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Sample records for ocean oxygen depletion

  1. Intensification of open-ocean oxygen depletion by vertically migrating animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Daniele; Galbraith, Eric D.; Carozza, David A.; Mislan, K. A. S.; Stock, Charles A.

    2013-07-01

    Throughout the ocean, countless small animals swim to depth in the daytime, presumably to seek refuge from large predators. These animals return to the surface at night to feed. This substantial diel vertical migration can result in the transfer of significant amounts of carbon and nutrients from the surface to depth. However, its consequences on ocean chemistry at the global scale have remained uncertain. Here, we determine the depths of these diel migrations in the global ocean using a global array of backscatter data from acoustic Doppler current profilers, collected between 1990 and 2011. We show that the depth of diel migration follows coherent large-scale patterns. We find that migration depth is greater where subsurface oxygen concentrations are high, such that seawater oxygen concentration is the best single predictor of migration depth at the global scale. In oxygen minimum zone areas, migratory animals generally descend as far as the upper margins of the low-oxygen waters. Using an ocean biogeochemical model coupled to a general circulation model, we show that by focusing oxygen consumption in poorly ventilated regions of the upper ocean, diel vertical migration intensifies oxygen depletion in the upper margin of oxygen minimum zones. We suggest that future changes in the extent of oxygen minimum zones could alter the migratory depths of marine organisms, with consequences for marine biogeochemistry, food webs and fisheries.

  2. Oxygen depletion recorded in upper waters of the glacial Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zunli; Hoogakker, Babette A. A.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Zhou, Xiaoli; Thomas, Ellen; Gutchess, Kristina M.; Lu, Wanyi; Jones, Luke; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen depletion in the upper ocean is commonly associated with poor ventilation and storage of respired carbon, potentially linked to atmospheric CO2 levels. Iodine to calcium ratios (I/Ca) in recent planktonic foraminifera suggest that values less than ~2.5 μmol mol-1 indicate the presence of O2-depleted water. Here we apply this proxy to estimate past dissolved oxygen concentrations in the near surface waters of the currently well-oxygenated Southern Ocean, which played a critical role in carbon sequestration during glacial times. A down-core planktonic I/Ca record from south of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) suggests that minimum O2 concentrations in the upper ocean fell below 70 μmol kg-1 during the last two glacial periods, indicating persistent glacial O2 depletion at the heart of the carbon engine of the Earth's climate system. These new estimates of past ocean oxygenation variability may assist in resolving mechanisms responsible for the much-debated ice-age atmospheric CO2 decline.

  3. Oxygen depletion recorded in upper waters of the glacial Southern Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zunli; Hoogakker, Babette A. A.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Zhou, Xiaoli; Thomas, Ellen; Gutchess, Kristina M.; Lu, Wanyi; Jones, Luke; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen depletion in the upper ocean is commonly associated with poor ventilation and storage of respired carbon, potentially linked to atmospheric CO2 levels. Iodine to calcium ratios (I/Ca) in recent planktonic foraminifera suggest that values less than ∼2.5 μmol mol−1 indicate the presence of O2-depleted water. Here we apply this proxy to estimate past dissolved oxygen concentrations in the near surface waters of the currently well-oxygenated Southern Ocean, which played a critical role in carbon sequestration during glacial times. A down-core planktonic I/Ca record from south of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) suggests that minimum O2 concentrations in the upper ocean fell below 70 μmol kg−1 during the last two glacial periods, indicating persistent glacial O2 depletion at the heart of the carbon engine of the Earth's climate system. These new estimates of past ocean oxygenation variability may assist in resolving mechanisms responsible for the much-debated ice-age atmospheric CO2 decline. PMID:27029225

  4. Oxygen depletion recorded in upper waters of the glacial Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zunli; Hoogakker, Babette A A; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Zhou, Xiaoli; Thomas, Ellen; Gutchess, Kristina M; Lu, Wanyi; Jones, Luke; Rickaby, Rosalind E M

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen depletion in the upper ocean is commonly associated with poor ventilation and storage of respired carbon, potentially linked to atmospheric CO2 levels. Iodine to calcium ratios (I/Ca) in recent planktonic foraminifera suggest that values less than ∼2.5 μmol mol(-1) indicate the presence of O2-depleted water. Here we apply this proxy to estimate past dissolved oxygen concentrations in the near surface waters of the currently well-oxygenated Southern Ocean, which played a critical role in carbon sequestration during glacial times. A down-core planktonic I/Ca record from south of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) suggests that minimum O2 concentrations in the upper ocean fell below 70 μmol kg(-1) during the last two glacial periods, indicating persistent glacial O2 depletion at the heart of the carbon engine of the Earth's climate system. These new estimates of past ocean oxygenation variability may assist in resolving mechanisms responsible for the much-debated ice-age atmospheric CO2 decline. PMID:27029225

  5. Hazardous off-gassing of carbon monoxide and oxygen depletion during ocean transportation of wood pellets.

    PubMed

    Svedberg, Urban; Samuelsson, Jerker; Melin, Staffan

    2008-06-01

    Five ocean vessels were investigated for the characterization and quantification of gaseous compounds emitted during ocean transportation of wood pellets in closed cargo hatches from Canada to Sweden. The study was initiated after a fatal accident with several injured during discharge in Sweden. The objective with the investigation was to better understand the off-gassing and issues related to workers' exposure. Air sampling was done during transport and immediately before discharge in the undisturbed headspace air above the wood pellets and in the staircase adjacent to each hatch. The samples were analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and direct reading instruments. The following compounds and ranges were detected in samples from the five ships: carbon monoxide (CO) 1460-14650 ppm, carbon dioxide (CO2) 2960-21570 ppm, methane 79.9-956 ppm, butane equivalents 63-842 ppm, ethylene 2-21.2 ppm, propylene 5.3-36 ppm, ethane 0-25 ppm and aldehydes 2.3-35 ppm. The oxygen levels were between 0.8 and 16.9%. The concentrations in the staircases were almost as high as in the cargo hatches, indicating a fairly free passage of air between the two spaces. A potentially dangerous atmosphere was reached within a week from loading. The conclusions are that ocean transportation of wood pellets in confined spaces may produce an oxygen deficient atmosphere and lethal levels of CO which may leak into adjacent access spaces. The dangerous combination of extremely high levels of CO and reduced oxygen produces a fast-acting toxic combination. Measurement of CO in combination with oxygen is essential prior to entry in spaces having air communication with cargo hatches of wood pellets. Forced ventilation of staircases prior to entry is necessary. Redesign, locking and labeling of access doors and the establishment of rigorous entry procedures and training of onboard crew as well as personnel boarding ocean vessels are also important.

  6. Cyclic magnetite dissolution in Pleistocene sediments of the abyssal northwest Pacific Ocean: Evidence for glacial oxygen depletion and carbon trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korff, Lucia; Dobeneck, Tilo; Frederichs, Thomas; Kasten, Sabine; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gersonde, Rainer; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    The carbonate-free abyss of the North Pacific defies most paleoceanographic proxy methods and hence remains a "blank spot" in ocean and climate history. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic, geochemical, and sedimentological methods were combined to date and analyze seven middle to late Pleistocene northwest Pacific sediment cores from water depths of 5100 to 5700 m. Besides largely coherent tephra layers, the most striking features of these records are nearly magnetite-free zones corresponding to glacial marine isotope stages (MISs) 22, 12, 10, 8, 6, and 2. Magnetite depletion is correlated with organic carbon and quartz content and anticorrelated with biogenic barite and opal content. Within interglacial sections and mid-Pleistocene transition glacial stages MIS 20, 18, 16, and 14, magnetite fractions of detrital, volcanic, and bacterial origin are all well preserved. Such alternating successions of magnetic iron mineral preservation and depletion are known from sapropel-marl cycles, which accumulated under periodically changing bottom water oxygen and redox conditions. In the open central northwest Pacific Ocean, the only conceivable mechanism to cause such abrupt change is a modified glacial bottom water circulation. During all major glaciations since MIS 12, oxygen-depleted Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW)-sourced bottom water seems to have crept into the abyssal northwest Pacific below ~5000 m depth, thereby changing redox conditions in the sediment, trapping and preserving dissolved and particulate organic matter and, in consequence, reducing and dissolving both, biogenic and detrital magnetite. At deglaciation, a downward progressing oxidation front apparently remineralized and released these sedimentary carbon reservoirs without replenishing the magnetite losses.

  7. Ancient Oceans Had Less Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    The amount of dissolved oxygen in the oceans in the mid-Proterozoic period has evolutionary implications since essential trace metals are redox sensitive. The findings suggest that there is global lack of oxygen in seawater.

  8. Seasonal oxygen depletion in the North Sea, a review.

    PubMed

    Topcu, H D; Brockmann, U H

    2015-10-15

    Seasonal mean oxygen depletion in offshore and coastal North Sea bottom waters was shown to range between 0.9 and 1.8 mg/L, corresponding to 95-83% saturation, between July and October over a 30-year assessment period (1980-2010). The magnitude of oxygen depletion was controlled by thermal stratification, modulated by water depth and nitrogen availability. Analyses were based on about 19,000 combined data sets. Eutrophication problem areas were identified mainly in coastal waters by oxygen minima, the lower 10th percentile of oxygen concentrations, and deviations of oxygen depletion from correlated stratification values. Connections between oxygen consumption and nitrogen sources and conversion, including denitrification, were indicated by correlations. Mean oxygen consumption reflected a minimum seasonal turnover of 3.1 g N/m(2) in the south-eastern North Sea, including denitrification of 1 g N/m(2). Oxygen depletion was underestimated in shallow coastal waters due to repeated erosion of stratification as indicated by local high variability.

  9. The oxygenation of the atmosphere and oceans

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Heinrich D

    2006-01-01

    The last 3.85 Gyr of Earth history have been divided into five stages. During stage 1 (3.85–2.45 Gyr ago (Ga)) the atmosphere was largely or entirely anoxic, as were the oceans, with the possible exception of oxygen oases in the shallow oceans. During stage 2 (2.45–1.85 Ga) atmospheric oxygen levels rose to values estimated to have been between 0.02 and 0.04 atm. The shallow oceans became mildly oxygenated, while the deep oceans continued anoxic. Stage 3 (1.85–0.85 Ga) was apparently rather ‘boring’. Atmospheric oxygen levels did not change significantly. Most of the surface oceans were mildly oxygenated, as were the deep oceans. Stage 4 (0.85–0.54 Ga) saw a rise in atmospheric oxygen to values not much less than 0.2 atm. The shallow oceans followed suit, but the deep oceans were anoxic, at least during the intense Neoproterozoic ice ages. Atmospheric oxygen levels during stage 5 (0.54 Ga–present) probably rose to a maximum value of ca 0.3 atm during the Carboniferous before returning to its present value. The shallow oceans were oxygenated, while the oxygenation of the deep oceans fluctuated considerably, perhaps on rather geologically short time-scales. PMID:16754606

  10. Potential and timescales for oxygen depletion in coastal upwelling systems: A box-model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. S.; Hales, B.; Siedlecki, S.; Samelson, R. M.

    2016-05-01

    A simple box model is used to examine oxygen depletion in an idealized ocean-margin upwelling system. Near-bottom oxygen depletion is controlled by a competition between flushing with oxygenated offshore source waters and respiration of particulate organic matter produced near the surface and retained near the bottom. Upwelling-supplied nutrients are consumed in the surface box, and some surface particles sink to the bottom where they respire, consuming oxygen. Steady states characterize the potential for hypoxic near-bottom oxygen depletion; this potential is greatest for faster sinking rates, and largely independent of production timescales except in that faster production allows faster sinking. Timescales for oxygen depletion depend on upwelling and productivity differently, however, as oxygen depletion can only be reached in meaningfully short times when productivity is rapid. Hypoxia thus requires fast production, to capture upwelled nutrients, and fast sinking, to deliver the respiration potential to model bottom waters. Combining timescales allows generalizations about tendencies toward hypoxia. If timescales of sinking are comparable to or smaller than the sum of those for respiration and flushing, the steady state will generally be hypoxic, and results indicate optimal timescales and conditions exist to generate hypoxia. For example, the timescale for approach to hypoxia lengthens with stronger upwelling, since surface particle and nutrient are shunted off-shelf, in turn reducing subsurface respiration and oxygen depletion. This suggests that if upwelling winds intensify with climate change the increased forcing could offer mitigation of coastal hypoxia, even as the oxygen levels in upwelled source waters decline.

  11. Oceanic bromoform emissions weighted by their ozone depletion potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegtmeier, S.; Ziska, F.; Pisso, I.; Quack, B.; Velders, G. J. M.; Yang, X.; Krüger, K.

    2015-12-01

    At present, anthropogenic halogens and oceanic emissions of very short-lived substances (VSLSs) both contribute to the observed stratospheric ozone depletion. Emissions of the long-lived anthropogenic halogens have been reduced and are currently declining, whereas emissions of the biogenic VSLSs are expected to increase in future climate due to anthropogenic activities affecting oceanic production and emissions. Here, we introduce a new approach for assessing the impact of oceanic halocarbons on stratospheric ozone by calculating their ozone depletion potential (ODP)-weighted emissions. Seasonally and spatially dependent, global distributions are derived within a case-study framework for CHBr3 for the period 1999-2006. At present, ODP-weighted emissions of CHBr3 amount up to 50 % of ODP-weighted anthropogenic emissions of CFC-11 and to 9 % of all long-lived ozone depleting halogens. The ODP-weighted emissions are large where strong oceanic emissions coincide with high-reaching convective activity and show pronounced peaks at the Equator and the coasts with largest contributions from the Maritime Continent and western Pacific Ocean. Variations of tropical convective activity lead to seasonal shifts in the spatial distribution of the trajectory-derived ODP with the updraught mass flux, used as a proxy for trajectory-derived ODP, explaining 71 % of the variance of the ODP distribution. Future climate projections based on the RCP 8.5 scenario suggest a 31 % increase of the ODP-weighted CHBr3 emissions by 2100 compared to present values. This increase is related to a larger convective updraught mass flux in the upper troposphere and increasing emissions in a future climate. However, at the same time, it is reduced by less effective bromine-related ozone depletion due to declining stratospheric chlorine concentrations. The comparison of the ODP-weighted emissions of short- and long-lived halocarbons provides a new concept for assessing the overall impact of oceanic

  12. Southern Ocean biological impacts on global ocean oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, David P.; Kriest, Iris; Koeve, Wolfgang; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Southern Ocean (SO) physical and biological processes are known to have a large impact on global biogeochemistry. However, the role that SO biology plays in determining ocean oxygen concentrations is not completely understood. These dynamics are investigated here by shutting off SO biology in two marine biogeochemical models. The results suggest that SO biological processes reduce the ocean's oxygen content, mainly in the deep ocean, by 14 to 19%. However, since these processes also trap nutrients that would otherwise be transported northward to fuel productivity and subsequent organic matter export, consumption, and the accompanying oxygen consumption in midlatitude to low-latitude waters, SO biology helps to maintain higher oxygen concentrations in these subsurface waters. Thereby, SO biology can influence the size of the tropical oxygen minimum zones. As a result of ocean circulation the link between SO biological processes and remote oxygen changes operates on decadal to centennial time scales.

  13. Inhomogeneous depletion of oxygen ions in metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vykhodets, Vladimir B.; Jarvis, Emily A. A.; Kurennykh, Tatiana E.; Beketov, Igor V.; Obukhov, Sviatoslav I.; Samatov, Oleg M.; Medvedev, Anatoly I.; Davletshin, Andrey E.; Whyte, Travis H.

    2016-02-01

    Zirconia and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) have multiple uses, including catalysis, fuel cells, dental applications, and thermal coatings. We employ nuclear reaction analysis to determine elemental composition of YSZ nanoparticles synthesized by laser evaporation including 18O studies to distinguish between oxide and adsorbed oxygen content as a function of surface area. We see dramatic deviation from stoichiometry that can be traced to loss of oxygen from the oxide near the surface of these nanopowders. Density functional calculations are coupled with these experimental studies to explore the electronic structure of nonstoichiometric surfaces achieved through depletion of oxygen. Our results show oxygen-depleted surfaces present under oxygen potentials where stoichiometric, oxygen-terminated surfaces would be favored thermodynamically for crystalline systems. Oxygen depletion at nanopowder surfaces can create effective two-dimensional surface metallic states while maintaining stoichiometry in the underlying nanoparticle core. This insight into nanopowder surfaces applies to dissimilar oxides of aluminum and zirconium indicating synthesis conditions may be more influential than the inherent oxide properties and displaying need for distinct models for nanopowders of these important engineering materials where surface chemistry dominates performance.

  14. Oceanic oxygenation events in the anoxic Ediacaran ocean.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, S K; Planavsky, N J; Jiang, G; Kendall, B; Owens, J D; Wang, X; Shi, X; Anbar, A D; Lyons, T W

    2016-09-01

    The ocean-atmosphere system is typically envisioned to have gone through a unidirectional oxygenation with significant oxygen increases in the earliest (ca. 635 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma), or late (ca. 560 Ma) Ediacaran Period. However, temporally discontinuous geochemical data and the patchy metazoan fossil record have been inadequate to chart the details of Ediacaran ocean oxygenation, raising fundamental debates about the timing of ocean oxygenation, its purported unidirectional rise, and its causal relationship, if any, with the evolution of early animal life. To better understand the Ediacaran ocean redox evolution, we have conducted a multi-proxy paleoredox study of a relatively continuous, deep-water section in South China that was paleogeographically connected with the open ocean. Iron speciation and pyrite morphology indicate locally euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic) environments throughout the Ediacaran in this section. In the same rocks, redox sensitive element enrichments and sulfur isotope data provide evidence for multiple oceanic oxygenation events (OOEs) in a predominantly anoxic global Ediacaran-early Cambrian ocean. This dynamic redox landscape contrasts with a recent view of a redox-static Ediacaran ocean without significant change in oxygen content. The duration of the Ediacaran OOEs may be comparable to those of the oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) in otherwise well-oxygenated Phanerozoic oceans. Anoxic events caused mass extinctions followed by fast recovery in biologically diversified Phanerozoic oceans. In contrast, oxygenation events in otherwise ecologically monotonous anoxic Ediacaran-early Cambrian oceans may have stimulated biotic innovations followed by prolonged evolutionary stasis.

  15. Oceanic oxygenation events in the anoxic Ediacaran ocean.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, S K; Planavsky, N J; Jiang, G; Kendall, B; Owens, J D; Wang, X; Shi, X; Anbar, A D; Lyons, T W

    2016-09-01

    The ocean-atmosphere system is typically envisioned to have gone through a unidirectional oxygenation with significant oxygen increases in the earliest (ca. 635 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma), or late (ca. 560 Ma) Ediacaran Period. However, temporally discontinuous geochemical data and the patchy metazoan fossil record have been inadequate to chart the details of Ediacaran ocean oxygenation, raising fundamental debates about the timing of ocean oxygenation, its purported unidirectional rise, and its causal relationship, if any, with the evolution of early animal life. To better understand the Ediacaran ocean redox evolution, we have conducted a multi-proxy paleoredox study of a relatively continuous, deep-water section in South China that was paleogeographically connected with the open ocean. Iron speciation and pyrite morphology indicate locally euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic) environments throughout the Ediacaran in this section. In the same rocks, redox sensitive element enrichments and sulfur isotope data provide evidence for multiple oceanic oxygenation events (OOEs) in a predominantly anoxic global Ediacaran-early Cambrian ocean. This dynamic redox landscape contrasts with a recent view of a redox-static Ediacaran ocean without significant change in oxygen content. The duration of the Ediacaran OOEs may be comparable to those of the oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) in otherwise well-oxygenated Phanerozoic oceans. Anoxic events caused mass extinctions followed by fast recovery in biologically diversified Phanerozoic oceans. In contrast, oxygenation events in otherwise ecologically monotonous anoxic Ediacaran-early Cambrian oceans may have stimulated biotic innovations followed by prolonged evolutionary stasis. PMID:27027776

  16. Oats may grow better in water depleted in oxygen 18 and deuterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleason, J.D.; Friedman, I.

    1975-01-01

    WHILE growing oats at different temperatures in water of different 18O and deuterium (D) abundances, we noticed that oats grown in Antarctic water in which is depleted in 18O and D by -49??? and -400???, relative to standard mean ocean water (SMOW used as a comparative reference in hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies), showed initial growth 1-2 weeks sooner than did oats grown in water containing greater 18O and D concentrations. The oats seemed to grow better in water which was most depleted in the stable isotopes throughout the growth period. ?? 1975 Nature Publishing Group.

  17. Drivers of summer oxygen depletion in the central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queste, B. Y.; Fernand, L.; Jickells, T. D.; Heywood, K. J.; Hind, A. J.

    2015-06-01

    In stratified shelf seas, oxygen depletion beneath the thermocline is a result of a greater rate of biological oxygen demand than the rate of supply of oxygenated water. Suitably equipped gliders are uniquely placed to observe both the supply through the thermocline and the consumption of oxygen in the bottom layers. A Seaglider was deployed in the shallow (≈ 100 m) stratified North Sea in a region of known low oxygen during August 2011 to investigate the processes regulating supply and consumption of dissolved oxygen below the pycnocline. The first deployment of such a device in this area, it provided extremely high resolution observations, 316 profiles (every 16 min, vertical resolution of 1 m) of CTD, dissolved oxygen concentrations, backscatter and fluorescence during a three day deployment. The high temporal resolution observations revealed occasional small scale events that supply oxygenated water into the bottom layer at a rate of 2±1 μmol dm-3 day-1. Benthic and pelagic oxygen sinks, quantified through glider observations and past studies, indicate more gradual background consumption rates of 2.5±1 μmol dm-3 day-1. This budget revealed that the balance of oxygen supply and demand is in agreement with previous studies of the North Sea. However, the glider data show a net oxygen consumption rate of 2.8±0.3 μmol dm-3 day-1 indicating a localised or short-lived increase in oxygen consumption rates. This high rate of oxygen consumption is indicative of an unidentified oxygen sink. We propose that this elevated oxygen consumption is linked to localised depocentres and rapid remineralisation of resuspensded organic matter. The glider proved to be an excellent tool for monitoring shelf sea processes despite challenges to glider flight posed by high tidal velocities, shallow bathymetry, and very strong density gradients. The direct observation of these processes allows more up to date rates to be used in the development of ecosystem models.

  18. What prevents nitrogen depletion in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical South Pacific?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, B.; Pahlow, M.; Wagner, H.; Oschlies, A.

    2015-02-01

    Local coupling between nitrogen fixation and denitrification in current biogeochemical models could result in runaway feedback in open-ocean oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), eventually stripping OMZ waters of all fixed nitrogen. This feedback does not seem to operate at full strength in the ocean, as nitrate does not generally become depleted in open-ocean OMZs. To explore in detail the possible mechanisms that prevent nitrogen depletion in the OMZ of the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP), we develop a box model with fully prognostic cycles of carbon, nutrients and oxygen in the upwelling region and its adjacent open ocean. Ocean circulation is calibrated with Δ14C data of the ETSP. The sensitivity of the simulated nitrogen cycle to nutrient and oxygen exchange and ventilation from outside the model domain and to remineralization scales inside an OMZ is analysed. For the entire range of model configurations explored, we find that the fixed-N inventory can be stabilized at non-zero levels in the ETSP OMZ only if the remineralization rate via denitrification is slower than that via aerobic respiration. In our optimum model configuration, lateral oxygen supply into the model domain is required at rates sufficient to oxidize at least about one fifth of the export production in the model domain to prevent anoxia in the deep ocean. Under these conditions, our model is in line with the view of phosphate as the ultimate limiting nutrient for phytoplankton, and implies that for the current notion of nitrogen fixation being favoured in N-deficit waters, the water column of the ETSP could even be a small net source of nitrate.

  19. Drivers of summer oxygen depletion in the central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queste, Bastien Y.; Fernand, Liam; Jickells, Timothy D.; Heywood, Karen J.; Hind, Andrew J.

    2016-02-01

    In stratified shelf seas, oxygen depletion beneath the thermocline is a result of a greater rate of biological oxygen demand than the rate of supply of oxygenated water. Suitably equipped gliders are uniquely placed to observe both the supply through the thermocline and the consumption of oxygen in the bottom layers. A Seaglider was deployed in the shallow (≍ 100 m) stratified North Sea in a region of known low oxygen during August 2011 to investigate the processes regulating supply and consumption of dissolved oxygen below the pycnocline. The first deployment of such a device in this area, it provided extremely high-resolution observations, 316 profiles (every 16 min, vertical resolution of 1 m) of conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD), dissolved oxygen concentrations, backscatter, and fluorescence during a 3-day deployment.The high temporal resolution observations revealed occasional small-scale events (< 200 m or 6 h) that supply oxygenated water to the bottom layer at a rate of 2 ± 1 µmol dm-3 day-1. Benthic and pelagic oxygen sinks, quantified through glider observations and past studies, indicate more gradual background consumption rates of 2.5 ± 1 µmol dm-3 day-1. This budget revealed that the balance of oxygen supply and demand is in agreement with previous studies of the North Sea. However, the glider data show a net oxygen consumption rate of 2.8 ± 0.3 µmol dm-3 day-1, indicating a localized or short-lived (< 200 m or 6 h) increase in oxygen consumption rates. This high rate of oxygen consumption is indicative of an unidentified oxygen sink. We propose that this elevated oxygen consumption is linked to localized depocentres and rapid remineralization of resuspended organic matter.The glider proved to be an excellent tool for monitoring shelf sea processes despite challenges to glider flight posed by high tidal velocities, shallow bathymetry, and very strong density gradients. The direct observation of these processes allows more up to date

  20. Oxygen depletion in relation to water residence times.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Stephen M; Icely, John D; Newton, Alice

    2007-11-01

    The relationship between residence time and oxygen saturation was investigated in a mesotidal lagoon in southern Portugal. The system receives no significant freshwater input during the summer months and has a high evaporation rate. These features enable an estimate of residence time from the salinity differences between ocean water entering the system and lagoon water. More than 10,000 GPS referenced measurements of oxygen saturation, temperature and salinity were made during large spring tides in September, 2006. The lowest oxygen saturation ( approximately 44%) was measured in the waters with the highest calculated residence times (7 days). There was a significant linear decrease in the oxygen saturation with increasing residence time of approximately 16% per day. This was similar to the rate measured on a neap tide in August, 2005. The high salinity, low oxygen saturated water was spatially confined to one inner channel, except at high water when this water was pushed into other channels. Although the tides investigated were the largest for several years, the oxygen saturation did not exceed 70% in this inner region. It is proposed that the direct discharge of oxygen consuming effluent, including domestic sewage, into this inner channel is responsible for this persistent oxygen deficit. PMID:17968445

  1. Mercury depletion events over Antarctic and Arctic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerentorp Mastromonaco, M. G.; Gardfeldt, K.; Wangberg, I.; Jourdain, B.; Dommergue, A.; Kuronen, P.; Pirrone, N.; Jacobi, H.

    2013-12-01

    and were correlated with local measurements of ozone. The sources of the depleted air masses were examined using backward wind trajectories and BrO maps, showing that the depletion events occurred in the Arctic Ocean, 2000 km away from the Pallas-Matorova station.

  2. The puzzle of oceanic oxygen utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeve, Wolfgang; Kähler, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The biological carbon pump is an important component of the oceanic carbon cycle and expected to respond to the anthropogenic perturbation of climate and ocean chemistry. Yet, large uncertainties exist in the quantification of the strength of the biological carbon pump of today's ocean. The export of organic matter from the ocean's euphotic zone is a critical benchmark number of this strength. Local measurements of the export flux are highly uncertain, due f.e. to severe methodological issues and undersampling of the ocean. Uncertainties in the contribution of dissolved organic matter to export further add when it comes to a global assessment. The vertical integral of oxygen utilization in the interior of the ocean is considered an independent and save estimate of export production, which accounts for particles as well as dissolved export pathways. For that purpose regional oxygen utilization rates (OUR) have been computed from apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) and an estimate of the time elapsed since the last contact with the atmosphere. Surprisingly the assumptions underlying this concept have not been tested rigorously. Using global ocean biogeochemical models we compare OUR computed from AOU and an ideal age tracer with an independent and perfect estimate of ocean respiration available in the model. Consistently in three different global models, we find that OUR underestimates true respiration by a factor of about three. Most of the differences between respiration and OUR are observed in the upper 1000m of the ocean. In addition to this underestimate in bulk global numbers, we find also important qualitative differences between the two independent approaches. For example, the contribution of dissolved organic matter driving oxygen utilization is largely underestimated when based on bulk tracer concentrations (AOU, DOC), which is the usual approach applied to observations. Also, diagnosing the global importance of denitrification relative to oxic metabolism is

  3. OXYGEN DEPLETION IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: IMPLICATIONS FOR GRAIN MODELS AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF ELEMENTAL OXYGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Whittet, D. C. B.

    2010-02-20

    This paper assesses the implications of a recent discovery that atomic oxygen is being depleted from diffuse interstellar gas at a rate that cannot be accounted for by its presence in silicate and metallic oxide particles. To place this discovery in context, the uptake of elemental O into dust is considered over a wide range of environments, from the tenuous intercloud gas and diffuse clouds sampled by the depletion observations to dense clouds where ice mantles and gaseous CO become important reservoirs of O. The distribution of O in these contrasting regions is quantified in terms of a common parameter, the mean number density of hydrogen (n{sub H}). At the interface between diffuse and dense phases (just before the onset of ice-mantle growth) as much as {approx}160 ppm of the O abundance is unaccounted for. If this reservoir of depleted oxygen persists to higher densities it has implications for the oxygen budget in molecular clouds, where a shortfall of the same order is observed. Of various potential carriers, the most plausible appears to be a form of O-bearing carbonaceous matter similar to the organics found in cometary particles returned by the Stardust mission. The 'organic refractory' model for interstellar dust is re-examined in the light of these findings, and it is concluded that further observations and laboratory work are needed to determine whether this class of material is present in quantities sufficient to account for a significant fraction of the unidentified depleted oxygen.

  4. Late Archean Surface Ocean Oxygenation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, B.; Reinhard, C.; Lyons, T. W.; Kaufman, A. J.; Anbar, A. D.

    2009-12-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis must have evolved by 2.45-2.32 Ga, when atmospheric oxygen abundances first rose above 0.001% present atmospheric level (Great Oxidation Event; GOE). Biomarker evidence for a time lag between the evolution of cyanobacterial oxygenic photosynthesis and the GOE continues to be debated. Geochemical signatures from sedimentary rocks (redox-sensitive trace metal abundances, sedimentary Fe geochemistry, and S isotopes) represent an alternative tool for tracing the history of Earth surface oxygenation. Integrated high-resolution chemostratigraphic profiles through the 2.5 Ga Mt. McRae Shale (Pilbara Craton, Western Australia) suggest a ‘whiff’ of oxygen in the surface environment at least 50 M.y. prior to the GOE. However, the geochemical data from the Mt. McRae Shale does not uniquely constrain the presence or extent of Late Archean ocean oxygenation. Here, we present high-resolution chemostratigraphic profiles from 2.6-2.5 Ga black shales (upper Campbellrand Subgroup, Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa) that provide the earliest direct evidence for an oxygenated ocean water column. On the slope beneath the Campbellrand - Malmani carbonate platform (Nauga Formation), a mildly oxygenated water column (highly reactive iron to total iron ratios [FeHR/FeT] ≤ 0.4) was underlain by oxidizing sediments (low Re and Mo abundances) or mildly reducing sediments (high Re but low Mo abundances). After drowning of the carbonate platform (Klein Naute Formation), the local bottom waters became anoxic (FeHR/FeT > 0.4) and intermittently sulphidic (pyrite iron to highly reactive iron ratios [FePY/FeHR] > 0.8), conducive to enrichment of both Re and Mo in sediments, followed by anoxic and Fe2+-rich (ferruginous) conditions (high FeT, FePY/FeHR near 0). Widespread surface ocean oxygenation is suggested by Re enrichment in the broadly correlative Klein Naute Formation and Mt. McRae Shale, deposited ~1000 km apart in the Griqualand West and Hamersley basins

  5. Do large predatory fish track ocean oxygenation?

    PubMed

    Dahl, Tais W; Hammarlund, Emma U

    2011-01-01

    The Devonian appearance of 1-10 meter long armored fish (placoderms) coincides with geochemical evidence recording a transition into fully oxygenated oceans.1 A comparison of extant fish shows that the large individuals are less tolerant to hypoxia than their smaller cousins. This leads us to hypothesize that Early Paleozoic O(2) saturation levels were too low to support >1 meter size marine, predatory fish. According to a simple model, both oxygen uptake and oxygen demand scale positively with size, but the demand exceeds supply for the largest fish with an active, predatory life style. Therefore, the largest individuals may lead us to a lower limit on oceanic O(2) concentrations. Our presented model suggests 2-10 meter long predators require >30-50% PAL while smaller fish would survive at <25% PAL. This is consistent with the hypothesis that low atmospheric oxygen pressure acted as an evolutionary barrier for fish to grow much above ∼1 meter before the Devonian oxygenation.

  6. Oxygen utilization and downward carbon flux in an oxygen-depleted eddy in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Björn; Grundle, Damian S.; Schütte, Florian; Karstensen, Johannes; Löscher, Carolin R.; Hauss, Helena; Wagner, Hannes; Loginova, Alexandra; Kiko, Rainer; Silva, Péricles; Tanhua, Toste; Körtzinger, Arne

    2016-10-01

    The occurrence of mesoscale eddies that develop suboxic environments at shallow depth (about 40-100 m) has recently been reported for the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA). Their hydrographic structure suggests that the water mass inside the eddy is well isolated from ambient waters supporting the development of severe near-surface oxygen deficits. So far, hydrographic and biogeochemical characterization of these eddies was limited to a few autonomous surveys, with the use of moorings, underwater gliders and profiling floats. In this study we present results from the first dedicated biogeochemical survey of one of these eddies conducted in March 2014 near the Cape Verde Ocean Observatory (CVOO). During the survey the eddy core showed oxygen concentrations as low as 5 µmol kg-1 with a pH of around 7.6 at approximately 100 m depth. Correspondingly, the aragonite saturation level dropped to 1 at the same depth, thereby creating unfavorable conditions for calcifying organisms. To our knowledge, such enhanced acidity within near-surface waters has never been reported before for the open Atlantic Ocean. Vertical distributions of particulate organic matter and dissolved organic matter (POM and DOM), generally showed elevated concentrations in the surface mixed layer (0-70 m), with DOM also accumulating beneath the oxygen minimum. With the use of reference data from the upwelling region where these eddies are formed, the oxygen utilization rate was calculated by determining oxygen consumption through the remineralization of organic matter. Inside the core, we found these rates were almost 1 order of magnitude higher (apparent oxygen utilization rate (aOUR); 0.26 µmol kg-1 day-1) than typical values for the open North Atlantic. Computed downward fluxes for particulate organic carbon (POC), were around 0.19 to 0.23 g C m-2 day-1 at 100 m depth, clearly exceeding fluxes typical for an oligotrophic open-ocean setting. The observations support the view that the oxygen-depleted

  7. Finding forced trends in oceanic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Matthew C.; Deutsch, Curtis; Ito, Taka

    2016-02-01

    Anthropogenically forced trends in oceanic dissolved oxygen are evaluated in Earth system models in the context of natural variability. A large ensemble of a single Earth system model is used to clearly identify the forced component of change in interior oxygen distributions and to evaluate the magnitude of this signal relative to noise generated by internal climate variability. The time of emergence of forced trends is quantified on the basis of anomalies in oxygen concentrations and trends. We find that the forced signal should already be evident in the southern Indian Ocean and parts of the eastern tropical Pacific and Atlantic basins; widespread detection of forced deoxygenation is possible by 2030-2040. In addition to considering spatially discrete metrics of detection, we evaluate the similarity of the spatial structures associated with natural variability and the forced trend. Outside of the subtropics, these patterns are not wholly distinct on the isopycnal surfaces considered, and therefore, this approach does not provide significantly advanced detection. Our results clearly demonstrate the strong impact of natural climate variability on interior oxygen distributions, providing an important context for interpreting observations.

  8. Dynamic model constraints on oxygen-17 depletion in atmospheric O2 after a snowball Earth.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaobin; Bao, Huiming

    2013-09-01

    A large perturbation in atmospheric CO2 and O2 or bioproductivity will result in a drastic pulse of (17)O change in atmospheric O2, as seen in the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event in the immediate aftermath of a global deglaciation 635 Mya. The exact nature of the perturbation, however, is debated. Here we constructed a coupled, four-box, and quick-response biosphere-atmosphere model to examine both the steady state and dynamics of the MOSD event. Our model shows that the ultra-high CO2 concentrations proposed by the "snowball' Earth hypothesis produce a typical MOSD duration of less than 10(6) y and a magnitude of (17)O depletion reaching approximately -35‰. Both numbers are in remarkable agreement with geological constraints from South China and Svalbard. Moderate CO2 and low O2 concentration (e.g., 3,200 parts per million by volume and 0.01 bar, respectively) could produce distinct sulfate (17)O depletion only if postglacial marine bioproductivity was impossibly low. Our dynamic model also suggests that a snowball in which the ocean is isolated from the atmosphere by a continuous ice cover may be distinguished from one in which cracks in the ice permit ocean-atmosphere exchange only if partial pressure of atmospheric O2 is larger than 0.02 bar during the snowball period and records of weathering-derived sulfate are available for the very first few tens of thousands of years after the onset of the meltdown. In any case, a snowball Earth is a precondition for the observed MOSD event. PMID:23898167

  9. Dynamic model constraints on oxygen-17 depletion in atmospheric O2 after a snowball Earth.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaobin; Bao, Huiming

    2013-09-01

    A large perturbation in atmospheric CO2 and O2 or bioproductivity will result in a drastic pulse of (17)O change in atmospheric O2, as seen in the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event in the immediate aftermath of a global deglaciation 635 Mya. The exact nature of the perturbation, however, is debated. Here we constructed a coupled, four-box, and quick-response biosphere-atmosphere model to examine both the steady state and dynamics of the MOSD event. Our model shows that the ultra-high CO2 concentrations proposed by the "snowball' Earth hypothesis produce a typical MOSD duration of less than 10(6) y and a magnitude of (17)O depletion reaching approximately -35‰. Both numbers are in remarkable agreement with geological constraints from South China and Svalbard. Moderate CO2 and low O2 concentration (e.g., 3,200 parts per million by volume and 0.01 bar, respectively) could produce distinct sulfate (17)O depletion only if postglacial marine bioproductivity was impossibly low. Our dynamic model also suggests that a snowball in which the ocean is isolated from the atmosphere by a continuous ice cover may be distinguished from one in which cracks in the ice permit ocean-atmosphere exchange only if partial pressure of atmospheric O2 is larger than 0.02 bar during the snowball period and records of weathering-derived sulfate are available for the very first few tens of thousands of years after the onset of the meltdown. In any case, a snowball Earth is a precondition for the observed MOSD event.

  10. Genome and physiology of a model Epsilonproteobacterium responsible for sulfide detoxification in marine oxygen depletion zones.

    PubMed

    Grote, Jana; Schott, Thomas; Bruckner, Christian G; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Jost, Günter; Teeling, Hanno; Labrenz, Matthias; Jürgens, Klaus

    2012-01-10

    Eutrophication and global climate change lead to expansion of hypoxia in the ocean, often accompanied by the production of hydrogen sulfide, which is toxic to higher organisms. Chemoautotrophic bacteria are thought to buffer against increased sulfide concentrations by oxidizing hydrogen sulfide before its diffusion to oxygenated surface waters. Model organisms from such environments have not been readily available, which has contributed to a poor understanding of these microbes. We present here a detailed study of "Sulfurimonas gotlandica" str. GD1, an Epsilonproteobacterium isolated from the Baltic Sea oxic-anoxic interface, where it plays a key role in nitrogen and sulfur cycling. Whole-genome analysis and laboratory experiments revealed a high metabolic flexibility, suggesting a considerable capacity for adaptation to variable redox conditions. S. gotlandica str. GD1 was shown to grow chemolithoautotrophically by coupling denitrification with oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and dark CO(2) fixation. Metabolic versatility was further suggested by the use of a range of different electron donors and acceptors and organic carbon sources. The number of genes involved in signal transduction and metabolic pathways exceeds those of other Epsilonproteobacteria. Oxygen tolerance and environmental-sensing systems combined with chemotactic responses enable this organism to thrive successfully in marine oxygen-depletion zones. We propose that S. gotlandica str. GD1 will serve as a model organism in investigations that will lead to a better understanding how members of the Epsilonproteobacteria are able to cope with water column anoxia and the role these microorganisms play in the detoxification of sulfidic waters.

  11. Dynamic model constraints on oxygen-17 depletion in atmospheric O2 after a snowball Earth

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaobin; Bao, Huiming

    2013-01-01

    A large perturbation in atmospheric CO2 and O2 or bioproductivity will result in a drastic pulse of 17O change in atmospheric O2, as seen in the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event in the immediate aftermath of a global deglaciation 635 Mya. The exact nature of the perturbation, however, is debated. Here we constructed a coupled, four-box, and quick-response biosphere–atmosphere model to examine both the steady state and dynamics of the MOSD event. Our model shows that the ultra-high CO2 concentrations proposed by the “snowball’ Earth hypothesis produce a typical MOSD duration of less than 106 y and a magnitude of 17O depletion reaching approximately −35‰. Both numbers are in remarkable agreement with geological constraints from South China and Svalbard. Moderate CO2 and low O2 concentration (e.g., 3,200 parts per million by volume and 0.01 bar, respectively) could produce distinct sulfate 17O depletion only if postglacial marine bioproductivity was impossibly low. Our dynamic model also suggests that a snowball in which the ocean is isolated from the atmosphere by a continuous ice cover may be distinguished from one in which cracks in the ice permit ocean–atmosphere exchange only if partial pressure of atmospheric O2 is larger than 0.02 bar during the snowball period and records of weathering-derived sulfate are available for the very first few tens of thousands of years after the onset of the meltdown. In any case, a snowball Earth is a precondition for the observed MOSD event. PMID:23898167

  12. Late quaternary history of hydrography, oxygen depletion and organic carbon accumulation on the Oman Margin

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, R.F.; Zahn, R. ); Shimmield, G.B. )

    1990-01-09

    Measurements of the sedimentary organic carbon and nitrogen contents and minor element concentrations are used along with stable isotope records obtained form planktonic and benthic foraminifera to interpret hydrographic history at mid-depth (600 m) on the central Oman Margin (ODP Site 724) over the past half million years. Both C. wuellerstorfi data and Iodine/C[sub org] ratio information indicate that the oxygen minimum on the margin has been continuously present over the period examined. Glacial-interglacial [delta][sup 18]O amplitudes recorded by benthic foraminifera are reduced when compared to the estimated mean ocean changes of [delta][sup 18]O[sub seawater]. This implies that Red Sea outflow waters (which are enriched in [sup 18]O and [sup 13]C) were replaced during glacial periods by intermediate waters still enriched in [sup 13]C but relatively depleted in [sup 18]O. Glacial-interglacial amplitudes of the planktonic [delta][sup 18]O record exceed those of the mean ocean [delta][sup 18]O[sub seawater] variation and imply decreased surface water temperatures at this site during glacial times. If this interpretation is correct, then the data suggest that increased upwelling occurred during glacials. This conclusion conflicts with previous findings that upwelling maxima in the western Arabian Sea correspond to maxima in the strength of the SW monsoon, which occur primarily during interglacials.

  13. Undocumented water column sink for cadmium in open ocean oxygen-deficient zones.

    PubMed

    Janssen, David J; Conway, Tim M; John, Seth G; Christian, James R; Kramer, Dennis I; Pedersen, Tom F; Cullen, Jay T

    2014-05-13

    Cadmium (Cd) is a micronutrient and a tracer of biological productivity and circulation in the ocean. The correlation between dissolved Cd and the major algal nutrients in seawater has led to the use of Cd preserved in microfossils to constrain past ocean nutrient distributions. However, linking Cd to marine biological processes requires constraints on marine sources and sinks of Cd. Here, we show a decoupling between Cd and major nutrients within oxygen-deficient zones (ODZs) in both the Northeast Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans, which we attribute to Cd sulfide (CdS) precipitation in euxinic microenvironments around sinking biological particles. We find that dissolved Cd correlates well with dissolved phosphate in oxygenated waters, but is depleted compared with phosphate in ODZs. Additionally, suspended particles from the North Atlantic show high Cd content and light Cd stable isotope ratios within the ODZ, indicative of CdS precipitation. Globally, we calculate that CdS precipitation in ODZs is an important, and to our knowledge a previously undocumented marine sink of Cd. Our results suggest that water column oxygen depletion has a substantial impact on Cd biogeochemical cycling, impacting the global relationship between Cd and major nutrients and suggesting that Cd may be a previously unidentified tracer for water column oxygen deficiency on geological timescales. Similar depletions of copper and zinc in the Northeast Pacific indicate that sulfide precipitation in ODZs may also have an influence on the global distribution of other trace metals. PMID:24778239

  14. Undocumented water column sink for cadmium in open ocean oxygen-deficient zones

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, David J.; Conway, Tim M.; John, Seth G.; Christian, James R.; Kramer, Dennis I.; Pedersen, Tom F.; Cullen, Jay T.

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a micronutrient and a tracer of biological productivity and circulation in the ocean. The correlation between dissolved Cd and the major algal nutrients in seawater has led to the use of Cd preserved in microfossils to constrain past ocean nutrient distributions. However, linking Cd to marine biological processes requires constraints on marine sources and sinks of Cd. Here, we show a decoupling between Cd and major nutrients within oxygen-deficient zones (ODZs) in both the Northeast Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans, which we attribute to Cd sulfide (CdS) precipitation in euxinic microenvironments around sinking biological particles. We find that dissolved Cd correlates well with dissolved phosphate in oxygenated waters, but is depleted compared with phosphate in ODZs. Additionally, suspended particles from the North Atlantic show high Cd content and light Cd stable isotope ratios within the ODZ, indicative of CdS precipitation. Globally, we calculate that CdS precipitation in ODZs is an important, and to our knowledge a previously undocumented marine sink of Cd. Our results suggest that water column oxygen depletion has a substantial impact on Cd biogeochemical cycling, impacting the global relationship between Cd and major nutrients and suggesting that Cd may be a previously unidentified tracer for water column oxygen deficiency on geological timescales. Similar depletions of copper and zinc in the Northeast Pacific indicate that sulfide precipitation in ODZs may also have an influence on the global distribution of other trace metals. PMID:24778239

  15. Undocumented water column sink for cadmium in open ocean oxygen-deficient zones.

    PubMed

    Janssen, David J; Conway, Tim M; John, Seth G; Christian, James R; Kramer, Dennis I; Pedersen, Tom F; Cullen, Jay T

    2014-05-13

    Cadmium (Cd) is a micronutrient and a tracer of biological productivity and circulation in the ocean. The correlation between dissolved Cd and the major algal nutrients in seawater has led to the use of Cd preserved in microfossils to constrain past ocean nutrient distributions. However, linking Cd to marine biological processes requires constraints on marine sources and sinks of Cd. Here, we show a decoupling between Cd and major nutrients within oxygen-deficient zones (ODZs) in both the Northeast Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans, which we attribute to Cd sulfide (CdS) precipitation in euxinic microenvironments around sinking biological particles. We find that dissolved Cd correlates well with dissolved phosphate in oxygenated waters, but is depleted compared with phosphate in ODZs. Additionally, suspended particles from the North Atlantic show high Cd content and light Cd stable isotope ratios within the ODZ, indicative of CdS precipitation. Globally, we calculate that CdS precipitation in ODZs is an important, and to our knowledge a previously undocumented marine sink of Cd. Our results suggest that water column oxygen depletion has a substantial impact on Cd biogeochemical cycling, impacting the global relationship between Cd and major nutrients and suggesting that Cd may be a previously unidentified tracer for water column oxygen deficiency on geological timescales. Similar depletions of copper and zinc in the Northeast Pacific indicate that sulfide precipitation in ODZs may also have an influence on the global distribution of other trace metals.

  16. Enhanced deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation with global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froelicher, T. L.; Jaccard, S.; Dunne, J. P.; Paynter, D.; Gruber, N.

    2014-12-01

    Twenty-first century coupled climate model simulations, observations from the recent past, and theoretical arguments suggest a consistent trend towards warmer ocean temperatures and fresher polar surface oceans in response to increased radiative forcing resulting in increased upper ocean stratification and reduced ventilation and oxygenation of the deep ocean. Paleo-proxy records of the warming at the end of the last ice age, however, suggests a different outcome, namely a better ventilated and oxygenated deep ocean with global warming. Here we use a four thousand year global warming simulation from a comprehensive Earth System Model (GFDL ESM2M) to show that this conundrum is a consequence of different rates of warming and that the deep ocean is actually better ventilated and oxygenated in a future warmer equilibrated climate consistent with paleo-proxy records. The enhanced deep ocean ventilation in the Southern Ocean occurs in spite of increased positive surface buoyancy fluxes and a constancy of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds - circumstances that would otherwise be expected to lead to a reduction in deep ocean ventilation. This ventilation recovery occurs through a global scale interaction of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation undergoing a multi-centennial recovery after an initial century of transient decrease and transports salinity-rich waters inform the subtropical surface ocean to the Southern Ocean interior on multi-century timescales. The subsequent upwelling of salinity-rich waters in the Southern Ocean strips away the freshwater cap that maintains vertical stability and increases open ocean convection and the formation of Antarctic Bottom Waters. As a result, the global ocean oxygen content and the nutrient supply from the deep ocean to the surface are higher in a warmer ocean. The implications for past and future changes in ocean heat and carbon storage will be discussed.

  17. Genome and physiology of a model Epsilonproteobacterium responsible for sulfide detoxification in marine oxygen depletion zones

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Jana; Schott, Thomas; Bruckner, Christian G.; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Jost, Günter; Teeling, Hanno; Labrenz, Matthias; Jürgens, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Eutrophication and global climate change lead to expansion of hypoxia in the ocean, often accompanied by the production of hydrogen sulfide, which is toxic to higher organisms. Chemoautotrophic bacteria are thought to buffer against increased sulfide concentrations by oxidizing hydrogen sulfide before its diffusion to oxygenated surface waters. Model organisms from such environments have not been readily available, which has contributed to a poor understanding of these microbes. We present here a detailed study of “Sulfurimonas gotlandica” str. GD1, an Epsilonproteobacterium isolated from the Baltic Sea oxic-anoxic interface, where it plays a key role in nitrogen and sulfur cycling. Whole-genome analysis and laboratory experiments revealed a high metabolic flexibility, suggesting a considerable capacity for adaptation to variable redox conditions. S. gotlandica str. GD1 was shown to grow chemolithoautotrophically by coupling denitrification with oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and dark CO2 fixation. Metabolic versatility was further suggested by the use of a range of different electron donors and acceptors and organic carbon sources. The number of genes involved in signal transduction and metabolic pathways exceeds those of other Epsilonproteobacteria. Oxygen tolerance and environmental-sensing systems combined with chemotactic responses enable this organism to thrive successfully in marine oxygen-depletion zones. We propose that S. gotlandica str. GD1 will serve as a model organism in investigations that will lead to a better understanding how members of the Epsilonproteobacteria are able to cope with water column anoxia and the role these microorganisms play in the detoxification of sulfidic waters. PMID:22203982

  18. Aerobic Microbial Respiration in Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M.; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Schunck, Harald; Loescher, Carolin; Desai, Dhwani K.; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.

    2014-05-01

    In the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the tropical oceans, sluggish ventilation combined with strong microbial respiration of sinking organic matter results in the depletion of oxygen (O2). When O2 concentrations drop below ~5 µmol/L, organic matter is generally assumed to be respired with nitrate, ultimately leading to the loss of fixed inorganic nitrogen via anammox and denitrification. However, direct measurements of microbial O2 consumption at low O2 levels are - apart from a single experiment conducted in the OMZ off Peru - so far lacking. At the same time, consistently observed active aerobic ammonium and nitrite oxidation at non-detectable O2 concentrations (<1 µmol/L) in all major OMZs, suggests aerobic microorganisms, likely including heterotrophs, to be well adapted to near-anoxic conditions. Consequently, microaerobic (≤5 µmol/L) remineralization of organic matter, and thus release of ammonium, in low- O2 environments might be significantly underestimated at present. Here we present extensive measurements of microbial O2 consumption in OMZ waters, combined with highly sensitive O2 (STOX) measurements and meta-omic functional gene analyses. Short-term incubation experiments with labelled O2 (18-18O2) carried out in the Namibian and Peruvian OMZ, revealed persistent aerobic microbial activity at depths with non-detectable concentrations of O2 (≤50 nmol/L). In accordance, examination of metagenomes and metatranscriptomes from Chilean and Peruvian OMZ waters identified genes encoding for terminal respiratory oxidases with high O2 affinities as well as their expression by diverse microbial communities. Oxygen consumption was particularly enhanced near the upper OMZ boundaries and could mostly (~80%) be assigned to heterotrophic microbial activity. Compared to previously identified anaerobic microbial processes, microaerobic organic matter respiration was the dominant remineralization pathway and source of ammonium (~90%) in the upper Namibian and

  19. Arctic Marine Boundary Layer Ozone and Mercury Depletion: a view from the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottenheim, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    Dramatic depletion of ozone (O3) and gaseous elementary mercury (GEM) from the marine boundary layer during the spring in Polar Regions is known to be driven by bromine atoms originating from activation of seasalt bromide. Almost all surface based measurements have been made at coastal observatories, but most of the active processing of the air is believed to occur near or at the surface of the Arctic Ocean itself. A major objective of the OASIS (Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice and Snow) program during the International Polar Year (IPY) was therefore to make observations directly over the frozen Arctic Ocean. In the context of the OASIS-CANADA program, sponsored by the Canadian Federal Program Office of the IPY, several ocean bound projects were joined Including the French TARA expedition (2006-2008), the CFL campaign on the Canadian ice breaker CCGS Amundsen (February-April 2008), the COBRA campaign over the Hudson Bay near Kuujjuaraapik/Whapmagoostui, Quebec (February-March 2008) and the ASCOS campaign on the Swedish polar class ice breaker the Oden to the North Pole (August-September 2008). In this presentation I will summarize the observations and explore what has been learned regarding the drivers for the depletion process, such as the influence of the ambient temperature, the nature of the underlying surface, and the atmospheric stability. An important question is whether depletion in progress was observed, rather than the arrival of previously depleted air, as is generally the case at Arctic coastal observatories.

  20. Net production of oxygen in the subtropical ocean.

    PubMed

    Riser, Stephen C; Johnson, Kenneth S

    2008-01-17

    The question of whether the plankton communities in low-nutrient regions of the ocean, comprising 80% of the global ocean surface area, are net producers or consumers of oxygen and fixed carbon is a key uncertainty in the global carbon cycle. Direct measurements in bottle experiments indicate net oxygen consumption in the sunlit zone, whereas geochemical evidence suggests that the upper ocean is a net source of oxygen. One possible resolution to this conflict is that primary production in the gyres is episodic and thus difficult to observe: in this model, oligotrophic regions would be net consumers of oxygen during most of the year, but strong, brief events with high primary production rates might produce enough fixed carbon and dissolved oxygen to yield net production as an average over the annual cycle. Here we examine the balance of oxygen production over three years at sites in the North and South Pacific subtropical gyres using the new technique of oxygen sensors deployed on profiling floats. We find that mixing events during early winter homogenize the upper water column and cause low oxygen concentrations. Oxygen then increases below the mixed layer at a nearly constant rate that is similar to independent measures of net community production. This continuous oxygen increase is consistent with an ecosystem that is a net producer of fixed carbon (net autotrophic) throughout the year, with episodic events not required to sustain positive oxygen production. PMID:18202655

  1. Linking nutrient loading and oxygen in the coastal ocean: A new global scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Daniel C.; Harrison, John A.

    2016-03-01

    Recent decades have witnessed an exponential spread of low-oxygen regions in the coastal ocean due at least in-part to enhanced terrestrial nutrient inputs. As oxygen deprivation is a major stressor on marine ecosystems, there is a great need to quantitatively link shifts in nutrient loading with changes in oxygen concentrations. To this end, we have developed and here describe, evaluate, and apply the Coastal Ocean Oxygen Linked to Benthic Exchange And Nutrient Supply (COOLBEANS) model, a first-of-its-kind, spatially explicit (with 152 coastal segments) model, global model of coastal oxygen and nutrient dynamics. In COOLBEANS, benthic oxygen demand (BOD) is calculated using empirical models for aerobic respiration, iron reduction, and sulfate reduction, while oxygen supply is represented by a simple parameterization of exchange between surface and bottom waters. A nutrient cycling component translates shifts in riverine nutrient inputs into changes in organic matter delivery to sediments and, ultimately, oxygen uptake. Modeled BOD reproduces observations reasonably well (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency = 0.71), and estimates of exchange between surface and bottom waters correlate with stratification. The model examines sensitivity of bottom water oxygen to changes in nutrient inputs and vertical exchange between surface and bottom waters, highlighting the importance of this vertical exchange in defining the susceptibility of a system to oxygen depletion. These sensitivities along with estimated maximum hypoxic areas that are supported by present day nutrient loads are consistent with existing hypoxic regions. Sensitivities are put into context by applying historic changes in nitrogen loading observed in the Gulf of Mexico to the global coastal ocean, demonstrating that such loads would drive many systems anoxic or even sulfidic.

  2. Global deep ocean oxygenation by enhanced ventilation in the Southern Ocean under long-term global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, A.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Shigemitsu, M.; Oka, A.; Takahashi, K.; Ohgaito, R.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Global warming is expected to decrease ocean oxygen concentrations by less solubility of surface ocean and change in ocean circulation. The associated expansion of the oxygen minimum zone would have adverse impacts on marine organisms and ocean biogeochemical cycles. Oxygen reduction is expected to persist for a thousand years or more, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. However, long-term changes in ocean oxygen and circulation are still unclear. Here we simulate multimillennium changes in ocean circulation and oxygen under doubling and quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, using a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model and an offline biogeochemical model. In the first 500 years, global oxygen concentration decreases, consistent with previous studies. Thereafter, however, the oxygen concentration in the deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots at the end of the simulations, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. This is because, after the initial cessation, the recovery and overshooting of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea enhance ventilation and supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean. Another contributor to deep ocean oxygenation is seawater warming, which reduces the export production and shifts the organic matter remineralization to the upper water column. Our results indicate that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in deep ocean, which is opposite to the centennial-scale global oxygen reduction and general expectation.

  3. Prevalence of partnerships between bacteria and ciliates in oxygen-depleted marine water columns.

    PubMed

    Orsi, William; Charvet, Sophie; Vd'ačný, Peter; Bernhard, Joan M; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2012-01-01

    Symbioses between Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya in deep-sea marine environments represent a means for eukaryotes to exploit otherwise inhospitable habitats. Such symbioses are abundant in many low-oxygen benthic marine environments, where the majority of microbial eukaryotes contain prokaryotic symbionts. Here, we present evidence suggesting that in certain oxygen-depleted marine water-column habitats, the majority of microbial eukaryotes are also associated with prokaryotic cells. Ciliates (protists) associated with bacteria were found to be the dominant eukaryotic morphotype in the haloclines of two different deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. These findings are compared to associations between ciliates and bacteria documented from the permanently anoxic waters of the Cariaco Basin (Caribbean Sea). The dominance of ciliates exhibiting epibiotic bacteria across three different oxygen-depleted marine water column habitats suggests that such partnerships confer a fitness advantage for ciliates in these environments.

  4. Methylene blue- and thiol-based oxygen depletion for super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Philip; van de Linde, Sebastian; Lehmann, Julian; Sauer, Markus; Doose, Sören

    2013-03-19

    Anaerobic conditions are often required in solution-based bionanotechnological applications. Efficient oxygen depletion is essential for increasing photostability, optimizing fluorescence signals, and adjusting kinetics of fluorescence intermittency in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy/microscopy, particularly for super-resolution imaging techniques. We characterized methylene blue (MB)- and thiol-based redox reactions with the aim of designing an oxygen scavenger system as an alternative to the established enzyme-based oxygen scavenging systems or purging procedures. Redox reactions of the chromophore methylene blue in aqueous solution, commonly visualized in the blue bottle experiment, deplete molecular oxygen as long as a sacrificial reduction component is present in excess concentrations. We demonstrate that methylene blue in combination with reducing compounds such as β-mercaptoethylamine (MEA) can serve as fast and efficient oxygen scavenger. Efficient oxygen scavenging in aqueous solution is also possible with mere β-mercaptoethylamine at mM concentrations. We present kinetic parameters of the relevant reactions, pH-stability of the MB/MEA-oxygen scavenging system, and its application in single-molecule based super-resolution imaging.

  5. Oxygen-depleted zones inside reproductive structures of Brassicaceae: implications for oxygen control of seed development.

    PubMed

    Porterfield, D M; Kuang, A; Smith, P J; Crispi, M L; Musgrave, M E

    1999-10-01

    Growth of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. in decreasing oxygen partial pressures revealed a linear decrease in seed production below 15 kPa, with a complete absence of seed production at 2.5 kPa oxygen. This control of plant reproduction by oxygen had previously been attributed to an oxygen effect on the partitioning between vegetative and reproductive growth. However, plants grown in a series of decreasing oxygen concentrations produced progressively smaller embryos that had stopped developing at progressively younger stages, suggesting instead that their growth is limited by oxygen. Internal oxygen concentrations of buds, pistils, and developing siliques of Brassica rapa L. and siliques of Arabidopsis were measured using a small-diameter glass electrode that was moved into the structures using a micromanipulator. Oxygen partial pressures were found to be lowest in the developing perianth (11.1 kPa) and pistils (15.2 kPa) of the unopened buds. Pollination reduced oxygen concentration inside the pistils by 3 kPa after just 24 h. Inside Brassica silique locules, partial pressures of oxygen averaged 12.2 kPa in darkness, and increased linearly with increasing light levels to 16.2 kPa. Measurements inside Arabidopsis siliques averaged 6.1 kPa in the dark and rose to 12.2 kPa with light. Hypoxia in these microenvironments is postulated to be the point of control of plant reproduction by oxygen.

  6. Oxygen-depleted zones inside reproductive structures of Brassicaceae: implications for oxygen control of seed development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Kuang, A.; Smith, P. J.; Crispi, M. L.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1999-01-01

    Growth of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. in decreasing oxygen partial pressures revealed a linear decrease in seed production below 15 kPa, with a complete absence of seed production at 2.5 kPa oxygen. This control of plant reproduction by oxygen had previously been attributed to an oxygen effect on the partitioning between vegetative and reproductive growth. However, plants grown in a series of decreasing oxygen concentrations produced progressively smaller embryos that had stopped developing at progressively younger stages, suggesting instead that their growth is limited by oxygen. Internal oxygen concentrations of buds, pistils, and developing siliques of Brassica rapa L. and siliques of Arabidopsis were measured using a small-diameter glass electrode that was moved into the structures using a micromanipulator. Oxygen partial pressures were found to be lowest in the developing perianth (11.1 kPa) and pistils (15.2 kPa) of the unopened buds. Pollination reduced oxygen concentration inside the pistils by 3 kPa after just 24 h. Inside Brassica silique locules, partial pressures of oxygen averaged 12.2 kPa in darkness, and increased linearly with increasing light levels to 16.2 kPa. Measurements inside Arabidopsis siliques averaged 6.1 kPa in the dark and rose to 12.2 kPa with light. Hypoxia in these microenvironments is postulated to be the point of control of plant reproduction by oxygen.

  7. Evolving Oxygen Landscape of the Early Atmosphere and Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, T. W.; Reinhard, C. T.; Planavsky, N. J.

    2013-12-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable advances in our understanding of oxygen on the early Earth, and a new framework, the topic of this presentation, is now in place to address the controls on spatiotemporal distributions of oxygen and their potential relationships to deep-Earth processes. Recent challenges to the Archean biomarker record have put an added burden on inorganic geochemistry to fingerprint and quantify the early production, accumulation, and variation of biospheric oxygen. Fortunately, a wide variety of techniques now point convincingly to photosynthetic oxygen production and dynamic accumulation well before the canonical Great Oxidation Event (GOE). Recent modeling of sulfur recycling over this interval allows for transient oxygen accumulation in the atmosphere without the disappearance of non-mass-dependent (NMD) sulfur isotope anomalies from the stratigraphic record and further allows for persistent accumulation in the atmosphere well before the permanent disappearance of NMD signals. This recent work suggests that the initial rise of oxygen may have occurred in fits and starts rather than a single step, and that once permanently present in the atmosphere, oxygen likely rose to high levels and then plummeted, in phase with the Paleoproterozoic Lomagundi positive carbon isotope excursion. More than a billion years of oxygen-free conditions in the deep ocean followed and set a challenging course for life, including limited abundances and diversity of eukaryotic organisms. Despite this widespread anoxia, sulfidic (euxinic) conditions were likely limited to productive ocean margins. Nevertheless, euxinia was sufficiently widespread to impact redox-dependent nutrient relationships, particularly the availability of bioessential trace metals critical in the nitrogen cycle, which spawned feedbacks that likely maintained oxygen at very low levels in the ocean and atmosphere and delayed the arrival of animals. Then, in the mid, pre-glacial Neoproterozoic

  8. OASIS-CANADA: observations of boundary layer ozone and mercury depletion from the Arctic Ocean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottenheim, J. W.; Netcheva, S.; Staebler, R.; Steffen, A.

    2009-04-01

    Dramatic depletion of ozone (O3) and gaseous elementary mercury (GEM) from the marine boundary layer during the spring in Polar Regions is known to be driven by bromine atoms originating from activation of seasalt bromide. Almost all surface based measurements have been made at coastal observatories, but much of the active processing of the air is believed to occur near or at the surface of the Arctic Ocean itself. A major objective of the OASIS (Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice and Snow) program during the International Polar Year (IPY) was therefore to make observations directly over the frozen Arctic Ocean. In the context of the OASIS-CANADA program, sponsored by the Canadian Federal Program Office of the IPY, several ocean bound campaigns were joined including the French TARA expedition (2006-2008), the CFL campaign on the Canadian ice breaker CCGS Amundsen (February-April 2008), the COBRA campaign over the Hudson Bay near Kuujjuaraapik/Whapmagoostui, Quebec (February-March 2008), the ASCOS campaign on the Swedish polar class ice breaker Oden to the North Pole (August-September 2008), and the OASIS-09 campaign at Barrow Alaska (February-March 2009). In this presentation I will summarize the observations and explore what has been learned regarding the drivers for the depletion process, such as the influence of the ambient temperature, the nature of the underlying surface, and the atmospheric stability. An important question is whether depletion in progress was observed, rather than the arrival of previously depleted air, as is generally the case at Arctic coastal observatories.

  9. Ocean oxygenation in the wake of the Marinoan glaciation.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Swapan K; Planavsky, Noah J; Kendall, Brian; Wang, Xinqiang; Shi, Xiaoying; Scott, Clint; Anbar, Ariel D; Lyons, Timothy W; Jiang, Ganqing

    2012-09-27

    Metazoans are likely to have their roots in the Cryogenian period, but there is a marked increase in the appearance of novel animal and algae fossils shortly after the termination of the late Cryogenian (Marinoan) glaciation about 635 million years ago. It has been suggested that an oxygenation event in the wake of the severe Marinoan glaciation was the driving factor behind this early diversification of metazoans and the shift in ecosystem complexity. But there is little evidence for an increase in oceanic or atmospheric oxygen following the Marinoan glaciation, or for a direct link between early animal evolution and redox conditions in general. Models linking trends in early biological evolution to shifts in Earth system processes thus remain controversial. Here we report geochemical data from early Ediacaran organic-rich black shales (∼635-630 million years old) of the basal Doushantuo Formation in South China. High enrichments of molybdenum and vanadium and low pyrite sulphur isotope values (Δ(34)S values ≥65 per mil) in these shales record expansion of the oceanic inventory of redox-sensitive metals and the growth of the marine sulphate reservoir in response to a widely oxygenated ocean. The data provide evidence for an early Ediacaran oxygenation event, which pre-dates the previous estimates for post-Marinoan oxygenation by more than 50 million years. Our findings seem to support a link between the most severe glaciations in Earth's history, the oxygenation of the Earth's surface environments, and the earliest diversification of animals.

  10. Plasma corticosteroid dynamics in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque), during and after oxygen depletion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomasso J.R., Davis; Parker, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma corticosteroid concentrations in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, (normally 1.0 ± 0.3 μg/100 ml) increased significantly (to 5.9 ± 1.2μg/100 ml) in response to acute oxygen depletion and then returned to control levels within 30 min after the dissolved oxygen concentration was increased; however, a secondary increase in plasma corticosteroid levels was observed 6 h after exposure. Corticosteroid levels also increased in fish exposed to dissolved oxygen concentration of <0.2 mg/1 for three days. Methylene blue was not effective in preventing interrenal response to low dissolved oxygen. No diurnal plasma corticosteroid rhythm was observed in fish exposed to diurnal chemical rhythms of culture ponds.

  11. Monitoring of singlet oxygen in the lower troposphere and processes of ozone depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iasenko, Egor; Chelibanov, Vladimir; Marugin, Alexander; Kozliner, Marat

    2016-04-01

    The processes of ozone depletion in the atmosphere are widely discussed now in a connection with the problem of a global climate changes. It is known fact that photolysis of ozone in the upper atmosphere is the source of metastable molecules of oxygen. But, metastable molecules of oxygen can be formed as a result of photo initiated heterogeneous oxidation of molecules adsorbed on the surface of natural aerosol particles. During the outdoor experiment, we observed a formation of Singlet oxygen (1Δg) at concentration level of 2 ... 5 ppb when ice crystals have been exposed to the sun light. In experiments, we used Analyzers of Singlet oxygen and Ozone (produced by JSC "OPTEC") that utilize solid-state chemiluminescence technology. We assumed that the singlet oxygen is formed in the active centers on the surface of ice crystals in the presence or absence of anthropogenic pollutants in the atmosphere. Identified efficiency of heterogeneous reaction of O2 (1Δg) formation suggests the importance of the additional channel O3 + O2 (1Δg) → 2O2 + O (3P) of atmospheric ozone removal comparable with other well known cycles of ozone depletion.

  12. Tracing the stepwise oxygenation of the Proterozoic ocean.

    PubMed

    Scott, C; Lyons, T W; Bekker, A; Shen, Y; Poulton, S W; Chu, X; Anbar, A D

    2008-03-27

    Biogeochemical signatures preserved in ancient sedimentary rocks provide clues to the nature and timing of the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere. Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation proceeded in two broad steps near the beginning and end of the Proterozoic eon (2,500 to 542 million years ago). The oxidation state of the Proterozoic ocean between these two steps and the timing of deep-ocean oxygenation have important implications for the evolutionary course of life on Earth but remain poorly known. Here we present a new perspective on ocean oxygenation based on the authigenic accumulation of the redox-sensitive transition element molybdenum in sulphidic black shales. Accumulation of authigenic molybdenum from sea water is already seen in shales by 2,650 Myr ago; however, the small magnitudes of these enrichments reflect weak or transient sources of dissolved molybdenum before about 2,200 Myr ago, consistent with minimal oxidative weathering of the continents. Enrichments indicative of persistent and vigorous oxidative weathering appear in shales deposited at roughly 2,150 Myr ago, more than 200 million years after the initial rise in atmospheric oxygen. Subsequent expansion of sulphidic conditions after about 1,800 Myr ago (refs 8, 9) maintained a mid-Proterozoic molybdenum reservoir below 20 per cent of the modern inventory, which in turn may have acted as a nutrient feedback limiting the spatiotemporal distribution of euxinic (sulphidic) bottom waters and perhaps the evolutionary and ecological expansion of eukaryotic organisms. By 551 Myr ago, molybdenum contents reflect a greatly expanded oceanic reservoir due to oxygenation of the deep ocean and corresponding decrease in sulphidic conditions in the sediments and water column.

  13. Dynamic oxygenation of the early atmosphere and oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Timothy W.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Reinhard, Christopher T.

