatically lower number of DNA replicates required to ensure survival. Reproduction rates probably scale more or less inversely with body mass. Bacteria respond in a week, plankton in a year, whales in a century. We generally lack coherent theories to explain the origins of animals (metazoans) and the contributions of biodiversity to ecosystems. The One Ocean Model suggests that mobile

  14. Errors in the Simulated Heat Budget of CGCMs in the Eastern Part of the Tropical Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazel, J.; Masarik, M. T.; Mechoso, C. R.; Small, R. J.; Curchitser, E. N.

    2014-12-01

    The simulation of the tropical climate by coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (CGCMs) shows severe warm biases in the sea-surface temperature (SST) field of the southeastern part of the Pacific and the Atlantic (SEP and SEA, respectively). The errors are strongest near the land mass with a broad plume extending west, Also, the equatorial cold tongue is too strong and extends too far to the west. The simulated precipitation field generally shows a persistent double Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Tremendous effort has been made to improve CGCM performance in general and to address these tropical errors in particular. The present paper start by comparing Taylor diagrams of the SST errors in the SEP and SEA by CGCMs participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phases 3 and 5 (CMIP3 and CMIP5, respectively). Some improvement is noted in models that perform poorly in CMIP3, but the overall performance is broadly similar in the two intercomparison projects. We explore the hypothesis that an improved representation of atmosphere-ocean interaction involving stratocumulus cloud decks and oceanic upwelling is essential to reduce errors in the SEP and SEA. To estimate the error contribution by clouds and upwelling, we examine the upper ocean surface heat flux budget. The resolution of the oceanic component of the CGCMs in both CMIP3 and CMIP5 is too coarse for a realistic representation of upwelling. Therefore, we also examine simulations by the Nested Regional Climate Model (nRCM) system, which is a CGCM with a very high-resolution regional model embedded in coastal regions. The nRCM consists of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM, run at 1°) coupled to the global Parallel Ocean Program Model (POP, run at 1°) to which the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS6, run at 5-10 km) is nested in selected coastal regions.

  15. Detailed source term estimation of the atmospheric release for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident by coupling simulations of atmospheric dispersion model with improved deposition scheme and oceanic dispersion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katata, G.; Chino, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Terada, H.; Ota, M.; Nagai, H.; Kajino, M.; Draxler, R.; Hort, M. C.; Malo, A.; Torii, T.; Sanada, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Temporal variations in the amount of radionuclides released into the atmosphere during the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (FNPS1) accident and their atmospheric and marine dispersion are essential to evaluate the environmental impacts and resultant radiological doses to the public. In this paper, we estimate a detailed time trend of atmospheric releases during the accident by combining environmental monitoring data with atmospheric model simulations from WSPEEDI-II (Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information), and simulations from the oceanic dispersion model SEA-GEARN-FDM, both developed by the authors. A sophisticated deposition scheme, which deals with dry and fogwater depositions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation and subsequent wet scavenging due to mixed-phase cloud microphysics (in-cloud scavenging) for radioactive iodine gas (I2 and CH3I) and other particles (CsI, Cs, and Te), was incorporated into WSPEEDI-II to improve the surface deposition calculations. The fallout to the ocean surface calculated by WSPEEDI-II was used as input data for the SEA-GEARN-FDM calculations. Reverse and inverse source-term estimation methods based on coupling the simulations from both models was adopted using air dose rates and concentrations, and sea surface concentrations. The results revealed that the major releases of radionuclides due to FNPS1 accident occurred in the following periods during March 2011: the afternoon of 12 March due to the wet venting and hydrogen explosion at Unit 1, the morning of 13 March after the venting event at Unit 3, midnight of 14 March when the SRV (Safely Relief Valve) at Unit 2 was opened three times, the morning and night of 15 March, and the morning of 16 March. According to the simulation results, the highest radioactive contamination areas around FNPS1 were created from 15 to 16 March by complicated interactions among rainfall, plume movements, and the temporal variation of

  16. Modeling the Effects of Anisotropic Turbulence and Dispersive Waves on Oceanic Circulation and their Incorporation in Navy Ocean Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    anisotropic turbulence and dispersive waves in different environments , test them, compare them with data and implement them in ocean models. In this project...stratification and/or a solid body rotation. We have also performed computer simulations with an idealized circulation model of quasi-two-dimensional...member of a team on Martian planetary boundary layer at the International Space Science Institute and was responsible for reviewing turbulence models

  17. Importance of the Indian Ocean for simulating rainfall anomalies over eastern and southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Lisa; Graham, Nicholas E.

    1999-08-01

    The relative contributions of the Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) to the rainfall variability over eastern central, and southern Africa during the austral spring-summer are examined. The variability of African rainfall is statistically related to both oceans, but the variability in the two oceans is also related. To separate the effects of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, a suite of numerical model simulations is presented: GOGA, the atmosphere is forced by observed SSTs globally; IOGA, the atmosphere is forced by observed SSTs only in the Indian Ocean basin; and POGA, the atmosphere is forced by observed SSTs only in the tropical Pacific basin. While the SST variability of the tropical Pacific exerts some influence over the African region, it is the atmospheric response to the Indian Ocean variability that is essential for simulating the correct rainfall response over eastern, central, and southern Africa. Analyses of the dynamical response(s) seen in the numerical experiments and in the observations indicate that the Pacific and Indian Oceans have a competing influence over the Indian Ocean/African region. This competition is related to the influence of the two oceans on the Walker circulation and the consequences of that variability on low-level fluxes of moisture over central and southern Africa. Finally, given the high correlation found between SST variability in the Indian and Pacific Oceans with the Pacific leading by ˜3 months, we speculate on an approach to long-lead dynamical climate prediction over central-east and southern Africa.

  18. Oxygen gradients across the Pacific Ocean: Resolving an apparent discrepancy between atmospheric and ocean observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaloff Fletcher, S. E.; Steinkamp, K.; Stephens, B. B.; Tohjima, Y.; Gruber, N.

    2015-12-01

    We use oceanic and atmospheric model simulations to investigate and resolve a disagreement between observations of atmospheric O2/N2 and CO2 data and air-sea fluxes estimated from an ocean inversion. Atmospheric observations of O2/N2 and CO2 can be combined to calculate atmospheric potential oxygen (APO=O2/N2+1.1CO2), a powerful atmospheric tracer for ocean biogeochemical processes that is not influenced by terrestrial photosynthesis or respiration. A recent study identified a deep APO minimum in the Northwest Pacific from measurements collected on a repeat transect between New Zealand and Japan. This minimum could not be reproduced in atmospheric model simulations forced with air-sea fluxes estimated from ocean data, suggesting that oxygen uptake in the Northwest Pacific must be under-estimated by a factor of two. We use an updated ocean inverse method to estimate new air-sea fluxes from the ocean interior measurements at a higher spatial resolution than previous work using a suite of ten ocean general circulation models (OGCMs). These new air-sea flux estimates are able to match the atmospheric APO data when used as boundary conditions for an atmospheric transport model. The relative roles of thermal and biological processses in contributing to oxygen absorption by the North Pacific and other ocean regions is investigated.

  19. A perfectly matched layer for fluid-solid problems: Application to ocean-acoustics simulations with solid ocean bottoms.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhinan; Matzen, René; Cristini, Paul; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Martin, Roland

    2016-07-01

    A time-domain Legendre spectral-element method is described for full-wave simulation of ocean acoustics models, i.e., coupled fluid-solid problems in unbounded or semi-infinite domains, taking into account shear wave propagation in the ocean bottom. The technique can accommodate range-dependent and depth-dependent wave speed and density, as well as steep ocean floor topography. For truncation of the infinite domain, to efficiently absorb outgoing waves, a fluid-solid complex-frequency-shifted unsplit perfectly matched layer is introduced based on the complex coordinate stretching technique. The complex stretching is rigorously taken into account in the derivation of the fluid-solid matching condition inside the absorbing layer, which has never been done before in the time domain. Two implementations are designed: a convolutional formulation and an auxiliary differential equation formulation because the latter allows for implementation of high-order time schemes, leading to reduced numerical dispersion and dissipation, a topic of importance, in particular, in long-range ocean acoustics simulations. The method is validated for a two dimensional fluid-solid Pekeris waveguide and for a three dimensional seamount model, which shows that the technique is accurate and numerically long-time stable. Compared with widely used paraxial absorbing boundary conditions, the perfectly matched layer is significantly more efficient at absorbing both body waves and interface waves.

  20. Parallel Computation of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P; Song, Y T; Chao, Y; Zhang, H

    2005-04-05

    The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) is a regional ocean general circulation modeling system solving the free surface, hydrostatic, primitive equations over varying topography. It is free software distributed world-wide for studying both complex coastal ocean problems and the basin-to-global scale ocean circulation. The original ROMS code could only be run on shared-memory systems. With the increasing need to simulate larger model domains with finer resolutions and on a variety of computer platforms, there is a need in the ocean-modeling community to have a ROMS code that can be run on any parallel computer ranging from 10 to hundreds of processors. Recently, we have explored parallelization for ROMS using the MPI programming model. In this paper, an efficient parallelization strategy for such a large-scale scientific software package, based on an existing shared-memory computing model, is presented. In addition, scientific applications and data-performance issues on a couple of SGI systems, including Columbia, the world's third-fastest supercomputer, are discussed.

  1. Numerical simulations of interactions between Typhoon Choi-wan (0914) and the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, A.; Cronin, M. F.; Sutton, A. J.; Kawai, Y.; Ishii, M.

    2012-12-01

    This study uses data collected by the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) mooring during the passage of Typhoon Choi-Wan (International designation 0914) to validate numerical simulations of the typhoon-ocean interactions and their effect on carbon dioxide uptake and outgassing conducted by an atmosphere-wave-ocean coupled model incorporating a carbon equilibrium model. The eye of the typhoon passed the KEO mooring, located at 32.3○N, 144.5○E, ~40 km to the southeast on 19 September 2009. The coupled model reasonably simulated the positions of Choi-wan and variation in observed sea-level pressure, although the simulated moving speed was slower than that of the best track when the typhoon passed near the KEO buoy. The slow translation and poor oceanic initial field appeared to cause the results of lower sea-surface temperature (SST), sea-surface salinity (SSS) and oceanic partial CO2 than those of observations. Better agreement was found with the grid point south of the buoy when the eye of the typhoon passed by the buoy three hours ago, where the initial SST and SSS were higher than observations and simulated dissolved inorganic carbon were relatively high compared with that at the buoy. A difference in surface-roughness-length schemes affects sea-level pressure, air temperature and surface wind asymmetry but little effect on the values of SST, SSS and oceanic partial CO2 variations. Therefore, simulation of the sudden variation of the air-sea partial CO2 appears to be more sensitive to the typhoon track, the intensity and oceanic initial field than the effect of ocean waves.

  2. Indian Ocean and Indian summer monsoon: relationships without ENSO in ocean-atmosphere coupled simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crétat, Julien; Terray, Pascal; Masson, Sébastien; Sooraj, K. P.; Roxy, Mathew Koll

    2016-10-01

    The relationship between the Indian Ocean and the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) and their respective influence over the Indo-Western North Pacific (WNP) region are examined in the absence of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in two partially decoupled global experiments. ENSO is removed by nudging the tropical Pacific simulated sea surface temperature (SST) toward SST climatology from either observations or a fully coupled control run. The control reasonably captures the observed relationships between ENSO, ISM and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). Despite weaker amplitude, IODs do exist in the absence of ENSO and are triggered by a boreal spring ocean-atmosphere coupled mode over the South-East Indian Ocean similar to that found in the presence of ENSO. These pure IODs significantly affect the tropical Indian Ocean throughout boreal summer, inducing a significant modulation of both the local Walker and Hadley cells. This meridional circulation is masked in the presence of ENSO. However, these pure IODs do not significantly influence the Indian subcontinent rainfall despite overestimated SST variability in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean compared to observations. On the other hand, they promote a late summer cross-equatorial quadrupole rainfall pattern linking the tropical Indian Ocean with the WNP, inducing important zonal shifts of the Walker circulation despite the absence of ENSO. Surprisingly, the interannual ISM rainfall variability is barely modified and the Indian Ocean does not force the monsoon circulation when ENSO is removed. On the contrary, the monsoon circulation significantly forces the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal SSTs, while its connection with the western tropical Indian Ocean is clearly driven by ENSO in our numerical framework. Convection and diabatic heating associated with above-normal ISM induce a strong response over the WNP, even in the absence of ENSO, favoring moisture convergence over India.

  3. Numerical modelling of floating debris in the world's oceans.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, L C-M; Greer, S D; Borrero, J C

    2012-03-01

    A global ocean circulation model is coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking model to simulate 30 years of input, transport and accumulation of floating debris in the world ocean. Using both terrestrial and maritime inputs, the modelling results clearly show the formation of five accumulation zones in the subtropical latitudes of the major ocean basins. The relative size and concentration of each clearly illustrate the dominance of the accumulation zones in the northern hemisphere, while smaller seas surrounded by densely populated areas are also shown to have a high concentration of floating debris. We also determine the relative contribution of different source regions to the total amount of material in a particular accumulation zone. This study provides a framework for describing the transport, distribution and accumulation of floating marine debris and can be continuously updated and adapted to assess scenarios reflecting changes in the production and disposal of plastic worldwide.

  4. Development of an Ocean Model for COAMPS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    leveraging related programs to develop an ocean data assimilation capability. This prediction system will be the cornerstone of a vertically...ocean data assimilation system to a mesoscale atmospheric data assimilation system. This will include studies of issues that include, but are not...any given area; the availability of data , particularly synthetic observations; and the lack of a full-physics global model present the largest

  5. North Pacific Mesoscale Coupled Air-Ocean Simulations Compared with Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Koracin, Darko; Cerovecki, Ivana; Vellore, Ramesh; Mejia, John; Hatchett, Benjamin; McCord, Travis; McLean, Julie; Dorman, Clive

    2013-04-11

    Executive summary The main objective of the study was to investigate atmospheric and ocean interaction processes in the western Pacific and, in particular, effects of significant ocean heat loss in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions on the lower and upper atmosphere. It is yet to be determined how significant are these processes are on climate scales. The understanding of these processes led us also to development of the methodology of coupling the Weather and Research Forecasting model with the Parallel Ocean Program model for western Pacific regional weather and climate simulations. We tested NCAR-developed research software Coupler 7 for coupling of the WRF and POP models and assessed its usability for regional-scale applications. We completed test simulations using the Coupler 7 framework, but implemented a standard WRF model code with options for both one- and two-way mode coupling. This type of coupling will allow us to seamlessly incorporate new WRF updates and versions in the future. We also performed a long-term WRF simulation (15 years) covering the entire North Pacific as well as high-resolution simulations of a case study which included extreme ocean heat losses in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions. Since the extreme ocean heat loss occurs during winter cold air outbreaks (CAO), we simulated and analyzed a case study of a severe CAO event in January 2000 in detail. We found that the ocean heat loss induced by CAOs is amplified by additional advection from mesocyclones forming on the southern part of the Japan Sea. Large scale synoptic patterns with anomalously strong anticyclone over Siberia and Mongolia, deep Aleutian Low, and the Pacific subtropical ridge are a crucial setup for the CAO. It was found that the onset of the CAO is related to the breaking of atmospheric Rossby waves and vertical transport of vorticity that facilitates meridional advection. The study also indicates that intrinsic parameterization of the surface fluxes

  6. Ocean Model Development for COAMPS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    Tyrrhenian and Adriatic Seas , and the gyres off SW and SE Crete. Some reported features have not been reproduced to date, however, this work is ongoing...the North Pacific (POM was being run in the North Pacific in the NOMP Semi-Enclosed Seas Project). NCOM was used to simulate the passage of Hurricane...NCOM has been transitioned to the NOMP 6.2 Semi-Enclosed Seas Project at NRL for simulations of the East Asian Seas . These simulations will use data

  7. An ocean scatter propagation model for aeronautical satellite communication applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreland, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper an ocean scattering propagation model, developed for aircraft-to-satellite (aeronautical) applications, is described. The purpose of the propagation model is to characterize the behavior of sea reflected multipath as a function of physical propagation path parameters. An accurate validation against the theoretical far field solution for a perfectly conducting sinusoidal surface is provided. Simulation results for typical L band aeronautical applications with low complexity antennas are presented.

  8. Strong coupling among Antarctic ice shelves, ocean circulation and sea ice in a global sea-ice - ocean circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2016-04-01

    The thermodynamic effects of Antarctic ice shelf interaction with ocean circulation are investigated using a global, high-resolution, isopycnal ocean-circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. The model uses NASA MERRA Reanalysis from 1992 to 2011 as atmospheric forcing. The simulated long-period variability of ice-shelf melting/freezing rates differ across geographic locations. The ice shelves in Antarctic Peninsula, Amundsen and Bellingshausen sea embayments and the Amery Ice Shelf experience an increase in melting starting from 2005. This increase in melting is due to an increase in the subsurface (100-500 m) ocean heat content in the embayments of these ice shelves, which is caused by an increase in sea-ice concentration after 2005, and consequent reduction of the heat loss to the atmosphere. Our simulations provide a strong evidence for a coupling between ocean circulation, sea ice and ice shelves.

  9. Modelling the turbulence of a freezing Martian ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Gabor; Leitner, Johannes; Firneis, Maria

    2015-04-01

    We modified the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) to fit simulations investigating the hypotheses of early oceans or seas on planet Mars. Observed morphologies like paleoshorelines (Parker et al. 1987, Carr et al. 2003) and buried craters (Boyce et al. 2005, Head et al. 2002) indicate possible processes which could have been caused by large standing open bodies of water in the northern hemisphere of Mars. These structures, as well as altitude measurements of delta networks (diAchille et al. 2010) proclaim various sizes of oceans and or seas. Evidence for their existence whether one or more at different times in the early history of the planet, or the evolution and fate of an ocean are still elusive. The smoothness of the northern plains is debated, to be the result of volcanic effluents followed by the deposition of the sedimental load called the Vastias Borealis Formation (VBF). Detailed observations of crater depths (d/D ratios) in the northern hemisphere have shown further arguments for a northern ocean. The prevailing opinion is a short life of a liquid ocean, and a rather fast freezing period leading to sublimation under a thin atmosphere. McKay et al. (1990) have shown that liquid habitats could be maintained under an ice sheet for up to several hundred million years, if melt/freshwater and or volcanic activity was supported. Using the atmospheric data of the GCM (Forget et al. 1999) as input parameters for temperature and wind velocities, we simulate an ocean exposed from mild to freezing temperatures of water at different atmospheric pressures. We are investigating the detailed effects of turbulence on the ocean or sea floors, as well as the effects of salinity and freshwater inflow on the Martian soil. Apart from the driving forces like fed of outflow channels and or rivers and wind, the duration of liquid water is a key question on the redistribution of sediments and the formation of coastal structures.

  10. Study of subaqueous melting of Store Glacier, West Greenland using ocean observations and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Rignot, E. J.; Menemenlis, D.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Ice discharge from the Greenland Ice Sheet is mainly through tidewater glaciers that terminate in the ocean and melt in contact with ocean waters. Subaqueous melting at the calving front is a direct mechanism for mass loss and a potential trigger for glacier acceleration. We present an analysis of oceanographic data collected in the fjord of Store Glacier, West Greenland during August 2010 and 2012. Using these data, we calculate the subaqueous melt rates. Independently, we employ the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm), modified to include melting at the calving front and outflow of subglacial water to model the ice melt rates of Store Glacier. Previous 2-D sensitivity studies showed that the subaqueous melt rate reaches several meters per day during the summer, increases non-linearly with subglacial runoff and linearly with ocean thermal forcing, and ceases when subglacial discharge is off during winter. We present new 3-D simulations at very high resolution, with measured oceanic temperature/salinity as boundary conditions, and subglacial runoff from the University of Utrecht's Regional Atmospheric Climate Model outputs on different years and seasons. We compare the ocean observations and numerical simulations and discuss the seasonal and inter-annual variations of subaqueous melting. This study helps evaluate the impact of the ocean on the subaqueous melting of Greenland tidewater glaciers and in turn on glacier mass balance. This work was carried out at University of California, Irvine and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under contract with NASA Cryosphere Science Program.

  11. The role of local atmospheric forcing on the modulation of the ocean mixed layer depth in reanalyses and a coupled single column ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pookkandy, Byju; Dommenget, Dietmar; Klingaman, Nicholas; Wales, Scott; Chung, Christine; Frauen, Claudia; Wolff, Holger

    2016-11-01

    The role of local atmospheric forcing on the ocean mixed layer depth (MLD) over the global oceans is studied using ocean reanalysis data products and a single-column ocean model coupled to an atmospheric general circulation model. The focus of this study is on how the annual mean and the seasonal cycle of the MLD relate to various forcing characteristics in different parts of the world's oceans, and how anomalous variations in the monthly mean MLD relate to anomalous atmospheric forcings. By analysing both ocean reanalysis data and the single-column ocean model, regions with different dominant forcings and different mean and variability characteristics of the MLD can be identified. Many of the global oceans' MLD characteristics appear to be directly linked to the different atmospheric forcing characteristics at different locations. Here, heating and wind-stress are identified as the main drivers; in some, mostly coastal, regions the atmospheric salinity forcing also contributes. The annual mean MLD is more closely related to the annual mean wind-stress and the MLD seasonality is more closely related to the seasonality in heating. The single-column ocean model, however, also points out that the MLD characteristics over most global ocean regions, and in particular in the tropics and subtropics, cannot be maintained by local atmospheric forcings only, but are also a result of ocean dynamics that are not simulated in a single-column ocean model. Thus, lateral ocean dynamics are essential in correctly simulating observed MLD.

  12. High-Order/Low-Order methods for ocean modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Christopher; Womeldorff, Geoff; Chacón, Luis; Knoll, Dana A.

    2015-06-01

    We examine a High Order/Low Order (HOLO) approach for a z-level ocean model and show that the traditional semi-implicit and split-explicit methods, as well as a recent preconditioning strategy, can easily be cast in the framework of HOLO methods. The HOLO formulation admits an implicit-explicit method that is algorithmically scalable and second-order accurate, allowing timesteps much larger than the barotropic time scale. We demonstrate how HOLO approaches, in particular the implicit-explicit method, can provide a solid route for ocean simulation to heterogeneous computing and exascale environments.

  13. Optimal Combining Data for Improving Ocean Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    regional circulation models for accurate estimating the upper ocean velocity field, subsurface thermohaline structure, and mixing characteristics (2...data fusion in the framework of twin experiments with a high resolution circulation model and on real data - Combining radar data with tracer... thermohaline patterns and, second, separating space and time variability in glider observations for fast changing thermohaline structures (etc mesoscale fronts

  14. Ocean Model Assessment with Lagrangian Metrics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    project are to aid in the development of accurate modeling of upper ocean circulation by using data on circulation observations to test models. These tests...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The long-term goals of this project are to aid in the

  15. An isopycnic ocean carbon cycle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assmann, K. M.; Bentsen, M.; Segschneider, J.; Heinze, C.

    2009-07-01

    The carbon cycle is a major forcing component in the global climate system. Modelling studies aiming to explain recent and past climatic changes and to project future ones thus increasingly include the interaction between the physical and biogeochemical systems. Their ocean components are generally z-coordinate models that are conceptually easy to use but that employ a vertical coordinate that is alien to the real ocean structure. Here we present first results from a newly developed isopycnic carbon cycle model and demonstrate the viability of using an isopycnic physical component for this purpose. As expected, the model represents interior ocean transport of biogeochemical tracers well and produces realistic tracer distributions. Difficulties in employing a purely isopycnic coordinate lie mainly in the treatment of the surface boundary layer which is often represented by a bulk mixed layer. The most significant adjustments of the biogeochemical code for use with an isopycnic coordinate are in the representation of upper ocean biological production. We present a series of sensitivity studies exploring the effect of changes in biogeochemical and physical processes on export production and nutrient distribution. Apart from giving us pointers for further model development, they highlight the importance of preformed nutrient distributions in the Southern Ocean for global nutrient distributions. Use of a prognostic slab atmosphere allows us to assess the effect of the changes in export production on global ocean carbon uptake and atmospheric CO2 levels. Sensitivity studies show that iron limitation for biological particle production, the treatment of light penetration for biological production, and the role of diapycnal mixing result in significant changes of modelled air-sea fluxes and nutrient distributions.

  16. Final Report. Coupled simulations of Antarctic Ice-sheet/ocean interactions using POP and CISM

    SciTech Connect

    Asay-Davis, Xylar Storm

    2015-12-30

    The project performed under this award, referred to from here on as CLARION (CoupLed simulations of Antarctic Ice-sheet/Ocean iNteractions), included important advances in two models of ice sheet and ocean interactions. Despite its short duration (one year), the project made significant progress on its three major foci. First, together with collaborator Daniel Martin at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), I developed the POPSICLES coupled ice sheet-ocean model to the point where it could perform a number of pan-Antarctic simulations under various forcing conditions. The results were presented at a number of major conferences and workshops worldwide, and are currently being incorporated into two manuscripts in preparation.

  17. iMarNet: an ocean biogeochemistry model intercomparison project within a common physical ocean modelling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, L.; Yool, A.; Allen, J. I.; Anderson, T. R.; Barciela, R.; Buitenhuis, E. T.; Butenschön, M.; Enright, C.; Halloran, P. R.; Le Quéré, C.; de Mora, L.; Racault, M.-F.; Sinha, B.; Totterdell, I. J.; Cox, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean biogeochemistry (OBGC) models span a wide variety of complexities, including highly simplified nutrient-restoring schemes, nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) models that crudely represent the marine biota, models that represent a broader trophic structure by grouping organisms as plankton functional types (PFTs) based on their biogeochemical role (dynamic green ocean models) and ecosystem models that group organisms by ecological function and trait. OBGC models are now integral components of Earth system models (ESMs), but they compete for computing resources with higher resolution dynamical setups and with other components such as atmospheric chemistry and terrestrial vegetation schemes. As such, the choice of OBGC in ESMs needs to balance model complexity and realism alongside relative computing cost. Here we present an intercomparison of six OBGC models that were candidates for implementation within the next UK Earth system model (UKESM1). The models cover a large range of biological complexity (from 7 to 57 tracers) but all include representations of at least the nitrogen, carbon, alkalinity and oxygen cycles. Each OBGC model was coupled to the ocean general circulation model Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) and results from physically identical hindcast simulations were compared. Model skill was evaluated for biogeochemical metrics of global-scale bulk properties using conventional statistical techniques. The computing cost of each model was also measured in standardised tests run at two resource levels. No model is shown to consistently outperform all other models across all metrics. Nonetheless, the simpler models are broadly closer to observations across a number of fields and thus offer a high-efficiency option for ESMs that prioritise high-resolution climate dynamics. However, simpler models provide limited insight into more complex marine biogeochemical processes and ecosystem pathways, and a parallel approach of

  18. iMarNet: an ocean biogeochemistry model inter-comparison project within a common physical ocean modelling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, L.; Yool, A.; Allen, J. I.; Anderson, T. R.; Barciela, R.; Buitenhuis, E. T.; Butenschön, M.; Enright, C.; Halloran, P. R.; Le Quéré, C.; de Mora, L.; Racault, M.-F.; Sinha, B.; Totterdell, I. J.; Cox, P. M.

    2014-07-01

    Ocean biogeochemistry (OBGC) models span a wide range of complexities from highly simplified, nutrient-restoring schemes, through nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) models that crudely represent the marine biota, through to models that represent a broader trophic structure by grouping organisms as plankton functional types (PFT) based on their biogeochemical role (Dynamic Green Ocean Models; DGOM) and ecosystem models which group organisms by ecological function and trait. OBGC models are now integral components of Earth System Models (ESMs), but they compete for computing resources with higher resolution dynamical setups and with other components such as atmospheric chemistry and terrestrial vegetation schemes. As such, the choice of OBGC in ESMs needs to balance model complexity and realism alongside relative computing cost. Here, we present an inter-comparison of six OBGC models that were candidates for implementation within the next UK Earth System Model (UKESM1). The models cover a large range of biological complexity (from 7 to 57 tracers) but all include representations of at least the nitrogen, carbon, alkalinity and oxygen cycles. Each OBGC model was coupled to the Nucleus for the European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) ocean general circulation model (GCM), and results from physically identical hindcast simulations were compared. Model skill was evaluated for biogeochemical metrics of global-scale bulk properties using conventional statistical techniques. The computing cost of each model was also measured in standardised tests run at two resource levels. No model is shown to consistently outperform or underperform all other models across all metrics. Nonetheless, the simpler models that are easier to tune are broadly closer to observations across a number of fields, and thus offer a high-efficiency option for ESMs that prioritise high resolution climate dynamics. However, simpler models provide limited insight into more complex marine

  19. The Fidelity of Ocean Models With Explicit Eddies (Chapter 17)

    SciTech Connect

    McClean, J; Jayne, S; Maltrud, M; Ivanova, D

    2007-08-01

    Current practices within the oceanographic community have been reviewed with regard to the use of metrics to assess the realism of the upper-ocean circulation, ventilation processes diagnosed by time-evolving mixed layer depth and mode water formation, and eddy heat fluxes in large-scale fine resolution ocean model simulations. We have striven to understand the fidelity of these simulations in the context of their potential use in future fine-resolution coupled climate system studies. A variety of methodologies are used to assess the veracity of the numerical simulations. Sea surface height variability and the location of western boundary current paths from altimetry have been used routinely as basic indicators of fine-resolution model performance. Drifters and floats have also been used to provide pseudo-Eulerian measures of the mean and variability of surface and sub-surface flows, while statistical comparisons of observed and simulated means have been carried out using James tests. Probability density functions have been used to assess the Gaussian nature of the observed and simulated flows. Length and time scales have been calculated in both Eulerian and Lagrangian frameworks from altimetry and drifters, respectively. Concise measures of multiple model performance have been obtained from Taylor diagrams. The time-evolution of the mixed layer depth at monitoring stations has been compared with simulated time series. Finally, eddy heat fluxes are compared to climatological inferences.

  20. Aviation Safety Simulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houser, Scott; Yackovetsky, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Simulation Model is a software tool that enables users to configure a terrain, a flight path, and an aircraft and simulate the aircraft's flight along the path. The simulation monitors the aircraft's proximity to terrain obstructions, and reports when the aircraft violates accepted minimum distances from an obstruction. This model design facilitates future enhancements to address other flight safety issues, particularly air and runway traffic scenarios. This report shows the user how to build a simulation scenario and run it. It also explains the model's output.

  1. Massively parallel implementation of a high order domain decomposition equatorial ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; McCaffrey, J.W.; Piacsek, S.

    1999-06-01

    The present work is about the algorithms and parallel constructs of a spectral element equatorial ocean model. It shows that high order domain decomposition ocean models can be efficiently implemented on massively parallel architectures, such as the Connection Machine Model CM5. The optimized computational efficiency of the parallel spectral element ocean model comes not only from the exponential convergence of the numerical solution, but also from the work-intensive, medium-grained, geometry-based data parallelism. The data parallelism is created to efficiently implement the spectral element ocean model on the distributed-memory massively parallel computer, which minimizes communication among processing nodes. Computational complexity analysis is given for the parallel algorithm of the spectral element ocean model, and the model's parallel performance on the CM5 is evaluated. Lastly, results from a simulation of wind-driven circulation in low-latitude Atlantic Ocean are described.

  2. MASSIVELY PARALLEL IMPLEMENTATION OF A HIGH ORDER DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION EQUATORIAL OCEAN MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    MA,H.; MCCAFFREY,J.W.; PIACSEK,S.

    1998-07-15

    The present work is about the algorithms and parallel constructs of a spectral element equatorial ocean model. It shows that high order domain decomposition ocean models can be efficiently implemented on massively parallel architectures, such as the Connection Machine Model CM5. The optimized computational efficiency of the parallel spectral element ocean model comes not only from the exponential convergence of the numerical solution, but also from the work-intensive, medium-grained, geometry-based data parallelism. The data parallelism is created to efficiently implement the spectral element ocean model on the distributed-memory massively parallel computer, which minimizes communication among processing nodes. Computational complexity analysis is given for the parallel algorithm of the spectral element ocean model, and the model's parallel performance on the CM5 is evaluated. Lastly, results from a simulation of wind-driven circulation in low-latitude Atlantic ocean are described.