    2014-05-01

    The traditional view of the oxygenation of the early atmosphere and oceans depicts irreversibly rising abundances in two large steps: one at the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) ca. 2.3-2.4 billion years ago (Ga) and another near the end of the Neoproterozoic. This talk will explore how the latest data challenge this paradigm. Recent results reveal a far more dynamic history of early oxygenation, one with both rising and falling levels, long periods of sustained low concentrations even after the GOE, complex feedback relationships that likely coupled nutrients and ocean redox, and dramatic changes tied through still-emerging cause-and-effect relationships to first-order tectonic, climatic, and evolutionary events. In the face of increasing doubt about the robustness of organic biomarker records from the Archean, researchers are increasingly reliant on inorganic geochemical proxies for the earliest records of oxygenic photosynthesis. Proxy data now suggest oxygenesis at ca. 3.0 Ga with a likelihood of local oxygen build up in the surface ocean long before the GOE, as well as low (and perhaps transient) accumulation in the atmosphere against a backdrop of mostly less than ca. 0.001% of the present atmospheric concentration. By the GOE, the balance between oxygen sources and sinks shifted in favor of persistent accumulation, although sedimentary recycling of non-mass-dependent sulfur isotope signatures allows for the possibility of rising and falling atmospheric oxygen before the GOE as traditionally defined by the sulfur isotope record. Recycling may also hinder our ability to precisely date the transition to permanent oxygen accumulation beyond trace levels. Diverse data point to a dramatic increase in biospheric oxygen following the GOE, coincident with the largest positive carbon isotope excursion in Earth history, followed by an equally dramatic drop. This decline in Earth surface redox potential ushered in more than a billion years of dominantly low oxygen levels in

  14. Evidence for enhanced phosphorus regeneration from marine sediments overlain by oxygen depleted waters

    SciTech Connect

    Ingall, E.; Jahnki, R.

    1994-06-01

    Phosphorus regeneration and burial fluxes determined from in situ benthic flux chamber and solid phase measurements at sites on the Californian continental margin, Peruvian continental slope, North Carolina continental slope, and from the Santa Monica basin, California are reported. Comparison of these sites indicates that O{sub 2}-depleted bottomwaters enhance P regeneration from sediments, diminishing overall phosphorus burial efficiency. Based on these observations, a positive feedback, linking ocean anoxia, enhanced benthic phosphorus regeneration, and marine productivity is proposed. On shorter timescales, these results also suggest that O{sub 2} depletion in coastal regions caused by eutrophication may enhance P regeneration from sediments, thereby providing additional P necessary for increased biological productivity. 42 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Microsensor and transcriptomic signatures of oxygen depletion in biofilms associated with chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    James, Garth A; Ge Zhao, Alice; Usui, Marcia; Underwood, Robert A; Nguyen, Hung; Beyenal, Haluk; deLancey Pulcini, Elinor; Agostinho Hunt, Alessandra; Bernstein, Hans C; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John; Williamson, Kerry S; Franklin, Michael J; Stewart, Philip S

    2016-03-01

    Biofilms have been implicated in delayed wound healing, although the mechanisms by which biofilms impair wound healing are poorly understood. Many species of bacteria produce exotoxins and exoenzymes that may inhibit healing. In addition, oxygen consumption by biofilms and by the responding leukocytes, may impede wound healing by depleting the oxygen that is required for healing. In this study, oxygen microsensors to measure oxygen transects through in vitro cultured biofilms, biofilms formed in vivo within scabs from a diabetic (db/db) mouse wound model, and ex vivo human chronic wound specimens was used. The results showed that oxygen levels within mouse scabs had steep gradients that reached minima ranging from 17 to 72 mmHg on live mice and from 6.4 to 1.1 mmHg on euthanized mice. The oxygen gradients in the mouse scabs were similar to those observed for clinical isolates cultured in vitro and for human ex vivo specimens. To characterize the metabolic activities of the bacteria in the mouse scabs, transcriptomics analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms associated with the db/db mice wounds was performed. The results demonstrated that the bacteria expressed genes for metabolic activities associated with cell growth. Interestingly, the transcriptome results also indicated that the bacteria within the wounds experienced oxygen-limitation stress. Among the bacterial genes that were expressed in vivo were genes associated with the Anr-mediated hypoxia-stress response. Other bacterial stress response genes highly expressed in vivo were genes associated with stationary-phase growth, osmotic stress, and RpoH-mediated heat shock stress. Overall, the results supported the hypothesis that bacterial biofilms in chronic wounds promote chronicity by contributing to the maintenance of localized low oxygen tensions, through their metabolic activities and through their recruitment of cells that consume oxygen for host defensive processes.

  16. Incomplete Denitrification Causes Rapid Nitrous Oxide Cycling in the Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbin, A. R.; Ward, B. B.; Stocker, R.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a major cause of stratospheric ozone depletion, yet its sources and sinks remain poorly quantified in the oceans. We used isotope tracers to directly measure N2O reduction rates in the eastern tropical North Pacific. Because of incomplete denitrification, N2O cycling rates are an order of magnitude higher than predicted by current models in suboxic regions, and the spatial distribution suggests strong dependence on both organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, N2O turnover is 20 times higher than the net atmospheric efflux. The rapid rate of this cycling coupled to an expected expansion of suboxic ocean waters implies future increases in N2O emissions.

  17. Contrasted effects of climate change on temperate large lakes oxygen-depletion (Lakes Geneva, Bourget, Annecy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenny, Jean-Philippe; Arnaud, Fabien; Dorioz, Jean-Marcel; Alric, Benjamin; Sabatier, Pierre; Perga, Marie-Elodie

    2013-04-01

    Among manifestations of the entry in a new geological era -The Anthropocene- marked by the fingerprinting of human activities in global ecology, the development of persistent zones of oxygen-depletion particularly threatens aquatic ecosystems. This results in a loss of fisheries, a loss of biodiversity, an alteration of food-webs and even, in extreme cases, mass mortality of fauna1. Whereas hypoxia -defined as dissolved oxygen ≤2 mg/l- has long been considered as a consequence of the sole eutrophication, recent studies showed it also depends on climate change. Despite basic processes of oxygen-depletion are well-known, till now no study evaluated the contrasted effects of climate changes on a long-term perspective. Here we show that climate change paced fluctuation of hypoxia in 3 large lakes (Lake Geneva, Lake Bourget and Lake Annecy) that were previously disturbed by unprecedented nutrient input. Our approach couples century-scale paleo-reconstruction of 1) hypoxia, 2) flood regime and 3) nutrient level, thanks to an exceptional 80 sediment core data collection taken in three large lakes (Geneva, Bourget, Annecy), and monitoring data. Our results show that volume of hypoxia can be annually estimated according to varve records through large lakes. Quantitative additive models were then used to identify and hierarchy environmental forcings on hypoxia. Flood regime and air temperatures hence appeared as significant forcing factors of hypolimnetic hypoxia. Noticeably, their effects are highly contrasted between lakes, depending on specific lake morphology and local hydrological regime. We hence show that greater is the lake specific river discharge the more is the control of winter mixing and the lower is the control of thermal stratification on oxygen depletion. Our study confirms that the perturbation of food web due to nutrient input led to a higher vulnerability of aquatic ecosystems to climate change. We further show specific hydrological regime play a crucial

  18. Investigating Arctic Boundary Layer Ozone Depletions: Sodar, Lidar and Microwave Profiler Measurements on the Frozen Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, R. M.; Bottenheim, J. W.; Seabrook, J.; Whiteway, J.; Asplin, M.; Barber, D.; Poehler, D.; Friess, U.

    2008-12-01

    Even though it has been more than 20 years since the discovery of the episodic depletion of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic during springtime, our understanding of the chemical and physical processes involved is still incomplete. Next to the difficulty of measuring the minute concentrations of the relevant halogen compounds, the main reason for this deficiency is the inaccessibility of the Arctic Ocean, which has meant that with minor exceptions the only data available thus far have been from coastal stations. The Circumpolar Flaw Lead (CFL) study in 2008 provided a unique platform for sophisticated measurements directly on the frozen ocean. For the first time, a combination of ground-level ozone sensors, a DIAL ozone lidar, a microwave temperature and humidity profiler, a sodar, and a MAX-DOAS was employed to characterize the Arctic boundary layer over the ocean. It is shown that depletions always grew from the ground up, and were eroded from aloft. The onset of depletions was generally associated with a drop in wind speeds, allowing the formation of a stable surface inversion with colder and drier air near the surface. Depletions were terminated by higher wind speeds eroding this stable surface layer. The depth of the depleted air mass was typically 300 - 600 m. BrO shows a strong diurnal pattern with daytime levels up to 30 ppt in ozone depleted air. In cases where local depletion mechanisms dominated over advection, the depletion rate was typically -3 ppb/hr.

  19. Constraining the Extent and Intensity of Ocean De-oxygenation During Global Carbon Cycle Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgwell, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The extent and intensity of oxygen minimum zones have a first order relationship with the efficiency of nutrient and trace metal recycling in the oceans, global burial rates of organic carbon, and the availability of aerobe habitat. Reconstructing how the extent and intensity of oxygen depletion has varied with past changes in climate and global carbon cycle perturbation would enable something of the sensitivity of de-oxyenation (and its attendant impacts) to CO2 release to be quantified. However, even the extent of past de-oxygenation is notoriously difficult to constrain from the scattered and generally ocean margin and interior seaway dominated availability of observations. Spatially resolved global biogeochemical models can help, as by placing the distribution of records of any particular proxy into a global, mechanistic framework, one can make a more quantitative assessment of the observations. Moreover, multiple proxies with differing controls and sensitivities to redox state can be assessed simultaneously to help further constrain the interpretation. In this talk I will illustrate this (model-data) approach, taking examples from OAE2 and OAE1a, proxy records of seafloor anoxia and photic zone euxinia, and using the 'GENIE' Earth system model (http://mycgenie.seao2.org). I will also discuss what records and model-data approaches might be used to help better understand much subtler de-oxygenation events such as the PETM.

  20. Differentiation of magma oceans and the thickness of the depleted layer on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomatov, V. S.; Stevenson, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Various arguments suggest that Venus probably has no asthenosphere, and it is likely that beneath the crust there is a highly depleted and highly viscous mantle layer which was probably formed in the early history of the planet when it was partially or completely molten. Models of crystallization of magma oceans suggest that just after crystallization of a hypothetical magma ocean, the internal structure of Venus consists of a crust up to about 70 km thickness, a depleted layer up to about 500 km, and an enriched lower layer which probably consists of an undepleted 'lower mantle' and heavy enriched accumulates near the core-mantle boundary. Partial or even complete melting of Venus due to large impacts during the formation period eventually results in differentiation. However, the final result of such a differentiation can vary from a completely differentiated mantle to an almost completely preserved homogeneous mantle depending on competition between convection and differentiation: between low viscosity ('liquid') convection and crystal settling at small crystal fractions, or between high viscosity ('solid') convection and percolation at large crystal fractions.

  1. Gene regulatory and metabolic adaptation processes of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12T during oxygen depletion.

    PubMed

    Laass, Sebastian; Kleist, Sarah; Bill, Nelli; Drüppel, Katharina; Kossmehl, Sebastian; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Klein, Johannes; Rohde, Manfred; Bartsch, Annekathrin; Wittmann, Christoph; Schmidt-Hohagen, Kerstin; Tielen, Petra; Jahn, Dieter; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2014-05-01

    Metabolic flexibility is the key to the ecological success of the marine Roseobacter clade bacteria. We investigated the metabolic adaptation and the underlying changes in gene expression of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12(T) to anoxic life by a combination of metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome analyses. Time-resolved studies during continuous oxygen depletion were performed in a chemostat using nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. Formation of the denitrification machinery was found enhanced on the transcriptional and proteome level, indicating that D. shibae DFL12(T) established nitrate respiration to compensate for the depletion of the electron acceptor oxygen. In parallel, arginine fermentation was induced. During the transition state, growth and ATP concentration were found to be reduced, as reflected by a decrease of A578 values and viable cell counts. In parallel, the central metabolism, including gluconeogenesis, protein biosynthesis, and purine/pyrimidine synthesis was found transiently reduced in agreement with the decreased demand for cellular building blocks. Surprisingly, an accumulation of poly-3-hydroxybutanoate was observed during prolonged incubation under anoxic conditions. One possible explanation is the storage of accumulated metabolites and the regeneration of NADP(+) from NADPH during poly-3-hydroxybutanoate synthesis (NADPH sink). Although D. shibae DFL12(T) was cultivated in the dark, biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll was increased, possibly to prepare for additional energy generation via aerobic anoxygenic photophosphorylation. Overall, oxygen depletion led to a metabolic crisis with partly blocked pathways and the accumulation of metabolites. In response, major energy-consuming processes were reduced until the alternative respiratory denitrification machinery was operative. PMID:24648520

  2. Sedimentary constraints on the duration of the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event.

    PubMed

    Killingsworth, Bryan A; Hayles, Justin A; Zhou, Chuanming; Bao, Huiming

    2013-10-29

    The ~635 Ma Marinoan glaciation is marked by dramatic Earth system perturbations. Deposition of nonmass-dependently (17)O-depleted sulfate (SO4(2-)) in worldwide postglacial sediments is, thus far, unique to this glaciation. It is proposed that an extremely high-pCO2 atmosphere can result in highly (17)O-depleted atmospheric O2, or the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event. This anomalous (17)O signal was imparted to sulfate of oxidative weathering origin. However, (17)O-depleted sulfate occurs in limited sedimentary intervals, suggesting that Earth surface conditions conducive to the MOSD had a finite duration. An MOSD duration can, therefore, provide much needed constraint on modeling Earth system responses at that time. Unfortunately, the sulfate (17)O record is often sparse or lacks radiometric dates. Here, we report 11 barite layers from a post-Marinoan dolostone sequence at Wushanhu in the South China Block. The (17)O depletion fluctuates in magnitude in lower layers but is persistently absent up section, providing the most confident first and last sedimentary appearance of the anomaly. δ(13)C chemostratigraphy is used to correlate the Wushanhu section to two proximal sections on the same shallow platform that lack barite layers but have published U-Pb dates that occur in dolostone and shale. Assuming a similar pattern and rate for carbonate and shale deposition among the different sections, we estimate the MOSD duration at 0-0.99 My. This number can be further constrained by new radiometric dates from equivalent sequences worldwide, thus underpinning models on the nonsteady-state Earth system response in the immediate aftermath of the Marinoan meltdown. PMID:23386719

  3. Sedimentary constraints on the duration of the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event

    PubMed Central

    Killingsworth, Bryan A.; Hayles, Justin A.; Zhou, Chuanming; Bao, Huiming

    2013-01-01

    The ∼635 Ma Marinoan glaciation is marked by dramatic Earth system perturbations. Deposition of nonmass-dependently 17O-depleted sulfate (SO42−) in worldwide postglacial sediments is, thus far, unique to this glaciation. It is proposed that an extremely high-pCO2 atmosphere can result in highly 17O-depleted atmospheric O2, or the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event. This anomalous 17O signal was imparted to sulfate of oxidative weathering origin. However, 17O-depleted sulfate occurs in limited sedimentary intervals, suggesting that Earth surface conditions conducive to the MOSD had a finite duration. An MOSD duration can, therefore, provide much needed constraint on modeling Earth system responses at that time. Unfortunately, the sulfate 17O record is often sparse or lacks radiometric dates. Here, we report 11 barite layers from a post-Marinoan dolostone sequence at Wushanhu in the South China Block. The 17O depletion fluctuates in magnitude in lower layers but is persistently absent up section, providing the most confident first and last sedimentary appearance of the anomaly. δ13C chemostratigraphy is used to correlate the Wushanhu section to two proximal sections on the same shallow platform that lack barite layers but have published U-Pb dates that occur in dolostone and shale. Assuming a similar pattern and rate for carbonate and shale deposition among the different sections, we estimate the MOSD duration at 0–0.99 My. This number can be further constrained by new radiometric dates from equivalent sequences worldwide, thus underpinning models on the nonsteady-state Earth system response in the immediate aftermath of the Marinoan meltdown. PMID:23386719

  4. Sedimentary constraints on the duration of the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killingsworth, Bryan A.; Hayles, Justin A.; Zhou, Chuanming; Bao, Huiming

    2013-10-01

    The ∼635 Ma Marinoan glaciation is marked by dramatic Earth system perturbations. Deposition of nonmass-dependently 17O-depleted sulfate (SO42-) in worldwide postglacial sediments is, thus far, unique to this glaciation. It is proposed that an extremely high-pCO2 atmosphere can result in highly 17O-depleted atmospheric O2, or the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event. This anomalous 17O signal was imparted to sulfate of oxidative weathering origin. However, 17O-depleted sulfate occurs in limited sedimentary intervals, suggesting that Earth surface conditions conducive to the MOSD had a finite duration. An MOSD duration can, therefore, provide much needed constraint on modeling Earth system responses at that time. Unfortunately, the sulfate 17O record is often sparse or lacks radiometric dates. Here, we report 11 barite layers from a post-Marinoan dolostone sequence at Wushanhu in the South China Block. The 17O depletion fluctuates in magnitude in lower layers but is persistently absent up section, providing the most confident first and last sedimentary appearance of the anomaly. δ13C chemostratigraphy is used to correlate the Wushanhu section to two proximal sections on the same shallow platform that lack barite layers but have published U-Pb dates that occur in dolostone and shale. Assuming a similar pattern and rate for carbonate and shale deposition among the different sections, we estimate the MOSD duration at 0-0.99 My. This number can be further constrained by new radiometric dates from equivalent sequences worldwide, thus underpinning models on the nonsteady-state Earth system response in the immediate aftermath of the Marinoan meltdown.

  5. Sedimentary constraints on the duration of the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event.

    PubMed

    Killingsworth, Bryan A; Hayles, Justin A; Zhou, Chuanming; Bao, Huiming

    2013-10-29

    The ~635 Ma Marinoan glaciation is marked by dramatic Earth system perturbations. Deposition of nonmass-dependently (17)O-depleted sulfate (SO4(2-)) in worldwide postglacial sediments is, thus far, unique to this glaciation. It is proposed that an extremely high-pCO2 atmosphere can result in highly (17)O-depleted atmospheric O2, or the Marinoan Oxygen-17 Depletion (MOSD) event. This anomalous (17)O signal was imparted to sulfate of oxidative weathering origin. However, (17)O-depleted sulfate occurs in limited sedimentary intervals, suggesting that Earth surface conditions conducive to the MOSD had a finite duration. An MOSD duration can, therefore, provide much needed constraint on modeling Earth system responses at that time. Unfortunately, the sulfate (17)O record is often sparse or lacks radiometric dates. Here, we report 11 barite layers from a post-Marinoan dolostone sequence at Wushanhu in the South China Block. The (17)O depletion fluctuates in magnitude in lower layers but is persistently absent up section, providing the most confident first and last sedimentary appearance of the anomaly. δ(13)C chemostratigraphy is used to correlate the Wushanhu section to two proximal sections on the same shallow platform that lack barite layers but have published U-Pb dates that occur in dolostone and shale. Assuming a similar pattern and rate for carbonate and shale deposition among the different sections, we estimate the MOSD duration at 0-0.99 My. This number can be further constrained by new radiometric dates from equivalent sequences worldwide, thus underpinning models on the nonsteady-state Earth system response in the immediate aftermath of the Marinoan meltdown.

  6. Evidence for an oxygen-depleted liquid outer core of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haijun; Fei, Yingwei; Cai, Lingcang; Jing, Fuqian; Hu, Xiaojun; Xie, Hongsen; Zhang, Lianmeng; Gong, Zizheng

    2011-11-24

    On the basis of geophysical observations, cosmochemical constraints, and high-pressure experimental data, the Earth's liquid outer core consists of mainly liquid iron alloyed with about ten per cent (by weight) of light elements. Although the concentrations of the light elements are small, they nevertheless affect the Earth's core: its rate of cooling, the growth of the inner core, the dynamics of core convection, and the evolution of the geodynamo. Several light elements-including sulphur, oxygen, silicon, carbon and hydrogen-have been suggested, but the precise identity of the light elements in the Earth's core is still unclear. Oxygen has been proposed as a major light element in the core on the basis of cosmochemical arguments and chemical reactions during accretion. Its presence in the core has direct implications for Earth accretion conditions of oxidation state, pressure and temperature. Here we report new shockwave data in the Fe-S-O system that are directly applicable to the outer core. The data include both density and sound velocity measurements, which we compare with the observed density and velocity profiles of the liquid outer core. The results show that we can rule out oxygen as a major light element in the liquid outer core because adding oxygen into liquid iron would not reproduce simultaneously the observed density and sound velocity profiles of the outer core. An oxygen-depleted core would imply a more reduced environment during early Earth accretion.

  7. Loss of p53 causes mitochondrial DNA depletion and altered mitochondrial reactive oxygen species homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lebedeva, Maria A.; Eaton, Jana S.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to its central role in cellular stress signaling, the tumor suppressor p53 modulates mitochondrial respiration through its nuclear transcription factor activity and localizes to mitochondria where it enhances apoptosis and suppresses mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutagenesis. Here we demonstrate a new conserved role for p53 in mtDNA copy number maintenance and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis. In mammals, mtDNA is present in thousands of copies per cell and is essential for normal development and cell function. We show that p53 null mouse and p53 knock-down human primary fibroblasts exhibit mtDNA depletion and decreased mitochondrial mass under normal culture growth conditions. This is accompanied by a reduction of the p53R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase mRNA and protein and of mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) at the protein level only. Finally, p53-depleted cells exhibit significant disruption of cellular ROS homeostasis, characterized by reduced mitochondrial and cellular superoxide levels and increased cellular hydrogen peroxide. Altogether, these results elucidate additional mitochondria-related functions for p53 and implicate mtDNA depletion and ROS alterations as potentially relevant to cellular transformation, cancer cell phenotypes, and the Warburg Effect. PMID:19413947

  8. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    PubMed

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Löscher, Carolin; Schunck, Harald; Desai, Dhwani K; Hauss, Helena; Kiko, Rainer; Holtappels, Moritz; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz, Ruth A; Graco, Michelle I; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein. PMID:26192623

  9. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    PubMed

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Löscher, Carolin; Schunck, Harald; Desai, Dhwani K; Hauss, Helena; Kiko, Rainer; Holtappels, Moritz; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz, Ruth A; Graco, Michelle I; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  10. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    PubMed Central

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M.; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Löscher, Carolin; Schunck, Harald; Desai, Dhwani K.; Hauss, Helena; Kiko, Rainer; Holtappels, Moritz; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Graco, Michelle I.; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein. PMID:26192623

  11. Reconstructing ecosystem functions of the active microbial community of the Baltic Sea oxygen depleted sediments

    PubMed Central

    Franzetti, Andrea; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöling, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Baltic Sea deep water and sediments hold one of the largest anthropogenically induced hypoxic areas in the world. High nutrient input and low water exchange result in eutrophication and oxygen depletion below the halocline. As a consequence at Landsort Deep, the deepest point of the Baltic Sea, anoxia in the sediments has been a persistent condition over the past decades. Given that microbial communities are drivers of essential ecosystem functions we investigated the microbial community metabolisms and functions of oxygen depleted Landsort Deep sediments by metatranscriptomics. Results show substantial expression of genes involved in protein metabolism demonstrating that the Landsort Deep sediment microbial community is active. Identified expressed gene suites of metabolic pathways with importance for carbon transformation including fermentation, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and methanogenesis were identified. The presence of transcripts for these metabolic processes suggests a potential for heterotrophic-autotrophic community synergism and indicates active mineralisation of the organic matter deposited at the sediment as a consequence of the eutrophication process. Furthermore, cyanobacteria, probably deposited from the water column, are transcriptionally active in the anoxic sediment at this depth. Results also reveal high abundance of transcripts encoding integron integrases. These results provide insight into the activity of the microbial community of the anoxic sediment at the deepest point of the Baltic Sea and its possible role in ecosystem functioning. PMID:26823996

  12. Reconstructing ecosystem functions of the active microbial community of the Baltic Sea oxygen depleted sediments.

    PubMed

    Thureborn, Petter; Franzetti, Andrea; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöling, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Baltic Sea deep water and sediments hold one of the largest anthropogenically induced hypoxic areas in the world. High nutrient input and low water exchange result in eutrophication and oxygen depletion below the halocline. As a consequence at Landsort Deep, the deepest point of the Baltic Sea, anoxia in the sediments has been a persistent condition over the past decades. Given that microbial communities are drivers of essential ecosystem functions we investigated the microbial community metabolisms and functions of oxygen depleted Landsort Deep sediments by metatranscriptomics. Results show substantial expression of genes involved in protein metabolism demonstrating that the Landsort Deep sediment microbial community is active. Identified expressed gene suites of metabolic pathways with importance for carbon transformation including fermentation, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and methanogenesis were identified. The presence of transcripts for these metabolic processes suggests a potential for heterotrophic-autotrophic community synergism and indicates active mineralisation of the organic matter deposited at the sediment as a consequence of the eutrophication process. Furthermore, cyanobacteria, probably deposited from the water column, are transcriptionally active in the anoxic sediment at this depth. Results also reveal high abundance of transcripts encoding integron integrases. These results provide insight into the activity of the microbial community of the anoxic sediment at the deepest point of the Baltic Sea and its possible role in ecosystem functioning. PMID:26823996

  13. Extreme hypoxemic tolerance and blood oxygen depletion in diving elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Meir, Jessica U; Champagne, Cory D; Costa, Daniel P; Williams, Cassondra L; Ponganis, Paul J

    2009-10-01

    Species that maintain aerobic metabolism when the oxygen (O(2)) supply is limited represent ideal models to examine the mechanisms underlying tolerance to hypoxia. The repetitive, long dives of northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have remained a physiological enigma as O(2) stores appear inadequate to maintain aerobic metabolism. We evaluated hypoxemic tolerance and blood O(2) depletion by 1) measuring arterial and venous O(2) partial pressure (Po(2)) during dives with a Po(2)/temperature recorder on elephant seals, 2) characterizing the O(2)-hemoglobin (O(2)-Hb) dissociation curve of this species, 3) applying the dissociation curve to Po(2) profiles to obtain %Hb saturation (So(2)), and 4) calculating blood O(2) store depletion during diving. Optimization of O(2) stores was achieved by high venous O(2) loading and almost complete depletion of blood O(2) stores during dives, with net O(2) content depletion values up to 91% (arterial) and 100% (venous). In routine dives (>10 min) Pv(O(2)) and Pa(O(2)) values reached 2-10 and 12-23 mmHg, respectively. This corresponds to So(2) of 1-26% and O(2) contents of 0.3 (venous) and 2.7 ml O(2)/dl blood (arterial), demonstrating remarkable hypoxemic tolerance as Pa(O(2)) is nearly equivalent to the arterial hypoxemic threshold of seals. The contribution of the blood O(2) store alone to metabolic rate was nearly equivalent to resting metabolic rate, and mean temperature remained near 37 degrees C. These data suggest that elephant seals routinely tolerate extreme hypoxemia during dives to completely utilize the blood O(2) store and maximize aerobic dive duration.

  14. Millennial-scale projection of oceanic oxygen change due to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akitomo; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Shigemitsu, Masahito; Oka, Akira; Takahashi, Kunio; Ohgaito, Rumi; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Global warming is expected to globally decrease ocean oxygen concentrations by sea surface warming and ocean circulation change. Oxygen reduction is expected to persist for a thousand years or more, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. However, long-term changes in ocean oxygen and circulation are still unclear. Here we simulate multimillennium changes in ocean circulation and oxygen under doubling and quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, using GCM (MIROC) and an offline biogeochemical model. In the first 500 years, global oxygen concentration decreases, consistent with previous studies. Thereafter, however, the oxygen concentration in the deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots at the end of the simulations, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker AMOC. This is because, after the initial cessation, the recovery and overshooting of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea enhance ventilation and supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean. Another contributor to deep ocean oxygenation is seawater warming, which reduces the export production and shifts the organic matter remineralization to the upper water column. Our results indicate that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in deep ocean, which is opposite to the centennial-scale global oxygen reduction and general expectation.

  15. Oceanic nickel depletion and a methanogen famine before the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lalonde, Stefan V; Papineau, Dominic; Nisbet, Euan G; Barley, Mark E; Arndt, Nicholas T; Zahnle, Kevin; Kamber, Balz S

    2009-04-01

    It has been suggested that a decrease in atmospheric methane levels triggered the progressive rise of atmospheric oxygen, the so-called Great Oxidation Event, about 2.4 Gyr ago. Oxidative weathering of terrestrial sulphides, increased oceanic sulphate, and the ecological success of sulphate-reducing microorganisms over methanogens has been proposed as a possible cause for the methane collapse, but this explanation is difficult to reconcile with the rock record. Banded iron formations preserve a history of Precambrian oceanic elemental abundance and can provide insights into our understanding of early microbial life and its influence on the evolution of the Earth system. Here we report a decline in the molar nickel to iron ratio recorded in banded iron formations about 2.7 Gyr ago, which we attribute to a reduced flux of nickel to the oceans, a consequence of cooling upper-mantle temperatures and decreased eruption of nickel-rich ultramafic rocks at the time. We measured nickel partition coefficients between simulated Precambrian sea water and diverse iron hydroxides, and subsequently determined that dissolved nickel concentrations may have reached approximately 400 nM throughout much of the Archaean eon, but dropped below approximately 200 nM by 2.5 Gyr ago and to modern day values ( approximately 9 nM) by approximately 550 Myr ago. Nickel is a key metal cofactor in several enzymes of methanogens and we propose that its decline would have stifled their activity in the ancient oceans and disrupted the supply of biogenic methane. A decline in biogenic methane production therefore could have occurred before increasing environmental oxygenation and not necessarily be related to it. The enzymatic reliance of methanogens on a diminishing supply of volcanic nickel links mantle evolution to the redox state of the atmosphere.

  16. Oceanic nickel depletion and a methanogen famine before the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lalonde, Stefan V; Papineau, Dominic; Nisbet, Euan G; Barley, Mark E; Arndt, Nicholas T; Zahnle, Kevin; Kamber, Balz S

    2009-04-01

    It has been suggested that a decrease in atmospheric methane levels triggered the progressive rise of atmospheric oxygen, the so-called Great Oxidation Event, about 2.4 Gyr ago. Oxidative weathering of terrestrial sulphides, increased oceanic sulphate, and the ecological success of sulphate-reducing microorganisms over methanogens has been proposed as a possible cause for the methane collapse, but this explanation is difficult to reconcile with the rock record. Banded iron formations preserve a history of Precambrian oceanic elemental abundance and can provide insights into our understanding of early microbial life and its influence on the evolution of the Earth system. Here we report a decline in the molar nickel to iron ratio recorded in banded iron formations about 2.7 Gyr ago, which we attribute to a reduced flux of nickel to the oceans, a consequence of cooling upper-mantle temperatures and decreased eruption of nickel-rich ultramafic rocks at the time. We measured nickel partition coefficients between simulated Precambrian sea water and diverse iron hydroxides, and subsequently determined that dissolved nickel concentrations may have reached approximately 400 nM throughout much of the Archaean eon, but dropped below approximately 200 nM by 2.5 Gyr ago and to modern day values ( approximately 9 nM) by approximately 550 Myr ago. Nickel is a key metal cofactor in several enzymes of methanogens and we propose that its decline would have stifled their activity in the ancient oceans and disrupted the supply of biogenic methane. A decline in biogenic methane production therefore could have occurred before increasing environmental oxygenation and not necessarily be related to it. The enzymatic reliance of methanogens on a diminishing supply of volcanic nickel links mantle evolution to the redox state of the atmosphere. PMID:19360085

  17. Nationwide review of oxygen depletion and eutrophication in estuarine and coastal waters: Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Whitledge, T.E.

    1985-09-01

    The Status and Trends Program of the Ocean Assessment Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) contracted with Brookhaven National Laboratory to assess the health of the estuarine and coastal environments in the US as indicated by low oxygen concentrations, eutrophication or mass mortalities of biological organisms. This intensive eutrophication or mass mortalities of biological organisms. This intensive but brief survey was accomplished through subcontracts to five regional investigators and represented the (1) Northeast, (2) Southeast, (3) Florida, (4) Gulf Coast, and (5) West Coast regions of the country. Each principal investigator was responsible for a subset of the 196 estuaries or embayments in his region. Additional information on other contaminants were also included in the reports when such information was deemed important. An exhaustive search of all literature was not possible owing to the time and money constraints; however, significant data were located for most of the estuaries. 1 fig.

  18. Oxygenation of Ediacaran Ocean recorded by iron isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Haifeng; Zhu, Xiangkun; Wen, Hanjie; Yan, Bin; Li, Jin; Feng, Lianjun

    2014-09-01

    The increase in atmospheric oxygen during the late Neoproterozoic Era (ca. 800-542 Ma) may have stimulated the oxygenation of the deep oceans and the evolution of macroscopic multicellular organisms. However, the mechanism and magnitude of Neoproterozoic oxygenation remain uncertain. We present Fe isotopes, Fe species and other geochemical data for two sections of the Doushantuo Formation (ca. 635-551 Ma) deposited after the Nantuo glacial episode in the Yangtze Gorge area, South China. It is highlighted that highly positive δ56Fe values reflect a lower oxidation rate of Fe(II)aq under ferruginous conditions, and in turn near zero δ56Fe values indicate oxidizing conditions. Our study suggests that during the deposition of the bottom of Member II of the Doushantuo Formation the shallow seawater was oxic, but the deep water was characterized by ferruginous conditions, which is consistent with a redox chemical stratification model. Subsequent anoxic conditions under shallow seawater, represented by positive δ56Fe and negative δ13Ccarb excursions, should be ascribed to the upwelling of Fe(II)aq and dissolved organic carbon (DOC)-rich anoxic deep seawater. The oxidation of Fe (II)aq and DOC-rich anoxic deep seawater upon mixing with oxic shallow water provides an innovative explanation for the well-known negative δ13Ccarb excursions (ENC2) and positive δ56Fe excursions in the middle of Doushantuo Formation. Meanwhile, the upwelling Fe (II)aq- and DOC-rich anoxic deep seawater could increase photosynthetic activity. The balance between oxygen consumption and production was most important criteria for the oxygenation of Early Ediacaran Ocean and diversity of eukaryotic organisms.

  19. Moderate oxygen depletion as a factor favouring the filamentous growth of Sphaerotilus natans.

    PubMed

    Seder-Colomina, Marina; Goubet, Anne; Lacroix, Sébastien; Morin, Guillaume; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Esposito, Giovanni; Van Hullebusch, Eric D; Pernelle, Jean-Jacques

    2015-05-01

    Sphaerotilus natans is a neutrophilic iron-related sheath-forming filamentous microorganism that presents dual morphotype: single cells and ensheathed cells forming filaments. As S. natans has been proposed as a sorbent for inorganic pollutants and it is occasionally involved in bulking episodes, elucidating factors affecting its filamentous growth is of crucial interest. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of dissolved oxygen (DO) as a factor affecting S. natans filamentation from single cells. A method to quantify S. natans in its filamentous and single-cell morphotypes, based on a differential filtration procedure coupled with quantitative real-time PCR, was developed here. Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to validate the filtration step. Under actively aerated conditions (DO maintained at 7.6 ± 0.1 mg l(-1)), S. natans grew mainly as single cells throughout the experiment, while a depletion in DO concentration (to ~3 mg l(-1)) induced its filamentous growth. Indeed, when oxygen was reduced the proportion of single cells diminished from 83.3 ± 5.9 to 14.3 ± 3.4% while the filaments increased from 16.7 ± 5.9 to 85.7 ± 3.4%. Our results suggest that oxygen plays a key role in S. natans filamentation and contribute to better understanding of the filamentous proliferation of this bacterium. In addition, the proposed method will be helpful to evaluate other factors favouring filamentous growth. PMID:25666377

  20. NEBULAR WATER DEPLETION AS THE CAUSE OF JUPITER'S LOW OXYGEN ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mousis, Olivier; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2012-05-20

    Motivated by recent spectroscopic observations suggesting that atmospheres of some extrasolar giant planets are carbon-rich, i.e., carbon/oxygen ratio (C/O) {>=} 1, we find that the whole set of compositional data for Jupiter is consistent with the hypothesis that it should be a carbon-rich giant planet. We show that the formation of Jupiter in the cold outer part of an oxygen-depleted disk (C/O {approx} 1) reproduces the measured Jovian elemental abundances at least as well as the hitherto canonical model of Jupiter formed in a disk of solar composition (C/O 0.54). The resulting O abundance in Jupiter's envelope is then moderately enriched by a factor of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign solar (instead of {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign solar) and is found to be consistent with values predicted by thermochemical models of the atmosphere. That Jupiter formed in a disk with C/O {approx} 1 implies that water ice was heterogeneously distributed over several AU beyond the snow line in the primordial nebula and that the fraction of water contained in icy planetesimals was a strong function of their formation location and time. The Jovian oxygen abundance to be measured by NASA's Juno mission en route to Jupiter will provide a direct and strict test of our predictions.

  1. Moderate oxygen depletion as a factor favouring the filamentous growth of Sphaerotilus natans.

    PubMed

    Seder-Colomina, Marina; Goubet, Anne; Lacroix, Sébastien; Morin, Guillaume; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Esposito, Giovanni; Van Hullebusch, Eric D; Pernelle, Jean-Jacques

    2015-05-01

    Sphaerotilus natans is a neutrophilic iron-related sheath-forming filamentous microorganism that presents dual morphotype: single cells and ensheathed cells forming filaments. As S. natans has been proposed as a sorbent for inorganic pollutants and it is occasionally involved in bulking episodes, elucidating factors affecting its filamentous growth is of crucial interest. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of dissolved oxygen (DO) as a factor affecting S. natans filamentation from single cells. A method to quantify S. natans in its filamentous and single-cell morphotypes, based on a differential filtration procedure coupled with quantitative real-time PCR, was developed here. Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to validate the filtration step. Under actively aerated conditions (DO maintained at 7.6 ± 0.1 mg l(-1)), S. natans grew mainly as single cells throughout the experiment, while a depletion in DO concentration (to ~3 mg l(-1)) induced its filamentous growth. Indeed, when oxygen was reduced the proportion of single cells diminished from 83.3 ± 5.9 to 14.3 ± 3.4% while the filaments increased from 16.7 ± 5.9 to 85.7 ± 3.4%. Our results suggest that oxygen plays a key role in S. natans filamentation and contribute to better understanding of the filamentous proliferation of this bacterium. In addition, the proposed method will be helpful to evaluate other factors favouring filamentous growth.

  2. Coastal Upwelling Supplies Oxygen-Depleted Water to the Columbia River Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Roegner, G. Curtis; Needoba, Joseph A.; Baptista, António M.

    2011-01-01

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) is a common feature of many estuarine and shallow-water environments, and is often attributed to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment from terrestrial-fluvial pathways. However, recent events in the U.S. Pacific Northwest have highlighted that wind-forced upwelling can cause naturally occurring low DO water to move onto the continental shelf, leading to mortalities of benthic fish and invertebrates. Coastal estuaries in the Pacific Northwest are strongly linked to ocean forcings, and here we report observations on the spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentration in the Columbia River estuary. Hydrographic measurements were made from transect (spatial survey) or anchor station (temporal survey) deployments over a variety of wind stresses and tidal states during the upwelling seasons of 2006 through 2008. During this period, biologically stressful levels of dissolved oxygen were observed to enter the Columbia River estuary from oceanic sources, with minimum values close to the hypoxic threshold of 2.0 mg L−1. Riverine water was consistently normoxic. Upwelling wind stress controlled the timing and magnitude of low DO events, while tidal-modulated estuarine circulation patterns influenced the spatial extent and duration of exposure to low DO water. Strong upwelling during neap tides produced the largest impact on the estuary. The observed oxygen concentrations likely had deleterious behavioral and physiological consequences for migrating juvenile salmon and benthic crabs. Based on a wind-forced supply mechanism, low DO events are probably common to the Columbia River and other regional estuaries and if conditions on the shelf deteriorate further, as observations and models predict, Pacific Northwest estuarine habitats could experience a decrease in environmental quality. PMID:21533083

  3. Coastal upwelling supplies oxygen-depleted water to the Columbia River estuary.

    PubMed

    Roegner, G Curtis; Needoba, Joseph A; Baptista, António M

    2011-01-01

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) is a common feature of many estuarine and shallow-water environments, and is often attributed to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment from terrestrial-fluvial pathways. However, recent events in the U.S. Pacific Northwest have highlighted that wind-forced upwelling can cause naturally occurring low DO water to move onto the continental shelf, leading to mortalities of benthic fish and invertebrates. Coastal estuaries in the Pacific Northwest are strongly linked to ocean forcings, and here we report observations on the spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentration in the Columbia River estuary. Hydrographic measurements were made from transect (spatial survey) or anchor station (temporal survey) deployments over a variety of wind stresses and tidal states during the upwelling seasons of 2006 through 2008. During this period, biologically stressful levels of dissolved oxygen were observed to enter the Columbia River estuary from oceanic sources, with minimum values close to the hypoxic threshold of 2.0 mg L(-1). Riverine water was consistently normoxic. Upwelling wind stress controlled the timing and magnitude of low DO events, while tidal-modulated estuarine circulation patterns influenced the spatial extent and duration of exposure to low DO water. Strong upwelling during neap tides produced the largest impact on the estuary. The observed oxygen concentrations likely had deleterious behavioral and physiological consequences for migrating juvenile salmon and benthic crabs. Based on a wind-forced supply mechanism, low DO events are probably common to the Columbia River and other regional estuaries and if conditions on the shelf deteriorate further, as observations and models predict, Pacific Northwest estuarine habitats could experience a decrease in environmental quality. PMID:21533083

  4. Global estimates of net carbon production in the nitrate-depleted tropical and subtropical oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kitack; Karl, David M.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Zhang, Jia-Zhong

    2002-10-01

    Nitrate availability is generally considered to be the limiting factor for oceanic new production and this concept is central in our observational and modeling efforts. However, recent time-series observations off Bermuda and Hawaii indicate a significant removal of total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) in the absence of measurable nitrate. Here we estimate net carbon production in nitrate-depleted tropical and subtropical waters with temperatures higher than 20°C from the decrease in the salinity normalized CT inventory within the surface mixed layer. This method yields a global value of 0.8 +/- 0.3 petagrams of carbon per year (Pg C yr-1, Pg = 1015 grams), which equates to a significant fraction (20-40%) of the recent estimates (2.0-4.2 Pg C yr-1) of total new production in the tropical and subtropical oceans [Emerson et al., 1997; Lee, 2001]. The remainder is presumably supported by upward flux of nutrients into the euphotic zone via eddy diffusion and turbulent mixing processes or lateral exchange. Our calculation provides the first global-scale estimate of net carbon production in the absence of measurable nitrate. We hypothesize that it is attributable to dinitrogen (N2) fixing microorganisms, which can utilize the inexhaustible dissolved N2 pool and thereby bypass nitrate limitation.

  5. The rise of oxygen in Earth's early ocean and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Timothy W.; Reinhard, Christopher T.; Planavsky, Noah J.

    2014-02-01

    The rapid increase of carbon dioxide concentration in Earth's modern atmosphere is a matter of major concern. But for the atmosphere of roughly two-and-half billion years ago, interest centres on a different gas: free oxygen (O2) spawned by early biological production. The initial increase of O2 in the atmosphere, its delayed build-up in the ocean, its increase to near-modern levels in the sea and air two billion years later, and its cause-and-effect relationship with life are among the most compelling stories in Earth's history.

  6. The rise of oxygen in Earth's early ocean and atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Timothy W; Reinhard, Christopher T; Planavsky, Noah J

    2014-02-20

    The rapid increase of carbon dioxide concentration in Earth's modern atmosphere is a matter of major concern. But for the atmosphere of roughly two-and-half billion years ago, interest centres on a different gas: free oxygen (O2) spawned by early biological production. The initial increase of O2 in the atmosphere, its delayed build-up in the ocean, its increase to near-modern levels in the sea and air two billion years later, and its cause-and-effect relationship with life are among the most compelling stories in Earth's history.

  7. Directly Measured Clumped Isotope Temperatures From Known And Proposed Paleozoic Glacial Intervals Suggest That Oceans Were Depleted in 18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrizzo, D. A.; Runnegar, B.; Ivany, L.; Young, E. D.

    2011-12-01

    that the shells are slightly altered in some way. Regional vitrinite reflectance values of ~0.67 indicate maximum burial temperatures of 100-150° C, so intra-phase scrambling of 13C-18O bonds over 290 Ma may have affected all parts of the shell equally, thus reducing the clumped component by a proportionally small amount. Although the clumped isotope temperatures obtained from Eurydesma yield a Permian ocean water δ18O of ~0%, they seem too warm for the presumed periglacial setting. Lowering the temperatures to an acceptable level requires ocean water to have been depleted in 18O by up to 3-4% (Ivany and Runnegar, 2010). This is consistent with the oxygen isotope composition of the Silurian ocean obtained from clumped isotope temperatures during the Lau Event (-4 to -5%).

  8. Multiple sulfur isotope evidence for massive oceanic sulfate depletion in the aftermath of Snowball Earth.

    PubMed

    Sansjofre, Pierre; Cartigny, Pierre; Trindade, Ricardo I F; Nogueira, Afonso C R; Agrinier, Pierre; Ader, Magali

    2016-07-22

    The terminal Neoproterozoic Era (850-542 Ma) is characterized by the most pronounced positive sulfur isotope ((34)S/(32)S) excursions in Earth's history, with strong variability and maximum values averaging δ(34)S∼+38‰. These excursions have been mostly interpreted in the framework of steady-state models, in which ocean sulfate concentrations do not fluctuate (that is, sulfate input equals sulfate output). Such models imply a large pyrite burial increase together with a dramatic fluctuation in the isotope composition of marine sulfate inputs, and/or a change in microbial sulfur metabolisms. Here, using multiple sulfur isotopes ((33)S/(32)S, (34)S/(32)S and (36)S/(32)S ratios) of carbonate-associated sulfate, we demonstrate that the steady-state assumption does not hold in the aftermath of the Marinoan Snowball Earth glaciation. The data attest instead to the most impressive event of oceanic sulfate drawdown in Earth's history, driven by an increased pyrite burial, which may have contributed to the Neoproterozoic oxygenation of the oceans and atmosphere.

  9. Multiple sulfur isotope evidence for massive oceanic sulfate depletion in the aftermath of Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansjofre, Pierre; Cartigny, Pierre; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.; Nogueira, Afonso C. R.; Agrinier, Pierre; Ader, Magali

    2016-07-01

    The terminal Neoproterozoic Era (850-542 Ma) is characterized by the most pronounced positive sulfur isotope (34S/32S) excursions in Earth's history, with strong variability and maximum values averaging δ34S~+38‰. These excursions have been mostly interpreted in the framework of steady-state models, in which ocean sulfate concentrations do not fluctuate (that is, sulfate input equals sulfate output). Such models imply a large pyrite burial increase together with a dramatic fluctuation in the isotope composition of marine sulfate inputs, and/or a change in microbial sulfur metabolisms. Here, using multiple sulfur isotopes (33S/32S, 34S/32S and 36S/32S ratios) of carbonate-associated sulfate, we demonstrate that the steady-state assumption does not hold in the aftermath of the Marinoan Snowball Earth glaciation. The data attest instead to the most impressive event of oceanic sulfate drawdown in Earth's history, driven by an increased pyrite burial, which may have contributed to the Neoproterozoic oxygenation of the oceans and atmosphere.

  10. Multiple sulfur isotope evidence for massive oceanic sulfate depletion in the aftermath of Snowball Earth

    PubMed Central

    Sansjofre, Pierre; Cartigny, Pierre; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.; Nogueira, Afonso C. R.; Agrinier, Pierre; Ader, Magali

    2016-01-01

    The terminal Neoproterozoic Era (850–542 Ma) is characterized by the most pronounced positive sulfur isotope (34S/32S) excursions in Earth's history, with strong variability and maximum values averaging δ34S∼+38‰. These excursions have been mostly interpreted in the framework of steady-state models, in which ocean sulfate concentrations do not fluctuate (that is, sulfate input equals sulfate output). Such models imply a large pyrite burial increase together with a dramatic fluctuation in the isotope composition of marine sulfate inputs, and/or a change in microbial sulfur metabolisms. Here, using multiple sulfur isotopes (33S/32S, 34S/32S and 36S/32S ratios) of carbonate-associated sulfate, we demonstrate that the steady-state assumption does not hold in the aftermath of the Marinoan Snowball Earth glaciation. The data attest instead to the most impressive event of oceanic sulfate drawdown in Earth's history, driven by an increased pyrite burial, which may have contributed to the Neoproterozoic oxygenation of the oceans and atmosphere. PMID:27447895

  11. Multiple sulfur isotope evidence for massive oceanic sulfate depletion in the aftermath of Snowball Earth.

    PubMed

    Sansjofre, Pierre; Cartigny, Pierre; Trindade, Ricardo I F; Nogueira, Afonso C R; Agrinier, Pierre; Ader, Magali

    2016-01-01

    The terminal Neoproterozoic Era (850-542 Ma) is characterized by the most pronounced positive sulfur isotope ((34)S/(32)S) excursions in Earth's history, with strong variability and maximum values averaging δ(34)S∼+38‰. These excursions have been mostly interpreted in the framework of steady-state models, in which ocean sulfate concentrations do not fluctuate (that is, sulfate input equals sulfate output). Such models imply a large pyrite burial increase together with a dramatic fluctuation in the isotope composition of marine sulfate inputs, and/or a change in microbial sulfur metabolisms. Here, using multiple sulfur isotopes ((33)S/(32)S, (34)S/(32)S and (36)S/(32)S ratios) of carbonate-associated sulfate, we demonstrate that the steady-state assumption does not hold in the aftermath of the Marinoan Snowball Earth glaciation. The data attest instead to the most impressive event of oceanic sulfate drawdown in Earth's history, driven by an increased pyrite burial, which may have contributed to the Neoproterozoic oxygenation of the oceans and atmosphere. PMID:27447895

  12. Uptake of phytodetritus by benthic foraminifera under oxygen depletion at the Indian Margin (Arabian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enge, A. J.; Witte, U.; Kucera, M.; Heinz, P.

    2013-09-01

    Benthic foraminifera in sediments on the Indian margin of the Arabian Sea where the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) impinges on the continental slope are exposed to particularly severe levels of oxygen depletion. Food supply for the benthic community is high but delivered in distinct pulses during upwelling and water mixing events associated with summer and winter monsoon periods. In order to investigate the response by benthic foraminifera to such pulsed food delivery under oxygen concentrations of less than 0.1 mL L-1 (4.5 μmol L-1), an in situ isotope labeling experiment (13C, 15N) was performed at the western continental slope of India at 540 m water depth (OMZ core region). The assemblage of living foraminifera (>125 μm) in the uppermost centimeter at this depth is characterized by an unexpectedly high population density of 3982 ind. 10 cm-2 and a strong dominance by few calcareous species. For the experiment, we concentrated on the nine most abundant taxa, which constitute 93% of the entire foraminifera population at 0-1 cm sediment depth. Increased concentrations of 13C and 15N in the cytoplasm indicate that all investigated taxa took up the labeled phytodetritus during the 4 day experimental phase. In total, these nine species had assimilated 113.8 mg C m-2 (17.5% of the total added carbon). The uptake of nitrogen by the three most abundant taxa (Bolivina aff. B. dilatata, Cassidulina sp., Bulimina gibba) was 2.7 mg N m-2 (2% of the total added nitrogen) and showed the successful application of 15N as tracer in foraminiferal studies. The short-term response to the offered phytodetritus varied largely among foraminiferal species with Uvigerina schwageri being by far the most important species in short-term processing whereas the most abundant taxa Bolivina aff. B. dilatata and Cassidulina sp. showed comparably low uptake of the offered food. We suggest that the observed species-specific differences are related to individual biomass of species and to specific

  13. Sediment Mobilization From Reservoirs Can Cause Short Term Oxygen Depletion In Downstream Receiving Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C.; Schenk, L.; Bragg, H.; Singer, M.; Hume, N.

    2013-12-01

    Reservoir management can cause incidences of short-term sediment mobilization, e.g. during dam removal or drawdown for maintenance or habitat purposes. Much of the associated planning focuses on predicting, quantifying, and mitigating the physical impacts of sediment mobilization, transport, and deposition. Sediment pulses can cause multiple regulatory and management concerns, such as turbidity or suspended sediment concentrations that may exceed State standards, geomorphic change and effects on property or infrastructure, or wildlife impacts such as stress to fish via gill abrasion or burial of critical habitat. Water-quality issues associated with sediment mobilization, including nutrient and contaminant transport, are often given less attention, presumably because their effects are less immediate or because of resource constraints. Recent experience with large pulses of sediment from several western reservoirs involving dam removals and temporary drawdowns indicates that oxygen demand, leading to depletion of downstream dissolved oxygen (DO), can also be a significant short-term concern. During the October 2011 Condit Dam removal on the White Salmon River in Washington, DO in receiving waters about 4.5 km downstream of the dam dropped to less than 1 mg/L within 2 hours of the demolition; in response, salmonids were observed to be in distress, apparently gulping for air at the water surface. DO remained low for at least 24 hours in this reach, and dead fish were observed. In December 2012, during a drawdown designed to aid juvenile-salmonid migration through Fall Creek Reservoir in Oregon, DO dropped precipitously about 1.5 km downstream as turbidity peaked, and a muted DO decrease was also observed approximately 14 miles further downstream despite a large dilution from unaffected sources. Laboratory experiments and modeling using sediments from reservoirs proposed for removal on the Klamath River, California, demonstrated the likelihood for downstream DO

  14. Uranium Stable Isotopes: A Proxy For Productivity Or Ocean Oxygenation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Uranium elemental abundances in sediments have traditionally been used to reconstruct primary productivity and carbon flux in the ocean. 238U/235U isotope compositions, in contrast, are currently understood to reflect the extent of bottom water anoxia in the ocean. A review of our current understanding of authigenic U enrichment mechanism into reducing sediments suggests that a revision of this interpretation is warranted. Specifically, the current interpretation of U isotope effects in suboxic vs. anoxic deposits has not taken into account the well-documented linear relationship with organic C burial rates. Although organic C rain rates (i.e., surface productivity) and bottom water oxygenation are clearly related, distinction between these two environmental controls is conceptually important as it relates to the mechanism of enhanced C burial and ultimately the strength of the biological pump. Here we will review new and existing data to test the hypothesis that the isotope composition of authigenic U in reducing sediments are best described by their relationship with parameters related to organic carbon delivery and burial, rather than bottom water oxygen concentration.

  15. Marine oxygen holes as a consequence of oceanic acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, M.; Schellnhuber, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    An increase of atmospheric CO2 levels will not only drive future global mean temperatures towards values unprecedented during the whole Quaternary, but will also lead to an acidification of sea water which could harm the marine biota. Here we assess possible impacts of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on the marine biological carbon pump by utilizing a business-as-usual emission scenario of anthropogenic CO2. A corresponding release of 4075 Petagrams of Carbon in total has been applied to simulate the current millennium by employing an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC). This work is focused on studying the implications of reduced biogenic calcification caused by an increasing degree of oceanic acidification on the marine biological carbon pump. The attenuation of biogenic calcification imposes a small negative feedback on rising atmospheric pCO2 levels, tending to stabilize the Earth's climate. Since mineral ballast, notably particulate CaCO3, plays a dominant role in carrying organic matter through the water column, a reduction of its export fluxes weakens the strength of the biological carbon pump. There is, however, a dramatic effect discovered in our model world with severe consequences: since organic matter is oxidized in shallow waters when mineral-ballast fluxes weaken, oxygen holes (hypoxic zones) start to expand considerably in the oceans with potentially harmful impacts on a variety of marine ecosystems. Our study indicates that unbridled ocean acidification would exacerbate the observed hypoxia trends due to various environmental factors as reported in recent empirical studies.

  16. Records of past mid-depth ventilation: Cretaceous ocean anoxic event 2 vs. Recent oxygen minimum zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönfeld, J.; Kuhnt, W.; Erdem, Z.; Flögel, S.; Glock, N.; Aquit, M.; Frank, M.; Holbourn, A.

    2015-02-01

    Present day oceans are well ventilated, with the exception of mid-depth oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) under high surface water productivity, regions of sluggish circulation, and restricted marginal basins. In the Mesozoic, however, entire oceanic basins transiently became dysoxic or anoxic. The Cretaceous ocean anoxic events (OAEs) were characterised by laminated organic-carbon rich shales and low-oxygen indicating trace fossils preserved in the sedimentary record. Yet assessments of the intensity and extent of Cretaceous near-bottom water oxygenation have been hampered by deep or long-term diagenesis and the evolution of marine biota serving as oxygen indicators in today's ocean. Sedimentary features similar to those found in Cretaceous strata were observed in deposits underlying Recent OMZs, where bottom-water oxygen levels, the flux of organic matter, and benthic life have been studied thoroughly. Their implications for constraining past bottom-water oxygenation are addressed in this review. We compared OMZ sediments from the Peruvian upwelling with deposits of the late Cenomanian OAE 2 from the north-west African shelf. Holocene laminated sediments are encountered at bottom-water oxygen levels of < 7 μmol kg-1 under the Peruvian upwelling and < 5 μmol kg-1 in California Borderland basins and the Pakistan Margin. Seasonal to decadal changes of sediment input are necessary to create laminae of different composition. However, bottom currents may shape similar textures that are difficult to discern from primary seasonal laminae. The millimetre-sized trace fossil Chondrites was commonly found in Cretaceous strata and Recent oxygen-depleted environments where its diameter increased with oxygen levels from 5 to 45 μmol kg-1. Chondrites has not been reported in Peruvian sediments but centimetre-sized crab burrows appeared around 10 μmol kg-1, which may indicate a minimum oxygen value for bioturbated Cretaceous strata. Organic carbon accumulation

  17. Co-evolution of eukaryotes and ocean oxygenation in the Neoproterozoic era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenton, Timothy M.; Boyle, Richard A.; Poulton, Simon W.; Shields-Zhou, Graham A.; Butterfield, Nicholas J.

    2014-04-01

    The Neoproterozoic era (about 1,000 to 542 million years ago) was a time of turbulent environmental change. Large fluctuations in the carbon cycle were associated with at least two severe -- possible Snowball Earth -- glaciations. There were also massive changes in the redox state of the oceans, culminating in the oxygenation of much of the deep oceans. Amid this environmental change, increasingly complex life forms evolved. The traditional view is that a rise in atmospheric oxygen concentrations led to the oxygenation of the ocean, thus triggering the evolution of animals. We argue instead that the evolution of increasingly complex eukaryotes, including the first animals, could have oxygenated the ocean without requiring an increase in atmospheric oxygen. We propose that large eukaryotic particles sank quickly through the water column and reduced the consumption of oxygen in the surface waters. Combined with the advent of benthic filter feeding, this shifted oxygen demand away from the surface to greater depths and into sediments, allowing oxygen to reach deeper waters. The decline in bottom-water anoxia would hinder the release of phosphorus from sediments, potentially triggering a potent positive feedback: phosphorus removal from the ocean reduced global productivity and ocean-wide oxygen demand, resulting in oxygenation of the deep ocean. That, in turn, would have further reinforced eukaryote evolution, phosphorus removal and ocean oxygenation.

  18. LINE-1 hypomethylation induced by reactive oxygen species is mediated via depletion of S-adenosylmethionine.

    PubMed

    Kloypan, Chiraphat; Srisa-art, Monpicha; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Boonla, Chanchai

    2015-08-01

    Whether long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) hypomethylation induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) was mediated through the depletion of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) was investigated. Bladder cancer (UM-UC-3 and TCCSUP) and human kidney (HK-2) cell lines were exposed to 20 μM H2O2 for 72 h to induce oxidative stress. Level of LINE-1 methylation, SAM and homocysteine (Hcy) was measured in the H2O2 -exposed cells. Effects of α-tocopheryl acetate (TA), N-acetylcysteine (NAC), methionine, SAM and folic acid on oxidative stress and LINE-1 methylation in the H2O2 -treated cells were explored. Viabilities of cells treated with H2O2 were not significantly changed. Intracellular ROS production and protein carbonyl content were significantly increased, but LINE-1 methylation was significantly decreased in the H2O2 -treated cells. LINE-1 methylation was restored by TA, NAC, methionine, SAM and folic acid. SAM level in H2O2 -treated cells was significantly decreased, while total glutathione was significantly increased. SAM level in H2O2 -treated cells was restored by NAC, methionine, SAM and folic acid; while, total glutathione level was normalized by TA and NAC. Hcy was significantly decreased in the H2O2 -treated cells and subsequently restored by NAC. In conclusion, in bladder cancer and normal kidney cells exposed to H2O2 , SAM and Hcy were decreased, but total glutathione was increased. Treatments with antioxidants (TA and NAC) and one-carbon metabolites (SAM, methionine and folic acid) restored these changes. This pioneer finding suggests that exposure of cells to ROS activates glutathione synthesis via the transsulfuration pathway leading to deficiency of Hcy, which consequently causes SAM depletion and eventual hypomethylation of LINE-1.

  19. Involvement of molecular oxygen in the donor-side photoinhibition of Mn-depleted photosystem II membranes.

    PubMed

    Khorobrykh, A A; Klimov, V V

    2015-12-01

    It has been shown by Khorobrykh et al. (Biochemistry (Moscow) 67:683-688, 2002); Yanykin et al. (Biochim Biophys Acta 1797:516-523, 2010); Khorobrykh et al. (Biochemistry 50:10658-10665, 2011) that Mn-depleted photosystem II (PSII) membrane fragments are characterized by an enhanced oxygen photoconsumption on the donor side of PSII which is accompanied with hydroperoxide formation and it was suggested that the events are related to the oxidative photoinhibition of PSII. Experimental confirmation of this suggestion is presented in this work. The degree of photoinhibition was determined by the loss of the capability of exogenous electron donors (Mn(2+) or sodium ascorbate) to the reactivation of electron transport [measured by the light-induced changes of chlorophyll fluorescence yield (∆F)] in Mn-depleted PSII membranes. The transition from anaerobic conditions to aerobic ones significantly activated photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes both in the absence and in the presence of exogenous electron acceptor, ferricyanide. The photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes was suppressed upon the addition of exogenous electron donors (Mn(2+), diphenylcarbazide, and ferrocyanide). The addition of superoxide dismutase did not affect the photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes. It is concluded that the interaction of molecular oxygen (rather than superoxide anion radical formed on the acceptor side of PSII) with the oxidized components of the donor side of PSII reflects the involvement of O2 in the donor-side photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes.

  20. Depletion of oxygen, nitrate and nitrite in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone cause an imbalance of benthic nitrogen fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, S.; Gier, J.; Treude, T.; Lomnitz, U.; Dengler, M.; Cardich, J.; Dale, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are key regions for fixed nitrogen loss in both the sediments and the water column. During this study, the benthic contribution to N cycling was investigated at ten sites along a depth transect (74-989 m) across the Peruvian OMZ at 12°S. O2 levels were below detection limit down to ~500 m. Benthic fluxes of N2, NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, H2S and O2 were measured using benthic landers. Flux measurements on the shelf were made under extreme geochemical conditions consisting of a lack of O2, NO3- and NO2- in the bottom water and elevated seafloor sulphide release. These particular conditions were associated with a large imbalance in the benthic nitrogen cycle. The sediments on the shelf were densely covered by filamentous sulphur bacteria Thioploca, and were identified as major recycling sites for DIN releasing high amounts of NH4+up to 21.2 mmol m-2 d-1 that were far in excess of NH4+ release by ammonification. This difference was attributed to dissimilatory nitrate (or nitrite) reduction to ammonium (DNRA) that was partly being sustained by NO3- stored within the sulphur oxidizing bacteria. Sediments within the core of the OMZ (ca. 200-400 m) also displayed an excess flux of N of 3.5 mmol m-2 d-1 mainly as N2. Benthic nitrogen and sulphur cycling in the Peruvian OMZ appears to be particularly susceptible to bottom water fluctuations in O2, NO3- and NO2-, and may accelerate the onset of pelagic euxinia when NO3- and NO2- become depleted.

  1. Uranium and molybdenum isotope evidence for an episode of widespread ocean oxygenation during the late Ediacaran Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Brian; Komiya, Tsuyoshi; Lyons, Timothy W.; Bates, Steve M.; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Jiang, Ganqing; Creaser, Robert A.; Xiao, Shuhai; McFadden, Kathleen; Sawaki, Yusuke; Tahata, Miyuki; Shu, Degan; Han, Jian; Li, Yong; Chu, Xuelei; Anbar, Ariel D.

    2015-05-01

    To improve estimates of the extent of ocean oxygenation during the late Ediacaran Period, we measured the U and Mo isotope compositions of euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic) organic-rich mudrocks (ORM) of Member IV, upper Doushantuo Formation, South China. The average δ238U of most samples is 0.24 ± 0.16‰ (2SD; relative to standard CRM145), which is slightly higher than the average δ238U of 0.02 ± 0.12‰ for restricted Black Sea (deep-water Unit I) euxinic sediments and is similar to a modeled δ238U value of 0.2‰ for open ocean euxinic sediments in the modern well-oxygenated oceans. Because 238U is preferentially removed to euxinic sediments compared to 235U, expanded ocean anoxia will deplete seawater of 238U relative to 235U, ultimately leading to deposition of ORM with low δ238U. Hence, the high δ238U of Member IV ORM points to a common occurrence of extensive ocean oxygenation ca. 560 to 551 Myr ago. The Mo isotope composition of sediments deposited from strongly euxinic bottom waters ([H2S]aq >11 μM) either directly records the global seawater Mo isotope composition (if Mo removal from deep waters is quantitative) or represents a minimum value for seawater (if Mo removal is not quantitative). Near the top of Member IV, δ98Mo approaches the modern seawater value of 2.34 ± 0.10‰. High δ98Mo points to widespread ocean oxygenation because the preferential removal of isotopically light Mo to sediments occurs to a greater extent in O2-rich compared to O2-deficient marine environments. However, the δ98Mo value for most Member IV ORM is near 0‰ (relative to standard NIST SRM 3134 = 0.25‰), suggesting extensive anoxia. The low δ98Mo is at odds with the high Mo concentrations of Member IV ORM, which suggest a large seawater Mo inventory in well-oxygenated oceans, and the high δ238U. Hence, we propose that the low δ98Mo of most Member IV ORM was fractionated from contemporaneous seawater. Possible mechanisms driving this isotope fractionation include

  2. Uptake of phytodetritus by benthic foraminifera under oxygen depletion at the Indian margin (Arabian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enge, A. J.; Witte, U.; Kucera, M.; Heinz, P.

    2014-04-01

    Benthic foraminifera in sediments on the Indian margin of the Arabian Sea, where the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) impinges on the continental slope, are exposed to particularly severe levels of oxygen depletion. Food supply for the benthic community is high but delivered in distinct pulses during upwelling and water mixing events associated with summer and winter monsoon periods. In order to investigate the response by benthic foraminifera to such pulsed food delivery under oxygen concentrations of less than 0.1 mL L-1 (4.5 μmol L-1), an in situ isotope labeling experiment (13C, 15N) was performed on the western continental slope of India at 540 m water depth (OMZ core region). The assemblage of living foraminifera (>125 μm) in the uppermost centimeter at this depth is characterized by an unexpectedly high population density of 3982 individuals 10 cm-2 and a strong dominance by few calcareous species. For the experiment, we concentrated on the nine most abundant taxa, which constitute 93% of the entire foraminiferal population at 0-1 cm sediment depth. Increased concentrations of 13C and 15N in the cytoplasm indicate that all investigated taxa took up labeled phytodetritus during the 4 day experimental phase. In total, these nine species had assimilated 113.8 mg C m-2 (17.5% of the total added carbon). Uptake of nitrogen by the three most abundant taxa (Bolivina aff. B. dilatata, Cassidulina sp., Bulimina gibba) was 2.7 mg N m-2 (2% of the total added nitrogen). The response to the offered phytodetritus varied largely among foraminiferal species with Uvigerina schwageri being by far the most important species in short-term processing, whereas the most abundant taxa Bolivina aff. B. dilatata and Cassidulina sp. showed comparably low uptake of the offered food. We suggest the observed species-specific differences are related to species biomass and specific feeding preferences. In summary, the experiment in the OMZ core region shows rapid processing of fresh

  3. Bioessential element-depleted ocean following the euxinic maximum of the end-Permian mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Yamasaki, Shin-ichi; Ogawa, Yasumasa; Kimura, Kazuhiko; Kaiho, Kunio; Yoshida, Takeyoshi; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2014-05-01

    during the end-Permian maximum development of the reducing water column. A decrease in the Mo/U ratio despite enrichment of Mo and U also supports that of Mo. Calculations of the total amounts of these elements precipitated compared with the global seawater inventory suggest that when more than 6-10% of the global ocean became euxinic as much as the study section, most of the dissolved elements would precipitate into sediments, resulting in a global element-depleted seawater condition. Mo, V, and Cr act as bioessential elements for both primary producers and animals. The continuing reducing water column and the lack of bioessential elements could have had a considerable effect on primary producer turnover and marine life metabolism not only in the pelagic environment, but also in surrounding marine environments.

  4. Carbon and Oxygen Depletion and Extinction in the Translucent Cloud Toward HD 34534 (X Persei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Theodore P.; Hansen, Margaret M.; Black, John H.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Crutcher, Richard M.; Lutz, Barry L.

    1998-09-01

    In the Letter ``Carbon and Oxygen Depletion and Extinction in the Translucent Cloud toward HD 24534 (X Persei)'' byT. P. Snow, M. M. Hanson, J. H. Black, E. F. van Dishoeck, R. M. Crutcher, and B. L. Lutz (ApJ, 496, L113 [1998]), there was an error in the data reduction for the 2325 Å line of C II], and the result for the carbon abundance in this line of sight should be corrected to show that the C II] line was detected (at the 3 σ level) with an equivalent width of 0.90+/-0.30 mÅ, yielding a column density of 3+/-1×1017 cm-2. This result is similar to that of U. J. Sofia, E. L. Fitzpatrick, and D. M. Meyer (ApJ, 504, L47 [1998]), who have reanalyzed the same data. We find a line velocity (heliocentric) of +15 km s-1, which is in good agreement with previous measures of interstellar lines toward this star (e.g., D. J. Lien, Ph.D. thesis, Univ. Illinois [1984]). The cause of the original discrepancy is worth noting: we used the so-called FP-SPLIT procedure in the observations of C II] toward HD 24534, in which the exposure time was divided into a pattern of subexposures at four slightly shifted grating positions. The final spectrum must be reassembled by shifting and adding the subexposures. In the standard data reduction package supplied by the Space Telescope Science Institute, the shifting is optimized through cross-correlation of the subexposures by default. It turns out that this default procedure is inappropriate for such a spectrum that has a smooth continuum and lacks strong spectral features: false or insignificant cross-correlations can yield incorrect shifts. Incorrect shifts can smooth real, weak features into the noise while still eliminating the fixed-pattern noise of the detector array. This explains why we did not detect the C II] line in the original analysis. It appears that our previously quoted limit was overly optimistic, since it was based on the noise per sampling element rather than on the noise per resolution element. We note that even

  5. Stagnation and Storage of Strongly Depleted Melts in Slow-Ultraslow Spreading Oceans: Evidence from the Ligurian Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardo, Giovanni; Guarnieri, Luisa; Padovano, Matteo

    2013-04-01

    Our studies of Alpine-Apennine ophiolite massifs (i.e., Lanzo, Voltri, Ligurides, Corsica) show that the Jurassic Ligurian Tethys oceanic basin was a slow-ultraslow spreading basin, characterized by the exposures on the seafloor of mantle peridotites with extreme compositional variability. The large majority of these peridotites are made of depleted spinel harzburgites and plagioclase peridotites. The former are interpreted as reactive peridotites formed by the reactive percolation of under-saturated, strongly trace element depleted asthenospheric melts migrated by porous flow through the mantle lithosphere. The latter are considered as refertilized peridotites formed by peridotite impregnation by percolated silica-saturated, strongly trace element depleted melts. Strongly depleted melts were produced as low-degrees, single melt increments by near fractional melting of the passively upwelling asthenosphere during the rifting stage of the basin. They escaped single melt increment aggregation, migrated isolated through the mantle lithosphere by reactive porous or channeled flow before oceanic opening, and were transformed into silica-saturated derivative liquids that underwent entrapment and stagnation in the shallow mantle lithosphere forming plagioclase-enriched peridotites. Widespread small bodies of strongly depleted gabbro-norites testify for the local coalescence of these derivative liquids. These melts never reached the surface (i.e., the hidden magmatism), since lavas with their composition have never been found in the basin. Subsequently, aggregated MORB melts upwelled within replacive dunite channels (as evidenced by composition of magmatic clinopyroxenes in dunites), intruded at shallow levels as olivine gabbro bodies and extruded as basaltic lavas, to form the crustal rocks of the oceanic lithosphere (i.e., the oceanic magmatism). Km-scale bodies of MORB olivine gabbros were intruded into the plagioclase-enriched peridotites, which were formed in the

  6. Co-evolution of Eukaryotes and Ocean and Atmosphere Oxygenation in the Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic Eras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenton, T. M.; Daines, S. J.; Mills, B.; Boyle, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The nature, timing and cause(s) of the Earth's second oxygenation event are widely debated. It has been argued that there was a single pronounced rise in atmospheric oxygen toward present levels in the Late Neoproterozoic, which in turn triggered the evolution of animals. Here we suggest a more complex co-evolutionary scenario, with fluctuations in ocean and atmosphere oxygenation in the Late Neoproterozoic and Early Paleozoic caused partly by the evolution of animals, followed by a pronounced rise of atmospheric oxygen to present levels later in the Paleozoic caused by the rise of land plants. Current geochemical evidence suggests some parts of the deep oceans became oxygenated during the Ediacaran, but there was subsequent de-oxygenation of the ocean during the Cambrian that may have persisted into the Ordovician. Only later in the Paleozoic is there evidence for widespread oxygenation of the deep ocean, together with charcoal indicating atmospheric oxygen had approached present levels. The limited Neoproterozoic oxygenation of the ocean could be explained by the evolution of filter-feeding sponges removing oxygen demand from the water column and encouraging a shift from cyanobacteria to faster-sinking eukaryotic algae, which transferred oxygen demand to greater depths and into sediments. The resulting oxygenation of shelf bottom waters would have increased phosphorus removal from the ocean thus lowering global productivity and oxygen demand in a positive feedback loop encouraging ocean oxygenation [1]. The subsequent Cambrian de-oxygenation of the ocean could be explained by the evolution of bioturbating animals oxygenating the sediments and thus lowering the C/P burial ratio of organic matter, reducing organic carbon burial and lowering atmospheric oxygen [2]. The later rise of land plants, selectively weathering phosphorus from continental rocks and producing recalcitrant high C/P biomass, increased organic carbon burial and atmospheric oxygen, finally

  7. Effects of phytoplankton vertical migration on the formation of oxygen depleted water in a shallow coastal sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraguchi, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Chiba, S.; Shimizu, Y.; Nagao, M.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, oxygen budget was estimated for the lower layer of water column in a semi-enclosed bay, Ago Bay, Japan. Benthic oxygen consumption rates were measured directly with an in situ measurement device from 13 July to 16 August 2004. Oxygen budget was calculated based on physical, chemical and biological processes using the observed data. Along with the change of the water column structure at the time of a hit of typhoon, dominant phytoplankton species shifted from the diatom Skeletonema costatum to the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa circularisquama. During the diatom-dominating period, oxygen supply rate in the lower layer due to photosynthesis was comparable to or slightly lower than the sediment oxygen consumption rate. In contrast, during the dominance of the dinoflagellate, net oxygen budget was significantly negative in the lower layer while it was positive in the upper layer. This could be attributed to the migration behavior of the dominant dinoflagellate H. circularisquama that swim up to the upper layer and produce oxygen in daytime, and swim down to the lower layer and consume oxygen in nighttime. The results of the present study suggest that phytoplankton migration behavior can enhance the development of oxygen depleted water mass in the lower layer of eutrophic shallow coastal seas.

  8. Early evolution of the continental crust, the oxygenated atmosphere and oceans, and the heterogeneous mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmoto, H.

    2011-12-01

    increased U contents and U/Th ratios; (6) the increased Mo contents and Mo/Th ratios; (7) the presence of Ce anomalies (both positive and negative); and (8) the depletions/enrichments of sulfide-S contents. The anomalous enrichments of radiogenic Pb isotopes, found in many Archean-aged submarine volcanic rocks, also indicate that the Archean oceans were U- and O2-rich, and that a large scale transfer of U and other elements from the oceans to the oceanic crust, and to the mantle was already occurring in the Archean. Thus, through the creation of an oxygenated atmosphere, oxygenic photoautotrophs (e.g., cyanobacteria) have been influencing the geochemistry of the deep Earth and nature of volcanism since at least ~3,5 Ga ago.

  9. Abundance, composition, and distribution of crustacean zooplankton in relation to hypolimnetic oxygen depletion in west-central Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heberger, Roy F.; Reynolds, James B.

    1977-01-01

    Samples of crustacean zooplankton were collected monthly in west-central Lake Erie in April and June to October 1968, and in July and August 1970, before and during periods of hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen (DO) depletion. The water column at offshore stations was thermally stratified from June through September 1968, and the hypolimnion contained no DO in mid-August of 1968 or 1970. Composition, abundance, and vertical distribution of crustacean zooplankton changed coincidentally with oxygen depletion. From July to early August, zooplankton abundance dropped 79% in 1968 and 50% in 1970. The declines were attributed largely to a sharp decrease in abundance of planktonic Cyclops bicuspidatus thomasi. Zooplankton composition shifted from mainly cyclopoid copepods in July to mainly cladocerans and copepod nauplii in middle to late August. We believe that mortality of adults and dormancy of copepodites in response to anoxia was the probable reason for the late summer decline in planktonic C. b. thomasi.

  10. Influence of oxygen depletion layer on the properties of tin oxide gas-sensing films fabricated by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Gomathi; Cameron, David C.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper we report on the influence of film thickness on the electrical and gas-sensing properties of tin oxide thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The nature of the carrier and post-flow gases used in ALD was found to have a dramatic influence on the electrical conductance of the deposited films. Up to a film thickness of 50 nm the sheet conductance of the films increased with the thickness, and above 50 nm the sheet conductance was not significantly influenced by the film thickness. This effect was attributed to oxygen depletion at the film surface. When the depth of oxygen depletion ( d dep) was greater than or equal to the film thickness ( t), the sheet conductance was thickness dependant. On the other hand, when d dep≤ t, the sheet conductance was independent of the film thickness but depended on the depth of the oxygen depletion. This proposed explanation was verified by subjecting the films to different lengths of post-annealing in an oxygen depleted atmosphere. Gas-sensing functionality of the films with various thicknesses was examined. It was observed that the film thickness had a significant influence on the gas-sensing property of the films. When the thickness was greater than 40 nm, the sensitivity of the films to ethanol was found to follow the widely reported trend, i.e., the sensitivity decreases when the film thickness increases. Below the film thickness of 40 nm the sensitivity decreases as film thickness decreases, and we propose a model to explain this observation based on the increase in resistance due to multiple grain boundaries.

  11. Heterogeneous oxygenation states in the Atlantic and Tethys oceans during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westermann, Stéphane; Vance, Derek; Cameron, Vyllinniskii; Archer, Corey; Robinson, Stuart A.

    2014-10-01

    The Cenomanian-Turonian boundary (ca. 93.5 Ma) is marked by an episode of profound environmental change, including a major perturbation of the carbon cycle and an Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE-2). Here, we present molybdenum (Mo) isotope variations within the OAE-2 interval for four sections from the western Tethys (Furlo and La Contessa) and the North-Atlantic (ODP site 1276 and DSDP site 367). The main target of this study is to investigate the extent of reducing conditions (truly global in extent or restricted to poorly-ventilated restricted deep basins), with particular reference to the relationship between the change in the oxygenation state of the ocean and the link to global perturbations of the carbon cycle recorded in carbon isotopes. All four sections show fluctuations in the redox sensitive trace metal (RSTE) distribution, suggesting rapid variations in local redox conditions, ranging from anoxic to euxinic. The RSTE enrichment factors (EFs) also suggest different depositional conditions and paleoceanographic processes in the western Tethys versus the North Atlantic. Whereas the North Atlantic sites show evidence of weak watermass restriction associated with the action of a particulate shuttle within the water column, the EFs of the Tethyan sections are characteristic of unrestricted marine systems. Mo isotopes show surprisingly negative values through the Tethyan sections. At the onset of OAE-2, an increasing trend in δMo98 is observed, with values ranging from -0.6 to 0.6‰. During the second half of OAE-2, the δMo98 curve shows a progressive shift towards more negative values. In the North Atlantic, δMo98 signatures from ODP site 1276 show a similar behaviour as observed in the western Tethys. At DSDP site 367, Mo isotopes are generally heavier during OAE-2, fluctuating around an average value of 1.1‰. This is consistent with fully euxinic conditions and the black shales deposited may have recorded the seawater signature during OAE-2. The Mo isotope

  12. Functioning of the Ocean Biological Pump in the Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen minimum zones occur at mid-depths in the water column in regions with weak ventilation and relatively high export of organic matter from surface waters. They are important ocean for ocean biogeochemistry, and potentially for climate, as sites of water column denitrification and nitrous oxide production. Denitrification is the dominant loss process for fixed nitrogen in the oceans, and can thus affect the ocean inventory of this key nutrient. Denitrification is less energetically efficient than oxic remineralization. Larger zooplankton, which feed on sinking particles, are not present in the lowest oxygen waters. Both of these factors suggest that the remineralization of sinking particles may be slower within the OMZs than in more oxygenated waters. There is limited field evidence and from some modeling studies that remineralization is slower (remineralization length scales are longer) within OMZ waters. In this talk, I will present results from the Community Earth System Model (CESM) ocean component attempting to test this hypothesis. Comparing model results with observed ocean biogeochemical tracer distributions (i.e., phosphate, oxygen), I will examine whether slower remineralization within low oxygen waters provides a better match between simulated and observed tracer distributions. Longer remineralization length scales under low oxygen conditions would provide a negative feedback under global warming scenarios. The biological pump would transfer organic materials to depth more efficiently as ocean oxygen concentrations decline and the OMZs expand.

  13. Variability in subtropical-tropical cells drives oxygen levels in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duteil, Olaf; Böning, Claus W.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies found a negative trend in oxygen concentrations in tropical regions during the last decades. Employing a biogeochemical circulation model, we highlight the importance of wind-driven ocean transport associated with the Subtropical-Tropical Cells (STCs) in setting the oxygen levels in the tropical ocean. The observed and simulated slowdown of the STCs by 30% from the 1960s to the 1990s caused a decrease in oxygen transport to the tropics. Transport of phosphate was similarly reduced, decreasing export production and respiration. The effects of physical transport and biological consumption partly compensate, damping oxygen interannual and decadal variability. Our results suggest that the observed residual oxygen trend in the tropical Pacific is mainly driven by changes in oxygen transport. Accordingly, the observed recent strengthening of the STCs leads us to expect a pause in the oxygen decrease or even an increase of tropical Pacific oxygen values in the near future.

  14. Variability in subtropical-tropical cells drives oxygen levels in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duteil, Olaf; Böning, Claus W.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies found a negative trend in oxygen concentrations in tropical regions during the last decades. Employing a biogeochemical circulation model, we highlight the importance of wind-driven ocean transport associated with the Subtropical-Tropical Cells (STCs) in setting the oxygen levels in the tropical ocean. The observed and simulated slowdown of the STCs by 30% from the 1960s to the 1990s caused a decrease in oxygen transport to the tropics. Transport of phosphate was similarly reduced, decreasing export production and respiration. The effects of physical transport and biological consumption partly compensate, damping oxygen interannual and decadal variability. Our results suggest that the observed residual oxygen trend in the tropical Pacific is mainly driven by changes in oxygen transport. Accordingly, the observed recent strengthening of the STCs leads us to expect a pause in the oxygen decrease or even an increase of tropical Pacific oxygen values in the near future.

  15. Sensitivity of ocean oxygenation to variations in tropical zonal wind stress magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridder, Nina N.; England, Matthew H.

    2014-09-01

    Ocean oxygenation has been observed to have changed over the past few decades and is projected to change further under global climate change due to an interplay of several mechanisms. In this study we isolate the effect of modified tropical surface wind stress conditions on the evolution of ocean oxygenation in a numerical climate model. We find that ocean oxygenation varies inversely with low-latitude surface wind stress. Approximately one third of this response is driven by sea surface temperature anomalies; the remaining two thirds result from changes in ocean circulation and marine biology. Global mean O2 concentration changes reach maximum values of +4 μM and -3.6 μM in the two most extreme perturbation cases of -30% and +30% wind change, respectively. Localized changes lie between +92 μM under 30% reduced winds and -56 μM for 30% increased winds. Overall, we find that the extent of the global low-oxygen volume varies with the same sign as the wind perturbation; namely, weaker winds reduce the low-oxygen volume on the global scale and vice versa for increased trade winds. We identify two regions, one in the Pacific Ocean off Chile and the other in the Indian Ocean off Somalia, that are of particular importance for the evolution of oxygen minimum zones in the global ocean.

  16. Effect of oxygen breathing on micro oxygen bubbles in nitrogen-depleted rat adipose tissue at sea level and 25 kPa altitude exposures.

    PubMed

    Randsoe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2012-08-01

    The standard treatment of altitude decompression sickness (aDCS) caused by nitrogen bubble formation is oxygen breathing and recompression. However, micro air bubbles (containing 79% nitrogen), injected into adipose tissue, grow and stabilize at 25 kPa regardless of continued oxygen breathing and the tissue nitrogen pressure. To quantify the contribution of oxygen to bubble growth at altitude, micro oxygen bubbles (containing 0% nitrogen) were injected into the adipose tissue of rats depleted from nitrogen by means of preoxygenation (fraction of inspired oxygen = 1.0; 100%) and the bubbles studied at 101.3 kPa (sea level) or at 25 kPa altitude exposures during continued oxygen breathing. In keeping with previous observations and bubble kinetic models, we hypothesize that oxygen breathing may contribute to oxygen bubble growth at altitude. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 3 h of oxygen prebreathing at 101.3 kPa (sea level). Micro oxygen bubbles of 500-800 nl were then injected into the exposed abdominal adipose tissue. The oxygen bubbles were studied for up to 3.5 h during continued oxygen breathing at either 101.3 or 25 kPa ambient pressures. At 101.3 kPa, all bubbles shrank consistently until they disappeared from view at a net disappearance rate (0.02 mm(2) × min(-1)) significantly faster than for similar bubbles at 25 kPa altitude (0.01 mm(2) × min(-1)). At 25 kPa, most bubbles initially grew for 2-40 min, after which they shrank and disappeared. Four bubbles did not disappear while at 25 kPa. The results support bubble kinetic models based on Fick's first law of diffusion, Boyles law, and the oxygen window effect, predicting that oxygen contributes more to bubble volume and growth during hypobaric conditions. As the effect of oxygen increases, the lower the ambient pressure. The results indicate that recompression is instrumental in the treatment of aDCS. PMID:22653987

  17. Effect of oxygen breathing on micro oxygen bubbles in nitrogen-depleted rat adipose tissue at sea level and 25 kPa altitude exposures.

    PubMed

    Randsoe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2012-08-01

    The standard treatment of altitude decompression sickness (aDCS) caused by nitrogen bubble formation is oxygen breathing and recompression. However, micro air bubbles (containing 79% nitrogen), injected into adipose tissue, grow and stabilize at 25 kPa regardless of continued oxygen breathing and the tissue nitrogen pressure. To quantify the contribution of oxygen to bubble growth at altitude, micro oxygen bubbles (containing 0% nitrogen) were injected into the adipose tissue of rats depleted from nitrogen by means of preoxygenation (fraction of inspired oxygen = 1.0; 100%) and the bubbles studied at 101.3 kPa (sea level) or at 25 kPa altitude exposures during continued oxygen breathing. In keeping with previous observations and bubble kinetic models, we hypothesize that oxygen breathing may contribute to oxygen bubble growth at altitude. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 3 h of oxygen prebreathing at 101.3 kPa (sea level). Micro oxygen bubbles of 500-800 nl were then injected into the exposed abdominal adipose tissue. The oxygen bubbles were studied for up to 3.5 h during continued oxygen breathing at either 101.3 or 25 kPa ambient pressures. At 101.3 kPa, all bubbles shrank consistently until they disappeared from view at a net disappearance rate (0.02 mm(2) × min(-1)) significantly faster than for similar bubbles at 25 kPa altitude (0.01 mm(2) × min(-1)). At 25 kPa, most bubbles initially grew for 2-40 min, after which they shrank and disappeared. Four bubbles did not disappear while at 25 kPa. The results support bubble kinetic models based on Fick's first law of diffusion, Boyles law, and the oxygen window effect, predicting that oxygen contributes more to bubble volume and growth during hypobaric conditions. As the effect of oxygen increases, the lower the ambient pressure. The results indicate that recompression is instrumental in the treatment of aDCS.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Salinity and Dissolved Oxygen at Perdido Bay and Adjacent Coastal Ocean

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Fluid Dynamic Code (EFDC), a numerical estuarine and coastal ocean circulation hydrodynamic model, was used to simulate the distribution of the salinity, temperature, nutrients and dissolved oxygen (DO) in Perdido Bay and adjacent Gulf of Mexico. External forcing fa...

  19. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: The importance of the ocean-estuary connection

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean –estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO ...

  20. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: Importance of the ocean-estuary connection

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean –estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO ...

  1. Vitamin D Depletion in Pregnancy Decreases Survival Time, Oxygen Saturation, Lung Weight and Body Weight in Preterm Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Lykkedegn, Sine; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Beck-Nielsen, Signe Sparre; Pilecki, Bartosz; Duelund, Lars; Marcussen, Niels; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest a role of vitamin D in fetal lung development although not studied in preterm animals. We tested the hypothesis that vitamin D depletion aggravates respiratory insufficiency in preterm rat offspring. Furthermore, the effects of vitamin D depletion on growth and lung surfactant were investigated. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned low vitamin D (VDL) or control diet before mating and followed with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OH)D) determinations. After cesarean section at gestational day 19 (E19) or day 22 (E22), placental weight, birth weight, crown-rump-length (CRL), oxygenation (SaO2) at 30 min and survival time were recorded. The pup lungs were analyzed for phospholipid levels, surfactant protein A-D mRNA and the expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). S-25(OH)D was significantly lower in the VDL group at cesarean section (12 vs. 30nmol/L, p<0.0001). Compared to the controls, E19 VDL pups had lower birth weight (2.13 vs. 2.29g, p<0.001), lung weight (0.09 vs. 0.10g, p = 0.002), SaO2 (54% vs. 69%, p = 0.002) as well as reduced survival time (0.50 vs. 1.25h, p<0.0001). At E22, the VDL-induced pulmonary differences were leveled out, but VDL pups had lower CRL (4.0 vs. 4.5cm, p<0.0001). The phospholipid levels and the surfactant protein mRNA expression did not differ between the dietary groups. In conclusion, Vitamin D depletion led to lower oxygenation and reduced survival time in the preterm offspring, associated with reduced lung weight and birth weight. Further studies of vitamin D depletion in respiratory insufficiency in preterm neonates are warranted. PMID:27571350

  2. Vitamin D Depletion in Pregnancy Decreases Survival Time, Oxygen Saturation, Lung Weight and Body Weight in Preterm Rat Offspring.

    PubMed

    Lykkedegn, Sine; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Beck-Nielsen, Signe Sparre; Pilecki, Bartosz; Duelund, Lars; Marcussen, Niels; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest a role of vitamin D in fetal lung development although not studied in preterm animals. We tested the hypothesis that vitamin D depletion aggravates respiratory insufficiency in preterm rat offspring. Furthermore, the effects of vitamin D depletion on growth and lung surfactant were investigated. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned low vitamin D (VDL) or control diet before mating and followed with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OH)D) determinations. After cesarean section at gestational day 19 (E19) or day 22 (E22), placental weight, birth weight, crown-rump-length (CRL), oxygenation (SaO2) at 30 min and survival time were recorded. The pup lungs were analyzed for phospholipid levels, surfactant protein A-D mRNA and the expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). S-25(OH)D was significantly lower in the VDL group at cesarean section (12 vs. 30nmol/L, p<0.0001). Compared to the controls, E19 VDL pups had lower birth weight (2.13 vs. 2.29g, p<0.001), lung weight (0.09 vs. 0.10g, p = 0.002), SaO2 (54% vs. 69%, p = 0.002) as well as reduced survival time (0.50 vs. 1.25h, p<0.0001). At E22, the VDL-induced pulmonary differences were leveled out, but VDL pups had lower CRL (4.0 vs. 4.5cm, p<0.0001). The phospholipid levels and the surfactant protein mRNA expression did not differ between the dietary groups. In conclusion, Vitamin D depletion led to lower oxygenation and reduced survival time in the preterm offspring, associated with reduced lung weight and birth weight. Further studies of vitamin D depletion in respiratory insufficiency in preterm neonates are warranted. PMID:27571350

  3. Modeling oxygenation of an ocean-atmosphere system during the Late Ordovician-Devonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, K.

    2013-12-01

    Throughout the Earth's history, the redox state of surface environments, biogeochemical cycles, and biological innovation/extinction have been intimately related. Therefore, understanding the long-term (over millions of years) evolution of the redox state of an ocean-atmosphere system and its controlling factors is one of the fundamental topics of Earth Sciences. In particular, Early Paleozoic is marked by the prominent biological evolution/diversification events (Cambrian explosion and Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event), implying the causal linkage between ocean oxygenation and biological innovation. On the other hand, multiple lines of evidence (such as black shale deposition, low C/S ratio of buried sediments, low molybdenum isotopic value, and iron speciation data) suggest that ocean interior had been kept in low oxygen condition until the Devonian. Dahl et al. (2010) PNAS found an increase in molybdenum isotopic value from ~1.4‰ to ~2.0‰ between ~440 Ma and ~390 Ma, implying the oceanic redox transition to a well-oxygenated condition. It was proposed that this ocean oxygenation event correlates with the diversification of vascular land plants; an enhanced burial of terrigenous organic matter increases the oxygen supply rate to an ocean-atmosphere system. Although this hypothesis for a causal linkage between the diversification of land plants and oxidation event of an ocean-atmosphere system is intriguing, it remains unclear whether the radiation of land plant is necessary to cause such redox transition. Because oxygen is most likely regulated by a combination of several feedbacks in the Earth system, it is essential to evaluate the impact of plant diversification on the oxygenation state of an ocean-atmosphere system by use of a numerical model in which C-N-P-O-S coupled biogeochemical cycles between ocean-atmosphere-sediment systems are take into account. In this study, the paleoredox history of an ocean-atmosphere system during the Paleozoic is

  4. Phylogenetic analyses and nitrate-reducing activity of fungal cultures isolated from the permanent, oceanic oxygen minimum zone of the Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Cathrine Sumathi; Menezes, Larissa Danielle; Ramasamy, Kesava Priyan; Meena, Ram M

    2015-03-01

    Reports on the active role of fungi as denitrifiers in terrestrial ecosystems have stimulated an interest in the study of the role of fungi in oxygen-deficient marine systems. In this study, the culturable diversity of fungi was investigated from 4 stations within the permanent, oceanic, oxygen minimum zone of the Arabian Sea. The isolated cultures grouped within the 2 major fungal phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota; diversity estimates in the stations sampled indicated that the diversity of the oxygen-depleted environments is less than that of mangrove regions and deep-sea habitats. Phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA sequences revealed a few divergent isolates that clustered with environmental sequences previously obtained by others. This is significant, as these isolates represent phylotypes that so far were known only from metagenomic studies and are of phylogenetic importance. Nitrate reduction activity, the first step in the denitrification process, was recorded for isolates under simulated anoxic, deep-sea conditions showing ecological significance of fungi in the oxygen-depleted habitats. This report increases our understanding of fungal diversity in unique, poorly studied habitats and underlines the importance of fungi in the oxygen-depleted environments.

  5. Phylogenetic analyses and nitrate-reducing activity of fungal cultures isolated from the permanent, oceanic oxygen minimum zone of the Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Cathrine Sumathi; Menezes, Larissa Danielle; Ramasamy, Kesava Priyan; Meena, Ram M

    2015-03-01

    Reports on the active role of fungi as denitrifiers in terrestrial ecosystems have stimulated an interest in the study of the role of fungi in oxygen-deficient marine systems. In this study, the culturable diversity of fungi was investigated from 4 stations within the permanent, oceanic, oxygen minimum zone of the Arabian Sea. The isolated cultures grouped within the 2 major fungal phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota; diversity estimates in the stations sampled indicated that the diversity of the oxygen-depleted environments is less than that of mangrove regions and deep-sea habitats. Phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA sequences revealed a few divergent isolates that clustered with environmental sequences previously obtained by others. This is significant, as these isolates represent phylotypes that so far were known only from metagenomic studies and are of phylogenetic importance. Nitrate reduction activity, the first step in the denitrification process, was recorded for isolates under simulated anoxic, deep-sea conditions showing ecological significance of fungi in the oxygen-depleted habitats. This report increases our understanding of fungal diversity in unique, poorly studied habitats and underlines the importance of fungi in the oxygen-depleted environments. PMID:25688692

  6. Oxygen depletion speeds and simplifies diffusion in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Edwald, Elin; Stone, Matthew B; Gray, Erin M; Wu, Jing; Veatch, Sarah L

    2014-10-21

    Many cell types undergo a hypoxic response in the presence of low oxygen, which can lead to transcriptional, metabolic, and structural changes within the cell. Many biophysical studies to probe the localization and dynamics of single fluorescently labeled molecules in live cells either require or benefit from low-oxygen conditions. In this study, we examine how low-oxygen conditions alter the mobility of a series of plasma membrane proteins with a range of anchoring motifs in HeLa cells at 37°C. Under high-oxygen conditions, diffusion of all proteins is heterogeneous and confined. When oxygen is reduced with an enzymatic oxygen-scavenging system for ≥ 15 min, diffusion rates increase by > 2-fold, motion becomes unconfined on the timescales and distance scales investigated, and distributions of diffusion coefficients are remarkably consistent with those expected from Brownian motion. More subtle changes in protein mobility are observed in several other laboratory cell lines examined under both high- and low-oxygen conditions. Morphological changes and actin remodeling are observed in HeLa cells placed in a low-oxygen environment for 30 min, but changes are less apparent in the other cell types investigated. This suggests that changes in actin structure are responsible for increased diffusion in hypoxic HeLa cells, although superresolution localization measurements in chemically fixed cells indicate that membrane proteins do not colocalize with F-actin under either experimental condition. These studies emphasize the importance of controls in single-molecule imaging measurements, and indicate that acute response to low oxygen in HeLa cells leads to dramatic changes in plasma membrane structure. It is possible that these changes are either a cause or consequence of phenotypic changes in solid tumor cells associated with increased drug resistance and malignancy.

  7. Enzymatic assay of total cholesterol in serum or plasma by amperometric measurement of rate of oxygen depletion following saponification.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Christian, G D

    1977-01-17

    A method for serum or plasma cholesterol assay involving amperometric measurement of the rate of oxygen depletion in the cholesterol oxidase-catalyzed oxidation of cholesterol is described. The hydrolysis of the serum cholesterol esters is accomplished by saponification of 50 mul of sample with 0.2 ml of ethanolic KOH (1.0 mol/1) containing 0.5% Triton X-100 for 5 min at 75 degrees C. The rate of oxygen consumption in a 25-mul aliquot of this is measured with a Clark electrode in a Beckman Glucose Analyzer and the assay takes about one minute after incubation; results are read digitally on the instrument. The analyzer cell contains 1 ml of 1 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, with 100 mg sodium cholate/100 ml and 0.1-0.2 U cholesterol oxidase.

  8. Transmigrating neutrophils shape the mucosal microenvironment through localized oxygen depletion to influence resolution of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Eric L; Bruyninckx, Walter J; Kelly, Caleb J; Glover, Louise E; McNamee, Eóin N; Bowers, Brittelle E; Bayless, Amanda J; Scully, Melanie; Saeedi, Bejan J; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Ehrentraut, Stefan F; Curtis, Valerie F; Burgess, Adrianne; Garvey, John F; Sorensen, Amber; Nemenoff, Raphael; Jedlicka, Paul; Taylor, Cormac T; Kominsky, Douglas J; Colgan, Sean P

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute intestinal inflammation involves early accumulation of neutrophils (PMN) followed by either resolution or progression to chronic inflammation. Based on recent evidence mucosal metabolism influences disease outcomes, we hypothesized that transmigrating PMN influence the transcriptional profile of the surrounding mucosa. Microarray studies revealed a cohort of hypoxia-responsive genes regulated by PMN-epithelial crosstalk. Transmigrating PMN rapidly depleted microenvironmental O2 sufficiently to stabilize intestinal epithelial cell hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Utilizing HIF reporter mice in an acute colitis model, we investigated the relative contribution of PMN and the respiratory burst to “inflammatory hypoxia” in vivo. CGD mice, lacking a respiratory burst, developed accentuated colitis compared to control, with exaggerated PMN infiltration and diminished inflammatory hypoxia. Finally, pharmacological HIF stabilization within the mucosa protected CGD mice from severe colitis. In conclusion, transcriptional imprinting by infiltrating neutrophils modulates the host response to inflammation, via localized O2 depletion, resulting in microenvironmental hypoxia and effective inflammatory resolution. PMID:24412613

  9. Hidden biosphere in an oxygen-deficient Atlantic open ocean eddy: future implications of ocean deoxygenation on primary production in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löscher, C. R.; Fischer, M. A.; Neulinger, S. C.; Fiedler, B.; Philippi, M.; Schütte, F.; Singh, A.; Hauss, H.; Karstensen, J.; Körtzinger, A.; Künzel, S.; Schmitz, R. A.

    2015-08-01

    The eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) is characterized by a highly productive coastal upwelling system and a moderate oxygen minimum zone with lowest open ocean oxygen (O2) concentrations of around 40 μmol kg-1. Only recently, the discovery of re-occurring mesoscale eddies with sometimes close to anoxic O2 concentrations (<1 μmol kg-1) and located just below the mixed layer challenged our understanding of O2 distribution and biogeochemical processes in this area. Here, we present the first metagenomic dataset from a deoxygenated anticyclonic modewater eddy in the open waters of the ETNA. In the eddy, we observed a significantly lower bacterial diversity compared to surrounding waters, along with a significant community shift. We detected enhanced primary productivity in the surface layer of the eddy indicated by elevated chlorophyll concentrations and increased carbon uptake rates up to three times as high as in surrounding waters. Carbon uptake below the euphotic zone correlated to the presence of a specific high-light ecotype of Prochlorococcus, which is usually underrepresented in the ETNA. Our combined data indicate that high primary production in the eddy fuels export production and the presence of a specific microbial community responsible for enhanced respiration at shallow depths, below the mixed layer base. Progressively decreasing O2 concentrations in the eddy were found to promote transcription of the key gene for denitrification, nirS, in the O2-depleted core waters. This process is usually absent from the open ETNA waters. In the light of future ocean deoxygenation our results show exemplarily that even distinct events of anoxia have the potential to alter microbial community structures and with that critically impact primary productivity and biogeochemical processes of oceanic water bodies.

  10. Hidden biosphere in an oxygen-deficient Atlantic open-ocean eddy: future implications of ocean deoxygenation on primary production in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löscher, C. R.; Fischer, M. A.; Neulinger, S. C.; Fiedler, B.; Philippi, M.; Schütte, F.; Singh, A.; Hauss, H.; Karstensen, J.; Körtzinger, A.; Künzel, S.; Schmitz, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) is characterized by a highly productive coastal upwelling system and a moderate oxygen minimum zone with lowest open-ocean oxygen (O2) concentrations of approximately 40 μmol kg-1. The recent discovery of re-occurring mesoscale eddies with close to anoxic O2 concentrations (< 1 μmol kg-1) located just below the mixed layer has challenged our understanding of O2 distribution and biogeochemical processes in this area. Here, we present the first microbial community study from a deoxygenated anticyclonic modewater eddy in the open waters of the ETNA. In the eddy, we observed significantly lower bacterial diversity compared to surrounding waters, along with a significant community shift. We detected enhanced primary productivity in the surface layer of the eddy indicated by elevated chlorophyll concentrations and carbon uptake rates of up to three times as high as in surrounding waters. Carbon uptake rates below the euphotic zone correlated to the presence of a specific high-light ecotype of Prochlorococcus, which is usually underrepresented in the ETNA. Our data indicate that high primary production in the eddy fuels export production and supports enhanced respiration in a specific microbial community at shallow depths, below the mixed-layer base. The transcription of the key functional marker gene for dentrification, nirS, further indicated a potential for nitrogen loss processes in O2-depleted core waters of the eddy. Dentrification is usually absent from the open ETNA waters. In light of future projected ocean deoxygenation, our results show that even distinct events of anoxia have the potential to alter microbial community structure with critical impacts on primary productivity and biogeochemical processes of oceanic water bodies.

  11. Hidden biosphere in an oxygen-deficient Atlantic open ocean eddy: future implications of ocean deoxygenation on primary production in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loescher, Carolin; Fischer, Martin; Neulinger, Sven; Fiedler, Björn; Philippi, Miriam; Schütte, Florian; Singh, Arvind; Hauss, Helena; Karstensen, Johannes; Körtzinger, Arne; Schmitz, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    The eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) is characterized by a highly productive coastal upwelling system and a moderate oxygen minimum zone with lowest open ocean oxygen (O2) concentrations of approximately 40 μmol kg-1. The recent discovery of re-occurring mesoscale eddies with close to anoxic O2 concentrations (<1 μmol kg-1) located just below the mixed layer has challenged our understanding of O2 distribution and biogeochemical processes in this area. Here, we present the first microbial community study from a deoxygenated anticyclonic modewater eddy in the open waters of the ETNA. In the eddy, we observed significantly lower bacterial diversity compared to surrounding waters, along with a significant community shift. We detected enhanced primary productivity in the surface layer of the eddy indicated by elevated chlorophyll concentrations and carbon uptake rates of up to three times as high as in surrounding waters. Carbon uptake rates below the euphotic zone correlated to the presence of a specific high-light ecotype of Prochlorococcus, which is usually underrepresented in the ETNA. Our data indicate that high primary production in the eddy fuels export production and supports enhanced respiration in a specific microbial community at shallow depths, below the mixed layer base. The O2-depleted core waters eddy promoted transcription of the key gene for denitrification, nirS. This process is usually absent from the open ETNA waters. In light of future projected ocean deoxygenation, our results show that even distinct events of anoxia have the potential to alter microbial community structure with critical impacts on primary productivity and biogeochemical processes of oceanic water bodies.

  12. Novel eukaryotic lineages inferred from small-subunit rRNA analyses of oxygen-depleted marine environments.

    PubMed

    Stoeck, Thorsten; Epstein, Slava

    2003-05-01

    Microeukaryotes in oxygen-depleted environments are among the most diverse, as well as the least studied, organisms. We conducted a cultivation-independent, small-subunit (SSU) rRNA-based survey of microeukaryotes in suboxic waters and anoxic sediments in the great Sippewisset salt marsh, Cape Cod, Mass. We generated two clone libraries and analyzed approximately 300 clones, which contained a large diversity of microeukaryotic SSU rRNA signatures. Only a few of these signatures were closely related (sequence similarity of >97%) to the sequences reported earlier. The bulk of our sequences represented deep novel branches within green algae, fungi, cercozoa, stramenopiles, alveolates, euglenozoa and unclassified flagellates. In addition, a significant number of detected rRNA sequences exhibited no affiliation to known organisms and sequences and thus represent novel lineages of the highest taxonomical order, most of them branching off the base of the global phylogenetic tree. This suggests that oxygen-depleted environments harbor diverse communities of novel organisms, which may provide an interesting window into the early evolution of eukaryotes.

  13. The bottom oxygen border of bioluminescence distribution in ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavoruev, Valerii

    2006-02-01

    From materials of forwarding researches follows, that the depth of deposition of the bottom border of bioluminescence plankton has not correlation with any of measurable hydrological parameters. As the reaction of bioluminescence is oxygen depended, it was logical to assume, that the situation of the bottom maximum of luminescence plankton is determined by concentration of oxygen. The data of vertical distribution of bioluminescence intensity of plankton and concentration of oxygen received in the Black Sea and near to east coast of America were investigated. Is established, that the deep maximum of bioluminescence of plankton is found out between isooxygen 0.35 and 0.20 ml/l. At concentration of oxygen in water is lower 0.10-0.20 ml/l the bioluminescence of plankton it is not found out.

  14. Role of oxygen consumption in hypoxia protection by translation factor depletion.

    PubMed

    Scott, Barbara; Sun, Chun-Ling; Mao, Xianrong; Yu, Cong; Vohra, Bhupinder P S; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; Crowder, C Michael

    2013-06-15

    The reduction of protein synthesis has been associated with resistance to hypoxic cell death. Which components of the translation machinery control hypoxic sensitivity and the precise mechanism has not been systematically investigated, although a reduction in oxygen consumption has been widely assumed to be the mechanism. Using genetic reagents in Caenorhabditis elegans, we examined the effect on organismal survival after hypoxia of knockdown of 10 factors functioning at the three principal steps in translation. Reduction-of-function of all 10 translation factors significantly increased hypoxic survival to varying degrees, not fully accounted for by the level of translational suppression. Measurement of oxygen consumption showed that strong hypoxia resistance was possible without a significant decrease in oxygen consumption. Hypoxic sensitivity had no correlation with lifespan or reactive oxygen species sensitivity, two phenotypes associated with reduced translation. Resistance to tunicamycin, which produces misfolded protein toxicity, was the only phenotype that significantly correlated with hypoxic sensitivity. Translation factor knockdown was also hypoxia protective for mouse primary neurons. These data show that translation factor knockdown is hypoxia protective in both C. elegans and mouse neurons and that oxygen consumption does not necessarily determine survival; rather, mitigation of misfolded protein toxicity is more strongly associated with hypoxic protection. PMID:23531825

  15. Role of oxygen consumption in hypoxia protection by translation factor depletion

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Barbara; Sun, Chun-Ling; Mao, Xianrong; Yu, Cong; Vohra, Bhupinder P. S.; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; Crowder, C. Michael

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The reduction of protein synthesis has been associated with resistance to hypoxic cell death. Which components of the translation machinery control hypoxic sensitivity and the precise mechanism has not been systematically investigated, although a reduction in oxygen consumption has been widely assumed to be the mechanism. Using genetic reagents in Caenorhabditis elegans, we examined the effect on organismal survival after hypoxia of knockdown of 10 factors functioning at the three principal steps in translation. Reduction-of-function of all 10 translation factors significantly increased hypoxic survival to varying degrees, not fully accounted for by the level of translational suppression. Measurement of oxygen consumption showed that strong hypoxia resistance was possible without a significant decrease in oxygen consumption. Hypoxic sensitivity had no correlation with lifespan or reactive oxygen species sensitivity, two phenotypes associated with reduced translation. Resistance to tunicamycin, which produces misfolded protein toxicity, was the only phenotype that significantly correlated with hypoxic sensitivity. Translation factor knockdown was also hypoxia protective for mouse primary neurons. These data show that translation factor knockdown is hypoxia protective in both C. elegans and mouse neurons and that oxygen consumption does not necessarily determine survival; rather, mitigation of misfolded protein toxicity is more strongly associated with hypoxic protection. PMID:23531825

  16. Covariation of deep Southern Ocean oxygenation and atmospheric CO2 through the last ice age.

    PubMed

    Jaccard, Samuel L; Galbraith, Eric D; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Anderson, Robert F

    2016-02-11

    No single mechanism can account for the full amplitude of past atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration variability over glacial-interglacial cycles. A build-up of carbon in the deep ocean has been shown to have occurred during the Last Glacial Maximum. However, the mechanisms responsible for the release of the deeply sequestered carbon to the atmosphere at deglaciation, and the relative importance of deep ocean sequestration in regulating millennial-timescale variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration before the Last Glacial Maximum, have remained unclear. Here we present sedimentary redox-sensitive trace-metal records from the Antarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean that provide a reconstruction of transient changes in deep ocean oxygenation and, by inference, respired carbon storage throughout the last glacial cycle. Our data suggest that respired carbon was removed from the abyssal Southern Ocean during the Northern Hemisphere cold phases of the deglaciation, when atmospheric CO2 concentration increased rapidly, reflecting--at least in part--a combination of dwindling iron fertilization by dust and enhanced deep ocean ventilation. Furthermore, our records show that the observed covariation between atmospheric CO2 concentration and abyssal Southern Ocean oxygenation was maintained throughout most of the past 80,000 years. This suggests that on millennial timescales deep ocean circulation and iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean played a consistent role in modifying atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  17. Covariation of deep Southern Ocean oxygenation and atmospheric CO2 through the last ice age.

    PubMed

    Jaccard, Samuel L; Galbraith, Eric D; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Anderson, Robert F

    2016-02-11

    No single mechanism can account for the full amplitude of past atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration variability over glacial-interglacial cycles. A build-up of carbon in the deep ocean has been shown to have occurred during the Last Glacial Maximum. However, the mechanisms responsible for the release of the deeply sequestered carbon to the atmosphere at deglaciation, and the relative importance of deep ocean sequestration in regulating millennial-timescale variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration before the Last Glacial Maximum, have remained unclear. Here we present sedimentary redox-sensitive trace-metal records from the Antarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean that provide a reconstruction of transient changes in deep ocean oxygenation and, by inference, respired carbon storage throughout the last glacial cycle. Our data suggest that respired carbon was removed from the abyssal Southern Ocean during the Northern Hemisphere cold phases of the deglaciation, when atmospheric CO2 concentration increased rapidly, reflecting--at least in part--a combination of dwindling iron fertilization by dust and enhanced deep ocean ventilation. Furthermore, our records show that the observed covariation between atmospheric CO2 concentration and abyssal Southern Ocean oxygenation was maintained throughout most of the past 80,000 years. This suggests that on millennial timescales deep ocean circulation and iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean played a consistent role in modifying atmospheric CO2 concentration. PMID:26840491

  18. Cardiovascular and respiratory developmental plasticity under oxygen depleted environment and in genetically hypoxic zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Nadeem; Schwerte, Thorsten

    2010-08-01

    Known vertebrate response to low oxygen concentration include change in carbohydrate metabolism, increase in nitric oxide, stimulation of red blood cell and hemoglobin production and induction of gene expression for glycolytic enzymes and hormones. Also, extreme hypoxia plays main role in pathological studies of cardiac dysfunction. The morphological and physiological developmental studies of the cardiovascular system under low oxygen are important as it is directly related to oxygen supply and consumption. Furthermore, cardiac function demands high energy during system development and thus it is most likely to be affected by hypoxia. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) can act as a model organism for oxygen demand management study as in natural environment, due to ecological disturbances, it is exposed to changes in oxygen concentrations routinely and thus would have natural ability to cope with it for survival. We have studied, in zebrafish, i) cardiovascular flexibility under extreme hypoxia (PO(2)=20 Torr, 3 kPa) at 3-10 dpf (days post-fertilization), ii) cardiac re-animation in normoxia (PO(2)=152 Torr, 20 kPa) after 90 min of anoxia (PO(2)=0 Torr, 0 kPa)-induced suspended animation at 4 dpf and iii) oxygen consumption in 8 dpf von Hippel-Lindau (vhl(-)(/)(-)) mutant that exhibits an artificial hypoxic response under normoxic conditions. In hypoxic fish, cardiac output, stroke volume and end-diastolic volume were elevated while intersegmental blood vessels vascularization index at 6 dpf and at 10 dpf was 22% and 11% higher respectively as compared to the normoxic fish. The heart rate in hypoxic fish was lower until 6 dpf and then showed an elevated trend. There was no significant difference in body length between the hypoxic and normoxic individuals. The observed changes may have enhanced the performance of the cardiovascular system for oxygen uptake. We also report for the first time that the post-anoxia re-animated heart rate returns to normal after 48h. Measurement of

  19. Anthropogenic processing of dust affects the oxygen content of the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, Athanasios; Ito, Taka; Johnson, Matthew; Meskhidze, Nicholas; Valett, Jackie; Deutsch, Curtis

    2015-04-01

    Observations from the last several decades show a significant expansion of the tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). However, the underlying causes remain elusive, as the currently accepted effects of ocean warming and associated solubility decease cannot fully explain the observed oxygen trend. Here we show that anthropogenic pollution can change the pattern of biological productivity and oxygen trends consistent with observations in the tropics and extratropics. These effects are caused by the mobilization of iron in mineral dust by pollutants, where it is transported and deposited to the HNLC regions of the tropical pacific affecting primary productivity and oxygen consumption by bacterial respiration. In this study, it is shown that pollution-mobilized iron deposited to high latitude oceanic environments can profoundly impact subsurface oxygen and the extent of the OMZ through long-range oceanic transport. Together with the intensification of tropical upwelling since the 1990s associated with natural climate variability, our results can explain the expansion of the OMZ in the tropical Pacific in the late twentieth century. Unlike climate variability, however, anthropogenic pollution likely influences the long-term trends in marine biogeochemistry and further alters regional productivity and subsurface oxygen distributions with profound implications for marine habitats and nitrate inventory of the oceans.

  20. Anthropogenic processing of dust affects the oxygen content of the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, A.; Ito, T.; Johnson, M. S.; Meskhidze, N.; Valett, J.; Deutsch, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Observations from the last several decades show a significant expansion of the tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). However, the underlying causes remain elusive, as the currently accepted effects of ocean warming and associated solubility decease cannot fully explain the observed oxygen trend. Here we show that anthropogenic pollution can change the pattern of biological productivity and oxygen trends consistent with observations in the tropics and extratropics. These effects are caused by the mobilization of iron in mineral dust by pollutants, where it is transported and deposited to the HNLC regions of the tropical pacific affecting primary productivity and oxygen consumption by bacterial respiration. In this study, it is shown that pollution-mobilized iron deposited to high latitude oceanic environments can profoundly impact subsurface oxygen and the extent of the OMZ through long-range oceanic transport. Together with the intensification of tropical upwelling since the 1990s associated with natural climate variability, our results can explain the expansion of the OMZ in the tropical Pacific in the late twentieth century. Unlike climate variability, however, anthropogenic pollution likely influences the long-term trends in marine biogeochemistry and further alters regional productivity and subsurface oxygen distributions with profound implications for marine habitats and nitrate inventory of the oceans.

  1. The loss of dissolved oxygen in Nansen bottle samples from the deep Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, L. V.

    1982-10-01

    In the tropical and subtropical Atlantic Ocean loss of dissolved oxygen nearly always takes place within Nansen bottles between the time they close, in deep water, and the time the samples are drawn for analysis. The principal cause of this oxygen loss, in routine stations, is shown to be degassing; deep samples, rich in oxygen, are heated to above their saturation point as they are brought up through the thermocline and surface layers. Niskin bottles, which are better insulated, are immune from the fault. Examples of oxygen loss due to chemical reaction within the Nansen bottle and loss due, possibly, to bacterial respiration, are also described.

  2. The release of 14C-depleted carbon from the deep ocean during the last deglaciation: Evidence from the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Sean P.; Marchitto, Thomas M.; Lehman, Scott J.

    2010-09-01

    During the last deglaciation the concentration of CO 2 in the atmosphere increased and the radiocarbon activity (Δ 14C) of the atmosphere declined in two steps corresponding in timing to Heinrich Stadial 1 and the Younger Dryas. These changes have been attributed to the redistribution of 14C-depleted carbon from the deep ocean into the upper ocean and atmosphere. Recently, reconstructions of Δ 14C in intermediate waters of the eastern tropical Pacific have revealed pulses of very old water during the deglaciation, consistent with the release of 14C-depleted carbon from the deep ocean at this time. Here, we present reconstructions of intermediate water Δ 14C from the northern Arabian Sea near the coast of Oman. These reconstructions record significant aging of intermediate waters in the Arabian Sea during Heinrich Stadial 1 and, to a lesser extent, during the Younger Dryas. The timing and magnitude of 14C depletion in the Arabian Sea during Heinrich Stadial 1 is very similar to that previously observed in the eastern North Pacific near Baja California, indicating that similar mechanisms were involved in controlling Δ 14C at these two sites. The most parsimonious explanation of the Δ 14C records from the Arabian Sea and Baja California remains the release of 14C-depleted carbon from the deep ocean by renewal of upwelling and mixing in the Southern Ocean. These 14C-depleted waters would have been incorporated into thermocline and intermediate water masses formed in the Southern Ocean and spread northward into the Pacific, Indian and Atlantic Ocean basins.

  3. Oxygen depletion in coastal seas and the effective spawning stock biomass of an exploited fish species

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichsen, H.-H.; von Dewitz, B.; Dierking, J.; Haslob, H.; Makarchouk, A.; Petereit, C.; Voss, R.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental conditions may have previously underappreciated effects on the reproductive processes of commercially exploited fish populations, for example eastern Baltic cod, that are living at the physiological limits of their distribution. In the Baltic Sea, salinity affects neutral egg buoyancy, which is positively correlated with egg survival, as only water layers away from the oxygen consumption-dominated sea bottom contain sufficient oxygen. Egg buoyancy is positively correlated to female spawner age/size. From observations in the Baltic Sea, a field-based relationship between egg diameter and buoyancy (floating depth) could be established. Hence, based on the age structure of the spawning stock, we quantify the number of effective spawners, which are able to reproduce under ambient hydrographic conditions. For the time period 1993–2010, our results revealed large variations in the horizontal extent of spawning habitat (1000–20 000 km2) and oxygen-dependent egg survival (10–80%). The novel concept of an effective spawning stock biomass takes into account offspring that survive depending on the spawning stock age/size structure, if reproductive success is related to egg buoyancy and the extent of hypoxic areas. Effective spawning stock biomass reflected the role of environmental conditions for Baltic cod recruitment better than the spawning stock biomass alone, highlighting the importance of including environmental information in ecosystem-based management approaches. PMID:26909164

  4. Oxygen depletion in coastal seas and the effective spawning stock biomass of an exploited fish species.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, H-H; von Dewitz, B; Dierking, J; Haslob, H; Makarchouk, A; Petereit, C; Voss, R

    2016-01-01

    Environmental conditions may have previously underappreciated effects on the reproductive processes of commercially exploited fish populations, for example eastern Baltic cod, that are living at the physiological limits of their distribution. In the Baltic Sea, salinity affects neutral egg buoyancy, which is positively correlated with egg survival, as only water layers away from the oxygen consumption-dominated sea bottom contain sufficient oxygen. Egg buoyancy is positively correlated to female spawner age/size. From observations in the Baltic Sea, a field-based relationship between egg diameter and buoyancy (floating depth) could be established. Hence, based on the age structure of the spawning stock, we quantify the number of effective spawners, which are able to reproduce under ambient hydrographic conditions. For the time period 1993-2010, our results revealed large variations in the horizontal extent of spawning habitat (1000-20 000 km(2)) and oxygen-dependent egg survival (10-80%). The novel concept of an effective spawning stock biomass takes into account offspring that survive depending on the spawning stock age/size structure, if reproductive success is related to egg buoyancy and the extent of hypoxic areas. Effective spawning stock biomass reflected the role of environmental conditions for Baltic cod recruitment better than the spawning stock biomass alone, highlighting the importance of including environmental information in ecosystem-based management approaches.

  5. Oxygen depletion in coastal seas and the effective spawning stock biomass of an exploited fish species.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, H-H; von Dewitz, B; Dierking, J; Haslob, H; Makarchouk, A; Petereit, C; Voss, R

    2016-01-01

    Environmental conditions may have previously underappreciated effects on the reproductive processes of commercially exploited fish populations, for example eastern Baltic cod, that are living at the physiological limits of their distribution. In the Baltic Sea, salinity affects neutral egg buoyancy, which is positively correlated with egg survival, as only water layers away from the oxygen consumption-dominated sea bottom contain sufficient oxygen. Egg buoyancy is positively correlated to female spawner age/size. From observations in the Baltic Sea, a field-based relationship between egg diameter and buoyancy (floating depth) could be established. Hence, based on the age structure of the spawning stock, we quantify the number of effective spawners, which are able to reproduce under ambient hydrographic conditions. For the time period 1993-2010, our results revealed large variations in the horizontal extent of spawning habitat (1000-20 000 km(2)) and oxygen-dependent egg survival (10-80%). The novel concept of an effective spawning stock biomass takes into account offspring that survive depending on the spawning stock age/size structure, if reproductive success is related to egg buoyancy and the extent of hypoxic areas. Effective spawning stock biomass reflected the role of environmental conditions for Baltic cod recruitment better than the spawning stock biomass alone, highlighting the importance of including environmental information in ecosystem-based management approaches. PMID:26909164

  6. Summertime in situ monitoring of oxygen depletion in Amursky Bay (Japan/East Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishchenko, Petr; Tishchenko, Pavel; Lobanov, Vyacheslav; Sergeev, Alexander; Semkin, Pavel; Zvalinsky, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    For more than three months in 2011, in situ monitoring of temperature (T), salinity (S) and dissolved oxygen concentrations (DO) was carried out using a Water Quality Monitor (WQM) station deployed on the seafloor of Amursky Bay (Japan/East Sea). During this period, hypoxia in the bottom waters persisted for 93 days. In the summers of 2012 and 2013, the spatial distribution of DO was measured during ship surveys. Using these time series of DO, the biological oxygen demand (BOD) and ventilation rates in bottom waters were estimated from May 10 to August 7. The seasonal change in the dominant direction of the wind, which occurs twice a year (spring and autumn), was an important natural factor in development and termination of seasonal hypoxia in the bay. Dominant southern winds in the summer induced downwelling circulation on the northwestern part of the Japan/East Sea shelf. Under this circulation, hypoxia developed in the bottom waters of Amursky Bay. In autumn, dominant northern winds induced upwelling, causing the advection of cold, oxygenated seawater into the bay, ending the period of hypoxia. Short-term fluctuations in wind direction in the summertime influenced spatial and vertical distribution of T, S and DO. At the end of the summer, the oscillation of the downwelling/upwelling circulations revealed complicated temporal-space distributions of hydrological parameters in Amursky Bay.

  7. Physical background of the development of oxygen depletion in ice-covered lakes.

    PubMed

    Golosov, S; Maher, O A; Schipunova, E; Terzhevik, A; Zdorovennova, G; Kirillin, G

    2007-03-01

    The effect of the heat interaction between a water column and sediments on the formation, development, and duration of existence of anaerobic zones in ice-covered lakes is estimated based on observational data from five frozen lakes located in northwestern Russia and North America. A simple one-dimensional model that describes the formation and development of the dissolved oxygen deficit in shallow ice-covered lakes is suggested. The model reproduces the main features of dissolved oxygen dynamics during the ice-covered period; that is, the vertical structure, the thickness, and the rate of increase of the anaerobic zone in bottom layers. The model was verified against observational data. The results from the verification show that the model adequately describes the dissolved oxygen dynamics in winter. The consumption rates of DO by bacterial plankton and by bottom sediments, which depend on the heat transfer through the water-sediment interface, are calculated. The results obtained allow the appearance of potentially dangerous anaerobic zones in shallow lakes and in separate lake areas, which result from thermal regime changes, to be predicted.

  8. A Delayed Noeproterozoic Oceanic Oxygenation: Evidence from the Mo Isotope of the Cryogenian Datangpo Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M.; Li, C.; Algeo, T. J.; Zhou, L.; Liu, X. D.; Feng, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    The onset of the Neoproterozoic oxygenation event (NOE) is usually considered to be at 750-800Ma, which was supposed to have triggered the subsequent oxygenation of the earth's atmosphere-ocean system, thus removing the barrier for the emergence and rapid diversification of animals. However, the subsequent oceanic redox responses in the Cryogenian are poorly constrained. Here, we conducted an integrated Fe-S-C-Mo biogeochemical study on black shales of the Cryogenian Datangpo Formation (~660Ma, Nanhua Basin, South China). Iron speciation data indicate that these black shales were deposited under euxinic water conditions. Co-variation between Mo and TOC suggests an increasing isolation of the basin from open ocean during the deposition of the black shales. Correspondingly, the Datangpo black shales show higher δ98Mo values (+0.97‰ to +1.12‰) for the lower part (0-10m) and lower δ98Mo values (+0.44‰ to +0.53‰) for the upper part (10-20m) consistent with a global scale seawater δ98Mo recorded in the lower part but only a basin scale seawater δ98Mo recorded in the upper part. Accordingly, we estimate the seawater Mo isotope closed to +1.1‰ at ~660 Ma, which suggests substantial oceanic anoxia compared to modern oceans (+2.3‰). The seawater δ98Mo reconstructed by the Datangpo black shales is exactly the same to previously reported seawater δ98Mo at ~750 Ma and ~640 Ma, indicating a continuous oceanic anoxia throughout the Cryogenian although widespread oceanic oxygenation was suggested for the subsequent Ediacaran by multiple geochemical records. Thus, in light of previous studies, our findings indicate a delayed oceanic oxygenation relative to the onset of NOE, which may help to explain the first presence of metazoa in Cryogenian but rapid diversification occurred in Ediacaran.

  9. The use of oxygen scavengers to prevent the transient discolouration of ground beef packaged under controlled, oxygen-depleted atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Gill, C O; McGinnis, J C

    1995-01-01

    Rates of O(2) absorption from air were determined for a type of commercial O(2) scavenger that is formulated for rapid O(2) absorption at chiller temperatures. Rates of O(2) absorption from N(2) atmospheres containing 600 ppm O(2) were determined for trays that each contained 350 g of ground beef. Packs with controlled atmospheres of N(2) that contained ground beef and O(2) scavengers were prepared, to determine the conditions under which the scavengers could prevent the transient discolouration of the meat which arises from its reaction with the residual O(2) initially present in pack atmospheres. The rates of O(2) absorption by individual scavengers varied from the average by ±50%. The rate of O(2) absorption declined with decreasing oxygen concentration, from an average value per scavenger of about 12 ml h(-1) when O(2) concentrations were between 20 and 10%. At O(2) concentrations <1% (10,000 ppm) the rate of O(2) absorption was directly proportioned to the O(2) concentration so that the O(2) concentration in an atmosphere in a gas-impermeable pouch declined exponentially with time. The absorption of O(2) by ground beef was similarly dependent on the O(2) concentration. At 2 °C, the transient discolouration of beef in atmospheres initially containing about 50 ppm O(2) was prevented by the presence of 17.5 scavengers per l of atmosphere. At -15 °C, discolouration was prevented by 5 scavengers per l. The findings indicate that the O(2) concentration in pack atmospheres has to be reduced below 10 ppm within 30 min at 2 °C, or 2 h at -1.5 °C if ground beef is not to transiently discolour. It is unlikely that the required rates of O(2) absorption could be obtained economically with currently available, commercial O(2) scavengers.

  10. Induction of Apoptosis by [8]-shogaol via Reactive Oxygen Species Generation, Glutathione Depletion and Caspase Activation in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Po-Chuen; Chen, Yi-Own; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Chen, Fu-An; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Chang, Ing-Shing; Wu, Hou; Sang, Shengmin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    Ginger, the rhizome of Zingiber officinale, is a traditional medicine with carminative effect, anti-nausea, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties. This study examined the growth inhibitory effects of [8]-shogaol, one of pungent phenolic compounds in ginger, on human leukemia HL-60 cells. It demonstrated that [8]-shogaol was able to induce apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Treatment with [8]-shogaol caused a rapid loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytosol, and subsequent induction of procaspase-9 and procaspase-3 processing. Taken together, these results suggest for the first time that ROS production and depletion of the glutathione that committed to [8]-shogaol-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. PMID:20163181

  11. Warm acclimation and oxygen depletion induce species-specific responses in salmonids.

    PubMed

    Anttila, Katja; Lewis, Mario; Prokkola, Jenni M; Kanerva, Mirella; Seppänen, Eila; Kolari, Irma; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2015-05-15

    Anthropogenic activities are greatly altering the habitats of animals, whereby fish are already encountering several stressors simultaneously. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the capacity of fish to respond to two different environmental stressors (high temperature and overnight hypoxia) separately and together. We found that acclimation to increased temperature (from 7.7±0.02°C to 14.9±0.05°C) and overnight hypoxia (daily changes from normoxia to 63-67% oxygen saturation), simulating climate change and eutrophication, had both antagonistic and synergistic effects on the capacity of fish to tolerate these stressors. The thermal tolerance of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and landlocked salmon (Salmo salar m. sebago) increased with warm acclimation by 1.3 and 2.2°C, respectively, but decreased when warm temperature was combined with overnight hypoxia (by 0.2 and 0.4°C, respectively). In contrast, the combination of the stressors more than doubled hypoxia tolerance in salmon and also increased hypoxia tolerance in char by 22%. Salmon had 1.2°C higher thermal tolerance than char, but char tolerated much lower oxygen levels than salmon at a given temperature. The changes in hypoxia tolerance were connected to the responses of the oxygen supply and delivery system. The relative ventricle mass was higher in cold- than in warm-acclimated salmon but the thickness of the compact layer of the ventricle increased with the combination of warm and hypoxia acclimation in both species. Char had also significantly larger hearts and thicker compact layers than salmon. The results illustrate that while fish can have protective responses when encountering a single environmental stressor, the combination of stressors can have unexpected species-specific effects that will influence their survival capacity.

  12. Fertility of the Mantle beneath the Ocean Basins: Harzburgite, Lherzolite, and Eclogite in Depleted to Enriched Sources of Abyssal Tholeiites, Ocean Islands, and LIPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natland, J. H.; Anderson, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    Current models for the origin of MORB and OIB invoke different degrees of partial melting of a homogeneous lherzolitic source, and a heterogeneous deep mantle source, respectively. In the ocean basins, MORBs are only part of a spectrum of geochemically diverse depleted to enriched basalts that erupt at or near ridges, off-axis seamounts and large igneous provinces. Even at ridges, mantle is locally enriched (e.g. E-MORB). The gradation in compositions from MORB to slightly less depleted tholeiites at LIPS, to variably enriched tholeiitic and alkalic basalts, basanites and olivine nephelinites of many ocean islands requires only differences in depth and degree of partial melting of shallow mantle lherzolite upon which trace-element and isotopic heterogeneity are superimposed. Alkalic basalts and differentiates in the oceans occur along nearly every seamount ridge rising >2000 m above the seafloor, a distribution too extensive to be explained by any number of plumes; this makes a plume origin for similar lavas on linear island chains questionable. Tapping along fractures of a shallow asthenospheric layer of variably enriched and fertile mantle that develops beneath the lithosphere through time is more likely. The long-term differentiation of the Earth, magmatism, recycling, continental rifting, and subduction insure that the upper mantle cannot be well mixed and homogeneous, a common but fallacious assumption in much petrogenetic theory. Mantle major-element and isotopic heterogeneity and variable temperature is a consequence of plate tectonics. Every association of ultramafic rocks in the ocean crust, ophiolites, and xenolith suites demonstrates significant bulk heterogeneity that survives partial melting. Thus sources of modern abyssal tholeiites must be variably fertile with respect to a basaltic melt fraction, and range from average harzburgite to fertile lherzolite, on both local and regional scales. In addition, subduction guarantees that most abyssal basalt

  13. Integrated Geochemical-Petrographic Insights on Neoproterozoic Ocean Oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, A.; Planavsky, N.; Wallace, M. W.; Wang, X.; Gueguen, B.

    2015-12-01

    Novel isotope systems have the potential to provide new insights into biogeochemical cycling in Earth's evolving oceans. However, much recent paleo-redox work has been done without extensive consideration of sample preservation or paleoenvironmental setting. Neoproterozoic reef complexes from South Australia provide a perfect setting to test geochemical redox proxies (e.g. uranium isotopes and trace metal chemistry) within a well-defined sedimentological and petrographic context. These reefs developed significant frameworks over ~1km of steep platform relief from the seafloor, and contain a variety of carbonate components including primary dolomite marine cements. Analysis of a variety of components within these reefs reveals significant variation in uranium isotope composition and trace metal chemistry between components, even within a single sample. Marine cements, which precipitated directly from seawater, have much lower contamination element concentrations (e.g. Al, Zr, Th) than depositional micrites, and appear to represent the best archive of ancient ocean conditions. These cements have high levels of Fe, Mn in shallow and deep reef facies (e.g. 2-3wt% Fe), but only Fe-oxide inclusions in peritidal settings. This distribution suggests ferruginous conditions under a surficial chemocline in this Neoproterozoic seawater. Uranium isotopes from pristine marine cements have relatively heavy values compared to modern seawater (median = -0.22 δ238U). These values are essentially unfractionated from riverine inputs, which we interpret as tracking extensive near quantitative low-T reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by abundant soluble iron in seawater. Depositional components and late stage cements have a much lighter and more variable U isotope compositions (-0.71 to -0.08 δ238U). This work highlights the need for fundamental petrographic constraints on the preservation of depositional geochemical signatures in the future use and development of sedimentary redox proxies.

  14. Multiple B-vitamin depletion in large areas of the coastal ocean.

    PubMed

    Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A; Cutter, Lynda S; Durazo, Reginaldo; Smail, Emily A; Gómez-Consarnau, Laura; Webb, Eric A; Prokopenko, Maria G; Berelson, William M; Karl, David M

    2012-08-28

    B vitamins are some of the most commonly required biochemical cofactors in living systems. Therefore, cellular metabolism of marine vitamin-requiring (auxotrophic) phytoplankton and bacteria would likely be significantly compromised if B vitamins (thiamin B(1), riboflavin B(2), pyridoxine B(6), biotin B(7), and cobalamin B(12)) were unavailable. However, the factors controlling the synthesis, ambient concentrations, and uptake of these key organic compounds in the marine environment are still not well understood. Here, we report vertical distributions of five B vitamins (and the amino acid methionine) measured simultaneously along a latitudinal gradient through the contrasting oceanographic regimes of the southern California-Baja California coast in the Northeast Pacific margin. Although vitamin concentrations ranged from below the detection limits of our technique to 30 pM for B(2) and B(12) and to ∼500 pM for B(1), B(6), and B(7), each vitamin showed a different geographical and depth distribution. Vitamin concentrations were independent of each other and of inorganic nutrient levels, enriched primarily in the upper mesopelagic zone (depth of 100-300 m), and associated with water mass origin. Moreover, vitamin levels were below our detection limits (ranging from ≤0.18 pM for B(12) to ≤0.81 pM for B(1)) in extensive areas (100s of kilometers) of the coastal ocean, and thus may exert important constraints on the taxonomic composition of phytoplankton communities, and potentially also on rates of primary production and carbon sequestration. PMID:22826241

  15. Survival of Campylobacter jejuni in co-culture with Acanthamoeba castellanii: role of amoeba-mediated depletion of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Bui, Xuan Thanh; Winding, Anne; Qvortrup, Klaus; Wolff, Anders; Bang, Dang Duong; Creuzenet, Carole

    2012-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of infectious diarrhoea worldwide but relatively little is known about its ecology. In this study, we examined its interactions with Acanthamoeba castellanii, a protozoan suspected to serve as a reservoir for bacterial pathogens. We observed rapid degradation of intracellular C.jejuni in A.castellanii 5 h post gentamicin treatment at 25°C. Conversely, we found that A.castellanii promoted the extracellular growth of C.jejuni in co-cultures at 37°C in aerobic conditions. This growth-promoting effect did not require amoebae - bacteria contact. The growth rates observed with or without contact with amoeba were similar to those observed when C.jejuni was grown in microaerophilic conditions. Preconditioned media prepared with live or dead amoebae cultivated with or without C.jejuni did not promote the growth of C.jejuni in aerobic conditions. Interestingly, the dissolved oxygen levels of co-cultures with or without amoebae - bacteria contact were much lower than those observed with culture media or with C.jejuni alone incubated in aerobic conditions, and were comparable with levels obtained after 24 h of growth of C.jejuni under microaerophilic conditions. Our studies identified the depletion of dissolved oxygen by A.castellanii as the major contributor for the observed amoeba-mediated growth enhancement. PMID:22176643

  16. Modulation of oxygen production in Archaean oceans by episodes of Fe(II) toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Mloszewska, Aleksandra M.; Cirpka, Olaf A.; Schoenberg, Ronny; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Oxygen accumulated in the surface waters of the Earth's oceans and atmosphere several hundred million years before the Great Oxidation Event between 2.4 and 2.3 billion years ago. Before the Great Oxidation Event, periods of enhanced submarine volcanism associated with mantle plume events supplied Fe(II) to sea water. These periods generally coincide with the disappearance of indicators of the presence of molecular oxygen in Archaean sedimentary records. The presence of Fe(II) in the water column can lead to oxidative stress in some organisms as a result of reactions between Fe(II) and oxygen that produce reactive oxygen species. Here we test the hypothesis that the upwelling of Fe(II)-rich, anoxic water into the photic zone during the late Archaean subjected oxygenic phototrophic bacteria to Fe(II) toxicity. In laboratory experiments, we found that supplying Fe(II) to the anoxic growth medium housing a common species of planktonic cyanobacteria decreased both the efficiency of oxygenic photosynthesis and their growth rates. We suggest that this occurs because of increasing intracellular concentrations of reactive oxygen species. We use geochemical modelling to show that Fe(II) toxicity in conditions found in the late Archaean photic zone could have substantially inhibited water column oxygen production, thus decreasing fluxes of oxygen to the atmosphere. We therefore propose that the timing of atmospheric oxygenation was controlled by the timing of submarine, plume-type volcanism, with Fe(II) toxicity as the modulating factor.

  17. Dissolved-oxygen depletion and other effects of storing water in Flaming Gorge Reservoir, Wyoming and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolke, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    The circulation of water in Flaming Gorge Reservoir is caused chiefly by insolation, inflow-outflow relationships, and wind, which is significant due to the geographical location of the reservoir. During 1970-75, there was little annual variation in the thickness, dissolved oxygen, and specific conductance of the hypolimnion near Flaming Gorge Dam. Depletion of dissolved oxygen occurred simultaneously in the bottom waters of both tributary arms in the upstream part of the reservoir and was due to reservoir stratification. Anaerobic conditions in the bottom water during summer stratification eventually results in a metalimnetie oxygen minimum in the reservoir. The depletion of flow in the river below Flaming Gorge Dam due to evaporation and bank storage in the reservoir for the 1983-75 period was 1,320 cubic hectometers, and the increase of dissolved-solids load in the river was 1,947,000 metric tens. The largest annual variations in dissolved-solids concentration in the river was about 800 milligrams per liter before closure of the dam and about 200 milligrams per liter after closure. The discharge weighted-average dissolved-solids concentration for the 5 years prior to closure was 888 milligrams per liter and 512 milligrams per liter after closure. The most significant changes in the individual dissolved-ion loads in the river during 1973-75 were the increase in sulfate (0.48 million metric tons), which was probably derived from the solution of gypsum, and the decrease in bicarbonate (0.39 million metric tons), which can be attributed to chemical precipitation. The maximum range in temperature in the Green River below the reservoir prior to closure of the dam in 1982 was from 0?C in winter to 21?C in summer. After closure until 1970 the temperature ranged from 2 ? to 12?C, but since 1970 the range has been from 4 ? to 9?C. During September 1975, a massive algal bloom was observed in the upstream part of the reservoir. The bloom covered approximately 16 kilometers

  18. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: Importance of the ocean-estuary connection - March 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean–estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO w...