  3. Coupled Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Sound in Coastal Ocean for Renewable Ocean Energy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Wen; Jung, Ki Won; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea; Deng, Z. Daniel

    2016-03-01

    An underwater sound model was developed to simulate sound propagation from marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) devices or offshore wind (OSW) energy platforms. Finite difference methods were developed to solve the 3D Helmholtz equation for sound propagation in the coastal environment. A 3D sparse matrix solver with complex coefficients was formed for solving the resulting acoustic pressure field. The Complex Shifted Laplacian Preconditioner (CSLP) method was applied to solve the matrix system iteratively with MPI parallelization using a high performance cluster. The sound model was then coupled with the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) for simulating sound propagation generated by human activities, such as construction of OSW turbines or tidal stream turbine operations, in a range-dependent setting. As a proof of concept, initial validation of the solver is presented for two coastal wedge problems. This sound model can be useful for evaluating impacts on marine mammals due to deployment of MHK devices and OSW energy platforms.

  4. Highly resolved observations and simulations of the ocean response to a hurricane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Thomas B.; Price, James F.; Girton, James B.; Webb, Douglas C.

    2007-07-01

    An autonomous, profiling float called EM-APEX was developed to provide a quantitative and comprehensive description of the ocean side of hurricane-ocean interaction. EM-APEX measures temperature, salinity and pressure to CTD quality and relative horizontal velocity with an electric field sensor. Three prototype floats were air-deployed into the upper ocean ahead of Hurricane Frances (2004). All worked properly and returned a highly resolved description of the upper ocean response to a category 4 hurricane. At a float launched 55 km to the right of the track, the hurricane generated large amplitude, inertially rotating velocity in the upper 120 m of the water column. Coincident with the hurricane passage there was intense vertical mixing that cooled the near surface layer by about 2.2°C. We find consistent model simulations of this event provided the wind stress is computed from the observed winds using a high wind-speed saturated drag coefficient.

  5. Optimal Combining Data for Improving Ocean Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    improving diagnosis and prediction of meso- and submesoscale processes in coastal frontal zones. Our theoretical findings in studying finite-size... Submesoscale physical- biogeochemical coupling across the Ligurian Current (northwestern Mediterranean) using a bio- optical glider, Limnol. Oceanogr...Garraffo, and L. Piterbarg , 2012, Parameterization of Submesoscale Transport in the Gulf Stream Region Using Lagrangian Subgridscale Models, Ocean

  6. A generalized multivariate regression model for modelling ocean wave heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. L.; Feng, Y.; Swail, V. R.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a generalized multivariate linear regression model is developed to represent the relationship between 6-hourly ocean significant wave heights (Hs) and the corresponding 6-hourly mean sea level pressure (MSLP) fields. The model is calibrated using the ERA-Interim reanalysis of Hs and MSLP fields for 1981-2000, and is validated using the ERA-Interim reanalysis for 2001-2010 and ERA40 reanalysis of Hs and MSLP for 1958-2001. The performance of the fitted model is evaluated in terms of Pierce skill score, frequency bias index, and correlation skill score. Being not normally distributed, wave heights are subjected to a data adaptive Box-Cox transformation before being used in the model fitting. Also, since 6-hourly data are being modelled, lag-1 autocorrelation must be and is accounted for. The models with and without Box-Cox transformation, and with and without accounting for autocorrelation, are inter-compared in terms of their prediction skills. The fitted MSLP-Hs relationship is then used to reconstruct historical wave height climate from the 6-hourly MSLP fields taken from the Twentieth Century Reanalysis (20CR, Compo et al. 2011), and to project possible future wave height climates using CMIP5 model simulations of MSLP fields. The reconstructed and projected wave heights, both seasonal means and maxima, are subject to a trend analysis that allows for non-linear (polynomial) trends.

  7. Serving ocean model data on the cloud

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meisinger, M.; Farcas, C.; Farcas, E.; Alexander, Corrine; Arrott, M.; de La Beaujardière, J.; Hubbard, P.; Mendelssohn, R.; Signell, R.

    2009-01-01

    The NOAA-led Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) and the NSF-funded Ocean Observatories Initiative Cyberinfrastructure Project (OOI-CI) are collaborating on a prototype data delivery system for numerical model output and other gridded data using cloud computing. The strategy is to take an existing distributed system for delivering gridded data and redeploy on the cloud, making modifications to the system that allow it to harness the scalability of the cloud as well as adding functionality that the scalability affords. ??2009 MTS.

  8. Modelling the Oceanic Nd Isotopic Composition With a North Atlantic Eddy Permitting Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peronne, S.; Treguier, A.; Arsouze, T.; Dutay, J.; Lacan, F.; Jeandel, C.

    2006-12-01

    The oceanic water masses differ by their temperatures, salinity, but also a number of geochemical tracers characterized by their weak concentrations and their ability to quantify oceanic processes (mixing, scavenging rates etc). Among these tracers, the Nd isotopic composition (hereafter epsilon-Nd) is a (quasi) conservative tracer of water mass mixing in the ocean interior, far from any lithogenic inputs. It has been recently established that exchange of Nd at the oceanic margins could be the dominant process controlling both its concentration and isotopic composition distribution in the ocean. This was demonstrated using in situ measurements and budget calculations and has recently been confirmed by a low resolution (2°) modeling approach (Arsouze et al., 2006). However, the currents flowing on the ocean margins are not correctly represented in coarse ocean models. It is the case in the North Atlantic ocean, which is of particular interest since i) it is the area of deep water formation and ii) these deep waters are characterized by the most negative epsilon-Nd values of the world ocean, which are used as "imprint" of the present and past thermohaline circulation. It is therefore essential to understand how these water masses acquire their epsilon-Nd signature. We propose here the first results of the modeling of oceanic Nd isotopic composition at eddy-permitting resolution, with the North Atlantic 0.25° version of the NEMO model used for the DRAKKAR European project. A 150 years off-line experiment and a shorter on-line experiment are performed. Simulated Nd distributions are compared to the present-day data base, vertical profiles, and the results of the low resolution model (in the North Atlantic). The eddy permitting model generally provides improved results, provided a high enough exchange rate is imposed in the deep ocean. Deficiencies of the simulated distribution in the Nordic Seas and the subpolar gyre are explained by errors in the input function on

  9. Assimilation of altimeter topography into oceanic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demey, Pierre; Menard, Yves; Pinardi, Nadia; Schroeter, J.; Verron, J.

    1991-01-01

    The primary goals of the authors are to build an intuition for assimilation techniques and to investigate the impact of variable altimeter topography on simple or complex oceanic models. In particular, applying various techniques and sensitivity studies to model and data constraints plays a key role. We are starting to use quasi-geostrophic, semigeostrophic, and primitive-equation (PE) models and to test the schemes in regions of interest to the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), as well as in the northeast Atlantic and the Mediterranean. The impact of scatterometer wind forcing on the results is also investigated. The use of Geosat, European Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-1), and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry data is crucial in fine tuning the models and schemes to the selected areas of interest.

  10. Scaling of atmosphere and ocean temperature correlations in observations and climate models.

    PubMed

    Fraedrich, Klaus; Blender, Richard

    2003-03-14

    Power-law scaling of near surface air temperature fluctuations and its geographical distribution is analyzed in 100-yr observations and in a 1000-yr simulation of the present-day climate with a complex atmosphere-ocean model. In observations and simulation detrended fluctuation analysis leads to the scaling exponent alpha approximately 1 over the oceans, alpha approximately 0.5 over the inner continents, and alpha approximately 0.65 in transition regions [spectrum S(f) approximately f(-beta),beta=2alpha-1]. Scaling up to decades is demonstrated in observations and coupled atmosphere-ocean models with complex and mixed-layer oceans. Only with the complex ocean model the simulated power laws extend up to centuries.

  11. Impact of an upgraded model in the NCEP Global Ocean Data Assimilation System: The tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Hasibur; Behringer, David W.; Penny, Stephen G.; Ravichandran, M.

    2016-11-01

    The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services (INCOIS) produces global ocean analysis based on the Global Ocean Data Assimilation System (GODAS). This study shows how upgrades to the forward model simulations from MOM4p0d to MOM4p1 impact ocean analyses over the tropical Indian Ocean in GODAS. Three experiments were performed with same atmospheric forcing fields: (i) using MOM4p0d (GODAS_p0), (ii) using MOM4p1 (GODAS_p1), both using observed temperature and synthetic salinity, and (iii) using MOM4p1 (GODAS_p1S) assimilating both observed temperature and observed salinity. Validation with independent observations shows significant improvement of subsurface temperature and salinity in the new analysis using MOM4p1 versus MOM4p0d. There is also improvement in the upper ocean current of the equatorial Indian Ocean. The impact of observed salinity on the upper ocean surface current is marginal, but there is significant improvement in the subsurface current. The seasonal and inter-annual variability of the Wyrtki jet and the equatorial undercurrent is improved in GODAS_p1 versus GODAS_p0. All analyses reproduced the Indian Ocean dipole, with the GODAS_p1S simulated sea surface temperature (SST) the most accurate. The temperature inversion over the north Bay of Bengal (BoB) is reproduced only in GODAS_p1S. The mean sea level over BoB and equatorial Indian Ocean improved in GODAS_p1S as compared with AVISO observation. The combined model upgrade and assimilation of observed salinity led to reduced root-mean-square deviation and higher correlation coefficient values in the sea level anomaly (SLA) when compared with satellite observations.

  12. Partially molten magma ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, D.N.

    1983-02-15

    The properties of the lunar crust and upper mantle can be explained if the outer 300-400 km of the moon was initially only partially molten rather than fully molten. The top of the partially molten region contained about 20% melt and decreased to 0% at 300-400 km depth. Nuclei of anorthositic crust formed over localized bodies of magma segregated from the partial melt, then grew peripherally until they coverd the moon. Throughout most of its growth period the anorthosite crust floated on a layer of magma a few km thick. The thickness of this layer is regulated by the opposing forces of loss of material by fractional crystallization and addition of magma from the partial melt below. Concentrations of Sr, Eu, and Sm in pristine ferroan anorthosites are found to be consistent with this model, as are trends for the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-rich suites on a diagram of An in plagioclase vs. mg in mafics. Clustering of Eu, Sr, and mg values found among pristine ferroan anorthosites are predicted by this model.

  13. Submesoscale Flows and Mixing in the Oceanic Surface Layer Using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Submesoscale Flows and Mixing in the Oceanic Surface Layer Using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS) M. Jeroen Molemaker (PI) James C...long-term goals of this project are to further the insight into the dynamics of submesoscale flow in the oceanic surface layer. Using the Regional...Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS), we aim to understand the impact of submesoscale processes on tracer mixing at small scales and the transfer of energy

  14. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Cao, Long

    2016-01-01

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scenario with SRES A2 CO2 emission until 2100 and zero emission afterwards, by year 3500, in the simulation without CO2-calcification feedback, model projects an accumulated ocean CO2 uptake of 1462 PgC, atmospheric CO2 of 612 ppm, and surface pH of 7.9. Inclusion of CO2-calcification feedback increases ocean CO2 uptake by 9 to 285 PgC, reduces atmospheric CO2 by 4 to 70 ppm, and mitigates the reduction in surface pH by 0.003 to 0.06, depending on the form of parameterization scheme used. It is also found that the effect of CO2-calcification feedback on ocean carbon uptake is comparable and could be much larger than the effect from CO2-induced warming. Our results highlight the potentially important role CO2-calcification feedback plays in ocean carbon cycle and projections of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. PMID:26838480

  15. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Cao, Long

    2016-02-03

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scenario with SRES A2 CO2 emission until 2100 and zero emission afterwards, by year 3500, in the simulation without CO2-calcification feedback, model projects an accumulated ocean CO2 uptake of 1462 PgC, atmospheric CO2 of 612 ppm, and surface pH of 7.9. Inclusion of CO2-calcification feedback increases ocean CO2 uptake by 9 to 285 PgC, reduces atmospheric CO2 by 4 to 70 ppm, and mitigates the reduction in surface pH by 0.003 to 0.06, depending on the form of parameterization scheme used. It is also found that the effect of CO2-calcification feedback on ocean carbon uptake is comparable and could be much larger than the effect from CO2-induced warming. Our results highlight the potentially important role CO2-calcification feedback plays in ocean carbon cycle and projections of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  16. Computer Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, V. S.

    2014-05-09

    Verification and validation of computer codes and models used in simulation are two aspects of the scientific practice of high importance and have recently been discussed by philosophers of science. While verification is predominantly associated with the correctness of the way a model is represented by a computer code or algorithm, validation more often refers to model’s relation to the real world and its intended use. It has been argued that because complex simulations are generally not transparent to a practitioner, the Duhem problem can arise for verification and validation due to their entanglement; such an entanglement makes it impossible to distinguish whether a coding error or model’s general inadequacy to its target should be blamed in the case of the model failure. I argue that in order to disentangle verification and validation, a clear distinction between computer modeling (construction of mathematical computer models of elementary processes) and simulation (construction of models of composite objects and processes by means of numerical experimenting with them) needs to be made. Holding on to that distinction, I propose to relate verification (based on theoretical strategies such as inferences) to modeling and validation, which shares the common epistemology with experimentation, to simulation. To explain reasons of their intermittent entanglement I propose a weberian ideal-typical model of modeling and simulation as roles in practice. I suggest an approach to alleviate the Duhem problem for verification and validation generally applicable in practice and based on differences in epistemic strategies and scopes

  17. Experimental design for three interrelated Marine Ice-Sheet and Ocean Model Intercomparison Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asay-Davis, X. S.; Cornford, S. L.; Durand, G.; Galton-Fenzi, B. K.; Gladstone, R. M.; Gudmundsson, G. H.; Hattermann, T.; Holland, D. M.; Holland, D.; Holland, P. R.; Martin, D. F.; Mathiot, P.; Pattyn, F.; Seroussi, H.

    2015-11-01

    Coupled ice sheet-ocean models capable of simulating moving grounding lines are just becoming available. Such models have a broad range of potential applications in studying the dynamics of marine ice sheets and tidewater glaciers, from process studies to future projections of ice mass loss and sea level rise. The Marine Ice Sheet-Ocean Model Intercomparison Project (MISOMIP) is a community effort aimed at designing and coordinating a series of model intercomparison projects (MIPs) for model evaluation in idealized setups, model verification based on observations, and future projections for key regions in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). Here we describe computational experiments constituting three interrelated MIPs for marine ice sheet models and regional ocean circulation models incorporating ice shelf cavities. These consist of ice sheet experiments under the Marine Ice Sheet MIP third phase (MISMIP+), ocean experiments under the ice shelf-ocean MIP second phase (ISOMIP+) and coupled ice sheet-ocean experiments under the MISOMIP first phase (MISOMIP1). All three MIPs use a shared domain with idealized bedrock topography and forcing, allowing the coupled simulations (MISOMIP1) to be compared directly to the individual component simulations (MISMIP+ and ISOMIP+). The experiments, which have qualitative similarities to Pine Island Glacier Ice Shelf and the adjacent region of the Amundsen Sea, are designed to explore the effects of changes in ocean conditions, specifically the temperature at depth, on basal melting and ice dynamics. In future work, differences between model results will form the basis for evaluation of the participating models.

  18. Simulating the Oceanic Migration of Silver Japanese Eels

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Lin; Miyazawa, Yasumasa; Béguer-Pon, Mélanie

    2016-01-01

    The oceanic migration of silver Japanese eels starts from their continental growth habitats in East Asia and ends at the spawning area near the West Mariana Ridge seamount chain. However, the actual migration routes remain unknown. In this study, we examined the possible oceanic migration routes and strategies of silver Japanese eels using a particle tracking method in which virtual eels (v-eels) were programmed to move vertically and horizontally in an ocean circulation model (Japan Coastal Ocean Predictability Experiment 2, JCOPE2). Four horizontal swimming strategies were tested: random heading, true navigation (readjusted heading), orientation toward the spawning area (fixed heading), and swimming against the Kuroshio. We found that all strategies, except random swimming, allowed v-eels swimming at 0.65 m s−1 to reach the spawning area within eight months after their departure from the south coast of Japan (end of the spawning season). The estimated minimum swimming speed required to reach the area spawning within eight months was 0.1 m s−1 for true navigation, 0.12 m s−1 for constant compass heading, and 0.35 m s−1 for swimming against the Kuroshio. The lowest swimming speed estimated from tracked Japanese eels at sea was 0.03 m.s−1, which would not allow them to reach the spawning area within eight months, through any of the tested orientation strategies. Our numerical experiments also showed that ocean circulation significantly affected the migration of Japanese v-eels. A strong Kuroshio could advect v-eels further eastward. In addition, western Pacific ocean currents accelerated the migration of navigating v-eels. The migration duration was shortened in years with a stronger southward flow, contributed by a stronger recirculation south of Japan, an enhanced subtropical gyre, or a higher southward Kuroshio velocity. PMID:26982484

  19. Effect of Aerosol and Ocean Representation on Simulated Climate Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Knutti, Reto; Wild, Martin

    2016-04-01

    It is still debated to what extent anthropogenic aerosols shaped 20th century surface temperatures, especially sea surface temperatures (SSTs), through alteration of surface solar radiation (SSR). SSTs, in turn, are crucial in the context of atmospheric circulation and ocean heat uptake. Uncertainty considering anthropogenic aerosol forcing thus translates into uncertainty regarding ocean heat uptake and, ultimately, climate responses towards anthropogenic influences. We use the global climate model ECHAM to analyse the 20th century climate response towards either anthropogenic aerosols or well-mixed greenhouse gases or both with different representations of ocean and aerosols: atmosphere-only with prescribed SSTs and interactive aerosols; mixed-layer ocean and interactive or prescribed aerosols; fully coupled with prescribed aerosols. For interactive aerosols we use the Hamburg Aerosol Module (HAM). Our results suggest that up to 15% of global ocean surfaces undergo an SSR reduction of at least -4W/m² in the year 2000, due to anthropogenic aerosols. The area affected depends on how aerosols are represented and whether clear sky or all sky SSR is considered. In MLO equilibria with interactive aerosols, anthropogenic aerosols clearly shape surface temperature response patterns. This is to a lesser degree the case for the transient fully coupled case. Additivity of global mean temperature responses towards single forcings - an assumption often made in the literature - is not fulfilled for the MLO experiments, but for the fully coupled experiments. While some of these differences can be attributed to the differing ocean representation, it is implied that differing aerosol representation may play an even more relevant role. Thus, our results corroborate not only the relevance of anthropogenic aerosols for surface temperature responses, but also highlight the relevance of choice of aerosol representation.

  20. Simulating the Oceanic Migration of Silver Japanese Eels.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Lin; Miyazawa, Yasumasa; Béguer-Pon, Mélanie

    2016-01-01

    The oceanic migration of silver Japanese eels starts from their continental growth habitats in East Asia and ends at the spawning area near the West Mariana Ridge seamount chain. However, the actual migration routes remain unknown. In this study, we examined the possible oceanic migration routes and strategies of silver Japanese eels using a particle tracking method in which virtual eels (v-eels) were programmed to move vertically and horizontally in an ocean circulation model (Japan Coastal Ocean Predictability Experiment 2, JCOPE2). Four horizontal swimming strategies were tested: random heading, true navigation (readjusted heading), orientation toward the spawning area (fixed heading), and swimming against the Kuroshio. We found that all strategies, except random swimming, allowed v-eels swimming at 0.65 m s-1 to reach the spawning area within eight months after their departure from the south coast of Japan (end of the spawning season). The estimated minimum swimming speed required to reach the area spawning within eight months was 0.1 m s-1 for true navigation, 0.12 m s-1 for constant compass heading, and 0.35 m s-1 for swimming against the Kuroshio. The lowest swimming speed estimated from tracked Japanese eels at sea was 0.03 m.s-1, which would not allow them to reach the spawning area within eight months, through any of the tested orientation strategies. Our numerical experiments also showed that ocean circulation significantly affected the migration of Japanese v-eels. A strong Kuroshio could advect v-eels further eastward. In addition, western Pacific ocean currents accelerated the migration of navigating v-eels. The migration duration was shortened in years with a stronger southward flow, contributed by a stronger recirculation south of Japan, an enhanced subtropical gyre, or a higher southward Kuroshio velocity.

  1. The forecasting Ocean assimilation model (FOAM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. J.; Acreman, D.; Barciela, R.; Hines, A.; Martin, M. J.; Sellar, A.; Stark, J.; Storkey, D.

    The FOAM system is built around the ocean and sea-ice components of the Met Office's Unified Model (UM), developed by the Hadley Centre for coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere climate prediction. It is forced by 6-hourly surface fluxes from the Met Office's Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) system, and assimilates temperature and salinity profiles from in situ instruments, surface temperature, sea-ice concentration and sea surface height data. A coarse resolution global configuration of FOAM on a 1 ° latitude-longitude grid with 20 vertical levels was implemented in the Met Office's operational suite in 1997. Nested models with grid spacings ranging from 30 km to 6 km are used to provide detailed forecasts for selected regions. The models are run each morning and typically produce 5-day forecasts. Real-time daily and archived analyses for the North Atlantic are freely available at http://nerc-essc.reading.ac.uk/las for research and developmentpurposes. We will present results from studies of the accuracy of the forecasts and how it depends on the data types assimilated and the assimilation scheme used. We will also briefly describe the developments being made to assimilate sea-ice concentration and velocity data and incorporate the HadOCC NPZD (nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus) model and assimilation of ocean colour data.

  2. Theory Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shlachter, Jack

    2012-08-23

    Los Alamos has a long history in theory, modeling and simulation. We focus on multidisciplinary teams that tackle complex problems. Theory, modeling and simulation are tools to solve problems just like an NMR spectrometer, a gas chromatograph or an electron microscope. Problems should be used to define the theoretical tools needed and not the other way around. Best results occur when theory and experiments are working together in a team.

  3. Response of the Antarctic ice sheet to ocean forcing using the POPSICLES coupled ice sheet-ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D. F.; Asay-Davis, X.; Price, S. F.; Cornford, S. L.; Maltrud, M. E.; Ng, E. G.; Collins, W.

    2014-12-01

    We present the response of the continental Antarctic ice sheet to sub-shelf-melt forcing derived from POPSICLES simulation results covering the full Antarctic Ice Sheet and the Southern Ocean spanning the period 1990 to 2010. Simulations are performed at 0.1 degree (~5 km) ocean resolution and ice sheet resolution as fine as 500 m using adaptive mesh refinement. A comparison of fully-coupled and comparable standalone ice-sheet model results demonstrates the importance of two-way coupling between the ice sheet and the ocean. The POPSICLES model couples the POP2x ocean model, a modified version of the Parallel Ocean Program (Smith and Gent, 2002), and the BISICLES ice-sheet model (Cornford et al., 2012). BISICLES makes use of adaptive mesh refinement to fully resolve dynamically-important regions like grounding lines and employs a momentum balance similar to the vertically-integrated formulation of Schoof and Hindmarsh (2009). Results of BISICLES simulations have compared favorably to comparable simulations with a Stokes momentum balance in both idealized tests like MISMIP3D (Pattyn et al., 2013) and realistic configurations (Favier et al. 2014). POP2x includes sub-ice-shelf circulation using partial top cells (Losch, 2008) and boundary layer physics following Holland and Jenkins (1999), Jenkins (2001), and Jenkins et al. (2010). Standalone POP2x output compares well with standard ice-ocean test cases (e.g., ISOMIP; Losch, 2008) and other continental-scale simulations and melt-rate observations (Kimura et al., 2013; Rignot et al., 2013). A companion presentation, "Present-day circum-Antarctic simulations using the POPSICLES coupled land ice-ocean model" in session C027 describes the ocean-model perspective of this work, while we focus on the response of the ice sheet and on details of the model. The figure shows the BISICLES-computed vertically-integrated ice velocity field about 1 month into a 20-year coupled Antarctic run. Groundling lines are shown in green.

  4. Ocean Prediction with the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    into hybrid approaches. Isopycnal (density tracking) layers are best in the deep stratified ocean, z-levels (constant fixed depths) are best used to...when this would lead to excessive crowding of coordinate surfaces. Thus, vertical grid points can be geometrically constrained to remain at a fixed depth...isopycnal in the open stratified ocean, but smoothly reverts to a terrain-following (a) coordinate in shallow coastal regions and to fixed pressure

  5. A Pacific Ocean general circulation model for satellite data assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Y.; Halpern, D.; Mechoso, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    A tropical Pacific Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) to be used in satellite data assimilation studies is described. The transfer of the OGCM from a CYBER-205 at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory to a CRAY-2 at NASA's Ames Research Center is documented. Two 3-year model integrations from identical initial conditions but performed on those two computers are compared. The model simulations are very similar to each other, as expected, but the simulations performed with the higher-precision CRAY-2 is smoother than that with the lower-precision CYBER-205. The CYBER-205 and CRAY-2 use 32 and 64-bit mantissa arithmetic, respectively. The major features of the oceanic circulation in the tropical Pacific, namely the North Equatorial Current, the North Equatorial Countercurrent, the South Equatorial Current, and the Equatorial Undercurrent, are realistically produced and their seasonal cycles are described. The OGCM provides a powerful tool for study of tropical oceans and for the assimilation of satellite altimetry data.

  6. Simulating the coupling between atmosphere ocean processes and the planktonic ecosystem during SERIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, N.; Denman, K.; McFarlane, N.; Solheim, L.

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a 1-D atmosphere-ocean-biogeochemical model to investigate the coupling between atmosphere-ocean exchanges and the planktonic ecosystem during the Subarctic Ecosystem Response to Iron Enrichment Study (SERIES) in 2002. The atmospheric Single Column Model (SCM) is based on the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis (CCCma) Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM). The ocean component employs the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM). A seven-component ecosystem model is embedded in GOTM, which includes nitrogen, organic and inorganic carbon, silica and oxygen cycling. We use observations from SERIES combined with atmospheric reanalysis data to initiate and force the coupled physical model. We found that atmospheric temperatures and humidities are higher and the stratification more stable if nudged to National Centre of Environmental Prediction (NCEP) rather than to European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 40-yr reanalysis data. Doubling the vertical resolution in the atmosphere improved the representation of mixing and the thermal structure, affecting cloudiness and radiative fluxes at the ocean surface as well as planetary boundary layer heights and gas dispersion in the lower atmosphere. From observed ocean-surface dimethyl sulphide (DMS) concentrations (outside the patch) we simulated DMS dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer by applying a first-order loss term, with turnover times ranging from 1 to 4 days. During SERIES, shallow boundary-layer heights that occurred when DMS production was highest prevented dispersion into the atmosphere beyond several 100 m. Finally, successive model runs with iron fertilization starting on June 25, July 10 and 25 showed that the general nature of the response to iron enrichment at OSP (SERIES) is robust, but the strength as well as length of the response depend strongly on short-term atmospheric conditions (wind and radiative fluxes).

  7. Continental and oceanic crustal magnetization modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Hayling, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Inversion of magnetic data from the MAGSAT satellite, to arrive at intensities of magnetization of the Earth's crust, was performed by two different methods. The first method uses a spherical harmonic model of the magnetic field. The coefficients believed to represent sources in the Earth's crust can then be inverted to arrive at vertical dipole moments per unit area at the Earth's surface. The spherical harmonic models contain coefficients of degrees of harmonics up to 23. The dipole moment per unit area for a surface element can then be determined by summing the contribution for each individual degree of harmonic. The magnetic moments were calculated for continental and oceanic areas separately as well as over certain latitudinal segments. Of primary concern was to determine whether there are any differences between continental and oceanic areas. The second analysis with magnetization intensities was made using narrower ranges of degrees of harmonics, assuming that higher degrees are present in the core field signal.

  8. Simulation of the 1986-1987 El Niño and 1988 La Niña events with a free surface tropical Pacific Ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong-Hua; Endoh, Masahiro

    1994-04-01

    Observed atmospheric forcing fields over the period 1984-1989 force a free surface tropical Pacific Ocean general circulation model. Numerical simulation of the 1986-1987 El Niño and 1988 La Niña events is presented in the paper. Some quantitative comparisons between model time series and corresponding observations of sea level, and upper ocean current and temperature are made to verify the model performance. Diagnostic analyses of heat balance and available energy budget are given as well. The space-time evolution of various model variables demonstrates that the model produces interannual variations with reasonable success. Beginning in mid-1986, westerly wind over the western equatorial Pacific drives strong eastward surface currents which accomplish the massive transfer of warm surface water. The strong westerly wind in late 1986 excites the pronounced equatorial Kelvin waves, which propagate eastward toward the eastern and coastal Pacific where they depress the thermocline and raise sea level twice, and increase sea surface temperature. The eastern Pacific warming occurs primarily from the diminished cooling contribution of vertical advection, whereas in the central Pacific, eastward advection by anomalous zonal flows is the principal mechanism. The El Niño conditions in the eastern Pacific disappear in mid-1987, whereas they remain in the central and western Pacific until early 1988. Subsequently, the tropical Pacific Ocean rebounds to significant La Niña conditions. Available energy (AE) has a good phase relationship with respect to other variables characterized by warm and cold conditions. AE is anomalously high prior to a warm event, accompanying conversion from kinetic energy (KE) to available potential energy (APE). During the development of El Niño, although relaxation of trade wind reduces input of wind energy, the appearance of westerly wind in the western Pacific leads to a sharp increase in KE. This excites excessive conversion from APE to KE

  9. Upper oceanic response to tropical cyclone Phailin in the Bay of Bengal using a coupled atmosphere-ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Kumar Ravi; Pant, Vimlesh

    2017-01-01

    A numerical simulation of very severe cyclonic storm `Phailin', which originated in southeastern Bay of Bengal (BoB) and propagated northwestward during 10-15 October 2013, was carried out using a coupled atmosphere-ocean model. A Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT) was used to make exchanges of fluxes consistent between the atmospheric model `Weather Research and Forecasting' (WRF) and ocean circulation model `Regional Ocean Modelling System' (ROMS) components of the `Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport' (COAWST) modelling system. The track and intensity of tropical cyclone (TC) Phailin simulated by the WRF component of the coupled model agrees well with the best-track estimates reported by the India Meteorological Department (IMD). Ocean model component (ROMS) was configured over the BoB domain; it utilized the wind stress and net surface heat fluxes from the WRF model to investigate upper oceanic response to the passage of TC Phailin. The coupled model shows pronounced sea surface cooling (2-2.5 °C) and an increase in sea surface salinity (SSS) (2-3 psu) after 06 GMT on 12 October 2013 over the northwestern BoB. Signature of this surface cooling was also observed in satellite data and buoy measurements. The oceanic mixed layer heat budget analysis reveals relative roles of different oceanic processes in controlling the mixed layer temperature over the region of observed cooling. The heat budget highlighted major contributions from horizontal advection and vertical entrainment processes in governing the mixed layer cooling (up to -0.1 °C h-1) and, thereby, reduction in sea surface temperature (SST) in the northwestern BoB during 11-12 October 2013. During the post-cyclone period, the net heat flux at surface regained its diurnal variations with a noontime peak that provided a warming tendency up to 0.05 °C h-1 in the mixed layer. Clear signatures of TC-induced upwelling are seen in vertical velocity (about 2.5 × 10-3 m s-1), rise in isotherms and

  10. Subsurface radar location of the putative ocean on Ganymede: Numerical simulation of the surface terrain impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyushin, Ya. A.

    2014-03-01

    Exploration of subsurface oceans on Jupiter's icy moons is a key issue of the icy moons' geology. Radar is in fact the only sounding technique which is able to penetrate their icy mantles, which can be many kilometers thick. Surface clutter, i.e. scattering of the radio waves on the rough surface, is known to be one of the most important problems of subsurface radar probing. Adequate numerical modeling of this scattering is required on all stages of subsurface radar experiment, including design of an instrument, operational strategy planning and data interpretation. In the present paper, a computer simulation technique for numerical simulations of radar sounding of rough surfaces is formulated in general form. Subsurface radar location of the ocean beneath Ganymedian ice with chirp radar signals has been simulated.