  19. Blood oxygen depletion is independent of dive function in a deep diving vertebrate, the northern elephant seal.

    PubMed

    Meir, Jessica U; Robinson, Patrick W; Vilchis, L Ignacio; Kooyman, Gerald L; Costa, Daniel P; Ponganis, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Although energetics is fundamental to animal ecology, traditional methods of determining metabolic rate are neither direct nor instantaneous. Recently, continuous blood oxygen (O2) measurements were used to assess energy expenditure in diving elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), demonstrating that an exceptional hypoxemic tolerance and exquisite management of blood O2 stores underlie the extraordinary diving capability of this consummate diver. As the detailed relationship of energy expenditure and dive behavior remains unknown, we integrated behavior, ecology, and physiology to characterize the costs of different types of dives of elephant seals. Elephant seal dive profiles were analyzed and O2 utilization was classified according to dive type (overall function of dive: transit, foraging, food processing/rest). This is the first account linking behavior at this level with in vivo blood O2 measurements in an animal freely diving at sea, allowing us to assess patterns of O2 utilization and energy expenditure between various behaviors and activities in an animal in the wild. In routine dives of elephant seals, the blood O2 store was significantly depleted to a similar range irrespective of dive function, suggesting that all dive types have equal costs in terms of blood O2 depletion. Here, we present the first physiological evidence that all dive types have similarly high blood O2 demands, supporting an energy balance strategy achieved by devoting one major task to a given dive, thereby separating dive functions into distinct dive types. This strategy may optimize O2 store utilization and recovery, consequently maximizing time underwater and allowing these animals to take full advantage of their underwater resources. This approach may be important to optimizing energy expenditure throughout a dive bout or at-sea foraging trip and is well suited to the lifestyle of an elephant seal, which spends > 90% of its time at sea submerged making diving its most "natural

  20. Blood oxygen depletion is independent of dive function in a deep diving vertebrate, the northern elephant seal.

    PubMed

    Meir, Jessica U; Robinson, Patrick W; Vilchis, L Ignacio; Kooyman, Gerald L; Costa, Daniel P; Ponganis, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Although energetics is fundamental to animal ecology, traditional methods of determining metabolic rate are neither direct nor instantaneous. Recently, continuous blood oxygen (O2) measurements were used to assess energy expenditure in diving elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), demonstrating that an exceptional hypoxemic tolerance and exquisite management of blood O2 stores underlie the extraordinary diving capability of this consummate diver. As the detailed relationship of energy expenditure and dive behavior remains unknown, we integrated behavior, ecology, and physiology to characterize the costs of different types of dives of elephant seals. Elephant seal dive profiles were analyzed and O2 utilization was classified according to dive type (overall function of dive: transit, foraging, food processing/rest). This is the first account linking behavior at this level with in vivo blood O2 measurements in an animal freely diving at sea, allowing us to assess patterns of O2 utilization and energy expenditure between various behaviors and activities in an animal in the wild. In routine dives of elephant seals, the blood O2 store was significantly depleted to a similar range irrespective of dive function, suggesting that all dive types have equal costs in terms of blood O2 depletion. Here, we present the first physiological evidence that all dive types have similarly high blood O2 demands, supporting an energy balance strategy achieved by devoting one major task to a given dive, thereby separating dive functions into distinct dive types. This strategy may optimize O2 store utilization and recovery, consequently maximizing time underwater and allowing these animals to take full advantage of their underwater resources. This approach may be important to optimizing energy expenditure throughout a dive bout or at-sea foraging trip and is well suited to the lifestyle of an elephant seal, which spends > 90% of its time at sea submerged making diving its most "natural

  1. Antioxidant defences and homeostasis of reactive oxygen species in different human mitochondrial DNA-depleted cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vergani, Lodovica; Floreani, Maura; Russell, Aaron; Ceccon, Mara; Napoli, Eleonora; Cabrelle, Anna; Valente, Lucia; Bragantini, Federica; Leger, Bertrand; Dabbeni-Sala, Federica

    2004-09-01

    Three pairs of parental (rho+) and established mitochondrial DNA depleted (rho0) cells, derived from bone, lung and muscle were used to verify the influence of the nuclear background and the lack of efficient mitochondrial respiratory chain on antioxidant defences and homeostasis of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial DNA depletion significantly lowered glutathione reductase activity, glutathione (GSH) content, and consistently altered the GSH2 : oxidized glutathione ratio in all of the rho0 cell lines, albeit to differing extents, indicating the most oxidized redox state in bone rho0 cells. Activity, as well as gene expression and protein content, of superoxide dismutase showed a decrease in bone and muscle rho0 cell lines but not in lung rho0 cells. GSH peroxidase activity was four times higher in all three rho0 cell lines in comparison to the parental rho+, suggesting that this may be a necessary adaptation for survival without a functional respiratory chain. Taken together, these data suggest that the lack of respiratory chain prompts the cells to reduce their need for antioxidant defences in a tissue-specific manner, exposing them to a major risk of oxidative injury. In fact bone-derived rho0 cells displayed the highest steady-state level of intracellular ROS (measured directly by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin, or indirectly by aconitase activity) compared to all the other rho+ and rho0 cells, both in the presence or absence of glucose. Analysis of mitochondrial and cytosolic/iron regulatory protein-1 aconitase indicated that most ROS of bone rho0 cells originate from sources other than mitochondria. PMID:15355341

  2. Oxygen Isotope in Phosphate an Indicator of Phosphorous Cycling in the Ocean - Controls, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paytan, A.; Roberts, K.; Defforey, D.; McLaughlin, K.; Lomas, M. W.; Church, M. J.; Mackey, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    In order to better constrain the parameters affecting oxygen isotope exchange between water and phosphate via biochemical reactions a set of culture experiments were conducted. Different species of phytoplankton were grown in seawater at various temperatures, light levels, and phosphate concentrations. The oxygen isotopic composition in the phosphate source, algal cells, and the isotopic composition oxygen in the dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) were measured. Results showing the effect of species, temperature, light and P availability on intracellular oxygen isotope exchange between phosphorus compounds and water will be presented. The effect of these parameters on the utility of the oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate as a tracer of phosphate utilization rate in the ocean will be discussed. This information is fundamental to any application of isotopic composition of oxygen of dissolved inorganic or organic phosphate to quantify the dynamics of phosphorus cycling in aquatic systems. The data will be utilized to investigate seasonal changes in phosphate sources and cycling in the open ocean and how these relate to phytoplankton abundance, hydrography, and nutrient concentrations.

  3. Hypolyminetic Oxygen Depletion And Dynamics of P Binding Forms: Insights From Modeling Sediment Early Diagenesis Coupled With Automatic Parameter Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafei, Babak; Schmid, Martin; Müller, Beat; Chwalek, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Sediment diagenesis can significantly impact on lake water quality through depleting hypolimnion oxygen and acting as a sink or source of nutrients and contaminants. In this study, we apply MATsedLAB, a sediment diagenesis module developed in MATLAB [1, 2] to quantify benthic oxygen consumption and biogeochemical cycling of phosphate (P) in lacustrine sediments of Lake Baldegg, located in central Switzerland. MATsedLAB provides an access to the advanced computational and visualization capabilities of the interactive programming environment of MATLAB. It allows for a flexible definition of non steady-state boundary conditions at the sediment-water interface (SWI), the model parameters as well as transport and biogeochemical reactions. The model has been extended to facilitate the model-independent parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis using the software package, PEST. Lake Baldegg represents an interesting case where sediment-water interactions control P loading in an eutrophic lake. It is of 5.2 km2 surface area and has been artificially aerated since 1982. Between 1960 and 1980, low oxygen concentrations and meromictic condition were established as a result of high productivity. Here, we use the cores for the measurements of anions and cations which were collected in April and June 2012 respectively from the deepest location (66 m), by Torres et al. (2013) to calibrate the developed model [3]. Depth profiles of thirty three species were simulated by including thirty mixed kinetic-equilibrium biogeochemical processes as well as imposing the fluxes of organic and inorganic matters along with solute concentrations at the SWI as dynamic boundary conditions. The diffusive transport in the boundary layer (DBL) above the SWI was included as the supply of O2 to the sediment surface can be diffusion-limited, and applying a constant O2 concentration at the sediment surface may overestimate O2 consumption. Benthic oxygen consumption was calculated as a function of

  4. Rise to modern levels of ocean oxygenation coincided with the Cambrian radiation of animals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Ling, Hong-Fei; Vance, Derek; Shields-Zhou, Graham A.; Zhu, Maoyan; Poulton, Simon W.; Och, Lawrence M.; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Li, Da; Cremonese, Lorenzo; Archer, Corey

    2015-01-01

    The early diversification of animals (∼630 Ma), and their development into both motile and macroscopic forms (∼575–565 Ma), has been linked to stepwise increases in the oxygenation of Earth's surface environment. However, establishing such a linkage between oxygen and evolution for the later Cambrian ‘explosion' (540–520 Ma) of new, energy-sapping body plans and behaviours has proved more elusive. Here we present new molybdenum isotope data, which demonstrate that the areal extent of oxygenated bottom waters increased in step with the early Cambrian bioradiation of animals and eukaryotic phytoplankton. Modern-like oxygen levels characterized the ocean at ∼521 Ma for the first time in Earth history. This marks the first establishment of a key environmental factor in modern-like ecosystems, where animals benefit from, and also contribute to, the ‘homeostasis' of marine redox conditions. PMID:25980960

  5. Rise to modern levels of ocean oxygenation coincided with the Cambrian radiation of animals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Ling, Hong-Fei; Vance, Derek; Shields-Zhou, Graham A; Zhu, Maoyan; Poulton, Simon W; Och, Lawrence M; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Li, Da; Cremonese, Lorenzo; Archer, Corey

    2015-05-18

    The early diversification of animals (∼ 630 Ma), and their development into both motile and macroscopic forms (∼ 575-565 Ma), has been linked to stepwise increases in the oxygenation of Earth's surface environment. However, establishing such a linkage between oxygen and evolution for the later Cambrian 'explosion' (540-520 Ma) of new, energy-sapping body plans and behaviours has proved more elusive. Here we present new molybdenum isotope data, which demonstrate that the areal extent of oxygenated bottom waters increased in step with the early Cambrian bioradiation of animals and eukaryotic phytoplankton. Modern-like oxygen levels characterized the ocean at ∼ 521 Ma for the first time in Earth history. This marks the first establishment of a key environmental factor in modern-like ecosystems, where animals benefit from, and also contribute to, the 'homeostasis' of marine redox conditions.

  6. Intracellular Isotope Localization in Ammonia sp. (Foraminifera) of Oxygen-Depleted Environments: Results of Nitrate and Sulfate Labeling Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Nomaki, Hidetaka; Bernhard, Joan M.; Ishida, Akizumi; Tsuchiya, Masashi; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Kitahashi, Tomo; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Toyofuku, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Some benthic foraminiferal species are reportedly capable of nitrate storage and denitrification, however, little is known about nitrate incorporation and subsequent utilization of nitrate within their cell. In this study, we investigated where and how much 15N or 34S were assimilated into foraminiferal cells or possible endobionts after incubation with isotopically labeled nitrate and sulfate in dysoxic or anoxic conditions. After 2 weeks of incubation, foraminiferal specimens were fixed and prepared for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and correlative nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analyses. TEM observations revealed that there were characteristic ultrastructural features typically near the cell periphery in the youngest two or three chambers of the foraminifera exposed to anoxic conditions. These structures, which are electron dense and ~200–500 nm in diameter and co-occurred with possible endobionts, were labeled with 15N originated from 15N-labeled nitrate under anoxia and were labeled with both 15N and 34S under dysoxia. The labeling with 15N was more apparent in specimens from the dysoxic incubation, suggesting higher foraminiferal activity or increased availability of the label during exposure to oxygen depletion than to anoxia. Our results suggest that the electron dense bodies in Ammonia sp. play a significant role in nitrate incorporation and/or subsequent nitrogen assimilation during exposure to dysoxic to anoxic conditions. PMID:26925038

  7. Intracellular Isotope Localization in Ammonia sp. (Foraminifera) of Oxygen-Depleted Environments: Results of Nitrate and Sulfate Labeling Experiments.

    PubMed

    Nomaki, Hidetaka; Bernhard, Joan M; Ishida, Akizumi; Tsuchiya, Masashi; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Kitahashi, Tomo; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Toyofuku, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Some benthic foraminiferal species are reportedly capable of nitrate storage and denitrification, however, little is known about nitrate incorporation and subsequent utilization of nitrate within their cell. In this study, we investigated where and how much (15)N or (34)S were assimilated into foraminiferal cells or possible endobionts after incubation with isotopically labeled nitrate and sulfate in dysoxic or anoxic conditions. After 2 weeks of incubation, foraminiferal specimens were fixed and prepared for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and correlative nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analyses. TEM observations revealed that there were characteristic ultrastructural features typically near the cell periphery in the youngest two or three chambers of the foraminifera exposed to anoxic conditions. These structures, which are electron dense and ~200-500 nm in diameter and co-occurred with possible endobionts, were labeled with (15)N originated from (15)N-labeled nitrate under anoxia and were labeled with both (15)N and (34)S under dysoxia. The labeling with (15)N was more apparent in specimens from the dysoxic incubation, suggesting higher foraminiferal activity or increased availability of the label during exposure to oxygen depletion than to anoxia. Our results suggest that the electron dense bodies in Ammonia sp. play a significant role in nitrate incorporation and/or subsequent nitrogen assimilation during exposure to dysoxic to anoxic conditions. PMID:26925038

  8. The impact of ozone depleting substances on the circulation, temperature, and salinity of the Southern Ocean: An attribution study with CESM1(WACCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, A.; Polvani, L. M.; Smith, K. L.; Abernathey, R. P.

    2015-07-01

    Observations show robust changes in the circulation, temperature, and salinity of the Southern Ocean in recent decades. To what extent these changes are related to the formation of the ozone hole in the late twentieth century is an open question. Using a comprehensive chemistry-climate Earth system model, we contrast model runs with varying and with fixed surface concentrations of ozone depleting substances (ODS) from 1955 to 2005. In our model, ODS cause the majority of the summertime changes in surface wind stress which, in turn, induce a clear poleward shift of the ocean's meridional overturning circulation. In addition, more than 30% of the model changes in the temperature and salinity of the Southern Ocean are caused by ODS. These findings offer unambiguous evidence that increased concentrations of ODS in the late twentieth century are likely to have been been an important driver of changes in the Southern Ocean.

  9. Circulation, eddies, oxygen, and nutrient changes in the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeschel, R.; Stramma, L.; Weller, R. A.; Fischer, T.

    2015-06-01

    A large subsurface oxygen deficiency zone is located in the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean (ETSP). The large-scale circulation in the eastern equatorial Pacific and off the coast of Peru in November/December 2012 shows the influence of the equatorial current system, the eastern boundary currents, and the northern reaches of the subtropical gyre. In November 2012 the equatorial undercurrent (EUC) is centered at 250 m depth, deeper than in earlier observations. In December 2012, the equatorial water is transported southeastward near the shelf in the Peru-Chile undercurrent (PCUC) with a mean transport of 1.4 Sv. In the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), the flow is overlaid with strong eddy activity on the poleward side of the OMZ. Floats with parking depth at 400 m show fast westward flow in the mid-depth equatorial channel and sluggish flow in the OMZ. Floats with oxygen sensors clearly show the passage of eddies with oxygen anomalies. The long-term float observations in the upper ocean lead to a net community production estimate at about 18° S of up to 16.7 mmol C m-3 yr-1 extrapolated to an annual rate and 7.7 mmol C m-3 yr-1 for the time period below the mixed layer. Oxygen differences between repeated ship sections are influenced by the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), by the phase of El Niño, by seasonal changes, and by eddies, and hence have to be interpreted with care. At and south of the Equator the decrease in oxygen in the upper ocean since 1976 is related to an increase in nitrate, phosphate, and in part silicate.

  10. All About Oxygen in the Ocean: Cheap, Quick and Easy Experiments for Pupils Grades 5 to 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria-Dengg, S.

    2015-12-01

    The collaborative research project (SFB 754) at GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Germany addresses among others the decreasing concentrations of oxygen in the oceans. The school outreach component of the SFB 754 a project funded by the German Science Foundation aims to spread the science behind ocean de-oxygenation in secondary schools in Germany. To realise this goal, a series of hands-on experiments have been developed on different topics like gas solubility in water, gas transport in the ocean, oxygen production by phytoplankton, oxygen consumption by bacteria and experiments on nutrient uptake by phytoplankton. The experiments developed are simple, using low cost and reusable materials thus ensuring affordability in schools. For the hands-on session the following experiments will be presented: (1) The effects of temperature, oxygen partial pressure, nature of solute and nature of solvent on the solubility of oxygen in water will be demonstrated using Luer-Lock syringes, (2) Oxygen transport from the ocean surface to the deep will be shown in an experiment using a modification of the "blue-bottle" experiment, and (3) Simulation of ocean circulation employing a 2-dimensional tank. Applications and experiment ideas using immobilised phytoplankton and other procedures suitable for schools for measuring oxygen consumption by bacteria will be introduced in a poster presentation.

  11. The Effect of Changes in the Hadley Circulation on Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Cruz Tello, G.; Ummenhofer, C.; Karnauskas, K. B.

    2014-12-01

    Recent research argued that the Hadley circulation (HC) is composed of three regional cells located at the eastern edges of the ocean basins, rather than a single, globe-encircling cell as the classic textbook view suggests. The HC is expected to expand in concert with global warming, which means that the dry regions beneath the descending branches of the HC are projected to become even drier. Changes in the HC are thus likely to impact freshwater resources on land, as well as the underlying ocean in the subtropics. The eastern edges of ocean basins are characterized by oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are regions of very low oxygen concentrations. They affect marine life, as many animals cannot handle the stress caused by such conditions. OMZs have expanded and shoaled in the last 50 years, and they are expected to continue to do so as global climate changes. The purpose of this research is to find links between the projected changes in OMZs and the HC. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Earth System Model 1.0 (CESM), Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5 (RCP8.5) experiment with a resolution of 0.9 by 1.25 degrees, which formed part of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5), was used for this analysis. Meridional winds and oceanic oxygen concentrations were the primarily analyzed variables. Latitudinal ocean oxygen slices demonstrate the OMZs' location along the eastern edges of ocean basins. Meridional winds overlayed with oxygen concentration are consistent with the idea that surface meridional 'Hadleywise flow' (i.e., towards the equator at the surface and towards the poles aloft) and OMZs are linked through changes in upwelling. Area-averaged time series spanning the historical period through to the end of the 21st century with RCP8.5 confirm that future changes in OMZs and the HC may be connected. Further research could lead to improved understanding of the factors that drive changes in both, which could

  12. The Upside-Down Biosphere: Evidence for the Partially Oxygenated Oceans During the Archean Eon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    This is a commentary on the preceding chapter by Ohmoto et al., in which it is suggested that oxygen concentrations have been high throughout Earth history. This is a contentious suggestion at odds with the prevailing view in the field, which contends that atmospheric oxygen concentrations rose from trace levels to a few percent of modern-day levels around 2.5 b.y. ago. This comment notes that many of the data sets cited by Ohmoto et al. as evidence for a relatively oxidized environment come from deep-ocean settings. This presents a possibility to reconcile some of these data and suggestions with the overwhelming evidence for an atmosphere free of oxygen at that time. Specifically, it is possible that deep-ocean waters were relatively oxidized with respect to certain redox pairs. These deep-ocean waters would have been more oxidized than surface waters, thus representing an "upside-down biosphere," as originally proposed 25 years ago by Jim Walker.

  13. Uranium Isotope Evidence for Temporary Ocean Oxygenation Following the Sturtian Glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, K. V.; Maher, K.; Macdonald, F. A.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    The link between widespread ocean oxygenation in the Neoproterozoic and the rise of animals has long been debated, largely because the timing and nature of oxygenation of the oceans remain poorly constrained. Strata deposited during the Cryogenian non-glacial interlude (660 to 635 Ma), between the Sturtian and Marinoan Snowball Earth glaciations, contain the earliest fossil evidence of animals. To quantitatively estimate patterns of seafloor oxygenation during this critical interval, we present uranium isotope (δ238U) data from limestone of the Taishir Formation (Fm) in Mongolia in two stratigraphic sections that are separated by ~75 km across the basin. The Taishir Fm hosts two large δ13C excursions that co-vary in total organic and inorganic (carbonate) carbon: a basal carbonate δ13C excursion to -4‰ in the Sturtian cap carbonate, followed by a rise to enriched values of +8‰, a second negative δ13C excursion to -7‰ referred to as the Taishir excursion, followed by a second rise to +10‰. Above the Sturtian glacial deposits, in the stratigraphic interval below the Taishir excursion, δ238U compositions have a mean value that is similar to that of modern seawater. After the Taishir excursion, the δ238U record exhibits a step decrease of ~0.3‰, and δ238U remains approximately constant until the erosional unconformity at the base of the Marinoan glacial deposits. We use a box model to constrain the uranium cycle behavior that best explains our observations. In the model, the best explanation for the less negative post-Sturtian values of δ238U is extensive oxygenation of the seafloor. Moreover, the model demonstrates that the higher δ238U values of the post-Sturtian limestones are inconsistent with an increased flux of uranium to the oceans due to post-Snowball weathering as the primary driver of the excursion. Thus, we favor a scenario in which there was a rise in oxygen levels following the Sturtian glaciation followed by a decrease in seafloor

  14. Coupled sulfur, iron and molybdenum isotope data from black shales of the Teplá-Barrandian unit argue against deep ocean oxygenation during the Ediacaran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzweil, Florian; Drost, Kerstin; Pašava, Jan; Wille, Martin; Taubald, Heinrich; Schoeckle, Daniel; Schoenberg, Ronny

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's atmosphere and hydrosphere changed from an Archean anoxic to a modern oxygenated world in two major steps, the Paleoproterozoic Great Oxidation Event (2.4-2.3 billion years ago) and the Neoproterozoic Oxidation Event (0.8-0.5 billion years ago). Both events had a strong influence on the availability of redox sensitive and bio-essential metals within the ocean and are, thus, strongly linked to fundamental biological innovations and diversification. Biological diversification during the Precambrian-Cambrian transition between 555 and 540 million years ago may have been driven by ocean-atmosphere oxygenation. The exact timing and the extent of (deep) ocean oxygenation within this time period remains unresolved though. Here we present major and trace element compositions as well as Mo, S and Fe isotopic data of organic-rich black shales from the Teplá-Barrandian unit, Czech Republic. New in situ zircon U-Pb ages provide a maximum depositional age of 559.8 ± 3.8 million years. Black shales with strong metal enrichment show low δ56Fe values due to the dominance of authigenic pyrite-Fe with δ56Fe values around -0.6‰ over detrital Fe with δ56Fe values around 0.1‰. Samples with lower authigenic metal enrichment show relatively low Mo/TOC ratios and increasing δ34S values, which is interpreted to reflect basinal restriction and longer seawater renewal times. In analogy to the modern Black Sea, the accompanied depletion of basinal Moaq due to near quantitative Mo removal might have led to the preservation of the seawater δ98Mo in the respective black shales. Our best estimate for this seawater Mo isotopic composition <560 million years ago is +1.2‰ in δ98Mo, which is nearly identical to seawater δ98Mo values inferred from Mid-Proterozoic black shales. The lack of higher δ98Mo values in black shales (and seawater) argues against contemporaneous Mn oxide formation in well oxygenated deep sea settings, which would preferentially adsorb isotopically

  15. Phosphate oxygen isotopic evidence for a temperate and biologically active Archaean ocean.

    PubMed

    Blake, Ruth E; Chang, Sae Jung; Lepland, Aivo

    2010-04-15

    Oxygen and silicon isotope compositions of cherts and studies of protein evolution have been interpreted to reflect ocean temperatures of 55-85 degrees C during the early Palaeoarchaean era ( approximately 3.5 billion years ago). A recent study combining oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of cherts, however, makes a case for Archaean ocean temperatures being no greater than 40 degrees C (ref. 5). Ocean temperature can also be assessed using the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate. Recent studies show that (18)O:(16)O ratios of dissolved inorganic phosphate (delta(18)O(P)) reflect ambient seawater temperature as well as biological processing that dominates marine phosphorus cycling at low temperature. All forms of life require and concentrate phosphorus, and as a result of biological processing, modern marine phosphates have delta(18)O(P) values typically between 19-26 per thousand (VSMOW), highly evolved from presumed source values of approximately 6-8 per thousand that are characteristic of apatite in igneous rocks and meteorites. Here we report oxygen isotope compositions of phosphates in sediments from the 3.2-3.5-billion-year-old Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa. We find that delta(18)O(P) values range from 9.3 per thousand to 19.9 per thousand and include the highest values reported for Archaean rocks. The temperatures calculated from our highest delta(18)O(P) values and assuming equilibrium with sea water with delta(18)O = 0 per thousand (ref. 12) range from 26 degrees C to 35 degrees C. The higher delta(18)O(P) values are similar to those of modern marine phosphate and suggest a well-developed phosphorus cycle and evolved biologic activity on the Archaean Earth. PMID:20393560

  16. The triple oxygen isotope tracer of primary productivity in a dynamic ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, David; Stanley, Rachel H. R.; Doney, Scott C.

    2014-05-01

    The triple oxygen isotopic composition of dissolved oxygen (17Δdis) was added to the ocean ecosystem and biogeochemistry component of the Community Earth System Model, version 1.1.1. Model simulations were used to investigate the biological and physical dynamics of 17Δdis and assess its application as a tracer of gross photosynthetic production (gross oxygen production (GOP)) of O2 in the ocean mixed layer. The model reproduced large-scale patterns of 17Δdis found in observational data across diverse biogeographical provinces. Mixed layer model performance was best in the Pacific and had a negative bias in the North Atlantic and a positive bias in the Southern Ocean. Based on model results, the steady state equation commonly used to calculate GOP from tracer values overestimated the globally averaged model GOP by 29%. Vertical entrainment/mixing and the time rate of change of 17Δdis were the two largest sources of bias when applying the steady state method to calculate GOP. Entrainment/mixing resulted in the largest overestimation in midlatitudes and during summer and fall and almost never caused an underestimation of GOP. The tracer time rate of change bias resulted both in underestimation of GOP (e.g., during spring blooms at high latitudes) and overestimation (e.g., during the summer following a bloom). Seasonally, bias was highest in the fall (September-October-November in the Northern Hemisphere, March-April-May in the Southern), overestimating GOP by 62%, globally averaged. Overall, the steady state method was most accurate in equatorial and low-latitude regions where it estimated GOP to within ±10%. Field applicable correction terms are derived for entrainment and mixing that capture 86% of model vertical bias and require only mixed layer depth history and triple oxygen isotope measurements from two depths.

  17. Phosphate oxygen isotopic evidence for a temperate and biologically active Archaean ocean.

    PubMed

    Blake, Ruth E; Chang, Sae Jung; Lepland, Aivo

    2010-04-15

    Oxygen and silicon isotope compositions of cherts and studies of protein evolution have been interpreted to reflect ocean temperatures of 55-85 degrees C during the early Palaeoarchaean era ( approximately 3.5 billion years ago). A recent study combining oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of cherts, however, makes a case for Archaean ocean temperatures being no greater than 40 degrees C (ref. 5). Ocean temperature can also be assessed using the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate. Recent studies show that (18)O:(16)O ratios of dissolved inorganic phosphate (delta(18)O(P)) reflect ambient seawater temperature as well as biological processing that dominates marine phosphorus cycling at low temperature. All forms of life require and concentrate phosphorus, and as a result of biological processing, modern marine phosphates have delta(18)O(P) values typically between 19-26 per thousand (VSMOW), highly evolved from presumed source values of approximately 6-8 per thousand that are characteristic of apatite in igneous rocks and meteorites. Here we report oxygen isotope compositions of phosphates in sediments from the 3.2-3.5-billion-year-old Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa. We find that delta(18)O(P) values range from 9.3 per thousand to 19.9 per thousand and include the highest values reported for Archaean rocks. The temperatures calculated from our highest delta(18)O(P) values and assuming equilibrium with sea water with delta(18)O = 0 per thousand (ref. 12) range from 26 degrees C to 35 degrees C. The higher delta(18)O(P) values are similar to those of modern marine phosphate and suggest a well-developed phosphorus cycle and evolved biologic activity on the Archaean Earth.

  18. Modelling the seasonal cycle of dissolved oxygen in the upper ocean at ocean weather station P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, F.; Garcon, V.; Minster, J.-F.

    1990-03-01

    Three main processes regulate the variations of dissolved O 2 concentrations in the surface waters: gas exchange at the air-sea interface, vertical mixing and biological activity of marine organisms. A one-dimensional integral mixed layer model ( GASPAR, 1988) is used to study the temporal evolution of monthly averaged dissolved O 2 content of surface waters at Ocean Weather Station P, and to assess the relative importance of the various contributing mechanisms during 1969-1972. Production and consumption due to biological activity are taken into account as an input function of the model. A large part of the seasonal signal of dissolved O 2 in surface waters can be reproduced by the physical model without biological activity. However, kinetics of gas exchange, biological production and entrainment of sub-mixed layer water all contribute by the same order of magnitude to supersaturation during warming periods and undersaturation during cooling periods. Various shapes (over depth and time) of production-consumption function have been tested for the year 1970. Most of the evolution of monthly average dissolved O 2 in the surface waters can be obtained (1) with a total annual production rate of the order of 5 mol O 2 m -2 y -1, (2) with a constant production throughout the year and in the 0-50 m layer, and (3) with logarithmic decrease in consumption between 50 and 300 m. The relative influence of various parameters on the three processes supplying O 2 to the surface waters is investigated. Total annual production P seems to be the most influential. Vertical mixing and depth of photic zone, z 0, affect the gas exchange flux during the cooling season. Episodic events, like storms, modify the supersaturation of the mixed layer O 2 content by up to 4 mmol m -3, but gas exchange later draws back this content towards a smooth evolution curve. Finally, the sensitivity of the net annual gas exchange to various parameters is too large for the model to provide a reliable value.

  19. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: The importance of the ocean-estuary connection - May 16, 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean –estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO ...

  20. Availability of free oxygen in deep bottom water of some Archean-Early Paleoproterozoic ocean basins as derived from iron formation facies analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beukes, N. J.; Smith, A.

    2013-12-01

    Archean to Early Paleoproterozoic ocean basins are commonly, although not exclusively, depicted as rather static systems; either permanently stratified with shallow mixed oxygenated water overlying anoxic deep water or with a totally anoxic water column. The anoxic water columns are considered enriched in dissolved ferrous iron derived from hydrothermal plume activity. These sourced deposition of iron formations through precipitation of mainly ferrihydrite via reaction with free oxygen in the stratified model or anaerobic iron oxidizing photoautotrophs in the anoxic model. However, both these models face a simple basic problem if detailed facies reconstructions of deepwater microbanded iron formations (MIFs) are considered. In such MIFs it is common that the deepest water and most distal facies is hematite rich followed shoreward by magnetite, iron silicate and siderite facies iron formation. Examples of such facies relations are known from jaspilitic iron formation of the ~3,2 Ga Fig Tree Group (Barberton Mountainland), ~ 2,95 Ga iron formations of the Witwatersrand-Mozaan basin and the ~2,5 Ga Kuruman Iron Formation, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa. Facies relations of these MIFs with associated siliciclastics or carbonates also indicate that the upper water columns of the basins, down to below wave base, were depleted in iron favoring anoxic-oxic stratification rather than total anoxia. In the MIFs it can be shown that hematite in the distal facies represents the earliest formed diagenetic mineral; most likely crystallized from primary ferrihydrite. The problem is one of how ferrihydrite could have been preserved on the ocean floor if it was in direct contact with reducing ferrous deep bottom water. Rather dissolved ferrous iron would have reacted with ferrihydrite to form diagenetic magnetite. This dilemma is resolved if in the area of deepwater hematite MIF deposition, the anoxic ferrous iron enriched plume was detached from the basin floor due to buoyancy

  1. Experiments on oxygen desorption from surface warm seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper presents the results of scoping deaeration experiments conducted with warm surface seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) conditions. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in seawater at three locations (in the supply water, water leaving the predeaerator, and discharge water from an evaporator) were measured and used to estimate oxygen desorption levels. The results suggest that 7 percent to 60 percent of the dissolved oxygen in the supply water was desorbed from seawater in the predeaerator for pressures ranging from 35 to 9 kPa. Bubble injection in the upcomer increased the oxygen desorption rate by 20 percent to 60 percent. The data also indicated that at typical OC-OTEC evaporator pressures, when flash evaporation in the evaporator occurred, 75 percent to 95 percent of the dissolved oxygen was desorbed overall from the warm seawater. The results were used to find the impact of a single-stage predeaeration scheme on the power to remove noncondensable gases in an OC-OTEC plant.

  2. Net community production at Ocean Station Papa observed with nitrate and oxygen sensors on profiling floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, Joshua N.; Johnson, Kenneth S.; Sakamoto, Carole M.; Jannasch, Hans W.; Coletti, Luke J.; Riser, Stephen C.; Swift, Dana D.

    2016-06-01

    Six profiling floats equipped with nitrate and oxygen sensors were deployed at Ocean Station P in the Gulf of Alaska. The resulting six calendar years and 10 float years of nitrate and oxygen data were used to determine an average annual cycle for net community production (NCP) in the top 35 m of the water column. NCP became positive in February as soon as the mixing activity in the surface layer began to weaken, but nearly 3 months before the traditionally defined mixed layer began to shoal from its winter time maximum. NCP displayed two maxima, one toward the end of May and another in August with a summertime minimum in June corresponding to the historical peak in mesozooplankton biomass. The average annual NCP was determined to be 1.5 ± 0.6 mol C m-2 yr-1 using nitrate and 1.5 ± 0.7 mol C m-2 yr-1 using oxygen. The results from oxygen data proved to be quite sensitive to the gas exchange model used as well as the accuracy of the oxygen measurement. Gas exchange models optimized for carbon dioxide flux generally ignore transport due to gas exchange through the injection of bubbles, and these models yield NCP values that are two to three time higher than the nitrate-based estimates. If nitrate and oxygen NCP rates are assumed to be related by the Redfield model, we show that the oxygen gas exchange model can be optimized by tuning the exchange terms to reproduce the nitrate NCP annual cycle.

  3. Constraints on oceanic meridional heat transport from combined measurements of oxygen and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resplandy, L.; Keeling, R. F.; Stephens, B. B.; Bent, J. D.; Jacobson, A.; Rödenbeck, C.; Khatiwala, S.

    2016-02-01

    Despite its importance to the climate system, the ocean meridional heat transport is still poorly quantified. We identify a strong link between the northern hemisphere deficit in atmospheric potential oxygen (APO = O_2 + 1.1 × CO_2 ) and the asymmetry in meridional heat transport between northern and southern hemispheres. The recent aircraft observations from the HIPPO campaign reveal a northern APO deficit in the tropospheric column of - 10.4 ± 1.0 per meg, double the value at the surface and more representative of large-scale air-sea fluxes. The global northward ocean heat transport asymmetry necessary to explain the observed APO deficit is about 0.7-1.1 PW, which corresponds to the upper range of estimates from hydrographic sections and atmospheric reanalyses.

  4. Fish Ecology and Evolution in the World's Oxygen Minimum Zones and Implications of Ocean Deoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, N D; Levin, L A

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) and oxygen limited zones (OLZs) are important oceanographic features in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean, and are characterized by hypoxic conditions that are physiologically challenging for demersal fish. Thickness, depth of the upper boundary, minimum oxygen levels, local temperatures, and diurnal, seasonal, and interannual oxycline variability differ regionally, with the thickest and shallowest OMZs occurring in the subtropics and tropics. Although most fish are not hypoxia-tolerant, at least 77 demersal fish species from 16 orders have evolved physiological, behavioural, and morphological adaptations that allow them to live under the severely hypoxic, hypercapnic, and at times sulphidic conditions found in OMZs. Tolerance to OMZ conditions has evolved multiple times in multiple groups with no single fish family or genus exploiting all OMZs globally. Severely hypoxic conditions in OMZs lead to decreased demersal fish diversity, but fish density trends are variable and dependent on region-specific thresholds. Some OMZ-adapted fish species are more hypoxia-tolerant than most megafaunal invertebrates and are present even when most invertebrates are excluded. Expansions and contractions of OMZs in the past have affected fish evolution and diversity. Current patterns of ocean warming are leading to ocean deoxygenation, causing the expansion and shoaling of OMZs, which is expected to decrease demersal fish diversity and alter trophic pathways on affected margins. Habitat compression is expected for hypoxia-intolerant species, causing increased susceptibility to overfishing for fisheries species. Demersal fisheries are likely to be negatively impacted overall by the expansion of OMZs in a warming world.

  5. Fish Ecology and Evolution in the World's Oxygen Minimum Zones and Implications of Ocean Deoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, N D; Levin, L A

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) and oxygen limited zones (OLZs) are important oceanographic features in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean, and are characterized by hypoxic conditions that are physiologically challenging for demersal fish. Thickness, depth of the upper boundary, minimum oxygen levels, local temperatures, and diurnal, seasonal, and interannual oxycline variability differ regionally, with the thickest and shallowest OMZs occurring in the subtropics and tropics. Although most fish are not hypoxia-tolerant, at least 77 demersal fish species from 16 orders have evolved physiological, behavioural, and morphological adaptations that allow them to live under the severely hypoxic, hypercapnic, and at times sulphidic conditions found in OMZs. Tolerance to OMZ conditions has evolved multiple times in multiple groups with no single fish family or genus exploiting all OMZs globally. Severely hypoxic conditions in OMZs lead to decreased demersal fish diversity, but fish density trends are variable and dependent on region-specific thresholds. Some OMZ-adapted fish species are more hypoxia-tolerant than most megafaunal invertebrates and are present even when most invertebrates are excluded. Expansions and contractions of OMZs in the past have affected fish evolution and diversity. Current patterns of ocean warming are leading to ocean deoxygenation, causing the expansion and shoaling of OMZs, which is expected to decrease demersal fish diversity and alter trophic pathways on affected margins. Habitat compression is expected for hypoxia-intolerant species, causing increased susceptibility to overfishing for fisheries species. Demersal fisheries are likely to be negatively impacted overall by the expansion of OMZs in a warming world. PMID:27573051

  6. Evidence for free oxygen in the Neoarchean ocean based on coupled iron-molybdenum isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaja, Andrew D.; Johnson, Clark M.; Roden, Eric E.; Beard, Brian L.; Voegelin, Andrea R.; Nägler, Thomas F.; Beukes, Nicolas J.; Wille, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Most geochemical proxies and models of atmospheric evolution suggest that the amount of free O2 in Earth’s atmosphere stayed below 10-5 present atmospheric level (PAL) until the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) that occurred between ∼2.2 and 2.4 Ga, at which time free O2 in the atmosphere increased to approximately 10-1 to 10-2 PAL. Although photosynthetically produced “O2 oases” have been proposed for the photic zone of the oceans prior to the GOE, it has been difficult to constrain absolute O2 concentrations and fluxes in such paleoenvironments. Here we constrain free O2 levels in the photic zone of a Late Archean marine basin by the combined use of Fe and Mo isotope systematics of Ca-Mg carbonates and shales from the 2.68 to 2.50 Ga Campbellrand-Malmani carbonate platform of the Kaapvaal Craton in South Africa. Correlated Fe and Mo isotope compositions require a key role for Fe oxide precipitation via oxidation of aqueous Fe(II) by photosynthetically-derived O2, followed by sorption of aqueous Mo to the newly formed Fe oxides. A dispersion/reaction model illustrates the effects of Fe oxide production and Mo sorption to Fe oxides, and suggests that a few to a few tens of μM free O2 was available in the photic zone of the Late Archean marine basin, consistent with some previous estimates. The coupling of Fe and Mo isotope systematics provides a unique view into the processes that occurred in the ancient shallow ocean after production of free O2 began, but prior to oxygenation of the deep ocean, or significant accumulation of free O2 in the atmosphere. These results require oxygenic photosynthesis to have evolved by at least 2.7 Ga and suggest that the Neoarchean ocean may have had a different oxygenation history than that of the atmosphere. The data also suggest that the extensive iron formation deposition that occurred during this time was unlikely to have been produced by anoxygenic photosynthetic Fe(II) oxidation. Finally, these data indicate that the ocean

  7. Marine biological production from in situ oxygen measurements on a profiling float in the subarctic Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushinsky, Seth M.; Emerson, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Evaluating the organic carbon flux from the surface ocean to the interior (the marine biological pump) is essential for predictions of ocean carbon cycle feedback to climate change. One approach for determining these fluxes is to measure the concentration of oxygen in the upper ocean over a seasonal cycle, calculate the net O2 flux using an upper ocean model, and then use a stoichiometric relationship between oxygen evolved and organic carbon produced. Applying this tracer in a variety of ocean areas over seasonal cycles requires accurate O2 measurements on autonomous vehicles. Here we demonstrate this approach using an O2 sensor on a profiling float that is periodically calibrated against atmospheric pO2. Using accurate data and a model that includes all physical and biological processes influencing oxygen, we determine an annual net community production of 0.7 ± 0.5 mol C m-2 yr-1 in the northeast Pacific Ocean (50°N, 145°W) from June 2012 to June 2013. There is a strong seasonal cycle in net biological oxygen production with wintertime fluxes caused by bubble processes critical to determining the annual flux. Approximately 50% of net autotrophic production during summer months is consumed by net respiration during the winter. The result is a biological pump in the subarctic Pacific Ocean that is less than that determined by similar methods in the subtropics to the south. This estimate is significantly lower than that predicted by satellite remote sensing and global circulation models.

  8. The role of biology in planetary evolution: cyanobacterial primary production in low-oxygen Proterozoic oceans.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Bryant, Donald A; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2016-02-01

    , including the activity of metabolically versatile cyanobacteria, played an important role in delaying the oxygenation of Earth's surface ocean during the Proterozoic Eon.

  9. The role of biology in planetary evolution: cyanobacterial primary production in low‐oxygen Proterozoic oceans

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Donald A.; Macalady, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    photosynthesis, including the activity of metabolically versatile cyanobacteria, played an important role in delaying the oxygenation of Earth's surface ocean during the Proterozoic Eon. PMID:26549614

  10. Ice-Tethered Profiler Observations of Dissolved Oxygen in the Arctic Ocean Under Permanent Ice Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, M.; Toole, J.; Laney, S.; Krishfield, R.

    2008-12-01

    Two Ice-Tethered Profilers (ITP), deployed in 2006 and 2007, have provided year-round dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements from the surface mixed layer to 760 m depth under permanent ice cover in the central Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean. A further two ITPs deployed in August 2008 are presently returning DO measurements from the northern Canada Basin and the Makarov Basin. The two ITPs that have returned year-long time series exhibit seasonal variability in DO that primarily reflects primary production and respiration; fractional oxygen saturation varies accordingly. The time evolution of DO is similar for the two ITPs, indicating a predominately temporal variability. Beginning in April, under-ice DO in the central basin increases due to photosynthetic production, reaching a maximum in July. Under-ice DO decreases between August and November and a prominent shallow oxygen maximum is observed immediately below the surface mixed layer. This DO maximum is likely the result of accumulation of oxygen in summer which is then prevented from escaping by the strong stratification. The maximum is destroyed at the onset of winter by convection and deepening of the surface layer. The ongoing DO measurements are key to understanding changes to primary production under thinning ice conditions characterized by higher under-ice light levels, and changing Arctic seasonality.

  11. High latitude control on tropical North Pacific thermocline oxygen via deep ocean circulation: implications for atmospheric CO2 and N2O concentrations over TERM1.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaccard, S. L.; Eric, G. D.; Haug, G. H.; Sigman, D. M.; Francois, R.; Dulski, P.

    2006-12-01

    Low-latitude Pacific Ocean records of past changes in productivity and denitrification have often been ascribed to local processes, including changes in local wind forcing, with some recent hypothesis calling on remote control by thermocline ventilation processes. Here we show that deep thermohaline circulation, a fundamentally high-latitude process, is also linked to the low-latitude thermocline biogeochemistry through its impact on nutrient and dissolved oxygen distributions. We present new, multi-proxy evidence from sediment records from the abyssal subarctic North Pacific, including sedimentary redox-sensitive trace metal distribution, Th-normalized biogenic barium, calcium carbonate, and opal mass accumulation rates, and bulk sedimentary 15N measurements. These proxies show that the abyss was significantly depleted in oxygen, and low 13C, all consistent with high DIC concentrations. Meanwhile, above a deep chemical divide, the overlying waters were relatively well-oxygenated and nutrient-poor. At the mid-point of the deglaciation, the glacial deep water mass dissipated upwards in the water column, releasing deeply-sequestered CO2 to the atmosphere and shifting nutrients into the thermocline. The flux of regenerated nutrients to the sunlit surface ocean associated with this breakdown of the deep water mass enhanced primary productivity throughout the subarctic Pacific, while records from lower latitudes of the North Pacific show a parallel boom in export production. The accelerated flux of organic matter from the surface contributed towards an intensification of the thermocline oxygen minimum zone, accelerating denitrification in the Eastern (sub)tropical North Pacific and the production of nitrous oxide. These observations, taken together with our evidence for changes in the deep North Pacific, suggest that the flux of nutrients from the deep North Pacific into the upper water column increased at the end of the ice age. This release may have occurred via the

  12. Oxygen isotope fractionation in the ocean surface and 18O/16O of atmospheric O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luz, Boaz; Barkan, Eugeni

    2011-12-01

    We have recently published a new evaluation of Earth's Dole effect, which was based, in part, on measurements of δO2/Ar, δ17O and δ18O of dissolved argon and oxygen in the ocean surface. In calculations of the oxygen isotope effect due to photosynthesis and respiration (ɛup), gross O2 production (G) was an important factor. However, our estimates of G were based on an approximate equation, and in a recent publication it has been suggested that G obtained with this equation could be underestimated by about 33%. If true, such underestimation of G might lead to different ɛup values. To test this possibility, we have used a new rigorous equation with relevant information on isotopic composition of photosynthetic O2 and recalculated ɛup. Given the uncertainties, the new values do not differ from the previous ones, and therefore, the implications of the strong fractionation in the upper ocean (˜25‰) to the global Dole effect remain as in our original publication.

  13. Identifying Oxygen Isotopic Signatures of ENSO Dynamics Through Isotope-Enabled Regional Ocean Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, S.; Powell, B.; Merrifield, M. A.; Cobb, K. M.; Nusbaumer, J. M.; Noone, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Coral oxygen isotope (δ18O) records provide important constraints on past variability in the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). However, the relationship between ENSO activity and δ18O anomalies is subject to a high degree of uncertainty owing to both observational limitations and poorly understood dynamical processes. The isotope-enabled Regional Ocean Modeling System (isoROMS) is designed to address some of these uncertainties; isoROMS is a flexible modeling framework capable of simulating δ18O over an arbitrary domain at a variety of spatial resolutions. Initial results for isoROMS simulations at the central equatorial Pacific Line Islands chain over the 1979-2009 period are presented, using water isotopologue fluxes taken from the isotope-enabled NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (iCAM). Mesoscale ocean processes can significantly impact temperature and seawater δ18O variability under certain conditions, particularly during strong La Nina events. The variability in the ENSO/δ18O relationship is then investigated over the 20th century using a suite of isoROMS simulations conducted with combinations of atmosphere and ocean reanalysis products, in an effort to determine the optimal form of 'forward models' for predicting δ18O given local conditions. Implications for our ability to quantitatively reconstruct ENSO amplitude and the properties of El Nino/La Nina events are discussed.

  14. Can variable pH and low oxygen moderate ocean acidification outcomes for mussel larvae?

    PubMed

    Frieder, Christina A; Gonzalez, Jennifer P; Bockmon, Emily E; Navarro, Michael O; Levin, Lisa A

    2014-03-01

    Natural variation and changing climate in coastal oceans subject meroplanktonic organisms to broad ranges of pH and oxygen ([O2 ]) levels. In controlled-laboratory experiments we explored the interactive effects of pH, [O2 ], and semidiurnal pH fluctuations on the survivorship, development, and size of early life stages of two mytilid mussels, Mytilus californianus and M. galloprovincialis. Survivorship of larvae was unaffected by low pH, low [O2 ], or semidiurnal fluctuations for both mytilid species. Low pH (<7.6) resulted in delayed transition from the trochophore to veliger stage, but this effect of low pH was absent when incorporating semidiurnal fluctuations in both species. Also at low pH, larval shells were smaller and had greater variance; this effect was absent when semidiurnal fluctuations of 0.3 units were incorporated at low pH for M. galloprovincialis but not for M. californianus. Low [O2 ] in combination with low pH had no effect on larval development and size, indicating that early life stages of mytilid mussels are largely tolerant to a broad range of [O2 ] reflective of their environment (80-260 μmol kg(-1) ). The role of pH variability should be recognized as an important feature in coastal oceans that has the capacity to modulate the effects of ocean acidification on biological responses.

  15. Electrochemical methods for autonomous chemical (phosphate and oxygen) monitoring in the ocean in the Oxygen Minimum Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonca, J.; Thouron, D.; Comtat, C.; Revsbech, N. P.; Garçon, V.

    2012-04-01

    Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZ), mainly localized in the EBUS, are known to play a crucial role on climate evolution via greenhouse gases budgets and on marine ecosystems (respiratory barrier, modifications of the nitrogen cycle). Deoxygenation will have widespread consequences due to the role oxygen plays in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and other important elements such as Fe, S. Developing new sensors for improving our understanding of the coupled biogeochemical cycles (P-O-C-N) in these regions constitutes an immense challenge. Electrochemistry provides promising liquid reagentless methods by going further in miniaturization, decreasing the response time and energy requirements and thus increasing our observing capacities in the ocean. We present an electrochemical method for phosphate determination in seawater based on the anodic oxidation of molybdenum in seawater in order to create molybdophosphate complexes amperometrically detected on a gold electrode by means of amperometry or square-wave voltammetry. We propose a solution to address the silicate interference issue based on an appropriate ratio of proton/molybdate within an electrochemical cell using specialized membrane technology. The detection limit can be as low as 180 nM. An application of this method is presented in the OMZ offshore Peru. The results show excellent agreement when compared to colorimetry with an average deviation of 5.1%. This work is a first step to develop an autonomous in situ sensor for electrochemical detection of phosphate in seawater. The STOX sensor for the measurements of ultra-low oxygen concentrations was improved by decreasing the distance between the sensing and guard cathodes. The modification of the sensor tip was done by development of a method for gold plating on the front silicone rubber membrane in order to form a guard cathode. Then, the traditional and modified STOX sensors were compared and the preliminary studies showed a great potential

  16. Distribution and Abundance of Hopanoid Producers in Low-Oxygen Environments of the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kharbush, Jenan J; Kejriwal, Kanchi; Aluwihare, Lihini I

    2016-02-01

    Hopanoids are bacterial membrane lipid biomarker molecules that feature prominently in the molecular fossil record. In the modern marine water column, recent reports implicate bacteria inhabiting low-oxygen environments as important sources of hopanoids to marine sediments. However, the preliminary biogeography reported by recent studies and the environmental conditions governing such distributions can only be confirmed when the numerical abundance of these organisms is known with more certainty. In this study, we employ two different approaches to examine the quantitative significance of phylogenetically distinct hopanoid producers in low-oxygen environments. First, we develop a novel quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for the squalene hopene cyclase (sqhC) gene, targeting a subset of hopanoid producers previously identified to be important in the eastern North Pacific Ocean. The results represent the first quantitative gene abundance data of any kind for hopanoid producers in the marine water column and show that these putative alphaproteobacterial hopanoid producers are rare, comprising at most 0.2 % of the total bacterial community in our samples. Second, a complementary analysis of existing low-oxygen metagenomic datasets further examined the generality of the qPCR observation. We find that the dominant sqhC sequences in these metagenomic datasets are associated with phyla such as Nitrospinae rather than Proteobacteria, consistent with the qPCR finding that alphaproteobacterial hopanoid producers are not very abundant in low-oxygen environments. In fact, positive correlations between sqhC gene abundance and environmental parameters in these samples identify nitrite availability as a potentially important factor in the ecology of hopanoid producers that dominate low-oxygen environments.

  17. The appearance of an oxygen-depleted condition on the Capitanian disphotic slope/basin in South China: Middle-Upper Permian stratigraphy at Chaotian in northern Sichuan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Masafumi; Isozaki, Yukio; Yao, Jianxin; Ji, Zhansheng; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-06-01

    The global environmental changes related to the end-Guadalupian (Permian) extinction have been recently studied in various shallow-marine sections in the world; however, no previous stratigraphic research focused on the sequence deposited in a relatively deep disphotic zone. In order to investigate the environmental changes in the disphotic zone during that interval, lithostratigraphy and secular changes in the sedimentary environment were analyzed for the ca. 150 m thick Guadalupian-Lopingian (Middle-Upper Permian) carbonates at Chaotian in northern Sichuan, South China. The upper Guadalupian Maokou Formation and the Lower Lopingian Wujiaping Formation are mostly composed of bioclastic limestone of a euphotic shelf facies and contain abundant shallow marine fossils, such as algae, corals, and fusulines. The topmost Maokou Formation (ca. 11 m thick) is unique in this section because it is composed of thinly bedded black mudstone/chert of a disphotic slope/basin facies with abundant radiolarians and ammonoids. The stratigraphic changes in litho- and bio-facies suggest a two-stepped transgression in the Capitanian followed by a great regression around the Guadalupian-Lopingian boundary (G-LB). Moreover, the stratigraphic changes in bioturbation, total organic carbon (TOC) content, and occurrence of framboidal pyrite suggest that the redox of the sedimentary environment at Chaotian changed drastically in accordance with newly clarified rapid sea-level fluctuations. In association with the Capitanian sea-level rise, the sedimentary environment shifted from an oxic shelf to an oxygen-depleted slope/basin, and again returned to an oxic shelf during the following great regression. The appearance of the oxygen-depleted condition on the Capitanian disphotic slope/basin in northern Sichuan is particularly important because it occurred clearly before the end-Guadalupian extinction event. It is also noteworthy that the oxygen-depleted seawater appeared for the first time on a

  18. Nitrogen Loss Processes and Nitrous Oxide Turnover in Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen is an essential element for life and the maintenance of all ecosystems. For many ecosystems, both aquatic and terrestrial, nitrogen is the element most likely to limit the amount and rate of production. But just as ecosystems can suffer from too little nitrogen, they are also sensitive to too much nitrogen, which leads to eutrophication and structural changes in food webs. Thus the processes by which nitrogen is removed are as critical to our understanding of ecosystem function as are those by which it is added. Nitrogen loss processes in the open ocean have been the focus of research and discovery in recent years. Long thought to be dominated by the bacterial respiratory process of denitrification, N loss is now also known to occur by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). We now understand that the ratio of the two processes is controlled by the quality and quantity of organic matter supplied to the anoxic waters of the ocean's major oxygen deficient zones. Coastal environments are also major sites of N loss but excess N loading from land often ameliorates the direct dependence of anammox and denitrification on organic matter composition. The ratio is important partly because of side products: Denitrification is a significant source and sink for nitrous oxide (N2O), while anammox has no significant contribution to N2O biogeochemistry. With the anthropogenic flux of CFCs at least mostly under control, N2O emissions to the atmosphere are the greatest contribution to ozone destruction, and they also contribute to greenhouse warming. Both anthropogenic and natural sources contribute to N2O emissions, and natural sources are sensitive to anthropogenic forcing. Our direct measurements of N2O production and consumption in the ocean agree with modeling results that have implicated multiple microbial processes and complex physical and biological control of N2O fluxes in the ocean.

  19. A correlation of reactive oxygen species accumulation by depletion of superoxide dismutases with age-dependent impairment in the nervous system and muscles of Drosophila adults.

    PubMed

    Oka, Saori; Hirai, Jun; Yasukawa, Takashi; Nakahara, Yasuyuki; Inoue, Yoshihiro H

    2015-08-01

    The theory that accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in internal organs is a major promoter of aging has been considered negatively. However, it is still controversial whether overexpression of superoxide dismutases (SODs), which remove ROS, extends the lifespan in Drosophila adults. We examined whether ROS accumulation by depletion of Cu/Zn-SOD (SOD1) or Mn-SOD (SOD2) influenced age-related impairment of the nervous system and muscles in Drosophila. We confirmed the efficient depletion of Sod1 and Sod2 through RNAi and ROS accumulation by monitoring of ROS-inducible gene expression. Both RNAi flies displayed accelerated impairment of locomotor activity with age and shortened lifespan. Similarly, adults with nervous system-specific depletion of Sod1 or Sod2 also showed reduced lifespan. We then found an accelerated loss of dopaminergic neurons in the flies with suppressed SOD expression. A half-dose reduction of three pro-apoptotic genes resulted in a significant suppression of the neuronal loss, suggesting that apoptosis was involved in the neuronal loss caused by SOD silencing. In addition, depletion of Sod1 or Sod2 in musculature is also associated with enhancement of age-related locomotion impairment. In indirect flight muscles from SOD-depleted adults, abnormal protein aggregates containing poly-ubiquitin accumulated at an early adult stage and continued to increase as the flies aged. Most of these protein aggregates were observed between myofibril layers. Moreover, immuno-electron microscopy indicated that the aggregates were predominantly localized in damaged mitochondria. These findings suggest that muscular and neuronal ROS accumulation may have a significant effect on age-dependent impairment of the Drosophila adults.

  20. Accumulation of organic matter in Cretaceous oxygen-deficient depositional environments in the central Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.; Claypool, G.E.; Thide, J.

    1984-01-01

    and intercepts of C-S regression lines however, are different for each site and all are different from regression lines for samples from modern anoxic marine sediments and from Black Sea cores. The organic-carbon-rich limestones on Hess Rise, the Mid-Pacific Mountains, and other plateaus and seamounts in the Pacific Ocean are not synchronous but do occur within the same general middle Cretaceous time period as organic-carbon-rich lithofacies elsewhere in the world ocean, particularly in the Atlantic Ocean. Strata of equivalent age in the deep basins of the Pacific Ocean are not rich in organic carbon, and were deposited in oxygenated environments. This observation, together with the evidence that the plateau sites were considerably shallower and closse to the equator during the middle Creataceous suggests that local tectonic and hydrographic conditions may have resulted in high surface-water productivity and the preservation of organic matter in an oxygen-deficient environment where an expanded mid-water oxygen minimum developed and impinged on elevated platforms and seamounts. ?? 1984.

  1. Forcings of nutrient, oxygen, and primary production interannual variability in the southeast Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachèlery, M.-L.; Illig, S.; Dadou, I.

    2016-08-01

    The recurrent occurrences of interannual warm and cold events along the coast of Africa have been intensively studied because of their striking effects on climate and fisheries. Using sensitivity experimentation based on a coupled physical/biogeochemical model, we show that the oceanic remote equatorial forcing explains more than 85% of coastal interannual nitrate and oxygen fluctuations along the Angolan and Namibian coasts up to the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS). These events, associated with poleward propagations of upwelling and downwelling Coastal Trapped Waves (CTW), are maximum in subsurface and controlled by physical advection processes. Surprisingly, an abrupt change in the CTW biogeochemical signature is observed in the BUS, associated with mixed vertical gradients due to the strong local upwelling dynamics. Coastal modifications of biogeochemical features result in significant primary production variations that may affect fisheries habitats and coastal biodiversity along the southwestern African coasts and in the BUS.

  2. Magma Ocean Depth and Oxygen Fugacity in the Early Earth--Implications for Biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Righter, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    A large class of elements, referred to as the siderophile (iron-loving) elements, in the Earth's mantle can be explained by an early deep magma ocean on the early Earth in which the mantle equilibrated with metallic liquid (core liquid). This stage would have affected the distribution of some of the classic volatile elements that are also essential ingredients for life and biochemistry - H, C, S, and N. Estimates are made of the H, C, S, and N contents of Earth's early mantle after core formation, considering the effects of variable temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and composition on their partitioning. Assessment is made of whether additional, exogenous, sources are required to explain the observed mantle concentrations, and areas are identified where additional data and experimentation would lead to an improved understanding of this phase of Earth's history. PMID:26037825

  3. Magma Ocean Depth and Oxygen Fugacity in the Early Earth--Implications for Biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Righter, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    A large class of elements, referred to as the siderophile (iron-loving) elements, in the Earth's mantle can be explained by an early deep magma ocean on the early Earth in which the mantle equilibrated with metallic liquid (core liquid). This stage would have affected the distribution of some of the classic volatile elements that are also essential ingredients for life and biochemistry - H, C, S, and N. Estimates are made of the H, C, S, and N contents of Earth's early mantle after core formation, considering the effects of variable temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and composition on their partitioning. Assessment is made of whether additional, exogenous, sources are required to explain the observed mantle concentrations, and areas are identified where additional data and experimentation would lead to an improved understanding of this phase of Earth's history.

  4. Depletion of hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 induces apoptotic sensitization of radioresistant A549 cells via reactive oxygen species-dependent p53 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Hong Shik; Hong, Eun-Hee; Lee, Su-Jae; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Lee, Chang-Woo; Yim, Ji-Hye; Um, Hong-Duck; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •HRP-3 is a radiation- and anticancer drug-responsive protein in A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 induces apoptosis of radio- and chemoresistant A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 promotes ROS generation via inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. •Depletion of HRP-3 enhances ROS-dependent p53 activation and PUMA expression. -- Abstract: Biomarkers based on functional signaling have the potential to provide greater insight into the pathogenesis of cancer and may offer additional targets for anticancer therapeutics. Here, we identified hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 (HRP-3) as a radioresistance-related gene and characterized the molecular mechanism by which its encoded protein regulates the radio- and chemoresistant phenotype of lung cancer-derived A549 cells. Knockdown of HRP-3 promoted apoptosis of A549 cells and potentiated the apoptosis-inducing action of radio- and chemotherapy. This increase in apoptosis was associated with a substantial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that was attributable to inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway and resulted in enhanced ROS-dependent p53 activation and p53-dependent expression of PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis). Therefore, the HRP-3/Nrf2/HO-1/ROS/p53/PUMA cascade is an essential feature of the A549 cell phenotype and a potential radiotherapy target, extending the range of targets in multimodal therapies against lung cancer.

  5. Effect of Chloride Depletion on the Magnetic Properties and the Redox Leveling of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhamed; Pokhrel, Ravi; Brudvig, Gary W; Badawi, Ashraf; Obayya, S S A

    2016-05-12

    Chloride is an essential cofactor in the oxygen-evolution reaction that takes place in photosystem II (PSII). The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) is oxidized in a linear four-step photocatalytic cycle in which chloride is required for the OEC to advance beyond the S2 state. Here, using density functional theory, we compare the energetics and spin configuration of two different states of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the S2 state: state A with Mn1(3+) and B with Mn4(3+) with and without chloride. The calculations suggest that model B with an S = 5/2 ground state occurs in the chloride-depleted PSII, which may explain the presence of the EPR signal at g = 4.1. Moreover, we use multiconformer continuum electrostatics to study the effect of chloride depletion on the redox potential associated with the S1/S2 and S2/S3 transitions. PMID:27077688

  6. Effects of nickel chloride and oxygen depletion on behaviour and vitality of zebrafish (Danio rerio, Hamilton, 1822) (Pisces, Cypriniformes) embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Cornelia; Köhler, H-R; Filser, Juliane; Gerhardt, Almut

    2008-04-01

    We examined acute (2 h exposure of 5-day-old larvae) and subchronic (exposure from fertilization up to an age of 11 days) effects of NiCl(2).6H2O on embryos and larvae of zebrafish (Danio rerio), both alone and in combination with oxygen depletion. The following endpoints were recorded: acute exposure: locomotory activity and survival; subchronic exposure: hatching rate, deformations, locomotory activity (at 5, 8 and 11 days) and mortality. In acute exposures nickel chloride (7.5-15 mg Ni/L) caused decreasing locomotory activity. Oxygen depletion (or=10 mg Ni/L resulted in delayed hatching at an age of 96 h, in decreased locomotory activity at an age of 5 days, and increased mortality at an age of 11 days (LC20=9.5 mg Ni/L). The observed LOEC for locomotory activity (7.5 mg Ni/L) is in the range of environmentally relevant concentrations. Since locomotory activity was already affected by acute exposure, this parameter is recommended to supplement commonly recorded endpoints of toxicity.

  7. Effects of oxygen-depleted atmospheres on survival and growth of Listeria monocytogenes on fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce stored at mild abuse commercial temperatures.

    PubMed

    O'Beirne, David; Gomez-Lopez, Vicente; Tudela, Juan A; Allende, Ana; Gil, Maria I

    2015-06-01

    The effects of oxygen-depleted atmospheres, 0.25% O2+12% CO2 (balance N2) and 2% O2 + 6% CO2 (balance N2), on growth of Listeria monocytogenes on fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce were determined. The study was carried out at mild abuse temperatures using controlled atmosphere chambers. During storage at a constant temperature of 7 °C, growth was enhanced at the lower oxygen level of 0.25% O2 by Day 10. Over 17 days of storage at temperatures designed to mimic mild abuse commercial conditions, there were again significantly higher counts under 0.25% O2 from Day 10 onwards. These were 0.9 and 0.7 log cycles higher on Days 14 and 17, respectively. When a model lettuce agar medium was used to eliminate possible interactions with competing flora the direct effects of the atmosphere enhancing the growth of L. monocytogenes was also observed. It is concluded that use of very O2-depleted atmospheres for control of enzymatic browning of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce may introduce a potential hazard under some commercial conditions. There is a need for greater vigilance and possibly additional measures to ensure consumer safety. PMID:25790986

  8. Production of reactive oxygen species in decoupled, Ca(2+)-depleted PSII and their use in assigning a function to chloride on both sides of PSII.

    PubMed

    Semin, Boris K; Davletshina, Lira N; Timofeev, Kirill N; Ivanov, Il'ya I; Rubin, Andrei B; Seibert, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Extraction of Ca(2+) from the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (PSII) in the absence of a chelator inhibits O2 evolution without significant inhibition of the light-dependent reduction of the exogenous electron acceptor, 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) on the reducing side of PSII. The phenomenon is known as "the decoupling effect" (Semin et al. Photosynth Res 98:235-249, 2008). Extraction of Cl(-) from Ca(2+)-depleted membranes (PSII[-Ca]) suppresses the reduction of DCPIP. In the current study we investigated the nature of the oxidized substrate and the nature of the product(s) of the substrate oxidation. After elimination of all other possible donors, water was identified as the substrate. Generation of reactive oxygen species HO, H2O2, and O 2 (·-) , as possible products of water oxidation in PSII(-Ca) membranes was examined. During the investigation of O 2 (·-) production in PSII(-Ca) samples, we found that (i) O 2 (·-) is formed on the acceptor side of PSII due to the reduction of O2; (ii) depletion of Cl(-) does not inhibit water oxidation, but (iii) Cl(-) depletion does decrease the efficiency of the reduction of exogenous electron acceptors. In the absence of Cl(-) under aerobic conditions, electron transport is diverted from reducing exogenous acceptors to reducing O2, thereby increasing the rate of O 2 (·-) generation. From these observations we conclude that the product of water oxidation is H2O2 and that Cl(-) anions are not involved in the oxidation of water to H2O2 in decoupled PSII(-Ca) membranes. These results also indicate that Cl(-) anions are not directly involved in water oxidation by the Mn cluster in the native PSII membranes, but possibly provide access for H2O molecules to the Mn4CaO5 cluster and/or facilitate the release of H(+) ions into the lumenal space.

  9. Sediment geochemical records of productivity and oxygen depletion along the margin of western North America during the past 60,000 years: teleconnections with Greenland Ice and the Cariaco Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.

    2007-01-01

    Many sediment records from the margins of the Californias (Alta and Baja) collected in water depths between 60 and 1200 m contain anoxic intervals (laminated sediments) that can be correlated with interstadial intervals as defined by the oxygen-isotope composition of Greenland ice (Dansgaard-Oeschger, D-O, cycles). These intervals include all or parts of Oxygen Isotope Stage 3 (OIS3; 60-24 cal ka), the Bo??lling/Allero??d warm interval (B/A; 15-13 cal ka), and the Holocene. This study uses organic carbon (Corg) and trace-element proxies for anoxia and productivity, namely elevated concentrations and accumulation rates of molybdenum and cadmium, in these laminated sediments to suggest that productivity may be more important than ventilation in producing changes in bottom-water oxygen (BWO) conditions on open, highly productive continental margins. The main conclusion from these proxies is that during the last glacial interval (LGI; 24-15 cal ka) and the Younger Dryas cold interval (YD; 13-11.6 cal ka) productivity was lower and BWO levels were higher than during OIS3, the B/A, and the Holocene on all margins of the Californias. The Corg and trace-element profiles in the LGI-B/A-Holocene transition in the Cariaco Basin on the margin of northern Venezuela are remarkably similar to those in the transition on the northern California margin. Correlation between D-O cycles in Greenland ice with gray-scale measurements in varved sediments in the Cariaco Basin also is well established. Synchronous climate-driven changes as recorded in the sediments on the margins of the Californias, sediments from the Cariaco Basin, and in the GISP-2 Greenland ice core support the hypothesis that changes in atmospheric dynamics played a major role in abrupt climate change during the last 60 ka. Millennial-scale cycles in productivity and oxygen depletion on the margins of the Californias demonstrate that the California Current System was poised at a threshold whereby perturbations of

  10. Temperature and Oxygen Isotope Composition of The Ediacaran Ocean: Constraints From Clumped Isotope Carbonate Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacie, M.; Eiler, J. M.; Fike, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    The temperature and chemical variations of the early oceans on Earth are highly debated, particularly for periods associated with significant evolutionary change and/or extinction. The temperature of past oceans has been estimated based on conventional carbonate-water and/or silicate-water stable oxygen isotope thermometry. Precambrian carbonates and silicates both exhibit a long-term secular trend of increasing δ18O values with decreasing age. This trend has been used to support two opposite - though related - interpretations: the Earth's oceans gradually cooled over the course of the Proterozoic eon, from a maximum of ~ 60-90°C at ~ 2.5Ga (and were, on average, relatively warm during much of the Paleozoic era) [1]. This interpretation has been supported by Si-isotope proxies and the thermal tolerances of proteins in various classes of microbial organisms [2-3]. Alternatively, the δ18O value of the oceans has gradually increased through time [4-5], and mean Earth surface temperatures varied over a narrow range similar to modern conditions. In other terms, one either assumes an ocean of constant δ18O and infers that climate varied dramatically, or vise versa. Finally, it is possible that post- depositional processes (e.g., diagenesis, burial metamorphism, weathering) has modified the δ18O values of all or most Precambrian sedimentary carbonates and silicates, overprinting any paleoclimatic variations. Carbonate 'clumped isotope' thermometry provides a new way to independently test these hypotheses because it allows one to determine the apparent growth temperatures of carbonate minerals based on their abundances of 13C-18O bonds, as reflected by the 'Δ47' value of CO2 extracted by phosphoric acid digestion [6]. This method is thermodynamically based and independent of the δ18O of water from which the carbonate grew. We will report the initial results of measurements of 'Δ47 for a suite of carbonates from the Sultanate of Oman. This Ediacaran age (~ 635 to

  11. Water column biogeochemistry of oxygen minimum zones in the eastern tropical North Atlantic and eastern tropical South Pacific oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löscher, Carolin R.; Bange, Hermann W.; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Callbeck, Cameron M.; Engel, Anja; Hauss, Helena; Kanzow, Torsten; Kiko, Rainer; Lavik, Gaute; Loginova, Alexandra; Melzner, Frank; Meyer, Judith; Neulinger, Sven C.; Pahlow, Markus; Riebesell, Ulf; Schunck, Harald; Thomsen, Sören; Wagner, Hannes

    2016-06-01

    Recent modeling results suggest that oceanic oxygen levels will decrease significantly over the next decades to centuries in response to climate change and altered ocean circulation. Hence, the future ocean may experience major shifts in nutrient cycling triggered by the expansion and intensification of tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are connected to the most productive upwelling systems in the ocean. There are numerous feedbacks among oxygen concentrations, nutrient cycling and biological productivity; however, existing knowledge is insufficient to understand physical, chemical and biological interactions in order to adequately assess past and potential future changes. In the following, we summarize one decade of research performed in the framework of the Collaborative Research Center 754 (SFB754) focusing on climate-biogeochemistry interactions in tropical OMZs. We investigated the influence of low environmental oxygen conditions on biogeochemical cycles, organic matter formation and remineralization, greenhouse gas production and the ecology in OMZ regions of the eastern tropical South Pacific compared to the weaker OMZ of the eastern tropical North Atlantic. Based on our findings, a coupling of primary production and organic matter export via the nitrogen cycle is proposed, which may, however, be impacted by several additional factors, e.g., micronutrients, particles acting as microniches, vertical and horizontal transport of organic material and the role of zooplankton and viruses therein.

  12. Large-scale fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric and oceanic oxygen levels from the record of U in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, C. A.; Bekker, A.; Planavsky, N. J.; Scott, C. T.; Gill, B. C.; Li, C.; Podkovyrov, V.; Maslov, A.; Konhauser, K. O.; Lalonde, S. V.; Love, G. D.; Poulton, S. W.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-05-01

    The atmosphere-ocean system experienced a progressive change from anoxic to more oxidizing conditions through time. This oxidation is traditionally envisaged to have occurred as two stepwise increases in atmospheric oxygen at the beginning and end of the Proterozoic Eon. Here, we present a study of the redox-sensitive element, uranium, in organic-rich shales to track the history of Earth's surface oxidation at an unprecedented temporal resolution. Fluctuations in the degree of uranium enrichment in organic-rich shales suggest that the initial rise of atmospheric oxygen ~2.4 billion yr ago was followed by a decline to less oxidizing conditions during the mid-Proterozoic. This redox state persisted for almost 1 billion yr, ending with a second oxygenation event in the latest Neoproterozoic. The U record tracks major fluctuations in surface oxygen level and challenges conventional models that suggest the Earth underwent a unidirectional rise in atmospheric oxygen during the Precambrian.

  13. Metalliferous sediments from Eolo Seamount (Tyrrhenian Sea): Hydrothermal deposition and re-deposition in a zone of oxygen depletion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dekov, V.M.; Kamenov, George D.; Savelli, C.; Stummeyer, Jens; Thiry, M.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Willingham, A.L.; Boycheva, T.B.; Rochette, P.; Kuzmann, E.; Fortin, D.; Vertes, A.

    2009-01-01

    A sediment core taken from the south-east slope of the Eolo Seamount is composed of alternating red-brown and light-brown to bluish-grey layers with signs of re-deposition in the middle-upper section. The red-brown layers are Fe-rich metalliferous sediments formed as a result of low-temperature (??? 77????C) hydrothermal discharge, whereas the bluish-grey layers most probably originated from background sedimentation of Al-rich detrital material. The metalliferous layers are composed mainly of Si-rich goethite containing some Al. Co-precipitation of hydrothermally released SiO44- and Fe2+ as amorphous or poorly crystalline Fe-Si-oxyhydroxides explains the high Si concentration in goethite. The elevated Al content of the goethite is fairly unusual, but reflects the extremely high background Al content of the Tyrrhenian seawater due to the high eolian terrigenous flux from the Sahara desert. The Sr and Nd isotope data suggest that the Eolo metalliferous sediments are the product of a 3-component mixture: hydrothermal fluid, seawater, and detrital material (Saharan dust and Aeolian Arc material). The enrichment in Fe, P, As, Mo, Cd, Be, Sb, W, Y, V, depletion in REE and transition elements (Cu, Co, Ni, Zn) and the REE distribution patterns support the low-temperature hydrothermal deposition of the metalliferous layers. The hydrothermal field is located in a seawater layer of relative O2 depletion, which led to a significant fractionation of the hydrothermally emitted Fe and Mn. Fe-oxyhydroxides precipitated immediately around the vents whereas Mn stayed in solution longer and the Mn-oxides precipitated higher up on the seamount slope in seawater with relatively higher O2 levels. High seismic activity led to sediment re-deposition and slumping of the Mn-rich layers down slope and mixing with the Fe-rich layers. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluating CMIP5 ocean biogeochemistry and Southern Ocean carbon uptake using atmospheric potential oxygen: Present-day performance and future projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevison, C. D.; Manizza, M.; Keeling, R. F.; Stephens, B. B.; Bent, J. D.; Dunne, J.; Ilyina, T.; Long, M.; Resplandy, L.; Tjiputra, J.; Yukimoto, S.

    2016-03-01

    Observed seasonal cycles in atmospheric potential oxygen (APO ~ O2 + 1.1 CO2) were used to evaluate eight ocean biogeochemistry models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Model APO seasonal cycles were computed from the CMIP5 air-sea O2 and CO2 fluxes and compared to observations at three Southern Hemisphere monitoring sites. Four of the models captured either the observed APO seasonal amplitude or phasing relatively well, while the other four did not. Many models had an unrealistic seasonal phasing or amplitude of the CO2 flux, which in turn influenced APO. By 2100 under RCP8.5, the models projected little change in the O2 component of APO but large changes in the seasonality of the CO2 component associated with ocean acidification. The models with poorer performance on present-day APO tended to project larger net carbon uptake in the Southern Ocean, both today and in 2100.

  15. Middle-Upper Permian carbon isotope stratigraphy at Chaotian, South China: Pre-extinction multiple upwelling of oxygen-depleted water onto continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Masafumi; Isozaki, Yukio; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro; Yao, Jianxin; Ji, Zhansheng

    2013-05-01

    In order to examine the causal relationships between the carbon cycle in a shallow euphotic zone and the environmental changes in a relatively deep disphotic zone at the end-Guadalupian (Middle Permian), isotopic compositions of carbonate carbon (δ13Ccarb) of the Guadalupian-Lopingian (Upper Permian) rocks were analyzed in the Chaotian section in northern Sichuan, South China. By analyzing exceptionally fresh drill core samples, a continuous chemostratigraphic record was newly obtained. The ca. 65 m-thick analyzed carbonate rocks at Chaotian comprise three stratigraphic units, i.e., the Limestone Unit of the Guadalupian Maokou Formation, the Mudstone Unit of the Maokou Formation, and the lower part of the Wuchiapingian (Lower Lopingian) Wujiaping Formation, in ascending order. The Limestone Unit of the Maokou Formation is characterized by almost constant δ13Ccarb values of ca. +4‰ followed by an abrupt drop for 7‰ to -3‰ in the topmost part of the unit. In the Mudstone Unit of the Maokou Formation, the δ13Ccarb values are rather constant around +2‰, although distinct three isotopic negative excursions for 3‰ from ca. +2 to -1‰ occurred in the upper part of the unit. In the lower part of the Wujiaping Formation, the δ13Ccarb values monotonously increase for 5‰ from ca. 0 to +5‰. The present data newly demonstrated four isotopic negative excursions in the topmost part of the Maokou Formation in the Capitanian (Late Guadalupian) at Chaotian. It is noteworthy that these negative excursions are in accordance with the emergence of an oxygen-depleted condition on the relatively deep disphotic slope/basin on the basis of litho- and bio-facies characteristics. They suggest multiple upwelling of oxygen-depleted waters with dissolved inorganic carbon of relatively low carbon isotope values along the continental margin, from the deeper disphotic slope/basin to the shallower euphotic shelf, slightly before the end-Guadalupian extinction. Although the

  16. Recent planktic foraminifers in the Fram Strait (Arctic Ocean): carbon and oxygen stable isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pados, T.; Spielhagen, R. F.; Bauch, D.; Meyer, H.; Segl, M.

    2012-12-01

    In paleoceanographic reconstructions the carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of fossil foraminifers refer to, e.g., paleoproductivity and stratification, while oxygen isotopic (δ18O) records provide information about variations in sea surface temperatures and salinities in the past. However, for a correct interpretation of the fossil data it is important to improve our understanding of the correlation between recent oceanic variability and the composition of shells of living calcareous microorganisms. For this, the upper water column and sediment surface in the Fram Strait (Arctic Ocean, 78°50'N, 5°W-8°E) were sampled for planktic foraminifer species Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sin.) and Turborotalita quinqueloba with a large-diameter multinet and a multicorer, respectively. The δ13C and δ18O values of the shells are compared to the stable isotope composition of the ambient water and to equilibrium calcite values to define the preferred calcification depths of the foraminifers and to determine the factors controlling the isotopic signature of these calcareous microorganisms. The study area was chosen because of its high oceanographic variability: in the eastern Fram Strait the northward flowing West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) carries Atlantic Water, with a thin mixed layer on top, while in the west the upper 200 m consists of cold, low-saline Arctic outflow waters of the East Greenland Current (EGC) and warmer, saline waters of Atlantic origin underneath. Despite this variable oceanographic regime along the studied transect, the stable carbon isotope ratios of the shells do not show major differences according to their horizontal but to their vertical distribution: the δ13C values of N. pachyderma (sin.) from plankton tow samples vary roughly between -1 and -0.1‰ depending on the water depth, while the δ18O values of the tests differ more between the stations.

  17. Geochemistry of brachiopods: Oxygen and carbon isotopic records of Paleozoic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veizer, Ján; Fritz, Peter; Jones, Brian

    1986-08-01

    Combined trace element and isotope studies of 319 brachiopods, covering the Ordovician to Permian time span, show that δ 13C and δ 18O in well preserved specimens varied during the Paleozoic. The overall δ 13C secular trend is in accord with the previously published observations, but its details are obscured by vital isotopic fractionation effects at generic level. Nonetheless, the results suggest that the negative correlation between marine δ 13C carbonate and δ 34S sulphate deteriorates at time scales of ⩽ 10 6 years, due to the long residence time, and thus slow response, of SO 42- in the ocean. For oxygen isotopes, all Devonian and older specimens have δ 18O of ⩽ -4%, while the well preserved Permian samples have near-present day δ 18O of about -1% (PDB). This isotopic dichotomy is probably not due to post-depositional phenomena, salinity, or biogenic fractionation effects. This leaves open the perennial arguments for a change in 18O /16O of sea water versus warmer ancient oceans. The present data are difficult to explain solely by the temperature alternative. The coincidence of the proposed shift in δ 18O with the large Late Paleozoic changes in marine 87Sr /86Sr , 13C /12C , 34S /32S , and "sea level stands" argues for a tectonic cause and for a change in 18O /16O of sea water, although such explanation is difficult to reconcile with global balance considerations and with isotopic patterns observed in alteration products of ancient basalts and ophiolites. Whatever the precise cause, or combination of causes, the implications for tectonism and/or paleoclimatology are of first order significance.

  18. OVOC (Oxygenated Volatile Organic Chemicals) in the Global Atmosphere: Atmospheric Budgets, Oceanic Concentrations, and Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.

    2004-01-01

    Airborne measurements of oxygenated volatile organic chemicals (OVOC), OH free radicals, and tracers of pollution were performed over the Pacific during Winter/Spring of 2001. Large concentrations of OVOC are present in the global troposphere and are expected to play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. Their total abundance (SIGMAOVOC) was nearly twice that of non-methane hydrocarbons (SIGMAC2-C8 NMHC). Throughout the troposphere, the OH reactivity of OVOC is comparable to that of methane and far exceeds that of NHMC. A comparison of these data with western Pacific observations collected some seven years earlier (Feb.-March, 1994) did not reveal significant differences. Analysis of the relative enhancement of selected OVOC with respect to CH3Cl and CO in twelve plumes originating from fires and sampled in the free troposphere (3-11 km) is used to assess their primary and secondary emissions from biomass combustion. The composition of these plumes also indicates a large shift of reactive nitrogen into the PAN reservoir thereby limiting ozone formation. These data are combined with other observations and interpreted with the help of a global 3-D model to assess OVOC global sources and sinks. We further interpret atmospheric observations with the help of an air-sea exchange model io show that oceans can be both net sorces and sinks. An extremely large oceanic reservoir of OVOC, that exceeds the atmospheric reservoir by more than an order of magnitude, can be inferred to be present. We conclude that OVOC sources are extremely large (150-500 TgC y-1) but remain poorly quantified. In many cases, measured concentrations are uncertain and incompatible with our present knowledge of atmospheric chemistry. Results based on observations from several field studies and critical gaps will be discussed.

  19. Oceanic acidification affects marine carbon pump and triggers extended marine oxygen holes.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Matthias; Schellnhuber, Hans-Joachim

    2009-03-01

    Rising atmospheric CO(2) levels will not only drive future global mean temperatures toward values unprecedented during the whole Quaternary but will also lead to massive acidification of sea water. This constitutes by itself an anthropogenic planetary-scale perturbation that could significantly modify oceanic biogeochemical fluxes and severely damage marine biota. As a step toward the quantification of such potential impacts, we present here a simulation-model-based assessment of the respective consequences of a business-as-usual fossil-fuel-burning scenario where a total of 4,075 Petagrams of carbon is released into the atmosphere during the current millennium. In our scenario, the atmospheric pCO(2) level peaks at approximately 1,750 microatm in the year 2200 while the sea-surface pH value drops by >0.7 units on global average, inhibiting the growth of marine calcifying organisms. The study focuses on quantifying 3 major concomitant effects. The first one is a significant (climate-stabilizing) negative feedback on rising pCO(2) levels as caused by the attenuation of biogenic calcification. The second one is related to the biological carbon pump. Because mineral ballast, notably CaCO(3), is found to play a dominant role in carrying organic matter through the water column, a reduction of its export fluxes weakens the strength of the biological carbon pump. There is, however, a third effect with severe consequences: Because organic matter is oxidized in shallow waters when mineral-ballast fluxes weaken, oxygen holes (hypoxic zones) start to expand considerably in the oceans in our model world--with potentially harmful impacts on a variety of marine ecosystems.

  20. Spatiotemporal Variability in the Salinity-Oxygen Isotope Relationship of Seawater Across the Tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, J. L.; Thompson, D. M.; Martin, N. J.; Cobb, K. M.; Noone, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between sea surface salinity and the stable oxygen isotope composition of seawater (δ18Osw) is of utmost importance to the quantitative reconstruction of past changes in sea surface salinity and sea surface temperature from δ18O values of marine carbonates. This relationship is often considered to be a uniform across ocean basins, but the constancy of the salinity-oxygen isotope relationship across space and time is highly uncertain due to a dearth of paired salinity-δ18Osw measurements. Here we present new linear salinity-δ18Osw relationships from weekly seawater sampling programs at sites spanning the tropical Pacific Ocean. New data from Palau, Papua New Guinea, and Galápagos show a strong and statistically significant relationship between salinity and δ18Osw. We were unable to detect a δ18Osw-salinity relationship at Kiritimati due to the low seasonal variability in salinity and δ18Osw, although lagoonal samples did show a significant salinity-δ18Osw relationship. The slope of the δ18O-salinity relationship was largest in Palau and Papua New Guinea and smallest in the Galápagos, consistent with increasing salinity-δ18Osw slopes from east to west in previous isotope-enabled model simulations. These results suggest that modeling δ18O carbonate using a constant salinity-δ18Osw slope may underestimate the contribution of δ18Osw to δ18O carbonate variance in the western tropical Pacific, and overestimate its contribution in the eastern tropical Pacific. A comparison of salinity-δ18Osw relationships derived from spatial surveys and time series at Papua New Guinea and Galápagos suggests space-for-time substitution is reasonable at these sites, at least within the time period of the investigation. However, the salinity-δ18Osw relationship varied temporally at Palau, with a larger slope occurring during a period of enhanced ENSO variability from 1998-2000 versus a period of more subdued ENSO variability from 2013-2014.

  1. Oxygenation of the shallow ocean after the Great Oxidation Event: Geochemistry and Carbon isotopes of the Paleoproterozoic Hutuo Group in North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Z.; Yang, F.; Papineau, D.

    2013-12-01

    the 2.1-2.0 Ga Zaonega Fm in the Fennoscandian Shield, thus correspond to pulsed oxidation of biomass in an oxygenated shallow ocean. The geochemical signatures of the carbonates which show minimal contamination by terrigenous materials provides constrains on the chemistry of the Paleoproterozoic ocean. PAAS-normalized REE patterns are flat or slightly LREE-depleted with variable but slightly negative to positive shale-normalized Ce anomaly and evident Eu anomaly. The carbonates have low concentrations of U, Mo, Co and Ni, and show upsection decrease in Mo, Co and Ni abundances, consistent with increasing redox states. Metapelites from the Hutuo Group show slightly positive Eu anomaly and low Mo concentrations and U/Th ratios (0.33 - 0.10), consistent with deposition in an oxygenated environment. Collectively, the data document the fluctuations of ocean redox states and final oxygenation of the Hutuo Basin in the aftermath of the GOE. Blooms of stromatolite-building cyanobacteria caused by high nutrient availability following the GOE might have played key roles in the final oxygenation of the atmosphere and shallow oceans.

  2. Fungal diversity in oxygen-depleted regions of the Arabian Sea revealed by targeted environmental sequencing combined with cultivation.

    PubMed

    Jebaraj, Cathrine S; Raghukumar, Chandralata; Behnke, Anke; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2010-03-01

    In order to study fungal diversity in oxygen minimum zones of the Arabian Sea, we analyzed 1440 cloned small subunit rRNA gene (18S rRNA gene) sequences obtained from environmental samples using three different PCR primer sets. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses yielded 549 distinct RFLP patterns, 268 of which could be assigned to fungi (Dikarya and zygomycetes) after sequence analyses. The remaining 281 RFLP patterns represented a variety of nonfungal taxa, even when using putatively fungal-specific primers. A substantial number of fungal sequences were closely related to environmental sequences from a range of other anoxic marine habitats, but distantly related to known sequences of described fungi. Community similarity analyses suggested distinctively different structures of fungal communities from normoxic sites, seasonally anoxic sites and permanently anoxic sites, suggesting different adaptation strategies of fungal communities to prevailing oxygen conditions. Additionally, we obtained 26 fungal cultures from the study sites, most of which were closely related (>97% sequence similarity) to well-described Dikarya. This indicates that standard cultivation mainly produces more of what is already known. However, two of these cultures were highly divergent to known sequences and seem to represent novel fungal groups on high taxonomic levels. Interestingly, none of the cultured isolates is identical to any of the environmental sequences obtained. Our study demonstrates the importance of a multiple-primer approach combined with cultivation to obtain deeper insights into the true fungal diversity in environmental samples and to enable adequate intersample comparisons of fungal communities.

  3. Water column biogeochemistry of oxygen minimum zones in the eastern tropical North Atlantic and eastern tropical South Pacific Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löscher, C. R.; Bange, H. W.; Schmitz, R. A.; Callbeck, C. M.; Engel, A.; Hauss, H.; Kanzow, T.; Kiko, R.; Lavik, G.; Loginova, A.; Melzner, F.; Neulinger, S. C.; Pahlow, M.; Riebesell, U.; Schunck, H.; Thomsen, S.; Wagner, H.

    2015-03-01

    Recent modeling results suggest that oceanic oxygen levels will decrease significantly over the next decades to centuries in response to climate change and altered ocean circulation. Hence the future ocean may experience major shifts in nutrient cycling triggered by the expansion and intensification of tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). There are numerous feedbacks between oxygen concentrations, nutrient cycling and biological productivity; however, existing knowledge is insufficient to understand physical, chemical and biological interactions in order to adequately assess past and potential future changes. We investigated the pelagic biogeochemistry of OMZs in the eastern tropical North Atlantic and eastern tropical South Pacific during a series of cruise expeditions and mesocosm studies. The following summarizes the current state of research on the influence of low environmental oxygen conditions on marine biota, viruses, organic matter formation and remineralization with a particular focus on the nitrogen cycle in OMZ regions. The impact of sulfidic events on water column biogeochemistry, originating from a specific microbial community capable of highly efficient carbon fixation, nitrogen turnover and N2O production is further discussed. Based on our findings, an important role of sinking particulate organic matter in controlling the nutrient stochiometry of the water column is suggested. These particles can enhance degradation processes in OMZ waters by acting as microniches, with sharp gradients enabling different processes to happen in close vicinity, thus altering the interpretation of oxic and anoxic environments.

  4. Oxygenation of a Cryogenian ocean (Nanhua Basin, South China) revealed by pyrite Fe isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feifei; Zhu, Xiangkun; Yan, Bin; Kendall, Brian; Peng, Xi; Li, Jin; Algeo, Thomas J.; Romaniello, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    The nature of ocean redox chemistry between the Cryogenian Sturtian and Marinoan glaciations (ca. 663-654 Ma) is important for understanding the relationship between environmental conditions and the subsequent emergence and expansion of early animals. The Cryogenian-to-Ediacaran stratigraphic succession of the Nanhua Basin in South China provides a nearly complete sedimentary record of the Cryogenian, including a continuous record of interglacial sedimentation. Here, we present a high-resolution pyrite Fe isotope record for a ∼120-m-long drill-core (ZK105) through Sturtian glacial diamictites and the overlying interglacial sediments in the Nanhua Basin to explore changes in marine chemistry during the late Cryogenian. Our pyrite Fe isotope profile exhibits significant stratigraphic variation: Interval I, comprising middle to upper Tiesi'ao diamictites (correlative with the Sturtian glaciation), is characterized by light, modern seawater-like Fe isotope compositions; Interval II, comprising uppermost Tiesi'ao diamictites and the basal organic-rich Datangpo Formation, is characterized by an abrupt shift to heavier Fe isotope compositions; and Interval III, comprising organic-poor grey shales in the middle Datangpo Formation, is characterized by the return of lighter, seawater-like Fe isotope compositions. We infer that Interval I pyrite was deposited in a predominantly anoxic glacial Nanhua Basin through reaction of dissolved Fe2+ and H2S mediated by microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). The shift to heavier pyrite Fe isotope values in Interval II is interpreted as partial oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron and subsequent near-quantitative reduction and transformation of Fe-oxyhydroxides to pyrite through coupling with oxidation of organic matter in the local diagenetic environment. In Interval III, near-quantitative oxidation of ferrous iron to Fe-oxyhydroxides followed by near-quantitative reduction and conversion to pyrite in the local diagenetic environment

  5. Decoupling of the Processes of Molecular Oxygen Synthesis and Electron Transport in Ca2+-Depleted PSII Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Semin, B. K.; Davletshina, L. N.; Ivanov, I. I.; Rubin, A. B.; Seibert, M.

    2008-10-01

    Extraction of Ca{sup 2+} from the O{sub 2}-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) membranes with 2 M NaCl in the light (PSII(-Ca/NaCl)) results in 90% inhibition of the O{sub 2}-evolution reaction. However, electron transfer from the donor to acceptor side of PSII, measured as the reduction of the exogenous acceptor 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP) under continuous light, is inhibited by only 30%. Thus, calcium extraction from the OEC inhibits the synthesis of molecular O{sub 2} but not the oxidation of a substrate we term X, the source of electrons for DCIP reduction. The presence of electron transfer across PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes was demonstrated using fluorescence induction kinetics, a method that does not require an artificial acceptor. The calcium chelator, EGTA (5 mM), when added to PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes, does not affect the inhibition of O{sub 2} evolution by NaCl but does inhibit DCIP reduction up to 92% (the reason why electron transport in Ca{sup 2+}-depleted materials has not been noticed before). Another chelator, sodium citrate (citrate/low pH method of calcium extraction), also inhibits both O{sub 2} evolution and DCIP reduction. The role of all buffer components (including bicarbonate and sucrose) as possible sources of electrons for PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes was investigated, but only the absence of chloride anions strongly inhibited the rate of DCIP reduction. Substitution of other anions for chloride indicates that Cl{sup -} serves its well-known role as an OEC cofactor, but it is not substrate X. Multiple turnover flash experiments have shown a period of four oscillations of the fluorescence yield (both the maximum level, F{sub max}, and the fluorescence level measured 50 s after an actinic flash in the presence of DCMU) in native PSII membranes, reflecting the normal function of the OEC, but the absence of oscillations in PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples. Thus, PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples do not evolve O{sub 2} but do transfer electrons from

  6. Life in the Slow, Dark, Salty, Cold and Oxygen-Depleted Lane - Insights on Habitability from Lake Vida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, A.

    2014-04-01

    Ice-entrained Lake Vida brine has provided an accessible natural habitat to study life in the slow lane - where cellular growth is limited, but not extinguished. We measured in situ stable isotopic signatures of N2O, SO42-, H2, conducted experiments utilizing stable isotope geochemical tracers to detect microbial transformations and employed radioisotopically-labeled amino acid precursors to detect cellular macromolecule biosynthesis. The results indicated a dominance of abiotic processes in the brine - yet support metabolically active life through detection of nominal rates of protein biosynthesis. At the same time, the brine has posed a challenge to our understanding of ecosystem energetics. Data collected thus far suggests that the brine is isolated from surfical processes and receives no new mass or energy from above. Calculations have estimated carbon remineralization rates, which indicate that resources should be depleted to the level of small molecules perhaps supporting a methanogenic ecosystem given the amount of time since encapsulation at the temperatures recorded - yet the brine is resource-rich harboring abundant bacteria and large molecules, in addition to a complex mixture of both reduced and oxidized compounds. This has motivated explorations into alternative sources of energy such as hydrogen - which was detected at levels ~ 10 micromolar - that could be generated by brine-rock interactions and supply endogenous energy to this closed ecosystem. This cold, salty, anoxic and organically rich brine, provides insight into a new category of habitable earth ecosystems that may also give us food for thought when considering habitability of giant planet icy worlds or of icy exoplanets. However, the methods we use, and the framework of scientific inquiry applied, are limited by perception and familiarity of rates of change that are important in human time scales. The Vida-icy brine ecosystem provides a model for expansion of our understanding of

  7. Large fluctuations of dissolved oxygen in the Indian and Pacific oceans during Dansgaard-Oeschger oscillations caused by variations of North Atlantic Deep Water subduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmittner, A.; Galbraith, E.D.; Hostetler, S.W.; Pedersen, Thomas F.; Zhang, R.

    2007-01-01

    Paleoclimate records from glacial Indian and Pacific oceans sediments document millennial-scale fluctuations of subsurface dissolved oxygen levels and denitrification coherent with North Atlantic temperature oscillations. Yet the mechanism of this teleconnection between the remote ocean basins remains elusive. Here we present model simulations of the oxygen and nitrogen cycles that explain how changes in deepwater subduction in the North Atlantic can cause large and synchronous variations of oxygen minimum zones, throughout the Northern Hemisphere of the Indian and Pacific oceans, consistent with the paleoclimate records. Cold periods in the North Atlantic are associated with reduced nutrient delivery to the upper Indo-Pacific oceans, thereby decreasing productivity. Reduced export production diminishes subsurface respiration of organic matter leading to higher oxygen concentrations and less denitrification. This effect of reduced oxygen consumption dominates at low latitudes. At high latitudes in the Southern Ocean and North Pacific, increased mixed layer depths and steepening of isopycnals improve ocean ventilation and oxygen supply to the subsurface. Atmospheric teleconnections through changes in wind-driven ocean circulation modify this basin-scale pattern regionally. These results suggest that changes in the Atlantic Ocean circulation, similar to those projected by climate models to possibly occur in the centuries to come because of anthropogenic climate warming, can have large effects on marine ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles even in remote areas. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Tuning the threshold voltage from depletion to enhancement mode in a multilayer MoS2 transistor via oxygen adsorption and desorption.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jie; Dhar, Sarit

    2016-01-14

    Selective chemical doping in two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is attractive for tailoring electrical properties according to device requirements. However, the ultra-thin 2D nature of MoS2 makes it difficult to realize effective doping by conventional ion implantation. Here, a simple method based on low-temperature (150 °C) annealing in air is developed for effective chemical doping in MoS2. We have demonstrated that the threshold voltage (V(th)) of multilayer MoS2 FET can be effectively tuned from depletion mode (V(th) = -1.8 V) to enhancement mode (V(th) = 1.1 V) by annealing in air at 150 °C. An energy band model based on electron trapping/detrapping due to oxygen adsorption on the MoS2 surface is proposed to explain the underlying mechanism. The model is consistent with an oxygen adsorption-desorption process evidenced by vacuum annealing that recovers the V(th) to its original value. These results can provide a simple approach for V(th) engineering and make a significant step toward 2D nanoelectronic device applications. PMID:26658374

  9. Experiments on oxygen desorption from surface warm seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A A

    1989-12-01

    This paper reports the results of scoping deaeration experiments conducted with warm surface seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in seawater at three locations (in the supply water, water leaving a predeaerator, and discharge water from an evaporator) were measured and used to estimate oxygen desorption levels. The results suggest that 7% to 60% of dissolved oxygen in the supply water was desorbed from seawater in the predeaerator for pressures ranging from 9 to 35 kPa. Bubble injection in the upcomer increased the oxygen desorption rate by 20% to 60%. The dependence of oxygen desorption with flow rate could not be determined. The data also indicated that at typical OC-OTEC evaporator pressures when flashing occurred, 75% to 95% of dissolved oxygen was desorbed overall from the warm seawater. The uncertainty in results is larger than one would desire. These uncertainties are attributed to the uncertainties and difficulties in the dissolved oxygen measurements. Methods to improve the measurements for future gas desorption studies for warm surface and cold deep seawater under OC-OTEC conditions are recommended. 14 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Experiments on oxygen desorption from surface warm seawater under Open-Cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OC-OTEC) conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaran, Ahmad A.

    1989-12-01

    This paper reports the results of scoping deaeration experiments conducted with warm surface seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in seawater at three locations (in the supply water, water leaving a predeaerator, and discharge water from an evaporator) were measured and used to estimate oxygen desorption levels. The results suggest that 7 pct to 60 pct of dissolved oxygen in the supply water was desorbed from seawater in the predeaerator for pressures ranging from 9 to 35 kPa. Bubble injection in the upcomer increased the oxygen desorption rate by 20 pct to 60 pct. The dependence of oxygen desorption with flow rate could not be determined. The data also indicated that at typical OC-OTEC evaporator pressures when flashing occurred, 75 pct to 95 pct of dissolved oxygen was desorbed overall from the warm seawater. The uncertainty in results is larger than one would desire. These uncertainties are attributed to the uncertainties and difficulties in the dissolved oxygen measurements. Methods to improve the measurements for future gas desorption studies for warm surface and cold deep seawater under OC-OTEC conditions are recommended.

  11. In-situ resistivity and Hall effect studies of persistent photoconductivity in oxygen-depleted YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitsch, W.; Stockinger, C.; Lang, W. |; Kula, W.; Sobolewski, R.

    1996-12-31

    The authors report on in-situ studies of the resistivity and the Hall effect in partially oxygen-depleted, metallic YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (YBCO) thin films during illumination with white light. The measurements were performed at temperatures of 100 K, 200 K, and 290 K and showed that the resistivity as well as the Hall coefficient decreased as a function of the illumination time. The photo-induced reduction of both quantities was largest at 290 K. Evaluation of the results of the Hall effect measurements within a simple one-band model shows that both the carrier mobility and the carrier concentration are enhanced by photodoping at 100 K and 200 K, with the enhancement of the carrier concentration dominating. At 290 K, however, the mobility decreases at large illumination times, whereas the carrier concentration increases substantially, over-compensating for the loss of mobility. From the qualitatively different time dependencies of the carrier mobility and the carrier concentration, they conclude that two co-existing mechanisms contribute to photodoping: the first mechanism is related to a change of the electronic structure and is tentatively attributed to photo-assisted oxygen ordering. The second mechanism resembles the photogeneration of carriers in semiconductors and is ascribed to a photo-induced charge transfer. At 290 K, only the charge transfer process drives photodoping, whereas oxygen ordering seems to be hampered by thermal disordering. Additional evidence for the co-existence of the two persistent photoconductivity mechanisms is derived from measurements of the spectral efficiency of photodoping at 253 K. They observe a finite photodoping effect at photon energies above and below the charge transfer gap of YBCO. Above the gap energy ({approx} 1.6 eV), however, the efficiency of photodoping increases remarkably. The conclusion is that two mechanisms contribute to photodoping in metallic YBCO.

  12. A Phanerozoic I/Ca compilation: potential links to ocean oxygenation, carbon cycle and bio-diversification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Zhou, X.; Algeo, T. J.; Saltzman, M.; Thomas, E.; Jenkyns, H. C.; Rickaby, R. E. M.; Whalen, M. T.; Gutchess, K. M.; Hardisty, D. S.; Lyons, T.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved iodine in seawater is present as two chemical species: iodide or iodate in anoxic and oxygenated environments, respectively. Because only iodate can be incorporated into the carbonate structure, I/Ca values in marine carbonate and fossils potentially record seawater iodate concentrations. I/Ca has been used as a paleo-proxy for ocean oxygenation across different time scales, ranging from glacial-interglacial cycles to the abrupt warming and/or oceanic anoxic events of the Meso- and Cenozoic to long-term redox evolution during the Precambrian. Here we present a compilation of new and published I/Ca data for the Phanerozoic Eon showing a major increase of I/Ca at about 200 Ma, close to the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. This major change post-dates the rise of other paleo-oxygenation indicators, specifically increasing Mo-isotope compositions during the Devonian (Dahl et al., 2010) and the modeled increase in seawater sulfate concentrations in Carboniferous-Permian (Algeo et al., 2015). I/Ca is more sensitive to the level of dissolved O2 because the redox potential of iodate closely resembles that of O2. By contrast, Mo and S proxies are sensitive to more strongly reducing conditions, specifically the global distribution euxinia in the oceans. The increase of I/Ca in our compilation may indicate that the volume of oxygenated seawater expanded globally to near-modern levels around 200 Ma, which is also the time pelagic calcifiers proliferated (Zeebe and Westbroek, 2003). These planktonic organisms might have shifted the O2 consumption pattern and nutrient cycle, leading to the final oxygenation of ocean interiors. Fundamental changes in global cycling of redox sensitive elements (Mo, S, I) also coincide with diversification of marine invertebrates (Alroy et al., 2008). These observations highlight that stepwise oxygenation of global oceans and the co-evolution of life may have been a protracted process spanning two-thirds of the Phanerozoic. References: Algeo

  13. Oxygen Isotopes Reveal Attenuation in Latitudinal Ocean Temperature Gradient during the Permian Icehouse to Hothouse Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultis, A. I.; Frank, T. D.; Fielding, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    To assess changes in paleolatitudinal temperature gradient in the Permian ocean system during the demise of the Late Paleozoic Ice Age (LPIA), we analyzed the oxygen isotope composition of high latitude brachiopod and bivalve shells and compared them to published low latitude isotope records. We selected brachiopods and Eurydesma bivalves of Early to Middle Permian age that lie along a transect extending from temperate paleolatitudes in Queensland to polar paleolatitudes in Tasmania. Using cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy and elemental analyses, diagenically altered samples were separated from well-preserved samples for isotopic analysis. Samples that were nonluminescent were prepared for elemental screening, and brachiopod and bivalve samples that passed both CL and trace element screening methods were analyzed for oxygen and carbon isotopes. The δ18O values reveal a long-term decrease in the paleolatitudinal temperature gradient from Early Permian (Sakmarian) and late Middle Permian (Capitanian), which parallels the trend in climate associated with the demise of LPIA. Transient decreases from glacial to non-glacial epochs are also evident. The δ18O values from well-preserved samples are as high as 0.1% during glacial epoch P2 (287-280 Ma: late Sakmarian to mid-Artinskian) and drop to -3.0% in the nonglacial interval between P2 and glacial epoch P3 (273-268 Ma: late Kungurian to latest Roadian). High-latitude δ18O values then rise to -1.5% during P3 and drop to -3.8% during the subsequent nonglacial interval. Low latitude δ18O values from the literature are as high as -2.3% during the P2 and drop to -2.9% in the nonglacial interval between P2 and the P3. δ18O values then rise to -1.6% during P3. Low latitude δ18O values drop to -4.4% between P3 and P4 and rise again to -2.4% during the P4 glacial epoch (267-260 Ma: late Wordian to late Capitanian). This comparison of high and low latitude δ18O suggests that meridional sea surface temperature gradients

  14. Carbon and oxygen isotopic disequilibrium during calcification of Globigerina bulloides in the Southern ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, P.; Ghosh, P.; N, A.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotopes in planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides recovered from the water column of 0-1000 m depth across the meridional transect i.e. 10°N to 53°S of Indian ocean were compared with the available data from the core-top samples across the same transect. We also recorded in situ temperatures of the water column based on probe (CTD) profiles. The δ18O and δ13C values measured in the core top samples matches with the tow results. The equilibrium δ18O of calcite calculated from known temperature and δ18O of water column allowed us to compare the observed δ18O of formaminieral shell with the expected equilibrium values. Our comparison of carbonate composition in the samples between 10°N till 40°S showed excellent match with the expected equilibrium δ18O values established from the water collected at depth range of ~75-200m, however beyond 40°S the disequilibrium was pronounced with heavier δ18O (enriched by ~1.5‰) recorded in the carbonate as compared with the expected equilibrium δ18O values established from water. This observation was further verified with δ13C measurement of shell carbonates comparing with the equilibrium δ13C of calcite calculated with known temperature and δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon in the water column. The δ13C of the shell carbonate was found heavier as compared to the expected equilibrium δ13C. Both δ18O and δ13C showed simultaneous enrichment signature in the region beyond 40°S suggesting role of processes such as leaching along with dissolution of shell carbonate in a relatively acidic condition.

  15. Characterizing seawater oxygen isotopic variability in a regional ocean modeling framework: Implications for coral proxy records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, S.; Powell, B. S.; Merrifield, M. A.; Cobb, K. M.; Nusbaumer, J.; Noone, D.

    2015-11-01

    Reconstructions of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are often created using the oxygen isotopic ratio in tropical coral skeletons (δ18O). However, coral δ18O can be difficult to interpret quantitatively, as it reflects changes in both temperature and the δ18O value of seawater. Small-scale (10-100 km) processes affecting local temperature and seawater δ18O are also poorly quantified and contribute an unknown amount to intercoral δ18O offsets. A new version of the Regional Ocean Modeling System capable of directly simulating seawater δ18O (isoROMS) is therefore presented to address these issues. The model is used to simulate δ18O variations over the 1979-2009 period throughout the Pacific at coarse (O(50 km)) resolution, in addition to 10 km downscaling experiments covering the central equatorial Pacific Line Islands, a preferred site for paleo-ENSO reconstruction from corals. A major impact of downscaling at the Line Islands is the ability to resolve fronts associated with tropical instability waves (TIWs), which generate large excursions in both temperature and seawater δ18O at Palmyra Atoll (5.9°N, 162.1°W). TIW-related sea surface temperature gradients are smaller at neighboring Christmas Island (1.9°N, 157.5°W), but the interaction of mesoscale features with the steep island topography nonetheless generates cross-island temperature differences of up to 1°C. These nonlinear processes alter the slope of the salinity:seawater δ18O relationship at Palmyra and Christmas, as well as affect the relation between coral δ18O and indices of ENSO variability. Consideration of the full physical oceanographic context of reef environments is therefore crucial for improving δ18O-based ENSO reconstructions.

  16. Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotope Composition of Archaean Oceans Preserved in the ~3.8 Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, E. C.; Rosing, M.; Bird, D. K.

    2010-12-01

    The hydrogen isotope composition of Earth’s oceans is dependent on fluxes from the mantle, continental crust, surficial and groundwater reservoirs, and the incoming and outgoing flux of hydrogen from space. δD values of serpentinites from the Isua supracrustal belt in West Greenland range from -53 to -99‰. The upper limit of these values demonstrably preserves a signature of original seawater metasomatism, and gives a lower limit δD value for early Archaean oceans of -26‰ based on equilibrium fractionation. We propose that the progressive increase in δDOCEAN since this time is due to the preferential uptake of hydrogen in continent-forming minerals, and to hydrogen escape via biogenic methanogenesis. At most, 1.4x1022 mol H2 has been lost due to hydrogen escape, depending on the volume of continents already present at ca. 3.8 Ga, and oceans at this time were likely ~109 to 125% the size of modern day oceans. This upper limit suggests that atmospheric methane levels in the Archaean were less than 500ppmv, limiting the extent to which atmospheric greenhouse gases counteracted the faint early Sun. Oxygen isotope compositions from the same serpentinites (+0.1 to 5.6‰) indicate that the δ18O of Early Archaean oceans was ~ 0-4‰; similar to modern values. Based on this, we propose that low δ18O values of Archaean and Paleozoic cherts and carbonates are not a function of changing ocean isotope composition, but rather are due to isotopic exchange with shallow hydrothermal fluids on the ocean floor or during diagenesis.

  17. Hypoxia Tolerance and Metabolic Suppression in Oxygen Minimum Zone Euphausiids: Implications for Ocean Deoxygenation and Biogeochemical Cycles.

    PubMed

    Seibel, Brad A; Schneider, Jillian L; Kaartvedt, Stein; Wishner, Karen F; Daly, Kendra L

    2016-10-01

    zooplankton in oxygen minimum zones and may have important implications for the economy and ecology of the oceans. The interacting effects of oxygen and temperature on the metabolism of oceanic species facilitate predictions of changing vertical distribution with climate change. PMID:27507237

  18. Hypoxia Tolerance and Metabolic Suppression in Oxygen Minimum Zone Euphausiids: Implications for Ocean Deoxygenation and Biogeochemical Cycles.

    PubMed

    Seibel, Brad A; Schneider, Jillian L; Kaartvedt, Stein; Wishner, Karen F; Daly, Kendra L

    2016-10-01

    zooplankton in oxygen minimum zones and may have important implications for the economy and ecology of the oceans. The interacting effects of oxygen and temperature on the metabolism of oceanic species facilitate predictions of changing vertical distribution with climate change.

  19. Alantolactone induces apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells via reactive oxygen species generation, glutathione depletion and inhibition of the Bcl-2/Bax signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, YAN; XU, HANJIE; WANG, JIAFEI

    2016-01-01

    Alantolactone is the active ingredient in frankincense, and is extracted from the dry root of elecampane. It has a wide variety of uses, including as an insect repellent, antibacterial, antidiuretic, analgesic and anticancer agent. In addition, alantolactone induces apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells, however, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study investigated whether alantolactone was able to induce apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells, and its potential mechanisms of action were analyzed. Treatment of HeLa cells with alantolactone (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 µM) for 12 h significantly inhibited growth in a dose-dependent manner. Cells treated with 30 µM of alantolactone for 0, 3, 6 and 12 h demonstrated marked induction of apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. Treatment of HeLa cells with 30 µM of alantolactone for 0, 3, 6 and 12 h significantly induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibited glutathione (GSH) production in HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner. Alantolactone additionally markedly inhibited the Bcl-2/Bax signaling pathway in HeLa cells. Therefore, administration of alantolactone induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells via ROS generation, GSH depletion and inhibition of the Bcl-2/Bax signaling pathway. PMID:27313767

  20. N-Acetyl Cysteine Depletes Reactive Oxygen Species and Prevents Dental Monomer-Induced Intrinsic Mitochondrial Apoptosis In Vitro in Human Dental Pulp Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Liu, Qian; Liu, Ying; Song, Qian; Yu, Fan; Yu, Haohan; Liu, Huan; Huang, Li; Chen, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the involvement of intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis in dental monomer-induced cytotoxicity and the influences of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) on this process. Methods Human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) were exposed to several dental monomers in the absence or presence of NAC, and cell viability, intracellular redox balance, morphology and function of mitochondria and key indicators of intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis were evaluated using various commercial kits. Results Dental monomers exerted dose-dependent cytotoxic effects on hDPCs. Concomitant to the over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of glutathione (GSH), differential changes in activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase were detected. Apoptosis, as indicated by positive Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) staining and activation of caspase-3, was observed after dental monomer treatment. Dental monomers impaired the morphology and function of mitochondria, and induced intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis in hDPCs via up-regulation of p53, Bax and cleaved caspase-3, and down-regulation of Bcl-2. NAC restored cell viability, relieved oxidative stress and blocked the apoptotic effects of dental monomers. Conclusions Dental monomers induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial intrinsic apoptosis in hDPCs. NAC could reduce the oxidative stress and thus protect hDPCs against dental monomer-induced apoptosis. PMID:26808507

  1. Modeling and evaluating the ecosystem of sea-grass beds, shallow waters without sea-grass, and an oxygen-depleted offshore area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohma, Akio; Sekiguchi, Yasuyuki; Nakata, Kisaburo

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the ecological mechanism of sea-grass beds (area 1), shallow waters/tidal flats without sea-grass near the mouth of a river (area 2), and an oxygen-depleted offshore area (area 3), we developed a numerical model, which could represent the biochemical and physical processes of the coastal marine ecosystem comprised of the above three areas. The model can represent the dynamics of coupled cycle of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and oxygen, dividing organic matter into five compartments viz: fast-labile POM, slow-labile POM, refractory POM, labile DOM, and refractory DOM. In addition, this model formulated three bacterial mineralization processes: oxic mineralization, suboxic mineralization, and anoxic mineralizaition. This model was applied to the "Jinno area (Jinno ecosystem)" of Atsumi Bay, Japan, where three types of areas (areas 1, 2, and 3) are all represented. The model reproduced the dynamics of the present field condition of the three areas accurately. From the analysis of the model results, we could indicate the characteristic processes of nutrient cycling in each different areas of an ecosystem. Biological fluxes, driven by suspension feeders, epiphytes and epifauna, were the main fluxes in area 1. Biological fluxes were also the main fluxes in area 2, but were largely driven by suspension feeders. In addition, physical fluxes of re-suspension in area 2 stood out compared to the other areas. Denitrification in area 2 is much larger than in areas 1 and 3. This is because the ratio of suboxic mineralization per all mineralization in that area is higher than in other areas. We also estimated the turnover rate of biological processes and physical processes in each area of the Jinno ecosystem to quantify the characteristics of nutrient cycling in each area. The turnover rate of biological or physical processes was defined as the ratio of the total biological or physical fluxes of a compartment to the mass of a compartment. The turnover rate of

  2. Benthic Oxygen Uptake in the Arctic Ocean Margins - A Case Study at the Deep-Sea Observatory HAUSGARTEN (Fram Strait)

    PubMed Central

    Cathalot, Cecile; Rabouille, Christophe; Sauter, Eberhard; Schewe, Ingo; Soltwedel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The past decades have seen remarkable changes in the Arctic, a hotspot for climate change. Nevertheless, impacts of such changes on the biogeochemical cycles and Arctic marine ecosystems are still largely unknown. During cruises to the deep-sea observatory HAUSGARTEN in July 2007 and 2008, we investigated the biogeochemical recycling of organic matter in Arctic margin sediments by performing shipboard measurements of oxygen profiles, bacterial activities and biogenic sediment compounds (pigment, protein, organic carbon, and phospholipid contents). Additional in situ oxygen profiles were performed at two sites. This study aims at characterizing benthic mineralization activity along local bathymetric and latitudinal transects. The spatial coverage of this study is unique since it focuses on the transition from shelf to Deep Ocean, and from close to the ice edge to more open waters. Biogeochemical recycling across the continental margin showed a classical bathymetric pattern with overall low fluxes except for the deepest station located in the Molloy Hole (5500 m), a seafloor depression acting as an organic matter depot center. A gradient in benthic mineralization rates arises along the latitudinal transect with clearly higher values at the southern stations (average diffusive oxygen uptake of 0.49 ± 0.18 mmol O2 m-2 d-1) compared to the northern sites (0.22 ± 0.09 mmol O2 m-2 d-1). The benthic mineralization activity at the HAUSGARTEN observatory thus increases southward and appears to reflect the amount of organic matter reaching the seafloor rather than its lability. Although organic matter content and potential bacterial activity clearly follow this gradient, sediment pigments and phospholipids exhibit no increase with latitude whereas satellite images of surface ocean chlorophyll a indicate local seasonal patterns of primary production. Our results suggest that predicted increases in primary production in the Arctic Ocean could induce a larger export of more

  3. Benthic Oxygen Uptake in the Arctic Ocean Margins - A Case Study at the Deep-Sea Observatory HAUSGARTEN (Fram Strait).

    PubMed

    Cathalot, Cecile; Rabouille, Christophe; Sauter, Eberhard; Schewe, Ingo; Soltwedel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The past decades have seen remarkable changes in the Arctic, a hotspot for climate change. Nevertheless, impacts of such changes on the biogeochemical cycles and Arctic marine ecosystems are still largely unknown. During cruises to the deep-sea observatory HAUSGARTEN in July 2007 and 2008, we investigated the biogeochemical recycling of organic matter in Arctic margin sediments by performing shipboard measurements of oxygen profiles, bacterial activities and biogenic sediment compounds (pigment, protein, organic carbon, and phospholipid contents). Additional in situ oxygen profiles were performed at two sites. This study aims at characterizing benthic mineralization activity along local bathymetric and latitudinal transects. The spatial coverage of this study is unique since it focuses on the transition from shelf to Deep Ocean, and from close to the ice edge to more open waters. Biogeochemical recycling across the continental margin showed a classical bathymetric pattern with overall low fluxes except for the deepest station located in the Molloy Hole (5500 m), a seafloor depression acting as an organic matter depot center. A gradient in benthic mineralization rates arises along the latitudinal transect with clearly higher values at the southern stations (average diffusive oxygen uptake of 0.49 ± 0.18 mmol O2 m-2 d-1) compared to the northern sites (0.22 ± 0.09 mmol O2 m-2 d-1). The benthic mineralization activity at the HAUSGARTEN observatory thus increases southward and appears to reflect the amount of organic matter reaching the seafloor rather than its lability. Although organic matter content and potential bacterial activity clearly follow this gradient, sediment pigments and phospholipids exhibit no increase with latitude whereas satellite images of surface ocean chlorophyll a indicate local seasonal patterns of primary production. Our results suggest that predicted increases in primary production in the Arctic Ocean could induce a larger export of more

  4. Benthic Oxygen Uptake in the Arctic Ocean Margins - A Case Study at the Deep-Sea Observatory HAUSGARTEN (Fram Strait).

    PubMed

    Cathalot, Cecile; Rabouille, Christophe; Sauter, Eberhard; Schewe, Ingo; Soltwedel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The past decades have seen remarkable changes in the Arctic, a hotspot for climate change. Nevertheless, impacts of such changes on the biogeochemical cycles and Arctic marine ecosystems are still largely unknown. During cruises to the deep-sea observatory HAUSGARTEN in July 2007 and 2008, we investigated the biogeochemical recycling of organic matter in Arctic margin sediments by performing shipboard measurements of oxygen profiles, bacterial activities and biogenic sediment compounds (pigment, protein, organic carbon, and phospholipid contents). Additional in situ oxygen profiles were performed at two sites. This study aims at characterizing benthic mineralization activity along local bathymetric and latitudinal transects. The spatial coverage of this study is unique since it focuses on the transition from shelf to Deep Ocean, and from close to the ice edge to more open waters. Biogeochemical recycling across the continental margin showed a classical bathymetric pattern with overall low fluxes except for the deepest station located in the Molloy Hole (5500 m), a seafloor depression acting as an organic matter depot center. A gradient in benthic mineralization rates arises along the latitudinal transect with clearly higher values at the southern stations (average diffusive oxygen uptake of 0.49 ± 0.18 mmol O2 m-2 d-1) compared to the northern sites (0.22 ± 0.09 mmol O2 m-2 d-1). The benthic mineralization activity at the HAUSGARTEN observatory thus increases southward and appears to reflect the amount of organic matter reaching the seafloor rather than its lability. Although organic matter content and potential bacterial activity clearly follow this gradient, sediment pigments and phospholipids exhibit no increase with latitude whereas satellite images of surface ocean chlorophyll a indicate local seasonal patterns of primary production. Our results suggest that predicted increases in primary production in the Arctic Ocean could induce a larger export of more

  5. Warming, euxinia and sea level rise during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum on the Gulf Coastal Plain: implications for ocean oxygenation and nutrient cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijs, A.; van Roij, L.; Harrington, G. J.; Schouten, S.; Sessa, J. A.; LeVay, L. J.; Reichart, G.-J.; Slomp, C. P.

    2014-07-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~ 56 Ma) was a ~ 200 kyr episode of global warming, associated with massive injections of 13C-depleted carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. Although climate change during the PETM is relatively well constrained, effects on marine oxygen concentrations and nutrient cycling remain largely unclear. We identify the PETM in a sediment core from the US margin of the Gulf of Mexico. Biomarker-based paleotemperature proxies (methylation of branched tetraether-cyclization of branched tetraether (MBT-CBT) and TEX86) indicate that continental air and sea surface temperatures warmed from 27-29 to ~ 35 °C, although variations in the relative abundances of terrestrial and marine biomarkers may have influenced these estimates. Vegetation changes, as recorded from pollen assemblages, support this warming. The PETM is bracketed by two unconformities. It overlies Paleocene silt- and mudstones and is rich in angular (thus in situ produced; autochthonous) glauconite grains, which indicate sedimentary condensation. A drop in the relative abundance of terrestrial organic matter and changes in the dinoflagellate cyst assemblages suggest that rising sea level shifted the deposition of terrigenous material landward. This is consistent with previous findings of eustatic sea level rise during the PETM. Regionally, the attribution of the glauconite-rich unit to the PETM implicates the dating of a primate fossil, argued to represent the oldest North American specimen on record. The biomarker isorenieratene within the PETM indicates that euxinic photic zone conditions developed, likely seasonally, along the Gulf Coastal Plain. A global data compilation indicates that O2 concentrations dropped in all ocean basins in response to warming, hydrological change, and carbon cycle feedbacks. This culminated in (seasonal) anoxia along many continental margins, analogous to modern trends. Seafloor deoxygenation and widespread (seasonal) anoxia likely

  6. Community composition of ammonia-oxidizing archaea from surface and anoxic depths of oceanic oxygen minimum zones.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuefeng; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) have been reported at high abundance in much of the global ocean, even in environments, such as pelagic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), where conditions seem unlikely to support aerobic ammonium oxidation. Due to the lack of information on any potential alternative metabolism of AOA, the AOA community composition might be expected to differ between oxic and anoxic environments. This hypothesis was tested by evaluating AOA community composition using a functional gene microarray that targets the ammonia monooxygenase gene subunit A (amoA). The relationship between environmental parameters and the biogeography of the Arabian Sea and the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) AOA assemblages was investigated using principal component analysis (PCA) and redundancy analysis (RDA). In both the Arabian Sea and the ETSP, AOA communities within the core of the OMZ were not significantly different from those inhabiting the oxygenated surface waters above the OMZ. The AOA communities in the Arabian Sea were significantly different from those in the ETSP. In both oceans, the abundance of archaeal amoA gene in the core of the OMZ was higher than that in the surface waters. Our results indicate that AOA communities are distinguished by their geographic origin. RDA suggested that temperature (higher in the Arabian Sea than in the ETSP) was the main factor that correlated with the differences between the AOA communities. Physicochemical properties that characterized the different environments of the OMZ and surface waters played a less important role, than did geography, in shaping the AOA community composition.

  7. Fe-XANES analyses of Reykjanes Ridge basalts: Implications for oceanic crust's role in the solid Earth oxygen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorttle, Oliver; Moussallam, Yves; Hartley, Margaret E.; Maclennan, John; Edmonds, Marie; Murton, Bramley J.

    2015-10-01

    3]source) we project observed liquid compositions to an estimate of Fe2O3 in the pure enriched endmember melt, and then apply simple fractional melting models, considering lherzolitic and pyroxenitic source mineralogies, to estimate [Fe2O3](source) content. Propagating uncertainty through these steps, we obtain a range of [Fe2O3](source) for the enriched melts (0.9-1.4 wt%) that is significantly greater than the ferric iron content of typical upper mantle lherzolites. This range of ferric iron contents is consistent with a hybridised lherzolite-basalt (pyroxenite) mantle component. The oxidised signal in enriched Icelandic basalts is therefore potential evidence for seafloor-hydrosphere interaction having oxidised ancient mid-ocean ridge crust, generating a return flux of oxygen into the deep mantle.

  8. Response of phytoplankton and dissolved oxygen and related marine ecological parameters to typhoon tropical cyclone in the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, DanLing

    Typhoons (tropical cyclones, or hurricanes) are strong wind events in the weather system, which influence the upper ocean dynamics and the ecosystem, in particular upwelling, water temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration and primary production and fish abundances. But little is known about the response of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration to a typhoon in the open ocean. This paper investigates the impact of a typhoon on DO concentration and related ecological parameters using in-situ and remote sensing data. The in-situ data were collected one week after the passage of the super-typhoon Nanmadol in the northern South China Sea in 2011. An increase in DO concentration, accompanied by a decrease in water temperature and an increase in salinity and Chl-a concentration, was measured at sampling stations close to the typhoon track. At these stations, maximum DO concentration was found at a depth of around 5 m and maximum Chl-a concentration at depths between 50 m and 75 m. The layer of high DO concentration extends from the surface to a depth of 35 m and the concentrations stay almost constant down to this depth. Due to the passage of the typhoon, also a large sea level anomaly (21.6 cm) and a high value of Ekman pumping velocity (4.0×10-4 m s-1) are observed, indicating upwelling phenomenon. At the same time, also intrusion of Kuroshio waters in the form of a loop current into the South China Sea (SCS) was observed. We attribute the increase of DO concentration after the passage of the typhoon to three effects:1) entrainment of oxygen from the air into the upper water layer and strong vertical mixing of the water body due to the typhoon winds, 2) upwelling of cold nutrient-rich water which stimulates photosynthesis of phytoplankton and thus the generation of oxygen, which also increases the DO concentration due to cold water since the solubility of oxygen increase with decreasing water temperature, and, possibly, 3) transport of DO enriched waters

  9. Air-Sea Exchange and Budget of Sulfur and Oxygen-Containing Volatile Organic Compounds in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, H.; Omori, Y.; Inomata, S.; Iwata, T.; Kameyama, S.

    2015-12-01

    By combining proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and gradient flux (GF) technique, in situ measurement of air-sea fluxes of multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was developed and deployed. Starting in 2008, we made in situ observations of air-sea fluxes at 15 locations as well as underway observations of marine air/surface seawater bulk concentrations in the Pacific Ocean, during eight research cruises by R/V Hakuho-Maru. The fluxes of biogenic trace gases, DMS and isoprene, were always positive, with the magnitudes being in accordance with previously reported. In contrast, the fluxes of oxygenated VOCs including acetone and acetaldehyde varied from negative to positive, suggesting that the tropical and subtropical Pacific are a source, while the North Pacific is a sink. A basin-scale budget of VOCs were determined for 4 biogeochemical provinces in the Pacific Ocean, and the role of oceans for VOCs were discussed with respect to physical and biogeochemical processes.

  10. Effects of ocean acidification on microbial community composition of, and oxygen fluxes through, biofilms from the Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Witt, Verena; Wild, Christian; Anthony, Kenneth R N; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Uthicke, Sven

    2011-11-01

    Rising anthropogenic CO(2) emissions acidify the oceans, and cause changes to seawater carbon chemistry. Bacterial biofilm communities reflect environmental disturbances and may rapidly respond to ocean acidification. This study investigates community composition and activity responses to experimental ocean acidification in biofilms from the Australian Great Barrier Reef. Natural biofilms grown on glass slides were exposed for 11 d to four controlled pCO(2) concentrations representing the following scenarios: A) pre-industrial (∼300 ppm), B) present-day (∼400 ppm), C) mid century (∼560 ppm) and D) late century (∼1140 ppm). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone library analyses of 16S rRNA genes revealed CO(2) -correlated bacterial community shifts between treatments A, B and D. Observed bacterial community shifts were driven by decreases in the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria and increases of Flavobacteriales (Bacteroidetes) at increased CO(2) concentrations, indicating pH sensitivity of specific bacterial groups. Elevated pCO(2) (C + D) shifted biofilm algal communities and significantly increased C and N contents, yet O(2) fluxes, measured using in light and dark incubations, remained unchanged. Our findings suggest that bacterial biofilm communities rapidly adapt and reorganize in response to high pCO(2) to maintain activity such as oxygen production.

  11. Autonomous observations of in vivo fluorescence and particle backscatteringin an oceanic oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Whitmire, A L; Letelier, R M; Villagrán, V; Ulloa, O

    2009-11-23

    The eastern South Pacific (ESP) oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) is a permanent hydrographic feature located directly off the coasts of northern Chile and Peru. The ESP OMZ reaches from coastal waters out to thousands of kilometers offshore, and can extend from the near surface to depths greater than 700 m. Oxygen minimum zones support unique microbial assemblages and play an important role in marine elemental cycles. We present results from two autonomous profiling floats that provide nine months of time-series data on temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a, and particulate backscattering in the ESP OMZ. We observed consistently elevated backscattering signals within low-oxygen waters, which appear to be the result of enhanced microbial biomass in the OMZ intermediate waters. We also observed secondary chlorophyll a fluorescence maxima within low-oxygen waters when the upper limit of the OMZ penetrated the base of the photic zone. We suggest that autonomous profiling floats are useful tools for monitoring physical dynamics of OMZs and the microbial response to perturbations in these areas.

  12. Northeastern Pacific oxygen minimum zone variability over the past 70 kyr: Impact of biological production and oceanic ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartapanis, Olivier; Tachikawa, Kazuyo; Bard, Edouard

    2011-12-01

    During the last glacial period, the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) within the northeastern Pacific Ocean strengthened and weakened on a millennial time scale, demonstrating a tight linkage with northern high latitude climate, although the precise mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Core MD02-2508, retrieved off Baja California, was analyzed for major and trace elements (Br, Ca, Ti, Fe, Mn, and Sr) using a XRF scanner and redox-sensitive trace elements (Cu, Ni, Cd, As, V, Cr, Mo, and U) using the ICP-MS. The trace element content, the Fe/Ti ratio, and Br-based organic carbon exhibit higher values during the Holocene and during warm Dansgaard-Oeschger events than during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), stadials, and Heinrich (H) events. A principal component analysis of the element/Al ratio indicated that the following two main factors controlled the chemical composition of the sediments: (1) export production, as represented by organic carbon, that was lower during cold periods; and (2) regional intermediate water oxygenation, as represented by U and Mo variability, that was not supported by a change in export production. The latter suggests that intermediate water oxygenation improved during H events, but slightly deteriorated during late Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 and MIS 2. A local biogeochemical effect, forced by atmospheric processes, impacted the LGM and H events in the same manner. Whereas regional intermediate oceanic circulation varied in an opposite manner during the LGM and H events, possibly as a result of the global reorganization of intermediate water circulation during the LGM.

  13. Dead zone or oasis in the open ocean? Zooplankton distribution and migration in low-oxygen modewater eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauss, Helena; Christiansen, Svenja; Schütte, Florian; Kiko, Rainer; Edvam Lima, Miryam; Rodrigues, Elizandro; Karstensen, Johannes; Löscher, Carolin R.; Körtzinger, Arne; Fiedler, Björn

    2016-04-01

    The eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) features a mesopelagic oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) at approximately 300-600 m depth. Here, oxygen concentrations rarely fall below 40 µmol O2 kg-1, but are expected to decline under future projections of global warming. The recent discovery of mesoscale eddies that harbour a shallow suboxic (< 5 µmol O2 kg-1) OMZ just below the mixed layer could serve to identify zooplankton groups that may be negatively or positively affected by ongoing ocean deoxygenation. In spring 2014, a detailed survey of a suboxic anticyclonic modewater eddy (ACME) was carried out near the Cape Verde Ocean Observatory (CVOO), combining acoustic and optical profiling methods with stratified multinet hauls and hydrography. The multinet data revealed that the eddy was characterized by an approximately 1.5-fold increase in total area-integrated zooplankton abundance. At nighttime, when a large proportion of acoustic scatterers is ascending into the upper 150 m, a drastic reduction in mean volume backscattering (Sv) at 75 kHz (shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler, ADCP) within the shallow OMZ of the eddy was evident compared to the nighttime distribution outside the eddy. Acoustic scatterers avoided the depth range between approximately 85 to 120 m, where oxygen concentrations were lower than approximately 20 µmol O2 kg-1, indicating habitat compression to the oxygenated surface layer. This observation is confirmed by time series observations of a moored ADCP (upward looking, 300 kHz) during an ACME transit at the CVOO mooring in 2010. Nevertheless, part of the diurnal vertical migration (DVM) from the surface layer to the mesopelagic continued through the shallow OMZ. Based upon vertically stratified multinet hauls, Underwater Vision Profiler (UVP5) and ADCP data, four strategies followed by zooplankton in response to in response to the eddy OMZ have been identified: (i) shallow OMZ avoidance and compression at the surface (e.g. most calanoid

  14. Dead zone or oasis in the open ocean? Zooplankton distribution and migration in low-oxygen modewater eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauss, H.; Christiansen, S.; Schütte, F.; Kiko, R.; Edvam Lima, M.; Rodrigues, E.; Karstensen, J.; Löscher, C. R.; Körtzinger, A.; Fiedler, B.

    2015-11-01

    The eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) features a mesopelagic oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) at approximately 300-600 m depth. Here, oxygen concentrations rarely fall below 40 μmol O2 kg-1, but are thought to decline in the course of climate change. The recent discovery of mesoscale eddies that harbour a shallow suboxic (< 5 μmol O2 kg-1) OMZ just below the mixed layer could serve to identify zooplankton groups that may be negatively or positively affected by on-going ocean deoxygenation. In spring 2014, a detailed survey of a suboxic anticyclonic modewater eddy (ACME) was carried out near the Cape Verde Ocean Observatory (CVOO), combining acoustic and optical profiling methods with stratified multinet hauls and hydrography. The multinet data revealed that the eddy was characterized by an approximately 1.5-fold increase in total area-integrated zooplankton abundance. A marked reduction in acoustic target strength (derived from shipboard ADCP, 75kHz) within the shallow OMZ at nighttime was evident. Acoustic scatterers were avoiding the depth range between about 85 to 120 m, where oxygen concentrations were lower than approximately 20 μmol O2 kg-1, indicating habitat compression to the oxygenated surface layer. This observation is confirmed by time-series observations of a moored ADCP (upward looking, 300 kHz) during an ACME transit at the CVOO mooring in 2010. Nevertheless, part of the diurnal vertical migration (DVM) from the surface layer to the mesopelagic continued through the shallow OMZ. Based upon vertically stratified multinet hauls, Underwater Vision Profiler (UVP5) and ADCP data, four strategies have been identified followed by zooplankton in response to the eddy OMZ: (i) shallow OMZ avoidance and compression at the surface (e.g. most calanoid copepods, euphausiids), (ii) migration to the shallow OMZ core during daytime, but paying O2 debt at the surface at nighttime (e.g. siphonophores, Oncaea spp., eucalanoid copepods), (iii) residing in the shallow

  15. Heavy Isotope Composition of Oxygen in Zircon from Soil Sample 14163: Lunar Perspective of an Early Ocean on the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Pidgeon, R. T.; Meyer, C.

    2006-01-01

    Thirty oxygen analyses of a large (sub-millimetre) zircon grain from the lunar soil sample 14163 have been determined using CAMECA 1270 ion microprobe. The sample 14163 was returned form the Fra Mauro region by Apollo 14 mission. Zircon grain of 0.6-0.8 mm in size extracted from the sample was imaged using CL detector fitted to the Philips Electron Microscope in order to reveal internal structure. Oxygen isotopes have been analysed during two sessions. The first set of data was collected using the original mount where the grain was set in the resin attached to the glass slide. This resulted in the two complications: (i) standard zircon has to be analysed from the separate mount and (ii) the lunar zircon grain was rased in the holder compared to the standard. In order to investigate, if the elevated oxygen compositions observed during this session could have resulted from this difference in geometric configuration during the standard and sample analyses, the lunar zircon was extracted from the original mount, remounted with the standard chip in the new resin disk and reanalysed during the second session. All analyses made during the first session show delta O-18 values heavier than 6.0%. The second set of data has a wider spread of delta O-18 values with some values as low as 5.6%. Nevertheless, a half of observed delta O-18 values in this set is also higher than 6.0%. Slightly lighter oxygen compositions observed during the second session indicate possible dependence of measured delta O-18 values on the geometry of analysed samples. Presence of zircons with similar heavy oxygen isotope compositions on the Moon, which neither had liquid water or felic crust similar to that on the Earth nor ever developed regime similar to plate tectonics, suggests that other mechanisms can be responsible for elevated delta O-18 values in zircons. This implies that there is no support for the presence of an ocean on the surface of the early Earth and as the ocean appears to be an

  16. REE signatures in 3.51 Ga BIF and Bedded Chert from Iron Ore Group, Singhbhum Craton, India: Implications for Paleoarchean Ocean Oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, J.; Ghosh, G.

    2013-12-01

    The metasedimentary rock records in Archaean greenmstone belts provide primary information on evolution of the early Earth. The bedded cherts and BIFs in particular have been studied from Paleo-Mesoarchean greenstone belts for understanding the nature of the oceanic circulation and for the record of early life. However, scarcity of low-strained Paleo-Mesoarchean successions is a major impediment in this regard. The southern Iron Ore Group (SIOG) (3506.8 × 2.3 Ma, U-Pb SHRIMP on zircon by Mukhopadhyay et al., 2008) of the Singhbhum Craton, eastern India includes low-grade bimodal volcanics-ultramafics and BIF -bearing greenstone succession. The bedded chert and BIFs in this succession show significant stratigraphic variation that suggests a stratified ocean and availability of dissolved oxygen in deep-water regime. Bedded chert occurs interleaved with either metabasics or with the silicic volcanics in the lower part of the succession. BIF occurs only towards the top of the succession conformably overlying the silicic volcanics. The bedded cherts with REE and other trace element compositions such as Cu, Co, Ni, Zr, Hf pointing towards contributions from terrigenous or silicic as well as mafic volcanic sources. In contrast BIFs with very low alumina content and superchondritic Y/Ho ratios (36.2 to 40.1) indicate negligible inputs from terrigenous source and is comparable to cherts from Cenozoic ridges. REE-compositions of the bedded chert with respect to PAAS show a flat pattern with feeble positive Eu-anomaly and negligible negative Ce-anomaly. The REE patterns in BIF though similar but show much stronger positive Eu-anomaly and negative Ce-anomaly in comparison. Stratigraphic trend in the geochemical proxies from bedded cherts to BIF, thus record a relative increase in positive Eu-anomaly and decrease in Ce-anomaly. The increase in Eu-anomaly coincident with the BIF deposition up section is likely to suggest increase in in hydrothermal input and ridge spreading

  17. [Photosynthesis and flows of organic carbon, carbon dioxide, and oxygen in the ocean].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A P; Vinogradov, M E

    2001-01-01

    The modern concept of photosynthesis as a mechanism for utilizing the energy of solar radiation is used as the basis for assessing the scale of photosynthetic production of initial organic matter in the ocean (primary biological production), its destruction, the carbon and carbon dioxide cycles (flows) involved in this process, and the size of oil- and gas-bearing hydrocarbonaceous formations originating in sedimentary deposits.

  18. A Mid-Holocene Shift and Millennial-Scale Variations in North Pacific Intermediate Water Oxygenation and Upper Ocean Hydrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembke-Jene, L.; Tiedemann, R.; Gong, X.; Nuernberg, D.; Max, L.; Lohmann, G.; Gorbarenko, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The subarctic North Pacific and its marginal seas constitute a key area in which rapid environmental changes over the past decades have been observed in instrumental records, like sea ice decreases, or alterations of nutrient inventories and oxygenation of mid-depth water masses. However, knowledge about the past climatic and oceanographic variability beyond instrumental time series in the subarctic North Pacific and its marginal seas is limited. Few temporally and spatially well-resolved high-resolution and spatially well datasets exist, with spatial and temporal coverage being insufficient to gain a detailed picture of past variations. Our proxydata-based study focuses on a collection of sediment records from the Okhotsk Sea as major source area for well ventilated North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) that cover the last ca. 12,000 years with high temporal and adequate spatial resolution. We decipher rapid changes in NPIW ventilation patterns on centennial to millennial time scales and show that the current ventilation of the mid-depth North Pacific has likely only been prevalent for the last 2 ka. We further provide evidence for a Mid-Holocene shift in mid-depth NPIW ventilation characteristics. Additionally, changes in North Atlantic Deep Water flow speed and patterns are reflected in our records of North Pacific mid-depth water mass dynamics, thus indicating a hemispheric-wide connection between the Atlantic and Pacific regions during the Holocene. Planktic oxygen isotope data suggest a high variability in the stratification of local surface water masses and the formation of sea ice, influencing the formation of new, well ventilated water masses near to our core sites. We compare the main Holocene baseline changes evidenced in our proxy reconstructions to Early Holocene and Pre-Industrial time slice results from the fully-coupled MPI-ESM (COSMOS) Earth System Model, with a focus on the Pacific Ocean to better understand NPIW and upper ocean dynamic changes.

  19. Community composition of ammonia-oxidizing archaea from surface and anoxic depths of oceanic oxygen minimum zones

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xuefeng; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B.

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) have been reported at high abundance in much of the global ocean, even in environments, such as pelagic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), where conditions seem unlikely to support aerobic ammonium oxidation. Due to the lack of information on any potential alternative metabolism of AOA, the AOA community composition might be expected to differ between oxic and anoxic environments. This hypothesis was tested by evaluating AOA community composition using a functional gene microarray that targets the ammonia monooxygenase gene subunit A (amoA). The relationship between environmental parameters and the biogeography of the Arabian Sea and the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) AOA assemblages was investigated using principal component analysis (PCA) and redundancy analysis (RDA). In both the Arabian Sea and the ETSP, AOA communities within the core of the OMZ were not significantly different from those inhabiting the oxygenated surface waters above the OMZ. The AOA communities in the Arabian Sea were significantly different from those in the ETSP. In both oceans, the abundance of archaeal amoA gene in the core of the OMZ was higher than that in the surface waters. Our results indicate that AOA communities are distinguished by their geographic origin. RDA suggested that temperature (higher in the Arabian Sea than in the ETSP) was the main factor that correlated with the differences between the AOA communities. Physicochemical properties that characterized the different environments of the OMZ and surface waters played a less important role, than did geography, in shaping the AOA community composition. PMID:23847601

  20. Oxygen isotope compositions of sinistral Neogloboquadrina pachyderma tests in surface sediments: North Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.; Hillaire-Marcel, C. )

    1994-02-01

    Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (Left-coiled) is a planktonic foraminifer indicator species for polar waters. It is present in both the glacial and interglacial sediments of the high-latitude oceans, and therefore is frequently used as a signal-carrier for constructing late Pleistocene-Holocene planktonic [delta][sup 18]O records. In this study the [delta][sup 18]O compositions of N. pachyderma (L) tests from deep-sea surface sediments are compared with surface water [delta][sup 18]O values and summer sea surface temperatures (SST) in the North Atlantic Ocean, the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, and the Labrador Sea. The authors document that for a temperature range of 2-8[degrees]C, the planktonic [delta][sup 18]O values follow paleotemperature equations with an offset of less than 0.4%, and that above 8[degrees]C the planktonic [delta][sup 18]O compositions become almost independent of SST and remain nearly constant. This pattern suggests that N. pachyderma (L) precipitates its shell nearly at isotopic equilibrium with surface waters colder than 8[degrees]C, and that in warmer surface waters N. pachyderma (L) changes its habitat depth or its growth season to secrete its shell at an ambient temperature around 7-9[degrees]C.