  11. Oceanic Carbon Dioxide Uptake in a Model of Century-Scale Global Warming

    PubMed

    Sarmiento; Le Quéré C

    1996-11-22

    In a model of ocean-atmosphere interaction that excluded biological processes, the oceanic uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) was substantially reduced in scenarios involving global warming relative to control scenarios. The primary reason for the reduced uptake was the weakening or collapse of the ocean thermohaline circulation. Such a large reduction in this ocean uptake would have a major impact on the future growth rate of atmospheric CO2. Model simulations that include a simple representation of biological processes show a potentially large offsetting effect resulting from the downward flux of biogenic carbon. However, the magnitude of the offset is difficult to quantify with present knowledge.

  12. Simulated 21st century's increase in oceanic suboxia by CO2-enhanced biotic carbon export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oschlies, Andreas; Schulz, Kai G.; Riebesell, Ulf; Schmittner, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The primary impacts of anthropogenic CO2 emissions on marine biogeochemical cycles predicted so far include ocean acidification, global warming induced shifts in biogeographical provinces, and a possible negative feedback on atmospheric CO2 levels by CO2-fertilized biological production. Here we report a new potentially significant impact on the oxygen-minimum zones of the tropical oceans. Using a model of global climate, ocean circulation, and biogeochemical cycling, we extrapolate mesocosm-derived experimental findings of a pCO2-sensitive increase in biotic carbon-to-nitrogen drawdown to the global ocean. For a simulation run from the onset of the industrial revolution until A.D. 2100 under a "business-as-usual" scenario for anthropogenic CO2 emissions, our model predicts a negative feedback on atmospheric CO2 levels, which amounts to 34 Gt C by the end of this century. While this represents a small alteration of the anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon cycle, the model results reveal a dramatic 50% increase in the suboxic water volume by the end of this century in response to the respiration of excess organic carbon formed at higher CO2 levels. This is a significant expansion of the marine "dead zones" with severe implications not only for all higher life forms but also for oxygen-sensitive nutrient recycling and, hence, for oceanic nutrient inventories.

  13. Modelling coral polyp calcification in relation to ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohn, S.; Merico, A.

    2012-11-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations due to anthropogenic emissions induce changes in the carbonate chemistry of the oceans and, ultimately, a drop in ocean pH. This acidification process can harm calcifying organisms like coccolithophores, molluscs, echinoderms, and corals. It is expected that ocean acidification in combination with other anthropogenic stressors will cause a severe decline in coral abundance by the end of this century, with associated disastrous effects on reef ecosystems. Despite the growing importance of the topic, little progress has been made with respect to modelling the impact of acidification on coral calcification. Here we present a model for a coral polyp that simulates the carbonate system in four different compartments: the seawater, the polyp tissue, the coelenteron, and the calcifying fluid. Precipitation of calcium carbonate takes place in the metabolically controlled calcifying fluid beneath the polyp tissue. The model is adjusted to a state of activity as observed by direct microsensor measurements in the calcifying fluid. We find that a transport mechanism for bicarbonate is required to supplement carbon into the calcifying fluid because CO2 diffusion alone is not sufficient to sustain the observed calcification rates. Simulated CO2 perturbation experiments reveal decreasing calcification rates under elevated pCO2 despite the strong metabolic control of the calcifying fluid. Diffusion of CO2 through the tissue into the calcifying fluid increases with increasing seawater pCO2, leading to decreased aragonite saturation in the calcifying fluid. Our modelling study provides important insights into the complexity of the calcification process at the organism level and helps to quantify the effect of ocean acidification on corals.

  14. Manganese in the west Atlantic Ocean in the context of the first global ocean circulation model of manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hulten, Marco; Middag, Rob; Dutay, Jean-Claude; de Baar, Hein; Roy-Barman, Matthieu; Gehlen, Marion; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Sterl, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Dissolved manganese (Mn) is a biologically essential element. Moreover, its oxidised form is involved in removing itself and several other trace elements from ocean waters. Here we report the longest thus far (17 500 km length) full-depth ocean section of dissolved Mn in the west Atlantic Ocean, comprising 1320 data values of high accuracy. This is the GA02 transect that is part of the GEOTRACES programme, which aims to understand trace element distributions. The goal of this study is to combine these new observations with new, state-of-the-art, modelling to give a first assessment of the main sources and redistribution of Mn throughout the ocean. To this end, we simulate the distribution of dissolved Mn using a global-scale circulation model. This first model includes simple parameterisations to account for the sources, processes and sinks of Mn in the ocean. Oxidation and (photo)reduction, aggregation and settling, as well as biological uptake and remineralisation by plankton are included in the model. Our model provides, together with the observations, the following insights: - The high surface concentrations of manganese are caused by the combination of photoreduction and sources contributing to the upper ocean. The most important sources are sediments, dust, and, more locally, rivers. - Observations and model simulations suggest that surface Mn in the Atlantic Ocean moves downwards into the southward-flowing North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), but because of strong removal rates there is no elevated concentration of Mn visible any more in the NADW south of 40° N. - The model predicts lower dissolved Mn in surface waters of the Pacific Ocean than the observed concentrations. The intense oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in subsurface waters is deemed to be a major source of dissolved Mn also mixing upwards into surface waters, but the OMZ is not well represented by the model. Improved high-resolution simulation of the OMZ may solve this problem. - There is a mainly

  15. An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations: Hydrography and fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilicak, Mehmet; Drange, Helge

    2016-04-01

    We compare the simulated Arctic Ocean in fifteen global ocean-sea ice models in the framework of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments, phase II (CORE-II). Most of these models are the ocean and sea-ice components of the coupled climate models used in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) experiments. We mainly focus on the hydrography of the Arctic interior, the state of Atlantic Water layer and heat and volume transports at the gateways of the Davis Strait, the Bering Strait, the Fram Strait and the Barents Sea Opening. We found that there is a large spread in temperature in the Arctic Ocean between the models, and generally large differences compared to the observed temperature at intermediate depths. Warm bias models have a strong temperature anomaly of inflow of the Atlantic Water entering the Arctic Ocean through the Fram Strait. Another process that is not represented accurately in the CORE-II models is the formation of cold and dense water, originating on the eastern shelves. In the cold bias models, excessive cold water forms in the Barents Sea and spreads into the Arctic Ocean through the St. Anna Through. There is a large spread in the simulated mean heat and volume transports through the Fram Strait and the Barents Sea Opening. The models agree more on the decadal variability, to a large degree dictated by the common atmospheric forcing. We conclude that the CORE-II model study helps us to understand the crucial biases in the Arctic Ocean. The current coarse resolution state-of-the-art ocean models need to be improved in accurate representation of the Atlantic Water inflow into the Arctic and density currents coming from the shelves.

  16. Ocean modelling aspects for drift applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephane, L.; Pierre, D.

    2010-12-01

    Nowadays, many authorities in charge of rescue-at-sea operations lean on operational oceanography products to outline research perimeters. Moreover, current fields estimated with sophisticated ocean forecasting systems can be used as input data for oil spill/ adrift object fate models. This emphasises the necessity of an accurate sea state forecast, with a mastered level of reliability. This work focuses on several problems inherent to drift modeling, dealing in the first place with the efficiency of the oceanic current field representation. As we want to discriminate the relevance of a particular physical process or modeling option, the idea is to generate series of current fields of different characteristics and then qualify them in term of drift prediction efficiency. Benchmarked drift scenarios were set up from real surface drifters data, collected in the Mediterranean sea and off the coasts of Angola. The time and space scales that we are interested in are about 72 hr forecasts (typical timescale communicated in case of crisis), for distance errors that we hope about a few dozen of km around the forecast (acceptable for reconnaissance by aircrafts) For the ocean prediction, we used some regional oceanic configurations based on the NEMO 2.3 code, nested into Mercator 1/12° operational system. Drift forecasts were computed offline with Mothy (Météo France oil spill modeling system) and Ariane (B. Blanke, 1997), a Lagrangian diagnostic tool. We were particularly interested in the importance of the horizontal resolution, vertical mixing schemes, and any processes that may impact the surface layer. The aim of the study is to ultimately point at the most suitable set of parameters for drift forecast use inside operational oceanic systems. We are also motivated in assessing the relevancy of ensemble forecasts regarding determinist predictions. Several tests showed that mis-described observed trajectories can finally be modelled statistically by using uncertainties

  17. Evaluating the ocean biogeochemical components of Earth system models using atmospheric potential oxygen and ocean color data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevison, C. D.; Manizza, M.; Keeling, R. F.; Kahru, M.; Bopp, L.; Dunne, J.; Tiputra, J.; Ilyina, T.; Mitchell, B. G.

    2015-01-01

    The observed seasonal cycles in atmospheric potential oxygen (APO) at a range of mid- to high-latitude surface monitoring sites are compared to those inferred from the output of six Earth system models (ESMs) participating in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The simulated air-sea O2 fluxes are translated into APO seasonal cycles using a matrix method that takes into account atmospheric transport model (ATM) uncertainty among 13 different ATMs. Three of the ocean biogeochemistry models tested are able to reproduce the observed APO cycles at most sites, to within the large TransCom3-era ATM uncertainty used here, while the other three generally are not. Net primary production (NPP) and net community production (NCP), as estimated from satellite ocean color data, provide additional constraints, albeit more with respect to the seasonal phasing of ocean model productivity than overall magnitude. The present analysis suggests that, of the tested ocean biogeochemistry models, the community ecosystem model (CESM) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) ESM2M are best able to capture the observed APO seasonal cycle at both northern and southern hemispheric sites. In most models, discrepancies with observed APO can be attributed to the underestimation of NPP, deep ventilation or both in the northern oceans.

  18. Modeling oceanic multiphase flow by using Lagrangian particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    While the density of seawater is basically determined by its temperature, salinity and pressure, the effective density becomes higher when the water mass contains suspended sediment. On the other hands, effective density declines when water mass contains fine scale materials of lower density such as bubbles and ice crystals. Such density anomaly induced by small scale materials suspended in water masses sometimes plays important roles in the sub-mesoscale ocean physics. To simulate these small scale oceanic multiphase flow, a new modeling framework using an online Lagrangian particle tracking method is developed. A Lagrangian particle tracking method has substantial advantages such as an explicit treatment of buoyancy force acting on each individual particle, no numerical diffusion and dissipation, high dynamic range and an ability to track the history and each individual particle. However, its numerical cost causes difficulty when we try to simulate a large number of particles. In the present study we implement a numerically efficient particle tracking scheme using linked-list data structure, which is coupled with a nonhydrostatic dynamical core. This newly developed model successfully reproduces characteristics of some interesting small scale multiphase processes, for example hyperpycnal flow (a sediment-rich river water plume trapped at ocean floor) and grease ice cover (a slurry mixture of frazil ice crystals and seawater).

  19. LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS TO SIMULATE CO2 OCEAN DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen M. Masutani

    1999-12-31

    This Final Technical Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of an investigation entitled ''Laboratory Experiments to Simulate CO{sub 2} Ocean Disposal'', funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's University Coal Research Program. This investigation responds to the possibility that restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions may be imposed in the future to comply with the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The primary objective of the investigation was to obtain experimental data that can be applied to assess the technical feasibility and environmental impacts of oceanic containment strategies to limit release of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal and other fossil fuel combustion systems into the atmosphere. A number of critical technical uncertainties of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} were addressed by performing laboratory experiments on liquid CO{sub 2} jet break-up into a dispersed droplet phase, and hydrate formation, under deep ocean conditions. Major accomplishments of this study included: (1) five jet instability regimes were identified that occur in sequence as liquid CO{sub 2} jet disintegration progresses from laminar instability to turbulent atomization; (2) linear regression to the data yielded relationships for the boundaries between the five instability regimes in dimensionless Ohnesorge Number, Oh, and jet Reynolds Number, Re, space; (3) droplet size spectra was measured over the full range of instabilities; (4) characteristic droplet diameters decrease steadily with increasing jet velocity (and increasing Weber Number), attaining an asymptotic value in instability regime 5 (full atomization); and (5) pre-breakup hydrate formation appears to affect the size distribution of the droplet phase primary by changing the effective geometry of the jet.

  20. Shallow Ocean Bottom BRDF Prediction, Modeling, and Inversion via Simulation With Surface/Volume Data Derived from X-ray Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    and Inversion via Simulation With Surface/Volume Data Derived from X-ray Tomography G. C. Boynton Physics Dept, University of Miami, PO Box...and Inversion via Simulation With Surface/Volume Data Derived from X-ray Tomography 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...sediments) into the previously manufactured sample holders for analysis by both our optical BRDF instrument and the Micro-focus Xray Computerized

  1. The Effect of Atmosphere-Ocean-Wave Interactions and Model Resolution on Hurricane Katrina in a Coupled Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patricola, C. M.; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Montuoro, R.

    2012-04-01

    The sensitivity of simulated strength, track, and structure of Hurricane Katrina to atmospheric model resolution, cumulus parameterization, and initialization time, as well as mesoscale ocean-atmosphere interactions with and without small-scale ocean-wave effect, are investigated with a fully coupled regional climate model. The atmosphere, ocean, and wave components are represented by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF), Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), and Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) model. Uncoupled atmosphere-only simulations with horizontal resolutions of 1, 3, 9, and 27 km show that while the simulated cyclone track is highly sensitive to initialization time, its dependence on model resolution is relatively weak. Using NCEP/CFSR reanalysis as initial and boundary conditions, WRF, even at low resolution, is able to track Katrina accurately for 3 days before it made landfall on August 29, 2005. Katrina's strength, however, is much more difficult to reproduce and exhibits a strong dependence on model resolution. At its lowest resolution (27 km), WRF is only capable of simulating a maximum strength of Category 2 storm. Even at 1 km resolution, the simulated Katrina only reaches Category 4 storm intensity. Further WRF experiments with and without cumulus parameterization reveal minor changes in strength. None of the WRF-only simulations capture the observed rapid intensification of Katrina to Category 5 when it passed over a warm Loop-Current eddy (LCE) in the Gulf of Mexico, suggesting that mesoscale ocean-atmosphere interactions involving LCEs may play a crucial role in Katrina's rapid intensification. Coupled atmosphere-ocean simulations are designed and carried out to investigate hurricane Katrina-LCE interactions with and without considering small-scale ocean wave processes in order to fully understand the dynamical ocean-atmosphere processes in the observed rapid cyclone intensification.

  2. Regionally coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice-marine biogeochemistry model ROM: 1. Description and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sein, Dmitry V.; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Gröger, Matthias; Fast, Irina; Cabos, William; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Hagemann, Stefan; Semmler, Tido; Izquierdo, Alfredo; Jacob, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    The general circulation models used to simulate global climate typically feature resolution too coarse to reproduce many smaller-scale processes, which are crucial to determining the regional responses to climate change. A novel approach to downscale climate change scenarios is presented which includes the interactions between the North Atlantic Ocean and the European shelves as well as their impact on the North Atlantic and European climate. The goal of this paper is to introduce the global ocean-regional atmosphere coupling concept and to show the potential benefits of this model system to simulate present-day climate. A global ocean-sea ice-marine biogeochemistry model (MPIOM/HAMOCC) with regionally high horizontal resolution is coupled to an atmospheric regional model (REMO) and global terrestrial hydrology model (HD) via the OASIS coupler. Moreover, results obtained with ROM using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and ECHAM5/MPIOM CMIP3 historical simulations as boundary conditions are presented and discussed for the North Atlantic and North European region. The validation of all the model components, i.e., ocean, atmosphere, terrestrial hydrology, and ocean biogeochemistry is performed and discussed. The careful and detailed validation of ROM provides evidence that the proposed model system improves the simulation of many aspects of the regional climate, remarkably the ocean, even though some biases persist in other model components, thus leaving potential for future improvement. We conclude that ROM is a powerful tool to estimate possible impacts of climate change on the regional scale.

  3. The Leading Modes of Decadal SST Variability in the Southern Ocean in CMIP5 Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Dommenget, Dietmar

    2016-04-01

    The leading modes of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) variability in the Southern Ocean on decadal and even larger time scales are analysed using Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) model simulations and observations. We compare the modes from the CMIP5 super ensemble against several simple null hypotheses, such as isotropic diffusion (red noise) and a Slab Ocean model, to investigate the sources of decadal variability and the physical processes affecting the characteristics of the modes. The results show three main modes in the Southern Ocean: the first and most dominant mode on interannual to decadal time scales is an annular mode with largest amplitudes in the Pacific, which is strongly related to atmospheric forcing by the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The second mode is an almost basin wide monopole pattern, which has pronounced multi-decadal and longer time scales variability. It is firstly inducted by the Wave-3 patterns in the atmosphere and further developed via ocean dynamics. The third mode is a dipole pattern in the southern Pacific that has a pronounced peak in the power spectrum at multi-decadal time scales. All three leading modes found in the CMIP5 super model have distinct patterns and time scale behaviour that can not be explained by simple stochastic null hypothesis, thus all three leading modes are ocean-atmospheric coupled modes and are likely to be substantially influenced or driven by ocean dynamical processes. The mechanism of the basin-wide mode is further analysed based on a series of idealized experiments. The results show that the monopole mode has a two-step power spectrum, with a first spectral increase on interannual time scale and a second higher up level on the multi-decadal to centennial time scales. Ocean dynamics, especially the ocean advection, transport the anomalous signals, connect the entire ocean and lead to the homogeneous-like spatial pattern even under stochastic

  4. Evaluating the ocean biogeochemical components of earth system models using atmospheric potential oxygen (APO) and ocean color data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevison, C. D.; Manizza, M.; Keeling, R. F.; Kahru, M.; Bopp, L.; Dunne, J.; Tjiputra, J.; Mitchell, B. G.

    2014-06-01

    The observed seasonal cycles in atmospheric potential oxygen (APO) at a range of mid to high latitude surface monitoring sites are compared to those inferred from the output of 6 Earth System Models participating in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). The simulated air-sea O2 fluxes are translated into APO seasonal cycles using a matrix method that takes into account atmospheric transport model (ATM) uncertainty among 13 different ATMs. Half of the ocean biogeochemistry models tested are able to reproduce the observed APO cycles at most sites, to within the current large ATM uncertainty, while the other half generally are not. Net Primary Production (NPP) and net community production (NCP), as estimated from satellite ocean color data, provide additional constraints, albeit more with respect to the seasonal phasing of ocean model productivity than the overall magnitude. The present analysis suggests that, of the tested ocean biogeochemistry models, CESM and GFDL ESM2M are best able to capture the observed APO seasonal cycle at both Northern and Southern Hemisphere sites. In the northern oceans, the comparison to observed APO suggests that most models tend to underestimate NPP or deep ventilation or both.

  5. Atmosphere-magma ocean modeling of GJ 1132 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Laura; Wordsworth, Robin; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Sasselov, Dimitar

    2017-01-01

    GJ 1132 b is a nearby Earth-sized exoplanet transiting an M dwarf, and is amongst the most highly characterizable small exoplanets currently known. Using a coupled atmosphere-magma ocean model, we determine that GJ 1132 b must have begun with more than 5 wt% initial water in order to still retain a water-based atmosphere. We also determine the amount of O2 that can build up in the atmosphere as a result of hydrogen dissociation and loss. We find that the magma ocean absorbs at most ~ 10% of the O2 produced, whereas more than 90% is lost to space through hydrodynamic drag. The results of the model depend strongly on the initial water abundance and the XUV model. The most common outcome for GJ 1132 b from our simulations is a tenuous atmosphere dominated by O2, although for very large initial water abundances, atmospheres with several thousands of bars of O2 are possible. A substantial steam envelope would indicate either the existence of an earlier H2 envelope or low XUV flux over the system's lifetime. A steam atmosphere would also imply the continued existence of a magma ocean on GJ 1132 b. Preliminary modeling with the addition of CO2 gas will be presented.

  6. The leading modes of decadal SST variability in the Southern Ocean in CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Dommenget, Dietmar

    2016-09-01

    The leading modes of Sea Surface Temperature variability in the Southern Ocean on decadal and even larger time scales are analysed using Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) model simulations and observations. The analysis is based on Empirical Orthogonal Function modes of the CMIP5 model super ensemble. We compare the modes from the CMIP5 super ensemble against several simple null hypotheses, such as isotropic diffusion (red noise) and a Slab Ocean model, to investigate the sources of decadal variability and the physical processes affecting the characteristics of the modes. The results show three main modes in the Southern Ocean: the first and most dominant mode on interannual to decadal time scales is an annular mode with largest amplitudes in the Pacific, which is strongly related to atmospheric forcing by the Southern Annular Mode and El Nino Southern Oscillation. The second mode is an almost basin wide monopole pattern, which has pronounced multi-decadal and longer time scales variability. It is firstly inducted by the Wave-3 patterns in the atmosphere and further developed via ocean dynamics. The third mode is a dipole pattern in the southern Pacific that has a pronounced peak in the power spectrum at multi-decadal time scales. All three leading modes found in the CMIP5 super model have distinct patterns and time scale behaviour that can not be explained by simple stochastic null hypothesis, thus all three leading modes are ocean-atmosphere coupled modes and are likely to be substantially influenced or driven by ocean dynamical processes.

  7. Analyzing Glacial-Interglacial Ocean Biogeochemical States in the MPI-Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, M.; Ilyina, T.

    2015-12-01

    There is still little consensus about the mechanisms causing the glacial - interglacial variationsin atmospheric CO2 concentrations of around 100 ppm. Some of those mechanisms aredriven by alterations in ocean biogeochemical cycles. Hence, it is crucial to understand oceanbiogeochemistry dynamics during glacial-interglacial transitions. Within the German nationalclimate modeling initiative PalMod, aiming at simulating a full glacial cycle (135k - today) intransient mode with a state-of-the-art Earth System Model (ESM), we address the oceanbiogeochemistry cycles using a comprehensive modeling approach. In order to set up themodel we start with ocean only simulations, which are based on the 3-D ocean generalcirculation model MPIOM coupled to the ocean biogeochemistry model HAMOCC.Atmospheric forcing data is derived from a fully coupled LGM simulation including theatmosphere general circulation model ECHAM6. This setup provides us a sophisticatedrepresentation of the ocean biogeochemistry during the LGM without using any kind of datarestoring,to be consistent with the biological, chemical and physical dynamics of the model.We analyze alterations in ocean biogeochemistry during the LGM in comparison to a preindustrialcontrol climate. We discuss and quantify the changes in ocean biogeochemicalcycles between these two states, as well as possible implications for carbon transfer due tochanges in ocean dynamics. In the next steps we will use the ocean biogeochemistry model aspart of the fully coupled MPI-ESM. Our results aim at improving the understanding of glacial- interglacial changes in atmospheric CO2, especially in terms of marine carbon sequestrationand release. The presented work contributes to developing comprehensive ESMs, which arecapable of simulating the climate evolution and the variability during the last glacial cycle.

  8. Coastal Downscaling Experiments: Can CESM Fields Successfully Force Regional Coastal Ocean Simulations with Strong Freshwater Forcing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCready, P.; Bryan, F.; Tseng, Y. H.; Whitney, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal ocean accounts for about half of the global fish harvest, but is poorly resolved in global climate models (a one-degree grid barely sees the continental shelf). Moreover, coastal ocean circulation is strongly modified by river freshwater sources, often coming from estuarine systems that are completely unresolved in the coarse grid. River freshwater input in CESM is added in a practical but ad hoc way, by imposing a surface salinity sink over a region of the ocean approximating the plume area of a given river. Here we present results from a series of model experiments using a high-resolution (1.5 km) ROMS model of the NE Pacific, including the Columbia River and the inland waters of Puget Sound. The base model does multi-year hindcasts using the best available sources of atmospheric (MM5/WRF), ocean (NCOM), river (USGS), and tidal forcing. It has been heavily validated against observations of all sorts, and performs well, so it is an ideal test bed for downscaling experiments. The model framework also does biogeochemistry, including oxygen, and carbon chemistry is being added to make forecasts of Ocean Acidification.This high-resolution ROMS model is systematically run in downscaling experiments for the year 2005 with combinations of CESM forcing (CAM, POP, and rivers) swapped in. Skill is calculated using observations. It is found that the runs with CESM forcing generally retain much of the skill of the base model. A compact metric of response to freshwater forcing is used, which is the mechanical energy required to destratify a shallow coastal volume. This, along with the average temperature and salinity of the volume, are used to characterize and compare runs, including the original CESM-POP fields. Finally the model is run with projected CESM simulation forcing at the end of 21st century based on a set of RCP scenarios, and the compact metrics are used to quantify differences from 2005.

  9. Anisotropic Mesoscale Eddy Transport in Ocean General Circulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, S. J.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bachman, S.; Bryan, F.; Dennis, J.; Danabasoglu, G.

    2014-12-01

    Modern climate models are limited to coarse-resolution representations of large-scale ocean circulation that rely on parameterizations for mesoscale eddies. The effects of eddies are typically introduced by relating subgrid eddy fluxes to the resolved gradients of buoyancy or other tracers, where the proportionality is, in general, governed by an eddy transport tensor. The symmetric part of the tensor, which represents the diffusive effects of mesoscale eddies, is universally treated isotropically in general circulation models. Thus, only a single parameter, namely the eddy diffusivity, is used at each spatial and temporal location to impart the influence of mesoscale eddies on the resolved flow. However, the diffusive processes that the parameterization approximates, such as shear dispersion, potential vorticity barriers, oceanic turbulence, and instabilities, typically have strongly anisotropic characteristics. Generalizing the eddy diffusivity tensor for anisotropy extends the number of parameters to three: a major diffusivity, a minor diffusivity, and the principal axis of alignment. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) with the anisotropic eddy parameterization is used to test various choices for the newly introduced parameters, which are motivated by observations and the eddy transport tensor diagnosed from high resolution simulations. Simply setting the ratio of major to minor diffusivities to a value of five globally, while aligning the major axis along the flow direction, improves biogeochemical tracer ventilation and reduces global temperature and salinity biases. These effects can be improved even further by parameterizing the anisotropic transport mechanisms in the ocean.

  10. Biogeochemial Cycling and Ocean Climate in the Maastrichtian: a Coupled Ecosystem-Physical Climate Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J.; Valdes, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Paleoclimate simulations of the Latest Cretaceous are presented, specifically for the Maastrichtian stage using the UK Met Office model HadCM3L. The vast majority of traditional paleoclimate simulation studies using General Circulation Models include representations of the atmosphere and ocean as well as a dynamic sea ice model. In this we study new presents model results from a GCM that also includes a detailed ocean biogeochemical scheme HadOCC. HadOCC is an ecosystem model, meaning it contains an explicit representation of planktonic species (both autotrophic phytoplankton and heterotrophic zooplankton) and is an NZPD model (Nutrient, Phytoplankton, Zooplankton, Detritus). It is also able to simulate air-sea gas exchange and primary productivity in the surface and near-surface as well as full ecosystem interaction throughout the water column. Compared to the present day, the Latest Cretaceous represents a very different world, both in terms of its atmospheric composition and in the configuration of the continents. It also offers the prospect of studying a past warm climate with significantly enhanced CO2 levels compared to the preindustrial era. For the simulations presented here, atmospheric CO2 levels are set to be four times their preindustrial values (290 parts per million). The combination of a very different continental configuration and hugely enhanced atmospheric CO2 levels results in a very different climate from what we know today. To first order, ocean temperatures are significantly higher and circulation patterns are very different. The combination of these fundamentally important ocean properties means that the resulting biological activity (which will be shown in an annual mean and seasonal sense) is able to provide clues as to which oceanic areas were more biologically active than others. Because of the fully dynamic and coupled nature of the biology and physics of this modelling framework, surface and benthic processes (and their interactions

  11. Numerical simulation of the Mindanao Eddy and Tropical Currents of Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rongfeng; Zeng, Qingcun; Ji, Zhongzhen

    1992-09-01

    Results of numerical simulation of currents in the western North Tropical Pacific Ocean by using a barotropic primitive equation model with fine horizontal resolution agreed well with observations and showed that the Mindanao Cyclonic Eddy located north of the equator and east of Mindanao Island exists during most of the year with monthly (and large seasonal) variations in scope, strength and central location. In June, an anticyclonic eddy occurs northeast of Halmahera Island, strength-circulation systems such as the North Equatorial Current, the Mindanao Current and the North Equatorial Countercurrent are all very well reproduced in the simulations.

  12. Model of Methane Hydrate Formation in Mid-ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrievsky, A. N.; Balanyuk, I. E.; Sorokhtin, O. G.; Matveenkov, V. V.; Dongaryan, L. Sh.

    2003-04-01

    MODEL OF METHANE HYDRATE FORMATION IN MID-OCEAN RIDGES A.N. Dmitrievsky, I.E. Balanyuk, O.G.Sorokhtin, V.V. Matveenkov, and L.Sh. Dongaryan P.P.Shirshov Institute of Oceanology Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia, balanyuk@sio.rssi.ru One among the most perspective direction in studying the ocean floor is the research of hydrothermal fields within the most active zones — rift valleys, where the processes of spreading of the ocean floor, uplift of the deep matter to the surface of the ocean floor, and creation of the new oceanic crust occur. Volcanic activity in these zones is accompanied with the formation of the hydrothermal system executing separation, transfer, and precipitation of a series of chemical elements. It is known that ore deposits with high concentration of iron, manganese, copper, nickel, cobalt are formed as a result of hydrothermal activity. It is much less known that hydrothermal activity in these zones has important but not so evident result — the formation of hydrocarbons in the form of methane hydrates. We propose the hypothesis of formation of methane hydrate deposits over the shallow slopes of the mid-oceanic ridges as an outcome of the action of two factors: the thermal convection of water in fractured-porous rocks of the crust and the reaction of serpentinization of the crust. The intensive exhalation of hydrocarbons takes place in the process of serpentinization. The conditions of water convection in the porous media are favorable for the formation and accumulation of methane hydrates in the near-surface layers of the oceanic crust. The carbonic-acid gas dissolved in the seawater is involved into the process of methane hydrate formation. It was established that the most favorable conditions for this mechanism are over the slopes of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. All types of water areas where gas hydrates occur can be conditionally subdivided into following geodynamic zones: the abyssal basins of the inner and marginal seas, the

  13. Simulation of actual terrain ocean tide in the bays with SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wang

    2017-02-01

    The real-time simulation of large-scale fluid scenes is of great value in both research and application. Water when relatively still has a well-defined surface; however, water changes its shape as it moves. In the case of ocean waves, features on the water’s surface move, but the water itself does not travel. The simple surface topology can become arbitrarily complex when the water becomes turbulent. Splashing, foaming, and breaking waves are complex processes best modeled by particle systems and volumetric techniques, but these techniques are inefficient in nonturbulent situations. Ocean tide in different bays can experience rotary tidal currents or other situation. We choose the physical-based SPH(smoothed particle hydrodynamics) fluid simulation method. SPH method belongs to particle method which is has no grid. The advantages of SPH are as follows: simulating liquid convection by particles directly to eliminate numerical fluctuation at free interface; grids unnecessary avoid grid distortion and reconstruction; simulating the fluid problem of significant transformation, especially in dealing the problems such as maximum distortion, the interface of motion material, the deformation boundary and free surface flow. Application of rapid neighboring particle search method, set the number of Department of Physics, as well as the presentation and rendering of fluid material, and finally use the Lagrangian method SPH system initialization and calculate the fluid density, pressure, internal forces and external forces, define the time integration and collision handling. With the analysis of physical-based ocean tide simulation, we can create the animation of the environment, and predict damage of ocean tide.