  1. Forward Modeling of Carbonate Proxy Data from Planktonic Foraminifera using Oxygen Isotope Tracers in a Global Ocean Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution and variation of oxygen isotopes in seawater are calculated using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies global ocean model. Simple ecological models are used to estimate the planktonic foraminiferal abundance as a function of depth, column temperature, season, light intensity, and density stratification. These models are combined to forward model isotopic signals recorded in calcareous ocean sediment. The sensitivity of the results to the changes in foraminiferal ecology, secondary calcification, and dissolution are also examined. Simulated present-day isotopic values for ecology relevant for multiple species compare well with core-top data. Hindcasts of sea surface temperature and salinity are made from time series of the modeled carbonate isotope values as the model climate changes. Paleoclimatic inferences from these carbonate isotope records are strongly affected by erroneous assumptions concerning the covariations of temperature, salinity, and delta (sup 18)O(sub w). Habitat-imposed biases are less important, although errors due to temperature-dependent abundances can be significant.

  2. Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios for selected sites of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Huang, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Increasingly, hydrologic studies require information on the isotopic composition of natural waters. This report presents stable hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen isotope ratios (δ180) of precipitation samples from seven selected sites of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN) collected during the years 1992-1994.

  3. Carbon, oxygen and biological productivity in the Southern Ocean in and out the Kerguelen plume: CARIOCA drifter results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlivat, L.; Boutin, J.; d'Ovidio, F.

    2015-06-01

    The Kerguelen Plateau region in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean supports annually a large-scale phytoplankton bloom which is naturally fertilized with iron. As part of the second Kerguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study expedition (KEOPS2) in austral spring (October-November 2011), one CARbon Interface OCean Atmosphere (CARIOCA) buoy was deployed east of the Kerguelen Plateau. It drifted eastward downstream along the Kerguelen plume. Hourly surface measurements of pCO2, O2 and ancillary observations were collected between 1 November 2011 and 12 February 2012 with the aim of characterizing the spatial and temporal variability of the biological net community production, NCP, downstream the Kerguelen Plateau, assessing the impact of iron-induced productivity on the biological inorganic carbon consumption and consequently on the CO2 flux exchanged at the air-sea interface. The trajectory of the buoy up to mid-December was within the longitude range 72-83° E, close to the polar front and then in the polar frontal zone, PFZ, up to 97° E. From 17 November to 16 December, the buoy drifted within the Kerguelen plume following a filament carrying dissolved iron, DFe, for a total distance of 700 km. In the first part of the trajectory of the buoy, within the iron plume, the ocean surface waters were always a sink for CO2 and a source for O2, with fluxes of respective mean values equal to -8 mmol CO2 and +38 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. To the east, as the buoy escaped the iron-enriched filament, the fluxes were in the opposite direction, with respective mean values of +5 mmol CO2 and -48 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. These numbers clearly indicate the strong impact of biological processes on the biogeochemistry in the surface waters within the Kerguelen plume in November-mid-December, while it is undetectable to the east in the PFZ from mid- December to mid-February. While the buoy follows the Fe-enriched filament, simultaneous observations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and

  4. Submarine and superimposed contact metamorphic oxygen isotopic exchange in an oceanic area, Sawyers Bar area, central Klamath Mountains, California, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, W.G.; Kolodny, Y.

    1997-02-01

    New bulk-rock oxygen isotope data indicate a complicated history of fluid-rock interactions in the upper few kilometers of a basaltic arc. attending its Mesozoic accretion to the western margin of North America. Folded, multiply recrystallized, weakly metasomatized mafic volcanics and interstratified sediments of the Sawyers Bar terrane, an eastern segment of the western Triassic and Paleozoic belt, were investigated. The following scenario can now be reconstructed: (1) island-arc tholeiites (IATs), ocean-island basalts (OIBs), and distal turbidites were deposited in a subsea environment during Permian and Early Mesozoic time (170-245 Ma). Basaltic rocks underwent low-temperature alteration by seawater; recrystallization occurred at 100-200{degrees}C and < 1 kbar. Alkali exchange and variable Mg-enrichment were accompanied by increases in bulk-rock {delta}{sup 18}O values of the greenstones from 6 to approximately 10{per_thousand}, preceeding initial stages of island-arc formation. (2) Middle Jurassic (165-170 Ma) suturing of the seaward oceanic arc structurally beneath a landward, 227 Ma blueschist terrane resulted in regional deformation and greenschist-facies metamorphism. Pervasive overprinting took place without important chemical or isotopic exchange under conditions of 300-425{degrees}C, 3 {+-} 1 kbar. (3) Granitoid plutons, emplaced during late-Middle Jurassic time (160-165 Ma), heated adjacent wallrocks to {approximately}500-600{degrees}C at pressures of approximately 2-3 kbar; thermal upgrading resulted in devolatilization of isotopically heavy metasediments and in the exchange of high {delta}{sup 18}O fluids with intercalated greenstones. {delta}{sup 18}O values in IAT and OIB metavolcanics increased from 9 to 10{per_thousand} alone axial portions of NS-trending folds to more than 15{per_thousand} where metabasalts are intimately interlayered with the metasediments. 72 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. SIMS and NanoSIMS analyses of Mesoproterozoic individual microfossils indicating continuous oxygen-producing photosynthesis in Proterozoic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, X.; Guo, Z.; House, C. H.; Chen, S.; Ta, K.

    2015-12-01

    Well-preserved microfossils in the stromatolites from the Gaoyuzhuang Formation (~1500Ma), which is younger than the Gunflint Formation (~1880Ma) and older than the Bitter Springs Formation (~850Ma), may play key roles in systematizing information about the evolution of early life and environmental changes in the Proterozoic Ocean. Here, a combination of light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam (FIB), nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were employed to characterize the morphology, elemental distributions and carbon isotope values of individual microfossils in the stromatolites from the Gaoyuahzuang Formation. Light microscopy analyses show that abundant filamentous and coccoid microfossils are exceptionally well preserved in chert. NanoSIMS analyses show that metabolically important elements such as 12C-, 13C-, 12C14N-, 32S-, and 34S- are concentrated in these microfossils and that the variations in the concentrations of these elements are similar, establishing the elemental distributions in incontestably biogenic microstructures. Carbon isotope (δ13C) values of individual microfossils range from -32.2‰ ± 0.9‰ to -23.3‰ ± 1.0‰ (weighted mean= -28.9‰ ± 0.1‰), consistent with carbon fixation via the Calvin cycle. The elevated δ13C values of the microfossils from Early-, Meso- to Late Proterozoic Era, possibly indicate decreasing CO2 and increasing O2 concentrations in the Proterozoic atmosphere. Our results, for the first time, provided the element distributions and cell specific carbon isotope values on convincing Mesoproterozoic cyanobacterial fossils, supporting continuous oxygen-producing photosynthesis in the Proterozoic Ocean.

  6. Carbon, oxygen and biological productivity in the Southern Ocean in and out the Kerguelen plume: CARIOCA drifter results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlivat, L.; Boutin, J.; d'Ovidio, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Kerguelen Plateau region in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean supports annually a large-scale phytoplankton bloom which is naturally fertilized with iron. As part of the second Kerguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study expedition (KEOPS2) in austral spring (October-November 2011), one Carioca buoy was deployed east of the Kerguelen plateau. It drifted eastward downstream in the Kerguelen plume. Hourly surface measurements of pCO2, O2 and ancillary observations were collected between 1 November 2011 to 12 February 2012 with the aim of characterizing the spatial and temporal variability of the biological Net Community Production (NCP) downstream the Kerguelen plateau, assess the impact of iron-induced productivity on the biological carbon consumption and consequently on the CO2 flux exchanged at the air-sea interface. The trajectory of the buoy until mid-December was within the longitude range, 72-83° E, close to the polar front and then in the polar frontal zone, PFZ, until 97° E. From 17 November to 16 December, the buoy drifted within the Kerguelen plume following a filament carrying dissolved iron, DFe, for a total distance of 700 km. In the first part of the trajectory, the ocean surface waters are a sink for CO2 and a source for CO2, with fluxes of respective mean values equal to -8 and +38 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1. Eastward, as the buoy escapes the iron enriched filament, the fluxes are in opposite direction, with respective mean values of +5 and -48 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. These numbers clearly indicate the strong impact of biological processes on the biogeochemistry in the surface waters within the Kerguelen plume in November-mid-December, while it is undetectable eastward in the PFZ from mid-December to mid-February. While the buoy follows the Fe enriched filament, simultaneous observations of dissolved inorganic carbon, DIC, and dissolved oxygen, O2, highlight biological events lasting from 2 to 4 days. Stoichiometric ratios, O2/C, between 1.1 and 1.4 are

  7. Lithospheric mantle heterogeneity across the continental-oceanic transition, northwest Ross Sea, Antarctica: new evidence from oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krans, S. R.; Panter, K. S.; Castillo, P.; Deering, C. D.; Kitajima, K.; Valley, J. W.; Hart, S. R.; Kyle, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen isotopes and whole rock chemistry from alkali basalt and basanite in the northwest Ross Sea, Antarctica offer new insight on source heterogeneity across the transition from continental to oceanic lithosphere in a magma-poor rifted margin. In situ SIMS analysis of olivine (Fo 79-90) from the most primitive lavas (MgO ≥ 8 wt%, Mg# 53-70, Ni= 115-338 ppm, Cr= 244-540 ppm) yield an average δ18O = 5.18 × 0.60 ‰ (2σ, n=30) for alkali basalt and 5.25 × 0.44 ‰ (2σ, n=52) for basanite (× 0.28 ‰, 2σ precision on a homogeneous olivine standard). These are similar to the range for olivine from mantle peridotite and HIMU type oceanic basalts (δ18O= 5.0 to 5.4 ‰ and 4.9 to 5.2 ‰, respectively [1]), but with greater variability. Lavas in this region experienced little differentiation, have minimal evidence of crustal contamination (87Sr/86Sr < 0.7030, 143Nd/144Nd > 0.5129), and olivine show no correlation between δ18O and Fo content, further suggesting that the δ18O values are source related. Whole-rock chemistry of alkali basalt and basanite are spatially distributed. In general, alkali basalt is found in thicker continental lithosphere with lower Sr (477-672ppm) and Nb/Y (1.2-2.4) than basanite. Basanite is found in oceanic and thinned continental lithosphere with higher Sr (642-1131 ppm) and Nb/Y (2.4-3.6). Variation in degree of silica-undersaturation and Nb/Y can be explained by varying degree of partial melting. While alkali basalt and basanite can result from varying degrees of partial melting of similar source compositions, the presence of amphibole in mantle xenoliths have lead workers in this region to propose contributions from a metasomatic source [2, 3, 4] with variable 206Pb/204Pb ratios [5]. A negative correlation between Nb/Y and δ18O in both rock types suggests that varying degrees of partial melting are tapping sources with different δ18O values; lower degree melts have δ18O ≤ 5.0 ‰ and higher degree melts have δ18O > 5.3

  8. Meltwater input to the southern ocean during the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Shemesh, A.; Burckle, L.H.; Hays, J.D.

    1994-12-02

    Three records of oxygen isotopes in biogenic silica from deep-sea sediment cores from the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean reveal the presence of isotopically depleted diatomaceous opal in sediment from the last glacial maximum. This depletion is attributed to the presence of lids of meltwater that mixed with surface water along certain trajectories in the Southern Ocean. An increase in the drainage from Antarctica or extensive northward transport of icebergs are among the main mechanisms that could have produced the increase in meltwater input to the glacial Southern Ocean. Similar isotopic trends were observed in older climatic cycles at the same cores.

  9. Oxygen fugacity profile of the oceanic upper mantle and the depth of redox melting beneath ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, F. A.; Cottrell, E.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen fugacity (fO2) of a mantle mineral assemblage, controlled primarily by Fe redox chemistry, sets the depth of the diamond to carbonated melt reaction (DCO3). Near-surface fO2 recorded by primitive MORB glasses and abyssal peridotites anchor the fO2 profile of the mantle at depth. If the fO2-depth relationship of the mantle is known, then the depth of the DCO3 can be predicted. Alternatively, if the DCO3 can be detected geophysically, then its depth can be used to infer physical and chemical characteristics of upwelling mantle. We present an expanded version of a model of the fO2-depth profile of adiabatically upwelling mantle first presented by Stagno et al. (2013), kindly provided by D. Frost. The model uses a chemical mass balance and empirical fits to experimental data to calculate compositions and modes of mantle minerals at specified P, T, and bulk Fe3+/ƩFe. We added P and T dependences to the partitioning of Al and Ca to better simulate the mineralogical changes in peridotite at depth and included majorite component in garnet to increase the depth range of the model. We calculate fO2 from the mineral assemblages using the grt-ol-opx oxybarometer (Stagno et al., 2013). The onset of carbonated melting occurs at the intersection of a Fe3+/ƩFe isopleth with the DCO3. Upwelling mantle is tied to the DCO3 until all native C is oxidized to form carbonated melts by reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+. The depth of intersection of a parcel of mantle with the DCO3 is a function of bulk Fe3+/ƩFe, potential temperature, and bulk composition. We predict that fertile mantle (PUM) along a 1400 °C adiabat, with 50 ppm bulk C, and Fe3+/ƩFe = 0.05 after C oxidation begins redox melting at a depth of 250 km. The model contextualizes observations of MORB redox chemistry. Because fertile peridotite is richer in Al2O3, the Fe2O3-bearing components of garnet are diluted leading to lower fO2 at a given depth compared to refractory mantle under the same conditions. This may indicate

  10. Reconstruction of seawater chemistry from deeply subducted oceanic crust; hydrogen and oxygen isotope of lawsonite eclogites preserving pillow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamabata, D., VI; Masuyama, Y.; Tomiyasu, F.; Ueno, Y.; Yui, T. F.; Okamoto, K.

    2014-12-01

    In order to understand evolution of life, change of seawater chemistry from Hadean, Archean to present is significant. Pillow structure is well-preserved in the Archean greenstone belt (e.g. Komiya et al., 1999). Oxygen and hydrogen isotope of rims in the pillow is useful conventional tool to decipher chemistry of Paleao-seawater from Archean to Present. However, Archean greenstone belt suffered regional metamorphism from greenschist to Amphibolite facies conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to testify the validity of pillow chemistry from recent (Phanerozoic) metamorphosed greenstone. We have systematically collected pillowed greenstone from blueschist and eclogites. Two eclogite exhibiting pillow structures were chosen for oxygen and hydrogen isotope analysis. One is from Corsica (lawsonite eclogite collected with Dr. Alberto Vidale Barbarone) and another is from Cazadero, Franciscan belt (collected by Dr. Tatsuki Tsujimori). The both are ascribed as MORB from major and trace bulk chemistry and Ca is rich in the core and Na is poor in the rims. The former exhibits garnet, omphacite, lawsonite, and glacophane. Phengite is in core of the pillow and chlorite is in the rims. In the latter, besides garnet, omphacite, epdiote and glaucophane, chlorite is recognized with phengite in the core. Glaucophane is richer in the rims from the both samples, therefore istope analysis of glaucophane was done. Mineral separation was carefully done using micro-mill, heavy liquid and isodynamic separator. 20 mg specimens were used for oxygen isotope analysis and 2mg were for hydrogen analysis. δ18O of the all analysis (7.7 to 8.3) is within the range of unaltered igneous oceanic crust and high temperature hydrothermal alteration although rims (8.3 for Franciscan and 8.0 for Corsica) are higher than cores (7.7 for Franciscan and Corsica). δD data is also consistent with hydrothermal alteration. It is relative higher in core from the Corsica and Franciscan (-45 and -56) than of the

  11. Diffusive Transfer of Oxygen From Seamount Basaltic Crust Into Overlying Sediments: an Example From the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone, Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, S.; Mewes, K.; Mogollón, J.; Picard, A.; Rühlemann, C.; Eisenhauer, A.; Kuhn, T.; Ziebis, W.

    2015-12-01

    Within the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone (CCFZ) located in the equatorial Pacific Ocean numerous seamounts, with diameters ranging from 3 to 30 km and varying heights above the surrounding seafloor of up to 2500 m, occur throughout the deep-sea plain. There is evidence that these may serve as conduits for low-temperature hydrothermal circulation of seawater through the oceanic crust. During RV SONNE cruise SO205 in April/May 2010 and BIONOD cruise with RV ĹATALANTE in spring 2012 we took piston and gravity cores for geochemical analyses, as well as for high-resolution pore-water oxygen and nutrient measurements. Specifically, we took cores along a transect at three sites, located 400, 700 and 1000 m away from the foot of a 240 m high seamount, called 'Teddy Bare'. At all 3 sites oxygen penetrates the entire sediment column of the organic carbon-poor sediment. More importantly, oxygen concentrations initially decrease with sediment depth but increase again at depths of 3 m and 7 m above the basaltic basement, suggesting an upward diffusion of oxygen from seawater circulating within the seamount crust into the overlying basal sediments. This is the first time this has been shown for the deep subsurface in the Pacific Ocean. Mirroring the oxygen concentrations nitrate concentrations accumulate with sediment depth but decrease towards the basement. Transport-reaction modeling revealed that (1) the diffusive flux of oxygen from the basaltic basement exceeds the oxygen consumption through organic matter oxidation and nitrification in the basal sediments and (2) the nutrient exchange between the sediment and the underlying basaltic crust occurs at orders-of-magnitude lower rates than between the sediment surface and the overlying bottom water. We furthermore show that the upward diffusion of oxygen from the basaltic basement affects the preservation of organic compounds within the oxic sediment column at all 3 sites. Our investigations indicate that an upward

  12. Numerical simulations of oceanic oxygen cycling in the FAMOUS Earth-System model: FAMOUS-ES, version 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. H. T.; Totterdell, I. J.; Halloran, P. R.; Valdes, P. J.

    2014-02-01

    Addition and validation of an oxygen cycle to the ocean component of the FAMOUS climate model are described. Surface validation is carried out with respect to HadGEM2-ES where good agreement is found and where discrepancies are mainly attributed to disagreement in surface temperature structure between the models. The agreement between the models at depth (where observations are also used in the comparison) in the Southern Hemisphere is less encouraging than in the Northern Hemisphere. This is attributed to a combination of excessive surface productivity in FAMOUS' equatorial waters (and its concomitant effect on remineralisation at depth) and its reduced overturning circulation compared to HadGEM2-ES. For the entire Atlantic basin FAMOUS has a circulation strength of 12.7 ± 0.4 Sv compared to 15.0 ± 0.9 for HadGEM2-ES. The HadGEM2-ES data used in this paper were obtained from the online database of the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, CMIP5 (Taylor et al., 2012).

  13. Dissolved Oxygen Sensor in Animal-Borne Instruments: An Innovation for Monitoring the Health of Oceans and Investigating the Functioning of Marine Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Bailleul, Frederic; Vacquie-Garcia, Jade; Guinet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The current decline in dissolved oxygen concentration within the oceans is a sensitive indicator of the effect of climate change on marine environment. However the impact of its declining on marine life and ecosystems’ health is still quite unclear because of the difficulty in obtaining in situ data, especially in remote areas, like the Southern Ocean (SO). Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) proved to be a relevant alternative to the traditional oceanographic platforms to measure physical and biogeochemical structure of oceanic regions rarely observed. In this study, we use a new stage of development in biologging technology to draw a picture of dissolved oxygen concentration in the SO. We present the first results obtained from a dissolved oxygen sensor added to Argos CTD-SRDL tags and deployed on 5 female elephant seals at Kerguelen. From October 2010 and October 2011, 742 oxygen profiles associated with temperature and salinity measurements were recorded. Whether a part of the data must be considered cautiously, especially because of offsets and temporal drifts of the sensors, the range of values recorded was consistent with a concomitant survey conducted from a research vessel (Keops-2 project). Once again, elephant seals reinforced the relationship between marine ecology and oceanography, delivering essential information about the water masses properties and the biological status of the Southern Ocean. But more than the presentation of a new stage of development in animal-borne instrumentation, this pilot study opens a new field of investigation in marine ecology and could be enlarged in a near future to other key marine predators, especially large fish species like swordfish, tuna or sharks, for which dissolved oxygen is expected to play a crucial role in distribution and behaviour. PMID:26200780

  14. Dissolved Oxygen Sensor in Animal-Borne Instruments: An Innovation for Monitoring the Health of Oceans and Investigating the Functioning of Marine Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Frederic; Vacquie-Garcia, Jade; Guinet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The current decline in dissolved oxygen concentration within the oceans is a sensitive indicator of the effect of climate change on marine environment. However the impact of its declining on marine life and ecosystems' health is still quite unclear because of the difficulty in obtaining in situ data, especially in remote areas, like the Southern Ocean (SO). Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) proved to be a relevant alternative to the traditional oceanographic platforms to measure physical and biogeochemical structure of oceanic regions rarely observed. In this study, we use a new stage of development in biologging technology to draw a picture of dissolved oxygen concentration in the SO. We present the first results obtained from a dissolved oxygen sensor added to Argos CTD-SRDL tags and deployed on 5 female elephant seals at Kerguelen. From October 2010 and October 2011, 742 oxygen profiles associated with temperature and salinity measurements were recorded. Whether a part of the data must be considered cautiously, especially because of offsets and temporal drifts of the sensors, the range of values recorded was consistent with a concomitant survey conducted from a research vessel (Keops-2 project). Once again, elephant seals reinforced the relationship between marine ecology and oceanography, delivering essential information about the water masses properties and the biological status of the Southern Ocean. But more than the presentation of a new stage of development in animal-borne instrumentation, this pilot study opens a new field of investigation in marine ecology and could be enlarged in a near future to other key marine predators, especially large fish species like swordfish, tuna or sharks, for which dissolved oxygen is expected to play a crucial role in distribution and behaviour.

  15. Dissolved Oxygen Sensor in Animal-Borne Instruments: An Innovation for Monitoring the Health of Oceans and Investigating the Functioning of Marine Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Frederic; Vacquie-Garcia, Jade; Guinet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The current decline in dissolved oxygen concentration within the oceans is a sensitive indicator of the effect of climate change on marine environment. However the impact of its declining on marine life and ecosystems' health is still quite unclear because of the difficulty in obtaining in situ data, especially in remote areas, like the Southern Ocean (SO). Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) proved to be a relevant alternative to the traditional oceanographic platforms to measure physical and biogeochemical structure of oceanic regions rarely observed. In this study, we use a new stage of development in biologging technology to draw a picture of dissolved oxygen concentration in the SO. We present the first results obtained from a dissolved oxygen sensor added to Argos CTD-SRDL tags and deployed on 5 female elephant seals at Kerguelen. From October 2010 and October 2011, 742 oxygen profiles associated with temperature and salinity measurements were recorded. Whether a part of the data must be considered cautiously, especially because of offsets and temporal drifts of the sensors, the range of values recorded was consistent with a concomitant survey conducted from a research vessel (Keops-2 project). Once again, elephant seals reinforced the relationship between marine ecology and oceanography, delivering essential information about the water masses properties and the biological status of the Southern Ocean. But more than the presentation of a new stage of development in animal-borne instrumentation, this pilot study opens a new field of investigation in marine ecology and could be enlarged in a near future to other key marine predators, especially large fish species like swordfish, tuna or sharks, for which dissolved oxygen is expected to play a crucial role in distribution and behaviour. PMID:26200780

  16. A model of biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulphur in the ocean: One step toward a global climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Gary

    1989-02-01

    An ocean model has been developed which, for prescribed physics, deals with interrelationships between chemical distributions, biogeochemical sinks and sources, chemical reactions at redox fronts, and transports across the air-sea and sediment-water interfaces. In its first application here, the model focuses on biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulphur in an ocean forced by river input of nutrients. This is a natural starting point for a global climate model since ocean circulation and biology determine atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a given inventory of inorganic C and oceanic production is controlled mainly by the availability of inorganic P and/or N. A general approach is taken to look at oxic versus anoxic conditions, P versus N limitation of primary production, with or without inorganic removal of phosphate to the sediments. As demanded by this approach, the model is nonlinear and continuous in a vertical coordinate. To focus on the biogeochemical aspects, ocean physics are kept as simple as possible. Cold, oxygen-rich water sinks at high latitudes and is upwelled with a constant velocity. Turbulent mixing is parameterized with a constant, vertical diffusion coefficient. The biogeochemical processes considered are new production, burial, nitrogen fixation, phosphorite formation, and three types of organic decomposition: oxidation with O2, denitrification, and sulphate reduction. Organic matter is taken to consist of a high- and a low-reactive fraction. The chemical species considered explicitly are PO43--P, NO3--N, O2, NH4+-N and H2S-S. Results indicate that a change from oxic to weakly anoxic conditions at middepths in a P-limited ocean would lead to strong local denitrification and low nitrate concentrations throughout the water column. New production would also become dominated by nitrogen fixers. Geological evidence implies that anoxic conditions in the water column have been rare in the Phanerozoic ocean. Both phosphorite

  17. Transit time distributions and oxygen utilization rates in the Northeast Pacific Ocean from chlorofluorocarbons and sulfur hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnerup, Rolf E.; Mecking, Sabine; Bullister, John L.

    2013-02-01

    Depth profiles of dissolved chlorofluorocarbon-11 (CFC-11) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) were measured during a September 2008 cruise in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. For each water sample, the two tracers were used in concert to estimate likely mean ages and widths of parameterized 1-D transit time distributions (TTDs). In shallow waters (<250 m), the TTDs' mean ages were relatively loosely constrained due to the slow decrease of atmospheric CFC-11 since 1994. In the main thermocline (25.0-26.6 σθ, ∼300-550 m), the CFC-11/SF6 tracer pair constrained TTDs' mean ages to within±10%. Deeper than 26.8 σθ (∼600 m), SF6 levels in 2008 were too low for the CFC-11/SF6 tracer pair to constrain the TTDs' mean ages. Within the main thermocline of the subtropical North Pacific Ocean (20°-37°N along 152°W), the TTDs' mean ages were used to estimate Oxygen Utilization Rates (OURs) of ∼11 μmol kg-1 yr-1 on 25.0-25.5 σθ (∼160 m), attenuating to very low rates (0.12 μmol kg-1 yr-1) by 26.8-27.0 σθ (∼600 m). Depth integration of the in-situ OURs implied an average carbon remineralization rate of 1.7±0.3 mol C m-2 yr-1 in this region and depth range, somewhat lower than other independent estimates. Along the 152°W section, depth integrating the apparent OURs implied carbon remineralization rates of 2.5-3.5 mol C m-2 yr-1 from 20°N to 30°N, 3.5-4.0 mol C m-2 yr-1 from 30°N to 40°N, and 2-2.7 mol C m-2 yr-1 north of 45°N.

  18. Oxygen and sulfur isotopes in sulfate in modern euxinic systems with implications for evaluating the extent of euxinia in ancient oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, M. L.; Johnston, D. T.

    2015-12-01

    Variability in the fraction of biogenic sulfide that is reoxidized back to sulfate has played a role in regulating redox budgets and oxygen levels in the ocean-atmosphere system throughout Earth history. In the modern, well-oxygenated ocean, 75-90% of sulfide produced by microbial sulfate reduction is reoxidized back to sulfate. At present, the areal extent of seafloor overlain by euxinic (i.e., anoxic and sulfidic) water is very low (<0.6%). However, geological evidence suggests that euxinia was much more common in ancient oceans. In theory, the presence of sulfide in the water column could induce higher reoxidation rates, as the delivery of oxidants is less transport limited in solution than when the chemocline is in sediments. In order to better understand these sorts of systematics and place isotopic constraints on this cycling, we present sulfur and oxygen isotope geochemistry in four modern euxinic systems. To interpret these data, we further develop a one-dimensional, depth-dependent geochemical model to estimate sulfide reoxidation rates in euxinic systems and evaluate model results in the context of geochemical and isotopic information. From these results, we determine that the percent of sulfide that is reoxidized back to sulfate is quite low (~11-42%). Given the proximity to overlying, fully oxygenated waters, this suggests that vertical exchange is significantly muted. This is in some sense surprising, but also consistent with the observation that sulfide is indeed allowed to accumulate in the bottom waters. We explore how water column density stratification and lateral transport influence reoxidation rates in these coastal ponds. We further pursue how these results can be extrapolated to the global ocean of times past.

  19. Acceleration of oxygen decline in the tropical Pacific over the past decades by aerosol pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, T.; Nenes, A.; Johnson, M. S.; Meskhidze, N.; Deutsch, C.

    2016-06-01

    Dissolved oxygen in the mid-depth tropical Pacific Ocean has declined in the past several decades. The resulting expansion of the oxygen minimum zone has consequences for the region's ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles, but the causes of the oxygen decline are not yet fully understood. Here we combine models of atmospheric chemistry, ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling to test the hypothesis that atmospheric pollution over the Pacific Ocean contributed to the redistribution of oxygen in deeper waters. We simulate the pollution-induced enhancement of atmospheric soluble iron and fixed nitrogen deposition, as well as its impacts on ocean productivity and biogeochemical cycling for the late twentieth century. The model reproduces the magnitude and large-scale pattern of the observed oxygen changes from the 1970s to the 1990s, and the sensitivity experiments reveal the reinforcing effects of pollution-enhanced iron deposition and natural climate variability. Despite the aerosol deposition being the largest in mid-latitudes, its effect on oceanic oxygen is most pronounced in the tropics, where ocean circulation transports added iron to the tropics, leading to an increased regional productivity, respiration and subsurface oxygen depletion. These results suggest that anthropogenic pollution can interact and amplify climate-driven impacts on ocean biogeochemistry, even in remote ocean biomes.

  20. What prevents nitrogen depletion in the OMZ of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, B.; Pahlow, M.; Wagner, H.; Oschlies, A.

    2014-07-01

    Local coupling between nitrogen fixation and denitrification in current biogeochemical models could result in a run-away feedback in open-ocean oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), eventually stripping OMZ waters of all fixed nitrogen. This feedback does not seem to operate at full strength in the ocean, as nitrate does not generally become depleted in open-ocean OMZs. To explore in detail the mechanism that prevents nitrogen depletion in the OMZ of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP), we develop a box model with fully prognostic cycles of carbon, nutrients, and oxygen in the upwelling region and its adjacent open ocean. Ocean circulation is calibrated with Δ14C data of the ETSP. The sensitivity of the simulated nitrogen cycle to nutrient and oxygen exchange and ventilation from outside the model domain and remineralization scales inside an OMZ is analysed. For the entire range of model configurations explored, we find that the fixed-N inventory can be stabilized at non-zero levels in the ETSP OMZ only if the remineralization rate via denitrification is slower than that via aerobic respiration. In our optimum model configuration, lateral oxygen supply to the model domain required at rates sufficient to oxidize at least about a fifth of the export production in the model domain to prevent anoxia in the deep ocean. Under these conditions, our model is in line with the view of phosphate as the ultimate limiting nutrient for phytoplankton, and implies that for the current notion of nitrogen fixation being favored in N-deficit waters, the water column of the ETSP could even be a small net source of fixed-N.

  1. Interleukin-1beta induces death in chondrocyte-like ATDC5 cells through mitochondrial dysfunction and energy depletion in a reactive nitrogen and oxygen species-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Rika; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Akaike, Takaaki; Akuta, Teruo; Nakamura, Masanori; Takami, Masamichi; Morimura, Naoko; Yasu, Kayoko; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2005-07-15

    IL-1 (interleukin-1) acts as a key mediator of the degeneration of articular cartilage in RA (rheumatoid arthritis) and OA (osteoarthritis),where chondrocyte death is observed. It is still controversial, however, whether IL-1 induces chondrocyte death. In the present study, the viability of mouse chondrocyte-like ATDC5 cells was reduced by the treatment with IL-1beta for 48 h or longer. IL-1beta augmented the expression of the catalytic gp91 subunit of NADPH oxidase, gp91phox, as well as inducible NO synthase in ATDC5 cells. Generation of nitrated guanosine and tyrosine suggested the formation of reactive nitrogen species including ONOO- (peroxynitrite), a reaction product of NO and O2-, in ATDC5 cells and rat primary chondrocytes treated with IL-1beta. Death of ATDC5 cells after IL-1beta treatment was prevented by an NADPH-oxidase inhibitor, AEBSF[4-(2-aminoethyl)benzene-sulphonyl fluoride], an NO synthase inhibitor, L-NAME (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester), and a ONOO- scavenger, uric acid. The viability of ATDC5 cells was reduced by the ONOO(-)-generator 3-(4-morpholinyl)sydnonimine hydrochloride, but not by either the NO-donor 1-hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-2-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene or S-nitrosoglutathione. Disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP deprivation were observed in IL-1beta-treated ATDC5 cells, both of which were restored by L-NAME, AEBSF or uric acid. On the other hand, no morphological or biochemical signs indicating apoptosis were observed in these cells. These results suggest that the death of chondrocyte-like ATDC5 cells was mediated at least in part by mitochondrial dysfunction and energy depletion through ONOO- formation after IL-1beta treatment. PMID:15784009

  2. Seasonal, sub-seasonal and spatial fluctuations in oxygen-depleted bottom waters in an embayment of an eastern boundary upwelling system: St Helena Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcher, G. C.; Probyn, T. A.

    2015-08-01

    The considerable impact of oxygen deficient waters on marine resources in St Helena Bay has generated interest in exploring the vulnerability of South Africa's largest and most productive bay to further deoxygenation in response to climate change. Seasonal, sub-seasonal and spatial fluctuations in bottom dissolved oxygen (DO) are examined in St Helena Bay to facilitate better interpretation of historical data. DO measurements in relation to physical, chemical and biological variables were made between November 2013 and November 2014. Alongshore bay characteristics were assessed through comparison of variables along the 50 m depth contour. A mean coefficient of variation of 0.35 provided a measure of the relative variability of near-bottom DO concentrations along this contour. Across-shelf transects captured the seasonal development of hypoxia in relation to the distribution of phytoplankton biomass. DO was lowest in autumn in the south of the bay prior to winter ventilation of the bottom waters. Exceptional dinoflagellate blooms forming extensive subsurface thin layers preceded the autumn DO minima. The development of hypoxia at inner and central stations prior to expansion beyond the boundaries of the bay provided evidence of local drawdown. Coincident with the seasonal decline of DO within the bay was an increase in macronutrient concentrations which tended to mirror DO concentrations. Indication of denitrification in the suboxic waters in the south of the bay was provided through evidence of a nitrate deficit in autumn supported by elevated nitrite concentrations. Superimposed on the seasonal decline of DO concentrations in the bottom waters were sub-seasonal events of hypoxia and anoxia linked to episodic deposition of organic matter as indicated by increases in bottom Chl a concentrations.

  3. Shelf life of case-ready beef steaks (Semitendinosus muscle) stored in oxygen-depleted master bag system with oxygen scavengers and CO2/N2 modified atmosphere packaging.

    PubMed

    Limbo, S; Uboldi, E; Adobati, A; Iametti, S; Bonomi, F; Mascheroni, E; Santagostino, S; Powers, T H; Franzetti, L; Piergiovanni, L

    2013-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the stability of beef from Semitendinosus muscle packaged in oxygen permeable wrapped-tray units and stored in a master bag system, with and without oxygen scavengers. Changes in the atmosphere composition, microbiological indexes, myoglobin forms and color parameters were monitored during the storage in master bag, blooming and display life. The presence of scavengers reduced rapidly the oxygen concentration and maintained it at values not detectable instrumentally. Within few days of storage in master bags, the resolution of the transient discoloration was completed and the meat quality was maintained over the anoxic storage. After the removal from master bags meat bloomed completely reaching OxyMb level and Chroma values higher than those on fresh meat at t(0). During 48 h of display life at 4 °C, quality attributes had a decay slower than samples stored traditionally in air. Without scavengers the oxygen caused the irreversible discoloration within 7 days, due to the formation of metmyoglobin on the surface.

  4. Modelling ischaemia in vitro: effects of temperature and glucose concentration on dopamine release evoked by oxygen and glucose depletion in a mouse brain slice.

    PubMed

    Davidson, C; Chauhan, N K; Knight, S; Gibson, C L; Young, A M J

    2011-11-15

    Current pharmacological interventions for acute stroke are largely ineffective or confounded by adverse effects, emphasising the need to develop new pharmacological treatments for neuroprotection. We have developed a robust in vitro model previously used in rats to assess dopamine release in mouse caudate nucleus brain slices, measured by fast cyclic voltammetry, during oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) as a model for cerebral ischaemia: this model will allow the study of transgenic mouse strains. During the pre-OGD equilibration period we found that a temperature of 33°C, with solution containing 10 mM glucose provided the optimum baseline conditions from which reliable OGD-induced changes in dopamine efflux could be measured, without being susceptible to spontaneous release events. During OGD we found no significant difference in any of the parameters measured between perfusion with glucose-free solution, and perfusion with solution containing 2 mM glucose. We therefore suggest, in agreement with previous work, that using 2 mM glucose during OGD is appropriate, and using these conditions we were able to reliably produce OGD-evoked dopamine release. PMID:21669225

  5. Modelling ischaemia in vitro: effects of temperature and glucose concentration on dopamine release evoked by oxygen and glucose depletion in a mouse brain slice.

    PubMed

    Davidson, C; Chauhan, N K; Knight, S; Gibson, C L; Young, A M J

    2011-11-15

    Current pharmacological interventions for acute stroke are largely ineffective or confounded by adverse effects, emphasising the need to develop new pharmacological treatments for neuroprotection. We have developed a robust in vitro model previously used in rats to assess dopamine release in mouse caudate nucleus brain slices, measured by fast cyclic voltammetry, during oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) as a model for cerebral ischaemia: this model will allow the study of transgenic mouse strains. During the pre-OGD equilibration period we found that a temperature of 33°C, with solution containing 10 mM glucose provided the optimum baseline conditions from which reliable OGD-induced changes in dopamine efflux could be measured, without being susceptible to spontaneous release events. During OGD we found no significant difference in any of the parameters measured between perfusion with glucose-free solution, and perfusion with solution containing 2 mM glucose. We therefore suggest, in agreement with previous work, that using 2 mM glucose during OGD is appropriate, and using these conditions we were able to reliably produce OGD-evoked dopamine release.

  6. The distribution pattern of the red tide and the process of oxygen depletion in the coastal brackish Lake Nakaumi, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, K.; Miyagi, H.; Katsuki, K.; Takata, H.; Dettman, D. L.

    2007-12-01

    Lake Nakaumi is a coastal brackish water lake formed by the Yumigahama peninsula. The water mass of Lake Nakaumi has two-layer structures. The main halocline divided to Nakaumi Surface Water (NSW) of the intermediate saline water (around 15psu) and Nakaumi Bottom Water (NBW) of the high saline water (about 30psu). Recently, the occurrence of red tide bloom is frequently observed in the lake. The main purpose of this study is to understand the influence of the red tide on the lake environment (The especially, dissolved oxygen in NBW). In this study, we investigated the water quality during April to June 2006 when the lake has experienced extensive occurrence of red tide, and we also monitored the chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) distribution by in vivo fluorometric method. ? Red tide blooms were observed almost in the entire area of Lake Nakaumi in spring, 2006. The water surface showed reddish brown color due to the occurrence of red tide. In the composition of the phytoplankton, Prorocentrum minimum was the dominant species during the red tide. The composition of the phytoplankton rapidly changed during May 27 to 30, and it shifts to the community in which Cyanophyceae is dominant. During that time, the Chl-a concentration rapidly decreased. Based on the vertical distribution of the Chl-a concentration, the red tide at our observation period was divided to 3 phases. In Phase I (March 18th to April 22nd), the Chl-a concentration was relatively low, and homogenous distribution in NSW. In Phase II (April 22nd to May 10th), the Chl-a concentration shows high value, and the peak of Chl-a concentration was present at small-scale and main halocline in the whole water column. In Phase III (May 10th to May 27th), the peak concentrations of Chl-a were distributed around small-scale halocline in NSW and main halocline. In NBW, the Chl-a concentration was low. In Phase I, the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of NBW shows 5~7mg/l. During Phase II, DO in NBW decreased. The decreasing

  7. Lake acidification and oxygen depletion may synergistically enhance nitrous oxide (N2O) production by nitrifier denitrification in a subalpine lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frame, C. H.; Goepfert, T. J.; Rollog, M.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms are an important source of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). They produce N2O through two mechanisms: by the decomposition of an intermediate in the ammonia (NH3) oxidation reaction, and by nitrifier denitrification, which is the enzymatic reduction of nitrite (NO2-). We investigated the impact of water pH and oxygen (O2) concentrations on rates of N2O production by these two mechanisms in the water column of Lake Lugano, a subalpine lake between Switzerland and Italy. Acidification of natural waters is known to reduce the rate of ammonia oxidation by forcing the equilibrium NH4+ ←→ NH3 + H+ away from NH3, the form that is preferentially taken up by ammonia oxidizers. In turn, this reduces the rate of N2O production by decomposition of the reaction intermediate during ammonia oxidation. However, using 15NH4+ and 15NO2- tracer additions during lake water incubations, we showed that reducing the pH from in situ values of 7.5 to 8 down to 6 to 7 actually increased the rate of N2O production by nitrifier denitrification. Hypoxia is thought to enhance N2O production by nitrifier denitrification. We did not observe nitrifier denitrification in incubations that were fully oxic (partial pressure of O2 = 20.9%) or had reduced O2 (partial pressure = 12%). However, when the incubation pH was lowered and the O2 reduced to 12%, N2O production by nitrifier denitrification was much greater than it was in incubations where only the pH was reduced or only the O2 concentration was reduced. Water for these experiments was drawn from depths just below the epilimnion of the monomictic south basin of Lugano, an environment whose pH, O2, and nutrient concentrations fluctuate throughout the water column on a seasonal basis and change in the shallower depths on a daily basis. We discuss the implications of these changes for the flux of shallow N2O into the atmosphere and a possible mechanism that explains the synergistic influence of O2 and pH on

  8. The 18O/16O Ratio of 2-Billion-Year-Old Seawater Inferred from Ancient Oceanic Crust.

    PubMed

    Holmden, C; Muehlenbachs, K

    1993-03-19

    An oxygen isotope profile of the 2-billion-year-old Purtuniq ophiolite overlaps with similar profiles of younger ophiolites and the modern oceanic crust. This overlap implies (i) that there was a similar style of seawater-ocean crust interaction during the past 2 billion years; (ii) that the oxygen isotope composition of early Proterozoic seawater was similar to the modern value; (iii) that early Proterozoic sea-floor spreading rates were similar to, or greater than, average modern rates; and (iv) that early Proterozoic carbonate rocks and cherts with low (18)O/(16)O ratios do not reflect global-scale (18)O depletion of early Proterozoic oceans. PMID:17816892

  9. Molybdenum (Mo) and Iron (Fe) Isotope Evidence of Tepla-Barrandian Black Shales Against Widespread Deep Ocean Oxygenation in the Late Neoproterozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzweil, F.; Pasava, J.; Drost, K.; Wille, M.; Schoenberg, R.

    2014-12-01

    The late Neoproterozoic was a period of major environmental perturbations including tectonic reorganizations, biologic evolution and environmental oxygenation (Neoproterozoic oxygenation event). Authigenic enrichments in redox-sensitive elements such as Mo, V and U in late Neoproterozoic black shales prior to the appearance of the first metazoan fossils indicate that increasing oxygen levels in the atmosphere-hydrosphere system have facilitated the evolution and diversification of multi-cellular life. The isotopic composition of these elements is another tool to trace (possibly global) changes in the oceanic redox state. For example, significantly higher δ98Mo of seawater and black shales are expected, when the sink of isotopically light Mo in oxic deep marine settings increased. Accordingly, modern anoxic sediments in the Black Sea as well as the well oxygenated seawater show high δ98Mo of 2.3 ‰. However, Mesoproterozoic black shales show relatively low δ98Mo values up to 1.4 ‰. To test if the enrichment of redox-sensitive elements and metazoan evolution temporally correlate with an increase in seawater δ98Mo, we present Mo and Fe isotope data of slightly younger late Neoproterozoic black shales of the Tepla-Barrandian, Czech Republic. We observe a perfect correlation of Fe/Al ratios with δ56Fe that is best explained by mixing of detrital derived Fe with δ56Fe of ~0.1 ‰ and hydrothermal sourced Fe with δ56Fe of ~-0.7 ‰. Hydrothermally dominated samples with low δ56Fe are also enriched in heavy metals such as Ni, Cu and Zn as well as hydrothermally derived Mo (with δ98Mo of ~0.6 ‰). Samples with minor hydrothermal influence show authigenic Mo enrichment from seawater with a maximum δ98Mo of 1.2 ‰. This estimate indicates no significant increase in the seawater δ98Mo during the Neoproterozoic and after the evolution of metazoan life. Thus, our Mo isotope dataset provides no evidence for deep ocean oxygenation during the Neoproterozoic

  10. Isotope composition and volume of Earth's early oceans.

    PubMed

    Pope, Emily C; Bird, Dennis K; Rosing, Minik T

    2012-03-20

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of Earth's seawater are controlled by volatile fluxes among mantle, lithospheric (oceanic and continental crust), and atmospheric reservoirs. Throughout geologic time the oxygen mass budget was likely conserved within these Earth system reservoirs, but hydrogen's was not, as it can escape to space. Isotopic properties of serpentine from the approximately 3.8 Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt in West Greenland are used to characterize hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of ancient seawater. Archaean oceans were depleted in deuterium [expressed as δD relative to Vienna standard mean ocean water (VSMOW)] by at most 25 ± 5‰, but oxygen isotope ratios were comparable to modern oceans. Mass balance of the global hydrogen budget constrains the contribution of continental growth and planetary hydrogen loss to the secular evolution of hydrogen isotope ratios in Earth's oceans. Our calculations predict that the oceans of early Earth were up to 26% more voluminous, and atmospheric CH(4) and CO(2) concentrations determined from limits on hydrogen escape to space are consistent with clement conditions on Archaean Earth.

  11. Isotope composition and volume of Earth’s early oceans

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Emily C.; Bird, Dennis K.; Rosing, Minik T.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of Earth’s seawater are controlled by volatile fluxes among mantle, lithospheric (oceanic and continental crust), and atmospheric reservoirs. Throughout geologic time the oxygen mass budget was likely conserved within these Earth system reservoirs, but hydrogen’s was not, as it can escape to space. Isotopic properties of serpentine from the approximately 3.8 Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt in West Greenland are used to characterize hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of ancient seawater. Archaean oceans were depleted in deuterium [expressed as δD relative to Vienna standard mean ocean water (VSMOW)] by at most 25 ± 5‰, but oxygen isotope ratios were comparable to modern oceans. Mass balance of the global hydrogen budget constrains the contribution of continental growth and planetary hydrogen loss to the secular evolution of hydrogen isotope ratios in Earth’s oceans. Our calculations predict that the oceans of early Earth were up to 26% more voluminous, and atmospheric CH4 and CO2 concentrations determined from limits on hydrogen escape to space are consistent with clement conditions on Archaean Earth. PMID:22392985

  12. Mathematical Modelling of Plankton-Oxygen Dynamics Under the Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Sekerci, Yadigar; Petrovskii, Sergei

    2015-12-01

    Ocean dynamics is known to have a strong effect on the global climate change and on the composition of the atmosphere. In particular, it is estimated that about 70% of the atmospheric oxygen is produced in the oceans due to the photosynthetic activity of phytoplankton. However, the rate of oxygen production depends on water temperature and hence can be affected by the global warming. In this paper, we address this issue theoretically by considering a model of a coupled plankton-oxygen dynamics where the rate of oxygen production slowly changes with time to account for the ocean warming. We show that a sustainable oxygen production is only possible in an intermediate range of the production rate. If, in the course of time, the oxygen production rate becomes too low or too high, the system's dynamics changes abruptly, resulting in the oxygen depletion and plankton extinction. Our results indicate that the depletion of atmospheric oxygen on global scale (which, if happens, obviously can kill most of life on Earth) is another possible catastrophic consequence of the global warming, a global ecological disaster that has been overlooked.

  13. Volatile abundances and oxygen isotopes in basaltic to dacitic lavas on mid-ocean ridges: The role of assimilation at spreading centers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanless, V.D.; Perfit, M.R.; Ridley, W.I.; Wallace, P.J.; Grimes, Craig B.; Klein, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    Most geochemical variability in MOR basalts is consistent with low- to moderate-pressure fractional crystallization of various mantle-derived parental melts. However, our geochemical data from MOR high-silica glasses, including new volatile and oxygen isotope data, suggest that assimilation of altered crustal material plays a significant role in the petrogenesis of dacites and may be important in the formation of basaltic lavas at MOR in general. MOR high-silica andesites and dacites from diverse areas show remarkably similar major element trends, incompatible trace element enrichments, and isotopic signatures suggesting similar processes control their chemistry. In particular, very high Cl and elevated H2O concentrations and relatively light oxygen isotope ratios (~ 5.8‰ vs. expected values of ~ 6.8‰) in fresh dacite glasses can be explained by contamination of magmas from a component of ocean crust altered by hydrothermal fluids. Crystallization of silicate phases and Fe-oxides causes an increase in δ18O in residual magma, but assimilation of material initially altered at high temperatures results in lower δ18O values. The observed geochemical signatures can be explained by extreme fractional crystallization of a MOR basalt parent combined with partial melting and assimilation (AFC) of amphibole-bearing altered oceanic crust. The MOR dacitic lavas do not appear to be simply the extrusive equivalent of oceanic plagiogranites. The combination of partial melting and assimilation produces a distinct geochemical signature that includes higher incompatible trace element abundances and distinct trace element ratios relative to those observed in plagiogranites.

  14. (Tl, Pb, Cu)Sr 2(Tl, Pb, Cu) 2Cu 2O 8- δ: a nonsuperconducting Tl-1222 * cuprate with both heavy atom single and oxygen depleted double layer motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, H. H.; Ringshandl, S.; Baltrusch, R.

    1998-05-01

    An account is given of the synthesis and structural investigation of a newly discovered tetragonal (Tl, Pb, Cu)Sr 2(Tl, Pb, Cu) 2Cu 2O 8- δ compound (Tl-1222 * phase) with both (Tl, Pb, Cu)O single and oxygen depleted (Tl, Pb, Cu) 2O x double layer motifs, space group I4/mmm, lattice parameters a=3.8405(2), c=29.2536(5) Å, and Dx=7.46 g cm -3. Micaceous and highly reflecting black single crystals of 1 mm×1 mm×3-5 μm size were obtained from a Tl 2O 3- and CuO-rich partial melt. The as-grown compound is nonsuperconducting. The very thin crystals are extremely liable to bend out of shape. Deterioration could not be observed within the period of a year under ambient conditions. The complex crystal structure has been solved using single crystals. We take note of the similarity of the unit cell dimensions to superconducting (Tl, Cu) 2Ba 2(Ca, Tl)Cu 2O 8 (Tl-2212 phase) with TlO double rocksalt layers, and compare crystal-chemical details of similar compounds. Apart from the possibility of obtaining superconducting properties by suitable doping, the mechanical properties of the new material are very attractive from the point of view of its use as highly scattering composite layers of an X-ray monochromator.

  15. Three-dimensional distribution of larval fish habitats in the shallow oxygen minimum zone in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean off Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, S. M.; Sánchez-Velasco, L.; Beier, E.; Godínez, Victor M.; Barton, Eric D.; Tamayo, A.

    2015-07-01

    Three-dimensional distribution of larval fish habitats was analyzed, from the upper limit of the shallow oxygen minimum zone (~0.2 mL/L) to the sea surface, in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean off Mexico in February 2010. The upper limit rises from ~250 m depth in the entrance of the Gulf of California to ~80 m depth off Cabo Corrientes. Three larval fish habitats were defined statistically: (i) a Gulf of California habitat dominated by Anchoa spp. larvae (epipelagic species), constrained to the oxygenated surface layer (>3.5 mL/L) in and above the thermocline (~60 m depth), and separated by a salinity front from the Tropical Pacific habitat; (ii) a Tropical Pacific habitat, dominated by Vinciguerria lucetia larvae (mesopelagic species), located throughout the sampled water column, but with the highest abundance in the oxygenated upper layer above the thermocline; (iii) an Oxygen Minimum habitat defined mostly below the thermocline in hypoxic (<1 mL/L; ~70 m depth) and anoxic (<0.2 mL/L; ~80 m depth) water off Cabo Corrientes. This subsurface hypoxic habitat had the highest species richness and larval abundance, with dominance of Bregmaceros bathymaster, an endemic neritic pelagic species; which was an unexpected result. This may be associated with the shoaling of the upper limit of the shallow oxygen minimum zone near the coast, a result of the strong costal upwelling detected by the Bakun Index. In this region of strong and semi-continuous coastal upwelling in the eastern tropical Pacific off Mexico, the shallow hypoxic water does not have dramatic effects on the total larval fish abundance but appears to affect species composition.

  16. Ozone Depletion by Hydrofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, M.; Fleming, E. L.; Newman, P. A.; Li, F.; Mlawer, E. J.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Bailey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are second-generation replacements for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons and other substances that caused the 'ozone hole'. Atmospheric concentrations of HFCs are projected to increase dramatically in the coming decades. Coupled chemistry-climate simulations forced by these projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere in 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs modulate atmospheric temperature, thereby changing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and enhancing the stratospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Sensitivity simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to atmospheric change in 2050, as compared with HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation and dynamics, for a likely 2050 climate, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 4.3x10-4 to 3.5x10-2; previously HFCs were assumed to have negligible ODPs since these species lack chlorine or bromine atoms. The ozone impacts of HFCs are further investigated with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM). The GEOSCCM is a three-dimensional, fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model with interactive stratospheric chemistry. Sensitivity simulations in which CO2, CFC-11 and HCFC-22 are enhanced individually are used as proxies for the atmospheric response to the HFC concentrations expected by the mid-21st century. Sensitivity simulations provide quantitative estimates of the impacts of these greenhouse gases on global total ozone, and can be used to assess their effects on the recovery of Antarctic ozone.

  17. Seasonal Carbonate Chemistry Covariation with Temperature, Oxygen, and Salinity in a Fjord Estuary: Implications for the Design of Ocean Acidification Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Reum, Jonathan C. P.; Alin, Simone R.; Feely, Richard A.; Newton, Jan; Warner, Mark; McElhany, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Carbonate chemistry variability is often poorly characterized in coastal regions and patterns of covariation with other biologically important variables such as temperature, oxygen concentration, and salinity are rarely evaluated. This absence of information hampers the design and interpretation of ocean acidification experiments that aim to characterize biological responses to future pCO2 levels relative to contemporary conditions. Here, we analyzed a large carbonate chemistry data set from Puget Sound, a fjord estuary on the U.S. west coast, and included measurements from three seasons (winter, summer, and fall). pCO2 exceeded the 2008–2011 mean atmospheric level (392 µatm) at all depths and seasons sampled except for the near-surface waters (< 10 m) in the summer. Further, undersaturated conditions with respect to the biogenic carbonate mineral aragonite were widespread (Ωar<1). We show that pCO2 values were relatively uniform throughout the water column and across regions in winter, enriched in subsurface waters in summer, and in the fall some values exceeded 2500 µatm in near-surface waters. Carbonate chemistry covaried to differing levels with temperature and oxygen depending primarily on season and secondarily on region. Salinity, which varied little (27 to 31), was weakly correlated with carbonate chemistry. We illustrate potential high-frequency changes in carbonate chemistry, temperature, and oxygen conditions experienced simultaneously by organisms in Puget Sound that undergo diel vertical migrations under present-day conditions. We used simple calculations to estimate future pCO2 and Ωar values experienced by diel vertical migrators based on an increase in atmospheric CO2. Given the potential for non-linear interactions between pCO2 and other abiotic variables on physiological and ecological processes, our results provide a basis for identifying control conditions in ocean acidification experiments for this region, but also highlight the wide

  18. Seasonal carbonate chemistry covariation with temperature, oxygen, and salinity in a fjord estuary: implications for the design of ocean acidification experiments.

    PubMed

    Reum, Jonathan C P; Alin, Simone R; Feely, Richard A; Newton, Jan; Warner, Mark; McElhany, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Carbonate chemistry variability is often poorly characterized in coastal regions and patterns of covariation with other biologically important variables such as temperature, oxygen concentration, and salinity are rarely evaluated. This absence of information hampers the design and interpretation of ocean acidification experiments that aim to characterize biological responses to future pCO2 levels relative to contemporary conditions. Here, we analyzed a large carbonate chemistry data set from Puget Sound, a fjord estuary on the U.S. west coast, and included measurements from three seasons (winter, summer, and fall). pCO2 exceeded the 2008-2011 mean atmospheric level (392 µatm) at all depths and seasons sampled except for the near-surface waters (< 10 m) in the summer. Further, undersaturated conditions with respect to the biogenic carbonate mineral aragonite were widespread (Ωar<1). We show that pCO2 values were relatively uniform throughout the water column and across regions in winter, enriched in subsurface waters in summer, and in the fall some values exceeded 2500 µatm in near-surface waters. Carbonate chemistry covaried to differing levels with temperature and oxygen depending primarily on season and secondarily on region. Salinity, which varied little (27 to 31), was weakly correlated with carbonate chemistry. We illustrate potential high-frequency changes in carbonate chemistry, temperature, and oxygen conditions experienced simultaneously by organisms in Puget Sound that undergo diel vertical migrations under present-day conditions. We used simple calculations to estimate future pCO2 and Ωar values experienced by diel vertical migrators based on an increase in atmospheric CO2. Given the potential for non-linear interactions between pCO2 and other abiotic variables on physiological and ecological processes, our results provide a basis for identifying control conditions in ocean acidification experiments for this region, but also highlight the wide range

  19. Historic and recent patterns in dissolved oxygen within the Yaquina Estuary (Oregon, USA): Importance of anthropogenic activities and oceanic conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial and temporal patterns of dissolved oxygen (DO) in Yaquina Estuary, Oregon (USA) are examined using historic and recent data. There was a significant increasing trend in DO in the upstream portion of the estuary during the years 1960–1985. Historically, minimum dry season ...

  20. Connection of the Oxygen Isotope in Stalagmites from East Asia with the Large Scale Atmospheric-Oceanic Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Jing, Y.; Luo, F.; Wan, J.

    2014-12-01

    Cave stalagmites δ18O is associated with climate, but the specific climatic meaning of East Asian stalagmites δ18O remains unclear. Several recent researches suggest that East Asian stalagmites δ18O represents neither surface air temperature nor precipitation, but an integral variation of Asian monsoon circulation systems. It reflects a ratio of different water vapor sources. Since large-scale atmospheric-oceanic patterns such as Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) show significant effects on the Asian monsoon circulation systems, in this work we explored the relationships between these atmospheric-oceanic patterns and the East Asian stalagmites δ18O during the last three centuries by using several reconstructed dataets together with instrumental records. Considering the human activities exert extraordinary impacts on climate, we compared the two separated periods, before and after the industrial revolution. The results show significant lead-lag connections between the East Asian stalagmites δ18O and the large-scale atmospheric-oceanic patterns. One positive correlation peaks when PDO leads the East Asian stalagmites δ18O by 3 years. This PDO-stalagmite connection is robust through the whole recent centuries. In comparison, the relations between AMO, NAO and the East Asian stalagmites δ18O exhibit significant differences in the post-industrial period and the pre-industrial period. Thus, the East Asian stalagmites δ18O may be a reflector of the signals of PDO.

  1. Biogeochemistry: Oxygen burrowed away

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2014-09-01

    Multicellular animals probably evolved at the seafloor after a rise in oceanic oxygen levels. Biogeochemical model simulations suggest that as these animals started to rework the seafloor, they triggered a negative feedback that reduced global oxygen.

  2. Using Oxygen and Neodymium Isotopes to Track Ocean Circulation in the North Atlantic During the Late Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, S. W.; Martin, E. E.; MacLeod, K. G.

    2005-12-01

    We have undertaken parallel analyses of δ18O and ɛNd in Late Cretaceous fish debris in an effort to determine the relative importance of tectonics and regional ocean circulation compared to global climate in controlling the nature of deposition on Demerara Rise. Demerara Rise is a submarine plateau along the NE margin of South America and was one of the last points of contact between Africa and South America as the Atlantic opened. Paleotemperatures estimated from the δ18O values suggest thermocline water temperatures declined by >10°C from the early Cenomanian to the Maastrichtian. In contrast, initial ɛNd(T) values show relatively little variation and are surprisingly nonradiogenic across this interval. Values for mid-Cenomanian fossil fish debris are ~-13.7, those in the lower Turonian are ~-16.7, and those from the Maastrichtian are ~-16. These values are less radiogenic than any reported from Fe-Mn crusts and fish teeth throughout the Cretaceous to Neogene. For comparison, Late Cretaceous values from the Pacific (Site 886) are ~-4.5. The Atlantic data suggest that North Atlantic deep waters may have been isolated from other ocean basins into the Maastrichtian. Alternatively, the nonradiogenic values may reflect local weathering inputs or diagenesis. Assuming the Nd isotopic data represent bottom water values, the continuity of the Nd data do not support the idea that lithologic and temperature shifts were associated with a change in deep water circulation and ventilation. In this case, we attribute the apparent temperature decrease from the early Cenomanian into the Turonian to subsidence from shelfal to bathyal depths post-rifting. The continued temperature decline into the Maastrichtian parallels global climate trends. With additional Nd isotopic analyses we hope to document end member values for the Late Cretaceous North Atlantic and track the timing of the deep connections between the North Atlantic and other ocean basins.

  3. Ancient oceanic crust in island arc lower crust: Evidence from oxygen isotopes in zircons from the Tanzawa Tonalitic Pluton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kazue; Kitajima, Kouki; Sawaki, Yusuke; Hattori, Kentaro; Hirata, Takafumi; Maruyama, Shigenori

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the lithological variability and genesis of island arc crust is important for understanding continental growth. Although the volcanic architecture of island arcs is comparatively well known, the nature of island arc middle- and lower-crust remains uncertain owing to limited exposure. One of the best targets for deciphering the evolution of an island arc system is the Tanzawa Tonalites (4-9 Ma), in the intra-oceanic Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc. These tonalities which occupied a mid-crustal position were generated by partial melting of lower crust. To constrain protoliths of the plutonic rocks in the island arc lower crust, in-situ O-isotopic analysis using an IMS-1280 Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer was carried out on 202 zircon grains separated from 4 plutons in the Tanzawa Tonalite. δ18O value of the zircons ranges from 4.1‰ to 5.5‰ and some zircons have δ18O slightly lower than the mantle range. The low zircon δ18O values from the Tanzawa Tonalite suggest that their protoliths involved materials with lower δ18O values than those of the mantle. Hydrothermally altered gabbros in the lower oceanic crust often have lower δ18O values than mantle and can be primary components of arc lower crust. The Tanzawa Tonalite is interpreted to have been formed by partial melting of island arc lower crust. Thus the low δ18O values in zircons from the Tanzawa Tonalites may originate by melting of the hydrothermally altered gabbro. Ancient oceanic crustal material was likely present in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc lower crust, at the time of formation of the Tanzawa Tonalites.

  4. Vertical partitioning of nitrogen-loss processes across the oxic-anoxic interface of an oceanic oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    De Brabandere, Loreto; Canfield, Don E; Dalsgaard, Tage; Friederich, Gernot E; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Thamdrup, Bo

    2014-10-01

    We investigated anammox, denitrification and dissimilatory reduction of nitrite to ammonium (DNRA) activity in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off northern Chile, at high-depth resolution through the oxycline into the anoxic OMZ core. This was accompanied by high-resolution nutrient and oxygen profiles to link changes in nitrogen transformation rates to physicochemical characteristics of the water column. Denitrification was detected at most depths, but anammox was the most active N2 -producing process, while DNRA was not detectable. Anammox and denitrification were mainly active in the anoxic OMZ core while activity was low to not detectable in the oxycline, except in association with an intrusion of OMZ core water. This indicates that continuous exposure to even submicromolar oxygen levels inhibits the processes either directly or through nitrite limitation. Anammox activity did not peak at the oxic-anoxic boundary but 20-50 m below matching the salinity maximum of the Equatorial Subsurface Water. This suggests that water history plays a major role for anammox activity possibly due to slow growth of anammox bacteria. Denitrification peaked deeper than anammox, likely reflecting a shift in the balance between this process and nitrate reduction to nitrite, governed by the relative availability of nitrate and nitrite.

  5. Vertical partitioning of nitrogen-loss processes across the oxic-anoxic interface of an oceanic oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    De Brabandere, Loreto; Canfield, Don E; Dalsgaard, Tage; Friederich, Gernot E; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Thamdrup, Bo

    2014-10-01

    We investigated anammox, denitrification and dissimilatory reduction of nitrite to ammonium (DNRA) activity in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off northern Chile, at high-depth resolution through the oxycline into the anoxic OMZ core. This was accompanied by high-resolution nutrient and oxygen profiles to link changes in nitrogen transformation rates to physicochemical characteristics of the water column. Denitrification was detected at most depths, but anammox was the most active N2 -producing process, while DNRA was not detectable. Anammox and denitrification were mainly active in the anoxic OMZ core while activity was low to not detectable in the oxycline, except in association with an intrusion of OMZ core water. This indicates that continuous exposure to even submicromolar oxygen levels inhibits the processes either directly or through nitrite limitation. Anammox activity did not peak at the oxic-anoxic boundary but 20-50 m below matching the salinity maximum of the Equatorial Subsurface Water. This suggests that water history plays a major role for anammox activity possibly due to slow growth of anammox bacteria. Denitrification peaked deeper than anammox, likely reflecting a shift in the balance between this process and nitrate reduction to nitrite, governed by the relative availability of nitrate and nitrite. PMID:24118779

  6. Long-Term Trends of Nutrients and Apparent Oxygen Utilization South of the Polar Front in Southern Ocean Intermediate Water from 1965 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Takahiro; Odate, Tsuneo; Fukuchi, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    The variation of nutrients over decadal timescales south of the polar front in the Southern Ocean is poorly known because of a lack of continuous observational data in this area. We examined data from long-term continuous hydrographic monitoring of 43 years (1965–2008) in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean, via the resupply of Antarctic stations under the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition and Australian Antarctic Research Expedition. We found significant increasing trends in phosphate and nitrate, and a decreasing trend in apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) in intermediate water (neutral density = 27.8–28.1 kgm−3) south of the polar front. The rates of phosphate and nitrate increase are 0.004 µmol yr−1 and 0.02 µmol yr−1, respectively. The rate of decline of AOU was 0.32 µmol yr−1. One reason for this phosphate and nitrate increase and AOU decline is reduced horizontal advection of North Atlantic Deep Water, which is characterized by low nutrients and high AOU. The relationship between climate change and nutrient variability remains obscure, emphasizing the importance of long-term monitoring. PMID:23990984

  7. Sea surface temperatures in the central southern Indian Ocean over the period 1790 to 2007 inferred from two monthly resolved Sr/Ca and oxygen isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinke, J.; Wassenburg, J.; Hardman, E.

    2009-04-01

    We obtained two monthly resolved Sr/Ca records from Rodrigues island (Mauritius) located in the trade wind belt of the central southern Indian Ocean. The longest core was obtained at a nearshore fringing reef and covers the period 1790-2005. This coral records surface air temperatures from the local weather station available from 1950 to the present. The most remarkable signal is a slight cooling after the 1950's. The second core was obtained from the open ocean and records a long-term warming trend between 1947 to 2007. The warming accelerated after the late 1970's in agreement with instrumental data. The oxygen isotope record is affected by salinity variations and shows a strong freshening trend after the late 1970's. The freshening trend is probably related to advection of low salinity waters with the South Equatorial Current and/or increased cyclonicity. We will discuss our results in light of interannual and decadal variability and present long-term seawater monitoring data.

  8. 50 CFR 216.15 - Depleted species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Depleted species. 216.15 Section 216.15 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE...

  9. 50 CFR 216.15 - Depleted species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Depleted species. 216.15 Section 216.15 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION..., Prince William Sound, Yakutat Bay, Shelikof Strait, and off Kodiak Island and freshwater tributaries...

  10. 50 CFR 216.15 - Depleted species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Depleted species. 216.15 Section 216.15 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION..., Prince William Sound, Yakutat Bay, Shelikof Strait, and off Kodiak Island and freshwater tributaries...

  11. Dissolved Fe(II) in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone and western tropical Indian Ocean during the inter-monsoon period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yoshiko; Moffett, James W.

    2013-03-01

    The concentration of iron(II) (Fe(II)) in seawater was investigated throughout the water column in the Arabian Sea and western tropical Indian Ocean including the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) as part of the 2009 Japanese GEOTRACES cruise using a luminol-chemiluminescence detection based flow injection analysis technique. A novel modification was the adjustment of the sample pH to 7.2 with a 3-(N-morpholino) propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) buffer to minimize Fe(II) oxidation during sampling. At stations in the Arabian Sea OMZ, Fe(II) had subsurface maxima in the oxygen-deficient and high nitrite layers; fully 7-29% of total dissolved Fe existed as Fe(II) in these samples. Subsurface Fe(II) maxima were not observed in stations south of the oxygen minimum zone. Within the OMZ, the distribution of Fe(II) resembled previous data obtained during the 2004 southwest monsoon, indicating that the Fe(II) maxima are seasonally and interannually persistent feature. These results confirm the close relationship between Fe(II) and the secondary nitrite maxima and suggest that the rich microbial community within this feature is closely involved with Fe redox cycling. Fe(II) concentrations near the seafloor were elevated in locations underlying the OMZ but nowhere else, possibly reflecting inputs from reducing sediments. To the south, a clear maximum in dissolved Fe from the Rodriguez Triple Junction hydrothermal system showed no evidence of Fe(II). The center location of the Rodriguez Triple Junction is 25° 35'S, 70° 00'E (Gamo et al., 2001), more than 800 km southwest of station ER10 (the closest station), so hydrothermally-derived Fe(II) was probably oxidized.

  12. The Ocean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broecker, Wallace S.

    1983-01-01

    The chemistry of the ocean, whose constituents interact with those of air and land to support life and influence climate, is known to have undergone changes since the last glacial epoch. Changes in dissolved oxygen, calcium ions, phosphate, carbon dioxide, carbonate ions, and bicarbonate ions are discussed. (JN)

  13. Variability in pH, fCO 2, oxygen and flux of CO 2 in the surface water along a transect in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chierici, Melissa; Fransson, Agneta; Turner, David R.; Pakhomov, E. A.; Froneman, P. W.

    2004-11-01

    Underway sampling and measurements of pH, fCO 2, oxygen and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) were performed in the surface waters from Cape Town (South Africa) to Queen Maud Land (Antarctica) in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean during the austral summer 1997/1998. From direct measurements of these parameters and from calculated fCO 2 the oceanic carbon dioxide system was studied and related to hydrological and biological parameters. fCO 2 was in general undersaturated relative to the atmosphere and showed a large variability with values ranging from 313 to 377 μatm with a mean value of 346±13 μatm. The undersaturation was more pronounced in areas associated with fronts where high Chl a and high pH in situ values were observed. Using shipboard wind speed data, estimates of the CO 2 flux were made along the transect and during three mesoscale surveys on the northward return transect in the area of the Spring Ice Edge (SIE), the Winter Ice Edge (WIE) and in the Antarctic Polar Front (APF). The undersaturation observed during the transect caused the ocean to act as a sink for CO 2 with a mean sea-air flux for the entire transect of -3±5 mmol m -2 d -1 with a large variability between -20 mmol m -2 d -1 (oceanic uptake) to 1.3 mmol m -2 d -1 (oceanic source). The lowest fCO 2 values (largest oceanic uptake of CO 2) were found at the southern boundary of the APF at 53°S, which coincided with a supersaturation in oxygen and high pH values. Oxygen concentrations were measured from 50°S to 63°S and varied between 324 and 359 μmol kg -1 with a mean value of 347±9 μmol kg -1. In general only small deviations from equilibrium oxygen saturation were observed (mean value=99±2%). However, in the SIE oxygen was clearly undersaturated, probably an effect of upwelling of oxygen poor deep water which had not yet been compensated for by biological production. Three weeks later, the ice edge had retreated in the SIE region and the Chl a concentration had increased three

  14. Study on the killing of oceanic harmful micro-organisms in ship's ballast water using oxygen active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Meng, X. Y.; Bai, M. D.; Tian, Y. P.; Jing, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Global Environment Facility has identified that the spread of marine invasive alien species is one of the four major risk factors threatening the safety of global marine environments. Ballast water discharge is the main cause of biological invasion. With physical methods of strong electric field ionization discharge at atmospheric pressure, O2 and sea water (gaseous) were ionized, and then dissociated to a number of oxygen active particles (ROS) such as ·OH, O2+, H2O+, etc. ROS was injected into 0.6 t h-1 ballast water treatment system to form high concentration ROS solution in order to kill the harmful micro-organisms in ballast water. According to the land-based test standard of International Maritime Organization (IMO) Guidelines for Approval of Ballast Water Management Systems (G8), this paper concludes that single-cell algae of 3.0 × 104 cell ml-1 and bacteria of 2.0 × 104 cfu ml-1 were killed by ROS solution of 2.0 ppm. Death rate could reach almost 100%. The results meet the requirements of Regulation D-2 of International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments completely.