  14. Fifty years of numerical modeling of baroclinic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, A. S.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a brief critical analysis of the main historical stages of numerical modeling for the last fifty years. It was a half a century ago that the numerical simulation of an actual baroclinic ocean was initiated by the author and his students [1, 2]. In meteorology, studies on the numerical modeling of a baroclinic atmosphere existed much earlier [21, 22]. Despite this, a similar move in oceanography was met with strong resistance. At that time, there were many studies on the calculation of the total mass transport. The founders of this field, V.B. Shtokman, H. Sverdrup, and W. Munk, were mistaken in believing that they addressed baroclinic models of the ocean. The author preferred works by V. Ekman [12] and I. Sandström and B. Helland-Hansen [19]. A generalization of recent studies made it possible to come to some conclusions on the need to use the level of the free oceanic surface as a basis rather than the function of total mass transport, on the role of the baroclinic β effect (BARBE), on the joint effect of baroclinicity and bottom relief (JEBAR), etc. The author conditionally divides these fifty years into the following three stages. (1) The first stage was 1961-1969, when the author and his students performed almost exclusively diagnostic and adaptation calculations of climatic characteristics. (2) The second stage began with papers by K. Bryan [23] and his students. This is an important and promising stage involving mainly prognostic studies and four-dimensional analysis. The major advances in modeling at this stage (the Gulf Stream separation point [61], the Kuroshio seasonal evolution [63], the formation of the cold intermediate layer in the Black Sea [80], the subsurface countercurrent in the Caspian Sea [25], the realistic four-dimensional analysis of the Kara Sea [60], etc.) were due to high-resolution and/or data assimilation with an adequate period of integration. (3) The third stage began with the activities of international

  15. An assessment of a software simulation tool for lidar atmosphere and ocean measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, K. A.; Vaughan, M.; Burton, S. P.; Hair, J. W.; Hostetler, C. A.; Kowch, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    A high-fidelity lidar simulation tool is used to generate synthetic lidar backscatter data that closely matches the expected performance of various lidars, including the noise characteristics inherent to analog detection and uncertainties related to the measurement environment. This tool supports performance trade studies and scientific investigations for both the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), which flies aboard Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), and the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). CALIOP measures profiles of attenuated backscatter coefficients (532 and 1064 nm) and volume depolarization ratios at 532 nm. HSRL measures the same profiles plus volume depolarization at 1064 nm and a molecular-only profile which allows for the direct retrieval of aerosol extinction and backscatter profiles at 532 nm. The simulation tool models both the fundamental physics of the lidar instruments and the signals generated from aerosols, clouds, and the ocean surface and subsurface. This work presents the results of a study conducted to verify the accuracy of the simulated data using data from both HSRL and CALIOP. The tool was tuned to CALIOP instrument settings and the model atmosphere was defined using profiles of attenuated backscatter and depolarization obtained by HSRL during underflights of CALIPSO. The validated HSRL data provide highly accurate measurements of the particulate intensive and extensive optical properties and thus were considered as the truth atmosphere. The resulting simulated data were processed through the CALIPSO data analysis system. Comparisons showed good agreement between the simulated and CALIOP data. This verifies the accuracy of the tool to support studies involving the characterization of instrument components and advanced data analysis techniques. The capability of the tool to simulate ocean surface scattering and subsurface

  16. An update on modeling land-ice/ocean interactions in CESM

    SciTech Connect

    Asay-davis, Xylar

    2011-01-24

    This talk is an update on ongoing land-ice/ocean coupling work within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The coupling method is designed to allow simulation of a fully dynamic ice/ocean interface, while requiring minimal modification to the existing ocean model (the Parallel Ocean Program, POP). The method makes use of an immersed boundary method (IBM) to represent the geometry of the ice-ocean interface without requiring that the computational grid be modified in time. We show many of the remaining development challenges that need to be addressed in order to perform global, century long climate runs with fully coupled ocean and ice sheet models. These challenges include moving to a new grid where the computational pole is no longer at the true south pole and several changes to the coupler (the software tool used to communicate between model components) to allow the boundary between land and ocean to vary in time. We discuss benefits for ice/ocean coupling that would be gained from longer-term ocean model development to allow for natural salt fluxes (which conserve both water and salt mass, rather than water volume).

  17. Laboratory Simulations of Ammonia-Rich Oceans in Icy Worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vance, S. D.; Brown, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Improved equations of state for ammonia-water solutions are important for properly understanding the interiors of large icy satellites hosting deep interior oceans. Titan is the primary example of such a world, but water-rich dwarf planets Measurements of solution density are now possible at relevant pressures (above approx. 250 megapascals) using the Simulator for Icy World Interiors. Analysis of sound velocity measurements in aqueous magnesium sulfate obtained in our laboratory, shows a correction on the order of 5% to 700 megapascals (7 kilobar) from -20 to 100 C and to 3 m (approx. 30 percentage by weight) concentration. Accurate prediction of density as a function of pressure, temperature, and ammonia concentration are needed for interpretation of remote observations to address questions of interior liquid layer depth, composition, and fluid dynamics.

  18. Carbon isotopes in the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, A.; Lindsay, K.; Giraud, X.; Gruber, N.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Liu, Z.; Brady, E. C.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon isotopes in the ocean are frequently used as paleoclimate proxies and as present-day geochemical ocean tracers. In order to allow a more direct comparison of climate model results with this large and currently underutilized data set, we added a carbon isotope module to the ocean model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), containing the cycling of the stable isotope 13C and the radioactive isotope 14C. We implemented the 14C tracer in two ways: in the "abiotic" case, the 14C tracer is only subject to air-sea gas exchange, physical transport, and radioactive decay, while in the "biotic" version, the 14C additionally follows the 13C tracer through all biogeochemical and ecological processes. Thus, the abiotic 14C tracer can be run without the ecosystem module, requiring significantly fewer computational resources. The carbon isotope module calculates the carbon isotopic fractionation during gas exchange, photosynthesis, and calcium carbonate formation, while any subsequent biological process such as remineralization as well as any external inputs are assumed to occur without fractionation. Given the uncertainty associated with the biological fractionation during photosynthesis, we implemented and tested three parameterizations of different complexity. Compared to present-day observations, the model is able to simulate the oceanic 14C bomb uptake and the 13C Suess effect reasonably well compared to observations and other model studies. At the same time, the carbon isotopes reveal biases in the physical model, for example, too sluggish ventilation of the deep Pacific Ocean.

  19. Report Viewgraphs for IC Project: Fully-coupled climate simulations with an eddy-permitting ocean component

    SciTech Connect

    Veneziani, Carmela

    2016-07-25

    Two sets of simulations were performed within this allocation: 1) a 12-year fully-coupled experiment in pre-industrial conditions, using the CICE4 version of the sea-ice model; 2) a set of multi-decadal ocean-ice-only experiments, forced with CORE-I atmospheric fields and using the CICE5 version of the sea-ice model.

  20. Model Calculations of Ocean Acidification at the End Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrrell, T.; Merico, A.; Armstrong McKay, D. I.

    2014-12-01

    Most episodes of ocean acidification (OA) in Earth's past were either too slow or too minor to provide useful lessons for understanding the present. The end-Cretaceous event (66 Mya) is special in this sense, both because of its rapid onset and also because many calcifying species (including 100% of ammonites and >95% of calcareous nannoplankton and planktonic foraminifera) went extinct at this time. We used box models of the ocean carbon cycle to evaluate whether impact-generated OA could feasibly have been responsible for the calcifier mass extinctions. We simulated several proposed consequences of the asteroid impact: (1) vaporisation of gypsum (CaSO4) and carbonate (CaCO3) rocks at the point of impact, producing sulphuric acid and CO2 respectively; (2) generation of NOx by the impact pressure wave and other sources, producing nitric acid; (3) release of CO2 from wildfires, biomass decay and disinterring of fossil organic carbon and hydrocarbons; and (4) ocean stirring leading to introduction into the surface layer of deep water with elevated CO2. We simulated additions over: (A) a few years (e-folding time of 6 months), and also (B) a few days (e-folding time of 10 hours) for SO4 and NOx, as recently proposed by Ohno et al (2014. Nature Geoscience, 7:279-282). Sulphuric acid as a consequence of gypsum vaporisation was found to be the most important acidifying process. Results will also be presented of the amounts of SO4 required to make the surface ocean become extremely undersaturated (Ωcalcite<0.5) for different e-folding times and combinations of processes. These will be compared to estimates in the literature of how much SO4 was actually released.

  1. Ocean forecasting in terrain-following coordinates: Formulation and skill assessment of the Regional Ocean Modeling System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haidvogel, D.B.; Arango, H.; Budgell, W.P.; Cornuelle, B.D.; Curchitser, E.; Di, Lorenzo E.; Fennel, K.; Geyer, W.R.; Hermann, A.J.; Lanerolle, L.; Levin, J.; McWilliams, J.C.; Miller, A.J.; Moore, A.M.; Powell, T.M.; Shchepetkin, A.F.; Sherwood, C.R.; Signell, R.P.; Warner, J.C.; Wilkin, J.

    2008-01-01

    Systematic improvements in algorithmic design of regional ocean circulation models have led to significant enhancement in simulation ability across a wide range of space/time scales and marine system types. As an example, we briefly review the Regional Ocean Modeling System, a member of a general class of three-dimensional, free-surface, terrain-following numerical models. Noteworthy characteristics of the ROMS computational kernel include: consistent temporal averaging of the barotropic mode to guarantee both exact conservation and constancy preservation properties for tracers; redefined barotropic pressure-gradient terms to account for local variations in the density field; vertical interpolation performed using conservative parabolic splines; and higher-order, quasi-monotone advection algorithms. Examples of quantitative skill assessment are shown for a tidally driven estuary, an ice-covered high-latitude sea, a wind- and buoyancy-forced continental shelf, and a mid-latitude ocean basin. The combination of moderate-order spatial approximations, enhanced conservation properties, and quasi-monotone advection produces both more robust and accurate, and less diffusive, solutions than those produced in earlier terrain-following ocean models. Together with advanced methods of data assimilation and novel observing system technologies, these capabilities constitute the necessary ingredients for multi-purpose regional ocean prediction systems. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of ocean and atmosphere coupling in a regional climate simulation: case study on typhoons over the CORDEX Southeast Asia domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remedio, A. R. C.; Sein, D.; Hodges, K.; Koldunov, N.; Daniela, J.

    2015-12-01

    Coupling of ocean to the atmosphere can potentially improve climate simulations including cyclonic activities within a region heavily influenced by the ocean-atmosphere interactions. From previous studies, atmosphere-only simulations have a tendency to produce higher number of cyclones compared to observations. In this study, REMO coupled with the Max Planck Institute Ocean Model or ROM, which is a regional atmosphere coupled with a global ocean model, is used to evaluate the impact of the atmosphere-ocean interaction to the tropical climate focusing on the typhoon activities. The aim is to identify the importance of the atmosphere-ocean coupling in the CORDEX Southeast Asia domain. The model domain spans 80 E to 180E and -15 S to 40 N, with a horizontal resolution of about 50 km and 27 hybrid vertical levels. The model is driven by the ERA-Interim reanalysis and run from the period of 1980 to 2012. To compare the influence of atmosphere-ocean coupling, the atmospheric model is also run uncoupled. Results on the simulated precipitation and temperature are compared to observations as well the changes in the tropical cyclone activity. Preliminary results indicate that the warm and wet biases over the ocean in the uncoupled simulations are reduced in the coupled simulations especially during the typhoon season. The frequency of typhoon occurrences is lower compared to the uncoupled model and is comparable to observations.

  3. Numerical noise in ocean and estuarine models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.; Carey, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate methods for solving the shallow water equations may lead to solutions exhibiting large fictitious, numerically-induced oscillations. The analysis of the discrete dispersion relation and modal solutions of small wavelengths provides a powerful technique for assessing the sensitivity of alternative numerical schemes to irregular data which may lead to such oscillatory numerical noise. For those schemes where phase speed vanishes at a finite wavenumber or there are multiple roots for wavenumber, oscillation modes can exist which are uncoupled from the dynamics of the problem. The discrete modal analysis approach is used here to identify two classes of spurious oscillation modes associated respectively with the two different asymptotic limits corresponding to estuarine and large scale ocean models. The analysis provides further insight into recent numerical results for models which include large spatial scales and Coriolis acceleration. ?? 1984.

  4. Upscalling processes in an ocean-atmosphere multiscale coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, S. G.; Berthet, S.; Samson, G.; Crétat, J.; Colas, F.; Echevin, V.; Jullien, S.; Hourdin, C.

    2015-12-01

    This work explores new pathways toward a better representation of the multi-scale physics that drive climate variability. We are analysing the key upscaling processes by which small-scale localized errors have a knock-on effect onto global climate. We focus on the Peru-Chilli coastal upwelling, an area known to hold among the strongest models biases in the Tropics. Our approach is based on the development of a multiscale coupling interface allowing us to couple WRF with the NEMO oceanic model in a configuration including 2-way nested zooms in the oceanic and/or the atmospheric component of the coupled model. Upscalling processes are evidenced and quantified by comparing three 20-year long simulations of a tropical channel (45°S-45°N), which differ by their horizontal resolution: 0.75° everywhere, 0.75°+0.25° zoom in the southeastern Pacific or 0.25° everywhere. This set of three 20-year long simulations was repeated with 3 different sets of parameterizations to assess the robustness of our results. Our results show that adding an embedded zoom over the southeastern Pacific only in the atmosphere cools down the SST along the Peru-Chili coast, which is a clear improvement. This change is associated with a displacement of the low-level cloud cover, which moves closer to the coast cooling further the coastal area SST. Offshore, we observe the opposite effect with a reduction of the cloud cover with higher resolution, which increases solar radiation and warms the SST. Increasing the resolution in the oceanic component show contrasting results according to the different set parameterization used in the experiments. Some experiment shows a coastal cooling as expected, whereas, in other cases, we observe a counterintuitive response with a warming of the coastal SST. Using at the same time an oceanic and an atmospheric zoom mostly combines the results obtained when using the 2-way nesting in only one component of the coupled model. In the best case, we archive by this

  5. Radiative Transfer Simulations of the Two-Dimensional Ocean Glint Reflectance and Determination of the Sea Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zhenyi; Li, Wei; Gatebe, Charles; Poudyal, Rajesh; Stamnes, Knut

    2016-01-01

    An optimized discrete-ordinate radiative transfer model (DISORT3) with a pseudo-two-dimensional bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is used to simulate and validate ocean glint reflectances at an infrared wavelength (1036 nm) by matching model results with a complete set of BRDF measurements obtained from the NASA cloud absorption radiometer (CAR) deployed on an aircraft. The surface roughness is then obtained through a retrieval algorithm and is used to extend the simulation into the visible spectral range where diffuse reflectance becomes important. In general, the simulated reflectances and surface roughness information are in good agreement with the measurements, and the diffuse reflectance in the visible, ignored in current glint algorithms, is shown to be important. The successful implementation of this new treatment of ocean glint reflectance and surface roughness in DISORT3 will help improve glint correction algorithms in current and future ocean color remote sensing applications.

  6. Ocean circulation modeling by use of radar altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olbers, Dirk; Alpers, W.; Hasselmann, K.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Kase, R.; Krauss, W.; Siedler, G.; Willebrand, J.; Zahel, W.

    1991-01-01

    The project will investigate the use of radar altimetry (RA) data in the determination of the ocean circulation models. RA data will be used to verify prognostic experiments of the steady state and seasonal cycle of large-scale circulation models and the statistical steady state of eddy-resolving models. The data will serve as initial and update conditions in data assimilation experiments and as constraints in inverse calculations. The aim of the project is a better understanding of ocean physics, the determination and mapping of ocean currents, and a contribution to the establishment of ocean circulation models for climate studies. The goal of the project is to use satellite radar altimetry data for improving our knowledge of ocean circulation both in a descriptive sense and through the physics that govern the circulation state. The basic tool is a series of ocean circulation models. Depending on the model, different techniques will be applied to incorporate the RA data.

  7. Submesoscale Flows and Mixing in the Ocean Surface Layer Using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Submesoscale Flows and Mixing in the Ocean Surface Layer Using the Regional...long-term goals of this project are to further the insight into the dynamics of submesoscale flow in the oceanic surface layer. Using the regional...oceanic modeling system (ROMS) we aim to understand the impact of submesoscale processes on the mixing at small scales of tracers and the transfer of

  8. Sensitivity of a climatologically-driven sea ice model to the ocean heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, C. L.; Good, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    Ocean heat flux sensitivity was studied on a numerical model of sea ice covering the Weddell Sea region of the southern ocean. The model is driven by mean monthly climatological atmospheric variables. For each model run, the ocean heat flux is uniform in both space and time. Ocean heat fluxes below 20 W m to the minus 2 power do not provide sufficient energy to allow the ice to melt to its summertime thicknesses and concentrations by the end of the 14 month simulation, whereas ocean heat fluxes of 30 W m to the minus 2 power and above result in too much ice melt, producing the almost total disappearance of ice in the Weddell Sea by the end of the 14 months. These results are dependent on the atmospheric forcing fields.

  9. Climate modeling over the Mediterranean Sea: impact of resolution and ocean coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akthar, Naveed; Brauch, Jennifer; Ahrens, Bodo

    2017-02-01

    Feedback between the Mediterranean Sea and the atmosphere on various temporal and spatial scales plays a major role in the regional climate system. We studied the impact of horizontal atmospheric grid resolution (grid-spacing of 9 vs. 50 km) and dynamic ocean coupling (the ocean model NEMOMED12) in simulations with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM. The evaluation focused on sea surface heat fluxes, 10-m wind speed, and sea surface temperature (SST) parameters on both seasonal and annual timescales. The finer grid improved the wind speed (particularly near coastal areas) and subsequently the turbulent heat flux simulations. Both parameters were better simulated with the interactive ocean model NEMOMED12 than with prescribed daily ocean SSTs (using near-observation ERA-Interim reanalysis based SSTs), but coupling introduced a warm SST bias in winter. Radiation fluxes were slightly better represented in coarse-grid simulations. Still, only the higher-resolution coupled simulations could reproduce the observed net outgoing total heat flux over the Mediterranean Sea. Investigation of the impact of sub-diurnal SST variations showed a strong effect on sub-daily heat fluxes and wind speed but minor effects at longer time scales. Therefore, a coupled atmosphere-ocean climate model should be preferred for studying the Mediterranean Sea climate system. Higher-resolution models should be preferred, but they are not yet able to perform better than their coarse-resolution predecessors in all aspects.

  10. Simulating oceanic CaCO3 export production in the greenhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, C.

    2004-08-01

    A model scenario for the change in global marine biogenic CaCO3 export production (CaCO3 = calcium carbonate) due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure is carried out. Findings from laboratory experiments, which suggest a decrease of biocalcification at higher pCO2, are extrapolated to the world ocean by use of the biogeochemical ocean general circulation model HAMOCC. For an A1B IPCC emission scenario and constant emission rates after year 2100, the simulation predicts a global decrease of biological CaCO3 export production by about 50% in year 2250. The negative feedback due to this drop in CaCO3 export on the atmospheric CO2 concentration is small as compared to the anthropogenic CO2 emissions. This negative feedback will potentially be compensated by a shallower remineralization of organic carbon.

  11. Adaptive wavelet simulation of global ocean dynamics using a new Brinkman volume penalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevlahan, N. K.-R.; Dubos, T.; Aechtner, M.

    2015-12-01

    In order to easily enforce solid-wall boundary conditions in the presence of complex coastlines, we propose a new mass and energy conserving Brinkman penalization for the rotating shallow water equations. This penalization does not lead to higher wave speeds in the solid region. The error estimates for the penalization are derived analytically and verified numerically for linearized one-dimensional equations. The penalization is implemented in a conservative dynamically adaptive wavelet method for the rotating shallow water equations on the sphere with bathymetry and coastline data from NOAA's ETOPO1 database. This code could form the dynamical core for a future global ocean model. The potential of the dynamically adaptive ocean model is illustrated by using it to simulate the 2004 Indonesian tsunami and wind-driven gyres.

  12. Natural ocean carbon cycle sensitivity to parameterizations of the recycling in a climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanou, A.; Romanski, J.; Gregg, W. W.

    2014-02-01

    Sensitivities of the oceanic biological pump within the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies ) climate modeling system are explored here. Results are presented from twin control simulations of the air-sea CO2 gas exchange using two different ocean models coupled to the same atmosphere. The two ocean models (Russell ocean model and Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, HYCOM) use different vertical coordinate systems, and therefore different representations of column physics. Both variants of the GISS climate model are coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (the NASA Ocean Biogeochemistry Model, NOBM), which computes prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2 and the deep ocean carbon transport and storage. In particular, the model differences due to remineralization rate changes are compared to differences attributed to physical processes modeled differently in the two ocean models such as ventilation, mixing, eddy stirring and vertical advection. GISSEH(GISSER) is found to underestimate mixed layer depth compared to observations by about 55% (10%) in the Southern Ocean and overestimate it by about 17% (underestimate by 2%) in the northern high latitudes. Everywhere else in the global ocean, the two models underestimate the surface mixing by about 12-34%, which prevents deep nutrients from reaching the surface and promoting primary production there. Consequently, carbon export is reduced because of reduced production at the surface. Furthermore, carbon export is particularly sensitive to remineralization rate changes in the frontal regions of the subtropical gyres and at the Equator and this sensitivity in the model is much higher than the sensitivity to physical processes such as vertical mixing, vertical advection and mesoscale eddy transport. At depth, GISSER, which has a significant warm bias, remineralizes nutrients and carbon faster thereby producing more nutrients and carbon at depth, which

  13. Natural Ocean Carbon Cycle Sensitivity to Parameterizations of the Recycling in a Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanou, A.; Romanski, J.; Gregg, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivities of the oceanic biological pump within the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies ) climate modeling system are explored here. Results are presented from twin control simulations of the air-sea CO2 gas exchange using two different ocean models coupled to the same atmosphere. The two ocean models (Russell ocean model and Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, HYCOM) use different vertical coordinate systems, and therefore different representations of column physics. Both variants of the GISS climate model are coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (the NASA Ocean Biogeochemistry Model, NOBM), which computes prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2 and the deep ocean carbon transport and storage. In particular, the model differences due to remineralization rate changes are compared to differences attributed to physical processes modeled differently in the two ocean models such as ventilation, mixing, eddy stirring and vertical advection. GISSEH(GISSER) is found to underestimate mixed layer depth compared to observations by about 55% (10 %) in the Southern Ocean and overestimate it by about 17% (underestimate by 2%) in the northern high latitudes. Everywhere else in the global ocean, the two models underestimate the surface mixing by about 12-34 %, which prevents deep nutrients from reaching the surface and promoting primary production there. Consequently, carbon export is reduced because of reduced production at the surface. Furthermore, carbon export is particularly sensitive to remineralization rate changes in the frontal regions of the subtropical gyres and at the Equator and this sensitivity in the model is much higher than the sensitivity to physical processes such as vertical mixing, vertical advection and mesoscale eddy transport. At depth, GISSER, which has a significant warm bias, remineralizes nutrients and carbon faster thereby producing more nutrients and carbon at depth, which

  14. Tracking the long-distance dispersal of marine organisms: sensitivity to ocean model resolution.

    PubMed

    Putman, Nathan F; He, Ruoying

    2013-04-06

    Ocean circulation models are widely used to simulate organism transport in the open sea, where challenges of directly tracking organisms across vast spatial and temporal scales are daunting. Many recent studies tout the use of 'high-resolution' models, which are forced with atmospheric data on the scale of several hours and integrated with a time step of several minutes or seconds. However, in many cases, the model's outputs that are used to simulate organism movement have been averaged to considerably coarser resolutions (e.g. monthly mean velocity fields). To examine the sensitivity of tracking results to ocean circulation model output resolution, we took the native model output of one of the most sophisticated ocean circulation models available, the Global Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, and averaged it to commonly implemented spatial and temporal resolutions in studies of basin-scale dispersal. Comparisons between simulated particle trajectories and in situ near-surface drifter trajectories indicated that 'over averaging' model output yields predictions inconsistent with observations. Further analyses focused on the dispersal of juvenile sea turtles indicate that very different inferences regarding the pelagic ecology of these animals are obtained depending on the resolution of model output. We conclude that physical processes occurring at the scale of days and tens of kilometres should be preserved in ocean circulation model output to realistically depict the movement marine organisms and the resulting ecological and evolutionary processes.

  15. Comparison of a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model with and without Oceanic Eddy-Induced Advection. Part I: Ocean Spinup and Control Integrations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Anthony C.; O'Farrell, Siobhan P.; Gordon, Hal B.

    2000-01-01

    The Gent and McWilliams (GM) parameterization for large-scale water transport caused by mesoscale oceanic eddies is introduced into the oceanic component of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation global coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Parallel simulations with and without the GM scheme are performed to examine the effect of this parameterization on the model behavior for integrations lasting several centuries under conditions of constant atmospheric CO2. The solution of the version with GM shows several significant improvements over that of the earlier version. First, the generally beneficial effects of the GM scheme found previously in studies of stand-alone ocean models, including more realistic deep water properties, increased stratification, reduced high-latitude convection, elimination of fictitious horizontal diffusive heat transport, and more realistic surface fluxes in some regions, are all maintained during the coupled integration. These improvements are especially pronounced in the high-latitude Southern Ocean. Second, the magnitude of flux adjustment is reduced in the GM version, mainly because of smaller surface fluxes at high southern latitudes in the GM ocean spinup. Third, the GM version displays markedly reduced climate drift in comparison to the earlier version. Analysis in the present study verifies previous indications that changes in the pattern of convective heat flux are central to the drift in the earlier version, supporting the view that reduced convective behavior in the GM version contributes to the reduction in drift. Based on the satisfactory behavior of the GM model version, the GM coupled integration is continued for a full 1000 yr. Key aspects of the model behavior during this longer period are also presented. Interannual variability of surface air temperature in the two model versions is briefly examined using some simple measures of magnitude. The variability differs between the two versions regionally, but

  16. Application of a Topological Metric for Assessing Numerical Ocean Models with Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morey, S. L.; Dukhovskoy, D. S.; Hiester, H. R.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.; MacDonald, I. R.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite-based sensors provide a vast amount of observational data over the world ocean. Active microwave radars measure changes in sea surface height and backscattering from surface waves. Data from passive radiometers sensing emissions in multiple spectral bands can directly measure surface temperature, be combined with other data sources to estimate salinity, or processed to derive estimates of optically significant quantities, such as concentrations of biochemical properties. Estimates of the hydrographic variables can be readily used for assimilation or assessment of hydrodynamic ocean models. Optical data, however, have been underutilized in ocean circulation modeling. Qualitative assessments of oceanic fronts and other features commonly associated with changes in optically significant quantities are often made through visual comparison. This project applies a topological approach, borrowed from the field of computer image recognition, to quantitatively evaluate ocean model simulations of features that are related to quantities inferred from satellite imagery. The Modified Hausdorff Distance (MHD) provides a measure of the similarity of two shapes. Examples of applications of the MHD to assess ocean circulation models are presented. The first application assesses several models' representation of the freshwater plume structure from the Mississippi River, which is associated with a significant expression of color, using a satellite-derived ocean color index. Even though the variables being compared (salinity and ocean color index) differ, the MHD allows contours of the fields to be compared topologically. The second application assesses simulations of surface oil transport driven by winds and ocean model currents using surface oil maps derived from synthetic aperture radar backscatter data. In this case, maps of time composited oil coverage are compared between the simulations and satellite observations.

  17. Distribution of carbon isotopes in the glacial ocean: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crucifix, Michel

    2005-12-01

    A series of simulations are conducted with a global climate model of intermediate complexity (MoBidiC). This model includes ocean circulation dynamics, including the carbon cycle, coupled to a zonally averaged atmosphere. Oceanic distributions of nutrients, apparent oxygen utilization, radiocarbon, and carbon 13 are discussed for the preindustrial era (validation) as well as three states of the glacial ocean, termed interstadial (very active formation of deep water in the North Atlantic Ocean), stadial (moderate convection and important flow of Antarctic Deep Water in the Atlantic), and Heinrich (no formation of North Atlantic Deep Water). The stadial and interstadial states are stable. The Heinrich state is forced by a continuous freshwater discharge into the North Atlantic. The model exhibits significant changes in the isotopic composition of the ocean between the three modeled glacial states. Results for δ13C tend to be in qualitative agreement with paleoceanographic data, except that the model fails at representing the strong depletion in δ13C in the Southern Ocean. The Heinrich Atlantic Ocean is older than the stadial ocean at all depths (up to 1500 years). The "interstadial" ocean has younger deep water and older intermediate water than the "stadial." It is recognized that the simulated changes in intermediate water age are less reliable because of the structure of the model. Color tracers are used to show that changes in the isotopic composition of Atlantic bottom water are mainly related to a redistribution of water masses. A simple method is tested, by which it is possible to reconstruct the North Atlantic water flow from the zonal profiles of salinity and Δ14C. Finally, dividing artificially the gas exchange rate in the Southern Ocean by four results in a 0.4‰ decrease in the δ13C of Antarctic Bottom Water. Changes in new production are, comparatively, less effective at altering the δ13C ratio.

  18. Quantifying Key Climate Parameter Uncertainties Using an Earth System Model with a Dynamic 3D Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R.; Sriver, R. L.; Goes, M. P.; Urban, N.; Matthews, D.; Haran, M.; Keller, K.

    2011-12-01

    Climate projections hinge critically on uncertain climate model parameters such as climate sensitivity, vertical ocean diffusivity and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol forcings. Climate sensitivity is defined as the equilibrium global mean temperature response to a doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Vertical ocean diffusivity parameterizes sub-grid scale ocean vertical mixing processes. These parameters are typically estimated using Intermediate Complexity Earth System Models (EMICs) that lack a full 3D representation of the oceans, thereby neglecting the effects of mixing on ocean dynamics and meridional overturning. We improve on these studies by employing an EMIC with a dynamic 3D ocean model to estimate these parameters. We carry out historical climate simulations with the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) varying parameters that affect climate sensitivity, vertical ocean mixing, and effects of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. We use a Bayesian approach whereby the likelihood of each parameter combination depends on how well the model simulates surface air temperature and upper ocean heat content. We use a Gaussian process emulator to interpolate the model output to an arbitrary parameter setting. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to estimate the posterior probability distribution function (pdf) of these parameters. We explore the sensitivity of the results to prior assumptions about the parameters. In addition, we estimate the relative skill of different observations to constrain the parameters. We quantify the uncertainty in parameter estimates stemming from climate variability, model and observational errors. We explore the sensitivity of key decision-relevant climate projections to these parameters. We find that climate sensitivity and vertical ocean diffusivity estimates are consistent with previously published results. The climate sensitivity pdf is strongly affected by the prior assumptions, and by the scaling

  19. Numerical simulation of small-scale mixing processes in the upper ocean and atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O.; Troitskaya, Yu; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of turbulent mixing and momentum and heat exchange occur in the upper ocean at depths up to several dozens of meters and in the atmospheric boundary layer within interval of millimeters to dozens of meters and can not be resolved by known large- scale climate models. Thus small-scale processes need to be parameterized with respect to large scale fields. This parameterization involves the so-called bulk coefficients which relate turbulent fluxes with large-scale fields gradients. The bulk coefficients are dependent on the properties of the small-scale mixing processes which are affected by the upper-ocean stratification and characteristics of surface and internal waves. These dependencies are not well understood at present and need to be clarified. We employ Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) as a research tool which resolves all relevant flow scales and does not require closure assumptions typical of Large-Eddy and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (LES and RANS). Thus DNS provides a solid ground for correct parameterization of small-scale mixing processes and also can be used for improving LES and RANS closure models. In particular, we discuss the problems of the interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves propagating in the pycnocline in the upper ocean as well as the impact of surface waves on the properties of atmospheric boundary layer over wavy water surface.

  20. Decadal-Scale Response of the Antarctic Ice sheet to a Warming Ocean using the POPSICLES Coupled Ice Sheet-Ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D. F.; Asay-Davis, X.; Cornford, S. L.; Price, S. F.; Ng, E. G.; Collins, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present POPSICLES simulation results covering the full Antarctic Ice Sheet and the Southern Ocean spanning the period from 1990 to 2010. We use the CORE v. 2 interannual forcing data to force the ocean model. Simulations are performed at 0.1o(~5 km) ocean resolution with adaptive ice sheet resolution as fine as 500 m to adequately resolve the grounding line dynamics. We discuss the effect of improved ocean mixing and subshelf bathymetry (vs. the standard Bedmap2 bathymetry) on the behavior of the coupled system, comparing time-averaged melt rates below a number of major ice shelves with those reported in the literature. We also present seasonal variability and decadal melting trends from several Antarctic regions, along with the response of the ice shelves and the consequent dynamic response of the grounded ice sheet.POPSICLES couples the POP2x ocean model, a modified version of the Parallel Ocean Program, and the BISICLES ice-sheet model. POP2x includes sub-ice-shelf circulation using partial top cells and the commonly used three-equation boundary layer physics. Standalone POP2x output compares well with standard ice-ocean test cases (e.g., ISOMIP) and other continental-scale simulations and melt-rate observations. BISICLES makes use of adaptive mesh refinement and a 1st-order accurate momentum balance similar to the L1L2 model of Schoof and Hindmarsh to accurately model regions of dynamic complexity, such as ice streams, outlet glaciers, and grounding lines. Results of BISICLES simulations have compared favorably to comparable simulations with a Stokes momentum balance in both idealized tests (MISMIP-3d) and realistic configurations.The figure shows the BISICLES-computed vertically-integrated grounded ice velocity field 5 years into a 20-year coupled full-continent Antarctic-Southern-Ocean simulation. Submarine melt rates are painted onto the surface of the floating ice shelves. Grounding lines are shown in green.

  1. Oceanic radiance model development and validation: application of airborne active-passive ocean color spectral measurements.

    PubMed

    Hoge, F E; Swift, R; Yungel, J

    1995-06-20

    It is shown that airborne active-passive (laser-solar) ocean color data can be used to develop and validate oceanic radiance models. The two principal inputs to the oceanic radiance model, chlorophyll pigment and incident solar irradiance, are obtained from a nadir-viewing laser-induced fluorescence spectrometer and a zenith-viewing radiometer, respectively. The computed water-leaving radiances are validated by comparison with the calibrated output of a separate nadir-viewing radiometer subsystem. In the North Atlantic Ocean, the calculated and the observed airborne radiances are found to compare very favorably for the 443-, 520-, and 550-nm wavelengths over an ∼ 170-km flight track east of St. John's, Newfoundland. The results further suggest that the semianalytical radiance model of ocean color, the airborne active (laser) fluorescence spectrometer, and the passive (solar) radiometric instrumentation are all remarkably precise.

  2. Response of a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Greenland Ice Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stammer, D.; Agarwal, N.; Herrmann, P.; Köhl, A.; Mechoso, C. R.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the transient response of the global coupled ocean-atmosphere system to enhanced freshwater forcing representative of melting of the Greenland ice sheets. A 50-year long simulation by a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (CGCM) is compared with another of the same length in which Greenland melting is prescribed. To highlight the importance of coupled atmosphere-ocean processes, the CGCM results are compared with those of two other experiments carried out with the oceanic general circulation model (OGCM). In one of these OGCM experiments, the prescribed surface fluxes of heat, momentum and freshwater correspond to the unperturbed simulation by the CGCM; in the other experiment, Greenland melting is added to the freshwater flux. The responses by the CGCM and OGCM to the Greenland melting have similar patterns in the Atlantic, albeit the former having five times larger amplitudes in sea surface height anomalies. The CGCM shows likewise stronger variability in all state variables in all ocean basins because the impact of Greenland melting is quickly communicated to all ocean basins via atmospheric bridges. We conclude that the response of the global climate to Greenland ice melting is highly dependent on coupled atmosphere-ocean processes. These lead to reduced latent heat flux into the atmosphere and an associated increase in net freshwater flux into the ocean, especially in the subpolar North Atlantic. The combined result is a stronger response of the coupled system to Greenland ice sheet melting.

  3. Development of a global ocean mercury model with a methylation cycle: Outstanding issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniuk, Kirill; Dastoor, Ashu

    2017-02-01

    We present a newly developed global ocean mercury (Hg) transport and biogeochemistry model and use preanthropogenic equilibrium simulations to highlight physical and chemical processes which reveal significant knowledge gaps that need to be addressed. As with previous 3-D ocean Hg model work we use a bulk chemistry scheme based on particulate organic carbon remineralization. We also include an explicit methylation cycle based on available reaction rates. The methylation to demethylation rate ratio based on various field studies is found to be inconsistent with the concentration ratios measured in the Southern Ocean around Antarctica and in the Arctic. There is also model-measurement disagreement in the old waters of the tropical and North Pacific Ocean. The model produces an intermediate water maximum in total Hg in this region reflecting the higher age of water which is absent in observations. The model also underestimates total Hg concentrations in the deepest waters in this region. These disagreements in depth profile shape point to an inadequate representation of scavenging and sedimentation and possibly seabed emission or remobilization of Hg. In addition, the total Hg distribution differences compared to previous model work reflect sensitivity to ocean model transport characteristics and in particular the tracer diffusion. The residence time of Hg in the global ocean and the surface evasion flux of elemental Hg is sensitive to such model aspects. We find a global ocean Hg turnover time against sediment burial to be about 1100 years which is within the range of previous studies.

  4. Sensitivity of a global coupled ocean-sea ice model to the parameterization of vertical mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goosse, H.; Deleersnijder, E.; Fichefet, T.; England, M. H.

    1999-06-01

    Three numerical experiments have been carried out with a global coupled ice-ocean model to investigate its sensitivity to the treatment of vertical mixing in the upper ocean. In the first experiment, a widely used fixed profile of vertical diffusivity and viscosity is imposed, with large values in the upper 50 m to crudely represent wind-driven mixing. In the second experiment, the eddy coefficients are functions of the Richardson number, and, in the third case, a relatively sophisticated parameterization, based on the turbulence closure scheme of Mellor and Yamada version 2.5, is introduced. We monitor the way the different mixing schemes affect the simulated ocean ventilation, water mass properties, and sea ice distributions. CFC uptake is also diagnosed in the model experiments. The simulation of the mixed layer depth is improved in the experiment which includes the sophisticated turbulence closure scheme. This results in a good representation of the upper ocean thermohaline structure and in heat exchange with the atmosphere within the range of current estimates. However, the error in heat flux in the experiment with simple fixed vertical mixing coefficients can be as high as 50 W m-2 in zonal mean during summer. Using CFC tracers allows us to demonstrate that the ventilation of the deep ocean is not significantly influenced by the parameterization of vertical mixing in the upper ocean. The only exception is the Southern Ocean. There, the ventilation is too strong in all three experiments. However, modifications of the vertical diffusivity and, surprisingly, the vertical viscosity significantly affect the stability of the water column in this region through their influence on upper ocean salinity, resulting in a more realistic Southern Ocean circulation. The turbulence scheme also results in an improved simulation of Antarctic sea ice coverage. This is due to to a better simulation of the mixed layer depth and thus of heat exchanges between ice and ocean. The

  5. SAR image simulation in the time domain for moving ocean surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takero; Rheem, Chang-Kyu

    2013-04-02

    This paper presents a fundamental simulation method to generate synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images for moving ocean surfaces. We have designed the simulation based on motion induced modulations and Bragg scattering, which are important features of ocean SAR images. The time domain simulation is able to obtain time series of microwave backscattering modulated by the orbital motions of ocean waves. Physical optics approximation is applied to calculate microwave backscattering. The computational grids are smaller than transmit microwave to demonstrate accurate interaction between electromagnetic waves and ocean surface waves. In this paper, as foundations for SAR image simulation of moving ocean surfaces, the simulation is carried out for some targets and ocean waves. The SAR images of stationary and moving targets are simulated to confirm SAR signal processing and motion induced modulation. Furthermore, the azimuth signals from the regular wave traveling to the azimuth direction also show the azimuthal shifts due to the orbital motions. In addition, incident angle dependence is simulated for irregular wind waves to compare with Bragg scattering theory. The simulation results are in good agreement with the theory. These results show that the simulation is applicable for generating numerical SAR images of moving ocean surfaces.

  6. Use of Envisat RA2 Sea Level Observations in the Bluelink Ocean Modelling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, David A.; Oke, Peter R.; Cahill, Madeline L.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite and in-situ components of the Global Ocean Observing System are assimilated into the Bluelink mesoscale-resolving global ocean model in order to produce both hindcasts and forecasts of the three- dimensional physical state of the ocean. Sea level anomaly estimates provided by the RA2 altimeter embarked on Envisat are an essential inclusion (along with data from Jason-1 and -2) in the data set. We show that with three altimeters in use, the basic features of many rapidly evolving mesoscale features can successfully be simulated in a global ocean model. This has been verified using un-assimilated surface-drifting buoys, and other data. Many successful applications of the system have now been made. Here, we describe how the search for a WWII wreck off Brisbane was assisted by information on ocean currents, and discuss an interesting case of coastal water temperatures near Sydney exceeding climatology by 4o in May 2010.

  7. Finding the driver of local ocean-atmosphere coupling in reanalyses and CMIP5 climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Barradas, Alfredo; Kalnay, Eugenia; Peña, Malaquías; BozorgMagham, Amir E.; Motesharrei, Safa

    2016-06-01

    Identification of the driver of coupled anomalies in the climate system is of great importance for a better understanding of the system and for its use in predictive efforts with climate models. The present analysis examines the robustness of a physical method proposed three decades ago to identify coupled anomalies as of atmospheric or oceanic origin by analyzing 850 mb vorticity and sea surface temperature anomalies. The method is then used as a metric to assess the coupling in climate simulations and a 30-year hindcast from models of the CMIP5 project. Analysis of the frequency of coupled anomalies exceeding one standard deviation from uncoupled NCEP/NCAR and ERA-Interim and partially coupled CFSR reanalyses shows robustness in the main results: anomalies of oceanic origin arise inside the deep tropics and those of atmospheric origin outside of the tropics. Coupled anomalies occupy similar regions in the global oceans independently of the spatiotemporal resolution. Exclusion of phenomena like ENSO, NAO, or AMO has regional effects on the distribution and origin of coupled anomalies; the absence of ENSO decreases anomalies of oceanic origin and favors those of atmospheric origin. Coupled model simulations in general agree with the distribution of anomalies of atmospheric and oceanic origin from reanalyses. However, the lack of the feedback from the atmosphere to the ocean in the AMIP simulations reduces substantially the number of coupled anomalies of atmospheric origin and artificially increases it in the tropics while the number of those of oceanic origin outside the tropics is also augmented. Analysis of a single available 30-year hindcast surprisingly indicates that coupled anomalies are more similar to AMIP than to coupled simulations. Differences in the frequency of coupled anomalies between the AMIP simulations and the uncoupled reanalyses, and similarities between the uncoupled and partially coupled reanalyses, support the notion that the nature of the

  8. Diurnal ocean surface layer model validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Jeffrey D.; May, Douglas A.; Abell, Fred, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The diurnal ocean surface layer (DOSL) model at the Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center forecasts the 24-hour change in a global sea surface temperatures (SST). Validating the DOSL model is a difficult task due to the huge areas involved and the lack of in situ measurements. Therefore, this report details the use of satellite infrared multichannel SST imagery to provide day and night SSTs that can be directly compared to DOSL products. This water-vapor-corrected imagery has the advantages of high thermal sensitivity (0.12 C), large synoptic coverage (nearly 3000 km across), and high spatial resolution that enables diurnal heating events to be readily located and mapped. Several case studies in the subtropical North Atlantic readily show that DOSL results during extreme heating periods agree very well with satellite-imagery-derived values in terms of the pattern of diurnal warming. The low wind and cloud-free conditions necessary for these events to occur lend themselves well to observation via infrared imagery. Thus, the normally cloud-limited aspects of satellite imagery do not come into play for these particular environmental conditions. The fact that the DOSL model does well in extreme events is beneficial from the standpoint that these cases can be associated with the destruction of the surface acoustic duct. This so-called afternoon effect happens as the afternoon warming of the mixed layer disrupts the sound channel and the propagation of acoustic energy.

  9. A coastal ocean model with subgrid approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Roy A.

    2016-06-01

    A wide variety of coastal ocean models exist, each having attributes that reflect specific application areas. The model presented here is based on finite element methods with unstructured grids containing triangular and quadrilateral elements. The model optimizes robustness, accuracy, and efficiency by using semi-implicit methods in time in order to remove the most restrictive stability constraints, by using a semi-Lagrangian advection approximation to remove Courant number constraints, and by solving a wave equation at the discrete level for enhanced efficiency. An added feature is the approximation of the effects of subgrid objects. Here, the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the incompressibility constraint are volume averaged over one or more computational cells. This procedure gives rise to new terms which must be approximated as a closure problem. A study of tidal power generation is presented as an example of this method. A problem that arises is specifying appropriate thrust and power coefficients for the volume averaged velocity when they are usually referenced to free stream velocity. A new contribution here is the evaluation of three approaches to this problem: an iteration procedure and two mapping formulations. All three sets of results for thrust (form drag) and power are in reasonable agreement.

  10. Oceanic Excitations On Polar Motion: A Cross Comparison Among Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Chen, J.; Liao, X.; Wilson, C. R.

    2004-12-01

    Recent studies based on various oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs) demonstrated that the oceans are a major contributor to polar motion excitations. In this paper, we analyze and compare observed non-atmospheric polar motion excitations with oceanic angular momentum (OAM) variations determined from four OGCMs, which include the parallel ocean climate model (POCM), a barotropic ocean model (BOM), the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) non-data-assimilating model (ECCO-NDA), and the ECCO data-assimilating model (ECCO-DA). The data to be analyzed span a 5-year¡_s overlapped period from 1993 to 1997. At annual time scale, these four OAM estimates do not agree well with each other, while POCM shows relatively larger discrepancies than other three models. At intraseasonal time scales, ECCO-DA yields the best agreement with observations, and reduces the variance of non-atmospheric excitations by about 60%, 10-20% more than those explained by other three models. However, at the very short periods of 4-20 days, the BOM estimates could explain about half of the observed variance, twice as much as that by ECCO-NDA, and also shows considerably better correlation with observations. Due to different modeling schemes and methods, significant discrepancies could arise with respect to the quantity of modeling large-scale oceanic mass redistribution and current variation. A clear understanding of global oceanic contributions to polar motion excitation still remains a challenge.

  11. Preformed and regenerated phosphate in ocean general circulation models: can right total concentrations be wrong?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duteil, O.; Koeve, W.; Oschlies, A.; Aumont, O.; Bianchi, D.; Bopp, L.; Galbraith, E.; Matear, R.; Moore, J. K.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Segschneider, J.

    2012-05-01

    Phosphate distributions simulated by seven state-of-the-art biogeochemical ocean circulation models are evaluated against observations of global ocean nutrient distributions. The biogeochemical models exhibit different structural complexities, ranging from simple nutrient-restoring to multi-nutrient NPZD type models. We evaluate the simulations using the observed volume distribution of phosphate. The errors in these simulated volume class distributions are significantly larger when preformed phosphate (or regenerated phosphate) rather than total phosphate is considered. Our analysis reveals that models can achieve similarly good fits to observed total phosphate distributions for a~very different partitioning into preformed and regenerated nutrient components. This has implications for the strength and potential climate sensitivity of the simulated biological carbon pump. We suggest complementing the use of total nutrient distributions for assessing model skill by an evaluation of the respective preformed and regenerated nutrient components.

  12. Preformed and regenerated phosphate in ocean general circulation models: can right total concentrations be wrong?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duteil, O.; Koeve, W.; Oschlies, A.; Aumont, O.; Bianchi, D.; Bopp, L.; Galbraith, E.; Matear, R.; Moore, J. K.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Segschneider, J.

    2011-12-01

    Phosphate distributions simulated by seven state-of-the-art biogeochemical ocean circulation models are evaluated against observations of global ocean nutrient distributions. The biogeochemical models exhibit different structural complexities, ranging from simple nutrient-restoring to multi-nutrient NPZD type models. We evaluate the simulations using the observed volume distribution of phosphate. The errors in these simulated volume class distributions are significantly larger when preformed phosphate (or regenerated phosphate) rather than total phosphate is considered. Our analysis reveals that models can achieve similarly good fits to observed total phosphate distributions for a very different partitioning into preformed and regenerated nutrient components. This has implications for the strength and potential climate sensitivity of the simulated biological carbon pump. We suggest complementing the use of total nutrient distributions for assessing model skill by an evaluation of the respective preformed and regenerated nutrient components.

  13. Atmosphere-ocean ozone exchange: A global modeling study of biogeochemical, atmospheric, and waterside turbulence dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzeveld, L.; Helmig, D.; Fairall, C. W.; Hare, J.; Pozzer, A.

    2009-12-01

    The significance of the removal of tropospheric ozone by the oceans, covering ˜2/3 of the Earth's surface, has only been addressed in a few studies involving water tank, aircraft, and tower flux measurements. On the basis of results from these few observations of the ozone dry deposition velocity (VdO3), atmospheric chemistry models generally apply an empirical, constant ocean uptake rate of 0.05 cm s-1. This value is substantially smaller than the atmospheric turbulent transport velocity for ozone. On the other hand, the uptake is higher than expected from the solubility of ozone in clean water alone, suggesting that there is an enhancement in oceanic ozone uptake, e.g., through a chemical destruction mechanism. We present an evaluation of a global-scale analysis with a new mechanistic representation of atmosphere-ocean ozone exchange. The applied atmosphere chemistry-climate model includes not only atmospheric but also waterside turbulence and the role of waterside chemical loss processes as a function of oceanic biogeochemistry. The simulations suggest a larger role of biogeochemistry in tropical and subtropical ozone oceanic uptake with a relative small temporal variability, whereas in midlatitude and high-latitude regions, highly variable ozone uptake rates are expected because of the stronger influence of waterside turbulence. Despite a relatively large range in the explicitly calculated ocean uptake rate, there is a surprisingly small sensitivity of simulated Marine Boundary Layer ozone concentrations compared to the sensitivity for the commonly applied constant ocean uptake approach. This small sensitivity points at compensating effects through inclusion of the process-based ocean uptake mechanisms to consider variability in oceanic O3 deposition consistent with that in atmospheric and oceanic physical, chemical, and biological processes.

  14. Verification of a numerical ocean model of the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Ray C.; Luther, Mark E.; O'Brien, James J.; Legler, David M.

    1988-12-01

    A case study evaluating the predictive capability of an upper layer circulation model of the northwest Indian Ocean is presented. The model is a nonlinear, reduced gravity model incorporating realistic boundary geometry and is forced by observed winds. Model results for the fall of 1985 are compared with and evaluated against U.S. Navy bathythermograph and NOAA satellite data collected during August-November 1985. An assessment is made of the model's ability to simulate correctly the circulation structure. Ship wind observations are converted to wind stress for model forcing by a procedure developed by Legler and Navon (1988). The model is only moderately successful in reproducing the structure of the large, rather homogeneous pool of water located off the Arabian Peninsula in September. However, the model behaves remarkably well in the dynamically active region around Socotra. Major fronts and eddies frequently observed in the region during the transition period between the southwest and the northeast monsoon appear in the 1985 model results and compare well, both temporally and spatially, with the observational data. Thus given accurate wind information, the model appears highly effective in dynamically active regions and demonstrates potential as a useful prognostic tool for evaluation of the Arabian Sea when real time winds become available.

  15. Simulations of bacterial chemotaxis in the turbulent ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watteaux, Romain; Taylor, John

    2012-11-01

    Nearly half of the global primary production occurs in the oceans. Between 30 and 50% of the newly generated carbon is released into the surrounding water as dissolved organic matter (DOM), and is almost exclusively accessible to bacteria. By consuming DOM and returning the carbon to the marine food web, bacteria act as recyclers. Some bacteria are motile and have the ability to modify their otherwise random motility in response to a chemical cue, a process known as chemotaxis. It has been recently shown that motile bacteria can benefit from turbulence by clustering around thin DOM filaments, thereby increasing their uptake (Taylor and Stocker, Science, accepted). Here, we extend the previous analysis by considering weakly diffusive DOM patches (with a Schmidt number, Sc = ν /κC up to 1000), and examine the counteracting effects of chemotaxis and random motility. Using direct numerical simulations (DNS), we find that the uptake enhancement depends on characteristic length scales of DOM and bacteria filaments, which in turn depend on three parameters: the turbulent dissipation rate, the bacteria swimming speed, and the DOM diffusivity. By exploring a range of realistic parameter values, we are able to characterize the advantage afforded by motility.

  16. Observed and Modeled Trends in Southern Ocean Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.

    2003-01-01

    Conceptual models and global climate model (GCM) simulations have both indicated the likelihood of an enhanced sensitivity to climate change in the polar regions, derived from the positive feedbacks brought about by the polar abundance of snow and ice surfaces. Some models further indicate that the changes in the polar regions can have a significant impact globally. For instance, 37% of the temperature sensitivity to a doubling of atmospheric CO2 in simulations with the GCM of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) is attributable exclusively to inclusion of sea ice variations in the model calculations. Both sea ice thickness and sea ice extent decrease markedly in the doubled CO, case, thereby allowing the ice feedbacks to occur. Stand-alone sea ice models have shown Southern Ocean hemispherically averaged winter ice-edge retreats of 1.4 deg latitude for each 1 K increase in atmospheric temperatures. Observations, however, show a much more varied Southern Ocean ice cover, both spatially and temporally, than many of the modeled expectations. In fact, the satellite passive-microwave record of Southern Ocean sea ice since late 1978 has revealed overall increases rather than decreases in ice extents, with ice extent trends on the order of 11,000 sq km/year. When broken down spatially, the positive trends are strongest in the Ross Sea, while the trends are negative in the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Seas. Greater spatial detail can be obtained by examining trends in the length of the sea ice season, and those trends show a coherent picture of shortening sea ice seasons throughout almost the entire Bellingshausen and Amundsen Seas to the west of the Antarctic Peninsula and in the far western Weddell Sea immediately to the east of the Peninsula, with lengthening sea ice seasons around much of the rest of the continent. This pattern corresponds well with the spatial pattern of temperature trends, as the Peninsula region is the one region in the Antarctic with a strong

  17. In Situ Eddy Analysis in a High-Resolution Ocean Climate Model.

    PubMed

    Woodring, Jonathan; Petersen, Mark; Schmeißer, Andre; Patchett, John; Ahrens, James; Hagen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    An eddy is a feature associated with a rotating body of fluid, surrounded by a ring of shearing fluid. In the ocean, eddies are 10 to 150 km in diameter, are spawned by boundary currents and baroclinic instabilities, may live for hundreds of days, and travel for hundreds of kilometers. Eddies are important in climate studies because they transport heat, salt, and nutrients through the world's oceans and are vessels of biological productivity. The study of eddies in global ocean-climate models requires large-scale, high-resolution simulations. This poses a problem for feasible (timely) eddy analysis, as ocean simulations generate massive amounts of data, causing a bottleneck for traditional analysis workflows. To enable eddy studies, we have developed an in situ workflow for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of MPAS-Ocean, a high-resolution ocean climate model, in collaboration with the ocean model research and development process. Planned eddy analysis at high spatial and temporal resolutions will not be possible with a postprocessing workflow due to various constraints, such as storage size and I/O time, but the in situ workflow enables it and scales well to ten-thousand processing elements.

  18. Climate variability and predictability associated with the Indo-Pacific Oceanic Channel Dynamics in the CCSM4 Coupled System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Dongliang; Xu, Peng; Xu, Tengfei

    2017-01-01

    An experiment using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4), a participant of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase-5 (CMIP5), is analyzed to assess the skills of this model in simulating and predicting the climate variabilities associated with the oceanic channel dynamics across the Indo-Pacific Oceans. The results of these analyses suggest that the model is able to reproduce the observed lag correlation between the oceanic anomalies in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean and those in the cold tongue in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean at a time lag of 1 year. This success may be largely attributed to the successful simulation of the interannual variations of the Indonesian Throughflow, which carries the anomalies of the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) into the western equatorial Pacific Ocean to produce subsurface temperature anomalies, which in turn propagate to the eastern equatorial Pacific to generate ENSO. This connection is termed the "oceanic channel dynamics" and is shown to be consistent with the observational analyses. However, the model simulates a weaker connection between the IOD and the interannual variability of the Indonesian Throughflow transport than found in the observations. In addition, the model overestimates the westerly wind anomalies in the western-central equatorial Pacific in the year following the IOD, which forces unrealistic upwelling Rossby waves in the western equatorial Pacific and downwelling Kelvin waves in the east. This assessment suggests that the CCSM4 coupled climate system has underestimated the oceanic channel dynamics and overestimated the atmospheric bridge processes.

  19. North Atlantic simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II). Part I: Mean states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Yeager, Steve G.; Bailey, David; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Danilov, Sergey; Diansky, Nikolay; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Forget, Gael; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Gusev, Anatoly; Heimbach, Patrick; Howard, Armando; Jung, Thomas; Kelley, Maxwell; Large, William G.; Leboissetier, Anthony; Lu, Jianhua; Madec, Gurvan; Marsland, Simon J.; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio; George Nurser, A. J.; Pirani, Anna; y Mélia, David Salas; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Treguier, Anne-Marie; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Simulation characteristics from eighteen global ocean-sea-ice coupled models are presented with a focus on the mean Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and other related fields in the North Atlantic. These experiments use inter-annually varying atmospheric forcing data sets for the 60-year period from 1948 to 2007 and are performed as contributions to the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). The protocol for conducting such CORE-II experiments is summarized. Despite using the same atmospheric forcing, the solutions show significant differences. As most models also differ from available observations, biases in the Labrador Sea region in upper-ocean potential temperature and salinity distributions, mixed layer depths, and sea-ice cover are identified as contributors to differences in AMOC. These differences in the solutions do not suggest an obvious grouping of the models based on their ocean model lineage, their vertical coordinate representations, or surface salinity restoring strengths. Thus, the solution differences among the models are attributed primarily to use of different subgrid scale parameterizations and parameter choices as well as to differences in vertical and horizontal grid resolutions in the ocean models. Use of a wide variety of sea-ice models with diverse snow and sea-ice albedo treatments also contributes to these differences. Based on the diagnostics considered, the majority of the models appear suitable for use in studies involving the North Atlantic, but some models require dedicated development effort.

  20. Performance of an upper-ocean model coupled to an atmospheric GCM: preliminary results. Vol. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, D.

    1982-02-01

    A global dynamical model of the upper ocean and sea ice is coupled to the OSU atmospheric general circulation model. Preliminary results are described from a 16-month simulation with seasonally-varying insolation, and compared with both observations and the results from two earlier experiments with simpler upper-ocean models. The present ocean model consists of two vertically homogeneous layers of variable thickness: the upper layer represents the well-mixed layer and can entrain or detrain fluid locally with the lower layer, as in standard mixed-layer models. The second layer typically has thicknesses of approx.100 to approx.400 meters and crudely represents the seasonal thermocline and the part of the main thermocline involved in the subtropical gyres; it rests immiscibly on deep water of no motion where the density contrast is prescribed. Horizontal advection is predicted in both layers by the primitive momentum equations. Sea ice can form if the upper-layer temperature (SST) drops to freezing, after which the local ice thickness is predicted thermo-dynamically with ice dynamics neglected. The 16-month simulation is started from relatively realistic conditions obtained by spinning up the atmospheric and oceanic models separately. After several months of the coupled run, errors of up to 4/sup 0/C in the SST appear in the western oceans, probably due to the underestimate of the western boundary currents inherent in coarse-grid oceanic models. Equatorial upwelling and undercurrents are simulated but extend basin-wide, producing SSTs up to 6/sup 0/C too cold in the western equatorial Pacific. The large-scale seasonal variation of sea-ice thickness and extent are fairly realistic. Surface heat fluxes are compared with observations and with an earlier control integration of the atmospheric GCM, in an effort to distinguish between errors in the SST caused by the upper-ocean model and those caused by the atmospheric model. 38 refs., 11 figs.

  1. Three-Dimensional Ocean Noise Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    tf^NOG^^ WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, Senior Scientist February 27, 2015 Dr. Kyle...Office (WHOI) ONR REG Boston N62879 -J Defense Technical Information Center Naval Research Laboratory MS#12 • Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA...Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02542 *now at: Department of Oceanography

  2. Modeling of subaqueous melting in Petermann Fjord, Northwestern Greenland using an ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, C.; Rignot, E. J.; Xu, Y.; An, L.; Tinto, K. J.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Basal melting of the floating tongue of Petermann Glacier, in northwestern Greenland is by far the largest process of mass ablation. Melting of the floating tongue is controlled by the buoyancy of the melt water plume, the pressure-dependence of the melting point of sea ice, and the mixing of warm subsurface water with fresh buoyant subglacial discharge. In prior simulations of this melting process, the role of subglacial discharge has been neglected because in similar configurations (floating ice shelves) in the Antarctic, surface runoff is negligible; this is however not true in Greenland. Here, we use the Mass Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) at a high spatial resolution (10 m x 10 m) to simulate the melting process of the ice shelf in 2-D. The model is constrained by ice shelf bathymetry and ice thickness (refined model in the immediate vicinity of the grounding line) from NASA Operation IceBridge (2011), ocean temperature/salinity data from Johnson et al. (2011), ocean tide height and current from the Arctic Ocean Tidal Inverse Model (AOTIM-5) by Padman and Erofeeva (2004) and subglacial discharge at the grounding line calculated by the hydrostatic potential of the ice from estimated products of the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO) of Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI). We compare the results obtained in winter (no runoff) with summer, and the sensitivity of the results to thermal forcing from the ocean, and to the variation of tide height and current, and to the magnitude of subglacial runoff. We conclude on the impact of the ocean and surface melting on the melting regime of the floating ice tongue of Petermann. The basal melt rate increases ~20% with summer surface runoff. This work is performed under a contract with NASA Cryosphere Program.

  3. Stochastic modeling of inhomogeneous ocean waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, P. B.; Janssen, T. T.; Herbers, T. H. C.

    2015-12-01

    Refraction of swell waves in coastal waters can result in fast-scale variations of wave statistics due to wave interference. These variations cannot be resolved by wave models based on the radiative transport equation. More advanced models based on quasi-coherent theory, a generalization of the radiative transfer equation, can be coupled or nested into larger-scale models to resolve such local inhomogeneous effects. However, source terms for quasi-coherent models to account for non-conservative and nonlinear effects are not available, which hampers their operational use. In the present work we revisit the derivation of quasi-coherent theory to consistently include a source term for dissipation associated with depth-induced wave breaking. We demonstrate how general source terms can be incorporated in this class of models and compare model simulations with the new dissipation term to laboratory observations of focusing and breaking waves over a submerged shoal. The results show that a consistent derivation of source terms is essential to accurately capture coherent effects in coastal areas. Specifically, our results show that if coherent effects are ignored in the dissipation term, interference effects are strongly exaggerated. With the development of source terms for quasi-coherent models they can be effectively nested inside or otherwise coupled to larger-scale wave models to efficiently improve operational predictive capability of wave models near the coast.

  4. Iron supply to the Southern Ocean mixed layer from below; the ocean model effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schourup-Kristensen, Vibe; Hauck, Judith; Losch, Martin; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.; Völker, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    In the iron limited Southern Ocean, the biogeochemical results of commonly used ocean general circulation biogeochemical models differ greatly dependent on the ocean model used. This is largely due to the difficulties in reproducing a realistic mixed layer depth (MLD), which leads to different degrees of light limitation and nutrient supply from below. Regarding the iron sources to the Southern Ocean, research has traditionally focused on the input from dust and the sediment, but recent studies have highlighted the importance of the vertical supply to the mixed layer from the nutrient rich deeper water. This latter supply mechanism may also be affected by the large inter-model differences in the MLD and thereby influence the total net primary production and export production in the models. We have performed a model study in which the biogeochemical model REcoM2 was coupled to two different ocean models, the Finite Element Sea-ice Ocean Model (FESOM) and the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The effect of the ocean mixed layer on the magnitude of the iron sources from below in the two models was analyzed, as was the effect on the export and net primary production. Our results revealed a remarkable difference in terms of mode and magnitude of transport dependent on the mixed layer depth in the two models; the mean iron supply from below in the Southern Ocean was on average four times higher in MITgcm than in FESOM. The dominant pathway was entrainment in MITgcm, whereas diffusion dominated in FESOM. We discuss how the difference in the depth and seasonal amplitude of the mixed layer between the models has a major effect on the vertical iron profile and thereby also on the iron fluxes. A further effect of the difference in supply is that the fraction of exported net primary production is higher in MITgcm than in FESOM, showing that the choice of ocean model has a significant impact on the modeled carbon cycle in the Southern Ocean, with possible implications for

  5. Including eddies in global ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semtner, Albert J.; Chervin, Robert M.