  15. Water Depletion Threatens Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauman, K. A.; Richter, B. D.; Postel, S.; Floerke, M.; Malsy, M.

    2014-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the human activity that has by far the largest impact on water, constituting 85% of global water consumption and 67% of global water withdrawals. Much of this water use occurs in places where water depletion, the ratio of water consumption to water availability, exceeds 75% for at least one month of the year. Although only 17% of global watershed area experiences depletion at this level or more, nearly 30% of total cropland and 60% of irrigated cropland are found in these depleted watersheds. Staple crops are particularly at risk, with 75% of global irrigated wheat production and 65% of irrigated maize production found in watersheds that are at least seasonally depleted. Of importance to textile production, 75% of cotton production occurs in the same watersheds. For crop production in depleted watersheds, we find that one half to two-thirds of production occurs in watersheds that have not just seasonal but annual water shortages, suggesting that re-distributing water supply over the course of the year cannot be an effective solution to shortage. We explore the degree to which irrigated production in depleted watersheds reflects limitations in supply, a byproduct of the need for irrigation in perennially or seasonally dry landscapes, and identify heavy irrigation consumption that leads to watershed depletion in more humid climates. For watersheds that are not depleted, we evaluate the potential impact of an increase in irrigated production. Finally, we evaluate the benefits of irrigated agriculture in depleted and non-depleted watersheds, quantifying the fraction of irrigated production going to food production, animal feed, and biofuels.

  16. The Late Permian Ocean: What's the Big Stink?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, K. M.; Ridgwell, A.; Kump, L. R.

    2006-12-01

    Since the ocean is (and has been) sulfate rich, the development of basinal to global anoxia is often associated with the buildup of hydrogen sulfide in anoxic waters. Bacterial sulfate reduction begins to dominate after oxygen and nitrate have been depleted, producing hydrogen sulfide. Hence, low atmospheric oxygen content, warm surface ocean temperatures, and high O2 demand reduce oceanic oxygen content and favor the establishment of euxinia. Biomarker evidence for photic zone sulfide and biogeochemical calculations suggest that the end-Permian mass extinction was one interval during which extreme anoxia may have led to H2S buildup. We hypothesize that H2S release to the atmosphere would be possible if the upward flux of sulfide from deep water in a largely euxinic ocean exceeded the oxygen flux into the surface ocean from wind mixing. In this scenario, destabilization of the chemocline (oxygen-sulfide interface) would cause sulfide poisoning in both the marine and terrestrial realms and contribute to the extinction. We used the end-Permian configuration of GENIE (www.genie.ac.uk), an energy-moisture-balance atmosphere model coupled to a 3-D, non-eddy-resolving, frictional geostrophic model to evaluate this hypothesis. This model includes marine biogeochemistry and capably simulates processes associated with the transition to oceanic anoxia. We performed a series of simulations designed to identify the conditions necessary for widespread euxinia and chemocline destabilization. We characterized the magnitude of hydrogen sulfide flux as a function of increasing oceanic phosphate content resulting from P release from sediments in anoxic environments. Significant ocean-atmosphere fluxes of H2S result from 6- to 10-fold increases in ocean phosphate at modern oxygen levels. These fluxes are focused in upwelling regions, although toxic H2S concentrations are also observed in the surface waters of nearshore equatorial regions. Our initial simulations support the

  17. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-12-10

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo

  18. Battery depletion monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.S.

    1982-01-26

    A cmos inverter is used to compare pacemaker battery voltage to a referenced voltage. When the reference voltage exceeds the measured battery voltage, the inverter changes state to indicate battery depletion.

  19. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  20. Oxygen thermobarometry of abyssal spinel peridotites: The redox state and C-O-H volatile composition of the Earth's sub-oceanic upper mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Bryndzia, L.T. ); Wood, B.J. )

    1990-12-01

    The authors have applied the spinel peridotite oxygen barometer to abyssal spinel peridotites from the mid-Atlantic, central Indian, southwest Indian and American-Antarctic ocean ridge systems. The results indicate that the oxygen fugacity (F{sub O{sub 2}}) of the suboceanic mantle is on average 0.9 {plus minus}0.7 (n = 33; {plus minus} 1sd) log units below the Fayalite-Magnetite-Quartz (FMQ) f{sub O{sub 2}} buffer, in excellent agreement with f{sub O{sub 2}} estimates of MORB glasses (FMQ {minus}1.20 {plus minus} 0.63, n = 87; {plus minus} 1 sd). The agreement between MORBs and their mantle source region suggests that the rapidly quenched liquids have not undergone significant oxidation (by hydrogen degassing, for example) during their ascent and eruption. Their results also show that the suboceanic mantle is more reduced than the subcontinental mantle, for which the average value of log f{sub O{sub 2}} lies approximately at FMQ (log f{sub O{sub 2}} = FMQ + 0.24 {plus minus} 0.5, n = 54; {plus minus} 1 sd). Abyssal spinel peridotites from the Islas Orcadas fracture Zone (FZ), near the Bouvet Island hotspot, are the most reduced samples in our suite (log f{sub O{sub 2}} = FMQ {minus}1.67 to {minus}2.32), and they are compatible with a graphite-saturated fluid being present in this source region. In general, however, upper mantle f{sub O{sub 2}}'s are too high for graphite to be stable, and they estimate an activity of carbon relative to graphite of about 0.05 under the approximate conditions of MORB generation (P {approximately} 10 kb, T {approximately} 1,325{degree}C, log f{sub O{sub 2}} {approximately} FMQ {minus}0.9). Under these conditions an average CO{sub 2} content in the mantle of {approximately} 215 to 545 ppm would be consistent with the fluid compositions of MORB glasses.

  1. Primary production and carbon export rates across the subpolar N. Atlantic Ocean basin based on triple oxygen isotope and dissolved O2 and Ar gas measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quay, P.; Stutsman, J.; Steinhoff, T.

    2012-06-01

    Gross photosynthetic O2 production (GOP) rates in the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean were estimated using the measured isotopic composition of dissolved oxygen in the surface layer on samples collected on nine transits of a container ship between Great Britain and Canada during March 2007 to June 2008. The mean basin-wide GOP rate of 226 ± 48 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 during summer was double the winter rate of 107 ± 41 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. Converting these GOP rates to equivalent 14C-based PP (14C-PPeqv) yielded rates of 1005 ± 216 and 476 ± 183 mg C m-2 d-1 in summer and winter, respectively, that generally agreed well with previous 14C-based PP estimates in the region. The 14C-PPeqv estimates were 1-1.6× concurrent satellite-based PP estimates along the cruise track. A net community production rate (NCP) of 87 ± 12 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 (62 ± 9 mmol C m-2 d-1) and NCP/GOP of 0.35 ± 0.06 in the mixed layer was estimated from O2/Ar and 17Δ measurements (61°N 26°W) during spring bloom conditions in May 2008. Contrastingly, a much lower long-term annual mean NCP or organic carbon export rate of 2.8 ± 2.7 mol C m-2 yr-1 (8 ± 7 mmol C m-2 d-1) and NCP/GOP of 0.07 ± 0.06 at the winter mixed layer depth was estimated from 15 years of surface O2 data in the subpolar N. Atlantic collected during the CARINA program.

  2. Stable Isotope Constraints on the Ocean from Hydrothermally-altered Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, R. T.

    2007-12-01

    The 18O/16O ratio of the ocean provides an important constraint on the global geochemical cycles in the Precambrian Earth. The oxygen isotope ratio of the ocean is most likely buffered near its present day value as long as plate tectonics is operative. A quasi-steady state value for oxygen isotopes is reached on a 100 Myr timescale after the onset of plate tectonics. Hydrothermally-altered igneous rocks constrain the oxygen and hydrogen isotope value of the hydrosphere back through time. Whereas, the oxygen isotope composition of seawater owes its value to the competition between low temperature chemical weathering and mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal exchange, there is no such process for hydrogen isotopes. Changes in the oxygen isotope ratio of seawater should be reflected in hydrothermally altered rocks by the presence of low or high 18O exchanged igneous rocks with normal δD values. The distribution of D and 18O in hydrothermally rocks is used to infer the position of the meteoric water line back through time. Results from the Phanerozoic, the Proterozoic, and the Archean fail to confirm the hypothesis that the global oceans were ever strongly 18O-depleted. The meteoric water line is anchored to the isotopic composition of seawater, the isotope standard for both oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. The ability to use sedimentary rocks or other proxies for climate depend upon the variation in the stable isotopic composition of seawater. Thus far, the hydrothermal record does not support the existence of low 18O oceans. This suggests that low 18O values observed in carbonates and cherts result from either precipitation from oceans with higher temperature or from bodies of water isolated from the open ocean.

  3. Oxygen safety

    MedlinePlus

    COPD - oxygen safety; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - oxygen safety; Chronic obstructive airways disease - oxygen safety; Emphysema - oxygen safety; Heart failure - oxygen-safety; Palliative care - oxygen safety; ...

  4. Carbon isotope excursions and the oxidant budget of the Ediacaran atmosphere and ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Thomas F.; Kennedy, Martin J.

    2008-11-01

    A possible global drop in marine carbon isotope values to aslow as -12{per thousand} Peedee belemnite (PDB), recorded in the EdiacaranShuram Formation of Oman, has been attributed to the non-steady-stateoxidation of oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) resultingfrom the rise in atmospheric oxygen to near modern values atthe end of the Precambrian. Geologic constraints indicate thatthe excursion lasted between 25 and 50 m.y., requiring a DOCpool thousands of times to 10,000 times the modern inventoryto conform with carbon isotope mass balance calculations fora -12{per thousand} excursion. At the consequent rates of DOC oxidation,oceanic sulfate and oxygen in the atmosphere and oceans areexhausted on a time scale of 800 k.y. Oxidant depletion isincompatible with independent geochemical and biological indicatorsthat show oceanic sulfate and oxygen levels were maintainedor increased during the Shuram excursion. Furthermore, a DOC-drivenexcursion does not explain strong covariation between the carbonand oxygen isotope record. These indicators show that negativeisotope excursions recorded in the Shuram and other Ediacaransections are unlikely to represent a global ocean signal.

  5. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  6. Charge depletion meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J. F.

    1984-11-01

    This invention relates to a charge depletion meter apparatus having a current to frequency converter to sense and convert the current drain of a battery source to a digital signal which is divided and then accumulated in a counter. An LCD display unit displays the accumulated charge which is received from the counter.

  7. Biotic Proxies For Ocean Acidification?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E.

    2013-12-01

    Present and future high atmospheric pCO2 levels have caused acidification of the oceans, which has led to studies of past ocean acidification and its biotic response in the geological record (1). Therefore we need proxies for past acidification. Geochemical proxies for ocean pH are being developed (e.g., boron based), and various trace element and stable isotope proxies in part reflect carbonate saturation levels. In addition to geochemical proxies, the relative abundances of some benthic foraminiferal species might serve as proxies for the saturation state of bottom or pore waters. In general, pore waters are less carbonate-saturated than bottom waters, and infaunal benthic foraminifera calcify in such less saturated waters. The relative abundance of infaunal species of benthic foraminifera has commonly been used as a proxy for a high food supply (and/or oxygen depleted bottom or pore waters). This proxy (infaunal %), however, can be used to indicate high food/low oxygen ONLY in the absence of evidence for carbonate dissolution, and is a qualitative proxy for carbonate undersaturation of bottom and pore waters in the presence of such evidence (2). The living species Nuttallides umbonifer can calcify in carbonate-corrosive waters (i.e., below the lysocline), and its extinct Paleogene ancestor N. truempyi may have had a similar tolerance, in view of the fact that it is a deep-water species and commonly abundant in samples which otherwise contain agglutinant taxa only. The pattern of deep-sea benthic foraminiferal abundances across the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum at South Atlantic Site 1263 (Walvis Ridge) can then be interpreted as a time sequence indicative of full dissolution (no calcareous benthics) at the start of the event, followed by strong dissolution (mainly infaunal taxa with relatively high % of N. truempyi), moderate dissolution (high % of N. truempyi), and return to background conditions. On the opposite extreme, extinction of pelagic calcifiers at

  8. A better-ventilated ocean triggered by Late Cretaceous changes in continental configuration.

    PubMed

    Donnadieu, Yannick; Pucéat, Emmanuelle; Moiroud, Mathieu; Guillocheau, François; Deconinck, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) are large-scale events of oxygen depletion in the deep ocean that happened during pre-Cenozoic periods of extreme warmth. Here, to assess the role of major continental configuration changes occurring during the Late Cretaceous on oceanic circulation modes, which in turn influence the oxygenation level of the deep ocean, we use a coupled ocean atmosphere climate model. We simulate ocean dynamics during two different time slices and compare these with existing neodymium isotope data (ɛNd). Although deep-water production in the North Pacific is continuous, the simulations at 94 and 71 Ma show a shift in southern deep-water production sites from South Pacific to South Atlantic and Indian Ocean locations. Our modelling results support the hypothesis that an intensification of southern Atlantic deep-water production and a reversal of deep-water fluxes through the Caribbean Seaway were the main causes of the decrease in ɛNd values recorded in the Atlantic and Indian deep waters during the Late Cretaceous.

  9. A better-ventilated ocean triggered by Late Cretaceous changes in continental configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnadieu, Yannick; Pucéat, Emmanuelle; Moiroud, Mathieu; Guillocheau, François; Deconinck, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) are large-scale events of oxygen depletion in the deep ocean that happened during pre-Cenozoic periods of extreme warmth. Here, to assess the role of major continental configuration changes occurring during the Late Cretaceous on oceanic circulation modes, which in turn influence the oxygenation level of the deep ocean, we use a coupled ocean atmosphere climate model. We simulate ocean dynamics during two different time slices and compare these with existing neodymium isotope data (εNd). Although deep-water production in the North Pacific is continuous, the simulations at 94 and 71 Ma show a shift in southern deep-water production sites from South Pacific to South Atlantic and Indian Ocean locations. Our modelling results support the hypothesis that an intensification of southern Atlantic deep-water production and a reversal of deep-water fluxes through the Caribbean Seaway were the main causes of the decrease in εNd values recorded in the Atlantic and Indian deep waters during the Late Cretaceous.

  10. A better-ventilated ocean triggered by Late Cretaceous changes in continental configuration.

    PubMed

    Donnadieu, Yannick; Pucéat, Emmanuelle; Moiroud, Mathieu; Guillocheau, François; Deconinck, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) are large-scale events of oxygen depletion in the deep ocean that happened during pre-Cenozoic periods of extreme warmth. Here, to assess the role of major continental configuration changes occurring during the Late Cretaceous on oceanic circulation modes, which in turn influence the oxygenation level of the deep ocean, we use a coupled ocean atmosphere climate model. We simulate ocean dynamics during two different time slices and compare these with existing neodymium isotope data (ɛNd). Although deep-water production in the North Pacific is continuous, the simulations at 94 and 71 Ma show a shift in southern deep-water production sites from South Pacific to South Atlantic and Indian Ocean locations. Our modelling results support the hypothesis that an intensification of southern Atlantic deep-water production and a reversal of deep-water fluxes through the Caribbean Seaway were the main causes of the decrease in ɛNd values recorded in the Atlantic and Indian deep waters during the Late Cretaceous. PMID:26777897

  11. A better-ventilated ocean triggered by Late Cretaceous changes in continental configuration

    PubMed Central

    Donnadieu, Yannick; Pucéat, Emmanuelle; Moiroud, Mathieu; Guillocheau, François; Deconinck, Jean- François

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) are large-scale events of oxygen depletion in the deep ocean that happened during pre-Cenozoic periods of extreme warmth. Here, to assess the role of major continental configuration changes occurring during the Late Cretaceous on oceanic circulation modes, which in turn influence the oxygenation level of the deep ocean, we use a coupled ocean atmosphere climate model. We simulate ocean dynamics during two different time slices and compare these with existing neodymium isotope data (ɛNd). Although deep-water production in the North Pacific is continuous, the simulations at 94 and 71 Ma show a shift in southern deep-water production sites from South Pacific to South Atlantic and Indian Ocean locations. Our modelling results support the hypothesis that an intensification of southern Atlantic deep-water production and a reversal of deep-water fluxes through the Caribbean Seaway were the main causes of the decrease in ɛNd values recorded in the Atlantic and Indian deep waters during the Late Cretaceous. PMID:26777897

  12. Ozone depletion by hydrofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Fleming, Eric L.; Newman, Paul A.; Li, Feng; Mlawer, Eli; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Bailey, Roshelle

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are projected to increase considerably in the coming decades. Chemistry climate model simulations forced by current projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere increasingly through 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs increase tropospheric and stratospheric temperatures, thereby enhancing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and modifying the atmospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 2-D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to HFC-related atmospheric change in 2050; its effects are comparable to the combined impacts of HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a, and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation, and dynamics, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 0.39 × 10-3 to 30.0 × 10-3, approximately 100 times larger than previous ODP estimates which were based solely on chemical effects.

  13. Biotic and human vulnerability to projected changes in ocean biogeochemistry over the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Mora, Camilo; Wei, Chih-Lin; Rollo, Audrey; Amaro, Teresa; Baco, Amy R; Billett, David; Bopp, Laurent; Chen, Qi; Collier, Mark; Danovaro, Roberto; Gooday, Andrew J; Grupe, Benjamin M; Halloran, Paul R; Ingels, Jeroen; Jones, Daniel O B; Levin, Lisa A; Nakano, Hideyuki; Norling, Karl; Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Rex, Michael; Ruhl, Henry A; Smith, Craig R; Sweetman, Andrew K; Thurber, Andrew R; Tjiputra, Jerry F; Usseglio, Paolo; Watling, Les; Wu, Tongwen; Yasuhara, Moriaki

    2013-10-01

    Ongoing greenhouse gas emissions can modify climate processes and induce shifts in ocean temperature, pH, oxygen concentration, and productivity, which in turn could alter biological and social systems. Here, we provide a synoptic global assessment of the simultaneous changes in future ocean biogeochemical variables over marine biota and their broader implications for people. We analyzed modern Earth System Models forced by greenhouse gas concentration pathways until 2100 and showed that the entire world's ocean surface will be simultaneously impacted by varying intensities of ocean warming, acidification, oxygen depletion, or shortfalls in productivity. In contrast, only a small fraction of the world's ocean surface, mostly in polar regions, will experience increased oxygenation and productivity, while almost nowhere will there be ocean cooling or pH elevation. We compiled the global distribution of 32 marine habitats and biodiversity hotspots and found that they would all experience simultaneous exposure to changes in multiple biogeochemical variables. This superposition highlights the high risk for synergistic ecosystem responses, the suite of physiological adaptations needed to cope with future climate change, and the potential for reorganization of global biodiversity patterns. If co-occurring biogeochemical changes influence the delivery of ocean goods and services, then they could also have a considerable effect on human welfare. Approximately 470 to 870 million of the poorest people in the world rely heavily on the ocean for food, jobs, and revenues and live in countries that will be most affected by simultaneous changes in ocean biogeochemistry. These results highlight the high risk of degradation of marine ecosystems and associated human hardship expected in a future following current trends in anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:24143135

  14. Biotic and Human Vulnerability to Projected Changes in Ocean Biogeochemistry over the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Camilo; Wei, Chih-Lin; Rollo, Audrey; Amaro, Teresa; Baco, Amy R.; Billett, David; Bopp, Laurent; Chen, Qi; Collier, Mark; Danovaro, Roberto; Gooday, Andrew J.; Grupe, Benjamin M.; Halloran, Paul R.; Ingels, Jeroen; Jones, Daniel O. B.; Levin, Lisa A.; Nakano, Hideyuki; Norling, Karl; Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Rex, Michael; Ruhl, Henry A.; Smith, Craig R.; Sweetman, Andrew K.; Thurber, Andrew R.; Tjiputra, Jerry F.; Usseglio, Paolo; Watling, Les; Wu, Tongwen; Yasuhara, Moriaki

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing greenhouse gas emissions can modify climate processes and induce shifts in ocean temperature, pH, oxygen concentration, and productivity, which in turn could alter biological and social systems. Here, we provide a synoptic global assessment of the simultaneous changes in future ocean biogeochemical variables over marine biota and their broader implications for people. We analyzed modern Earth System Models forced by greenhouse gas concentration pathways until 2100 and showed that the entire world's ocean surface will be simultaneously impacted by varying intensities of ocean warming, acidification, oxygen depletion, or shortfalls in productivity. In contrast, only a small fraction of the world's ocean surface, mostly in polar regions, will experience increased oxygenation and productivity, while almost nowhere will there be ocean cooling or pH elevation. We compiled the global distribution of 32 marine habitats and biodiversity hotspots and found that they would all experience simultaneous exposure to changes in multiple biogeochemical variables. This superposition highlights the high risk for synergistic ecosystem responses, the suite of physiological adaptations needed to cope with future climate change, and the potential for reorganization of global biodiversity patterns. If co-occurring biogeochemical changes influence the delivery of ocean goods and services, then they could also have a considerable effect on human welfare. Approximately 470 to 870 million of the poorest people in the world rely heavily on the ocean for food, jobs, and revenues and live in countries that will be most affected by simultaneous changes in ocean biogeochemistry. These results highlight the high risk of degradation of marine ecosystems and associated human hardship expected in a future following current trends in anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:24143135

  15. Biotic and human vulnerability to projected changes in ocean biogeochemistry over the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Mora, Camilo; Wei, Chih-Lin; Rollo, Audrey; Amaro, Teresa; Baco, Amy R; Billett, David; Bopp, Laurent; Chen, Qi; Collier, Mark; Danovaro, Roberto; Gooday, Andrew J; Grupe, Benjamin M; Halloran, Paul R; Ingels, Jeroen; Jones, Daniel O B; Levin, Lisa A; Nakano, Hideyuki; Norling, Karl; Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Rex, Michael; Ruhl, Henry A; Smith, Craig R; Sweetman, Andrew K; Thurber, Andrew R; Tjiputra, Jerry F; Usseglio, Paolo; Watling, Les; Wu, Tongwen; Yasuhara, Moriaki

    2013-10-01

    Ongoing greenhouse gas emissions can modify climate processes and induce shifts in ocean temperature, pH, oxygen concentration, and productivity, which in turn could alter biological and social systems. Here, we provide a synoptic global assessment of the simultaneous changes in future ocean biogeochemical variables over marine biota and their broader implications for people. We analyzed modern Earth System Models forced by greenhouse gas concentration pathways until 2100 and showed that the entire world's ocean surface will be simultaneously impacted by varying intensities of ocean warming, acidification, oxygen depletion, or shortfalls in productivity. In contrast, only a small fraction of the world's ocean surface, mostly in polar regions, will experience increased oxygenation and productivity, while almost nowhere will there be ocean cooling or pH elevation. We compiled the global distribution of 32 marine habitats and biodiversity hotspots and found that they would all experience simultaneous exposure to changes in multiple biogeochemical variables. This superposition highlights the high risk for synergistic ecosystem responses, the suite of physiological adaptations needed to cope with future climate change, and the potential for reorganization of global biodiversity patterns. If co-occurring biogeochemical changes influence the delivery of ocean goods and services, then they could also have a considerable effect on human welfare. Approximately 470 to 870 million of the poorest people in the world rely heavily on the ocean for food, jobs, and revenues and live in countries that will be most affected by simultaneous changes in ocean biogeochemistry. These results highlight the high risk of degradation of marine ecosystems and associated human hardship expected in a future following current trends in anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions.

  16. Insights into Ocean Acidification During the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum from Boron Isotopes at Southern Ocean Site 738

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, I.; Hoenisch, B.; Friedrich, O.

    2015-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) is a ~650-kyr interval of global warming, with a brief ~50 ky long peak warming interval, and an abrupt termination. Deep sea and surface ocean temperature evolution across this interval are fairly well constrained, but thus far we have little understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the gradual warming and rapid recovery. Carbonate mass accumulation rates suggest a shoaling of the carbonate compensation depth, and studies on alkenones indicate increasing atmospheric CO2 levels during the MECO. This suggests an increase in surface ocean CO2, and consequently ocean acidification. However, the severity and timing of the proposed ocean acidification with respect to the onset, peak warming and the termination are currently not well resolved. The boron isotopic composition (δ11B) recorded in planktic foraminifer shells offers an opportunity to infer oceanic pH across this interval. We are working on a boron isotope reconstruction from Southern Ocean IODP site 738 and South Atlantic IODP site 1263, covering 42.0 to 38.5 Ma. These sites are characterized by good carbonate preservation and well-defined age models have been established. Additionally, ecology, nutrient content and bottom-water oxygenation have been shown to change significantly across the event towards a more eutrophic, periodically oxygen-depleted environment supporting different biological communities. We selected the planktic foraminifera species Acarinina spinuloinflata for this study because it is symbiont-bearing, suggesting a near-surface habitat and little vertical migration in the water column, and because of its abundance in the samples. δ11B data will be translated to surface ocean pH and atmospheric pCO2 will be approximated to refine knowledge about the carbon cycle during this time. Parallel analysis of two core sites will help to evaluate the tenacity of the data.

  17. Nitrogen cycling. Rapid nitrous oxide cycling in the suboxic ocean.

    PubMed

    Babbin, Andrew R; Bianchi, Daniele; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B

    2015-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a major cause of stratospheric ozone depletion, yet its sources and sinks remain poorly quantified in the oceans. We used isotope tracers to directly measure N2O reduction rates in the eastern tropical North Pacific. Because of incomplete denitrification, N2O cycling rates are an order of magnitude higher than predicted by current models in suboxic regions, and the spatial distribution suggests strong dependence on both organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, N2O turnover is 20 times higher than the net atmospheric efflux. The rapid rate of this cycling coupled to an expected expansion of suboxic ocean waters implies future increases in N2O emissions. PMID:26045434

  18. Rapid nitrous oxide cycling in the suboxic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbin, Andrew R.; Bianchi, Daniele; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a major cause of stratospheric ozone depletion, yet its sources and sinks remain poorly quantified in the oceans. We used isotope tracers to directly measure N2O reduction rates in the eastern tropical North Pacific. Because of incomplete denitrification, N2O cycling rates are an order of magnitude higher than predicted by current models in suboxic regions, and the spatial distribution suggests strong dependence on both organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, N2O turnover is 20 times higher than the net atmospheric efflux. The rapid rate of this cycling coupled to an expected expansion of suboxic ocean waters implies future increases in N2O emissions.

  19. Tank depletion flow controller

    DOEpatents

    Georgeson, Melvin A.

    1976-10-26

    A flow control system includes two bubbler tubes installed at different levels within a tank containing such as radioactive liquid. As the tank is depleted, a differential pressure transmitter monitors pressure differences imparted by the two bubbler tubes at a remote, shielded location during uniform time intervals. At the end of each uniform interval, balance pots containing a dense liquid are valved together to equalize the pressures. The resulting sawtooth-shaped signal generated by the differential pressure transmitter is compared with a second sawtooth signal representing the desired flow rate during each time interval. Variations in the two signals are employed by a control instrument to regulate flow rate.

  20. How Depleted is the MORB mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A. W.; Hart, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the degree of mantle depletion of highly incompatible elements is critically important for assessing Earth's internal heat production and Urey number. Current views of the degree of MORB source depletion are dominated by Salters and Stracke (2004), and Workman and Hart (2005). The first is based on an assessment of average MORB compositions, whereas the second considers trace element data of oceanic peridotites. Both require an independent determination of one absolute concentration, Lu (Salters & Stracke), or Nd (Workman & Hart). Both use parent-daughter ratios Lu/Hf, Sm/Nd, and Rb/Sr calculated from MORB isotopes combined with continental-crust extraction models, as well as "canonical" trace element ratios, to boot-strap the full range of trace element abundances. We show that the single most important factor in determining the ultimate degree of incompatible element depletion in the MORB source lies in the assumptions about the timing of continent extraction, exemplified by continuous extraction versus simple two-stage models. Continued crust extraction generates additional, recent mantle depletion, without affecting the isotopic composition of the residual mantle significantly. Previous emphasis on chemical compositions of MORB and/or peridotites has tended to obscure this. We will explore the effect of different continent extraction models on the degree of U, Th, and K depletion in the MORB source. Given the uncertainties of the two most popular models, the uncertainties of U and Th in DMM are at least ±50%, and this impacts the constraints on the terrestrial Urey ratio. Salters, F.J.M. and Stracke, A., 2004, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 5, Q05004. Workman, R.K. and Hart, S.R., 2005, EPSL 231, 53-72.

  1. Ocean acidification in the Western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, W.; Chen, B.; Chen, L.

    2011-12-01

    We report carbonate chemistry and ocean acidification status in the western Arctic Ocean from 65-88οN based on data collected in summer 2008 and 2010. In the marginal seas, surface waters have high pH and high carbonate saturation state (Ω) due to intensive biological uptake of CO2. In the southern Canada Basin, surface waters have low pH and low Ω due to the uptake of atmospheric CO2 and sea-ice melt. In the northern Arctic Ocean basin, there is no serious ocean acidification in surface water due to heavy ice-coverage but pH and Ω in the subsurface waters at the oxygen minimum and nutrient maximum zone (at 100-150 m) are low due mostly to respiration-derived CO2 and an increased biological production and export in surface waters. Such multitude responses of ocean carbonate chemistry (northern vs. southern basin, basins vs. margins, and surface vs. subsurface) to climate changes are unique to the Arctic Ocean system. We will explore biogeochemical control mechanisms on carbonate chemistry and ocean acidification in the Arctic Ocean environments in the context of recent warming and sea-ice retreat.

  2. An emerging picture of Neoproterozoic ocean chemistry: Insights from the Chuar Group, Grand Canyon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, David T.; Poulton, Simon W.; Dehler, Carol; Porter, Susannah; Husson, Jon; Canfield, Donald E.; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2010-02-01

    Detailed iron, sulfur and carbon chemistry through the > 742 million year old Chuar Group reveals a marine basin dominated by anoxic and ferrous iron-rich (ferruginous) bottom waters punctuated, late in the basin's development, by an intrusion of sulfide-rich (euxinic) conditions. The observation that anoxia occurred frequently in even the shallowest of Chuar environments (10s of meters or less) suggests that global atmospheric oxygen levels were significantly lower than today. In contrast, the transition from ferruginous to euxinic subsurface water is interpreted to reflect basinal control—specifically, increased export of organic carbon from surface waters. Low fluxes of organic carbon into subsurface water masses should have been insufficient to deplete oxygen via aerobic respiration, resulting in an oxic oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Where iron was available, larger organic carbon fluxes should have depleted oxygen and facilitated anaerobic respiration using ferric iron as the oxidant, with iron carbonate as the expected mineralogical signature in basinal shale. Even higher organic fluxes would, in turn, have depleted ferric iron and up-regulated anaerobic respiration by sulfate reduction, reflected in high pyrite abundances. Observations from the Chuar Group are consistent with these hypotheses, and gain further support from pyrite and sulfate sulfur isotope abundances. In general, Chuar data support the hypothesis that ferruginous subsurface waters returned to the oceans, replacing euxinia, well before the Ediacaran emergence of persistently oxygenated conditions, and even predating the Sturtian glaciation. Moreover, our data suggest that the reprise of ferruginous water masses may relate to widespread rifting during the break-up of Rodinia. This environmental transition, in turn, correlates with both microfossil and biomarker evidence for an expanding eukaryotic presence in the oceans, suggesting a physiologically mediated link among tectonics, environmental

  3. Ocean Warming and Biochemical Effects of Dissociation of Oceanic Methane Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    Ocean exploration during last two decades indicates that huge deposits of oceanic methane hydrate (MH) exist on the seafloor on continental margins. MH transforms into water and methane (CH4) gas when it dissociates. After MH dissociates, CH4 gas is entrapped in bubbles coated with films of microbial. Evidences indicate that a great population of tiny bubbles flows with ocean currents at intermediate depth instead of rising to the ocean surface. This provides the time for microbes (methane oxidation bacteria) to consume the CH4. Earlier observations of CH4 bubbles in swamp and those generated from hydrothermal vents indicate that a great portion of CH4 has been oxidized before the bubbles rise to water surface. The chemical energy (heat) from oxidizing CH4 is released step-by-step following the chemical reactions and transferred from one organism to another through out the food chain. As long as the final products are water and CO2, the total heat to be generated will be conserved in the water mass no matter what processes take place. The energy density is low due to diffusion, but the yield (~195 Kcal/mole of CH4) remains the same. The oxidation of CH4 causes a depletion of dissolved oxygen (O2) in seawater near (and above) MH dissociation level. Ocean observations reflect this biochemical mechanism with a distinct core of minimum dissolved O2 within major ocean currents (like Gulf Stream) flowing over known methane hydrate deposits (like Blake Ridge). The additional heat generated through this micro-biochemical process is sufficient to cause the trend of ocean warming during last 5 decades since the advent of modern ocean observation. The biochemically generated extra heat is carried by Gulf Stream into Arctic Ocean and that complements the atmospheric heat fluxes in thawing the basin's sea ice by the observed thickness. Therefore, it is hypothesized that this micro-biochemical warming of oceans might be one of the factors causing the global warming in the

  4. Anaerobic Nitrogen Turnover by Sinking Diatom Aggregates at Varying Ambient Oxygen Levels

    PubMed Central

    Stief, Peter; Kamp, Anja; Thamdrup, Bo; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    In the world’s oceans, even relatively low oxygen levels inhibit anaerobic nitrogen cycling by free-living microbes. Sinking organic aggregates, however, might provide oxygen-depleted microbial hotspots in otherwise oxygenated surface waters. Here, we show that sinking diatom aggregates can host anaerobic nitrogen cycling at ambient oxygen levels well above the hypoxic threshold. Aggregates were produced from the ubiquitous diatom Skeletonema marinoi and the natural microbial community of seawater. Microsensor profiling through the center of sinking aggregates revealed internal anoxia at ambient 40% air saturation (∼100 μmol O2 L-1) and below. Accordingly, anaerobic nitrate turnover inside the aggregates was evident within this range of ambient oxygen levels. In incubations with 15N-labeled nitrate, individual Skeletonema aggregates produced NO2- (up to 10.7 nmol N h-1 per aggregate), N2 (up to 7.1 nmol N h-1), NH4+ (up to 2.0 nmol N h-1), and N2O (up to 0.2 nmol N h-1). Intriguingly, nitrate stored inside the diatom cells served as an additional, internal nitrate source for dinitrogen production, which may partially uncouple anaerobic nitrate turnover by diatom aggregates from direct ambient nitrate supply. Sinking diatom aggregates can contribute directly to fixed-nitrogen loss in low-oxygen environments in the ocean and vastly expand the ocean volume in which anaerobic nitrogen turnover is possible, despite relatively high ambient oxygen levels. Depending on the extent of intracellular nitrate consumption during the sinking process, diatom aggregates may also be involved in the long-distance export of nitrate to the deep ocean. PMID:26903977

  5. Anaerobic Nitrogen Turnover by Sinking Diatom Aggregates at Varying Ambient Oxygen Levels.

    PubMed

    Stief, Peter; Kamp, Anja; Thamdrup, Bo; Glud, Ronnie N

    2016-01-01

    In the world's oceans, even relatively low oxygen levels inhibit anaerobic nitrogen cycling by free-living microbes. Sinking organic aggregates, however, might provide oxygen-depleted microbial hotspots in otherwise oxygenated surface waters. Here, we show that sinking diatom aggregates can host anaerobic nitrogen cycling at ambient oxygen levels well above the hypoxic threshold. Aggregates were produced from the ubiquitous diatom Skeletonema marinoi and the natural microbial community of seawater. Microsensor profiling through the center of sinking aggregates revealed internal anoxia at ambient 40% air saturation (∼100 μmol O2 L(-1)) and below. Accordingly, anaerobic nitrate turnover inside the aggregates was evident within this range of ambient oxygen levels. In incubations with (15)N-labeled nitrate, individual Skeletonema aggregates produced NO2 (-) (up to 10.7 nmol N h(-1) per aggregate), N2 (up to 7.1 nmol N h(-1)), NH4 (+) (up to 2.0 nmol N h(-1)), and N2O (up to 0.2 nmol N h(-1)). Intriguingly, nitrate stored inside the diatom cells served as an additional, internal nitrate source for dinitrogen production, which may partially uncouple anaerobic nitrate turnover by diatom aggregates from direct ambient nitrate supply. Sinking diatom aggregates can contribute directly to fixed-nitrogen loss in low-oxygen environments in the ocean and vastly expand the ocean volume in which anaerobic nitrogen turnover is possible, despite relatively high ambient oxygen levels. Depending on the extent of intracellular nitrate consumption during the sinking process, diatom aggregates may also be involved in the long-distance export of nitrate to the deep ocean. PMID:26903977

  6. Depleted zinc: Properties, application, production.

    PubMed

    Borisevich, V D; Pavlov, A V; Okhotina, I A

    2009-01-01

    The addition of ZnO, depleted in the Zn-64 isotope, to the water of boiling water nuclear reactors lessens the accumulation of Co-60 on the reactor interior surfaces, reduces radioactive wastes and increases the reactor service-life because of the inhibitory action of zinc on inter-granular stress corrosion cracking. To the same effect depleted zinc in the form of acetate dihydrate is used in pressurized water reactors. Gas centrifuge isotope separation method is applied for production of depleted zinc on the industrial scale. More than 20 years of depleted zinc application history demonstrates its benefits for reduction of NPP personnel radiation exposure and combating construction materials corrosion.

  7. The Impact of Nutrient Inputs from Atmospheric and Riverine Sources on Oceanic Nitrous-oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suntharalingam, Parvadha; Buitenhuis, Erik

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous-oxide (N2O) is a major greenhouse gas, and an important agent of stratospheric ozone depletion. Ocean emissions of nitrous-oxide account for over a quarter of present-day global natural N2O emissions to the atmosphere. This marine N2O source results from a combination of nitrification and denitrification reactions associated with the cycling of organic matter in the oxygenated and sub-oxic regions of the ocean. In addition, in intense sub-oxic and anoxic ocean zones, denitrification processes can provide a local sink of nitrous-oxide. It has been suggested that significant shifts in the global ocean-atmosphere N2O flux could result from changes in nutrient inputs to the ocean that stimulate marine productivity and hence influence N2O cycling and the net oceanic source to the atmosphere. In this analysis we employ the NEMO-PlankTOM10 global ocean biogeochemistry model, in conjunction with embedded representations of the ocean N2O cycle, to assess the relative influences, on present-day ocean N2O, of nutrient inputs to the ocean from atmospheric deposition and riverine fluxes. Specifically, we investigate nutrient forcing from contrasting sources including anthropogenic atmospheric deposition of NOy and NHx (Dentener et al 2006), atmospheric dust deposition (Jickells et al. 2005), and riverine inputs of Fe, Si, N, P, and organic and inorganic carbon (da Cunha et al. 2007). Model analyses are used to quantify the relative influences of these separate nutrient inputs on the net oceanic N2O source. We also characterize the uncertainty in our results associated with our modeled representation of N2O by evaluating the sensitivity to a set of empirically-based and process-based parameterizations of the marine N2O cycle.

  8. 12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM CASTING OPERATIONS CEASED IN 1988. (11/14/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  9. Oxygen and Early Animal Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, S.

    2012-12-01

    It is often hypothesized that the rise of animals was triggered by an increase in O2 levels in the atmosphere and oceans. However, this hypothesis is remarkably difficult to test, because the timing of animal divergences is poorly resolved, the physiology of early animals is often unknown, estimates of past pO2 levels come with large error bars, and causal relationships between oxygenation and animal evolution are difficult to establish. Nonetheless, existing phylogenetic, paleontological, and geochemical data indicate that the evolution of macroscopic animals and motile macrometazoans with energetically expensive lifestyles may be temporally coupled with ocean oxygenation events in the Ediacaran Period. Thus, it is plausible that ocean oxygenation may have been a limiting factor in the early evolution of macroscopic, complex, and metabolically aggressive animals (particularly bilaterian animals). However, ocean oxygenation and animal evolution were likely engaged in two-way interactions: Ediacaran oxygenation may have initially lifted a physiological barrier for the evolution of animal size, motility, and active lifestyles, but subsequent animal diversification in the Paleozoic may have also changed oceanic redox structures. Viewed in a broader context, the early evolutionary history of animals was contingent upon a series of events, including genetic preparation (developmental genetics), environmental facilitation (oceanic oxygenation), and ecological escalation (Cambrian explosion), but the rise of animals to ecological importance also had important geobiological impacts on oceanic redox structures, sedimentary fabrics, and global geochemical cycles.

  10. Depleted Uranium in Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M.J.; Croff, A.G.

    1997-12-31

    For uranium to be useful in most fission nuclear reactors, it must be enriched (i.e. the concentration of the fissile isotope 235U must be increased). Therefore, depleted uranium (DU)-uranium which has less than naturally occurring concentrations of 235U-is a co-product of the enrichment process. Four to six tons of DU exist for every ton of fresh light water reactor fuel. There were 407,006 MgU 407,000 metric tons (t) of DU stored on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites as of July 1993. If this DU were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and emplaced in a near surface disposal facility, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. However, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated that near surface disposal of large quantities of DU tails is not appropriate. Thus, there is the possibility that disposition via disposal will be in a deep geological repository. One alternative that may significantly reduce the cost of DU disposition is to use it beneficially. In fact, DOE has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large scale uses of DU and to encourage its reuse. Several beneficial uses, many of which involve applications in the repository per se or in managing the wastes to go into the repository, are discussed in this report.

  11. Oxygen isotope record of oceanic and high-pressure metasomatism: a P-T-time-fluid path for the Monviso eclogites (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubatto, Daniela; Angiboust, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Fluids are considered a fundamental agent for chemical exchanges between different rock types in the subduction system. Constraints on the sources and pathways of subduction fluids thus provide crucial information to reconstruct subduction processes. The Monviso ophiolitic sequence is composed of mafic, ultramafic and minor sediments that have been subducted to ~80 km depth. In this sequence, both localized fluid flow and channelized fluids along major shear zones have been documented. We investigate the timing and source of the fluids that affected the dominant mafic rocks using microscale U-Pb dating of zircon and oxygen isotope analysis of mineral zones (garnet, zircon and antigorite) in high-pressure rocks with variable degree of metasomatic modification. In mafic eclogites, Jurassic zircon cores are the only mineralogical relicts of the protolith gabbros and retain δ18O values of 4.5-6 ‰, typical of mantle melts. Garnet and metamorphic zircon that grew during prograde to peak metamorphism display low δ18O values between 0.2 and 3.8 ‰, which are likely inherited from high-temperature alteration of the protolith on the sea floor. This is corroborated by δ18O values of 3.0 and 3.6 ‰ in antigorite from surrounding serpentinites. In metasomatized eclogites within the lower shear zone, garnet rim formed at the metamorphic peak shows a shift to higher δ18O up to 6 ‰. The age of zircons in high-pressure veins and metasomatized eclogites constrains the timing of fluid flow at high pressure at around 45-46 Ma. Although the oxygen data do not contradict previous reports of interaction with serpentinite-derived fluids, the shift to isotopically heavier oxygen compositions requires contribution from sediment-derived fluids. The scarcity of metasediments in the Monviso sequence suggests that such fluids were concentrated and fluxed along the lower shear zone in a sufficient amount to modify the oxygen composition of the eclogitic minerals.

  12. Local origins of interdecadal Pacific variability in the tropical and North Pacific Ocean: evidence from a comparative study of coral oxygen isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wenfeng; Wei, Gangjian

    2014-08-01

    Interdecadal Pacific variability (IPV) is commonly observed in both the tropical and mid-latitude Pacific Ocean, and has a widespread influence on surface climate in the Pan-Pacific Basin. This variability is recorded by climate proxies such as geochemical parameters preserved in corals. However, the origins of IPV remain uncertain. To shed light on this, interdecadal variations in two long coral δ18O records from Nauru Island and the South China Sea (SCS), respectively located in the tropical Pacific and the mid-latitude North Pacific Ocean, were investigated. The interdecadal fluctuations in the δ18O series from Nauru Island (tropical Pacific) match those of the NINO3.4 index reasonably well (r=-0.30, n=96, p=0.0015), but are not correlated with those of the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO) index (r=-0.17, n=96, p=0.05). The δ18O time series from the SCS (northwestern Pacific), by contrast, co-vary with the PDO index (r=-0.30, n=156, p=0.0007), but are out of phase with the NINO3.4 index at the interdecadal timescale (r=0.04, n=156, p=0.31). The impact on the interdecadal variability of processes occurring outside the growth region of corals is generally weak. The results thus do not support a tropical origin of IPV, but demonstrate that the interdecadal variability in the tropical Pacific and the North Pacific originates predominantly from local coupled ocean-atmosphere processes within these regions. The results also suggest that tropical-extratropical interactions played a role in IPV between 1920 and 1940, which indicates that IPV is a complex climatic phenomenon that involves multiple forcing mechanisms.

  13. Stored mafic/ultramafic crust and early Archean mantle depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Clement G.; Patchett, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    Both early and late Archean rocks from greenstone belts and felsic gneiss complexes exhibit positive epsilon(Nd) values of +1 to +5 by 3.5 Ga, demonstrating that a depleted mantle reservoir existed very early. The amount of preserved pre-3.0 Ga continental crust cannot explain such high epsilon values in the depleted residue unless the volume of residual mantle was very small: a layer less than 70 km thick by 3.0 Ga. Repeated and exclusive sampling of such a thin layer, especially in forming the felsic gneiss complexes, is implausible. Extraction of enough continental crust to deplete the early mantle and its destructive recycling before 3.0 Ga ago requires another implausibility, that the sites of crustal generation of recycling were substantially distinct. In contrast, formation of mafic or ultramafic crust analogous to present-day oceanic crust was continuous from very early times. Recycled subducted oceanic lithosphere is a likely contributor to present-day hotspot magmas, and forms a reservoir at least comparable in volume to continental crust. Subduction of an early mafic/ultramafic oceanic crust and temporary storage rather than immediate mixing back into undifferentiated mantle may be responsible for the depletion and high epsilon(Nd) values of the Archean upper mantle.

  14. Phanerozoic atmosphere oxygen cycles revealed by trace elements in marine pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Large, R. R.; Halpin, J.

    2014-12-01

    It is generally accepted that oxygen in the atmosphere rose in two major steps at around 2.4-2.2 and 0.7-0.5 billion years ago. The variation in atmosphere oxygen over the last 500 million years, is considered to have been relatively minor by comparison. Sedimentary pyrite from marine shales efficiently captures many trace elements from the oceans, providing a novel proxy for seawater chemistry. Here we use temporal changes in the selenium and cobalt content of Phanerozoic marine pyrite, coupled with the 87Sr/86Sr ratio in marine carbonate, to argue for five dramatic pO2 cycles, each starting with a period of oxygenation, followed by a period of de-oxygenation. The selenium proxy is based on the premise that increased erosion of continental rocks leads to the release of selenium as both the selenate and selenite species. Under neutral to alkaline, oxygenated conditions the selenate species remains highly soluble, where it can be readily transported via river systems to the ocean. Cobalt on the other hand becomes less soluble under increasing pO2 as the oxidized species Co2+ and CoO are immobilised by Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides, that form during weathering. Thus variations in the Se and Co composition of marine pyrite enable us to propose a new oxygenation proxy; the ratio Se/Co, which increases in marine pyrite during periods of increasing pO2 (oxygenation) and decreases during periods of decreasing pO2 (deoxygenation). The first half of each of the five Phanerozoic pO2 cycles involves an increase in atmosphere/ocean oxygenation driven initially by supercontinent dispersal, increased continental erosion and nutrient trace element flux to the oceans. Increased marine productivity leads to carbon and sulphur sequestration, producing metalliferous black shales, and further drives oxygenation to the peak of the cycle. The cycle downside suggests decreasing oxidative erosion and nutrient delivery, resulting in a drop in productivity. Continued drawdown of ocean trace

  15. Expansion of oxygen minimum zones may reduce available habitat for tropical pelagic fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramma, Lothar; Prince, Eric D.; Schmidtko, Sunke; Luo, Jiangang; Hoolihan, John P.; Visbeck, Martin; Wallace, Douglas W. R.; Brandt, Peter; Körtzinger, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Climate model predictions and observations reveal regional declines in oceanic dissolved oxygen, which are probably influenced by global warming. Studies indicate ongoing dissolved oxygen depletion and vertical expansion of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the tropical northeast Atlantic Ocean. OMZ shoaling may restrict the usable habitat of billfishes and tunas to a narrow surface layer. We report a decrease in the upper ocean layer exceeding 3.5mll-1 dissolved oxygen at a rate of <=1myr-1 in the tropical northeast Atlantic (0-25°N, 12-30°W), amounting to an annual habitat loss of ~5.95×1013m3, or 15% for the period 1960-2010. Habitat compression and associated potential habitat loss was validated using electronic tagging data from 47 blue marlin. This phenomenon increases vulnerability to surface fishing gear for billfishes and tunas, and may be associated with a 10-50% worldwide decline of pelagic predator diversity. Further expansion of the Atlantic OMZ along with overfishing may threaten the sustainability of these valuable pelagic fisheries and marine ecosystems.

  16. Ego depletion impairs implicit learning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kelsey R; Sanchez, Daniel J; Wesley, Abigail H; Reber, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Implicit skill learning occurs incidentally and without conscious awareness of what is learned. However, the rate and effectiveness of learning may still be affected by decreased availability of central processing resources. Dual-task experiments have generally found impairments in implicit learning, however, these studies have also shown that certain characteristics of the secondary task (e.g., timing) can complicate the interpretation of these results. To avoid this problem, the current experiments used a novel method to impose resource constraints prior to engaging in skill learning. Ego depletion theory states that humans possess a limited store of cognitive resources that, when depleted, results in deficits in self-regulation and cognitive control. In a first experiment, we used a standard ego depletion manipulation prior to performance of the Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL) task. Depleted participants exhibited poorer test performance than did non-depleted controls, indicating that reducing available executive resources may adversely affect implicit sequence learning, expression of sequence knowledge, or both. In a second experiment, depletion was administered either prior to or after training. Participants who reported higher levels of depletion before or after training again showed less sequence-specific knowledge on the post-training assessment. However, the results did not allow for clear separation of ego depletion effects on learning versus subsequent sequence-specific performance. These results indicate that performance on an implicitly learned sequence can be impaired by a reduction in executive resources, in spite of learning taking place outside of awareness and without conscious intent.

  17. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules.

  18. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290–320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime—the ‘Antarctic ozone hole’. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  19. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  20. Ocean Biogeochemistry and Phytoplankton Ecology in a Global Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. K.; Doney, S. C.; Lindsay, K.

    2005-05-01

    A coupled Biogeochemistry/Ecosystem/Circulation (BEC) model is used to examine ocean biogeochemistry and phytoplankton ecology at the global scale. Phytoplankton groups represented in the model include diatoms, diazotrophs, coccolithophores and picoplankton. The groups experience differential grazing pressure and compete for light and the potentially growth-limiting nutrients iron, nitrate, ammonium, phosphate, and silicate. The model includes several key aspects of the global nitrogen cycle including nitrogen fixation (by the diazotrophs), water column denitrification under low oxygen conditions, and atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the oceans. We examine how these nitrogen fluxes influence ecosystem structure and also how light and nutrient availability restrict phytoplankton growth rates over seasonal timescales. Atmospheric deposition of mineral dust also inputs dissolved iron to the ocean model. These iron additions modify phytoplankton community composition, and rates of production and export in the iron-limited High Nitrate, Low Chlorophyll regions, and indirectly modify ecosystem dynamics by altering rates of nitrogen fixation in nitrogen-depleted, tropical and subtropical regions. We will examine the links between dust/iron deposition and nitrogen cycling in the oceans.

  1. Microfabrics in depleted mantle plaeotransform (New Caledonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Christian; Chatzaras, Vasileios; Von Der Handt, Anette

    2016-04-01

    The New Caledonia ophiolite contains several wrench zones that have been interpreted as paleotransforms. These transform-ridge systems developed at the transition between ridge development and intra-oceanic subduction that resulted in depleted mantle (about 18 % melt according to olivine Mg# - spinel Cr#). The most prominent is the Bogota Peninsula paleotransform, a 10 km wide shear zone in which strain localizes in the 2 km wide Ouassé mylonite zone. This strain gradient is associated with microstructure and microfabric evolution that informs the relationship between hydration and strain in mantle mylonite. Olivine recrystallized grain size varies from about 1 mm to about 0.2 mm toward the mylonite zone. The strain gradient is also demonstrated by increasing deformation of orthopyroxene (opx) grains that become elongate porphyroclasts in the mylonite zone. Orthopyroxene geothermometry reveals T ~ 1050-1000 C (Ca-opx) and 950-850 C (Cr-Al-opx) in the least deformed rocks. In the mylonite zone a wider range of T is recorded, with minima reaching 850 C (Ca-opx) and 750 C (Cr-Al-opx). Electron microprobe analysis also detects the presence of 20-200 micron interstitial, high-temperature amphibole (pargasite), with modal abundance increasing in the mylonite zone; this suggests that high-temperature pervasive fluid flow may have played a role in strain localization and mylonitization. Olivine crystallographic fabrics include A-type and E-type, the latter possibly reflecting hydration of shear zone tectonites. E-type fabrics are present in both mylonite and less deformed rocks, and appear to be more common in rocks with olivine grain size < 400 microns. A correlation between E-type fabrics and amphibole mode is being investigated. The shear zone protolith was depleted mantle in which the ridge-transform system was permeated by fluids. These fluids initially originated at the subduction interface, but during the transform evolution, ocean water likely permeated the shear

  2. PROGRESSIVE VENTILATION OF THE OCEANS - POTENTIAL FOR RETURN TO ANOXIC CONDITIONS IN THE POST-PALEOZOIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, Pat; Berry, William B.N.

    1980-09-01

    After the ventilation of the residual anoxic layer in the late Paleozoic (Berry and Wilde, 1978) a return to ephemeral anoxic conditions in the ocean is suggested by anoxic sediments found in the Mesozoic cores of the deep-sea drilling program (Schlanger and Jenkyns 1977, and Theide and Van Andel 1977). A preliminary physical oceanographic model is presented to explain the development of oxygen depleted layers in mid-waters below the surface wind-mixed layer during non-glacial climates. The model shows the range of temperature, salinity and density values for hypothetical water masses for two climatically related oceanographic situations: Case A where bottom waters are formed at mid-latitudes at the surface salinity maxima, and Case B where bottom waters are produced at high latitudes but not by sea-ice formation as in the modern ocean. The hypothetical water masses are characterized by examples from the modern ocean and extrapolation to non-glacial times is made by eliminating water masses produced by or influenced by sea-ice formation in modern glacial times. The state of oxidation is made by plotting the model water masses on an oxygen saturation diagram and comparing the relative oxygen capacity with modern conditions of zonal organic productivity. The model indicates for Case A (high latitude temperatures above 5°C) two oxygen, depleted layers in the equatorial regions (1) from about 200m to the depth of completed oxidation of surface material separated by an oxygenated zone to (2) a deep depleted zone along the base of the pycnocline at 2900 M. The deep depleted zone extends along the Case A pycnocline polarward toward the high latitude productivity maximum. For case B with a pycnocline at about 1500m the deep anoxic layer is not sustained. Considerations of density only, suggest that neutral stratification and the potential for overturn is enhanced for climates transitional between Case A and Case B where the density contrast between major water masses

  3. Testing fully depleted CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Ricard; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castander, Francisco J.; Jiménez, Jorge; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-08-01

    The focal plane of the PAU camera is composed of eighteen 2K x 4K CCDs. These devices, plus four spares, were provided by the Japanese company Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. with type no. S10892-04(X). These detectors are 200 μm thick fully depleted and back illuminated with an n-type silicon base. They have been built with a specific coating to be sensitive in the range from 300 to 1,100 nm. Their square pixel size is 15 μm. The read-out system consists of a Monsoon controller (NOAO) and the panVIEW software package. The deafualt CCD read-out speed is 133 kpixel/s. This is the value used in the calibration process. Before installing these devices in the camera focal plane, they were characterized using the facilities of the ICE (CSIC- IEEC) and IFAE in the UAB Campus in Bellaterra (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain). The basic tests performed for all CCDs were to obtain the photon transfer curve (PTC), the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) using X-rays and the EPER method, linearity, read-out noise, dark current, persistence, cosmetics and quantum efficiency. The X-rays images were also used for the analysis of the charge diffusion for different substrate voltages (VSUB). Regarding the cosmetics, and in addition to white and dark pixels, some patterns were also found. The first one, which appears in all devices, is the presence of half circles in the external edges. The origin of this pattern can be related to the assembly process. A second one appears in the dark images, and shows bright arcs connecting corners along the vertical axis of the CCD. This feature appears in all CCDs exactly in the same position so our guess is that the pattern is due to electrical fields. Finally, and just in two devices, there is a spot with wavelength dependence whose origin could be the result of a defectous coating process.

  4. What's in the Ocean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smail, James R.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of sea water, including: (1) the properties of sea water, (2) the law of relative proportions, (3) the ocean as a buffer, (4) the oxygen in sea water, and (5) the promise of chemical harvest from sea water. (CS)

  5. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb ... in your home. A different kind of oxygen therapy is called hyperbaric oxygen therapy. It uses oxygen ...

  6. Origin of Enthalpic Depletion Forces.

    PubMed

    Sapir, Liel; Harries, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Solutes excluded from macromolecules or colloids are known to drive depletion attractions. The established Asakura-Oosawa model, as well as subsequent theories aimed at explaining the effects of macromolecular crowding, attribute depletion forces to diminished hard-core excluded volume upon compaction, and hence predict depletion forces dominated by entropy. However, recent experiments measuring the effect of preferentially excluded solutes on protein folding and macromolecular association find these forces can also be enthalpic. We use simulations of macromolecular association in explicit binary cosolute-solvent mixtures, with solvent and cosolute intermolecular interactions that go beyond hard-cores, to show that not all cosolutes conform to the established entropically dominated model. We further demonstrate how the enthalpically dominated depletion forces that we find can be well described within an Asakura-Oosawa like model provided that the hard-core macromolecule-cosolute potential of mean force is augmented by a "soft" step-like repulsion.

  7. Possible biogeochemical consequences of ocean fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrman, J.A. ); Capone, D.G. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors consider biogeochemical secondary effects that could arise from an increase in ocean productivity, such as may occur via fertilization with Fe. These processes and feedback loops are infrequently discussed in this context, yet are likely to be highly relevant to the understanding of global change in general. In particular, the authors suggest that increased productivity may increase the production and efflux of greenhouse gases, such as nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and methane (CH{sub 4}) and that shifts in phytoplankton species and productivity may cause changes in another climate-related gas, dimethylsulfide (DMS). N{sub 2}O is also implicated in the destruction of stratospheric ozone. Factors contributing to amplified release include both increased nutrient cycling in general and possible development of low oxygen conditions from fertilization. It is also remotely possible that reduced oxygen from an initial fertilization could mobilize existing Fe pools, inducing uncontrolled self-fertilization. Although lack of relevant physiological and ecological data makes it difficult to provide quantitative limits on the extent of the undesired effects, rough calculations suggest that the enhanced release of N{sub 2}O alone could totally negate any potential benefit from fertilization and likely worsen global warming and ozone depletion.

  8. Ego depletion impairs implicit learning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kelsey R; Sanchez, Daniel J; Wesley, Abigail H; Reber, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Implicit skill learning occurs incidentally and without conscious awareness of what is learned. However, the rate and effectiveness of learning may still be affected by decreased availability of central processing resources. Dual-task experiments have generally found impairments in implicit learning, however, these studies have also shown that certain characteristics of the secondary task (e.g., timing) can complicate the interpretation of these results. To avoid this problem, the current experiments used a novel method to impose resource constraints prior to engaging in skill learning. Ego depletion theory states that humans possess a limited store of cognitive resources that, when depleted, results in deficits in self-regulation and cognitive control. In a first experiment, we used a standard ego depletion manipulation prior to performance of the Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL) task. Depleted participants exhibited poorer test performance than did non-depleted controls, indicating that reducing available executive resources may adversely affect implicit sequence learning, expression of sequence knowledge, or both. In a second experiment, depletion was administered either prior to or after training. Participants who reported higher levels of depletion before or after training again showed less sequence-specific knowledge on the post-training assessment. However, the results did not allow for clear separation of ego depletion effects on learning versus subsequent sequence-specific performance. These results indicate that performance on an implicitly learned sequence can be impaired by a reduction in executive resources, in spite of learning taking place outside of awareness and without conscious intent. PMID:25275517

  9. Reduction of the Powerful Greenhouse Gas N2O in the South-Eastern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Raes, Eric J; Bodrossy, Levente; Van de Kamp, Jodie; Holmes, Bronwyn; Hardman-Mountford, Nick; Thompson, Peter A; McInnes, Allison S; Waite, Anya M

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a key catalyst of stratospheric ozone depletion. Yet, little data exist about the sink and source terms of the production and reduction of N2O outside the well-known oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). Here we show the presence of functional marker genes for the reduction of N2O in the last step of the denitrification process (nitrous oxide reductase genes; nosZ) in oxygenated surface waters (180-250 O2 μmol.kg(-1)) in the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Overall copy numbers indicated that nosZ genes represented a significant proportion of the microbial community, which is unexpected in these oxygenated waters. Our data show strong temperature sensitivity for nosZ genes and reaction rates along a vast latitudinal gradient (32°S-12°S). These data suggest a large N2O sink in the warmer Tropical waters of the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Clone sequencing from PCR products revealed that most denitrification genes belonged to Rhodobacteraceae. Our work highlights the need to investigate the feedback and tight linkages between nitrification and denitrification (both sources of N2O, but the latter also a source of bioavailable N losses) in the understudied yet strategic Indian Ocean and other oligotrophic systems.

  10. Reduction of the Powerful Greenhouse Gas N2O in the South-Eastern Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Raes, Eric J.; Bodrossy, Levente; Van de Kamp, Jodie; Holmes, Bronwyn; Hardman-Mountford, Nick; Thompson, Peter A.; McInnes, Allison S.; Waite, Anya M.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a key catalyst of stratospheric ozone depletion. Yet, little data exist about the sink and source terms of the production and reduction of N2O outside the well-known oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). Here we show the presence of functional marker genes for the reduction of N2O in the last step of the denitrification process (nitrous oxide reductase genes; nosZ) in oxygenated surface waters (180–250 O2 μmol.kg-1) in the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Overall copy numbers indicated that nosZ genes represented a significant proportion of the microbial community, which is unexpected in these oxygenated waters. Our data show strong temperature sensitivity for nosZ genes and reaction rates along a vast latitudinal gradient (32°S-12°S). These data suggest a large N2O sink in the warmer Tropical waters of the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Clone sequencing from PCR products revealed that most denitrification genes belonged to Rhodobacteraceae. Our work highlights the need to investigate the feedback and tight linkages between nitrification and denitrification (both sources of N2O, but the latter also a source of bioavailable N losses) in the understudied yet strategic Indian Ocean and other oligotrophic systems. PMID:26800249

  11. Reduction of the Powerful Greenhouse Gas N2O in the South-Eastern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Raes, Eric J; Bodrossy, Levente; Van de Kamp, Jodie; Holmes, Bronwyn; Hardman-Mountford, Nick; Thompson, Peter A; McInnes, Allison S; Waite, Anya M

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a key catalyst of stratospheric ozone depletion. Yet, little data exist about the sink and source terms of the production and reduction of N2O outside the well-known oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). Here we show the presence of functional marker genes for the reduction of N2O in the last step of the denitrification process (nitrous oxide reductase genes; nosZ) in oxygenated surface waters (180-250 O2 μmol.kg(-1)) in the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Overall copy numbers indicated that nosZ genes represented a significant proportion of the microbial community, which is unexpected in these oxygenated waters. Our data show strong temperature sensitivity for nosZ genes and reaction rates along a vast latitudinal gradient (32°S-12°S). These data suggest a large N2O sink in the warmer Tropical waters of the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Clone sequencing from PCR products revealed that most denitrification genes belonged to Rhodobacteraceae. Our work highlights the need to investigate the feedback and tight linkages between nitrification and denitrification (both sources of N2O, but the latter also a source of bioavailable N losses) in the understudied yet strategic Indian Ocean and other oligotrophic systems. PMID:26800249

  12. The Effects of Volcano-Induced Ozone Depletion on Short-lived Climate Forcing in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, P. L.

    2012-12-01

    Photodissociation of oxygen maintains the stratopause ~50°C warmer than the tropopause. Photodissociation of ozone warms the lower stratosphere, preventing most of this high-energy DNA-damaging solar radiation from reaching the troposphere. Ozone depletion allows more UV energy to reach the lower troposphere causing photodissociation of anthropogenic ozone and nitrogen dioxide. UV energy also penetrates the ocean >10 m where it is absorbed more efficiently than infrared radiation that barely penetrates the surface. Manmade chlorofluorocarbons caused ozone depletion from 1965 to 1994 with slow recovery predicted over the next 50+ years. But the lowest levels of ozone followed the eruptions of Pinatubo (1991 VEI=6), Eyjafjallajökull (2010 VEI=4), and Grímsvötn (2011 VEI=4). Each of the relatively small, basaltic eruptions in Iceland caused more ozone depletion than the long-term effects of chlorofluorocarbons, although total ozone appears to return to pre-eruption levels within a decade. Ozone depletion by 20% increases energy flux thru the lowermost troposphere by 0.7 W m-2 for overhead sun causing temperatures in the lower stratosphere to drop >2°C since 1958 in steps after the 3 largest volcanic eruptions: Agung 1963, El Chichón 1982, and Pinatubo. Temperatures at the surface increased primarily in the regions and at the times of the greatest observed ozone depletion. The greatest warming observed was along the Western Antarctic Peninsula (65.4°S) where minimum temperatures rose 6.7°C from 1951 to 2003 while maximum temperatures remained relatively constant. Minimum total column ozone in September-October was 40-56% lower than in 1972 almost every year since 1987, strongly anti-correlated with observed minimum temperatures. Sea ice decreased 10%, 7 ice shelves separated, 87% of the glaciers retreated and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current warmed. Elsewhere under the ozone hole, warming of continental Antarctica was limited by the high albedo (0.86) of

  13. Depleting depletion: Polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Debashish; Marques, Carlos; Stuehn, Torsten; Kremer, Kurt

    A polymer collapses in a solvent when the solvent particles dislike monomers more than the repulsion between monomers. This leads to an effective attraction between monomers, also referred to as depletion induced attraction. This attraction is the key factor behind standard polymer collapse in poor solvents. Strikingly, even if a polymer exhibits poor solvent condition in two different solvents, it can also swell in mixtures of these two poor solvents. This collapse-swelling-collapse scenario is displayed by poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in aqueous alcohol. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a thermodynamically consistent generic model and theoretical arguments, we unveil the microscopic origin of this phenomenon. Our analysis suggests that a subtle interplay of the bulk solution properties and the local depletion forces reduces depletion effects, thus dictating polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures.

  14. Statistical analysis of iron geochemical data suggests limited late Proterozoic oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, Erik A.; Wolock, Charles J.; Morgan, Alex S.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P.; MacDonald, Francis A.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Johnston, David T.

    2015-07-01

    Sedimentary rocks deposited across the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic transition record extreme climate fluctuations, a potential rise in atmospheric oxygen or re-organization of the seafloor redox landscape, and the initial diversification of animals. It is widely assumed that the inferred redox change facilitated the observed trends in biodiversity. Establishing this palaeoenvironmental context, however, requires that changes in marine redox structure be tracked by means of geochemical proxies and translated into estimates of atmospheric oxygen. Iron-based proxies are among the most effective tools for tracking the redox chemistry of ancient oceans. These proxies are inherently local, but have global implications when analysed collectively and statistically. Here we analyse about 4,700 iron-speciation measurements from shales 2,300 to 360 million years old. Our statistical analyses suggest that subsurface water masses in mid-Proterozoic oceans were predominantly anoxic and ferruginous (depleted in dissolved oxygen and iron-bearing), but with a tendency towards euxinia (sulfide-bearing) that is not observed in the Neoproterozoic era. Analyses further indicate that early animals did not experience appreciable benthic sulfide stress. Finally, unlike proxies based on redox-sensitive trace-metal abundances, iron geochemical data do not show a statistically significant change in oxygen content through the Ediacaran and Cambrian periods, sharply constraining the magnitude of the end-Proterozoic oxygen increase. Indeed, this re-analysis of trace-metal data is consistent with oxygenation continuing well into the Palaeozoic era. Therefore, if changing redox conditions facilitated animal diversification, it did so through a limited rise in oxygen past critical functional and ecological thresholds, as is seen in modern oxygen minimum zone benthic animal communities.

  15. Statistical analysis of iron geochemical data suggests limited late Proterozoic oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Erik A; Wolock, Charles J; Morgan, Alex S; Gill, Benjamin C; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P; Macdonald, Francis A; Knoll, Andrew H; Johnston, David T

    2015-07-23

    Sedimentary rocks deposited across the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic transition record extreme climate fluctuations, a potential rise in atmospheric oxygen or re-organization of the seafloor redox landscape, and the initial diversification of animals. It is widely assumed that the inferred redox change facilitated the observed trends in biodiversity. Establishing this palaeoenvironmental context, however, requires that changes in marine redox structure be tracked by means of geochemical proxies and translated into estimates of atmospheric oxygen. Iron-based proxies are among the most effective tools for tracking the redox chemistry of ancient oceans. These proxies are inherently local, but have global implications when analysed collectively and statistically. Here we analyse about 4,700 iron-speciation measurements from shales 2,300 to 360 million years old. Our statistical analyses suggest that subsurface water masses in mid-Proterozoic oceans were predominantly anoxic and ferruginous (depleted in dissolved oxygen and iron-bearing), but with a tendency towards euxinia (sulfide-bearing) that is not observed in the Neoproterozoic era. Analyses further indicate that early animals did not experience appreciable benthic sulfide stress. Finally, unlike proxies based on redox-sensitive trace-metal abundances, iron geochemical data do not show a statistically significant change in oxygen content through the Ediacaran and Cambrian periods, sharply constraining the magnitude of the end-Proterozoic oxygen increase. Indeed, this re-analysis of trace-metal data is consistent with oxygenation continuing well into the Palaeozoic era. Therefore, if changing redox conditions facilitated animal diversification, it did so through a limited rise in oxygen past critical functional and ecological thresholds, as is seen in modern oxygen minimum zone benthic animal communities. PMID:26201598

  16. Statistical analysis of iron geochemical data suggests limited late Proterozoic oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Erik A; Wolock, Charles J; Morgan, Alex S; Gill, Benjamin C; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P; Macdonald, Francis A; Knoll, Andrew H; Johnston, David T

    2015-07-23

    Sedimentary rocks deposited across the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic transition record extreme climate fluctuations, a potential rise in atmospheric oxygen or re-organization of the seafloor redox landscape, and the initial diversification of animals. It is widely assumed that the inferred redox change facilitated the observed trends in biodiversity. Establishing this palaeoenvironmental context, however, requires that changes in marine redox structure be tracked by means of geochemical proxies and translated into estimates of atmospheric oxygen. Iron-based proxies are among the most effective tools for tracking the redox chemistry of ancient oceans. These proxies are inherently local, but have global implications when analysed collectively and statistically. Here we analyse about 4,700 iron-speciation measurements from shales 2,300 to 360 million years old. Our statistical analyses suggest that subsurface water masses in mid-Proterozoic oceans were predominantly anoxic and ferruginous (depleted in dissolved oxygen and iron-bearing), but with a tendency towards euxinia (sulfide-bearing) that is not observed in the Neoproterozoic era. Analyses further indicate that early animals did not experience appreciable benthic sulfide stress. Finally, unlike proxies based on redox-sensitive trace-metal abundances, iron geochemical data do not show a statistically significant change in oxygen content through the Ediacaran and Cambrian periods, sharply constraining the magnitude of the end-Proterozoic oxygen increase. Indeed, this re-analysis of trace-metal data is consistent with oxygenation continuing well into the Palaeozoic era. Therefore, if changing redox conditions facilitated animal diversification, it did so through a limited rise in oxygen past critical functional and ecological thresholds, as is seen in modern oxygen minimum zone benthic animal communities.