    The ocean is a turbulent fluid that is driven by winds and by surface exchanges of heat and moisture. It is as important as the atmosphere in governing climate through heat distribution, but so little is known about the ocean that it remains a “final frontier” on the face of the Earth. Many ocean currents are truly global in extent, such as the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the “conveyor belt” that connects the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans by flows around the southern tips of Africa and South America. It has long been a dream of some oceanographers to supplement the very limited observational knowledge by reconstructing the currents of the world ocean from the first principles of physics on a computer. However, until very recently, the prospect of doing this was thwarted by the fact that fluctuating currents known as “mesoscale eddies” could not be explicitly included in the calculation.

  6. A world ocean model for greenhouse sensitivity studies: resolution intercomparison and the role of diagnostic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Warren M.; Meehl, Gerald A.; Verplank, Lynda; Bettge, Thomas W.

    1994-05-01

    We have developed an improved version of a world ocean model with the intention of coupling to an atmospheric model. This article documents the simulation capability of this 1° global ocean model, shows improvements over our earlier 5° version, and compares it to features simulated with a 0.5° model. These experiments use a model spin-up methodology whereby the ocean model can subsequently be coupled to an atmospheric model and used for order 100-year coupled model integrations. With present-day computers, 1° is a reasonable compromise in resolution that allows for century-long coupled experiments. The 1° ocean model is derived from a 0.5°-resolution model developed by A. Semtner (Naval Postgraduate School) and R. Chervin (National Center for Atmospheric Research) for studies of the global eddy-resolving world ocean circulation. The 0.5° bottom topography and continental outlines have been altered to be compatible with the 1° resolution, and the Arctic Ocean has been added. We describe the ocean simulation characteristics of the 1° version and compare the result of weakly constraining (three-year time scale) the three-dimensional temperature and salinity fields to the observations below the thermocline (710 m) with the model forced only at the top of the ocean by observed annual mean wind stress, temperature, and salinity. The 1° simulations indicate that major ocean circulation patterns are greatly improved compared to the 5° version and are qualitatively reproduced in comparison to the 0.5° version. Using the annual mean top forcing alone in a 100-year simulation with the 1° version preserves the general features of the major observed temperature and salinity structure with most climate drift occurring mainly beneath the thermocline in the first 50 75 years. Because the thermohaline circulation in the 1° version is relatively weak with annual mean forcing, we demonstrate the importance of the seasonal cycle by performing two sensitivity experiments

  7. Interannual Sea Level Variations in the Tropical Indian Ocean from Geosat and Shallow Water Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perigaud, Claire; Delecluse, Pascale

    1993-01-01

    Sea level variations of the Indian Ocean north of 20 deg S are analyzed from Geosat satellite altimeter data over April 1985-September 1989. These variations are compared and interpreted with numerical simulations derived from a reduced gravity model forced by FSU observed winds over the same period. After decomposition into complex empirical orthogonal functions, the low-frequency anomalies are described by the first two modes for observations as well as for simulations. The sums of the two modes contain 34% and 40% of the observed and simulated variances, respectively. Averaged over the basin, the observed and simulated sea level changes are correlated by 0.92 over 1985-1988. The strongest change happens during the El Ninio 1986-1987: between winter 1986 and summer 1987 the basin-averaged sea level rises by approx. 1 cm. These low-frequency variations can partly be explained by changes in the Sverdrup circulation. The southern tropical Indian Ocean between 1O deg and 20 deg S is the domain where those changes are strongest: the averaged sea level rises by approx. 4.5 cm between winter 1986 and winter 1987. There, the signal propagates southwestward across the basin at a speed similar to free Rossby waves. Sensitivity of observed anomalies is examined over 1987-1988, with different orbit ephemeris, tropospheric corrections, and error reduction processes. The uncertainty of the basin-averaged sea level estimates is mostly due to the way the orbit error is reduced and reaches approx. 1 cm. Nonetheless, spatial correlation is good between the various observations and better than between observations and simulations. Sensitivity of simulated anomalies to the wind uncertainty, examined with Former Soviet Union (FSU) and European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) forcings over 1985-1988, shows that the variance of the simulations driven by ECMWF is 52% smaller, as FSU winds are stronger than ECMWF. Results show that the wind strength also affects the

  8. Influence of coupling on atmosphere, sea ice and ocean regional models in the Ross Sea sector, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdain, Nicolas C.; Mathiot, Pierre; Gallée, Hubert; Barnier, Bernard

    2011-04-01

    Air-sea ice-ocean interactions in the Ross Sea sector form dense waters that feed the global thermohaline circulation. In this paper, we develop the new limited-area ocean-sea ice-atmosphere coupled model TANGO to simulate the Ross Sea sector. TANGO is built up by coupling the atmospheric limited-area model MAR to a regional configuration of the ocean-sea ice model NEMO. A method is then developed to identify the mechanisms by which local coupling affects the simulations. TANGO is shown to simulate realistic sea ice properties and atmospheric surface temperatures. These skills are mostly related to the skills of the stand alone atmospheric and oceanic models used to build TANGO. Nonetheless, air temperatures over ocean and winter sea ice thickness are found to be slightly improved in coupled simulations as compared to standard stand alone ones. Local atmosphere ocean feedbacks over the open ocean are found to significantly influence ocean temperature and salinity. In a stand alone ocean configuration, the dry and cold air produces an ocean cooling through sensible and latent heat loss. In a coupled configuration, the atmosphere is in turn moistened and warmed by the ocean; sensible and latent heat loss is therefore reduced as compared to the stand alone simulations. The atmosphere is found to be less sensitive to local feedbacks than the ocean. Effects of local feedbacks are increased in the coastal area because of the presence of sea ice. It is suggested that slow heat conduction within sea ice could amplify the feedbacks. These local feedbacks result in less sea ice production in polynyas in coupled mode, with a subsequent reduction in deep water formation.

  9. Systematic errors in Monsoon simulation: importance of the equatorial Indian Ocean processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annamalai, H.; Taguchi, B.; McCreary, J. P., Jr.; Nagura, M.; Miyama, T.

    2015-12-01

    H. Annamalai1, B. Taguchi2, J.P. McCreary1, J. Hafner1, M. Nagura2, and T. Miyama2 International Pacific Research Center, University of Hawaii, USA Application Laboratory, JAMSTEC, Japan In climate models, simulating the monsoon precipitation climatology remains a grand challenge. Compared to CMIP3, the multi-model-mean (MMM) errors for Asian-Australian monsoon (AAM) precipitation climatology in CMIP5, relative to GPCP observations, have shown little improvement. One of the implications is that uncertainties in the future projections of time-mean changes to AAM rainfall may not have reduced from CMIP3 to CMIP5. Despite dedicated efforts by the modeling community, the progress in monsoon modeling is rather slow. This leads us to wonder: Has the scientific community reached a "plateau" in modeling mean monsoon precipitation? Our focus here is to better understanding of the coupled air-sea interactions, and moist processes that govern the precipitation characteristics over the tropical Indian Ocean where large-scale errors persist. A series idealized coupled model experiments are performed to test the hypothesis that errors in the coupled processes along the equatorial Indian Ocean during inter-monsoon seasons could potentially influence systematic errors during the monsoon season. Moist static energy budget diagnostics has been performed to identify the leading moist and radiative processes that account for the large-scale errors in the simulated precipitation. As a way forward, we propose three coordinated efforts, and they are: (i) idealized coupled model experiments; (ii) process-based diagnostics and (iii) direct observations to constrain model physics. We will argue that a systematic and coordinated approach in the identification of the various interactive processes that shape the precipitation basic state needs to be carried out, and high-quality observations over the data sparse monsoon region are needed to validate models and further improve model physics.

  10. Assimilation of geodetic dynamical ocean topography data into ocean circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjic, Tijana; Schroeter, Jens; Albertella, Alberta; Bosch, Wolfgang; Rummel, Reiner; Savcenko, Roman

    Estimation of ocean circulation via assimilation of satellite measurements of dynamical ocean topography (DOT) into the global finite-element ocean model (FEOM) is investigated. The DOT was obtained by means of geodetic approach from carefully cross-calibrated multi-mission-altimeter data and GRACE gravity fields. The spectral consistency was achieved by means of the filtering applied on sea surface and geoid. Since the dynamical ocean topography is obtained from data types coming from different sources, different techniques can be employed for their assimilation into ocean circulation models. For example, the data can be combined and interpolated onto the model grid before they are used in assimilation. In this case special care needs to be taken concerning the specification of observational error statistics. The assimilation is performed by employing the local SEIK filter and various functions for observations error covariance are used. Finally we consider the effects of assimilation on potential temperature field and on steric height changes. Analysed potential temperature is compared with ARGO data. We also compared the standard deviation of the observations and standard deviation of the steric height calculated from the analysis. In many regions of the world ocean there is a good correspondence between these two fields. However also structures that are not present in the observations appear in the steric height standard deviations. Keywords: dynamical ocean topography, data assimilation Session: A2.6

  11. Modelling Tropical Cyclones-Ocean interactions: the role of the Atmophere - Ocean coupling frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoccimarro, Enrico; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Gualdi, Silvio; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between Tropical Cyclones (TCs) and ocean is a major mechanism responsible for energy exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean. TCs affect the thermal and dynamical structure of the ocean, but the magnitude of the impact is still uncertain. Very few CMIP5 models demonstrated ability in representing TCs, mainly due to their horizontal resolution. We aim to improve TCs representation in next CMIPs experiments through the new CMCC-CM2VHR General Circulation Model, having a horizontal resolution of 1/4 degree in both atmospheric and ocean components. The model is capable to represent realistically TCs up to Cat-5 Typhoons. A good representation of the TC-Ocean interaction strongly depends on the coupling frequency between the atmospheric and the ocean components. In this work, we found that a better representation of the negative Sea Surface Temperature - TC induced feedback, through a high (hourly) coupling frequency, ensures the reduction of the TC induced Power Dissipation Index (PDI) bias of one order of magnitude. In addition, a cat-5 storm case study is deeply investigated also in terms of TC effects on the deep ocean.

  12. Anisotropic mesoscale eddy transport in ocean general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, Scott; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Bachman, Scott; Bryan, Frank; Dennis, John; Danabasoglu, Gokhan

    2014-11-01

    In modern climate models, the effects of oceanic mesoscale eddies are introduced by relating subgrid eddy fluxes to the resolved gradients of buoyancy or other tracers, where the proportionality is, in general, governed by an eddy transport tensor. The symmetric part of the tensor, which represents the diffusive effects of mesoscale eddies, is universally treated isotropically. However, the diffusive processes that the parameterization approximates, such as shear dispersion and potential vorticity barriers, typically have strongly anisotropic characteristics. Generalizing the eddy diffusivity tensor for anisotropy extends the number of parameters from one to three: major diffusivity, minor diffusivity, and alignment. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) with the anisotropic eddy parameterization is used to test various choices for the parameters, which are motivated by observations and the eddy transport tensor diagnosed from high resolution simulations. Simply setting the ratio of major to minor diffusivities to a value of five globally, while aligning the major axis along the flow direction, improves biogeochemical tracer ventilation and reduces temperature and salinity biases. These effects can be improved by parameterizing the oceanic anisotropic transport mechanisms.

  13. Modeling the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami for Introductory Physics Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLisi, Gregory A.; Rarick, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we develop materials to address student interest in the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004. We discuss the physical characteristics of tsunamis and some of the specific data regarding the 2004 event. Finally, we create an easy-to-make tsunami tank to run simulations in the classroom. The simulations exhibit three dramatic…

  14. Baroclinic Rossby Wave Signature in a General Circulation Ocean Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    northwest with a wavelength cf 300 km. For other laritudes of the North acific Ocean , Price and Maqaard (1980) determined that first mode baroclinic Rossby...role in the latitude belt 40-50N in the North acific 10 -. - !o Ocean . Magaard (1983) ir. a paper discussing bariclin _c Rossty wave energetics...HD-AI132 219 BAROCLINIC ROSSBY WAVE SIGNATURE IN A GENERAL CIRCULATION OCEAN MODEL(U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOLU MONTEREY CA A H RUTSCH JUN 83

  15. Chaotic dynamics in a simple dynamical green ocean plankton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cropp, Roger; Moroz, Irene M.; Norbury, John

    2014-11-01

    The exchange of important greenhouse gases between the ocean and atmosphere is influenced by the dynamics of near-surface plankton ecosystems. Marine plankton ecosystems are modified by climate change creating a feedback mechanism that could have significant implications for predicting future climates. The collapse or extinction of a plankton population may push the climate system across a tipping point. Dynamic green ocean models (DGOMs) are currently being developed for inclusion into climate models to predict the future state of the climate. The appropriate complexity of the DGOMs used to represent plankton processes is an ongoing issue, with models tending to become more complex, with more complicated dynamics, and an increasing propensity for chaos. We consider a relatively simple (four-population) DGOM of phytoplankton, zooplankton, bacteria and zooflagellates where the interacting plankton populations are connected by a single limiting nutrient. Chaotic solutions are possible in this 4-dimensional model for plankton population dynamics, as well as in a reduced 3-dimensional model, as we vary two of the key mortality parameters. Our results show that chaos is robust to the variation of parameters as well as to the presence of environmental noise, where the attractor of the more complex system is more robust than the attractor of its simplified equivalent. We find robust chaotic dynamics in low trophic order ecological models, suggesting that chaotic dynamics might be ubiquitous in the more complex models, but this is rarely observed in DGOM simulations. The physical equations of DGOMs are well understood and are constrained by conservation principles, but the ecological equations are not well understood, and generally have no explicitly conserved quantities. This work, in the context of the paucity of the empirical and theoretical bases upon which DGOMs are constructed, raises the interesting question of whether DGOMs better represent reality if they include

  16. Toward an internal gravity wave spectrum in global ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Malte; Arbic, Brian K.; Richman, James G.; Shriver, Jay F.; Kunze, Eric L.; Scott, Robert B.; Wallcraft, Alan J.; Zamudio, Luis

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution global ocean models forced by atmospheric fields and tides are beginning to display realistic internal gravity wave spectra, especially as model resolution increases. This paper examines internal waves in global simulations with 0.08° and 0.04° (~8 and 4 km) horizontal resolutions, respectively. Frequency spectra of internal wave horizontal kinetic energy in the North Pacific lie closer to observations in the 0.04° simulation than in the 0.08° simulation. The horizontal wave number and frequency (K-ω) kinetic energy spectra contain peaks in the semidiurnal tidal band and near-inertial band, along with a broadband frequency continuum aligned along the linear dispersion relations of low-vertical-mode internal waves. Spectral kinetic energy transfers describe the rate at which nonlinear mechanisms remove or supply kinetic energy in specific K-ω ranges. Energy is transferred out of low-mode inertial and semidiurnal internal waves into a broad continuum of higher-frequency and higher-wave number internal waves.

  17. Simulating the amplification of orbital forcing by ocean feedbacks in the last glaciation.

    PubMed

    Khodri, M; Leclainche, Y; Ramstein, G; Braconnot, P; Marti, O; Cortijo, E

    2001-03-29

    According to Milankovitch theory, the lower summer insolation at high latitudes about 115,000 years ago allowed winter snow to persist throughout summer, leading to ice-sheet build-up and glaciation. But attempts to simulate the last glaciation using global atmospheric models have failed to produce this outcome when forced by insolation changes only. These results point towards the importance of feedback effects-for example, through changes in vegetation or the ocean circulation-for the amplification of solar forcing. Here we present a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model of the last glaciation that produces a build-up of perennial snow cover at known locations of ice sheets during this period. We show that ocean feedbacks lead to a cooling of the high northern latitudes, along with an increase in atmospheric moisture transport from the Equator to the poles. These changes agree with available geological data and, together, they lead to an increased delivery of snow to high northern latitudes. The mechanism we present explains the onset of glaciation-which would be amplified by changes in vegetation-in response to weak orbital forcing.

  18. Global eddy permitting simulations of surface ocean nitrogen, iron, sulfur cycling.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shaoping; Elliott, Scott; Maltrud, Mathew E

    2003-01-01

    The geocycles of N, Fe and S in the ocean are tightly coupled and together exert strong influence on biogeochemistry of the earth system. We investigate this interaction by inserting macro-micronutrient cycling into a high resolution ocean model that realistically represents the general circulation. Simulated chlorophyll distributions reproduce many features of satellite-based measurements of ocean color. Meridional sections through model results and seasonally averaged SeaWiFS data agree reasonably well, both in the oligotrophic gyres and along fronts. Discrepancies are associated in many cases with shelf, ridge or island effects. Dimethyl sulfide peaks and their chlorophyll correlations are similar to those obtained on major oceanographic expeditions. Lack of strong regional relationships between the sulfide and phytoplankton may be partly explained by correspondence between time constants for production and for the traversal of mesoscale transport features. In general the eddies and filaments of tropical instability waves are well represented, including the onset of the 1997-1998 El Niño. North-south shifts of the transition zone chlorophyll front appear prominently in the results.

  19. Parallelism and optimization of numerical ocean forecasting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianliang; Pang, Renbo; Teng, Junhua; Liang, Hongtao; Yang, Dandan

    2016-10-01

    According to the characteristics of Chinese marginal seas, the Marginal Sea Model of China (MSMC) has been developed independently in China. Because the model requires long simulation time, as a routine forecasting model, the parallelism of MSMC becomes necessary to be introduced to improve the performance of it. However, some methods used in MSMC, such as Successive Over Relaxation (SOR) algorithm, are not suitable for parallelism. In this paper, methods are developedto solve the parallel problem of the SOR algorithm following the steps as below. First, based on a 3D computing grid system, an automatic data partition method is implemented to dynamically divide the computing grid according to computing resources. Next, based on the characteristics of the numerical forecasting model, a parallel method is designed to solve the parallel problem of the SOR algorithm. Lastly, a communication optimization method is provided to avoid the cost of communication. In the communication optimization method, the non-blocking communication of Message Passing Interface (MPI) is used to implement the parallelism of MSMC with complex physical equations, and the process of communication is overlapped with the computations for improving the performance of parallel MSMC. The experiments show that the parallel MSMC runs 97.2 times faster than the serial MSMC, and root mean square error between the parallel MSMC and the serial MSMC is less than 0.01 for a 30-day simulation (172800 time steps), which meets the requirements of timeliness and accuracy for numerical ocean forecasting products.

  20. Optimization of a Parallel Ocean General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Yi

    1997-01-01

    Global climate modeling is one of the grand chalenges of computational science, and ocean modeling plays an important role in both understanding the current climatic conditions and predicting the future climate change.

  1. Ocean Modeling and Visualization on Massively Parallel Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Yi; Li, P. Peggy; Wang, Ping; Katz, Daniel S.; Cheng, Benny N.

    1997-01-01

    Climate modeling is one of the grand challenges of computational science, and ocean modeling plays an important role in both understanding the current climatic conditions and predicting future climate change.

  2. SSPX simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K

    1999-09-20

    An analytical approximation to an R-L-C circuit representing SSPX is shown to reproduce the observed capacitor bank efficiency and gun optimization data. As in the SPICE code, the spheromak gun is represented by a fixed resistance chosen to balance energy transfer to the gun. A revised estimate of the magnetic decay time in SSPX Shot 1822 then brings our estimate of the gun efficiency itself in line with the observed spheromak magnetic field for this shot. Prompted by these successes, we present a turbulence-based theoretical model for the spheromak resistance that can be implemented in the SPICE code, of the form: R{sub s} = {kappa}I (1-I{sub 0}/I){sup 2} where I is the gun current, I{sub 0} = ({Lambda}{sub 0}/{mu}{sub 0}){Phi} with bias flux and Taylor eigenvalue {lambda}{sub 0}, and {kappa} is a coefficient based on the magnetic turbulence model employed in Dan Hua's spheromak simulation code. The value of {kappa} giving a good energy balance (around 0.1 m{Omega}/KA) implies substantial turbulence levels. Implementing our model in SPICE would provide a calibration for theoretical calculations of the turbulence. Our analytic approximation to the SPICE code provides guidance to optimize future performance in SSPX, the greatest benefit appearing to come from reducing or eliminating the protective resistor to increase bank efficiency. Eliminating the resistor altogether doubles the bank efficiency and the spheromak magnetic energy.

  3. STOIC: An Assessment of Coupled Model Climatology and Variability in Tropical Ocean Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, M.K.; Sperber, K.R.; Huddleston, M

    2000-08-30

    The tropics are regions of strong ocean-atmosphere interaction on seasonal and interannual timescales, so a good representation of observed tropical behavior is a desirable objective for coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models (CGCMs). To broaden and update previous assessments (Mechoso et al. 1995, Neelin et al. 1992), two complementary projects were initiated by the CLIVAR Working Group on Seasonal to Interannual Prediction (WGSIP): the El Nino Simulation Intercomparison Project (ENSIP, by Mojib Latif) and STOIC (Study of Tropical Oceans In Coupled models). The aim was to compare models against observations to identify common weaknesses and strengths. Results from ENSIP concentrating on the equatorial Pacific have been described by Latif et al. (2000), hereafter ENSIP2000. A detailed report on STOIC is available via anonymous ftp at email.meto.gov.uk/pub/cr/ ''stoic'' and is summarized in Davey et al. (2000). The STOIC analyses extend beyond the equatorial Pacific, to examine behavior in all three tropical ocean regions.

  4. Modern Geodynamic Model of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, O.; Sobolev, N.; Morozov, A.; Grikurov, G.; Shokalsky, S.; Kashubin, S.; Petrov, E.

    2012-04-01

    In 2011 at VSEGEI (Russia) within the international project "Atlas of Geological Maps of the Circumpolar Arctic", a draft of the structural tectonic map of the Arctic at 1: 5,000,000 scale was prepared. This map is accompanied by a model of deep lithospheric structure of the Russian Arctic, which reflects thickness, types and specific features of crustal structure, and by geodynamic reconstructions. Analysis of the geological and geophysical data enables distinguishing a set of features in the Arctic evolution: - Differences in geological structure and geodynamic evolution of the Western and Eastern Arctic have been spotted no less than since the Early Paleozoic, which was reflected in the formation of caledonides in the West of the Arctic, and ellesmerides in the East. - In the Middle Paleozoic-Mesozoic (Late Devonian-Early Cretaceous), the eastern parts of the Arctic were affected by geodynamic processes taking place in the Paleo-Pacific. The formation of the Canadian basin was a result of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous riftogenesis. A set of features of this basin - such as constrained spreading, considerable depth and topography of the floor, sedimentation specifics - allows us to consider it as a marginal basin of the Paleo-Pacific that moved into an island-arc evolution stage in the Late Jurassic. Collision orogenic activities that widely manifested themselves in the Northern-Eastern part of Asia on the verge of the Early-Late Cretaceous are related to intraplate riftogenic processes in the Central Arctic that were followed by basic magmatism manifestations in Svalbard, Franz Josef Land and New Siberian Islands. Cretaceous stage of the intraplate riftogenesis determined to a great extent the modern-day structure of the Eastern Arctic. - The opening of the Northern Atlantic was accompanied by tectonic compression in the Eastern parts of the Arctic. The formation of the Eurasian basin was preceded by Late Cretaceous-Paleogene period of amplitude

  5. DMS cycle in the marine ocean-atmosphere system a global model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloster, S.; Feichter, J.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Six, K. D.; Stier, P.; Wetzel, P.

    2005-08-01

    A global coupled ocean-atmosphere modeling system is established to study the production of Dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the ocean, the DMS flux to the atmosphere, and the resulting sulfur concentrations in the atmosphere. The DMS production and consumption processes in the ocean are simulated in the marine biogeochemistry model HAMOCC5, embedded in a ocean general circulation model (MPI-OM). The atmospheric model ECHAM5 is extended by the microphysical aerosol model HAM, treating the sulfur chemistry in the atmosphere and the evolution of the microphysically interacting internally- and externally mixed aerosol populations.

    We simulate a global annual mean DMS sea surface concentration of 1.8 nmol/l, a DMS emission of 28 Tg(S)/yr, a DMS burden in the atmosphere of 0.077 Tg(S), and a DMS lifetime of 1.0 days. To quantify the role of DMS in the atmospheric sulfur cycle we simulate the relative contribution of DMS-derived SO2 and SO4-2 to the total atmospheric sulfur concentrations. DMS contributes 25% to the global annually averaged SO2 column burden. For SO4-2 the contribution is 27%.

    The coupled model setup allows the evaluation of the simulated DMS quantities with measurements taken in the ocean and in the atmosphere. The simulated global distribution of DMS sea surface concentrations compares reasonably well with measurements. The comparison to SO4-2 surface concentration measurements in regions with a high DMS contribution to SO4-2 shows an overestimation by the model. This overestimation is most pronounced in the biologically active season with high DMS emissions and most likely caused by a too high simulated SO4-2 yield from DMS oxidation.

  6. Experimental Simulations of Lunar Magma Ocean Crystallization: The Plot (But Not the Crust) Thickens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, D. S.; Rapp, J. F.; Elardo, S. M.; Shearer, C. K., Jr.; Neal, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical models of differentiation of a global-scale lunar magma ocean (LMO) have raised as many questions as they have answered. Recent orbital missions and sample studies have provided new context for a large range of lithologies, from the comparatively magnesian "purest anorthosite" reported by to Si-rich domes and spinel-rich clasts with widespread areal distributions. In addition, the GRAIL mission provided strong constraints on lunar crustal density and average thickness. Can this increasingly complex geology be accounted for via the formation and evolution of the LMO? We have in recent years been conducting extensive sets of petrologic experiments designed to fully simulate LMO crystallization, which had not been attempted previously. Here we review the key results from these experiments, which show that LMO differentiation is more complex than initial models suggested. Several important features expected from LMO crystallization models have yet to be reproduced experimentally; combined modelling and experimental work by our group is ongoing.

  7. GENERAL: Self-organized Criticality Model for Ocean Internal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Lin, Min; Qiao, Fang-Li; Hou, Yi-Jun

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we present a simple spring-block model for ocean internal waves based on the self-organized criticality (SOC). The oscillations of the water blocks in the model display power-law behavior with an exponent of -2 in the frequency domain, which is similar to the current and sea water temperature spectra in the actual ocean and the universal Garrett and Munk deep ocean internal wave model [Geophysical Fluid Dynamics 2 (1972) 225; J. Geophys. Res. 80 (1975) 291]. The influence of the ratio of the driving force to the spring coefficient to SOC behaviors in the model is also discussed.

  8. Ocean modeling at multiple resolutions for ISR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathcart, J. Michael; Teague, J. Ralph; Burdette, Ed; Kocher, Brian

    2011-05-01

    Recent research efforts at Georgia Tech have focused on the development of a multi-resolution ocean clutter model. This research was driven by the need to support both surveillance and search requirements set by several government customers. These requirements indicated a need to support target detection and tracking for both resolved and unresolved scenarios for targets located either above or on an ocean surface. As a result of this changing sensor resolution characteristic for the various acquisition scenarios, a need for accurate ocean surface models at different geometric resolutions arose. Georgia Tech met this need through development of a multi-resolution approach to modeling both the ocean surface and, subsequently, the ocean signature across the optical spectrum. This approach combined empirical overhead data with high resolution ocean surface models to construct a series of varying resolution ocean clutter models. This paper will describe the approach to utilizing and merging the various clutter models as well as the results of using these models in the target detection and tracking analysis. Remaining issues associated with this clutter model development will be identified and potential solutions discussed.

  9. Decadal-Scale Response of the Antarctic Ice sheet to a Warming Ocean using the POPSICLES Coupled Ice Sheet-Ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Daniel; Asay-Davis, Xylar; Cornford, Stephen; Price, Stephen; Ng, Esmond; Collins, William

    2016-04-01

    We present POPSICLES simulation results covering the full Antarctic Ice Sheet and the Southern Ocean spanning the period from 1990 to 2010. We use the CORE v. 2 interannual forcing data to force the ocean model. Simulations are performed at 0.1 degree (~5 km) ocean resolution with adaptive ice sheet resolution as fine as 500 m to adequately resolve the grounding line dynamics. We discuss the effect of improved ocean mixing and subshelf bathymetry (vs. the standard Bedmap2 bathymetry) on the behavior of the coupled system, comparing time-averaged melt rates below a number of major ice shelves with those reported in the literature. We also present seasonal variability and decadal melting trends from several Antarctic regions, along with the response of the ice shelves and the consequent dynamic response of the grounded ice sheet. POPSICLES couples the POP2x ocean model, a modified version of the Parallel Ocean Program, and the BISICLES ice-sheet model. POP2x includes sub-ice-shelf circulation using partial top cells and the commonly used three-equation boundary layer physics. Standalone POP2x output compares well with standard ice-ocean test cases (e.g., ISOMIP) and other continental-scale simulations and melt-rate observations. BISICLES makes use of adaptive mesh refinement and a 1st-order accurate momentum balance similar to the L1L2 model of Schoof and Hindmarsh to accurately model regions of dynamic complexity, such as ice streams, outlet glaciers, and grounding lines. Results of BISICLES simulations have compared favorably to comparable simulations with a Stokes momentum balance in both idealized tests (MISMIP-3d) and realistic configurations.

  10. A dynamic, embedded Lagrangian model for ocean climate models, Part II: Idealised overflow tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Michael L.; Griffies, Stephen M.; England, Matthew H.

    2012-12-01

    Dense gravity current overflows occur in several regions throughout the world and are an important process in the meridional overturning circulation. Overflows are poorly represented in coarse resolution level coordinate ocean climate models. Here, the embedded Lagrangian model formulated in the companion paper of Bates et al. (2012) is used in two idealised test cases to examine the effect on the representation of dense gravity driven plumes, as well as the effect on the circulation of the bulk ocean in the Eulerian model. The results are compared with simulations with no parameterisation for overflows, as well as simulations that use traditional hydrostatic overflow schemes. The use of Lagrangian "blobs" is shown to improve three key characteristics that are poorly represented in coarse resolution level coordinate models: (1) the depth of the plume, (2) the along slope velocity of the plume, and (3) the response of the bulk ocean to the bottom boundary layer. These improvements are associated with the more appropriate set of dynamics satisfied by the blobs, leading to a more physically sound representation. Experiments are also conducted to examine sensitivity to blob parameters. The blob parameters are examined over a large parameter space.

  11. Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    associated life forms. And paradoxically, as we learn more and more about ocean life, for example, through the genomics revolution (Doney et al., 2004...designed to exploit present another challenge to interdis- includes a strong component of retro- new information (e.g., from genomics ), ciplinary ocean...interannual scales-and construct a trient-poor subtropical gyres, the phy- and new molecular and genomic tech- system with enough adaptability to re

  12. Seasonal Distributions of Global Ocean Chlorophyll and Nutrients: Analysis with a Coupled Ocean General Circulation Biogeochemical, and Radiative Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.

    1999-01-01

    A coupled general ocean circulation, biogeochemical, and radiative model was constructed to evaluate and understand the nature of seasonal variability of chlorophyll and nutrients in the global oceans. The model is driven by climatological meteorological conditions, cloud cover, and sea surface temperature. Biogeochemical processes in the model are determined from the influences of circulation and turbulence dynamics, irradiance availability, and the interactions among three functional phytoplankton groups (diatoms, chorophytes, and picoplankton) and three nutrient groups (nitrate, ammonium, and silicate). Phytoplankton groups are initialized as homogeneous fields horizontally and vertically, and allowed to distribute themselves according to the prevailing conditions. Basin-scale model chlorophyll results are in very good agreement with CZCS pigments in virtually every global region. Seasonal variability observed in the CZCS is also well represented in the model. Synoptic scale (100-1000 km) comparisons of imagery are also in good conformance, although occasional departures are apparent. Agreement of nitrate distributions with in situ data is even better, including seasonal dynamics, except for the equatorial Atlantic. The good agreement of the model with satellite and in situ data sources indicates that the model dynamics realistically simulate phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics on synoptic scales. This is especially true given that initial conditions are homogenous chlorophyll fields. The success of the model in producing a reasonable representation of chlorophyll and nutrient distributions and seasonal variability in the global oceans is attributed to the application of a generalized, processes-driven approach as opposed to regional parameterization, and the existence of multiple phytoplankton groups with different physiological and physical properties. These factors enable the model to simultaneously represent the great diversity of physical, biological

  13. Multi-model attribution of upper-ocean temperature changes using an isothermal approach.

    PubMed

    Weller, Evan; Min, Seung-Ki; Palmer, Matthew D; Lee, Donghyun; Yim, Bo Young; Yeh, Sang-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Both air-sea heat exchanges and changes in ocean advection have contributed to observed upper-ocean warming most evident in the late-twentieth century. However, it is predominantly via changes in air-sea heat fluxes that human-induced climate forcings, such as increasing greenhouse gases, and other natural factors such as volcanic aerosols, have influenced global ocean heat content. The present study builds on previous work using two different indicators of upper-ocean temperature changes for the detection of both anthropogenic and natural external climate forcings. Using simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, we compare mean temperatures above a fixed isotherm with the more widely adopted approach of using a fixed depth. We present the first multi-model ensemble detection and attribution analysis using the fixed isotherm approach to robustly detect both anthropogenic and natural external influences on upper-ocean temperatures. Although contributions from multidecadal natural variability cannot be fully removed, both the large multi-model ensemble size and properties of the isotherm analysis reduce internal variability of the ocean, resulting in better observation-model comparison of temperature changes since the 1950s. We further show that the high temporal resolution afforded by the isotherm analysis is required to detect natural external influences such as volcanic cooling events in the upper-ocean because the radiative effect of volcanic forcings is short-lived.

  14. Multi-model attribution of upper-ocean temperature changes using an isothermal approach

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Evan; Min, Seung-Ki; Palmer, Matthew D.; Lee, Donghyun; Yim, Bo Young; Yeh, Sang-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Both air-sea heat exchanges and changes in ocean advection have contributed to observed upper-ocean warming most evident in the late-twentieth century. However, it is predominantly via changes in air-sea heat fluxes that human-induced climate forcings, such as increasing greenhouse gases, and other natural factors such as volcanic aerosols, have influenced global ocean heat content. The present study builds on previous work using two different indicators of upper-ocean temperature changes for the detection of both anthropogenic and natural external climate forcings. Using simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, we compare mean temperatures above a fixed isotherm with the more widely adopted approach of using a fixed depth. We present the first multi-model ensemble detection and attribution analysis using the fixed isotherm approach to robustly detect both anthropogenic and natural external influences on upper-ocean temperatures. Although contributions from multidecadal natural variability cannot be fully removed, both the large multi-model ensemble size and properties of the isotherm analysis reduce internal variability of the ocean, resulting in better observation-model comparison of temperature changes since the 1950s. We further show that the high temporal resolution afforded by the isotherm analysis is required to detect natural external influences such as volcanic cooling events in the upper-ocean because the radiative effect of volcanic forcings is short-lived. PMID:27245575

  15. Multi-model attribution of upper-ocean temperature changes using an isothermal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Evan; Min, Seung-Ki; Palmer, Matthew D.; Lee, Donghyun; Yim, Bo Young; Yeh, Sang-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Both air-sea heat exchanges and changes in ocean advection have contributed to observed upper-ocean warming most evident in the late-twentieth century. However, it is predominantly via changes in air-sea heat fluxes that human-induced climate forcings, such as increasing greenhouse gases, and other natural factors such as volcanic aerosols, have influenced global ocean heat content. The present study builds on previous work using two different indicators of upper-ocean temperature changes for the detection of both anthropogenic and natural external climate forcings. Using simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, we compare mean temperatures above a fixed isotherm with the more widely adopted approach of using a fixed depth. We present the first multi-model ensemble detection and attribution analysis using the fixed isotherm approach to robustly detect both anthropogenic and natural external influences on upper-ocean temperatures. Although contributions from multidecadal natural variability cannot be fully removed, both the large multi-model ensemble size and properties of the isotherm analysis reduce internal variability of the ocean, resulting in better observation-model comparison of temperature changes since the 1950s. We further show that the high temporal resolution afforded by the isotherm analysis is required to detect natural external influences such as volcanic cooling events in the upper-ocean because the radiative effect of volcanic forcings is short-lived.

  16. Coupled atmosphere-ocean models of Titan's past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, C. P.; Pollack, J. B.; Lunine, J. I.; Courtin, R.

    1993-03-01

    The behavior and possible past evolution of fully coupled atmosphere and ocean model of Titan are investigated. It is found that Titan's surface temperature was about 20 K cooler at 4 Gyr ago and will be about 5 K warmer 0.5 Gyr in the future. The change in solar luminosity and the conversion of oceanic CH4 to C2H6 drive the evolution of the ocean and atmosphere over time. Titan appears to have experienced a frozen epoch about 3 Gyr ago independent of whether an ocean is present or not. This finding may have important implications for understanding the inventory of Titan's volatile compounds.

  17. Oceanic excitations on polar motion: a cross comparison among models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y. H.; Chen, J. L.; Liao, X. H.; Wilson, C. R.

    2005-08-01

    Recent studies based on various ocean general circulation models (OGCMs) demonstrate that the oceans are a major contributor to polar motion excitations. In this paper, we analyse and compare observed non-atmospheric polar motion excitations with oceanic angular momentum (OAM) variations determined from four OGCMs, which include the parallel ocean climate model (POCM), a barotropic ocean model (BOM), the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) non-data-assimilating model (ECCO-NDA) and the ECCO data-assimilating model (ECCO-DA). The data to be analysed span a 5-yr overlapped period from 1993 to 1997. At annual timescale, considerable discrepancies exist between POCM and the other three models, which result mainly from differences in annual components of the forcing wind fields. At semi-annual timescale, however, POCM shows better phase agreement with observed non-atmospheric polar motion excitation than the other three ocean models. At intraseasonal timescales, ECCO-DA yields better agreement with observations, and reduces the variance of non-atmospheric excitations by ~60 per cent, 10-20 per cent more than those explained by the other three models. However, at the very short periods of 4-20 days, the BOM estimates could explain about half of the observed variance, twice as much as that by ECCO-NDA, and also shows considerably better correlation with observations. Due to different modelling schemes and methods, significant discrepancies could arise with respect to the quality of modelling large-scale oceanic mass redistribution and current variation. A complete understanding of global oceanic contributions to polar motion excitation still remains a challenge.

  18. Response of the Miliolid Archaias angulatus to simulated ocean acidification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knorr, Paul O.; Robbins, Lisa L.; Harries, Peter J.; Hallock, Pamela; Wynn, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A common, but not universal, effect of ocean acidification on benthic foraminifera is a reduction in the growth rate. The miliolid Archaias angulatus is a high-Mg (>4 mole% MgCO3), symbiont-bearing, soritid benthic foraminifer that contributes to Caribbean reef carbonate sediments. A laboratory culture study assessed the effects of reduced pH on the growth of A. angulatus. We observed a statistically significant 50% reduction in the growth rate (p < 0.01), calculated from changes in maximum diameter, from 160 μm/28 days in the pH 8.0/pCO2air 480 ppm control group to 80 μm/28 days at a treatment level of pH 7.6/pCO2air 1328 ppm. Additionally, pseudopore area, δ18O values, and Mg/Ca ratio all increased, albeit slightly in the latter two variables. The reduction in growth rate indicates that under a high-CO2 setting, future A. angulatus populations will consist of smaller adults. A model using the results of this study estimates that at pH 7.6 A. angulatus carbonate production in the South Florida reef tract and Florida Bay decreases by 85%, from 0.27 Mt/yr to 0.04 Mt/yr, over an area of 9,000 km2.

  19. Comprehensive plate models for the thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grose, Christopher J.; Afonso, Juan Carlos

    2013-09-01

    Seafloor spreading and the cooling of oceanic lithosphere is a fundamental feature of plate tectonics in the Earth, the details of which are unveiled by modeling with constraints from mineral physics and geophysical observations. To work toward a more complete model of the thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere, we investigate the contributions of axial hydrothermal circulation, oceanic crust, and temperature-pressure-dependent thermal properties. We find that models with only temperature-dependent properties disagree with geophysical observations unless properties are artificially modified. On the other hand, more comprehensive models are in better agreement with geophysical observations. Our preferred model requires a thermal expansivity reduction of 15% from a mineral physics estimate, and predicts a plate thickness of about 110-130 km. A principal result of our analysis is that the oceanic crust is a major contributor to the cooling of oceanic lithosphere. The oceanic crust acts as an insulating lid on the mantle, causing the rate of lithospheric cooling to increase from "crustal" values near the ridge to higher mantle values at old-age. Major consequences of this insulation effect are: (a) low seafloor subsidence rate in proximity to ridge axes (<5 Ma), (b) the thermal structure of oceanic lithosphere is significantly warmer than previous models, (c) seafloor heat flow is significantly lower over young (<35 Ma) seafloor compared to simple models, (d) a low net seafloor heat flux (˜27 TW), and (e) temperature at the base of the seismogenic zone extends to 700-800°C mantle.

  20. Using ocean tracers to reduce uncertainties about ocean diapycnal mixing and model projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goes, M. P.; Urban, N.; Keller, K.; Schmittner, A.; Tonkonojenkov, R.; Haran, M.

    2010-12-01

    Current projections of the oceanic response to anthropogenic climate forcings are uncertain. Two key sources of these uncertainties are (i) structural errors in current Earth system models and (ii) imperfect knowledge of model parameters. Ocean tracers observations have the potential to reduce these uncertainties. Previous studies typically consider each tracer separately, neglect potentially important statistical properties of the system, or use methods that impose rather daunting computational demands. Here we extend and improve upon a recently developed approach using horizontally averaged vertical profiles of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-11), radiocarbon (DC14), and temperature (T) observations to reduce model parametric and structural uncertainties. Our method estimates a joint probability density function, which considers cross-tracer correlations and spatial autocorrelations of the errors. We illustrate this method by estimating two model parameters related to the vertical diffusivity, the background vertical diffusivity and the upper Southern Ocean mixing. We show that enhancing the upper Southern Ocean mixing in the model improves the representations of ocean tracers, as well as improves hindcasts of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and Ocean Carbon uptake. The most probable value of the background vertical diffusivity in the pelagic pycnocline is between 0.1-0.2 cm2/s. According to the statistical method, observations of DC14 reduce the uncertainty about the background vertical diffusivity the most followed by CFC-11 and T. Using all three tracers jointly reduces the model uncertainty by 40%, more than each tracer individually. Given several important caveats, we illustrate how the reduced model parametric uncertainty improves probabilistic projections of the AMOC and Ocean Carbon uptake.

  1. An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part II: Liquid freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Ilicak, Mehmet; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Drange, Helge; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Bailey, David A.; Bentsen, Mats; Biastoch, Arne; Bozec, Alexandra; Böning, Claus; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Curry, Beth; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Danilov, Sergey; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Iovino, Doroteaciro; Jahn, Alexandra; Jung, Thomas; Large, William G.; Lee, Craig; Lique, Camille; Lu, Jianhua; Masina, Simona; Nurser, A. J. George; Rabe, Benjamin; Roth, Christina; Salas y Mélia, David; Samuels, Bonita L.; Spence, Paul; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Xuezhu; Yeager, Steve G.

    2016-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean simulated in 14 global ocean-sea ice models in the framework of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments, phase II (CORE-II) is analyzed in this study. The focus is on the Arctic liquid freshwater (FW) sources and freshwater content (FWC). The models agree on the interannual variability of liquid FW transport at the gateways where the ocean volume transport determines the FW transport variability. The variation of liquid FWC is induced by both the surface FW flux (associated with sea ice production) and lateral liquid FW transport, which are in phase when averaged on decadal time scales. The liquid FWC shows an increase starting from the mid-1990s, caused by the reduction of both sea ice formation and liquid FW export, with the former being more significant in most of the models. The mean state of the FW budget is less consistently simulated than the temporal variability. The model ensemble means of liquid FW transport through the Arctic gateways compare well with observations. On average, the models have too high mean FWC, weaker upward trends of FWC in the recent decade than the observation, and low consistency in the temporal variation of FWC spatial distribution, which needs to be further explored for the purpose of model development.

  2. Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation for the near-ocean-surface high-resolution downwelling irradiance statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zao; Yue, Dick K. P.

    2014-05-01

    We present a numerical study of the near-surface underwater solar light statistics using the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer (RT) simulations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system. Advanced variance-reduction techniques and full program parallelization are utilized so that the model is able to simulate the light field fluctuations with high spatial [O(10-3 mm)] and temporal [O(10-3 s)] resolutions. In particular, we utilize the high-order correction technique for the beam-surface intersection points in the model to account for the shadowing effect of steep ocean surfaces, and therefore, the model is able to well predict the refraction and reflection of light for large solar zenith incidences. The Monte Carlo RT model is carefully validated by data-to-model comparisons using the Radiance in a Dynamic Ocean (RaDyO) experimental data. Based on the model, we are particularly interested in the probability density function (PDF) and coefficient of variation (CV) of the highly fluctuating downwelling irradiance. The effects of physical factors, such as the water turbidity of the ocean, solar incidence, and the detector size, are investigated. The results show that increased turbidity and detector size reduce the variability of the downwelling irradiance; the shadowing effect for large solar zenith incidence strongly enhances the variability of the irradiance at shallow depths.

  3. Simulation of ENSO with a global atmospheric GCM coupled to a high-resolution, tropical Pacific ocean GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Philander, S.G.H.; Pacanowski, R.C.; Lau, N.C.; Nath, M.J. )

    1992-04-01

    A global atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) coupled to an oceanic GCM that is dynamically active only in the tropical Pacific simulates variability over a broad spectrum of frequencies. Of special interest is the simulation of a realistically irregular Southern Oscillation between warm El Nino and cold La Nino states with time scale of 5 years. The spatial structure is different in the eastern and western halves of the ocean basin. Sea surface temperature changes have their largest amplitude in the central and eastern tropical Pacific, but the low-frequency zonal wind fluctuations are displaced westward and are large over the western half of the basin. During El Nino the associated curl contributes to a pair of pronounced minima in thermocline depth, symmetrically about the equator in the west. In the east the deepening of the thermodine in response to the winds in the west has an approximate Gaussian shape centered on the equator. The low-frequency sea surface temperature and zonal wind anomalies wax and wane practically in place and in phase without significant zonal phase propagation. Thermocline depth variations have phase propagation, a property of the oceanic response to the quasi-periodic winds that force currents and excite a host of waves with periods near 5 years, This indicates that the ocean-atmosphere interactions that cause El Nino to develop at a certain time are countered and reversed by the delayed response of the ocean to earlier winds. Kelvin and Rossby waves cannot be identified in the low-frequency fluctuations of this model, but they are energetic at relatively short periods and are of vital importance to a quasi-resonant oceanic mode with a period near 7 months that is excited in the model. The similarities and differences between the results of this simulation and those with other models are discussed.

  4. Theoretical comparison of subgrid turbulence in atmospheric and oceanic quasi-geostrophic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsios, Vassili; Frederiksen, Jorgen S.; Zidikheri, Meelis J.

    2016-04-01

    Due to the massive disparity between the largest and smallest eddies in the atmosphere and ocean, it is not possible to simulate these flows by explicitly resolving all scales on a computational grid. Instead the large scales are explicitly resolved, and the interactions between the unresolved subgrid turbulence and large resolved scales are parameterised. If these interactions are not properly represented then an increase in resolution will not necessarily improve the accuracy of the large scales. This has been a significant and long-standing problem since the earliest climate simulations. Historically subgrid models for the atmosphere and ocean have been developed in isolation, with the structure of each motivated by different physical phenomena. Here we solve the turbulence closure problem by determining the parameterisation coefficients (eddy viscosities) from the subgrid statistics of high-resolution quasi-geostrophic atmospheric and oceanic simulations. These subgrid coefficients are characterised into a set of simple unifying scaling laws, for truncations made within the enstrophy-cascading inertial range. The ocean additionally has an inverse energy cascading range, within which the subgrid model coefficients have different scaling properties. Simulations adopting these scaling laws are shown to reproduce the statistics of the reference benchmark simulations across resolved scales, with orders of magnitude improvement in computational efficiency. This reduction in both resolution dependence and computational effort will improve the efficiency and accuracy of geophysical research and operational activities that require data generated by general circulation models, including weather, seasonal, and climate prediction; transport studies; and understanding natural variability and extreme events.

  5. A Community Terrain-Following Ocean Modeling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    ways to incorporate wetting and drying effects. 4. A new NPZD biological model have been added using the formulation proposed by Powell et al. (2006...A Community Terrain-Following Ocean Modeling System Hernan G. Arango Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences Rutgers University 71 Dudley Road...generation primitive equation, Terrain-following Ocean Modeling System (TOMS) for high-resolution scientific and operational applications. This

  6. Modelling Ocean Dissipation in Icy Satellites: A Comparison of Linear and Quadratic Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, H.; Matsuyama, I.

    2015-12-01

    Although subsurface oceans are confirmed in Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, and strongly suspected in Enceladus and Titan, the exact mechanism required to heat and maintain these liquid reservoirs over Solar System history remains a mystery. Radiogenic heating can supply enough energy for large satellites whereas tidal dissipation provides the best explanation for the presence of oceans in small icy satellites. The amount of thermal energy actually contributed to the interiors of these icy satellites through oceanic tidal dissipation is largely unquantified. Presented here is a numerical model that builds upon previous work for quantifying tidally dissipated energy in the subsurface oceans of the icy satellites. Recent semi-analytical models (Tyler, 2008 and Matsuyama, 2014) have solved the Laplace Tidal Equations to estimate the time averaged energy flux over an orbital period in icy satellite oceans, neglecting the presence of a solid icy shell. These models are only able to consider linear Rayleigh friction. The numerical model presented here is compared to one of these semi-analytical models, finding excellent agreement between velocity and displacement solutions for all three terms to the tidal potential. Time averaged energy flux is within 2-6% of the analytical values. Quadratic (bottom) friction is then incorporated into the model, replacing linear friction. This approach is commonly applied to terrestrial ocean dissipation studies where dissipation scales nonlinearly with velocity. A suite of simulations are also run for the quadratic friction case which are then compared to and analysed against recent scaling laws developed by Chen and Nimmo (2013).

  7. Modeling of submarine melting in Petermann Fjord, Northwestern Greenland using an ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, C.; Rignot, E. J.; Xu, Y.; An, L.

    2013-12-01

    Basal melting of the floating tongue of Petermann Glacier, in northwestern Greenland is by far the largest process of mass ablation. Melting of the floating tongue is controlled by the buoyancy of the melt water plume, the pressure-dependence of the melting point of sea ice, and the mixing of warm subsurface water with fresh buoyant subglacial discharge. In prior simulations of this melting process, the role of subglacial discharge has been neglected because in similar configurations (floating ice shelves) in the Antarctic, surface runoff is negligible; this is however not true in Greenland. Here, we use the Mass Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) at a high spatial resolution (10 m x 10 m) to simulate the melting process of the ice shelf in 2-D. the model is constrained by ice shelf bathymetry and ice thickness from NASA Operation IceBridge, ocean temperature/salinity data from Johnson et al. (2011), and subglacial discharge estimated from output products of the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO). We compare the results obtained in winter (no runoff) with summer, and the sensitivity of the results to thermal forcing from the ocean, and to the magnitude of subglacial runoff. We conclude on the impact of the ocean and surface melting on the melting regime of the floating ice tongue of Petermann. This work is performed under a contract with NASA Cryosphere Program.

  8. Oceanic carbon dioxide uptake in a model of century-scale global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, J.L.; Le Quere, C.

    1996-11-22

    In a model of ocean-atmosphere interaction that excluded biological processes, the oceanic uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) was substantially reduced in scenarios involving global warming relative to control scenarios. The primary reason for the reduced uptake was the weakening or collapse of the ocean thermohaline circulation. Such a large reduction in this ocean uptake would have a major impact o the future growth rate of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Model simulations that include a simple representation of biological processes show a potentially large offsetting effect resulting from the downward flux of biogenic carbon. However, the magnitude of the offset is difficult to quantify with present knowledge. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Modeling the seasonal variability of a coupled Arctic ice-ocean system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Mellor, George L.

    1992-01-01

    The seasonal variability of the ice-ocean system in the Arctic Basin and the Norwegian, Greenland, and Barents Seas was modeled using a three-dimensional coupled ice-ocean model developed at Princeton University. The snow-ice model uses a three-level thermodynamic scheme similar to Semtner's (1976), but is extended to include the effect of leads. It is shown that simulations using the climatological monthly forcing fields produce a realistic seasonal variability of the ice cover. The ice thickness had a considerable sensitivity to the choice of the long-wave back radiation scheme, but these effects can be reduced through dynamical factors.

  10. Modeling pCO sub 2 in the upper ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, D.

    1990-12-01

    This report summarizes our current understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that control the natural cycling of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the surface ocean. Because the physics of mixing at the ocean surface creates the essential framework for the chemistry and biology, and because the literature on surface ocean mixing is extensive, a major focus of the report is to review existing mixed layer models for the upper ocean and their implementation in global ocean circulation models. Three families of mixed layer models have been developed. The integrated turbulent kinetic energy'' (TKE) models construct a budget for surface ocean TKE, using the wind stress as source and dissipation as sink for TKE. The shear instability'' models maintain profiles of current velocity resulting from the wind stress. Turbulence closure'' models are the most general and the most complicated of the three types, and are based on laboratory studies of fluid turbulence. This paper explores behavioral distinctions between the three types of models, and summarizes previously published comparisons of the generality, accuracy, and computational requirements of the three models. The application of mixed layer models to treatment of sea ice is also reviewed. 101 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Modelling the distribution of plutonium in the Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masanao; Povinec, Pavel P

    2003-01-01

    An Oceanic General Circulation Model (OGCM) including a plutonium scavenging model as well as an advection-diffusion model has been developed for modelling the distribution of plutonium in the Pacific Ocean. Calculated 239, 240Pu water profile concentrations and 239, 240Pu inventories in water and sediment of the Pacific Ocean have showed a reasonable agreement with the experimental results. The presence of local fallout plutonium in central North Pacific waters has been confirmed. The observed 240Pu/239Pu mass ratios confirm that plutonium originating from local fallout from nuclear weapons tests carried out at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls is more rapidly removed from surface waters to deeper waters than plutonium originating from global fallout. The developed OGCM can be used for modelling the dispersion of other non-conservative tracers in the ocean as well.

  12. Skill assessment of the PELAGOS global ocean biogeochemistry model over the period 1980-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vichi, M.; Masina, S.

    2009-04-01

    Global Ocean Biogeochemistry General Circulation models are useful tools to study biogeochemical processes at gobal and large scales under current climate and future scenario conditions. The accuracy of the future estimate is however dependent on the adequate representation of the current ocean biogeochemical features. To this purpose, the results of an interannual simulation of the global ocean biogeochemical model PELAGOS have been objectively compared with multi-variate observations from the last 20 years of the XX century. The model was assessed in terms of spatial and temporal variability of chlorophyll and primary production derived from satellite sensors, with a specific focus on the simulation of carbon production/consumption rates observed in the equatorial Pacific ocean and at the long-term JGOFS stations. The predicted chlorophyll is acceptable in the northern mid-latitude regions and equatorial Pacific, but is underestimated in the upwelling regions of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans and markedly overestimated in the Southern Ocean. This latter bias is linked to the inadequate representation of the mixed layer seasonal cycle in the region, which favours primary production during austral spring. Simulated primary production is comparable with satellite estimates both at the global scale and when compared with an independent data-set in the equatorial Pacific. A comparison with other models showed that PELAGOS results are as good as the estimates from state-of-the-art diagnostic models based on satellite data. The skill in reproducing the interannual varibility was assessed in the equatorial Pacific and against the decadal JGOFS timeseries BATS and HOT. In the tropical Pacific our analysis suggests that interannual variability of primary production is related to the climate variability both in the observations and in the model. At the JGOFS stations PELAGOS has skill to simulate the observed bacterial biomass and shows realistic means of primary and

  13. Numerical simulation of large-scale ocean-atmosphere coupling and the ocean's role in climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of reducing model generated sigma coordinate data to pressure levels is considered. A mass consistent scheme for performing budget analyses is proposed, wherein variables interpolated to a given pressure level are weighted according to the mass between a nominal pressure level above and either a nominal pressure level below or the Earth's surface, whichever is closer. The method is applied to the atmospheric energy cycle as simulated by the OSU two level atmospheric general circulation model. The results are more realistic than sigma coordinate analyses with respect to eddy decomposition, and are in agreement with the sigma coordinate evaluation of the numerical energy sink. Comparison with less sophisticated budget schemes indicates superiority locally, but not globally.

  14. Century-scale perspectives on observed and simulated Southern Ocean sea ice trends from proxy reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Will; Curran, Mark; Abram, Nerilie; Thomas, Elizabeth R.

    2016-10-01

    Since 1979 when continuous satellite observations began, Southern Ocean sea ice cover has increased, whilst global coupled climate models simulate a decrease over the same period. It is uncertain whether the observed trends are anthropogenically forced or due to internal variability, or whether the apparent discrepancy between models and observations can be explained by internal variability. The shortness of the satellite record is one source of this uncertainty, and a possible solution is to use proxy reconstructions, which extend the analysis period but at the expense of higher observational uncertainty. In this work, we evaluate the utility for change detection of 20th century Southern Ocean sea ice proxies. We find that there are reliable proxies for the East Antarctic, Amundsen, Bellingshausen and Weddell sectors in late winter, and for the Weddell Sea in late autumn. Models and reconstructions agree that sea ice extent in the East Antarctic, Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas has decreased since the early 1970s, consistent with an anthropogenic response. However, the decrease is small compared to internal variability, and the change is not robustly detectable. We also find that optimal fingerprinting filters out much of the uncertainty in proxy reconstructions. The Ross Sea is a confounding factor, with a significant increase in sea ice since 1979 that is not captured by climate models; however, existing proxy reconstructions of this region are not yet sufficiently reliable for formal change detection.

  15. Global ocean simulations by HYCOM on icosahedral and logically rectangular grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shan; Bleck, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    iHYCOM, short for "icosahedral HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model", is being developed at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. The purpose of formulating HYCOM on an icosahedral grid is to allow coupling to an existing icosahedral weather prediction model ("FIM", see http://fim.noaa.gov) unencumbered by interpolation problems at the air-sea-ice interface. We have tested the traditional HYCOM, formulated on a Mercator grid augmented by a bipolar pole patch, with iHYCOM for several decades at comparable horizontal mesh sizes in the 0.5-1.0 deg range, employing the same vertical resolution of 26 potential density (sigma_1) layers. These comparison runs were forced by CORE (Common Ocean-Ice Reference Experiment) fields. Several performance measures indicate that formulating HYCOM on an icosahedral mesh is feasible, although a numerically stable barotropic-baroclinic mode splitting scheme is not available yet. We compare the large scale circulations simulated by both model versions and investigate the model sensitivity to different horizontal grids.

  16. The coupled atmosphere-chemistry-ocean model SOCOL-MPIOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthers, S.; Anet, J. G.; Stenke, A.; Raible, C. C.; Rozanov, E.; Brönnimann, S.; Peter, T.; Arfeuille, F. X.; Shapiro, A. I.; Beer, J.; Steinhilber, F.; Brugnara, Y.; Schmutz, W.

    2014-09-01

    The newly developed atmosphere-ocean-chemistry-climate model SOCOL-MPIOM is presented by demonstrating the influence of chemistry-climate interactions on the climate state and the variability. Therefore, we compare pre-industrial control simulations with (CHEM) and without (NOCHEM) interactive chemistry. In general, the influence of the chemistry on the mean state and the variability is small and mainly restricted to the stratosphere and mesosphere. The atmospheric dynamics mainly differ in polar regions, with slightly stronger polar vortices in the austral and boreal winter, respectively. The strengthening of the vortex is related to larger stratospheric temperature gradients, which are attributed to a parameterisation of the absorption of ozone and oxygen in different wavelength intervals, which is considered in the version with interactive chemistry only. A second reason for the temperature differences between CHEM and NOCHEM is related to diurnal variations in the ozone concentrations in the higher atmosphere, which are missing in NOCHEM. Furthermore, stratospheric water vapour concentrations substantially differ between the two experiments, but their effect on temperature is small. In both setups, the simulated intensity and variability of the northern polar vortex is inside the range of present-day observations. Additionally, the performance of SOCOL-MPIOM under changing external forcings is assessed for the period 1600-2000 using an ensemble of simulations. In the industrial period from 1850 onward SOCOL-MPIOM overestimates the global mean surface air temperature increase in comparison to observational data sets. Sensitivity simulations show that this overestimation can be attributed to a combination of factors: the solar forcing reconstruction, the simulated ozone changes, and incomplete aerosol effects and land use changes.

  17. A 1/8° coupled biochemical-physical Indian Ocean Regional Model: Physical results and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ke; Derada, Sergio; Xue, Huijie; Xiu, Peng; Chai, Fei; Xie, Qiang; Wang, Dongxiao

    2015-08-01

    A coupled physical-biochemical Indian Ocean Regional Model (IORM), based on the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) and the Carbon Silicate Nitrogen Ecosystem (CoSiNE) model was configured with the primary objective of providing an accurate estimate of the oceanic physical state along with the biochemical processes simulated by CoSiNE to understand the variability in the Indian Ocean (IO). The model did not assimilate any data; instead, weak relaxation of temperature and salinity was implemented to keep the model stable in the long-term simulations. In this study, the skill of the IORM in simulating physical states in the IO was evaluated. Basin-scale surface circulation and cross-sectional transports were compared to observations, which demonstrated that the model replicated most of the observed features with reasonably good accuracy. Consistency and biases in the upper ocean temperature, salinity, and mixed layer depth were also analyzed. Lastly, the seasonality in the IO, its response to monsoonal forcing, and the evolution and dynamics of surface and subsurface dipole events were examined. The IORM reproduced most of the dynamic features including Ekman pumping, wave propagation, and climate variability at both annual and interannual time scales. The internal ocean dynamics and behavior of the modeled sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) suggest a coupled ocean/atmosphere instability that will require further research, including sensitivity experiments to realize improvements in model parameterization.

  18. Time-Domain Simulation of Along-Track Interferometric SAR for Moving Ocean Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takero; Rheem, Chang-Kyu

    2015-06-10

    A time-domain simulation of along-track interferometric synthetic aperture radar (AT-InSAR) has been developed to support ocean observations. The simulation is in the time domain and based on Bragg scattering to be applicable for moving ocean surfaces. The time-domain simulation is suitable for examining velocities of moving objects. The simulation obtains the time series of microwave backscattering as raw signals for movements of ocean surfaces. In terms of realizing Bragg scattering, the computational grid elements for generating the numerical ocean surface are set to be smaller than the wavelength of the Bragg resonant wave. In this paper, the simulation was conducted for a Bragg resonant wave and irregular waves with currents. As a result, the phases of the received signals from two antennas differ due to the movement of the numerical ocean surfaces. The phase differences shifted by currents were in good agreement with the theoretical values. Therefore, the adaptability of the simulation to observe velocities of ocean surfaces with AT-InSAR was confirmed.

  19. "One-Stop Shopping" for Ocean Remote-Sensing and Model Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, P. Peggy; Vu, Quoc; Chao, Yi; Li, Zhi-Jin; Choi, Jei-Kook

    2006-01-01

    OurOcean Portal 2.0 (http:// ourocean.jpl.nasa.gov) is a software system designed to enable users to easily gain access to ocean observation data, both remote-sensing and in-situ, configure and run an Ocean Model with observation data assimilated on a remote computer, and visualize both the observation data and the model outputs. At present, the observation data and models focus on the California coastal regions and Prince William Sound in Alaska. This system can be used to perform both real-time and retrospective analyses of remote-sensing data and model outputs. OurOcean Portal 2.0 incorporates state-of-the-art information technologies (IT) such as MySQL database, Java Web Server (Apache/Tomcat), Live Access Server (LAS), interactive graphics with Java Applet at the Client site and MatLab/GMT at the server site, and distributed computing. OurOcean currently serves over 20 real-time or historical ocean data products. The data are served in pre-generated plots or their native data format. For some of the datasets, users can choose different plotting parameters and produce customized graphics. OurOcean also serves 3D Ocean Model outputs generated by ROMS (Regional Ocean Model System) using LAS. The Live Access Server (LAS) software, developed by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is a configurable Web-server program designed to provide flexible access to geo-referenced scientific data. The model output can be views as plots in horizontal slices, depth profiles or time sequences, or can be downloaded as raw data in different data formats, such as NetCDF, ASCII, Binary, etc. The interactive visualization is provided by graphic software, Ferret, also developed by PMEL. In addition, OurOcean allows users with minimal computing resources to configure and run an Ocean Model with data assimilation on a remote computer. Users may select the forcing input, the data to be assimilated, the

  20. Advances in geophysics. Volume 28 - issues in atmospheric and oceanic modeling. Part A - climate dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Manabe, S.

    1985-01-01

    Papers are presented on large-scale eddies and the general circulation of the troposphere; the role of barotropic energy conversions in the general circulation; balance conditions in the earth's climate system, climate sensitivity; CO2 and hydrology; modeling of paleoclimates; and the southern oscillation and El Nino. Topics treated include the stratospheric dynamics of the middle atmosphere, wave-mean-flow interaction in the middle atmosphere, radiative-dynamical interactions in the middle atmosphere, and a mechanistic interpretation of stratospheric tracer transport. Consideration is given to the general circulation of Venus, and Jovian and comparative atmospheric modeling. Also discussed are the modeling of ocean circulation, tropical oceanography, the simulation of mesoscale ocean variability in midlatitude gyres, modeling circulation and mixing in estuaries and coastal oceans, and the modeling of sea-ice dynamics.

  1. Simulation based study of the effect of ocean waves on floating wind farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Di; Meneveau, Charles; Shen, Lian

    2012-11-01

    A hybrid numerical capability is developed for the simulation of floating wind farm offshore, in which large-eddy simulation is performed for wind turbulence, and a potential flow based method is used for the simulation of ocean wavefield. The wind and wave simulations are coupled through a two-way feedback scheme. The effect of wind turbines on the wind field is represented by an actuator disk model. A variety of fully-developed and fetch-limited wind-sea conditions are considered in the study. The simulation results indicate that the offshore wind farm obtains a higher wind power extraction rate under the fully-developed wind-sea condition compared with the fetch-limited condition. This higher extraction rate is caused by the faster propagating waves and the lower sea-surface resistance on the wind when the wind-seas are fully developed. Such wave effect becomes more prominent when the turbine density of the wind farm increases. DY and LS acknowledge the support of NSF-CBET-1133700. CM acknowledges the support of NSF-CBET-1133800 and NSF-AGS-1045189.

  2. Scaling laws for parametrizations of subgrid interactions in simulations of oceanic circulations.

    PubMed

    Kitsios, V; Frederiksen, J S; Zidikheri, M J

    2014-06-28

    Parametrizations of the subgrid eddy-eddy and eddy-meanfield interactions are developed for the simulation of baroclinic ocean circulations representative of an idealized Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Benchmark simulations are generated using a spectral spherical harmonic quasi-geostrophic model with maximum truncation wavenumber of T=504, which is equivalent to a resolution of 0.24° globally. A stochastic parametrization is used for the eddy-eddy interactions, and a linear deterministic parametrization for the eddy-meanfield interactions. The parametrization coefficients are determined from the statistics of benchmark simulations truncated back to the large eddy simulation (LES) truncation wavenumber, TRsimulations.

  3. The NOW regional coupled model: Application to the tropical Indian Ocean climate and tropical cyclone activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, G.; Masson, S.; Lengaigne, M.; Keerthi, M. G.; Vialard, J.; Pous, S.; Madec, G.; Jourdain, N. C.; Jullien, S.; Menkes, C.; Marchesiello, P.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the NOW regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model built from the NEMO ocean and WRF atmospheric numerical models. This model is applied to the tropical Indian Ocean, with the oceanic and atmospheric components sharing a common ¼° horizontal grid. Long experiments are performed over the 1990-2009 period using the Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ) and Kain-Fritsch (KF) cumulus parameterizations. Both simulations produce a realistic distribution of seasonal rainfall and a realistic northward seasonal migration of monsoon rainfall over the Indian subcontinent. At subseasonal time scales, the model reasonably reproduces summer monsoon active and break phases, although with underestimated rainfall and surface wind signals. Its relatively high resolution results in realistic spatial and seasonal distributions of tropical cyclones, but it fails to reproduce the strongest observed cyclone categories. At interannual time scales, the model reproduces the observed variability associated with the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and the delayed basin-wide warming/cooling induced by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The timing of IOD occurrence in the model generally matches that of the observed events, confirming the influence of ENSO on the IOD development (through the effect of lateral boundary conditions in our simulations). Although the KF and BMJ simulations share a lot in common, KF strongly overestimates rainfall at all time scales. KF also overestimates the number of simulated cyclones by a factor two, while simulating stronger events (up to 55 m s-1) compared to BMJ (up to 40 m s-1). These results could be related to an overly active cumulus parameterization in KF.

  4. Extratropical Cyclone-Scale Eddies Simulated from a Climate Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi.

    1995-01-01

    Three major issues related to the long-term variation of the activity of extratropical cyclone-scale eddies were investigated by using a version of NCAR CCM1 with coupled mixed-layer ocean model and ECMWF observational analyses: (1) The evaluation of CCM1 simulated physical quantities that characterize the extratropical cyclone-scale eddies and the mean flow baroclinicity; (2) The effect of oceanic heat transport on the eddy activity; (3) The possible changes in eddy activity under a greenhouse warming condition. Objective criteria were formulated to identify cyclone/anticyclone occurrence in GCMs. Variables that are important to describe cyclone-scale eddies, such as surface cyclone/anticyclone frequency distribution and the band-pass filtered root mean square value of 500 mb geopotential height, as well as basic variables such as temperature and wind were used to validate model simulations. Based on the model validation, variables were selected and used to study eddy activity under different climate conditions. A 25-year simulation with reduced oceanic heat transport in the ocean mixed-layer was performed to investigate the effect of oceanic heat transport on the atmospheric eddies. In addition, two one-hundred-year equilibrium simulations were analyzed to study the eddy activity under a greenhouse warming scenario. Model-to-observation comparison indicated that most quantities related to extratropical cyclone-scale eddies were sufficiently alike between CCM1 simulation and ECMWF observations, although discrepancies were found in a few variables. Model simulated eddy activity was found to be sensitive to the change of heat transport in the ocean mixed-layer. The reduction of oceanic heat transport resulted in excessive heat storage in the tropical ocean leading to an increase in meridional temperature gradient with subsequent enhanced eddy activity in the atmosphere. On the other hand, analyses of model simulations strongly suggested that eddy activity will

  5. Eddy-resolving 1/10° model of the World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrayev, R. A.; Khabeev, R. N.; Ushakov, K. V.

    2012-02-01

    The first results on simulating the intra-annual variability of the World Ocean circulation by use of the eddy-resolving model are considered. For this purpose, a model of the World Ocean with a 1/10° horizontal resolution and 49 vertical levels was developed (a 1/10 × 1/10 × 49 model of the World Ocean). This model is based on the traditional system of three-dimensional equations of the large-scale dynamics of the ocean and boundary conditions with an explicit allowance for water fluxes on the free surface of the ocean. The equations are written in the tripolar coordinate system. The numerical method is based on the separation of the barotropic and baroclinic components of the solution. Discretization in time is implemented using explicit schemes allowing effective parallelization for a large number of processors. The model uses the sub-models of the boundary layer of the atmosphere and the submodel of sea-ice thermodynamics. The model of the World Ocean was developed at the Institute of Numerical Mathematics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (INM RAS) and the P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanogy (IO RAS). The formulation of the problem of simulating the intra-annual variability of thermohydrodynamic processes of the World Ocean and the parameterizations that were used are considered. In the numerical experiment, the temporal evolution of the atmospheric effect is determined by the normal annual cycle according to the conditions of the international Coordinated Ocean-Ice Reference Experiment (CORE-I). The calculation was carried out on a multiprocessor computer with distributed memory; 1601 computational cores were used. The presented analysis demonstrates that the obtained results are quite satisfactory when compared to the results that were obtained by other eddy-resolving models of the global ocean. The analysis of the model solution is, to a larger extent, of a descriptive character. A detailed analysis of the results is to be presented in following works

  6. Stochastic Modeling of Decadal Variability in Ocean Gyres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, Dmitri; Berloff, Pavel

    2015-04-01

    Decadal large-scale low-frequency variability of the ocean circulation due to its nonlinear dynamics remains a big challenge for theoretical understanding and practical ocean modeling. This paper presents a novel fully data-driven approach that addresses this challenge. We propose non-Markovian low-order methodology with stochastic closure and data-adaptive mode decomposition. The multilayer stochastic linear model is obtained from the coarse-grained eddy-resolving ocean model solution, and it reproduces with high accuracy the main statistical properties of the decadal variability. The proposed methodology does not depend on the governing fluid dynamics equations and geometry of the problem, and it can be extended to other ocean models and ultimately to the real data.

  7. Stochastic modeling of decadal variability in ocean gyres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, D.; Berloff, P.

    2015-03-01

    Decadal large-scale low-frequency variability of the ocean circulation due to its nonlinear dynamics remains a big challenge for theoretical understanding and practical ocean modeling. This paper presents a novel fully data driven approach that addresses this challenge. Proposed is non-Markovian low-order methodology with stochastic closure and use of mode decomposition by multichannel Singular Spectrum Analysis. The multilayer stochastic linear model is obtained from the coarse-grained eddy-resolving ocean model solution, and with high accuracy it reproduces the main statistical properties of the decadal variability. The proposed methodology does not depend on the governing fluid dynamics equations and geometry of the problem, and it can be extended to other ocean models and ultimately to the real data.

  8. Modeling water clarity in oceans and coasts

    EPA Science Inventory

    In oceans and coastal waters, phytoplankton is the primary producer of organic compounds which form the base for the food chain. The concentration of phytoplankton is a major factor controlling water clarity and the depth to which light penetrates in the water column. The light i...

  9. Coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave simulations of a storm event over the Gulf of Lion and Balearic Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renault, Lionel; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Warner, John C.; Gomez, Marta; Vizoso, Guillermo; Tintore, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    The coastal areas of the North-Western Mediterranean Sea are one of the most challenging places for ocean forecasting. This region is exposed to severe storms events that are of short duration. During these events, significant air-sea interactions, strong winds and large sea-state can have catastrophic consequences in the coastal areas. To investigate these air-sea interactions and the oceanic response to such events, we implemented the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport Modeling System simulating a severe storm in the Mediterranean Sea that occurred in May 2010. During this event, wind speed reached up to 25 m.s-1 inducing significant sea surface cooling (up to 2°C) over the Gulf of Lion (GoL) and along the storm track, and generating surface waves with a significant height of 6 m. It is shown that the event, associated with a cyclogenesis between the Balearic Islands and the GoL, is relatively well reproduced by the coupled system. A surface heat budget analysis showed that ocean vertical mixing was a major contributor to the cooling tendency along the storm track and in the GoL where turbulent heat fluxes also played an important role. Sensitivity experiments on the ocean-atmosphere coupling suggested that the coupled system is sensitive to the momentum flux parameterization as well as air-sea and air-wave coupling. Comparisons with available atmospheric and oceanic observations showed that the use of the fully coupled system provides the most skillful simulation, illustrating the benefit of using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model for the assessment of these storm events.

  10. Advances in a distributed approach for ocean model data interoperability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.; Snowden, Derrick P.

    2014-01-01

    An infrastructure for earth science data is emerging across the globe based on common data models and web services. As we evolve from custom file formats and web sites to standards-based web services and tools, data is becoming easier to distribute, find and retrieve, leaving more time for science. We describe recent advances that make it easier for ocean model providers to share their data, and for users to search, access, analyze and visualize ocean data using MATLAB® and Python®. These include a technique for modelers to create aggregated, Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata convention datasets from collections of non-standard Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) output files, the capability to remotely access data from CF-1.6-compliant NetCDF files using the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Observation Service (SOS), a metadata standard for unstructured grid model output (UGRID), and tools that utilize both CF and UGRID standards to allow interoperable data search, browse and access. We use examples from the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®) Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed, a project in which modelers using both structured and unstructured grid model output needed to share their results, to compare their results with other models, and to compare models with observed data. The same techniques used here for ocean modeling output can be applied to atmospheric and climate model output, remote sensing data, digital terrain and bathymetric data.

  11. Oxygen utilization rate (OUR) underestimates ocean respiration: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeve, W.; Kähler, P.

    2016-08-01

    We use a simple 1-D model representing an isolated density surface in the ocean and 3-D global ocean biogeochemical models to evaluate the concept of computing the subsurface oceanic oxygen utilization rate (OUR) from the changes of apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) and water age. The distribution of AOU in the ocean is not only the imprint of respiration in the ocean's interior but is strongly influenced by transport processes and eventually loss at the ocean surface. Since AOU and water age are subject to advection and diffusive mixing, it is only when they are affected both in the same way that OUR represents the correct rate of oxygen consumption. This is the case only when advection prevails or with uniform respiration rates, when the proportions of AOU and age are not changed by transport. In experiments with the 1-D tube model, OUR underestimates respiration when maximum respiration rates occur near the outcrops of isopycnals and overestimates when maxima occur far from the outcrops. Given the distribution of respiration in the ocean, i.e., elevated rates near high-latitude outcrops of isopycnals and low rates below the oligotrophic gyres, underestimates are the rule. Integrating these effects globally in three coupled ocean biogeochemical and circulation models, we find that AOU-over-age based calculations underestimate true model respiration by a factor of 3. Most of this difference is observed in the upper 1000 m of the ocean with the discrepancies increasing toward the surface where OUR underestimates respiration by as much as factor of 4.

  12. Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2011-06-01

    It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

  13. Theory and Practice of Data Assimilation in Ocean Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    implementation and validation of practical data assimilation methods for synoptic ocean models. By “data assimilation” we mean the construction of a...composite estimate of the state of the ocean based on a combination of observed data with computational model output. Since data assimilation methods which...interested in the price paid in terms of accuracy and confidence for using economical but suboptimal data assimilation methods . Direct calculation of

  14. Theory and Practice of Data Assimilation in Ocean Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    assimilation methods for regional to basin scale ocean models. By "data assimilation" we mean the construction of a composite estimate of the state...of the ocean based on a combination of observed data with computational model output. Since data assimilation methods which give the most and best...terms of accuracy and confidence for using economical but suboptimal data assimilation methods . Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No

  15. Theory and Practice of Data Assimilation in Ocean Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    practical data assimilation methods for synoptic ocean models. By "data assimilation" we mean the construction of a composite estimate of the state of the...ocean based on a combination of observed data with computational model output. Since data assimilation methods which give the most and best information...accuracy and confidence for using economical but suboptimal data assimilation methods . Optimized methods require accurate knowledge of the statistics of

  16. Theory and Practice of Data Assimilation in Ocean Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-30

    assimilation methods for synoptic ocean models. By “data assimilation,” we mean the construction of a composite estimate of the state of the ocean based on a...combination of observed data with computational model output. Since data assimilation methods which give the most and best information are highly...accuracy and confidence for using economical but suboptimal data assimilation methods . Optimized methods require accurate knowledge of the statistics of

  17. An Arctic Ice/Ocean Coupled Model with Wave Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    case TOPAZ : a hybrid coordinate ocean model of roughly 13 km horizontal resolution forced by ECMWF atmospheric fields, as the platform to construct a...the TOPAZ ice/ocean model and WAVEWATCH III, and, for the latter, cross-relate to any viscoelastic parametrization of the sea ice to calibrate the...goal of embedding the 3D WIM described above into the TOPAZ framework, by so doing allowing fully directional seas generated by WAVEWATCH III as

  18. Simple parameter estimation for complex models — Testing evolutionary techniques on 3-dimensional biogeochemical ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattern, Jann Paul; Edwards, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    Parameter estimation is an important part of numerical modeling and often required when a coupled physical-biogeochemical ocean model is first deployed. However, 3-dimensional ocean model simulations are computationally expensive and models typically contain upwards of 10 parameters suitable for estimation. Hence, manual parameter tuning can be lengthy and cumbersome. Here, we present four easy to implement and flexible parameter estimation techniques and apply them to two 3-dimensional biogeochemical models of different complexities. Based on a Monte Carlo experiment, we first develop a cost function measuring the model-observation misfit based on multiple data types. The parameter estimation techniques are then applied and yield a substantial cost reduction over ∼ 100 simulations. Based on the outcome of multiple replicate experiments, they perform on average better than random, uninformed parameter search but performance declines when more than 40 parameters are estimated together. Our results emphasize the complex cost function structure for biogeochemical parameters and highlight dependencies between different parameters as well as different cost function formulations.

  19. Evaluation of CMIP5 models on sea surface salinity in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathrio, Ibnu; Manda, Atsuyoshi; Iizuka, Satoshi; Kodama, Yasu-Masa; Ishida, Sachinobu

    2017-01-01

    Prior to future climate assessment of the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison (CMIP5) experiments, how well CMIP5 models simulates present climate should be examined. Sea surface salinity (sss) play important role in ocean stratification and indirectly affects air sea interaction. However, few studies have been carried out to evaluate sss in CMIP5 models. In this study, performance of CMIP5 models in simulating sss in Indian Ocean was examined with respect to the observation. Our results showed that multi model ensemble (MME) mean of CMIP5 models displayed annual and seasonal salinity bias in three regions i.e. Western Indian Ocean (WIO), Bay of Bengal (BOB) and Southeastern Indian Ocean (SEIO). CMIP5 models overestimate sss in BOB about 1.5 psu and underestimated sss in WIO and SEIO about 0.4 psu. Biases in WIO and BOB were mainly attributed to bias in precipitation. CMIP5 models overestimated (underestimated) precipitation in WIO (BOB) with greater bias found during Boreal summer to winter. Meanwhile, advection process was responsible for negative SSS bias in SEIO.

  20. Simulation of the trans-oceanic tsunami propagation due to the 1883 Krakatau volcanic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, B. H.; Pelinovsky, E.; Kim, K. O.; Lee, J. S.

    The 1883 Krakatau volcanic eruption has generated a destructive tsunami higher than 40 m on the Indonesian coast where more than 36 000 lives were lost. Sea level oscillations related with this event have been reported on significant distances from the source in the Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Evidence of many manifestations of the Krakatau tsunami was a subject of the intense discussion, and it was suggested that some of them are not related with the direct propagation of the tsunami waves from the Krakatau volcanic eruption. Present paper analyzes the hydrodynamic part of the Krakatau event in details. The worldwide propagation of the tsunami waves generated by the Krakatau volcanic eruption is studied numerically using two conventional models: ray tracing method and two-dimensional linear shallow-water model. The results of the numerical simulations are compared with available data of the tsunami registration.

  1. Parallel Computation of Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave Coupled Storm Surge Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Yamashita, T.

    2003-12-01

    Ocean-atmosphere interactions are very important in the formation and development of tropical storms. These interactions are dominant in exchanging heat, momentum, and moisture fluxes. Heat flux is usually computed using a bulk equation. In this equation air-sea interface supplies heat energy to the atmosphere and to the storm. Dynamical interaction is most often one way in which it is the atmosphere that drives the ocean. The winds transfer momentum to both ocean surface waves and ocean current. The wind wave makes an important role in the exchange of the quantities of motion, heat and a substance between the atmosphere and the ocean. Storm surges can be considered as the phenomena of mean sea-level changes, which are the result of the frictional stresses of strong winds blowing toward the land and causing the set level and the low atmospheric pressure at the centre of the cyclone can additionally raise the sea level. In addition to the rise in water level itself, another wave factor must be considered. A rise of mean sea level due to white-cap wave dissipation should be considered. In bounded bodies of water, such as small seas, wind driven sea level set up is much serious than inverted barometer effects, in which the effects of wind waves on wind-driven current play an important role. It is necessary to develop the coupled system of the full spectral third-generation wind-wave model (WAM or WAVEWATCH III), the meso-scale atmosphere model (MM5) and the coastal ocean model (POM) for simulating these physical interactions. As the component of coupled system is so heavy for personal usage, the parallel computing system should be developed. In this study, first, we developed the coupling system of the atmosphere model, ocean wave model and the coastal ocean model, in the Beowulf System, for the simulation of the storm surge. It was applied to the storm surge simulation caused by Typhoon Bart (T9918) in the Yatsushiro Sea. The atmosphere model and the ocean model have

  2. Carbon dioxide induced ocean climatic change and tracer experiment with an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xingjian.

    1991-01-01

    The principal objective of this study is to determine whether or not the penetration of a passive tracer is analogous to the penetration of a greenhouse-gas-induced heating. The Atmosphere Ocean General Circulation Model (A-O GCM) has been used to study CO2-induced climate change and the penetration of passive tracers into the world ocean. The present climate and a 2 x CO2 climate have been simulated. The passive tracers tritium, CFC-11, CFC-12 and a 'passive CO2- induced heating' are simulated. The CO2-induced active and passive warmings are larger in the subtropics and high latitudes than in the tropics. The largest difference between the active and passive CO2-induced heatings occur in the North Atlantic deep ocean, with maximum cooling about -1.5C for the active case in layer four of the ocean (1150m). There is no hemispherically asymmetric warming as that found by Manabe et al. (1990) and Stouffer et al. (1990). The convective overturning and large-scale sinking motion are responsible for the large penetration of CO2-induced warming in high latitudes. The CO2-induced circulation changes show that the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation is significantly weakened due to the penetration of CO2-induced heating. Associated with this change, the strength of North Atlantic conveyor belt is reduced, which results in a large warming in the upper ocean and cooling in the deep layers. The characteristic response time ranges from 40-50 years for the active CO2-induced climate change, and 70-160 years for passive CO2-induced climate change. The physical processes controlling the geochemical tracer penetration are very similar to those for the CO2-induced heating. There is not a single tracer which penetrates into the ocean exactly like the active CO2-induced heating in terms of distribution, transport or physical process. CFC's may be the best candidate as a surrogate for the CO2-induced oceanic climate study.

  3. Multi-property modeling of ocean basin carbon fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to elucidate the causal mechanisms in some of the most important features of the global ocean/atomsphere carbon system. These included the interaction of physical and biological processes in the seasonal cycle of surface water pCo2, and links between productivity, surface chlorophyll, and the carbon cycle that would aid global modeling efforts. In addition, several other areas of critical scientific interest involving links between the marine biosphere and the global carbon cycle were successfully pursued; specifically, a possible relation between phytoplankton emitted DMS and climate, and a relation between the location of calcium carbonate burial in the ocean and metamorphic source fluxes of CO2 to the atmosphere. Six published papers covering the following topics are summarized: (1) Mass extinctions, atmospheric sulphur and climatic warming at the K/T boundary; (2) Sensitivity of climate and atmospheric CO2 to deep-ocean and shallow-ocean carbonate burial; (3) Controls on CO2 sources and sinks in the earthscale surface ocean; (4) pre-anthropogenic, earthscale patterns of delta pCO2 between ocean and atmosphere; (5) Effect on atmospheric CO2 from seasonal variations in the high latitude ocean; and (6) Limitations or relating ocean surface chlorophyll to productivity.

  4. The effect of basal friction on melting and freezing in ice shelf-ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwyther, David E.; Galton-Fenzi, Benjamin K.; Dinniman, Michael S.; Roberts, Jason L.; Hunter, John R.

    2015-11-01

    The ocean is an important control on the mass budget of the Antarctic ice sheet, through basal melting and refreezing underneath the floating extensions of the ice sheet known as ice shelves. The effect of the ice surface roughness (basal roughness) on melting and refreezing is investigated with idealised ice shelf-ocean numerical simulations. Both "hot" ocean forcing (e.g. Pine Island Glacier; high basal melting) and "cold" ocean forcing (e.g. Amery Ice Shelf; low basal melting, stronger refreezing) environments are investigated. The interaction between the ocean and ice shelf is further explored by examining the contributions to melt from heat exchange across the ice-ocean interface and across the boundary layer-ocean interior, with a varying drag coefficient. Simulations show increasing drag strengthens melting. Refreezing increases with drag in the cold cavity environment, while in the hot cavity environment, refreezing is small in areal extent and decreases with drag. Furthermore, melting will likely be focussed where there are strong boundary layer currents, rather than at the deep grounding line. The magnitude of the thermal driving of the basal melt decreases with increasing drag, except for in cold cavity refreeze zones where it increases. The friction velocity, a function of the upper layer ocean velocity and the drag coefficient, monotonically increases with drag. We find friction-driven mixing into the boundary layer is important for representing the magnitude and distribution of refreezing and without this effect, refreezing is underestimated. Including a spatially- and temporally-varying basal roughness (that includes a more realistic, rougher refreezing drag coefficient) alters circulation patterns and heat and salt transport. This leads to increased refreezing, altered melt magnitude and distribution, and a pattern of altered vertical flow across the entire ice shelf. These results represent a summary of melting and freezing beneath ice shelves and

  5. Mechanistic site-based emulation of a global ocean biogeochemical model for parametric analysis and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmings, J. C. P.; Challenor, P. G.; Yool, A.

    2014-09-01

    Biogeochemical ocean circulation models used to investigate the role of plankton ecosystems in global change rely on adjustable parameters to compensate for missing biological complexity. In principle, optimal parameter values can be estimated by fitting models to observational data, including satellite ocean colour products such as chlorophyll that achieve good spatial and temporal coverage of the surface ocean. However, comprehensive parametric analyses require large ensemble experiments that are computationally infeasible with global 3-D simulations. Site-based simulations provide an efficient alternative but can only be used to make reliable inferences about global model performance if robust quantitative descriptions of their relationships with the corresponding 3-D simulations can be established. The feasibility of establishing such a relationship is investigated for an intermediate complexity biogeochemistry model (MEDUSA) coupled with a widely-used global ocean model (NEMO). A site-based mechanistic emulator is constructed for surface chlorophyll output from this target model as a function of model parameters. The emulator comprises an array of 1-D simulators and a statistical quantification of the uncertainty in their predictions. The unknown parameter-dependent biogeochemical environment, in terms of initial tracer concentrations and lateral flux information required by the simulators, is a significant source of uncertainty. It is approximated by a mean environment derived from a small ensemble of 3-D simulations representing variability of the target model behaviour over the parameter space of interest. The performance of two alternative uncertainty quantification schemes is examined: a direct method based on comparisons between simulator output and a sample of known target model "truths" and an indirect method that is only partially reliant on knowledge of target model output. In general, chlorophyll records at a representative array of oceanic sites

  6. Evolution behavior of Gaussian Schell-model vortex beams propagating through oceanic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongping; Zhang, Bin; Gao, Zenghui; Zhao, Guangpu; Duan, Zhichun

    2014-07-28

    The analytical expressions for the cross-spectral density and average intensity of Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) vortex beams propagating through oceanic turbulence are obtained by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the spatial power spectrum of the refractive index of ocean water. The evolution behavior of GSM vortex beams through oceanic turbulence is studied in detail by numerical simulation. It is shown that the evolution behavior of coherent vortices and average intensity depends on the oceanic turbulence including the rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, rate of dissipation of mean-square temperature, relative strength of temperature salinity fluctuations, and beam parameters including the spatial correlation length and topological charge of the beams, as well as the propagation distance.

  7. Seasonal cycle of plankton production in the Iberian margin based on a high resolution ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboreda, Rosa; Nolasco, Rita; Castro, Carmen G.; Álvarez-Salgado, Xosé A.; Cordeiro, Nuno G. F.; Queiroga, Henrique; Dubert, Jesus

    2014-11-01

    The seasonal variability of plankton in the entire Iberian margin and the adjacent oceanic region was simulated by applying a NPZD-type biogeochemical model coupled to a physical high resolution configuration of the 3D Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). The NPZD model simulated the time and space evolution of nitrate, phytoplankton/chlorophyll, zooplankton and detritus. Model results were compared to remotely sensed sea surface temperature from AVHRR, mixed layer depth from ARGO floats, and sea surface chlorophyll-a from a monthly SeaWiFS climatology. The model was able to reasonably reproduce the seasonal cycle of phytoplankton biomass in the Iberian Atlantic margin and the adjacent oceanic region. It allowed us to make a general characterization of the spatio-temporal patterns of phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass, as well as detritus and nitrate distribution. However, some limitations in the model were revealed by the Taylor Diagrams analysis. The model seemed to overestimate the offshore spring phytoplankton bloom and the upwelling-related coastal maxima of chlorophyll-a in the shelf. On the other hand, winter chlorophyll-a decrease simulated by the model over the shelf agreed with in situ samplings reported in the literature, contrasting with the high chlorophyll-a estimations of satellite data. This evidenced that care should be taken when validating model results in the Iberian coastal region using satellite chlorophyll-a products, particularly in winter.

  8. Customised search and comparison of in situ, satellite and model data for ocean modellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamre, Torill; Vines, Aleksander; Lygre, Kjetil

    2014-05-01

    For the ocean modelling community, the amount of available data from historical and upcoming in situ sensor networks and satellite missions, provides an rich opportunity to validate and improve their simulation models. However, the problem of making the different data interoperable and intercomparable remains, due to, among others, differences in terminology and format used by different data providers and the different granularity provided by e.g. in situ data and ocean models. The GreenSeas project (Development of global plankton data base and model system for eco-climate early warning) aims to advance the knowledge and predictive capacities of how marine ecosystems will respond to global change. In the project, one specific objective has been to improve the technology for accessing historical plankton and associated environmental data sets, along with earth observation data and simulation outputs. To this end, we have developed a web portal enabling ocean modellers to easily search for in situ or satellite data overlapping in space and time, and compare the retrieved data with their model results. The in situ data are retrieved from a geo-spatial repository containing both historical and new physical, biological and chemical parameters for the Southern Ocean, Atlantic, Nordic Seas and the Arctic. The satellite-derived quantities of similar parameters from the same areas are retrieved from another geo-spatial repository established in the project. Both repositories are accessed through standard interfaces, using the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Feature Service (WFS), and OPeNDAP protocols, respectively. While the developed data repositories use standard terminology to describe the parameters, especially the measured in situ biological parameters are too fine grained to be immediately useful for modelling purposes. Therefore, the plankton parameters were grouped according to category, size and if available by element. This grouping

  9. Ocean and Coastal Modeling: Nonlinear Acoustic Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-27

    support of the operations at sea . The NRL prediction system, was configured with 3 nesting domains at resolutions of 4, 2, and 0.6 km. Two separate...to provide a minimum connection with realtime data since NCOM-GL assimilates sea surface temperatures (SST) and Modular Ocean Data Assimilation...recirculation patterns can be found between the eddy and the coastline. [FIGURE 2] The Sea Surface Temperature (SST) images obtained from NOAA AVHRR displayed

  10. Optimal Combining Data for Improving Ocean Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    hyperbolic or elliptic) and on the Hurst exponent characterizing the dynamics type (local or non-local). 3. Fusion data for estimating RD. Theoretical...1) RD vs time and different values of Hurst exponent h = 0.1 (black), h = 1 (red), h = 2 (blue) γ = 0.1,Ω = 0, 2) Same for γ = 0.1,Ω = 2 ). 3...accurate estimating the upper ocean velocity field and mixing characteristics such as relative dispersion and finite size Lyapunov exponent , (2

  11. Models of the Equatorial Ocean Circulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    doctoral committee for their encouragement and advice in the development of this work. I am especially indebted to D