  17. Toward a Unified Understanding of Mercury and Methylated Mercury from the World's Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, M. K.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Landing, W. M.; Sunderland, E. M.

    2012-12-01

    Marine fish and shellfish are the main source of toxic methylmercury exposure for humans. As recently as decade ago, very limited aqueous methylated mercury data were available from marine settings, resulting in a generally poor understanding of the processes controlling mercury in pelagic marine food webs. Recent oceanographic cruises have significantly improved availability of reliable measurements of methylated mercury and total mercury in seawater. This presentation will focus on vertical seawater profiles collected to depths 1000 m from three recent sampling efforts in collaboration with the CLIVAR Repeat Hydrography Program sponsored by NOAA including: 1) the northeastern Pacific (P16N cruise from Honolulu, Hawaii to Kodiak, Alaska); (2) the southern Indian Ocean (I5 cruise from Cape Town, South Africa, to Fremantle, Australia); and, (3) the Southern Ocean cruise (S4P from McMurdo, Antarctica, to Punta Arenas, Chile). Analytical results presented were all derived from the USGS Mercury Research Lab (http://wi.water.usgs.gov/mercury-lab). Supporting data derived from these cruises on water mass ages, nutrients, carbon and dissolved oxygen provide an opportunity to develop a stronger understanding of the biogeochemical factors controlling oceanic distributions of mercury and methylated mercury. Whole-water, median total mercury, and methylated mercury concentrations for the northern Pacific, southern Indian, and Southern Ocean were 1.10, 0.80, and 1.65 pM, , and 0.11, 0.08, and 0.32 pM, respectively. For all three oceans, vertical profiles of total mercury generally show the lowest concentrations in the surface mixed layer, and concentration maxima at the 700-1000 m depths. Surface depletion of total mercury is attributed to photo-chemical reduction and evasion of gaseous elemental mercury as well as scavenging by settling particulate matter, the main vector of transport to the subsurface ocean. Methylated mercury in all the ocean profiles reveal distinct mid

  18. Inorganic and Organic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (4 June-11 August, 2003)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyr, Alex

    2005-08-30

    This report presents methods and analytical and quality control procedures for nutrient, oxygen, and inorganic carbon system parameters performed during the A16N_2003a cruise, which took place from June 4 to August 11, 2003 aboard NOAA Ship R/V Ronald H. Brown under auspices of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The first hydrographic leg (June 19–July 10) was from Reykjavik, Iceland, to Funchal, Madeira, Portugal along the 20°W meridian, and the second leg (July 15–August 11) continued operations from Funchal, Portugal to Natal, Brazil, on a track southward and ending at 6°S, 25°W. The research was the first in a decadal series of repeat hydrography sections jointly funded by NOAA and the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of the CLIVAR/CO2/hydrography/tracer program. Samples were taken from up to 34 depths at 150 stations. The data presented in this report includes the analyses of water samples for total inorganic carbon (TCO2), fugacity of CO2 (fCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), pH, nitrate (NO3), nitrite (NO2), phosphate (PO4), silicate (SiO4), and dissolved oxygen (O2). The R/V Ronald H. Brown A16N_2003a data set is available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of the oceanographic data files and this printed documentation, which describes the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  19. Massive nitrous oxide emissions from the tropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Martínez, D. L.; Kock, A.; Löscher, C. R.; Schmitz, R. A.; Bange, H. W.

    2015-07-01

    Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas and a key compound in stratospheric ozone depletion. In the ocean, nitrous oxide is produced at intermediate depths through nitrification and denitrification, in particular at low oxygen concentrations. Although a third of natural emissions of nitrous oxide to the atmosphere originate from the ocean, considerable uncertainties in the distribution and magnitude of the emissions still exist. Here we present high-resolution surface measurements and vertical profiles of nitrous oxide that include the highest reported nitrous oxide concentrations in marine surface waters, suggesting that there is a hotspot of nitrous oxide emissions in high-productivity upwelling ecosystems along the Peruvian coast. We estimate that off Peru, the extremely high nitrous oxide supersaturations we observed drive a massive efflux of 0.2-0.9 Tg of nitrogen emitted as nitrous oxide per year, equivalent to 5-22% of previous estimates of global marine nitrous oxide emissions. Nutrient and gene abundance data suggest that coupled nitrification-denitrification in the upper oxygen minimum zone and transport of resulting nitrous oxide to the surface by upwelling lead to the high nitrous oxide concentrations. Our estimate of nitrous oxide emissions from the Peruvian coast surpasses values from similar, highly productive areas.

  20. Fully depleted back illuminated CCD

    DOEpatents

    Holland, Stephen Edward

    2001-01-01

    A backside illuminated charge coupled device (CCD) is formed of a relatively thick high resistivity photon sensitive silicon substrate, with frontside electronic circuitry, and an optically transparent backside ohmic contact for applying a backside voltage which is at least sufficient to substantially fully deplete the substrate. A greater bias voltage which overdepletes the substrate may also be applied. One way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is by physically connecting the voltage source to the ohmic contact. An alternate way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is to physically connect the voltage source to the frontside of the substrate, at a point outside the depletion region. Thus both frontside and backside contacts can be used for backside biasing to fully deplete the substrate. Also, high resistivity gaps around the CCD channels and electrically floating channel stop regions can be provided in the CCD array around the CCD channels. The CCD array forms an imaging sensor useful in astronomy.

  1. Initial PVO Evidence of Electron Depletion Signatures Downstream of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Hartle, R. E.; Perez-de-Tejada, H.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    This first analysis of Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) plasma analyzer electron measurements obtained in early 1992 during the PVO entry phase of the mission indicates the presence downstream from the terminator of a depletion or "bite out" of energetic ionosheath electrons similar to that observed on Mariner 10. There is more than one possible explanation for this energetic electron depletion. If it is due to atmospheric scattering, the electrons traveling along draped magnetic flux tubes that thread through the Venus neutral atmosphere would lose energy from impact ionization with oxygen. The cross-section for such electron impact ionization of oxygen has a peak near 100 eV, and it remains high above this energy, so atmospheric loss could provide a natural process for electrons at these energies to be selectively removed. In this case, our results are consistent with the Kar et al. (1994) study of PVO atmospheric entry ion mass spectrometer data which indicates that electron impact plays a significant role in maintaining the nightside ionosphere. Although it is appealing to interpret the energetic electron depletion in terms of direct atmospheric scattering, alternatively it could result from strong draping which connects the depletion region magnetically to the weak downstream bow shock and thereby reduces the electron source strength.

  2. Initial PVO evidence of electron depletion signatures downstream of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Hartle, R. E.; Perez-De-tejada, H.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    This first analysis of Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) plasma analyzer electron measurements obtained in early 1992 during teh PVO entry phase of the mission indicates the presence downstream from the terminator of a depletion or 'bite out' of energetic ionosheath electrons similar to that observed on Mariner 10. There is more than one possible explanation for this energetic electron depletion. If it is due to atmospheric scattering, the electrons traveling along draped magnetic flux tubes that thread through the Venus neutral atmosphere would lose energy from impact ionization with oxygen. The cross-section for such electron impact ionization of oxygen has a peak near 100 eV, and it remains high above this energy, so atmospheric loss could provde a natural process for electrons at these energies to be selectively removed. In this case, our results are consistent with the Kar et al. (1994) study of PVO atmospheric entry ion mass spectrometer data, which indicates that electron impact plays a significant role in maintaining the nightside ionosphere. Although it is appealing to interpret the energetic electron depletion in terms of direct atmospheric scattering, alternatively it could result from strong draping which connects the depletion region magnetically to the weak downstream bow shock and thereby reduces the electron source strength.

  3. Titration of the Earth: Ocean-Atmosphere Evolution Recorded in Marine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kah, L. C.

    2012-12-01

    The enzymatic production of carbonate biominerals marks a clear association between biological processes and carbonate mineral formation. Prior to the evolution of skeletonizing metazoans, however, biotic activity played a less critical role in the morphological development of carbonate minerals. Instead, carbonate mineral morphology was more strongly affected by abiotic parameters that affect carbonate nucleation and growth. The texture of non-enzymatically controlled carbonate precipitation in the Precambrian may therefore provide us with an additional window through which to observe fundamental changes in the chemical evolution of the global ocean. The Precambrian ocean experienced a progressive evolution from CO2-rich and O2-poor, to CO2-poor and O2-rich. Changes in CO2-availability fundamentally affect marine carbonate saturation state, which is reflected primarily in the rate of crystal growth. By contrast, redox evolution appears to have played a fundamental role in regulating carbonate precipitation via the differential inhibition of mineral nucleation. Carbonate mineral textures that indicate differential nucleation and growth can be traced both spatially and temporally in the Precambrian sedimentary record. Textures that are dominated by high rates of growth relative to nucleation are common in Archean, and become progressively restricted in their distribution by the latter Proterozoic. Spatial restriction, particularly of fabrics associated with redox-controlled nucleation, suggesting the development of chemically discrete oceanic environments. Such observations are consistent with recent models of suggesting that ocean oxygenation occurred in a top-down fashion, with well-oxygenated surface waters underlain by either anoxic deep-waters or oxygen-depleted substrate pore-waters. Deciphering relationships among these environments permits attribution of carbonate fabrics to specific geochemical conditions within the water column and provides critical

  4. The age curves of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in marine sulfate and their mutual interpretation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claypool, George E.; Holser, William T.; Kaplan, Isaac R.; Sakai, Hitoshi; Zak, Israel

    1980-01-01

    Three hundred new samples of marine evaporite sulfate, of world-wide distribution, were analyzed for δ34S, and 60 of these also for δ18O in the sulfate ion. Detailed δ34S age curves for Tertiary—Cretaceous, Permian—Pennsylvanian, Devonian, Cambrian and Proterozoic times document large variations in δ34S. A summary curve forδ18O also shows definite variations, some at different times than δ34S, and always smaller. The measured δ34S and δ18O correspond to variations in these isotopes in sulfate of the world ocean surface. The variations of δ18O are controlled by input and output fluxes of sulfur in the ocean, three of which are the same that control δ34S: deposition and erosion of sulfate, and deposition of sulfide. Erosion of sulfide differs in its effect on the S and O systems. δ18O in the sulfate does not seem to be measurably affected by equilibration with either seawater or with subsurface waters after crystallization. In principle, the simultaneous application of both δ34S and δ18O age curves should help reduce the number of assumptions in calculations of the cycles of sulfur and oxygen through geological time, and a new model involving symmetrical fluxes is introduced here to take advantage of the oxygen data. However, all previously published models as well as this one lead to anomalies, such as unreasonable calcium or oxygen depletions in the ocean—atmosphere system. In addition, most models are incapable of reproducing the sharp rises of the δ34S curve in the late Proterozoic, the Devonian and the Triassic which would be the result of unreasonably fast net sulfide deposition. This fast depletion could result from an ocean that has not always been mixed (as previously assumed in all model calculations).

  5. Mercury Depletion Episode Studies in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, A.; Schroeder, W.; Hoenniger, G.; Platt, U.; Lawson, G.

    2001-12-01

    Episodic mercury depletion episodes were first recorded in Alert, Canada in 1995. Since this time, considerable research has been undertaken to further study this phenomenon. It has been found that there is an occurrence of fast photo-chemically induced reactions involving the oxidation of Hg (0) to Hg (II) during the springtime period in the high Arctic. Data from a cold regions pyrolysis unit (CRPU) have confirmed that particle-associated mercury (PM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) are still present in the air during a mercury depletion event when Hg (0) concentration levels are very low. These more reactive species are less volatile and are more readily removed in the air and/or are deposited on the snow surfaces than Hg (0). In the winter and spring of 2000 in Alert, snow samples collected showed an almost 20 fold increase in mercury concentrations during the springtime period from the dark period. Air profiling measurements undertaken during the same time period have shown that Hg (0) is re-emitted from the snow pack surfaces both over land and the frozen Arctic Ocean near Alert. It is thought that free radical BrO is responsible for the destruction of ozone depletion episodes in the Arctic during springtime and increased concentrations from satellites have been measured during these times. Ground level in situ measurements taken over the frozen ocean during depletion events showed an anti-correlation between Hg (0) and BrO concentrations during MDEs. In February 2001, continuous automated RGM and PM measurements were initiated to further study this phenomenon in parallel with the CRPU to measure total atmospheric mercury concentrations in ambient air in the Canadian Arctic during springtime depletion events. A summary of findings from these studies will be presented.

  6. Remote Sensing of Ocean Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierssen, Heidi M.; Randolph, Kaylan

    The oceans cover over 70% of the earth's surface and the life inhabiting the oceans play an important role in shaping the earth's climate. Phytoplankton, the microscopic organisms in the surface ocean, are responsible for half of the photosynthesis on the planet. These organisms at the base of the food web take up light and carbon dioxide and fix carbon into biological structures releasing oxygen. Estimating the amount of microscopic phytoplankton and their associated primary productivity over the vast expanses of the ocean is extremely challenging from ships. However, as phytoplankton take up light for photosynthesis, they change the color of the surface ocean from blue to green. Such shifts in ocean color can be measured from sensors placed high above the sea on satellites or aircraft and is called "ocean color remote sensing." In open ocean waters, the ocean color is predominantly driven by the phytoplankton concentration and ocean color remote sensing has been used to estimate the amount of chlorophyll a, the primary light-absorbing pigment in all phytoplankton. For the last few decades, satellite data have been used to estimate large-scale patterns of chlorophyll and to model primary productivity across the global ocean from daily to interannual timescales. Such global estimates of chlorophyll and primary productivity have been integrated into climate models and illustrate the important feedbacks between ocean life and global climate processes. In coastal and estuarine systems, ocean color is significantly influenced by other light-absorbing and light-scattering components besides phytoplankton. New approaches have been developed to evaluate the ocean color in relationship to colored dissolved organic matter, suspended sediments, and even to characterize the bathymetry and composition of the seafloor in optically shallow waters. Ocean color measurements are increasingly being used for environmental monitoring of harmful algal blooms, critical coastal habitats

  7. Ocean tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendershott, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    A review of recent developments in the study of ocean tides and related phenomena is presented. Topics briefly discussed include: the mechanism by which tidal dissipation occurs; continental shelf, marginal sea, and baroclinic tides; estimation of the amount of energy stored in the tide; the distribution of energy over the ocean; the resonant frequencies and Q factors of oceanic normal modes; the relationship of earth tides and ocean tides; and numerical global tidal models.

  8. Effects of eustatic sea-level change, ocean dynamics, and iron fertilization on atmospheric pCO2 and seawater composition over the last 130 000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallmann, K.; Schneider, B.; Sarnthein, M.

    2015-06-01

    We developed and employed an earth system model to explore the forcings of atmospheric pCO2 change and the chemical and isotopic evolution of seawater over the last glacial cycle. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus, reactive nitrogen, molecular oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), 13C-DIC and 14C-DIC were calculated for 24 ocean boxes. The bi-directional water fluxes between these model boxes were derived from a 3-D circulation field of the modern ocean (Opa 8.2, NEMO) and tuned such that tracer distributions calculated by the box model were consistent with observational data from the modern ocean. To model the last 130 kyr, we employed records of past changes in sea-level, ocean circulation, and dust deposition. According to the model, about half of the glacial pCO2 drawdown may be attributed to marine regressions. The glacial sea-level low-stands implied steepened ocean margins, a reduced burial of particulate organic carbon, phosphorus, and neritic carbonate at the margin seafloor, a decline in benthic denitrification, and enhanced weathering of emerged shelf sediments. In turn, they led to a distinct rise in the standing stocks of DIC, TA, and nutrients in the global ocean, promoted the glacial sequestration of atmospheric CO2 in the ocean, and added 13C- and 14C-depleted DIC to the ocean as recorded in benthic foraminifera signals. The other half of the glacial drop in pCO2 was linked to reduced deep ocean dynamics, a shoaling of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, and a rise in iron fertilization. The increased transit time of deep waters in the glacial ocean led to significant 14C depletions with respect to the atmosphere. The deglacial rapid and stepwise rise in atmospheric pCO2 was induced by upwelling both in the Southern Ocean and subarctic North Pacific and promoted by a drop in dust-borne iron discharge to the Southern Ocean. The deglacial sea-level rise led to a gradual decline in nutrient, DIC, and TA stocks

  9. Oxygen Isotopes in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, R. N.

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen isotope abundance variations in meteorites are very useful in elucidating chemical and physical processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system (Clayton, 1993). On Earth, the mean abundances of the three stable isotopes are 16O: 99.76%, 17O: 0.039%, and 18O: 0.202%. It is conventional to express variations in abundances of the isotopes in terms of isotopic ratios, relative to an arbitrary standard, called SMOW (for standard mean ocean water), as follows:The isotopic composition of any sample can then be represented by one point on a "three-isotope plot," a graph of δ17O versus δ18O. It will be seen that such plots are invaluable in interpreting meteoritic data. Figure 1 shows schematically the effect of various processes on an initial composition at the center of the diagram. Almost all terrestrial materials lie along a "fractionation" trend; most meteoritic materials lie near a line of "16O addition" (or subtraction). (4K)Figure 1. Schematic representation of various isotopic processes shown on an oxygen three-isotope plot. Almost all terrestrial materials plot along a line of "fractionation"; most primitive meteoritic materials plot near a line of "16O addition." The three isotopes of oxygen are produced by nucleosynthesis in stars, but by different nuclear processes in different stellar environments. The principal isotope, 16O, is a primary isotope (capable of being produced from hydrogen and helium alone), formed in massive stars (>10 solar masses), and ejected by supernova explosions. The two rare isotopes are secondary nuclei (produced in stars from nuclei formed in an earlier generation of stars), with 17O coming primarily from low- and intermediate-mass stars (<8 solar masses), and 18O coming primarily from high-mass stars (Prantzos et al., 1996). These differences in type of stellar source result in large observable variations in stellar isotopic abundances as functions of age, size, metallicity, and galactic location ( Prantzos

  10. Depleted components in the source of hotspot magmas: Evidence from the Ninetyeast Ridge (Kerguelen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Frederick A.; Nobre Silva, Inês G.; Huang, Shichun; Pringle, Malcolm S.; Meleney, Peter R.; Weis, Dominique

    2015-09-01

    Although most ocean island basalts (OIB) are enriched in incompatible elements relative to mid-ocean ridge basalts, OIB depleted in these elements also occur on some islands. The Ninetyeast Ridge (NER) in the eastern Indian Ocean is a 5000 km long hotspot track defined by submarine basaltic volcanoes that were islands when they formed from 43 to 77 Ma. A subset of NER basalts, described as depleted, has high abundances of Sc, Y and Lu, which are relatively compatible in clinopyroxene and especially in garnet. It is unusual for magmas to have the trace element characteristics of a mineral. A likely explanation is that the depleted NER basalts were derived from a source that was created as a garnet- and clinopyroxene-bearing residue during partial melting. When this residue formed, the extent of melting must have been low as not all of the garnet and clinopyroxene was melted. To provide sufficient time for the relatively high Lu/Hf of the residue to develop the high 176Hf/177Hf that is characteristic of depleted NER basalts, this melting event must have been ancient. In the second much younger melting event that formed the NER, the extent of melting was sufficiently high to eliminate garnet and clinopyroxene from the ancient residue. Basalts erupted on a segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near the Azores were also derived from an ancient garnet-bearing residue. Residues from ancient partial melting events involving low extents of melting are the dominant source of mid-ocean ridge basalts and depleted magmas associated with the Kerguelen and Azores hotspots. In contrast, a very different process has been inferred for creating the source of depleted Icelandic basalts. Their source was gabbro containing cumulate plagioclase and clinopyroxene. Such gabbros are common in the lower oceanic crust, and if recycled into the Icelandic hotspot they are a source of depleted Icelandic basalts.

  11. Oceanic Uptake of Methyl Bromide: Implications for Oceanic Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Butler, J. H.; King, D. B.; Saltzman, E. S.; Tokarczyk, R.

    2002-12-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) is a source of inorganic bromine (Br) in the stratosphere, where it contributes to the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Unlike the chlorofluorocarbons, which are entirely anthropogenic, methyl bromide has both natural and anthropogenic sources. At ~10 parts per trillion in the troposphere, methyl bromide is believed to be the single largest contributor of stratospheric Br. Once in the stratosphere, Br is approximately 50 times more effective in depleting stratospheric ozone than Cl. However, the budget for CH3Br remains largely unbalanced with known sinks outweighing sources by ~50%. With production and degradation occurring in the ocean, the ocean is both a source and a sink for CH3Br. The balance between production and degradation results in the net undersaturation of CH3Br that has been observed over much of the world's ocean with an estimated global net ocean sink ranging from -11 to -20 Gg/y [King et al., 2000 and references therein]. However, effects of climate change, such as changes in windspeed distribution or sea-surface temperature could alter this balance. Modeling the potential effect of such forcing on the net flux of this important trace gas requires an understanding of the factors controlling the distributions of production and degradation in the surface ocean. During three recent research cruises (North Atlantic, North Pacific, and Southern Ocean), CH3Br degradation rate constants were measured along with saturation anomalies. Here we incorporate these data into a gridded global box model to examine the distribution of oceanic production rates necessary to support the observations. King, D.B., J.H. Butler, S.A. Montzka, S.A. Yvon-Lewis, and J.W. Elkins, Implications of methyl bromide supersaturations in the temperate North Atlantic Ocean, J. of Geophys. Res., 105 (D15), 19763-19769, 2000.

  12. Oxygen in demand: How oxygen has shaped vertebrate physiology.

    PubMed

    Dzal, Yvonne A; Jenkin, Sarah E M; Lague, Sabine L; Reichert, Michelle N; York, Julia M; Pamenter, Matthew E

    2015-08-01

    In response to varying environmental and physiological challenges, vertebrates have evolved complex and often overlapping systems. These systems detect changes in environmental oxygen availability and respond by increasing oxygen supply to the tissues and/or by decreasing oxygen demand at the cellular level. This suite of responses is termed the oxygen transport cascade and is comprised of several components. These components include 1) chemosensory detectors that sense changes in oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH in the blood, and initiate changes in 2) ventilation and 3) cardiac work, thereby altering the rate of oxygen delivery to, and carbon dioxide clearance from, the tissues. In addition, changes in 4) cellular and systemic metabolism alters tissue-level metabolic demand. Thus the need for oxygen can be managed locally when increasing oxygen supply is not sufficient or possible. Together, these mechanisms provide a spectrum of responses that facilitate the maintenance of systemic oxygen homeostasis in the face of environmental hypoxia or physiological oxygen depletion (i.e. due to exercise or disease). Bill Milsom has dedicated his career to the study of these responses across phylogenies, repeatedly demonstrating the power of applying the comparative approach to physiological questions. The focus of this review is to discuss the anatomy, signalling pathways, and mechanics of each step of the oxygen transport cascade from the perspective of a Milsomite. That is, by taking into account the developmental, physiological, and evolutionary components of questions related to oxygen transport. We also highlight examples of some of the remarkable species that have captured Bill's attention through their unique adaptations in multiple components of the oxygen transport cascade, which allow them to achieve astounding physiological feats. Bill's research examining the oxygen transport cascade has provided important insight and leadership to the study of the diverse suite

  13. Contribution of global groundwater depletion since 1900 to sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.

    2011-01-01

    Removal of water from terrestrial subsurface storage is a natural consequence of groundwater withdrawals, but global depletion is not well characterized. Cumulative groundwater depletion represents a transfer of mass from land to the oceans that contributes to sea-level rise. Depletion is directly calculated using calibrated groundwater models, analytical approaches, or volumetric budget analyses for multiple aquifer systems. Estimated global groundwater depletion during 1900–2008 totals ~4,500 km3, equivalent to a sea-level rise of 12.6 mm (>6% of the total). Furthermore, the rate of groundwater depletion has increased markedly since about 1950, with maximum rates occurring during the most recent period (2000–2008), when it averaged ~145 km3/yr (equivalent to 0.40 mm/yr of sea-level rise, or 13% of the reported rate of 3.1 mm/yr during this recent period).

  14. Genetic relations among basic lavas and ultramafic nodules: Evidence from oxygen isotope compositions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyser, T.K.; O'Neil, J.R.; Carmichael, I.S.E.

    1982-01-01

    ??18O values of unaltered basic lavas range from 4.9 to 8.3 but different types of basalts are usually restricted to narrow and distinct ranges of isotopic composition. The average ??18O values for Hawaiian tholeiites, mid-ocean ridge tholeiites, and alkali basalts are 5.4, 5.7, and 6.2 permil, respectively. Potassic lavas and andesites tend to be more 18O rich with ??18O values between 6.0 and 8.0 permil. The differences among the oxygen isotopic compositions of most of these lavas can be attributed to partial melting of isotopically distinct sources. The oxygen isotope compositions of the sources may be a function of prior melting events which produce 18O-depleted partial melts and 18O-enriched residues as a consequence of relatively large isotopic fractionations that exist at high temperatures. It is proposed that lavas with relatively low ??18O values are derived from primitive, 18O-depleted sources whereas 18O-rich basalts are produced from refractory sources that have already produced partial melts. High temperature fractionations among silicate liquids and coexisting minerals can be used in conjunction with the oxygen isotope compositions of ultramafic nodules to place constraints on the genetic relations between some nodules and different types of basic lavas. ?? 1982 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Thermophoretic depletion follows Boltzmann distribution.

    PubMed

    Duhr, Stefan; Braun, Dieter

    2006-04-28

    Thermophoresis, also termed thermal diffusion or the Soret effect, moves particles along temperature gradients. For particles in liquids, the effect lacks a theoretical explanation. We present experimental results at moderate thermal gradients: (i) Thermophoretic depletion of 200 nm polystyrene spheres in water follows an exponential distribution over 2 orders of magnitude in concentration; (ii) Soret coefficients scale linearly with the sphere's surface area. Based on the experiments, it is argued that local thermodynamic equilibrium is a good starting point to describe thermophoresis.

  16. Ozone depletion, paradigms, and politics

    SciTech Connect

    Iman, R.L.

    1993-10-01

    The destruction of the Earth`s protective ozone layer is a prime environmental concern. Industry has responded to this environmental problem by: implementing conservation techniques to reduce the emission of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs); using alternative cleaning solvents that have lower ozone depletion potentials (ODPs); developing new, non-ozone-depleting solvents, such as terpenes; and developing low-residue soldering processes. This paper presents an overview of a joint testing program at Sandia and Motorola to evaluate a low-residue (no-clean) soldering process for printed wiring boards (PWBs). Such processes are in widespread use in commercial applications because they eliminate the cleaning operation. The goal of this testing program was to develop a data base that could be used to support changes in the mil-specs. In addition, a joint task force involving industry and the military has been formed to conduct a follow-up evaluation of low-residue processes that encompass the concerns of the tri-services. The goal of the task force is to gain final approval of the low-residue technology for use in military applications.

  17. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  18. Dependence of interstellar depletion on hydrogen column density - Possibilities and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarafdar, S. P.; Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A reexamination of the observed column densities of various elements in diffuse clouds suggests that almost all elements including oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and argon may be depleted with respect to hydrogen in interstellar clouds with large hydrogen column density. The amount of depletion varies from element to element and increases with increasing column density of hydrogen nuclei. This result is in qualitative agreement with the depletion of oxygen and sulfur independently inferred from the gas phase chemistry of sulfur in dense clouds. The rate of increase of depletion with hydrogen column density implied by the present study is large. It is possible that observational selection effects may have amplified the real dependence on N(H). A broad spectrum of C/O ratios ranging from values greater than unity to values less than unity appears possible for interstellar clouds, which would have the effect of a large variation in chemical composition from cloud to cloud.

  19. Issues in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Steven Andrew

    Following the announcement of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985 there have arisen a multitude of questions pertaining to the nature and consequences of polar ozone depletion. This thesis addresses several of these specific questions, using both computer models of chemical kinetics and the Earth's radiation field as well as laboratory kinetic experiments. A coupled chemical kinetic-radiative numerical model was developed to assist in the analysis of in situ field measurements of several radical and neutral species in the polar and mid-latitude lower stratosphere. Modeling was used in the analysis of enhanced polar ClO, mid-latitude diurnal variation of ClO, and simultaneous measurements of OH, HO_2, H_2 O and O_3. Most importantly, such modeling was instrumental in establishing the link between the observed ClO and BrO concentrations in the Antarctic polar vortex and the observed rate of ozone depletion. The principal medical concern of stratospheric ozone depletion is that ozone loss will lead to the enhancement of ground-level UV-B radiation. Global ozone climatology (40^circS to 50^ circN latitude) was incorporated into a radiation field model to calculate the biologically accumulated dosage (BAD) of UV-B radiation, integrated over days, months, and years. The slope of the annual BAD as a function of latitude was found to correspond to epidemiological data for non-melanoma skin cancers for 30^circ -50^circN. Various ozone loss scenarios were investigated. It was found that a small ozone loss in the tropics can provide as much additional biologically effective UV-B as a much larger ozone loss at higher latitudes. Also, for ozone depletions of > 5%, the BAD of UV-B increases exponentially with decreasing ozone levels. An important key player in determining whether polar ozone depletion can propagate into the populated mid-latitudes is chlorine nitrate, ClONO_2 . As yet this molecule is only indirectly accounted for in computer models and field

  20. The nutrient, salinity, and stable oxygen isotope composition of Bering and Chukchi Seas waters in and near the Bering Strait

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, L.W. |; Whitledge, T.E.; Grebmeier, J.M. |; Weingartner, T.

    1997-06-01

    Seawater nutrient, salinity, and oxygen 18 data collected from 1990 to 1993 in the Bering and Chukchi Seas were used to identify potential sources of nutrients and water masses that result in formation of the Arctic Ocean upper halocline and its associated nutrient maximum. Water matching the {delta}{sup 18}O values of the Arctic Ocean upper halocline and containing sufficient, or a nearly sufficient, nutrient and salinity concentration was collected in subsurface waters in the summer in portions of the Bering Sea, particularly the Gulf of Anadyr. However, nutrient concentrations significantly declined in this north flowing water over the shallow continental shelf before it reached the Bering Strait, as a consequence of biological utilization, and dilution with nutrient-poor and oxygen 18-depleted fresh water. Therefore it does not appear likely that the flow of unaltered water through the Bering Strait in the summer plays a critical role in the formation of the Arctic Ocean upper halocline. The role of other mechanisms for contributing Pacific-derived waters to the Arctic Ocean nutrient maximum is considered.{copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union

  1. Why Oceanic Anoxic Events Terminated? Data and Speculations About the end of OAE1a.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erba, E.

    2006-12-01

    After three decades of research on oceanic anoxic events (OAEs), an impressive amount of geo-data has generated models that try to explain the peculiar mid Cretaceous ocean/atmosphere system. Plausible causes of oceanic anoxia have been identified and somehow substantiated with geological data. Refined and improved chronology has allowed the dating of events that perhaps accidentally concurred to trigger and maintain oceanic anoxia for long time intervals. Based on the original definition, OAEs are intervals of abnormal primary productivity in surface seawaters and oxygen-depletion in bottom seawaters. There is a general consensus on the role of carbon dioxide increases, and implicit tectonic-igneous events, triggering a major climate change, responses of marine biota and restructuring of chemical and physical characteristics of the ocean. An improved understanding of processes at the onset and during OAEs has been achieved, but less attention has been paid to the termination of anoxia. The early Aptian OAE 1a is an extreme and long lasting perturbation of the Cretaceous. It is associated with geochemical anomalies and fundamental changes in marine and terrestrial ecosystems. The end of OAE1a was characterized in pelagic sections, allowing the identification, dating and quantification of paleonvironmental changes. Specifically, nannofossil assemblages were quantified to estimate biogenic calcite production and fluxes, and reconstruct the evolution of calcareous phytoplankton, relative to changes in planktonic communities and in the ocean/atmosphere composition. The restoration of oxygenated bottom waters correlates with a renewal of nannoplankton calcification and a short- lived but distinctive cooling episode. The end of anoxia appears to be abrupt and unambiguously anticipates the long-lasting C isotopic positive excursion that is detached from organic carbon-rich black shales in pelagic sequences. The sharp re-oxygenation might imply a major external cause and

  2. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 85-95% pure oxygen. The concentrator runs on electricity or a battery. A concentrator for home usually ... systems deliver 100% oxygen, and do not require electricity. A small canister can be filled from the ...

  3. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  4. The Case of Ozone Depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambright, W. Henry

    2005-01-01

    While the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is widely perceived as a space agency, since its inception NASA has had a mission dedicated to the home planet. Initially, this mission involved using space to better observe and predict weather and to enable worldwide communication. Meteorological and communication satellites showed the value of space for earthly endeavors in the 1960s. In 1972, NASA launched Landsat, and the era of earth-resource monitoring began. At the same time, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the environmental movement swept throughout the United States and most industrialized countries. The first Earth Day event took place in 1970, and the government generally began to pay much more attention to issues of environmental quality. Mitigating pollution became an overriding objective for many agencies. NASA's existing mission to observe planet Earth was augmented in these years and directed more toward environmental quality. In the 1980s, NASA sought to plan and establish a new environmental effort that eventuated in the 1990s with the Earth Observing System (EOS). The Agency was able to make its initial mark via atmospheric monitoring, specifically ozone depletion. An important policy stimulus in many respects, ozone depletion spawned the Montreal Protocol of 1987 (the most significant international environmental treaty then in existence). It also was an issue critical to NASA's history that served as a bridge linking NASA's weather and land-resource satellites to NASA s concern for the global changes affecting the home planet. Significantly, as a global environmental problem, ozone depletion underscored the importance of NASA's ability to observe Earth from space. Moreover, the NASA management team's ability to apply large-scale research efforts and mobilize the talents of other agencies and the private sector illuminated its role as a lead agency capable of crossing organizational boundaries as well as the science-policy divide.

  5. Precambrian Secular Evolution of Oceanic Nickel Concentrations: An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konhauser, K.; Pecoits, E.; Peacock, C.; Robbins, L. J.; Kappler, A.; Lalonde, S.

    2014-12-01

    Iron formations (IF) preserve a history of Precambrian oceanic elemental abundance that can be exploited to address nutrient limitations on early biological productivity. In 2009 we reported that secular trends in IF Ni/Fe ratios record a reduced flux of Ni to the oceans ca. 2.7 billion years ago, which we attribute to decreased eruption of Ni-rich ultramafic rocks1. We determined that dissolved Ni concentrations may have reached ~400 nM throughout much of the Archean, but dropped below ~200 nM by 2.5 Ga and to modern day values (~9 nM) by ~550 Ma. As Ni is a key metal cofactor in several enzymes of methanogens, its decline would have stifled their activity in the ancient oceans and disrupted the supply of biogenic methane. Here we provide an updated compilation of Ni concentrations and Ni/Fe ratios in Precambrian iron formations based on a greatly expanded (>3 fold) dataset. We frame our rock record compilation in the context of new experiments examining the partitioning and mobility of Ni during simulated diagenesis of Ni-doped iron formation mineral precursors, as well as a fresh look at Ni-Fe scaling relationships in IF vs. modern Fe-rich chemical sediments. While its potential effects on atmospheric oxygenation remains to be fully resolved2, our new results reaffirm the Paleoproterozoic Ni famine, whereby the enzymatic reliance of methanogens on a diminishing supply of volcanic Ni links mantle cooling to the trajectory of Earth surface biogeochemical evolution. Konhauser KO, et al. (2009) Oceanic nickel depletion and a methanogen famine before the Great Oxidation Event. Nature 458: 750-753. Kasting JE (2013) What caused the rise of atmospheric O2? Chemical Geology 362: 13-25.

  6. Investigating the distribution of dissolved copper, zinc, silver and cadmium in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, D. J.; Cullen, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    A stated goal of the GEOTRACES program is to better understand the large-scale distribution of trace metals in the marine environment. A characteristic feature of the soft Lewis acid metals like copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), silver (Ag) and cadmium (Cd) is their correlation with the major algal nutrients. These correlations imply that the proximate control on the distribution of these metals is microbial uptake at the ocean surface, sinking associated with particulate organic matter and subsequent remineralization in the ocean interior. Combined with sedimentary records of past metal concentrations such correlations can provide much needed information on water mass circulation and nutrient cycling in the paleo-ocean. Today, as trace nutrients and/or toxins these metals help shape microbial community composition and influence productivity. Here we present depth profiles through the low dissolved oxygen waters of the north Pacific which show decoupling of trace metal-macronutrient relationships driven by depletion anomalies of trace metal concentrations in the broad, low oxygen layer. Similar anomalies have been previously reported in permanently anoxic layers (e.g. fjords) or in waters in contact with suboxic sediments and attributed to sulfidic removal of soft trace metals. The observed trace metal behavior and trace metal-macronutrient relationships in the oxygen minimum layer in the northeastern Pacific is consistent with the possibility of sulfidic scavenging of soft metals and the formation of insoluble metal sulfides in the water column. Implications of this influence on the basin scale distribution of soft metals like Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd through scavenging in the spreading low oxygen layer in the northeastern Pacific are discussed.

  7. Diallyl disulphide depletes glutathione in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lemar, Katey M.; Aon, Miguel A.; Cortassa, Sonia; O’Rourke, Brian; T. Müller, Carsten; Lloyd, David

    2008-01-01

    Using two-photon scanning laser microscopy, we investigated the effect of an Allium sativum (garlic) constituent, diallyl disulphide (DADS), on key physiological functions of the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans. A short 30 min exposure to 0.5 mm DADS followed by removal induced 70% cell death (50% necrotic, 20% apoptotic) within 2 h, increasing to 75% after 4 h. The early intracellular events associated with DADS-induced cell death were monitored with two-photon fluorescence microscopy to track mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NADH or reduced glutathione (GSH) under aerobic conditions. DADS treatment decreased intracellular GSH and elevated intracellular ROS levels. Additionally, DADS induced a marked decrease of ΔΨm and lowered respiration in cell suspensions and isolated mitochondria. In vitro kinetic experiments in cell-free extracts suggest that glutathione-S-transferase (GST) is one of the intracellular targets of DADS. Additional targets were also identified, including inhibition of a site or sites between complexes II-IV in the electron transport chain, as well as the mitochondrial ATP-synthase. The results indicate that DADS is an effective antifungal agent able to trigger cell death in Candida, most probably by eliciting oxidative stress as a consequence of thiol depletion and impaired mitochondrial function. PMID:17534841

  8. Ocean Acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Rodriguez, Maria Debora

    The oceans play a central role in the maintenance of life on Earth. Oceans provide extensive ecosystems for marine animals and plants covering two-thirds of the Earth's surface, are essential sources of food, economic activity, and biodiversity, and are central to the global biogeochemical cycles. The oceans are the largest reservoir of carbon in the Planet, and absorb approximately one-third of the carbon emissions that are released to the Earth's atmosphere as a result of human activities. Since the beginning of industrialization, humans have been responsible for the increase in one greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2), from approximately 280 parts per million (ppm) at the end of the nineteenth century to the current levels of 390ppm. As well as affecting the surface ocean pH, and the organisms living at the ocean surface, these increases in CO2 are causing global mean surface temperatures to rise.

  9. Facets of diazotrophy in the oxygen minimum zone waters off Peru.

    PubMed

    Loescher, Carolin R; Großkopf, Tobias; Desai, Falguni D; Gill, Diana; Schunck, Harald; Croot, Peter L; Schlosser, Christian; Neulinger, Sven C; Pinnow, Nicole; Lavik, Gaute; Kuypers, Marcel M M; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2014-11-01

    Nitrogen fixation, the biological reduction of dinitrogen gas (N2) to ammonium (NH4(+)), is quantitatively the most important external source of new nitrogen (N) to the open ocean. Classically, the ecological niche of oceanic N2 fixers (diazotrophs) is ascribed to tropical oligotrophic surface waters, often depleted in fixed N, with a diazotrophic community dominated by cyanobacteria. Although this applies for large areas of the ocean, biogeochemical models and phylogenetic studies suggest that the oceanic diazotrophic niche may be much broader than previously considered, resulting in major implications for the global N-budget. Here, we report on the composition, distribution and abundance of nifH, the functional gene marker for N2 fixation. Our results show the presence of eight clades of diazotrophs in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off Peru. Although proteobacterial clades dominated overall, two clusters affiliated to spirochaeta and archaea were identified. N2 fixation was detected within OMZ waters and was stimulated by the addition of organic carbon sources supporting the view that non-phototrophic diazotrophs were actively fixing dinitrogen. The observed co-occurrence of key functional genes for N2 fixation, nitrification, anammox and denitrification suggests that a close spatial coupling of N-input and N-loss processes exists in the OMZ off Peru. The wide distribution of diazotrophs throughout the water column adds to the emerging view that the habitat of marine diazotrophs can be extended to low oxygen/high nitrate areas. Furthermore, our statistical analysis suggests that NO2(-) and PO4(3-) are the major factors affecting diazotrophic distribution throughout the OMZ. In view of the predicted increase in ocean deoxygenation resulting from global warming, our findings indicate that the importance of OMZs as niches for N2 fixation may increase in the future.

  10. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope evidence for a temperate climate 3.42 billion years ago.

    PubMed

    Hren, M T; Tice, M M; Chamberlain, C P

    2009-11-12

    Stable oxygen isotope ratios (delta(18)O) of Precambrian cherts have been used to establish much of our understanding of the early climate history of Earth and suggest that ocean temperatures during the Archaean era ( approximately 3.5 billion years ago) were between 55 degrees C and 85 degrees C (ref. 2). But, because of uncertainty in the delta(18)O of the primitive ocean, there is considerable debate regarding this conclusion. Examination of modern and ancient cherts indicates that another approach, using a combined analysis of delta(18)O and hydrogen isotopes (deltaD) rather than delta(18)O alone, can provide a firmer constraint on formational temperatures without independent knowledge of the isotopic composition of ambient waters. Here we show that delta(18)O and deltaD sampled from 3.42-billion-year-old Buck Reef Chert rocks in South Africa are consistent with formation from waters at varied low temperatures. The most (18)O-enriched Buck Reef Chert rocks record the lowest diagenetic temperatures and were formed in equilibrium with waters below approximately 40 degrees C. Geochemical and sedimentary evidence suggests that the Buck Reef Chert was formed in shallow to deep marine conditions, so our results indicate that the Palaeoarchaean ocean was isotopically depleted relative to the modern ocean and far cooler (

  11. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope evidence for a temperate climate 3.42 billion years ago.

    PubMed

    Hren, M T; Tice, M M; Chamberlain, C P

    2009-11-12

    Stable oxygen isotope ratios (delta(18)O) of Precambrian cherts have been used to establish much of our understanding of the early climate history of Earth and suggest that ocean temperatures during the Archaean era ( approximately 3.5 billion years ago) were between 55 degrees C and 85 degrees C (ref. 2). But, because of uncertainty in the delta(18)O of the primitive ocean, there is considerable debate regarding this conclusion. Examination of modern and ancient cherts indicates that another approach, using a combined analysis of delta(18)O and hydrogen isotopes (deltaD) rather than delta(18)O alone, can provide a firmer constraint on formational temperatures without independent knowledge of the isotopic composition of ambient waters. Here we show that delta(18)O and deltaD sampled from 3.42-billion-year-old Buck Reef Chert rocks in South Africa are consistent with formation from waters at varied low temperatures. The most (18)O-enriched Buck Reef Chert rocks record the lowest diagenetic temperatures and were formed in equilibrium with waters below approximately 40 degrees C. Geochemical and sedimentary evidence suggests that the Buck Reef Chert was formed in shallow to deep marine conditions, so our results indicate that the Palaeoarchaean ocean was isotopically depleted relative to the modern ocean and far cooler (

  12. A new 0.9 Ma oxygen isotope stratigraphy for a shallow-water sedimentary transect across three IODP 317 sites in the Canterbury Bight of southwest Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuan; Wu, YingYing

    2016-04-01

    Sedimentary records in shallow-water environment provide unique opportunity to further our understanding on the regional relative sea level changes in relation to global climate change. Here we present a new 0.9 Ma oxygen isotope stratigraphy for a shallow-water sedimentary transect across three IODP 317 sites in the Canterbury Bight of southwest Pacific Ocean. The three sites are located on the eastern margin of the South Island of New Zealand, including a continental slope site, IODP317-U1352 and two continental shelf sites, IODP317-U1354 and IODP317-U1351. We first generated high resolution benthic foraminifers (Nonionella flemingi) δ18O records for the three sites and a planktonic (Globigerina bulloides) record for the U1352B. An initial chronological framework for the benthic δ18O record of the U1352B was constructed using 8 accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dates and 4 biostratigraphic events. Then a refined age model was established by correlating the U1352B benthic δ18O record with the EDC δD record on the AICC2012 time-scale, and the LR04 benthic δ18O stack. Although the U1354B and U1351B have lower sedimentation rates, their benthic δ18O records correlate well with that of U1352B. In order to ensure the accuracy of the chronostratigraphic framework established, we also analyzed the characteristics of sedimentary grain size and the planktonic and benthic δ18O values. In accord with the adjacent sites, the results show that the melt of Southern Alps glaciers due to the warming climate during MIS 11 and 5.5 led to the increased fresh water delivery, with massive terrigenous deposit; and the warm SST during the MIS7 is related with the STF migration, which led to strong current activity, with coarser grain size. Meanwhile, records of benthic δ18O, sedimentation rate and content of >63μm coarse fraction of site U1352 all indicate the MIS 20 was indeed a colder interval compared to subsequent glacial times.

  13. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  14. The 1988 Antarctic ozone depletion: Comparison with previous year depletions

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeberl, M.R.; Stolarski, R.S.; Krueger, A.J. )

    1989-05-01

    The 1988 spring Antarctic ozone depletion was observed by TOMS to be substantially smaller than in recent years. The minimum polar total ozone values declined only 15% during September 1988 compared to nearly 50% during September 1987. At southern midlatitudes, exceptionally high total ozone values were recorded beginning in July 1988. The total integrated southern hemispheric ozone increased rapidly during the Austral spring, approaching 1980 levels during October. The high midlatitude total ozone values were associated with a substantial increase in eddy activity as indicated by the standard deviation in total ozone in the zonal band 30{degree}-60{degree}S. The standard deviation also correlates with the QBO cycling of the tropical winds. Mechanisms through which the increased midlatitude eddy activity could disrupt the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole are briefly discussed.

  15. The 1988 Antarctic ozone depletion - Comparison with previous year depletions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Krueger, Arlin J.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 spring Antarctic ozone depletion was observed by TOMS to be substantially smaller than in recent years. The minimum polar total ozone values declined only 15 percent during September 1988, compared to nearly 50 percent during September 1987. At southern midlatitudes, exceptionally high total ozone values were recorded beginning in July 1988. The total integrated southern hemispheric ozone increased rapidly during the Austral spring, approaching 1980 levels during October. The high midlatitude total ozone values were associated with a substantial increase in eddy activity as indicated by the standard deviation in total ozone in the zonal band 30-60 deg S. Mechanisms through which the increased midlatitude eddy activity could disrupt the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole are briefly discussed.

  16. Effects of eustatic sea-level change, ocean dynamics, and nutrient utilization on atmospheric pCO2 and seawater composition over the last 130 000 years: a model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallmann, K.; Schneider, B.; Sarnthein, M.

    2016-02-01

    We have developed and employed an Earth system model to explore the forcings of atmospheric pCO2 change and the chemical and isotopic evolution of seawater over the last glacial cycle. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus (DP), reactive nitrogen, molecular oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), 13C-DIC, and 14C-DIC were calculated for 24 ocean boxes. The bi-directional water fluxes between these model boxes were derived from a 3-D circulation field of the modern ocean (Opa 8.2, NEMO) and tuned such that tracer distributions calculated by the box model were consistent with observational data from the modern ocean. To model the last 130 kyr, we employed records of past changes in sea-level, ocean circulation, and dust deposition. According to the model, about half of the glacial pCO2 drawdown may be attributed to marine regressions. The glacial sea-level low-stands implied steepened ocean margins, a reduced burial of particulate organic carbon, phosphorus, and neritic carbonate at the margin seafloor, a decline in benthic denitrification, and enhanced weathering of emerged shelf sediments. In turn, low-stands led to a distinct rise in the standing stocks of DIC, TA, and nutrients in the global ocean, promoted the glacial sequestration of atmospheric CO2 in the ocean, and added 13C- and 14C-depleted DIC to the ocean as recorded in benthic foraminifera signals. The other half of the glacial drop in pCO2 was linked to inferred shoaling of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and more efficient utilization of nutrients in the Southern Ocean. The diminished ventilation of deep water in the glacial Atlantic and Southern Ocean led to significant 14C depletions with respect to the atmosphere. According to our model, the deglacial rapid and stepwise rise in atmospheric pCO2 was induced by upwelling both in the Southern Ocean and subarctic North Pacific and promoted by a drop in nutrient utilization in the Southern Ocean. The deglacial sea

  17. Evidence For Volcanic Initiation Of Cretaceous Ocean Anoxic Events (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sageman, B. B.; Hurtgen, M. T.; McElwain, J.; Adams, D.; Barclay, R. S.; Joo, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Increasing evidence from studies of Cretaceous ocean anoxic events (OAE’s) has suggested that major changes in volcanic activity may have played a significant role in their genesis. Numerous specific mechanisms of have been proposed, including increases in atmospheric CO2 and surface temperature, leading to enhanced chemical weathering and terrestrial nutrient release, or increases in reduced trace metal fluxes, leading to oxygen depletion and possibly providing micronutrients for enhanced primary production. An additional pathway by which the byproducts of enhanced volcanic activity may have contributed to OAE genesis involves relationships between the biogeochemical cycles sulfur, iron, and phosphorus. Recent analysis of S-isotope data from carbonate-associated sulfate and pyrite collected across the Cenomanian-Turonian OAE2 in the Western Interior basin suggest that increases in sulfate to an initially sulfate-depleted ocean preceded onset of the event. Modern lake data support the idea that increases in sulfate concentration drive microbial sulfate reduction, leading to more efficient regeneration of P from sedimentary organic matter. If the early Cretaceous opening of the South Atlantic was accompanied by evaporite deposition sufficient to draw down global marine sulfate levels, and widespread anoxia leading to elevated pyrite burial helped maintain these low levels for the succeeding 30 myr, during which most Cretaceous OAE’s are found, perhaps pulses of volcanism that rapidly introduced large volumes of sulfate may have played a key role in OAE initiation. The eventually burial of S in the form of pyrite may have returned sulfate levels to a low background, thus providing a mechanism to terminate the anoxic events. This talk will review the evidence for volcanic initiation of OAE’s in the context of the sulfate-phosphorus regeneration model.

  18. Oxygen variance and meridional oxygen supply in the Tropical North East Atlantic oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, J.; Brandt, P.; Greatbatch, R. J.; Krahmann, G.; Körtzinger, A.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of the mean oceanic oxygen concentration results from a balance between ventilation and consumption. In the eastern tropical Pacific and Atlantic, this balance creates extended oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) at intermediate depth. Here, we analyze hydrographic and velocity data from shipboard and moored observations, which were taken along the 23°W meridian cutting through the Tropical North East Atlantic (TNEA) OMZ, to study the distribution and generation of oxygen variability. By applying the extended Osborn-Cox model, the respective role of mesoscale stirring and diapycnal mixing in producing enhanced oxygen variability, found at the southern and upper boundary of the OMZ, is quantified. From the well-ventilated equatorial region toward the OMZ core a northward eddy-driven oxygen flux is observed whose divergence corresponds to an oxygen supply of about 2.4 μmol kg-1 year-1 at the OMZ core depth. Above the OMZ core, mesoscale eddies act to redistribute low- and high-oxygen waters associated with westward and eastward currents, respectively. Here, absolute values of the local oxygen supply >10 μmol kg-1 year-1 are found, likely balanced by mean zonal advection. Combining our results with recent studies, a refined oxygen budget for the TNEA OMZ is derived. Eddy-driven meridional oxygen supply contributes more than 50 % of the supply required to balance the estimated oxygen consumption. The oxygen tendency in the OMZ, as given by the multidecadal oxygen decline, is maximum slightly above the OMZ core and represents a substantial imbalance of the oxygen budget reaching about 20 % of the magnitude of the eddy-driven oxygen supply.

  19. Type 2-depleted fungal laccase.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, P M; McMillin, D R; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, M; Antholine, W E; Reinhammar, B

    1988-01-01

    Although copper is quantitatively removed from fungal laccase (Polyporus versicolor) by extended dialysis against high concentrations of cyanide, we have been unable to reconstitute the protein by addition of Cu(I) ions. However, two new methods for reversibly removing the type 2 Cu centre have been developed. The visible absorption at 610 nm, which is attributable to type 1 Cu, is unaffected by the procedure, but the absorbance of the type 3 Cu at 330 nm is decreased by 60 +/- 10%. The decrease is due, at least in part, to partial reduction of the binuclear type 3 centre, although there may be some change in the molar absorptivity of the oxidized chromophore as well. The change in the c.d. spectrum that occurs at approx. 350 nm may be explained in the same way, but it may also reflect the loss of a signal due to the type 2 Cu. Upon removal of the type 2 Cu an absorbance increase appears at approx. 435 nm, and it is assigned to the semi-reduced form of the type 3 pair. In the e.p.r. spectrum of the type 2-depleted enzyme the type 1 Cu signal exhibits well-resolved ligand hyperfine splitting, which can be simulated on the basis of contributions from two N and two H nuclei (AH congruent to AN congruent to 25 MHz). The H atoms are assumed to be attached to the beta-carbon of the covalently bonded cysteine ligand. A signal from a semi-reduced form(s) of the type 3 site can also be resolved in the spectrum of the type 2-depleted enzyme, and on the basis of the second integral of the e.p.r. spectrum 40% of the type 3 pairs are believed to be in a partially reduced state. The semi-reduced type 3 site is remarkably stable and is not readily oxidized by H2O2 or IrCl6(2-) or reduced by Fe(CN)6(4-). Intramolecular electron transfer is apparently quite slow in at least some forms of the type 2-depleted enzyme, and this may explain why the activity is at best 5% of that of the native enzyme. Full activity returns when type 2 copper is restored. PMID:2845923

  20. An experimental study on the effect of carbonic anhydrase on the oxygen isotope exchange kinetics and equilibrium in the carbonic acid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchikawa, J.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Stable oxygen isotopes of marine biogenic carbonates are often depleted in 18O relative to the values expected for thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater. One possibility is that 18O-depletion in carbonates is kinetically controlled. The kinetic isotope effect associated with the hydration of CO2 results in 18O-depleted HCO3-. If the HCO3- is utilized before re-establishing equilibrium with ambient water under rapid calcification, the 18O-depletion will be recorded in carbonates. But one caveat in this kinetic model is the fact that many marine calcifiers posses carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bearing enzyme that catalyzes the CO2 hydration reaction. It is expected that this enzyme accelerates 18O-equilibration in the carbonic acid system by facilitating direct oxygen isotope exchange between HCO3- and H2O via CO2 hydration. Clearly this argues against the conceptual framework of the kinetic model. Yet the critical variable here is the effectiveness of the carbonic anhydrase, which is likely to depend on its concentration and the carbonate chemistry of the aqueous medium. It is also hitherto unknown whether the presence of carbonic anhydrase alters the equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations between dissolved carbonate species and water. We performed a series of quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments to examine the changes in the oxygen isotope equilibration time as a function of carbonic anhydrase concentrations. We conducted experiments at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are similar to the average surface ocean pH and the elevated pH levels observed within calcification microenvironments of certain corals and planktonic foraminifera. A summary of our new experimental results will be presented.

  1. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.

    2011-04-27

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  2. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, H. O.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Kendziora, C.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Pordes, S.; Rogers, H.

    2011-04-01

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however 39Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in 39Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO2 well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO2. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N2, and He mixture, from the CO2 through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N2 and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO2 facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  3. Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

  4. Variability in Deep Subarctic Pacific Oxygen Concentration Over the Past 150 ka.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaccard, S.; Haug, G. H.; Sigman, D. M.; Pedersen, T. F.; Francois, R.; Dulski, P.; Thierstein, H. R.

    2005-12-01

    The subarctic North Pacific represents the end of the global deep ocean circulation pathway, where deep water rises to the subsurface to complete the global thermohaline circulation. Subsurface waters upwelling into the euphotic zone are depleted in oxygen and enriched in dissolved carbon dioxide and macronutrients as a result of constant respiration and remineralization of organic carbon along the routes of abyssal circulation. The subarctic Pacific thus represents a sensitive region to investigate variations in sedimentary redox conditions as a consequence of climate change. Here we present Th-normalized sedimentary redox-sensitive trace metal (Mn, Mo, U) accumulation rates from ODP Site 882 to infer changes in deep North Pacific ventilation across terminations I & II. We couple these observations with submillennial-scale biogenic barium measurements as a proxy for carbon export to separate the influences of deep water oxygen concentration and sedimentary organic carbon respiration on the redox state of the sediment. Our results suggest that the deep subarctic Pacific water column was close to suboxic conditions during glacial intervals. Authigenic uranium concentrations are significantly higher during cold periods, despite a significant decrease of primary productivity due to a more severe water-column stratification, leaving changes in bottom water oxygenation as the only plausible explanation to account for trace metal enrichment. Molybdenum concentrations in the sediment are not significantly higher than average crustal values, indicating that the water-sediment interface never reached anoxic (i.e. sulfidic) conditions. Simple calculations suggest that glacial oxygen concentration might have been as low as 20-40 μ mol. Ventilation resumed rapidly during deglaciation and remained efficient throughout warm intervals, as indicated by the occurrence of lower authigenic uranium concentrations in the face of higher productivity and carbon flux to the sediment. We

  5. The Southern Ocean's role in carbon exchange during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Burke, Andrea; Robinson, Laura F

    2012-02-01

    Changes in the upwelling and degassing of carbon from the Southern Ocean form one of the leading hypotheses for the cause of glacial-interglacial changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide. We present a 25,000-year-long Southern Ocean radiocarbon record reconstructed from deep-sea corals, which shows radiocarbon-depleted waters during the glacial period and through the early deglaciation. This depletion and associated deep stratification disappeared by ~14.6 ka (thousand years ago), consistent with the transfer of carbon from the deep ocean to the surface ocean and atmosphere via a Southern Ocean ventilation event. Given this evidence for carbon exchange in the Southern Ocean, we show that existing deep-ocean radiocarbon records from the glacial period are sufficiently depleted to explain the ~190 per mil drop in atmospheric radiocarbon between ~17 and 14.5 ka.

  6. High-voltage-compatible, fully depleted CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Stephen E.; Bebek, Chris J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Emes, JohnE.; Fabricius, Max H.; Fairfield, Jessaym A.; Groom, Don E.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, William F.; Palaio, Nick P.; Roe, Natalie A.; Wang, Guobin

    2006-05-15

    We describe charge-coupled device (CCD) developmentactivities at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).Back-illuminated CCDs fabricated on 200-300 mu m thick, fully depleted,high-resistivity silicon substrates are produced in partnership with acommercial CCD foundry.The CCDs are fully depleted by the application ofa substrate bias voltage. Spatial resolution considerations requireoperation of thick, fully depleted CCDs at high substrate bias voltages.We have developed CCDs that are compatible with substrate bias voltagesof at least 200V. This improves spatial resolution for a given thickness,and allows for full depletion of thicker CCDs than previously considered.We have demonstrated full depletion of 650-675 mu m thick CCDs, withpotential applications in direct x-ray detection. In this work we discussthe issues related to high-voltage operation of fully depleted CCDs, aswell as experimental results on high-voltage-compatible CCDs.

  7. Biogeochemical cycling of cadmium isotopes along a high-resolution section through the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Tim M.; John, Seth G.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a bioactive trace element in the oceans, with a nutrient-like distribution that closely matches dissolved phosphate. Seawater-dissolved stable Cd isotope ratios (δ114Cd) are a relatively new parameter, which show much promise for furthering our understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of Cd in the oceans. Here we present a high-resolution paired section of dissolved Cd concentrations and dissolved δ114Cd from 21 open-ocean stations along the US GEOTRACES GA03 transect through the North Atlantic Ocean. Dissolved Cd concentrations along the section are strongly influenced by water-mass distribution and the cycling of Cd. The highest dissolved Cd concentrations (400-540 pmol kg-1) are associated with Antarctic-sourced water masses, whilst biological uptake in the surface ocean results in a strong vertical gradient in dissolved Cd towards the surface, reaching as low as 0.03 pmol kg-1 in western surface waters. Dissolved δ114Cd is also characterized by a vertical gradient from ∼+0.2‰ in the deep ocean to +2‰ to +5‰ in the Cd-depleted surface ocean (relative to NIST SRM 3108). This variability in δ114Cd can be ascribed to mixing of Antarctic and North Atlantic water masses, together with fractionation due to in situ biological uptake of light Cd in the very surface ocean. Subtle deviations from this overall pattern of dissolved Cd concentration and dissolved δ114Cd are observed within low-oxygen waters off North Africa, where a dissolved Cd deficit relative to phosphate is associated with higher dissolved δ114Cd values. Together with elevated particulate Cd and Ba, this suggests that Cd sulfide precipitation is occurring within the water column of the North Atlantic, constituting a potentially important sink for isotopically light Cd. Additionally, the first measurements of dissolved δ114Cd within a hydrothermal plume at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge show that Cd is scavenged from the dissolved phase, leaving the remnant dissolved Cd

  8. CO depletion in the Gould Belt clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, H.; Viti, S.; Yates, J.; Hatchell, J.; Fuller, G. A.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Sadavoy, S.; Buckle, J. V.; Graves, S.; Roberts, J.; Nutter, D.; Davis, C.; White, G. J.; Hogerheijde, M.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Butner, H.; Richer, J.; Di Francesco, J.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical comparison of CO depletion in a set of local molecular clouds within the Gould Belt using Sub-millimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) and Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme (HARP) data. This is the most wide-ranging study of depletion thus far within the Gould Belt. We estimate CO column densities assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and, for a selection of sources, using the radiative transfer code RADEX in order to compare the two column density estimation methods. High levels of depletion are seen in the centres of several dust cores in all the clouds. We find that in the gas surrounding protostars, levels of depletion are somewhat lower than for starless cores with the exception of a few highly depleted protostellar cores in Serpens and NGC 2024. There is a tentative correlation between core mass and core depletion, particularly in Taurus and Serpens. Taurus has, on average, the highest levels of depletion. Ophiuchus has low average levels of depletion which could perhaps be related to the anomalous dust grain size distribution observed in this cloud. High levels of depletion are often seen around the edges of regions of optical emission (Orion) or in more evolved or less dynamic regions such as the bowl of L1495 in Taurus and the north-western region of Serpens.

  9. Ego depletion increases risk-taking.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Asal, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how the availability of self-control resources affects risk-taking inclinations and behaviors. We proposed that risk-taking often occurs from suboptimal decision processes and heuristic information processing (e.g., when a smoker suppresses or neglects information about the health risks of smoking). Research revealed that depleted self-regulation resources are associated with reduced intellectual performance and reduced abilities to regulate spontaneous and automatic responses (e.g., control aggressive responses in the face of frustration). The present studies transferred these ideas to the area of risk-taking. We propose that risk-taking is increased when individuals find themselves in a state of reduced cognitive self-control resources (ego-depletion). Four studies supported these ideas. In Study 1, ego-depleted participants reported higher levels of sensation seeking than non-depleted participants. In Study 2, ego-depleted participants showed higher levels of risk-tolerance in critical road traffic situations than non-depleted participants. In Study 3, we ruled out two alternative explanations for these results: neither cognitive load nor feelings of anger mediated the effect of ego-depletion on risk-taking. Finally, Study 4 clarified the underlying psychological process: ego-depleted participants feel more cognitively exhausted than non-depleted participants and thus are more willing to take risks. Discussion focuses on the theoretical and practical implications of these findings. PMID:22931000

  10. Appreciating Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  11. Depleted argon from underground sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.O.; Alton, A.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Kendziora, C.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  12. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, H. O.; Alton, A.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Kendziora, C.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Pordes, S.

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic 39Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in 39Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO2 well has been discovered to contain approximately 500 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO2. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N2, and He mixture, from the CO2 through chromatographic gas separation. The N2 and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  13. Beneficial Uses of Depleted Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.; Croff, A.G.; Haire, M. J.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring uranium contains 0.71 wt% {sup 235}U. In order for the uranium to be useful in most fission reactors, it must be enriched the concentration of the fissile isotope {sup 235}U must be increased. Depleted uranium (DU) is a co-product of the processing of natural uranium to produce enriched uranium, and DU has a {sup 235}U concentration of less than 0.71 wt%. In the United States, essentially all of the DU inventory is in the chemical form of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and is stored in large cylinders above ground. If this co-product material were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and disposed, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. Only small amounts of DU have at this time been beneficially reused. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large-scale uses of DU and encourage its reuse for the primary purpose of potentially reducing the cost and expediting the disposition of the DU inventory. This paper discusses the inventory of DU and its rate of increase; DU disposition options; beneficial use options; a preliminary cost analysis; and major technical, institutional, and regulatory issues to be resolved.

  14. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Daniel B.; Ward, Lewis M.; Jones, CarriAyne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2014-03-01

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth's surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850-542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635-542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5-4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth.

  15. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Daniel B.; Ward, Lewis M.; Jones, CarriAyne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth’s surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850–542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635–542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5–4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth. PMID:24550467

  16. Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is the smallest of the Earth's four major oceans, covering 14x10(exp 6) sq km located entirely within the Arctic Circle (66 deg 33 min N). It is a major player in the climate of the north polar region and has a variable sea ice cover that tends to increase its sensitivity to climate change. Its temperature, salinity, and ice cover have all undergone changes in the past several decades, although it is uncertain whether these predominantly reflect long-term trends, oscillations within the system, or natural variability. Major changes include a warming and expansion of the Atlantic layer, at depths of 200-900 m, a warming of the upper ocean in the Beaufort Sea, a considerable thinning (perhaps as high as 40%) of the sea ice cover, a lesser and uneven retreat of the ice cover (averaging approximately 3% per decade), and a mixed pattern of salinity increases and decreases.

  17. Ozone Depletion, UVB and Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    The primary constituents of the Earth's atmosphere are molecular nitrogen and molecular oxygen. Ozone is created when ultraviolet light from the sun photodissociates molecular oxygen into two oxygen atoms. The oxygen atoms undergo many collisions but eventually combine with a molecular oxygen to form ozone (O3). The ozone molecules absorb ultraviolet solar radiation, primarily in the wavelength region between 200 and 300 nanometers, resulting in the dissociation of ozone back into atomic oxygen and molecular oxygen. The oxygen atom reattaches to an O2 molecule, reforming ozone which can then absorb another ultraviolet photon. This sequence goes back and forth between atomic oxygen and ozone, each time absorbing a uv photon, until the oxygen atom collides with and ozone molecule to reform two oxygen molecules.

  18. Nitrogen cycle feedbacks as a control on euxinia in the mid-Proterozoic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, R. A.; Clark, J. R.; Poulton, S. W.; Shields-Zhou, G.; Canfield, D. E.; Lenton, T. M.

    2013-02-01

    Geochemical evidence invokes anoxic deep oceans until the terminal Neoproterozoic ~0.55 Ma, despite oxygenation of Earth’s atmosphere nearly 2 Gyr earlier. Marine sediments from the intervening period suggest predominantly ferruginous (anoxic Fe(II)-rich) waters, interspersed with euxinia (anoxic H2S-rich conditions) along productive continental margins. Today, sustained biotic H2S production requires NO3- depletion because denitrifiers outcompete sulphate reducers. Thus, euxinia is rare, only occurring concurrently with (steady state) organic carbon availability when N2-fixers dominate the production in the photic zone. Here we use a simple box model of a generic Proterozoic coastal upwelling zone to show how these feedbacks caused the mid-Proterozoic ocean to exhibit a spatial/temporal separation between two states: photic zone NO3- with denitrification in lower anoxic waters, and N2-fixation-driven production overlying euxinia. Interchange between these states likely explains the varying H2S concentration implied by existing data, which persisted until the Neoproterozoic oxygenation event gave rise to modern marine biogeochemistry.

  19. Nitrogen cycle feedbacks as a control on euxinia in the mid-Proterozoic ocean.

    PubMed

    Boyle, R A; Clark, J R; Poulton, S W; Shields-Zhou, G; Canfield, D E; Lenton, T M

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical evidence invokes anoxic deep oceans until the terminal Neoproterozoic ~0.55 Ma, despite oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere nearly 2 Gyr earlier. Marine sediments from the intervening period suggest predominantly ferruginous (anoxic Fe(II)-rich) waters, interspersed with euxinia (anoxic H(2)S-rich conditions) along productive continental margins. Today, sustained biotic H(2)S production requires NO(3)(-) depletion because denitrifiers outcompete sulphate reducers. Thus, euxinia is rare, only occurring concurrently with (steady state) organic carbon availability when N(2)-fixers dominate the production in the photic zone. Here we use a simple box model of a generic Proterozoic coastal upwelling zone to show how these feedbacks caused the mid-Proterozoic ocean to exhibit a spatial/temporal separation between two states: photic zone NO(3)(-) with denitrification in lower anoxic waters, and N(2)-fixation-driven production overlying euxinia. Interchange between these states likely explains the varying H(2)S concentration implied by existing data, which persisted until the Neoproterozoic oxygenation event gave rise to modern marine biogeochemistry.

  20. Pressures on the marine environment and the changing climate of ocean biogeochemistry.

    PubMed

    Rees, Andrew P

    2012-12-13

    The oceans are under pressure from human activities. Following 250 years of industrial activity, effects are being seen at the cellular through to regional and global scales. The change in atmospheric CO(2) from 280 ppm in pre-industrial times to 392 ppm in 2011 has contributed to the warming of the upper 700 m of the ocean by approximately 0.1°C between 1961 and 2003, to changes in sea water chemistry, which include a pH decrease of approximately 0.1, and to significant decreases in the sea water oxygen content. In parallel with these changes, the human population has been introducing an ever-increasing level of nutrients into coastal waters, which leads to eutrophication, and by 2008 had resulted in 245,000 km(2) of severely oxygen-depleted waters throughout the world. These changes are set to continue for the foreseeable future, with atmospheric CO(2) predicted to reach 430 ppm by 2030 and 750 ppm by 2100. The cycling of biogeochemical elements has proved sensitive to each of these effects, and it is proposed that synergy between stressors may compound this further. The challenge, within the next few decades, for the marine science community, is to elucidate the scope and extent that biological processes can adapt or acclimatize to a changing chemical and physical marine environment. PMID:23129714

  1. Tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    A tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium was tested in the laboratory using deuterium and protium. The vessel contains 0.5 kg of depleted uranium and can hold up to 18 grams of tritium. The conditions for activation, tritium loading and tritium unloading were defined. The safety aspects that included air-ingress, tritium diffusion, temperature and pressure potentials were evaluated.

  2. Specification for the VERA Depletion Benchmark Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kang Seog

    2015-12-17

    CASL-X-2015-1014-000 iii Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The CASL neutronics simulator MPACT is under development for the neutronics and T-H coupled simulation for the pressurized water reactor. MPACT includes the ORIGEN-API and internal depletion module to perform depletion calculations based upon neutron-material reaction and radioactive decay. It is a challenge to validate the depletion capability because of the insufficient measured data. One of the detoured methods to validate it is to perform a code-to-code comparison for benchmark problems. In this study a depletion benchmark suite has been developed and a detailed guideline has been provided to obtain meaningful computational outcomes which can be used in the validation of the MPACT depletion capability.

  3. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion.

    PubMed

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J

    2015-04-28

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI-LC-MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte.