Science.gov

Sample records for ocean thermal stress

  1. Thermal stresses due to cooling of a viscoelastic oceanic lithosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Denlinger, R.P. ); Savage, W.Z. )

    1989-01-10

    Theories based upon thermal contraction of cooling oceanic lithosphere provide a successful basis for correlating seafloor bathymetry and heat flow. The horizontal components of the contraction of the lithosphere as it cools potentially give rise to large thermal stresses. Current methods to calculate these stresses assume that on the time scales of cooling, the lithosphere initially behaves as an inviscid fluid and instantly freezes into an elastic solid at some critical temperature. These instant-freezing methods inaccurately predict transient thermal stresses in rapidly cooling silicate glass plates because of the temperature dependent rheology of the material. The temperature dependent rheology of the lithosphere may affect the transient thermal stress distribution in a similar way, and for this reason the authors use a thermoviscoelastic model to estimate thermal stresses in young oceanic lithosphere. This theory is formulated here for linear creep processes that have an Arrhenius rate dependence on temperature. Results show that the stress differences between instant freezing and linear thermoviscoelastic theory are most pronounced at early times (0-20 m.y.) when the instant freezing stresses may be twice as large. The solutions for the two methods asymptotically approach the same solution with time. A comparison with intraplate seismicity shows that both methods underestimate the depth of compressional stresses inferred from the seismicity in a systematic way.

  2. Thermal stresses due to cooling of a viscoelastic oceanic lithosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denlinger, R.P.; Savage, W.Z.

    1989-01-01

    Instant-freezing methods inaccurately predict transient thermal stresses in rapidly cooling silicate glass plates because of the temperature dependent rheology of the material. The temperature dependent rheology of the lithosphere may affect the transient thermal stress distribution in a similar way, and for this reason we use a thermoviscoelastic model to estimate thermal stresses in young oceanic lithosphere. This theory is formulated here for linear creep processes that have an Arrhenius rate dependence on temperature. Our results show that the stress differences between instant freezing and linear thermoviscoelastic theory are most pronounced at early times (0-20 m.y. when the instant freezing stresses may be twice as large. The solutions for the two methods asymptotically approach the same solution with time. A comparison with intraplate seismicity shows that both methods underestimate the depth of compressional stresses inferred from the seismicity in a systematic way. -from Authors

  3. Thermal stresses, differential subsidence, and flexure at oceanic fracture zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessel, Pal; Haxby, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Geosat geoid undulations over four Pacific fracture zones have been analyzed. After correcting for the isostatic thermal edge effect, the amplitudes of the residuals are shown to be proportional to the age offset. The shape of the residuals seems to broaden with increasing age. Both geoid anomalies and available ship bathymetry data suggest that slip must sometimes occur on the main fracture zone or secondary faults. Existing models for flexure at fracture zones cannot explain the observed anomalies. A combination model accounting for slip and including flexure from thermal stresses and differential subsidence is presented. This model accounts for lateral variations in flexural rigidity from brittle and ductile yielding due to both thermal and flexural stresses and explains both the amplitudes and the shape of the anomalies along each fracture zone. The best fitting models have mechanical plate thicknesses that are described by the depth to the 600-700 C isotherms.

  4. Thermal stresses, differential subsidence, and flexure at oceanic fracture zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessel, Pal; Haxby, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Geosat geoid undulations over four Pacific fracture zones have been analyzed. After correcting for the isostatic thermal edge effect, the amplitudes of the residuals are shown to be proportional to the age offset. The shape of the residuals seems to broaden with increasing age. Both geoid anomalies and available ship bathymetry data suggest that slip must sometimes occur on the main fracture zone or secondary faults. Existing models for flexure at fracture zones cannot explain the observed anomalies. A combination model accounting for slip and including flexure from thermal stresses and differential subsidence is presented. This model accounts for lateral variations in flexural rigidity from brittle and ductile yielding due to both thermal and flexural stresses and explains both the amplitudes and the shape of the anomalies along each fracture zone. The best fitting models have mechanical plate thicknesses that are described by the depth to the 600-700 C isotherms.

  5. Physiological response of the cold-water coral Desmophyllum dianthus to thermal stress and ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Gori, Andrea; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Hennige, Sebastian J; Murray, Fiona; Rottier, Cécile; Wicks, Laura C; Roberts, J Murray

    2016-01-01

    Rising temperatures and ocean acidification driven by anthropogenic carbon emissions threaten both tropical and temperate corals. However, the synergistic effect of these stressors on coral physiology is still poorly understood, in particular for cold-water corals. This study assessed changes in key physiological parameters (calcification, respiration and ammonium excretion) of the widespread cold-water coral Desmophyllum dianthus maintained for ∼8 months at two temperatures (ambient 12 °C and elevated 15 °C) and two pCO2 conditions (ambient 390 ppm and elevated 750 ppm). At ambient temperatures no change in instantaneous calcification, respiration or ammonium excretion rates was observed at either pCO2 levels. Conversely, elevated temperature (15 °C) significantly reduced calcification rates, and combined elevated temperature and pCO2 significantly reduced respiration rates. Changes in the ratio of respired oxygen to excreted nitrogen (O:N), which provides information on the main sources of energy being metabolized, indicated a shift from mixed use of protein and carbohydrate/lipid as metabolic substrates under control conditions, to less efficient protein-dominated catabolism under both stressors. Overall, this study shows that the physiology of D. dianthus is more sensitive to thermal than pCO2 stress, and that the predicted combination of rising temperatures and ocean acidification in the coming decades may severely impact this cold-water coral species.

  6. Physiological response of the cold-water coral Desmophyllum dianthus to thermal stress and ocean acidification

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Hennige, Sebastian J.; Murray, Fiona; Rottier, Cécile; Wicks, Laura C.; Roberts, J. Murray

    2016-01-01

    Rising temperatures and ocean acidification driven by anthropogenic carbon emissions threaten both tropical and temperate corals. However, the synergistic effect of these stressors on coral physiology is still poorly understood, in particular for cold-water corals. This study assessed changes in key physiological parameters (calcification, respiration and ammonium excretion) of the widespread cold-water coral Desmophyllum dianthus maintained for ∼8 months at two temperatures (ambient 12 °C and elevated 15 °C) and two pCO2 conditions (ambient 390 ppm and elevated 750 ppm). At ambient temperatures no change in instantaneous calcification, respiration or ammonium excretion rates was observed at either pCO2 levels. Conversely, elevated temperature (15 °C) significantly reduced calcification rates, and combined elevated temperature and pCO2 significantly reduced respiration rates. Changes in the ratio of respired oxygen to excreted nitrogen (O:N), which provides information on the main sources of energy being metabolized, indicated a shift from mixed use of protein and carbohydrate/lipid as metabolic substrates under control conditions, to less efficient protein-dominated catabolism under both stressors. Overall, this study shows that the physiology of D. dianthus is more sensitive to thermal than pCO2 stress, and that the predicted combination of rising temperatures and ocean acidification in the coming decades may severely impact this cold-water coral species. PMID:26855864

  7. Thermal Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    central nervous system ; exertional heat stroke Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified 6 Lisa R. Leon 508-233-4862 Reset Thermal Stress...multiorgan system failure, and death. indicates stimulatory pathway, indicates inhibitor pathway. 336 Thermal Stressstress. Cardiovascular mechanisms have...clinically characterized by elevated core temperature (typically, but not always 440 1C), hot dry flushed skin, and central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction

  8. Ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, W.H.

    1983-03-17

    A brief explanation of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) concept and an estimate of the amount of energy that can be produced from the ocean resource without introducing environmental concerns are presented. Use of the OTEC system to generate electric power and products which can replace fossil fuels is shown. The OTEC program status and its prospects for the future are discussed.

  9. Ocean Thermal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkovsky, Boris

    1987-01-01

    Describes Ocean Thermal Energy Conservation (OTEC) as a method for exploiting the temperature difference between warm surface waters of the sea and its cold depths. Argues for full-scale demonstrations of the technique for producing energy for coastal regions. (TW)

  10. Ocean thermal plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Modular Ocean Thermal-Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant permits vital component research and testing and serves as operational generator for 100 megawatts of electric power. Construction permits evaporators and condensers to be tested in same environment in which they will be used, and could result in design specifications for most efficient plant facilities in future.

  11. Ocean Thermal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkovsky, Boris

    1987-01-01

    Describes Ocean Thermal Energy Conservation (OTEC) as a method for exploiting the temperature difference between warm surface waters of the sea and its cold depths. Argues for full-scale demonstrations of the technique for producing energy for coastal regions. (TW)

  12. Ocean thermal plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Modular Ocean Thermal-Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant permits vital component research and testing and serves as operational generator for 100 megawatts of electric power. Construction permits evaporators and condensers to be tested in same environment in which they will be used, and could result in design specifications for most efficient plant facilities in future.

  13. Ocean thermal plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A floating energy converter is described which uses large volumes of sea water to produce electrical power. In this plant, a fluid working medium is pumped to an evaporator where is is heated by a flow of warm surface sea water. The fluid in liquid form boils to a pressurized gas vapor which is routed to drive a turbine that, in turn, drives a generator for producing electricity. The gas vapor then enters a condenser immersed in cold sea water pumped from lower depths, condenses to its original liquid form, and then pumped to the evaporator to repeat the cycle. Modular components can be readily interchanged on the ocean thermal unit and inlet pipes for the sea water are provided with means for maintaining the pipes in alignment with the oncoming current. The modular construction allows for the testing of various components to provide a more rapid optimization of a standardized plant.

  14. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Ascari, Matthew

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world’s ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today’s state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources.

  15. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerby, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is reviewed briefly. The two types of OTEC system (open and closed) are described and limitations are pointed out. A bibliography of 148 references on OTEC is given for the time period 1975 to 1980. Entries are arranged alphabetically according to the author's name. (MJJ)

  16. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavi, A.

    1977-01-01

    Energy Research and Development Administration research progress in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) is outlined. The development program is being focused on cost effective heat exchangers; ammonia is generally used as the heat exchange fluid. Projected costs for energy production by OTEC vary between $1000 to $1700 per kW.

  17. Simulation and observations of annual density banding in skeletons of Montastraea (Cnidaria: Scleractinia) growing under thermal stress associated with ocean warming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worum, F.P.; Carricart-Ganivet, J. P.; Benson, L.; Golicher, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a model of annual density banding in skeletons of Montastraea coral species growing under thermal stress associated with an ocean-warming scenario. The model predicts that at sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) <29??C, high-density bands (HDBs) are formed during the warmest months of the year. As temperature rises and oscillates around the optimal calcification temperature, an annual doublet in the HDB (dHDB) occurs that consists of two narrow HDBs. The presence of such dHDBs in skeletons of Montastraea species is a clear indication of thermal stress. When all monthly SSTs exceed the optimal calcification temperature, HDBs form during the coldest, not the warmest, months of the year. In addition, a decline in mean-annual calcification rate also occurs during this period of elevated SST. A comparison of our model results with annual density patterns observed in skeletons of M. faveolata and M. franksi, collected from several localities in the Mexican Caribbean, indicates that elevated SSTs are already resulting in the presence of dHDBs as a first sign of thermal stress, which occurs even without coral bleaching. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  18. Energy from ocean thermal gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R.

    1980-02-01

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) transforms the solar heating of the ocean surface into electrical energy, either transmitting it to shore or using it to manufacture energy-intensive products such as aluminum, ammonia, hydrogen or magnesium at sea. Open-cycle systems, requiring extremely large turbines and degasifiers, are not thought to be as advanced as closed-cycle systems which use heat exchangers (either shell-and-tube or plate) that are made of titanium, stainless steel or aluminum alloys, which must minimize corrosion and biofouling, and that use ammonia, propane or fluorocarbons as working fluids. OTEC platform configurations include ship shapes and submersibles, such as spar buoys, and require cold-water pipes 1,000 m long, made of such materials as elastomers, lightweight concrete and fiberglass-reinforced plastic.

  19. The distribution of the thermally tolerant symbiont lineage (Symbiodinium clade D) in corals from Hawaii: correlations with host and the history of ocean thermal stress

    PubMed Central

    Stat, Michael; Pochon, Xavier; Franklin, Erik C; Bruno, John F; Casey, Kenneth S; Selig, Elizabeth R; Gates, Ruth D

    2013-01-01

    Spatially intimate symbioses, such as those between scleractinian corals and unicellular algae belonging to the genus Symbiodinium, can potentially adapt to changes in the environment by altering the taxonomic composition of their endosymbiont communities. We quantified the spatial relationship between the cumulative frequency of thermal stress anomalies (TSAs) and the taxonomic composition of Symbiodinium in the corals Montipora capitata, Porites lobata, and Porites compressa across the Hawaiian archipelago. Specifically, we investigated whether thermally tolerant clade D Symbiodinium was in greater abundance in corals from sites with high frequencies of TSAs. We recovered 2305 Symbiodinium ITS2 sequences from 242 coral colonies in lagoonal reef habitats at Pearl and Hermes Atoll, French Frigate Shoals, and Kaneohe Bay, Oahu in 2007. Sequences were grouped into 26 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with 12 OTUs associated with Montipora and 21 with Porites. Both coral genera associated with Symbiodinium in clade C, and these co-occurred with clade D in M. capitata and clade G in P. lobata. The latter represents the first report of clade G Symbiodinium in P. lobata. In M. capitata (but not Porites spp.), there was a significant correlation between the presence of Symbiodinium in clade D and a thermal history characterized by high cumulative frequency of TSAs. The endogenous community composition of Symbiodinium and an association with clade D symbionts after long-term thermal disturbance appear strongly dependent on the taxa of the coral host. PMID:23762518

  20. The distribution of the thermally tolerant symbiont lineage (Symbiodinium clade D) in corals from Hawaii: correlations with host and the history of ocean thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Stat, Michael; Pochon, Xavier; Franklin, Erik C; Bruno, John F; Casey, Kenneth S; Selig, Elizabeth R; Gates, Ruth D

    2013-05-01

    Spatially intimate symbioses, such as those between scleractinian corals and unicellular algae belonging to the genus Symbiodinium, can potentially adapt to changes in the environment by altering the taxonomic composition of their endosymbiont communities. We quantified the spatial relationship between the cumulative frequency of thermal stress anomalies (TSAs) and the taxonomic composition of Symbiodinium in the corals Montipora capitata, Porites lobata, and Porites compressa across the Hawaiian archipelago. Specifically, we investigated whether thermally tolerant clade D Symbiodinium was in greater abundance in corals from sites with high frequencies of TSAs. We recovered 2305 Symbiodinium ITS2 sequences from 242 coral colonies in lagoonal reef habitats at Pearl and Hermes Atoll, French Frigate Shoals, and Kaneohe Bay, Oahu in 2007. Sequences were grouped into 26 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with 12 OTUs associated with Montipora and 21 with Porites. Both coral genera associated with Symbiodinium in clade C, and these co-occurred with clade D in M. capitata and clade G in P. lobata. The latter represents the first report of clade G Symbiodinium in P. lobata. In M. capitata (but not Porites spp.), there was a significant correlation between the presence of Symbiodinium in clade D and a thermal history characterized by high cumulative frequency of TSAs. The endogenous community composition of Symbiodinium and an association with clade D symbionts after long-term thermal disturbance appear strongly dependent on the taxa of the coral host.

  1. Ocean thermal-energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, G.; Niblett, C.; Walker, L.

    1983-03-01

    The principles underlying ocean thermal-energy conversion (OTEC) are reviewed, and a schematic layout of a system is included. The two systems currently under study, the open system and the closed system, are described. The prospect now, it is noted, is that OTEC plants will not be commercially viable on a widespread basis, even in the tropics. This is especially true of the large-scale plants that have been envisioned. A strong possibility is seen, however, that smaller plants, generating about 40 megawatts of electrical power, can survive commercially. The following conditions would favor their success: placement on land rather than at sea; placement in areas (such as islands) where alternative energy supplies are at a premium; and designing the plant to operate in conjunction with either an aquaculture or a desalination plant.

  2. Thermoelastic stress - How important as a cause of earthquakes in young oceanic lithosphere?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratt, S. R.; Bergman, E. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Thermoelastic or thermal stress is a potentially important contributor to the state of stress in the oceanic lithosphere. The present paper provides several simple models for the state of thermoelastic stress in a young oceanic lithosphere, taking into account a comparison of the predictions of these models with the characteristics of near-ridge earthquakes. Attention is given to the characteristics of near-ridge earthquakes, sources of stress in an oceanic lithosphere, previous models of thermal stress, the calculation of thermal stress, and thermal stress models. A test is conducted of the hypothesis that thermoelastic stress is a significant component of the stress field in a young oceanic lithosphere. The considered models support the hypothesis that thermoelastic stress is a significant component of the stress field in a young oceanic lithosphere.

  3. Thermoelastic stress - How important as a cause of earthquakes in young oceanic lithosphere?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratt, S. R.; Bergman, E. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Thermoelastic or thermal stress is a potentially important contributor to the state of stress in the oceanic lithosphere. The present paper provides several simple models for the state of thermoelastic stress in a young oceanic lithosphere, taking into account a comparison of the predictions of these models with the characteristics of near-ridge earthquakes. Attention is given to the characteristics of near-ridge earthquakes, sources of stress in an oceanic lithosphere, previous models of thermal stress, the calculation of thermal stress, and thermal stress models. A test is conducted of the hypothesis that thermoelastic stress is a significant component of the stress field in a young oceanic lithosphere. The considered models support the hypothesis that thermoelastic stress is a significant component of the stress field in a young oceanic lithosphere.

  4. Ocean engineering for ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The panel on OTEC Ocean Engineering of the National Research Council was formed to assess the state of ocean engineering knowledge, technology, and practice necessary to design, construct, and operate OTEC plants. The panel concentrated its study on platforms, moorings, and foundations; the cold water pipe; and submarine cables for electric power transmission. The panel did not address the design and engineering of power plants; institutional and management issues or the commercial feasibility of OTEC; or its environmental impacts. The panel focused instead on determining the state of development of several of the ocean engineering technologies needed to design and construct a 40-MWe OTEC plant; it also examined the technical feasibility and advantages of larger and smaller plants.

  5. Thermal stress and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Johnstone, Andrew F M; Aydin, Cenk

    2014-07-01

    Elevating ambient temperature above thermoneutrality exacerbates toxicity of most air pollutants, insecticides, and other toxic chemicals. On the other hand, safety and toxicity testing of toxicants and drugs is usually performed in mice and rats maintained at sub-thermoneutral temperatures of ~22∘C. When exposed to chemical toxicants under these relatively cool conditions, rodents typically undergo a regulated hypothermic response, characterized by preference for cooler ambient temperatures and controlled reduction in core temperature. Reducing core temperature delays the clearance of most toxicants from the body; however, a mild hypothermia also improves recovery and survival from the toxicant. Raising ambient temperature to thermoneutrality and above increases the rate of clearance of the toxicant but also exacerbates toxicity. Furthermore, heat stress combined with work or exercise is likely to worsen toxicity. Body temperature of large mammals, including humans, does not decrease as much in response to exposure to a toxicant. However, heat stress can nonetheless worsen toxic outcome in humans through a variety of mechanisms. For example, heat-induced sweating and elevation in skin blood flow accelerates uptake of some insecticides. Epidemiological studies suggest that thermal stress may exacerbate the toxicity of airborne pollutants such as ozone and particulate matter. Overall, translating results of studies in rodents to that of humans is a formidable task attributed in part to the interspecies differences in thermoregulatory response to the toxicants and to thermal stress.

  6. Ocean Engineering for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    California Julian H. Si~nguan A. Dudley Waff Maritime Institute for Remsearchr S Annapolis, Maryland and Industri ~l Development Washington, D. C... industry in the development of OTEC. . The panel focused its assessment of feasibility on a 40-megawatt oehctric (MWe) OTEC plant because, in the main...Importance*** Difficulty*** Platforms, Moorings, and Foundations 1. Integrate industrial process design requirements with Land/Shelf/ ocean

  7. Oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere: The thermal and mechanical structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Froidevaux, C.; Yuen, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    A coupled thermal and mechanical solid state model of the oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere is presented. The model includes vertical conduction of heat with a temperature dependent thermal conductivity, horizontal and vertical advection of heat, viscous dissipation or shear heating, and linear or nonlinear deformation mechanisms with temperature and pressure dependent constitutive relations between shear stress and strain rate. A constant horizontal velocity u sub 0 and temperature t sub 0 at the surface and zero horizontal velocity and constant temperature t sub infinity at great depth are required. In addition to numerical values of the thermal and mechanical properties of the medium, only the values of u sub 0, t sub 0 and t sub infinity are specified. The model determines the depth and age dependent temperature horizontal and vertical velocity, and viscosity structures of the lithosphere and asthenosphere. In particular, ocean floor topography, oceanic heat flow, and lithosphere thickness are deduced as functions of the age of the ocean floor.

  8. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2003-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  9. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2002-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  10. Ocean thermal energy conversion: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-11-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion, or OTEC is a technology that extracts power from the ocean's natural thermal gradient. This technology is being pursued by researchers from many nations; in the United States, OTEC research is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Ocean Energy Technology program. The program's goal is to develop the technology so that industry can make a competent assessment of its potential; either as an alternative or as a supplement to conventional energy sources. Federally funded research in components and systems will help OTEC to the threshold of commercialization. An overview of the OTEC technology is provided.

  11. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion, or OTEC is a technology that extracts power from the ocean's natural thermal gradient. This technology is being pursued by researchers from many nations; in the United States, OTEC research is funded by the US Department of Energy's Ocean Energy Technology program. The program's goal is to develop the technology so that industry can make a competent assessment of its potential -- either as an alternative or as a supplement to conventional energy sources. Federally funded research in components and systems will help OTEC to the threshold of commercialization. This publication provides an overview of the OTEC technology. 47 refs., 25 figs.

  12. Thermoelastic stress in oceanic lithosphere due to hotspot reheating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Anning; Wiens, Douglas A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of hotspot reheating on the intraplate stress field is investigated by modeling the three-dimensional thermal stress field produced by nonuniform temperature changes in an elastic plate. Temperature perturbations are calculated assuming that the lithosphere is heated by a source in the lower part of the thermal lithosphere. A thermal stress model for the elastic lithosphere is calculated by superposing the stress fields resulting from temperature changes in small individual elements. The stress in an elastic plate resulting from a temperature change in each small element is expressed as an infinite series, wherein each term is a source or an image modified from a closed-from half-space solution. The thermal stress solution is applied to midplate swells in oceanic lithosphere with various thermal structures and plate velocities. The results predict a stress field with a maximum deviatoric stress on the order of 100 MPa covering a broad area around the hotspot plume. The predicted principal stress orientations show a complicated geographical pattern, with horizontal extension perpendicular to the hotspot track at shallow depths and compression along the track near the bottom of the elastic lithosphere.

  13. Thermoelastic stress in oceanic lithosphere due to hotspot reheating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Anning; Wiens, Douglas A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of hotspot reheating on the intraplate stress field is investigated by modeling the three-dimensional thermal stress field produced by nonuniform temperature changes in an elastic plate. Temperature perturbations are calculated assuming that the lithosphere is heated by a source in the lower part of the thermal lithosphere. A thermal stress model for the elastic lithosphere is calculated by superposing the stress fields resulting from temperature changes in small individual elements. The stress in an elastic plate resulting from a temperature change in each small element is expressed as an infinite series, wherein each term is a source or an image modified from a closed-from half-space solution. The thermal stress solution is applied to midplate swells in oceanic lithosphere with various thermal structures and plate velocities. The results predict a stress field with a maximum deviatoric stress on the order of 100 MPa covering a broad area around the hotspot plume. The predicted principal stress orientations show a complicated geographical pattern, with horizontal extension perpendicular to the hotspot track at shallow depths and compression along the track near the bottom of the elastic lithosphere.

  14. Concrete for Ocean Thermal Energy, Conversion Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    construction of massive floating structures to house ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC ) systems. The relevant capabilities and limitations of available...which reasonable improvements can be made in the near term to provide greater assurances of long-term safe and reliable operation of the OTEC systems and to provide lower cost structures. (Author)

  15. Ocean thermal gradient hydraulic power plant.

    PubMed

    Beck, E J

    1975-07-25

    Solar energy stored in the oceans may be used to generate power by exploiting ploiting thermal gradients. A proposed open-cycle system uses low-pressure steam to elevate vate water, which is then run through a hydraulic turbine to generate power. The device is analogous to an air lift pump.

  16. Ocean thermal energy conversion: Materials issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, J. B., Jr.

    The Ocean thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program, in the Ocean Energy Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy, is concerned with the development of options that can be utilized to extract and distribute significant amounts of energy from the ocean. The biofouling control and materials portion of the program is concerned with the development of effective and environmentally acceptable methods to minimize biofouling and corrosion in high thermal conductivity materials suitable for use in heat exchangers and condensers. The mechanical and chemical techniques employed for biofouling control are reviewed and the recent success with chlorination is presented. The corrosion of aluminum alloys, copper alloys, stainless steel, stainless alloys, and titanium in near-surface warm and deep cold water is reviewed with emphasis on aluminum alloys. The major materials issues are reviewed with emphasis on lifetime and cost.

  17. On the thermally-driven ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjermundsen, Ada; LaCasce, Joseph Henry; Denstad, Liv

    2017-04-01

    How will the ocean circulation respond to extensive temperature change? Warming over the Arctic Ocean due to the loss of sea ice and snow cover will impact the surface air temperature (Serreze and Farncis, 2006; Screen and Simmonds, 2010) and thereby the Northern Hemisphere (NH) temperature gradient. The ocean circulation will respond, but freshwater from ice melting and shifting storm tracks make it hard to determine the ocean response to temperature changes alone. Attempts have been made to separate the impact of wind, thermal and freshwater forcings on the large scale ocean circulation (Cai, 1994; Saenko et al., 2002; Nycander et al. 2007), but our understanding remains incomplete. Here we examine numerical solutions of the global circulation with realistic bathymetry, driven solely by surface buoyancy forcing. Explicit wind forcing is excluded, although vertical mixing is retained. The character of the resulting flow is consistent in many ways with the observed ocean circulation,with inflow to and sinking in the Nordic Seas, baroclinic western boundary currents and an overturning streamfunction which closely resembles those obtained in full GCMs and in observations. The overturning circulation exhibits two thermally-driven cells: one in the Southern Ocean (SO) and one in the Atlantic. We investigate the inter-basin transports, the relative importance of the two overturning cells for the global ocean circulation, as well as the sensitivity of the ocean circulation to changes in buoyancy forcing. We find that reduced Atlantic overturning accelerates the SO circulation, while a reduced SO circulation strengthens the Atlantic overturning considerably. References: Cai, W. (1994). Circulation driven by observed surface thermohaline fields in a coarse resolution ocean general circulation model. J. Geophys. Res.: Oceans, 99, 10163-10181. Nycander, J. et al. (2007). Thermodynamic Analysis of Ocean Circulation, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 37, 2038-2052. Saenko, O. A. et al

  18. Thermal anomalies in stressed Teflon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. H.; Wulff, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    In the course of testing polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) as a calorimetric gasketing material, serendipity revealed a thermal anomaly in stressed film that occurs concomitantly with the well-documented 25 C transition. The magnitude of the excess energy absorption - about 35 cal/g - is suggested to be related to the restricted thermal expansion of the film.

  19. Thermal stress and human performance.

    PubMed

    Enander, A E; Hygge, S

    1990-01-01

    There is evidence that the thermal stress encountered in many work environments may negatively affect various aspects of human performance and behavior. Evaluation of the empirical research is, however, complicated by differences in both the methodology and the definition of the basic stimulus. Effects of heat and cold stress are briefly reviewed, with particular regard to theoretical considerations.

  20. Oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere - Thermal and mechanical structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Yuen, D. A.; Froidevaux, C.

    1976-01-01

    A coupled thermomechanical subsolidus model of the oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere is developed which includes vertical heat conduction, a temperature-dependent thermal conductivity, heat advection by a horizontal and vertical mass flow that depends on depth and age, contributions of viscous dissipation or shear heating, a linear or nonlinear deformation law relating shear stress and strain rate, as well as a temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity. The model requires a constant horizontal velocity and temperature at the surface, but zero horizontal velocity and constant temperature at great depths. The depth- and age-dependent temperature, horizontal and vertical velocities, and viscosity structure of the lithosphere and asthenosphere are determined along with the age-dependent shear stress in those two zones. The ocean-floor topography, oceanic heat flow, and lithosphere thickness are deduced as functions of ocean-floor age; seismic velocity profiles which exhibit a marked low-velocity zone are constructed from the age-dependent geotherms and assumed values of the elastic parameters. It is found that simple boundary-layer cooling determines the thermal structure at young ages, while effects of viscous dissipation become more important at older ages.

  1. Sensitivity of Southern Ocean circulation to wind stress changes: Role of relative wind stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, D. R.; Zhai, X.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of different wind stress bulk formulae on the response of the Southern Ocean circulation to wind stress changes is investigated using an idealised channel model. Surface/mixed layer properties are found to be sensitive to the use of the relative wind stress formulation, where the wind stress depends on the difference between the ocean and atmosphere velocities. Previous work has highlighted the surface eddy damping effect of this formulation, which we find leads to increased circumpolar transport. Nevertheless the transport due to thermal wind shear does lose sensitivity to wind stress changes at sufficiently high wind stress. In contrast, the sensitivity of the meridional overturning circulation is broadly the same regardless of the bulk formula used due to the adiabatic nature of the relative wind stress damping. This is a consequence of the steepening of isopycnals offsetting the reduction in eddy diffusivity in their contribution to the eddy bolus overturning, as predicted using a residual mean framework.

  2. Environmental impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising technology for production of energy and usable by-products from solar-generated temperature gradients in the world's oceans. Although considered benign compared to alternative forms of energy generation, deployment of OTEC plants will result in interactions with marine, terrestrial, and atmospheric environments and in socioeconomic interactions with surrounding areas. The Ocean Energy Technology Program of the Department of Energy has funded research to improve the understanding of these interactions. No insurmountable environmental obstacle to OTEC deployment has been uncovered. This document contains a summary of that research for entrepreneurs, utility engineers, and others interested in pursuing OTEC's potential. In addition, it provides a guide to permits, regulations, and licenses applicable to construction of an OTEC plant.

  3. Thermal and mechanical structure of the upper mantle: A comparison between continental and oceanic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, C.; Schubert, G.; Yuen, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Temperature, velocity, and viscosity profiles for coupled thermal and mechanical models of the upper mantle beneath continental shields and old ocean basins show that under the continents, both tectonic plates and the asthenosphere, are thicker than they are beneath the oceans. The minimum value of viscosity in the continental asthenosphere is about an order of magnitude larger than in the shear zone beneath oceans. The shear stress or drag underneath continental plates is also approximately an order of magnitude larger than the drag on oceanic plates. Effects of shear heating may account for flattening of ocean floor topography and heat flux in old ocean basins.

  4. Ocean atmosphere thermal decoupling in the eastern equatorial Indian ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Sudheer; Ravichandran, M.; Kumar, B. Praveen; Jampana, Raju V.; Han, Weiqing

    2016-09-01

    Eastern equatorial Indian ocean (EEIO) is one of the most climatically sensitive regions in the global ocean, which plays a vital role in modulating Indian ocean dipole (IOD) and El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO). Here we present evidences for a paradoxical and perpetual lower co-variability between sea-surface temperature (SST) and air-temperature (Tair) indicating instantaneous thermal decoupling in the same region, where signals of the strongly coupled variability of SST anomalies and zonal winds associated with IOD originate at inter-annual time scale. The correlation minimum between anomalies of Tair and SST occurs in the eastern equatorial Indian ocean warm pool region (≈70°E-100°E, 5°S-5°N), associated with lower wind speeds and lower sensible heat fluxes. At sub-monthly and Madden-Julian oscillation time scales, correlation of both variables becomes very low. In above frequencies, precipitation positively contributes to the low correlation by dropping Tair considerably while leaving SST without any substantial instant impact. Precipitation is led by positive build up of SST and post-facto drop in it. The strong semi-annual response of SST to mixed layer variability and equatorial waves, with the absence of the same in the Tair, contributes further to the weak correlation at the sub-annual scale. The limited correlation found in the EEIO is mainly related to the annual warming of the region and ENSO which is hard to segregate from the impacts of IOD.

  5. Ocean atmosphere thermal decoupling in the eastern equatorial Indian ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Sudheer; Ravichandran, M.; Kumar, B. Praveen; Jampana, Raju V.; Han, Weiqing

    2017-07-01

    Eastern equatorial Indian ocean (EEIO) is one of the most climatically sensitive regions in the global ocean, which plays a vital role in modulating Indian ocean dipole (IOD) and El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO). Here we present evidences for a paradoxical and perpetual lower co-variability between sea-surface temperature (SST) and air-temperature (Tair) indicating instantaneous thermal decoupling in the same region, where signals of the strongly coupled variability of SST anomalies and zonal winds associated with IOD originate at inter-annual time scale. The correlation minimum between anomalies of Tair and SST occurs in the eastern equatorial Indian ocean warm pool region (≈70°E-100°E, 5°S-5°N), associated with lower wind speeds and lower sensible heat fluxes. At sub-monthly and Madden-Julian oscillation time scales, correlation of both variables becomes very low. In above frequencies, precipitation positively contributes to the low correlation by dropping Tair considerably while leaving SST without any substantial instant impact. Precipitation is led by positive build up of SST and post-facto drop in it. The strong semi-annual response of SST to mixed layer variability and equatorial waves, with the absence of the same in the Tair, contributes further to the weak correlation at the sub-annual scale. The limited correlation found in the EEIO is mainly related to the annual warming of the region and ENSO which is hard to segregate from the impacts of IOD.

  6. Ocean Modulation of the Thermal Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, R. E.

    2009-12-01

    Modification of the sea surface temperature is shown to effect atmospheric circulation in a low resolution atmospheric general circulation model. One hypothesis, not directly tested here, is that a change in oceanic deep mixing processes allows less ocean surface heat to be carried into the depths, and preferentially effects the lower latitudes. Here it is proposed that a specific pattern of excess sea surface heat, similar to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation pattern of sea surface temperature anomalies, is transferred to the atmosphere by radiation and evaporation, and contributes to an increased equator to pole atmospheric temperature gradient. We then apply the theory of the thermal wind, which uses first order dynamics of the global atmosphere to relate horizontal temperature gradients to vertical gradients in the geostrophic winds. Thermal wind theory is used here to predict the changes in atmospheric circulation that result from changes in the latitudinal distribution of sea surface temperature. The predictions are tested by low resolution computer simulations and found to agree within an order of magnitude. We speculate on the role of ocean circulation oscillations in decadal climate variability, and on an energy and dissipation accounting approach to begin to quantify how anthropogenic radiative forcing is effecting natural climate modes of variability.

  7. Contribution of Surface Thermal Forcing to Mixing in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Huang, S. D.; Xia, K. Q.

    2016-12-01

    The mixing rate in convective flows driven by surface temperature gradient is investigated laboratorially to understand the contribution of surface thermal forcing (STF) to mixing in ocean. We found that either increasing Rayleigh number Ra or lateral aspect ratio Г can individually enhance the mixing. It is the depth ratio, defined by the ratio of thermocline thickness to sea depth, that substantially determines the contribution of STF to mixing in ocean. If the ocean circulation is purely driven by STF, the mixing rate and mixing efficiency will be O(10-6 m2/s) and 0.95, which are far from the real values, O(10-5 m2/s) and 0.17, in ocean. The meridional heat transport will also be two orders smaller than the real value 2 PW nowadays. These suggest that the mixing in real ocean is not dominated by STF and the meridional heat transport is conveyor belt powered by other energy source like wind stress.

  8. Topographic Stress in the Oceans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-20

    tilt witnd stress, Itldeed, ilves ’s, takmla- 0 A AQ 1 1) - rb tions described by D. Olbcrs of the Alfred 6 similar to the zonal momentum budget...issue Wegener Institut. Bremerhaven. Federal Re- ’ r’ , in ACC channel geometry.:.L~:-b- "T qg)"-7 in channel.geometry public of Germany, suggest that

  9. Ocean thermal energy conversion: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, P.C.

    1981-10-01

    The OTEC principle is discussed along with general system and cycle types, specific OTEC designs, OTEC applications, and the ocean thermal resource. The historic development of OTEC is briefly reviewed, and the status of French, Japanese, EUROCEAN, and US programs is assessed. US efforts are detailed and DOE's strategy outlined with OTEC-1 and Mini-OTEC information. Power system components of the more technically advanced closed-cycle OTEC concept are discussed. These include: heat exchangers, corrosion and biofouling countermeasures, working fluids, ammonia power systems, and on-platform seawater systems. Several open-cycle features are also discussed. A critical review is presented of the ocean engineering aspects of OTEC power systems. Major subsystems such as platform, cold water pipe, mooring system, dynamic positioning system, power transmission cable system are assessed for their relationships with the ocean environment and with each other. Nine available studies of OTEC costs are reviewed. Tentative comparisons are made between OTEC and traditional fuel costs, and OTEC products and markets are considered. Possible environmental and social effects of OTEC development are discussed. International, national, and local laws regulating OTEC plants and OTEC energy products are reviewed. Tax incentives, attitudes of the utilities, and additional legislative needs are considered. (LEW)

  10. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system

    DOEpatents

    Wittig, J. Michael

    1980-01-01

    An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

  11. Intraplate seismicity and stresses in young oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, D. A.; Stein, S.

    1984-01-01

    A systematic study has been conducted of oceanic intraplate seismicity in the 1964-1983 period occurring in lithosphere younger than 35 million years. Detailed findings are presented on the stress in young lithosphere, depth of seismicity, intraplate events in fracture zones, seismicity distributions, and regional concentrations of seismicity. It is concluded that there is no evidence of a general transition from tensional to compressive stresses at any particular age of the lithosphere. Extensional events are located mostly in the Indian Ocean and have tensional axes oriented at large angles to the spreading direction. Compressional axes of thrust faulting events show a weak preferred orientation parallel to the spreading direction. Normal faulting events occur at greater depths and temperatures than thrust faulting events. Differential thermal contraction along fracture zones is not a significant source of intraplate seismicity.

  12. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Sands, M. Dale

    1980-08-01

    Significant achievements in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power in this decade with subsequent large-scale commercialization to follow by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, Interstate Electronics has prepared an OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment (EA) that considers tne development, demonstration, and commercialization of OTEC power systems. The EA considers several tecnnological designs (open cycle and closed cycle), plant configurations (land-based, moored, and plantship), and power usages (baseload electricity and production of ammonia and aluminum). Potencial environmental impacts, health and safety issues, and a status update of international, federal, and state plans and policies, as they may influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  13. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A legislative proposal to develop ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) facilities for power generation was the subject of hearings held on April 10 and May 1, 1980. Following the test of S. 2492 are the statements of 20 witnesses and additional materials submitted for consideration. The need for a large-scale demonstration of OTEC and the need for a Federal regulatory, siting, and financial-assistance framework are the major commercialization issues. S. 2492 provides one-stop licensing by treating the facilities as vessels and making them eligible for loan guarantees. The bill complements S. 1430, which deals with the demonstration program. OTEC development in Hawaii has progressed to a second pilot project. (DCK)

  14. Ocean thermal energy conversion: Perspective and status

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, A.; Hillis, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of the thermal gradient between the warm surface waters and the deep cold waters of tropical oceans was first proposed by J. A. d'Arsonval in 1881 and tried unsuccessfully be George Claude in 1930. Interest in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) and other renewable energy sources revived in the 1970s as a result of oil embargoes. At that time, the emphasis was on large floating plants miles from shore producing 250--400 MW for maintained grids. When the problems of such plants became better understood and the price of oil reversed its upward trend, the emphasis shifted to smaller (10 MW) shore-based plants on tropical islands. Such plants would be especially attractive if they produce fresh water as a by-product. During the past 15 years, major progress has been made in converting OTEC unknowns into knowns. Mini-OTEC proved the closed-cycle concept. Cost-effective heat-exchanger concepts were identified. An effective biofouling control technique was discovered. Aluminum was determined to be promising for OTEC heat exchangers. Heat-transfer augmentation techniques were identified, which promised a reduction on heat-exchanger size and cost. Fresh water was produced by an OTEC open-cycle flash evaporator, using the heat energy in the seawater itself. The current R D emphasis is on the design and construction of a test facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the open-cycle process. The 10 MW shore-based, closed-cycle plant can be built with today's technology; with the incorporation of a flash evaporator, it will produce fresh water as well as electrical power -- both valuable commodities on many tropical islands. The open-cycle process has unknowns that require solution before the technical feasibility can be demonstrated. The economic viability of either cycle depends on reducing the capital costs of OTEC plants and on future trends in the costs of conventional energy sources. 7 refs.

  15. Ocean thermal energy conversion: Perspective and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Anthony; Hillis, David L.

    The use of the thermal gradient between the warm surface waters and the deep cold waters of tropical oceans was first proposed by J. A. d'Arsonval in 1881 and tried unsuccessfully by George Claude in 1930. Interest in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) and other renewable energy sources revived in the 1970s as a result of oil embargoes. At that time, the emphasis was on large floating plants miles from shore producing 250 to 400 MW for maintained grids. When the problems of such plants became better understood and the price of oil reversed its upward trend, the emphasis shifted to smaller (10 MW) shore based plants on tropical islands. Such plants would be especially attractive if they produce fresh water as a by-product. During the past 15 years, major progress has been made in converting OTEC unknowns into knowns. Mini-OTEC proved the closed cycle concept. Cost effective heat exchanger concepts were identified. An effective biofouling control technique was discovered. Aluminum was determined to be promising for OTEC heat exchangers. Heat transfer augmentation techniques were identified, which promised a reduction on heat exchanger size and cost. Fresh water was produced by an OTEC open cycle flash evaporator, using the heat energy in the seawater itself. The current R and D emphasis is on the design and construction of a test facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the open cycle process. The 10 MW shore-based, closed cycle plant can be built with today's technology; with the incorporation of a flash evaporator, it will produce fresh water as well as electrical power; both valuable commodities on many tropical islands. The open cycle process has unknowns that require solution before the technical feasibility can be demonstrated. The economic viability of either cycle depends on reducing the capital costs of OTEC plants and on future trends in the costs of conventional energy sources.

  16. Thermal structure of oceanic transform faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behn, M.D.; Boettcher, M.S.; Hirth, G.

    2007-01-01

    We use three-dimensional finite element simulations to investigate the temperature structure beneath oceanic transform faults. We show that using a rheology that incorporates brittle weakening of the lithosphere generates a region of enhanced mantle upwelling and elevated temperatures along the transform; the warmest temperatures and thinnest lithosphere are predicted to be near the center of the transform. Previous studies predicted that the mantle beneath oceanic transform faults is anomalously cold relative to adjacent intraplate regions, with the thickest lithosphere located at the center of the transform. These earlier studies used simplified rheologic laws to simulate the behavior of the lithosphere and underlying asthenosphere. We show that the warmer thermal structure predicted by our calculations is directly attributed to the inclusion of a more realistic brittle rheology. This temperature structure is consistent with a wide range of observations from ridge-transform environments, including the depth of seismicity, geochemical anomalies along adjacent ridge segments, and the tendency for long transforms to break into small intratransform spreading centers during changes in plate motion. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  17. Ocean thermal energy conversion: report to congress - fiscal year 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-31

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) activities related to ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) during fiscal year 1982 are described. The agency focus has been in the areas of providing ocean engineering and technical assistance to the Department of Energy (DOE), in streamlining the administration of the Federal OTEC licensing system, and in environmental assistance.

  18. Transient thermal stress recovery for structural models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, William

    1992-01-01

    A method for computing transient thermal stress vectors from temperature vectors is described. The three step procedure involves the use of NASTRAN to generate an influence coefficient matrix which relates temperatures to stresses in the structural model. The transient thermal stresses are then recovered and sorted for maximum and minimum values. Verification data for the procedure is also provided.

  19. Thermal state of continental and oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasterok, Derrick P.

    The thermal state of the continental and oceanic lithosphere is reassessed on the basis of new databases for global heat flow and lithospheric heat production, recent advances in thermophysical properties measurements of minerals at high pressures and temperatures, and a better understanding of convective heat loss in young seafloor. The updated global heat flow database incorporates >60,000 records with >44,800 heat flow determinations. The update significantly increases the quantity and spatial coverage of global heat flow data since the last update in 1993. A new family of continental geotherms is proposed that is parametric in surface heat flow and takes advantage of thermophysical property data. The range of geotherms is constrained by xenolith P--T estimates; a cratonic geotherm consistent with a surface heat flow of 40 mW/m2 is particularly well constrained. Upper crustal heat production represents ˜26% of the total surface heat flow. Average heat production for the continental lower crust and mantle are 0.4 muW/m3 and 0.02 muW/m3, respectively. Recent controversy about the interpretation of heat flow observations in young seafloor is resolved by careful filtering of data based on sediment thickness and distance from seamounts and weighting marine studies where the environment of heat flow measurements is carefully documented. Oceanic geotherms, fit to bathymetry and heat flow data, are produced for a plate model with 7 km thick crust, a plate thickness of 95 km, and mantle potential temperature of 1425°C. While the current estimate of global heat loss (44 TW) is reasonable, these new reference models will be instrumental in refining and estimating uncertainty in the solid Earth's global heat loss.

  20. Satellite Constellation for Ocean Wind and Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Xie, X.

    2009-12-01

    A scatterometer sends microwave pulses to the earth's surface and measure the power backscattered from the surface roughness. The roughness is believed to be in equilibrium with the stress (turbulent transport of momentum). The backscatter depends not only on the magnitude of the stress but also the stress direction relative to the direction of the radar beam. Measuring both stress magnitude and direction is the major unique capability of the scatterometer. Although stress drives ocean circulation, we do not have any large-scale stress measurement except from the scatterometer; our concept of stress distribution is largely derived from our knowledge on wind. Stress is closely related to wind. The geophysical product of the scatterometer is the equivalent neutral wind. It is a fictitious quantity, which has an unambiguous relation with surface stress by definition, while the relation between actual wind and surface stress depends on atmospheric vertical density stratification. Over most of the ocean, the atmosphere is near neutral and the current is much smaller than wind and it is generally assumed that the equivalent neutral wind is the actual wind. QuikSCAT, a Ku-band scatterometer, was launched in 1999. The scientific contributions to natural disaster, energy, weather, climate, water, ecosystem, and agriculture from one decade of QuikSCAT measurements will be presented. A C-band scatterometer, ASCAT, was launched by European Space Agency in 2006. Ku-band scatterometers, similar in design with QuikSCAT, will be launched by India and China in 2010 and 2011. One polar orbiting scatterometer could only sample the earth at most two times a day. If the future scatterometers will produce similarly high quality data, the future constellation of scatterometers, with different overhead crossing time, will meet the six hourly revisit frequency required by the operational weather forecast community and the inertial frequency required by research oceanographers. The coverage

  1. Contribution to encyclopedia of thermal stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taler, Jan; Ocłoń, Pawel

    2015-06-01

    This paper lists the contribution in the international interdisciplinary reference - Encyclopedia of Thermal Stresses (ETS). The ETS, edited by the world famous expert in field of Thermal Stresses - Professor Richard Hetnarski from Rochester Institute of Technology, was published by Springer in 2014. This unique Encyclopedia, subdivided into 11 volumes is the most extensive and comprehensive work related to the Thermal Stresses topic. The entries were carefully prepared by specialists in the field of thermal stresses, elasticity, heat conduction, optimization among others. The Polish authors' contribution within this work is significant; over 70 entries were prepared by them.

  2. Thermal stress fracture of ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal stress failures of ceramic coatings are discussed in terms of fracture mechanics concepts. The effects of transient and residual stresses on single and multiple cycle failure mechanisms are considered. A specific example of a zirconia thermal barrier coating is presented and its endurance calculated using the proposed relationships.

  3. Observations of Upper-Ocean Thermal Structure in the Tropical Atlantic Ocean during Hurricane Danny and Tropical Storm Erika (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridinger, S.; Jesse, J. A.; Sanabia, E.; Jayne, S. R.; Swick, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    In August 2015, Hurricane Danny and Tropical Storm Erika formed in close proximity within the Main Development Region over the tropical Atlantic Ocean. The westward tropical cyclone tracks remained within 1.5° latitude for more than 1500 km before reaching the Lesser Antilles. The upper-ocean thermal structure beneath these two tropical systems is investigated using AXBT, ALAMO, and Argo float observations, and changes over time are analyzed. The 59 AXBT and 12 ALAMO floats deployed from USAFR WC-130J aircraft as part of the USNA TROPIC program and AXBT Demonstration Project, along with the Argo floats, provide insight into temporal and spatial scales of the impact of wind-stress on the upper ocean. Several observations are highlighted and observed changes in the mixed layer are compared to theoretical results obtained using the Price-Weller-Pinkel ocean mixed layer model.

  4. Isostasy and the ambient state of stress in the oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    It is proposed that the ambient state of isostatic deviatoric stress in the ocean lithosphere is the minimum necessary for the support of the density and topographic anomalies associated with the elevation of the mid-ocean ridges. The principal evidence for this hypothesis is that it is in agreement with the observed oceanic intraplate earthquake mechanisms. The main deviatoric stresses are compressive perpendicular to the axis of the mid-ocean ridge, zero parallel to the ridge, and tensile vertically. At any given distance from the ridge the stress is maximum at the seafloor; it decreases with depth at about the same rate as the cooling of the lithosphere, so that the entire thermal boundary layer acts as a support to the global square root of age topography of the oceans.

  5. Thermal stresses in planetary elastic lithospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The role of thermal stresses in the tectonics of the moon is reexamined in this paper. A model is used that considers a spherical elastic shell overlying a fluid core. It is shown that the thermal stresses generated by temperature changes within the shell usually dominate over the thermal contraction or expansion of the core. During the entire evolution of the moon the cooling of the lithosphere is likely to have dominated the cooling of the interior and the result would be tensional lithospheric thermal stresses. However, during the recent evolution of the moon the change in the near surface thermal stresses is compressional. It is argued that the surface compressional features on Mercury are not due to the thermal contraction of the interior

  6. Thermal Stress Awareness, Self-Study #18649

    SciTech Connect

    Chochoms, Michael

    2016-11-15

    Thermal stresses can expose individuals to a variety of health hazards at work, home, and play. Every year thermal stresses cause severe injuries and death to a large range of people, from elderly people in cities during summer heat waves to young people engaged in winter mountaineering. Awareness is the key to preventing the health hazards associated with thermal stresses. This course is designed for personnel at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). It addresses both heat and cold stresses and discusses their factors, signs and symptoms, treatments, and controls.

  7. Starch gelatinization under thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Faroongsarng, D; Wongpoowarak, W; Mitrevej, A

    1999-01-01

    The behavior under thermal stress of starch dispersed in water was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to estimate the heat transported through the aqueous medium in gelatinization, and to characterize the range of gelatinization temperatures. In DSC scanning mode, the endotherm of 10% starch in aqueous dispersion showed the tracing of gelatinization at between 67 and 80 degrees C, having an onset at approximately 69 degrees C. In the isothermal mode, characteristically distinct isothermal heat flow profiles were revealed. It was hypothesized that the thermal influx proposed as being analogous to the diffusion process may affect the profiles. The profiles were transformed and nonlinearly fitted according to the square root of time model to characterize a so-called t-parameter, which was related to mean square displacement of molecular distribution. The t-parameter of starch in excess of water decreased compared to that of water only. The plot of difference in these t-parameters, expressed as delta, against temperature showed a dramatically decreased delta at the temperature between 66.7 and 75.2 degrees C, which coincided with the findings from scanning mode DSC. It was further hypothesized that the decreased delta may be due to the gelatinizing process. According to the theory of polymer solution, the critical temperature (theta) at 75.2 degrees C, where the free energy became theoretically negative, i.e., the starch became spontaneously dissolved, was drawn. This theta was located within the range of gelatinizing temperatures. It was deduced that starch polymer may have dissolved during gelatinization. The dissolution from acetaminophen tablets prepared by starch paste was lower compared with that of negative controls (without paste). Moreover, the paste prepared at gelatinizing temperature (70 degrees C) seemed to inhibit acetaminophen dissolution from tablet matrices more than that prepared at subgelatinizing temperature (50 degrees C).

  8. Comprehensive plate models for the thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grose, Christopher J.; Afonso, Juan Carlos

    2013-09-01

    Seafloor spreading and the cooling of oceanic lithosphere is a fundamental feature of plate tectonics in the Earth, the details of which are unveiled by modeling with constraints from mineral physics and geophysical observations. To work toward a more complete model of the thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere, we investigate the contributions of axial hydrothermal circulation, oceanic crust, and temperature-pressure-dependent thermal properties. We find that models with only temperature-dependent properties disagree with geophysical observations unless properties are artificially modified. On the other hand, more comprehensive models are in better agreement with geophysical observations. Our preferred model requires a thermal expansivity reduction of 15% from a mineral physics estimate, and predicts a plate thickness of about 110-130 km. A principal result of our analysis is that the oceanic crust is a major contributor to the cooling of oceanic lithosphere. The oceanic crust acts as an insulating lid on the mantle, causing the rate of lithospheric cooling to increase from "crustal" values near the ridge to higher mantle values at old-age. Major consequences of this insulation effect are: (a) low seafloor subsidence rate in proximity to ridge axes (<5 Ma), (b) the thermal structure of oceanic lithosphere is significantly warmer than previous models, (c) seafloor heat flow is significantly lower over young (<35 Ma) seafloor compared to simple models, (d) a low net seafloor heat flux (˜27 TW), and (e) temperature at the base of the seismogenic zone extends to 700-800°C mantle.

  9. Experimental Constraints on Thermal Cracking of Peridotite at Mid-Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demartin, B.; Hirth, G.; Evans, B.

    2002-12-01

    Fluid flow at oceanic spreading centers controls the cooling and rheology of oceanic lithosphere, the biological and chemical evolution of hydrothermal systems, and serpentinization of mantle peridotite. Faults provide conduits for focused flow at the ridges and likely provide the channels necessary to sustain high-temperature hydrothermal vents. However, dispersed fluid flow can be accommodated though a zone of thermally fractured rock and promote distributed serpentinization of the lithosphere at slow spreading ridges. Thermal fractures form in upwelling mantle peridotite due to both thermal expansion anisotropy and thermal expansion mismatch between mineral grains. To test the applicability of micromechanical models for thermal cracking in peridotite and determine the critical stress intensity factor necessary to initiate thermal cracking in the oceanic lithosphere, we have run controlled cooling rate experiments on hot-pressed olivine aggregates. During the experiments, we use a pore fluid monitoring technique to determine when cracking proceeds to an extent where an interconnected microcrack network develops. By varying grain size, cooling rate, and confining pressure during the experiments, we can either enhance or suppress thermal cracking within the olivine samples. Larger grain sizes (38 - 60 microns) or faster cooling rates (1oC/s) enhance microcrack formation. Based on our experiments, we estimate a critical stress intensity factor of ~0.65-0.75 MPa m1/2. The laboratory experiments can be scaled to the Earth using micromechanical models for the influence of grain size and cooling rate on the freezing temperature for viscous dissipation of thermal stresses (Evans and Clarke, 1980). The depth extent of thermal cracking can be estimated by coupling micromechanical models of stress intensity resulting from anisotropic thermal contraction with thermal models for upwelling mantle at oceanic spreading centers. Our analysis indicates that thermal cracking of

  10. Anharmonicity induced thermal modulation in stressed graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, JianJun; Fu, WeiCheng; Chen, JiGe; Zhao, Hong

    2017-07-01

    Thermal properties are essentially decided by atomic geometry and thus stress is the most direct way for manipulating. In this paper, we investigate stress modulation of thermal conductivity of graphene by molecular dynamics simulations and discuss the underlying microscopic mechanism. It is found that thermal conductivity of flexural-free graphene increases with compression and decreases with strain, while thermal conductivity of flexural-included graphene decreases with both compression and strain. Such difference in thermal behavior originates from the changes in the anharmonicity of the interatomic potential, where the wrinkle scattering is responsible for the thermal conductivity diminishment in flexural-included graphene under strain. By comparing the results obtained from the Tersoff and AIREBO potentials, it is revealed that the degree of the symmetry of interatomic potential determines the thermal conductivity variation of graphene. Our results indicate that the symmetry of interatomic potential should be taken into careful consideration in constructing the lattice model of graphene.

  11. Thermal stress effects in intermetallic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, P. K.; Sensmeier, M. D.; Kupperman, D. S.; Wadley, H. N. G.

    1993-01-01

    Intermetallic matrix composites develop residual stresses from the large thermal expansion mismatch (delta-alpha) between the fibers and matrix. This work was undertaken to: establish improved techniques to measure these thermal stresses in IMC's; determine residual stresses in a variety of IMC systems by experiments and modeling; and, determine the effect of residual stresses on selected mechanical properties of an IMC. X ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction (ND), synchrotron XRD (SXRD), and ultrasonics (US) techniques for measuring thermal stresses in IMC were examined and ND was selected as the most promising technique. ND was demonstrated on a variety of IMC systems encompassing Ti- and Ni-base matrices, SiC, W, and Al2O3 fibers, and different fiber fractions (Vf). Experimental results on these systems agreed with predictions of a concentric cylinder model. In SiC/Ti-base systems, little yielding was found and stresses were controlled primarily by delta-alpha and Vf. In Ni-base matrix systems, yield strength of the matrix and Vf controlled stress levels. The longitudinal residual stresses in SCS-6/Ti-24Al-llNb composite were modified by thermomechanical processing. Increasing residual stress decreased ultimate tensile strength in agreement with model predictions. Fiber pushout strength showed an unexpected inverse correlation with residual stress. In-plane shear yield strength showed no dependence on residual stress. Higher levels of residual tension led to higher fatigue crack growth rates, as suggested by matrix mean stress effects.

  12. Thermal Stresses In Space-Shuttle Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jenkins, Jerald M.

    1989-01-01

    Combined thermal deformations of wing-skin panel and TPS would not tear SIP layer. Report presents analysis of thermal stresses induced in skin panel, thermal-protection system (TPS), and strain-isolation pad (SIP) of Space Shuttle orbiter. Purpose of analysis to determine whether any part of above mentioned structures overstressed and overdeformed under reentry heating, assuming one TPS tile lost at end of reentry heating.

  13. Thermal feedback on wind stress as a contributing cause of climate variability

    SciTech Connect

    Cessi, P.

    2000-01-01

    A model that isolates the interaction between midlatitude ocean gyres and the wind stress due to atmospheric baroclinic eddies is formulated. The ocean and atmosphere are coupled through their respective heat balances and global heat and momentum conservations are enforced. The ocean flow creates a steep oceanic thermal front at the midlatitude intergyre boundary. This frontogenesis sharpens the atmospheric temperature gradients and locally increases the atmospheric eddy heat transport. The result is a well-defined storm track that, because of the delayed adjustment of the gyres to the wind stress, oscillates in time with a period of about 18 yr.

  14. Photoinduced and thermal stress in silicon microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datskos, Panos G.; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskou, Irene

    1998-10-01

    The photogeneration of free charge carriers in a semiconductor gives rise to mechanical strain. We measured the deflection of silicon microcantilevers resulting from photoinduced stress. The excess charge carriers responsible for the photoinduced stress, were produced via photon irradiation from a diode laser with wavelength λ=780 nm. For Si microcantilevers, the photoinduced stress is of opposite direction and about four times larger than the stress resulting from only thermal excitation. In this letter we report on our study of the photoinduced stress in silicon microcantilevers and discuss their temporal and photometric response.

  15. Thermal stress in high temperature cylindrical fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    1988-01-01

    Uninsulated structures fabricated from carbon or silicon-based materials, which are allowed to become hot during flight, are attractive for the design of some components of hypersonic vehicles. They have the potential to reduce weight and increase vehicle efficiency. Because of manufacturing contraints, these structures will consist of parts which must be fastened together. The thermal expansion mismatch between conventional metal fasteners and carbon or silicon-based structural materials may make it difficult to design a structural joint which is tight over the operational temperature range without exceeding allowable stress limits. In this study, algebraic, closed-form solutions for calculating the thermal stresses resulting from radial thermal expansion mismatch around a cylindrical fastener are developed. These solutions permit a designer to quickly evaluate many combinations of materials for the fastener and the structure. Using the algebraic equations developed, material properties and joint geometry were varied to determine their effect on thermal stresses. Finite element analyses were used to verify that the closed-form solutions derived give the correct thermal stress distribution around a cylindrical fastener and to investigate the effect of some of the simplifying assumptions made in developing the closed-form solutions for thermal stresses.

  16. Rotor thermal stress monitoring in steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonín, Bouberle; Jan, Jakl; Jindřich, Liška

    2015-11-01

    One of the issues of steam turbines diagnostics is monitoring of rotor thermal stress that arises from nonuniform temperature field. The effort of steam turbine operator is to operate steam turbine in such conditions, that rotor thermal stress doesn't exceed the specified limits. If rotor thermal stress limits are exceeded for a long time during machine operation, the rotor fatigue life is shortened and this may lead to unexpected machine failure. Thermal stress plays important role during turbine cold startup, when occur the most significant differences of temperatures through rotor cross section. The temperature field can't be measured directly in the entire rotor cross section and standardly the temperature is measured by thermocouple mounted in stator part. From this reason method for numerical solution of partial differential equation of heat propagation through rotor cross section must be combined with method for calculation of temperature on rotor surface. In the first part of this article, the application of finite volume method for calculation of rotor thermal stress is described. The second part of article deals with optimal trend generation of thermal flux, that could be used for optimal machine loading.

  17. Dimensional Analysis of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Heat Exchangers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-30

    8217thIJt4IiTY CLASSIFICATION OF TWI4S PAG(E ona Dola t ern.r) 20. (continued) c-a• of factors having significance in OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion...heat exchangers. Certain of these groups are then evaluated for a model and prototype OTEC -Type heat exchanger using the same working fluid and ex...Development Administration, and the U. S. Navy are brought out. Chapter II investigates the scaling problems of heat ex- changers in OTEC (Ocean Thermal

  18. Thermal exchanges and temperature stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, P.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal comfort during space flight is discussed. Heat production of man during space flight and wear loss as a mean of dissipating heat are described. Water cooled garments are also considered, along with tolerance for extreme heat and body heat storage. Models of human temperature regulation are presented in the form of documented FORTRAN programs.

  19. Thermal exchanges and temperature stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, P.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal comfort during space flight is discussed. Heat production of man during space flight and wear loss as a mean of dissipating heat are described. Water cooled garments are also considered, along with tolerance for extreme heat and body heat storage. Models of human temperature regulation are presented in the form of documented FORTRAN programs.

  20. Thermal deformations and stresses in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.

    1980-01-01

    Residual stresses are induced during curing in angle-ply laminates as a result of anisotropic thermal deformations of the variously oriented plies. Residual strains are measured experimentally using embedded strain gage techniques, and residual stresses are computed using orthotropic stress-strain relations. The results show that, for graphite and Kevlar laminates, residual stresses at room temperature are high enough to cause damage in the plies in the transverse to the fiber direction. It is also shown that residual stresses do not relax appreciably. The ply stacking sequence is found to have no effect on the magnitude of average residual stresses. Residual stresses and susceptibility to cracking during curing depend to a marked extent on ply layup.

  1. Solar Program Assessment: Environmental Factors - Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    This report presents the environmental problems which may arise with the further development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, one of the eight Federally-funded solar technologies. To provide a background for this environmental analysis, the history and basic concepts of the technology are reviewed, as are its economic and resource requirements.…

  2. Quantitative evaluation of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC): executive briefing

    SciTech Connect

    Gritton, E.C.; Pei, R.Y.; Hess, R.W.

    1980-08-01

    Documentation is provided of a briefing summarizing the results of an independent quantitative evaluation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) for central station applications. The study concentrated on a central station power plant located in the Gulf of Mexico and delivering power to the mainland United States. The evaluation of OTEC is based on three important issues: resource availability, technical feasibility, and cost.

  3. Thermal stresses in thick laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper provides an analytical formulation to investigate the thermomechanical behavior of thick composite shells subjected to a temperature distribution which varies arbitrarily in the radial direction. For illustrative purposes, shells under uniform temperature change are presented. It is found that thermal twist would occur even for symmetric laminated shells. Under uniform temperature rise, results for off-axis graphite/epoxy shells show that extensional-shear coupling can cause tensile radial stress throughout the shell and tensile hoop stress in the inner region. Laminated graphite/epoxy shells can exhibit negative effective thermal expansion coefficients in the longitudinal and transverse directions. Finally, the stacking sequence has a strong influence on the thermal stress distributions.

  4. Gene Expression Dynamics Accompanying the Sponge Thermal Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Christine; Conaco, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Marine sponges are important members of coral reef ecosystems. Thus, their responses to changes in ocean chemistry and environmental conditions, particularly to higher seawater temperatures, will have potential impacts on the future of these reefs. To better understand the sponge thermal stress response, we investigated gene expression dynamics in the shallow water sponge, Haliclona tubifera (order Haplosclerida, class Demospongiae), subjected to elevated temperature. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we show that these conditions result in the activation of various processes that interact to maintain cellular homeostasis. Short-term thermal stress resulted in the induction of heat shock proteins, antioxidants, and genes involved in signal transduction and innate immunity pathways. Prolonged exposure to thermal stress affected the expression of genes involved in cellular damage repair, apoptosis, signaling and transcription. Interestingly, exposure to sublethal temperatures may improve the ability of the sponge to mitigate cellular damage under more extreme stress conditions. These insights into the potential mechanisms of adaptation and resilience of sponges contribute to a better understanding of sponge conservation status and the prediction of ecosystem trajectories under future climate conditions. PMID:27788197

  5. Interplay of variable thermal conductivity and expansivity on the thermal structure of oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, S.; Yuen, D. A.

    The sensitivity of pressure- and temperature-dependent thermal conductivity (k: W/m/K) and the thermal expansivity (α:1/K) on the thermal structure of the oceanic plate is investigated parametrically by comparing the ocean floor depth and heat flux calculated by one-dimensional conduction model with those of GDH1, a theoretical thermal model of the oceanic lithosphere. We find that an optimum fit is obtained, when the value of thermal expansivity is ˜ 3 × 10-5, while those associated with the thermal conductivity have many possibilities. The estimates, which give an equally good fit to the GDH1 model, of the plate thickness D (km) and the temperature at the base of the plate Tm (°C) may be given by Tm ˜ 1450-(k0-4.5) × 100-(α-3.0 × 10-5) × 105×100, D ˜ 90 + (k0-4.5) × 20 - (α-3.0 × 10-5) × 105 × 20 where k0 (W/m/K) is the lattice thermal conductivity at the ocean floor. A similar relation is obtained for constant thermal conductivity.

  6. Thermal Stresses in Silicon-Web Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Ben K.; Utku, Senol; Ray, Sujit Kumar

    1987-01-01

    Mathematical model represents thermomechanical behavior of solid web of rectangular cross section as pulled from melt of same material. Intended for application to growth of silicon webs or ribbons, model general enough to be applicable to other materials as well. Shows suitable temperature distribution results in stress-free ribbon. Conceptual ribbon of rectangular cross section pulled from melt. Simplified configuration used to calculate thermal conditions for stress-free ribbon.

  7. Thermal analysis of thermoelectric power generator; Including thermal stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Merbati, Abdulrahman Salman

    In recent years, the energy demand is increasing leads to use and utilization of clean energy becomes target of countries all over the world. Thermoelectric generator is one type of clean energy generators which is a solid-state device that converts heat energy into electrical energy through the Seebeck effect. With availability of, heat from different sources such as solar energy and waste energy from systems, thermoelectric research becomes important research topic and researchers investigates efficient means of generating electricity from thermoelectric generators. One of the important problems with a thermoelectric is development of high thermal stresses due to formation of temperature gradient across the thermoelectric generator. High thermal stress causes device failure through cracks or fractures and these short comings may reduce the efficiency or totally fail the device. In this thesis work, thermodynamic efficiency and thermal stresses developed in thermoelectric generator are analyzed numerically. The bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) properties are used in simulation. Stress levels in thermoelectric device pins are computed for various pin geometric configurations. MASTER.

  8. Thermal stress and diabetic complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko

    1995-06-01

    Activities of erythrocyte aldose reductase were compared in 34 normal subjects, 45 diabetic patients, and nine young men following immersion in water at 25, 39, and 42° C. Mean basal enzyme activity was 1.11 (SEM 0.12) U/g Hb and 2.07 (SEM 0.14) U/g Hb in normal controls and diabetic patients, respectively ( P<0.0001). Activities of the enzyme showed a good correlation with hemaglobin A1 (HbA1) concentrations ( P<0.01) but not with fasting plasma glucose concentrations. After immersion at 42° C for 10 min, enzyme activity was increased by 37.6% ( P<0.01); however, the activity decreased by 52.2% ( P<0.005) after immersion for 10 min at 39° C and by 47.0% ( P<0.05) at 25° C. These changes suggest that heat stress might aggravate diabetic complications, and body exposure to hot environmental conditions is not recommended for diabetic patients.

  9. Utilizing Ocean Thermal Energy in a Submarine Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Chao, Yi

    2009-01-01

    A proposed system would exploit the ocean thermal gradient for recharging the batteries in a battery-powered unmanned underwater vehicle [UUV (essentially, a small exploratory submarine robot)] of a type that has been deployed in large numbers in research pertaining to global warming. A UUV of this type travels between the ocean surface and depths, measuring temperature and salinity. The proposed system is related to, but not the same as, previously reported ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems that exploit the ocean thermal gradient but consist of stationary apparatuses that span large depth ranges. The system would include a turbine driven by working fluid subjected to a thermodynamic cycle. CO2 has been provisionally chosen as the working fluid because it has the requisite physical properties for use in the range of temperatures expected to be encountered in operation, is not flammable, and is much less toxic than are many other commercially available refrigerant fluids. The system would be housed in a pressurized central compartment in a UUV equipped with a double hull (see figure). The thermodynamic cycle would begin when the UUV was at maximum depth, where some of the CO2 would condense and be stored, at relatively low temperature and pressure, in the annular volume between the inner and outer hulls. The cycle would resume once the UUV had ascended to near the surface, where the ocean temperature is typically greater than or equals 20 C. At this temperature, the CO2 previously stored at depth in the annular volume between the inner and outer hulls would be pressurized to approx. equals 57 bar (5.7 MPa). The pressurized gaseous CO2 would flow through a check valve into a bladder inside the pressurized compartment, thereby storing energy of the relatively warm, pressurized CO2 for subsequent use after the next descent to maximum depth.

  10. Data Analysis for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (otec)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    Unit Number 01. The author wishes to thank Mr. David Boswell of DTNSRDC, Annapolis, Maryland for his work on OTEC software development. The...assistance of Mr. Glenn Grannemann of Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in reviewing Panama City OTEC data analysis techniques is...FOR OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY Technical Memodnndum CONVERSION ( OTEC ) , * IERFORMING Ono, XCIPOOT mulesea 7. AUTNORf.) .. CONTRACT OR GRANT S411jbdb .ftf

  11. Research and development on ocean thermal energy conversion in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, H.

    1982-08-01

    The study of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) in Japan has been conducted under the leadership of a team of the ''Sunshine Project'', a national new energy development project promoted by the Ministry of International Trade and Industries (MITI) since 1974. At present, two experimental OTEC power plants -Nauru's OTEC plant and Imari's OTEC plant are operating. In this paper, the review of research and development activity of these two OTEC plants in Japan is made.

  12. Thermal stress depletes energy reserves in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Klepsatel, Peter; Gáliková, Martina; Xu, Yanjun; Kühnlein, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how environmental temperature affects metabolic and physiological functions is of crucial importance to assess the impacts of climate change on organisms. Here, we used different laboratory strains and a wild-caught population of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to examine the effect of temperature on the body energy reserves of an ectothermic organism. We found that permanent ambient temperature elevation or transient thermal stress causes significant depletion of body fat stores. Surprisingly, transient thermal stress induces a lasting “memory effect” on body fat storage, which also reduces survivorship of the flies upon food deprivation later after stress exposure. Functional analyses revealed that an intact heat-shock response is essential to protect flies from temperature-dependent body fat decline. Moreover, we found that the temperature-dependent body fat reduction is caused at least in part by apoptosis of fat body cells, which might irreversibly compromise the fat storage capacity of the flies. Altogether, our results provide evidence that thermal stress has a significant negative impact on organismal energy reserves, which in turn might affect individual fitness. PMID:27641694

  13. Thermal stress depletes energy reserves in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Klepsatel, Peter; Gáliková, Martina; Xu, Yanjun; Kühnlein, Ronald P

    2016-09-19

    Understanding how environmental temperature affects metabolic and physiological functions is of crucial importance to assess the impacts of climate change on organisms. Here, we used different laboratory strains and a wild-caught population of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to examine the effect of temperature on the body energy reserves of an ectothermic organism. We found that permanent ambient temperature elevation or transient thermal stress causes significant depletion of body fat stores. Surprisingly, transient thermal stress induces a lasting "memory effect" on body fat storage, which also reduces survivorship of the flies upon food deprivation later after stress exposure. Functional analyses revealed that an intact heat-shock response is essential to protect flies from temperature-dependent body fat decline. Moreover, we found that the temperature-dependent body fat reduction is caused at least in part by apoptosis of fat body cells, which might irreversibly compromise the fat storage capacity of the flies. Altogether, our results provide evidence that thermal stress has a significant negative impact on organismal energy reserves, which in turn might affect individual fitness.

  14. Thermal cooling of the oceanic lithosphere from geoid height data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazenae, A.

    1985-01-01

    Another type of geophysical observation has proved to be very useful in the study of thermal cooling of the oceanic lithosphere. It is the geoid height derivative with respect to plate age, a quantity computed from the short wavelength geoid step across fracture zones measured by altimeter satellites. Two categories of simples models are proposed to describe cooling and contraction of the oceanic lithosphere with age. Both plate model and half space model, give almost similar results up to ages of 50 to 70 ma, but predict quite distinct behavior of seafloor depth, heat flow and other parameters in old basins. Tests of thermal models are based on heat flow and topography data. However, heat flow is not very sensitive to the form of the thermal model. Large areas of the ocean floor are particularly shallow, and as a result topography data may not be very appropriate to discriminate between plate and half space models, and no clear concensus on a preferred model yet exists.

  15. Thermal-Stress-Free Fasteners for Orthotropic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, M. L.; Mcwithey, R. R.; Kearns, T. F.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical basis for design of thermal-stress-free fasteners developed. Two-dimensional analysis defines shapes of interfaces between materials. Design technique determines fastener shapes that maintain tight thermal-stress-free joint while joint undergoes uniform temperature change.

  16. Environmental programs for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, P.

    1981-07-01

    The environmental research effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program has the goal of providing documented information on the effect of proposed operations on the ocean and the effect of oceanic conditions on the plant. The associated environment program consists of archival studies in potential areas serial oceanographic cruises to sites or regions of interest, studies from various fixed platforms at sites, and compilation of such information for appropriate legal compliance and permit requirements and for use in progressive design of OTEC plants. Site/regions investigated are south of Mobile and west of Tampa, Gulf of Mexico; Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico; St. Croix, Virgin Islands; Kahe Point, Oahu and Keahole Point, Hawaii, Hawaiian Islands; and off the Brazilian south Equatorial Coast. Four classes of environmental concerns identified are: redistribution of oceanic properties (ocean water mixing, impingement/entrainment etc.); chemical pollution (biocides, working fluid leaks, etc.); structural effects (artificial reef, aggregation, nesting/migration, etc.); socio-legal-economic (worker safety, enviromaritime law, etc.).

  17. Modeling of thermal stresses in welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; Aramayo, G.A.

    1993-12-31

    The transient stress distribution in a Sigmajig test specimen resulting from mechanical and thermal loading was calculated for a Type 316 stainless steel specimen using finite element analysis. The study attempted to resolve the relationship between the dynamic stress distribution, particularly near the trailing edge of the pool, and the observed cracking behavior in the test specimen. The initiation and propagation of the crack during welding was visually monitored using a stroboscopic vision system. The numerical results were used to understand the initiation and propagation of hot-cracks during controlled welding of a specimen subjected to external restraint.

  18. Coral Thermal Tolerance: Tuning Gene Expression to Resist Thermal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bellantuono, Anthony J.; Granados-Cifuentes, Camila; Miller, David J.; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    The acclimatization capacity of corals is a critical consideration in the persistence of coral reefs under stresses imposed by global climate change. The stress history of corals plays a role in subsequent response to heat stress, but the transcriptomic changes associated with these plastic changes have not been previously explored. In order to identify host transcriptomic changes associated with acquired thermal tolerance in the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora, corals preconditioned to a sub-lethal temperature of 3°C below bleaching threshold temperature were compared to both non-preconditioned corals and untreated controls using a cDNA microarray platform. After eight days of hyperthermal challenge, conditions under which non-preconditioned corals bleached and preconditioned corals (thermal-tolerant) maintained Symbiodinium density, a clear differentiation in the transcriptional profiles was revealed among the condition examined. Among these changes, nine differentially expressed genes separated preconditioned corals from non-preconditioned corals, with 42 genes differentially expressed between control and preconditioned treatments, and 70 genes between non-preconditioned corals and controls. Differentially expressed genes included components of an apoptotic signaling cascade, which suggest the inhibition of apoptosis in preconditioned corals. Additionally, lectins and genes involved in response to oxidative stress were also detected. One dominant pattern was the apparent tuning of gene expression observed between preconditioned and non-preconditioned treatments; that is, differences in expression magnitude were more apparent than differences in the identity of genes differentially expressed. Our work revealed a transcriptomic signature underlying the tolerance associated with coral thermal history, and suggests that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind physiological acclimatization would be critical for the modeling of reefs in impending climate

  19. Coral thermal tolerance: tuning gene expression to resist thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Bellantuono, Anthony J; Granados-Cifuentes, Camila; Miller, David J; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    The acclimatization capacity of corals is a critical consideration in the persistence of coral reefs under stresses imposed by global climate change. The stress history of corals plays a role in subsequent response to heat stress, but the transcriptomic changes associated with these plastic changes have not been previously explored. In order to identify host transcriptomic changes associated with acquired thermal tolerance in the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora, corals preconditioned to a sub-lethal temperature of 3°C below bleaching threshold temperature were compared to both non-preconditioned corals and untreated controls using a cDNA microarray platform. After eight days of hyperthermal challenge, conditions under which non-preconditioned corals bleached and preconditioned corals (thermal-tolerant) maintained Symbiodinium density, a clear differentiation in the transcriptional profiles was revealed among the condition examined. Among these changes, nine differentially expressed genes separated preconditioned corals from non-preconditioned corals, with 42 genes differentially expressed between control and preconditioned treatments, and 70 genes between non-preconditioned corals and controls. Differentially expressed genes included components of an apoptotic signaling cascade, which suggest the inhibition of apoptosis in preconditioned corals. Additionally, lectins and genes involved in response to oxidative stress were also detected. One dominant pattern was the apparent tuning of gene expression observed between preconditioned and non-preconditioned treatments; that is, differences in expression magnitude were more apparent than differences in the identity of genes differentially expressed. Our work revealed a transcriptomic signature underlying the tolerance associated with coral thermal history, and suggests that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind physiological acclimatization would be critical for the modeling of reefs in impending climate

  20. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Induced Ocean Response to Wind Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Doyle, J. D.; Veeramony, J.; Rogers, W.; Fan, Y.; Martin, P.; Campbell, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    Significant efforts have been made in recent years to improve the track and intensity forecasts of Navy's operational Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System for Tropical Cyclone (COAMPS-TC). In this study, we illustrate some key challenges related to TC intensity prediction and air-sea interaction processes using COAMPS-TC coupled with the 3D circulation Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM). We have identified a low intensity bias in COAMPS-TC partially stems from model biases in the momentum flux utilized by NCOM. We will discuss recent advancements in COAMPS to better quantify the prediction of momentum flux across the air-sea interface by coupling with a wave model Simulating Wave NearShore (SWAN). The recent case of hurricane Blanca (2015), a storm that occurred off the Baha California which produced a significant ocean cold wake of 4-6 °C, is used to examine the sensitivity of ocean response to wind stress in the air-ocean and air-ocean-wave coupled COAMPS-TC. The results show both the coupled TC track and intensity are differ substantially relative to the uncoupled COAMPS-TC. When the wind stress magnitude is reduced to just 1/3 of the uncoupled value, there is a significant damping of the ocean internal wave structure and cold wake magnitude.

  1. Thermal stress fracturing of magma simulant materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wemple, R.P.; Longcope, D.B.

    1986-10-01

    Direct contact heat exchanger concepts for the extraction of energy from magma chambers are being studied as part of the DOE-funded Magma Energy Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories. These concepts require the solidification of molten material by a coolant circulated through a borehole drilled into the magma and subsequent fracture of the solid either as a natural consequence of thermal stress or by deliberate design (intentional flaws, high pressure, etc.). This report summarizes the results of several thermal stress fracturing experiments performed in the laboratory and compares the results with an analysis developed for use as a predictive tool. Information gained from this test series has been the basis for additional work now under way to simulate magma melt solidification processes.

  2. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst...

  3. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst...

  4. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  5. 40 CFR 90.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 90.329... Equipment Provisions § 90.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for thermally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000...

  6. 40 CFR 90.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 90.329... Equipment Provisions § 90.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for thermally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000...

  7. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst...

  8. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  9. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  10. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  11. 40 CFR 90.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 90.329... Equipment Provisions § 90.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for thermally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000...

  12. 40 CFR 90.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Catalyst thermal stress test. 90.329... Equipment Provisions § 90.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for thermally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000...

  13. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst...

  14. Thermal stress analysis for a wood composite blade. [wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, K. C.; Harb, A.

    1984-01-01

    Heat conduction throughout the blade and the distribution of thermal stresses caused by the temperature distribution were determined for a laminated wood wind turbine blade in both the horizontal and vertical positions. Results show that blade cracking is not due to thermal stresses induced by insulation. A method and practical example of thermal stress analysis for an engineering body of orthotropic materials is presented.

  15. 40 CFR 90.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 90.329... Equipment Provisions § 90.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for... thermal stress test is not required for engine families certified to the Phase 2 standards....

  16. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst by... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress...

  17. Geoid data and thermal structure of the oceanic lithosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, W.P.; Stein, S.; Stein, C.A.

    1995-07-15

    A long-standing question is whether old oceanic lithosphere continues cooling as the boundary layer of a halfspace or approaches thermal equilibrium as modeled by a finite thickness plate. Although the latter is the most direct inference from seafloor depths and heat flow, other explanations have been proposed. We investigate this issue using published results for the derivative of the oceanic geoid with age estimated from geoid offsets across fracture zones. Such data have not been used extensively in analyses of the thermal evolution of the lithosphere, primarily because they are inconsistent with two commonly used thermal models; a halfspace or a 125-km-thick plate. Recent studies, however, find that depth and heat flow data are better fit by a thinner (95 km) plate model. We thus compile published geoid slope results, and find that these data, though scattered, can discriminate between the models. Geoid slope changes with age, rather than being constant as predicted for a cooling halfspace. This variation is greater than predicted for a thick plate and is better fit by a thin plate. Geoid data should thus be useful for improving thermal models of the lithosphere. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Thermal stress microfracturing of crystalline and sedimentary rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.F.

    1989-05-01

    The goal of the research program is to understand mechanisms of thermal cracking in granitic rocks. The research plan included development of a theoretical understanding of cracking due to thermal stresses, laboratory work to characterize crack strain in rocks thermally stressed under different conditions (including natural thermal histories), and microscopic work to count and catalog crack occurrences, and geologic application to naturally occurring granites.

  19. Oceanic intraplate earthquakes: Implications for local and regional intraplate stress

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, E.A.; Solomon, S.C.

    1980-10-10

    Focal mechanisms of intraplate earthquakes provide the only means at present by which to characterize the long-wavelength tectonic stress field in oceanic lithosphere. Stress orientations inferred from focal mechanisms may not accurately reflect the state of stress in the epicentral area, however, or the measured stresses may be dominated by local rather than regional sources. To establish a data set with which to study these possibilities, a comprehensive catalog of 159 oceanic intraplate earthquakes has been complied for events since 1963 with m/sub b/ 4.7 or larger. Focal mechanisms are available for approximately one quarter of the events, and several new mechanisms are presented here. For a representative subset of this catalog (83 events), the bathymetry and tectonic history of the epicentral areas have been assembled, and the earthquakes have been rated according to their association with (1) a preexisting fault zone, which might decouple the P axis of the focal mechanism from the true orientation of maximum compressive stress, and (2) large bathymetric relief, which might be a source of large local stresses. Oceanic intraplate earthquakes are commonly found in association with zones of previous weakness (usually fracture zones), but they do not show any particular association with large bathymetric features. In the central Indian Ocean there are enough focal mechanisms available to establish a well-defined NW-SE orientation for P axes and presumably for the direction of greatest compressive stress. The consistency of the P axes of these widely varying mechanisms in the presence of the Ninetyeast Ridge, a site of major intraplate deformation and large bathymetric relief, is remarkable. A possible explanation is that in the presence of a large number of preexisting faults with a range of orientations, slip occurs on those faults which have large resolved shear stresses from the regional stress field.

  20. Satellite and Ocean Model Analysis of Thermal Conditions Affecting Coral Reefs in the Western Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Delgado, Z.; Ummenhofer, C.; Swales, D. J.

    2016-02-01

    Corals are thought to be one of the smallest yet most productive ecosystems in the world. They have great economic and ecological value, but are increasingly affected by anthropogenic, biological and physical threats, such as a rise in sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean acidification due to an increase in CO2 in the atmosphere, among other factors. Here, specific events are investigated that likely exerted significant stress on corals, focusing particularly on unusual climatic conditions in the Western Indian Ocean during the 2001 to 2007 period as reflected by anomalies in degree heating weeks, hotspots and SST. Anomalous conditions in subsurface temperatures and mixed layer depth across the Indian Ocean region are also examined. We do this by using monthly, year-to-date, and annual composites of twice-weekly 50-km satellite coral bleaching monitoring products from the NOAA Coral Reef Watch and complementing it with output from a high-resolution global ocean model hindcast (1948-2007) forced with observed atmospheric forcing. Two years stand out in our analysis for the satellite data and model output: 2003 and 2005 exhibit strong warming in the Western Indian Ocean and cooling in the East. To establish the physical mechanisms giving rise to the unusual conditions and hotspot origins in 2003 and 2005 we also evaluate regional circulation changes in the Western Indian Ocean.

  1. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Sands, M. Dale

    1980-08-01

    Significant acccrmplishments in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power within this decade with subsequent large scale commercialization following by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, the Oceanic Engineering Operations of Interstate Electronics Corporation has prepared several OTEC Environmental Assessments over the past years, in particular, the OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment. The Programmatic EA considers several technological designs (open- and closed-cycle), plant configuratlons (land-based, moored, and plant-ship), and power usages (baseload electricity, ammonia and aluminum production). Potential environmental impacts, health and safetv issues and a status update of the institutional issues as they influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  2. Interplay of variable thermal conductivity and expansivity on the thermal structure of oceanic lithosphere II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, S.; Yuen, D. A.

    2004-04-01

    We have extended our previous analysis of the effects of constant vs. variable, i.e., pressure and temperature dependent thermal conductivity (k) and constant thermal expansivity (a) on the thermal structure of the oceanic lithosphere. We apply our analysis to the actual data set including information on the geoid slope. The heat flow and ocean floor depth data constrain the thermal expansivity (a ≍ 3 × 10-5 1/°C). Including geoid slope data may loosely constrain both the thermal expansivity and the thermal conductivity. The probable value of thermal conductivity is ≍ 3 W/m/°C for the constant k case and ≍ 4 W/m/°C (at ambient conditions) for the variable k case. These a and k are generally consistent with laboratory data of appropriate lithospheric materials. Our analysis supports the plate model with thin lithosphere and high bottom temperature, such as GDH1 (95 km; 1450°C). Variable k case requires slightly thinner and higher temperature lithosphere (≍ 85 km and ≍ 1500°C) and gives a slightly better fit to the geoid slope data.

  3. Intraplate earthquakes and the state of stress in oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Eric A.

    1986-01-01

    The dominant sources of stress relieved in oceanic intraplate earthquakes are investigated to examine the usefulness of earthquakes as indicators of stress orientation. The primary data for this investigation are the detailed source studies of 58 of the largest of these events, performed with a body-waveform inversion technique of Nabelek (1984). The relationship between the earthquakes and the intraplate stress fields was investigated by studying, the rate of seismic moment release as a function of age, the source mechanisms and tectonic associations of larger events, and the depth-dependence of various source parameters. The results indicate that the earthquake focal mechanisms are empirically reliable indicators of stress, probably reflecting the fact that an earthquake will occur most readily on a fault plane oriented in such a way that the resolved shear stress is maximized while the normal stress across the fault, is minimized.

  4. Thermal evolution of the lithosphere near oceanic hotspots and the subaerial lifespan of volcanic ocean islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, K.; Perron, J. T.; Royden, L.

    2016-12-01

    Vertical motions of the Earth's surface driven by heat flow, surface loading, and mantle buoyancy generate topography and constrain the rheology and dynamics of the Earth's interior. At oceanic hotspots, these processes interact to modify the bathymetry, and paleoshorelines on hotspot volcanoes record changes in seafloor depth over various timescales. The seafloor surrounding oceanic hotspots is typically 0.5-2 km shallower than expected for its age over areas hundreds to >1000 km wide. The origin of this shallow bathymetry is uncertain; excess heat in the upper mantle, dynamic pressure at the base of the lithosphere, thinning of the lithosphere, or some combination of these processes may generate uplift. If bathymetric swells are produced by thinning of the lithosphere, their subsidence should mimic the subsidence of young oceanic lithosphere. We use a spatial median filter to separate regional and residual bathymetry at various oceanic hotspots. Considering the end-member case of purely thermal swell compensation, we model the thermal evolution of the lithosphere along the swell crest parallel to plate motion. We test various combinations of upper mantle temperature anomalies and extents of lithospheric thinning that produce the observed swell uplift. Comparing the model to regional bathymetry, we find that predicted thermal subsidence is significantly slower than observed subsidence, suggesting a dynamic contribution to swell uplift. This is consistent with global observations of island subsidence; because lithospheric thinning makes a minor contribution to swell uplift, hotspot islands subside definitively as they are transported away from a sublithospheric source of swell uplift. We estimate island residence times atop swell topography (swell wavelength/plate velocity) and find a correspondence to the age at which islands typically drown to form atolls and guyots in various hotspot chains.

  5. Heat transfer research for ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kreith, F.; Bharathan, D.

    1988-02-01

    In this lecture an overview of the heat and mass-transfer phenomena of importance in ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is presented with particular emphasis on open-cycle OTEC systems. Also included is a short historical review of OTEC developments in the past century and a comparison of open and closed-cycle thermodynamics. Finally, results of system analyses, showing the effect of plant size on cost and the near-term potential of using OTEC for combined power production and desalination systems, are briefly discussed.

  6. Heat transfer research for ocean thermal energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreith, F.; Bharathan, D.

    1987-03-01

    In this lecture an overview of the heat- and mass-transfer phenomena of importance in ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is presented with particular emphasis on open-cycle OTEC systems. Also included is a short historical review of OTEC developments in the past century and a comparison of open- and closed-cycle thermodynamics. Finally, results of system analyses, showing the effect of plant size on cost and the near-term potential of using OTEC for combined power production and desalination systems are briefly discussed.

  7. Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Green, H.J. ); Guenther, P.R. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Observed ocean thermal response to Hurricanes Gustav and Ike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Patrick C.; Shay, Lynn K.; Brewster, Jodi K.; Jaimes, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The 2008 Atlantic hurricane season featured two hurricanes, Gustav and Ike, crossing the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) within a 2 week period. Over 400 airborne expendable bathythermographs (AXBTs) were deployed in a GOM field campaign before, during, and after the passage of Gustav and Ike to measure the evolving upper ocean thermal structure. AXBT and drifter deployments specifically targeted the Loop Current (LC) complex, which was undergoing an eddy-shedding event during the field campaign. Hurricane Gustav forced a 50 m deepening of the ocean mixed layer (OML), dramatically altering the prestorm ocean conditions for Hurricane Ike. Wind-forced entrainment of colder thermocline water into the OML caused sea surface temperatures to cool by over 5°C in GOM common water, but only 1-2°C in the LC complex. Ekman pumping and a near-inertial wake were identified by fluctuations in the 20°C isotherm field observed by AXBTs and drifters following Hurricane Ike. Satellite estimates of the 20° and 26°C isotherm depths and ocean heat content were derived using a two-layer model driven by sea surface height anomalies. Generally, the satellite estimates correctly characterized prestorm conditions, but the two-layer model inherently could not resolve wind-forced mixing of the OML. This study highlights the importance of a coordinated satellite and in situ measurement strategy to accurately characterize the ocean state before, during, and after hurricane passage, particularly in the case of two consecutive storms traveling through the same domain.

  9. Thermal stress on chickens in transit.

    PubMed

    Webster, A J; Tuddenham, A; Saville, C A; Scott, G B

    1993-05-01

    1. An artificial chicken, 'Gloria', was constructed to simulate heat exchanges of poultry during transport. Tests of the instrument in a wind tunnel showed it to have insulation properties similar to that of a live bird. 2. Gloria accompanied chickens in two types of transport modules, A (enclosed) and B (open). The average temperature difference between inside and outside the loaded vehicles when stationary and in motion were 14.0 and 7.6 for Type A and 8.8 and 6.0 for Type B. Average air movement while vehicles were in motion was 0.5 m/s for Type A and 3.3 m/s for Type B. 3. Measurements of sensible heat loss from Gloria at different temperatures and wind speeds were compared with published estimates of thermoneutral heat production and thermal insulation for well and poorly feathered chickens to estimate the range of thermal stresses likely to be experienced by chickens in transit. 4. The results showed that the combination of circumstances necessary to ensure thermal comfort for birds both at rest and in motion is very rare (e.g. only between 7 and 8 degrees C for well feathered birds in enclosed vehicles). It is, however, possible to ensure thermal comfort over a wide range of ambient air temperatures by appropriate control of air movement within the vehicle whether at rest or in motion.

  10. Theoretical basis for design of thermal-stress-free fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, M. L.; Mcwithey, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical basis was developed for the design of fasteners which are free of thermal stress. A fastener can be shaped to eliminate the thermal stress which would otherwise result from differential thermal expansion between dissimilar fastener and sheet materials for many combinations of isotropic and orthotropic materials. The resulting joint remains snug, yet free of thermal stress at any temperature, if the joint is uniform in temperature, if it is frictionless, and if the coefficients of thermal expansion of the materials do not change with temperature. In general, such a fastener has curved sides; however, if both materials have isotropic coefficients of thermal expansion, a conical fastener is free of thermal stress. Equations are presented for thermal stress free shapes at both initial and final temperature, and typical fastener shapes are shown.

  11. Physiological Responses to Thermal Stress and Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyota, Hiroyuki; Ohya, Akira; Yamagata, Junko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miyagawa, Toshiaki; Kawabata, Takashi

    The simple and noninvasive measuring methods of bioinstrumentation in humans is required for optimization of air conditioning and management of thermal environments, taking into consideration the individual specificity of the human body as well as the stress conditions affecting each. Changes in human blood circulation were induced with environmental factors such as heat, cold, exercise, mental stress, and so on. In this study, the physiological responses of human body to heat stress and exercise were investigated in the initial phase of the developmental research. We measured the body core and skin temperatures, skin blood flow, and pulse wave as the indices of the adaptation of the cardiovascular system. A laser Doppler skin blood flowmetry using an optical-sensor with a small portable data logger was employed for the measurement. These results reveal the heat-stress and exercise-induced circulatory responses, which are under the control of the sympathetic nerve system. Furthermore, it was suggested that the activity of the sympathetic nervous system could be evaluated from the signals of the pulse wave included in the signals derived from skin blood flow by means of heart rate variability assessments and detecting peak heights of velocity-plethysmogram.

  12. Analysis of thermal stresses and metal movement during welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraki, T.; Masubuchi, K.

    1973-01-01

    The research is reported concerning the development of a system of mathematical solutions and computer programs for one- and two-dimensional analyses for thermal stresses. Reports presented include: the investigation of thermal stress and buckling of tantalum and columbium sheet; and analysis of two dimensional thermal strains and metal movement during welding.

  13. Physiological Response of Siderastrea siderea to Thermal Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno-Laureano, Y.; Mercado-Molina, A. E.; Fonseca, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Warming of the ocean water is one of the major causes of coral bleaching, a phenomenon that disrupt the obligate endosymbiotic relationships that corals has with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. Because it is predicted that sea surface temperature are going to increase 1-3°C in the next 10 years, it is important to understand how coral species will respond to such changes. It is known that the coral Siderastrea siderea is a scleractinian coral common to the Caribbean reefs that has shown to be very resistant to environmental stressors such as sedimentation and water contamination. However, little is known about its capacity to overcome high temperatures. But several studies suggest that Siderastrea siderea can recover faster than other corals from thermal-stress. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the physiology S. siderea varies with respect to an increase in water temperature. We conducted a controlled laboratory experiments where the coral were exposed to typical (27.5°C) and elevated temperatures (31.5°C). We quantified the densities of the endosymbiotic Symbiodinium spp. as well as physiological parameters such as protein and chlorophyll concentration to determine whether they change in response to an increase in temperature. Results show no significant differences or a direct relation between the thermal stress and the physiological mechanisms studied. Which would suggest that S. siderea indeed has the mechanisms to cope to high temperature scenarios.

  14. 40 CFR 91.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 91.329....329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for termally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000 ±10 °C. (b)...

  15. Modeling Thermal and Environmental Effects of Prototype Scale Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamrick, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) utilizes the temperature difference between the mix lay and deep water electricity generation. The small temperature difference compared to other thermal-electric generation devises, typically between 20 and 25 C, requires the substantial volumetric flows on the order of hundreds of cubic meters per second to generate net energy and recover capital investments. This presentation described the use of a high resolution three-dimensional EFDC model with an embedded jet-plume model to simulate the thermal and environmental impacts of a number of prototype OTEC configurations on the southwest coast of Oahu, Hawaii. The EFDC model is one-way nested into a larger scale ROMS model to allow for realistic incorporation of region processes including external and internal tides and sub-tidal circulation. Impacts on local thermal structure and the potential for nutrient enrichment of the mixed layer are addressed with model and presented.

  16. Thermal and stress analysis of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassenti, B. N.; Brickley, A. M.; Sinko, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis has been performed that predicts the thermomechanical behavior of thermal barrier coated specimens. The analysis predicts the behavior during both plasma spray coating application and burner rig testing conditions simulating engine operation. The analysis was accomplished through utilization of one-dimensional through thickness and two-dimensional finite element calculations. The results of these calculations showed that specimens with a substrate control temperature between 300 F and 600 F would be optimum. Controlling substrate temperature was found to have a more dominant effect on the mechanical strains than the ceramic or substrate thicknesses. The predicted stresses and mechanical strains at the bond-coating interface are large enough to cause cracks in this region where post-test observations have determined coating failures originate.

  17. Thermal-Stress Reducer For Metal/Composite Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glinski, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Simple insert called "thermal link" reduces stresses caused by mismatches between thermal expansions of metal part and nonmetallic part made of fiber/matrix composite material. Link conceived for use in casing of advanced jet engine.

  18. Geographical variation in thermal tolerance within Southern Ocean marine ectotherms.

    PubMed

    Morley, Simon A; Hirse, Timo; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Peck, Lloyd S

    2009-06-01

    Latitudinal comparisons of the Southern Ocean limpet, Nacella concinna, and clam, Laternula elliptica, acclimated to 0.0 degrees C, were used to assess differences in thermal response to two regimes, 0.0, 5.1 to 10.0 degrees C and 2.5, 7.5 to 12.5 degrees C, raised at 5.0 degrees C per week. At each temperature, tissue energy status was measured through a combination of O(2) consumption, intracellular pH, cCO(2), citrate synthase (CS) activity, organic acids (succinate, acetate, propionate), adenylates (ATP, ADP, AMP, ITP, PLA (phospho-L-arginine)) and heart rate. L. elliptica from Signy (60 degrees S) and Rothera (67 degrees S), which experience a similar thermal regime (-2 to +1 degrees C) had the same lethal (7.5-10.0 degrees C), critical (5.1-7.5 degrees C) and pejus (<5.1 degrees C;=getting worse) limits with only small differences in biochemical response. N. concinna, which experiences a wider thermal regime (-2 to +15.8 degrees C), had higher lethal limits (10.0-12.5 degrees C). However, at their Northern geographic limit N. concinna, which live in a warmer environment (South Georgia, 54 degrees S), had a lower critical limit (5.1-10.0 degrees C; O(2), PLA and organic acids) than Rothera and Signy N. concinna (10.0-12.5 degrees C). This lower limit indicates that South Georgia N. concinna have different biochemical responses to temperatures close to their thermal limit, which may make them more vulnerable to future warming trends.

  19. Shelf mounted ocean thermal energy conversion platform, revised preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-03-01

    This report relates model tests of a generic Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) platform. The objective of these tests is to aid in the evaluation of new OTEC designs and to present a data base for design purposes. The test plant has been designed to provide a data base for comparison with current and projected analytical tools as well as comparisons of results from one model configuration to another. The new conceptual OTEC designs are different from the typical offshore (jacket type) structure which is quite transparent to waves. The major difference is the addition of large submerged power production modules to the frame. These proposed modules offer a large surface area to obstruct the flow and thereby increase the global wave forces acting on the structure.

  20. Coupled thermal stress simulations of ductile tearing

    DOE PAGES

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Dion, Kristin

    2016-03-01

    Predictions for ductile tearing of a geometrically complex Ti-6Al-4V plate were generated using a Unified Creep Plasticity Damage model in fully coupled thermal stress simulations. Uniaxial tension and butterfly shear tests performed at displacement rates of 0.0254 and 25.4 mm/s were also simulated. Results from these simulations revealed that the material temperature increase due to plastic work can have a dramatic effect on material ductility predictions in materials that exhibit little strain hardening. Furthermore, this occurs because the temperature increase causes the apparent hardening of the material to decrease which leads to the initiation of deformation localization and subsequent ductilemore » tearing earlier in the loading process.« less

  1. Coupled thermal stress simulations of ductile tearing

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Dion, Kristin

    2016-03-01

    Predictions for ductile tearing of a geometrically complex Ti-6Al-4V plate were generated using a Unified Creep Plasticity Damage model in fully coupled thermal stress simulations. Uniaxial tension and butterfly shear tests performed at displacement rates of 0.0254 and 25.4 mm/s were also simulated. Results from these simulations revealed that the material temperature increase due to plastic work can have a dramatic effect on material ductility predictions in materials that exhibit little strain hardening. Furthermore, this occurs because the temperature increase causes the apparent hardening of the material to decrease which leads to the initiation of deformation localization and subsequent ductile tearing earlier in the loading process.

  2. Observations of Upper-Ocean Thermal Structure in the Central North Pacific during Hurricanes Guillermo, Hilda, and Ignacio (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. V., III; McAlister, K. B.; Sanabia, E.; Jayne, S. R.; Swick, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    In August and September 2015, Hurricanes Guillermo, Hilda, and Ignacio formed in close proximity over the eastern North Pacific Ocean. The west-northwestward hurricane tracks remained within 2° latitude for nearly 2000 km before separating meridionally southeast of the Hawaiian Islands. The upper-ocean thermal structure beneath these three tropical systems is investigated using AXBT, ALAMO, and Argo float observations, and changes over time are analyzed. The 67 AXBT and 6 ALAMO floats deployed from USAFR WC-130J aircraft as part of the USNA TROPIC program and AXBT Demonstration Project, along with the Argo floats, provide insight into temporal and spatial scales of the impact of wind stress on the upper ocean. Several observations are highlighted and observed changes in the mixed layer are compared to theoretical results obtained using the Price-Weller-Pinkel ocean mixed layer model.

  3. Thermal-stress-free fasteners for joining orthotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    1987-01-01

    Hot structures fabricated from orthotropic materials are an attractive design option for future high speed vehicles. Joining subassemblies of these materials with standard cylindrical fasteners can lead to loose joints or highly stressed joints due to thermal stress. A method has been developed to eliminate thermal stress and maintain a tight joint by shaping the fastener and mating hole. This method allows both materials (fastener and structure), with different coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE's) in each of the three principal material directions, to expand freely with temperature yet remain in contact. For the assumptions made in the analysis, the joint will remain snug, yet free of thermal stress at any temperature. Finite element analysis was used to verify several thermal-stress-free fasteners and to show that conical fasteners, which are thermal-stress-free for isotropic materials, can reduce thermal stresses for transversely isotropic materials compared to a cylindrical fastener. Equations for thermal-stress-free shapes are presented and typical fastener shapes are shown.

  4. Thermal-stress-free fasteners for joining orthotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    Hot structures fabricated from orthotropic materials are an attractive design option for future high speed vehicles. Joining subassemblies of these materials with standard cylindrical fasteners can lead to loose joints or highly stressed joints due to thermal stress. A method has been developed to eliminate thermal stresses and maintain a tight joint by shaping the fastener and mating hole. This method allows both materials (fastener and structure), with different coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) in each of the three material directions, to expand freely with temperature yet remain in contact. For the assumptions made in the analysis, the joint will remain snug, yet free of thermal stress at any temperature. Finite element analysis was used to verify several thermal-stress-free fasteners and to show that conical fasteners, which are thermal-stress-free for isotropic materials, can reduce thermal stresses for transversely isotropic materials compared to a cylindrical fastener. Equations for thermal-stress-free shapes are presented and typical fastener shapes are shown.

  5. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... efficiency. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst by exposing it to quiescent heated air in an... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust...

  6. Thermal Residual Stress in Environmental Barrier Coated Silicon Nitride - Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Abdul-Aziz; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2009-01-01

    When exposed to combustion environments containing moisture both un-reinforced and fiber reinforced silicon based ceramic materials tend to undergo surface recession. To avoid surface recession environmental barrier coating systems are required. However, due to differences in the elastic and thermal properties of the substrate and the environmental barrier coating, thermal residual stresses can be generated in the coated substrate. Depending on their magnitude and nature thermal residual stresses can have significant influence on the strength and fracture behavior of coated substrates. To determine the maximum residual stresses developed during deposition of the coatings, a finite element model (FEM) was developed. Using this model, the thermal residual stresses were predicted in silicon nitride substrates coated with three environmental coating systems namely barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS), rare earth mono silicate (REMS) and earth mono di-silicate (REDS). A parametric study was also conducted to determine the influence of coating layer thickness and material parameters on thermal residual stress. Results indicate that z-direction stresses in all three systems are small and negligible, but maximum in-plane stresses can be significant depending on the composition of the constituent layer and the distance from the substrate. The BSAS and REDS systems show much lower thermal residual stresses than REMS system. Parametric analysis indicates that in each system, the thermal residual stresses can be decreased with decreasing the modulus and thickness of the coating.

  7. THERMAL RESIDUAL STRESSES IN BILAYERED, TRILAYERED AND GRADED DENTAL CERAMICS.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Douglas; Souza, Júlio C M; Silva, Filipe S; Fredel, Márcio; Mesquita-Guimarães, Joana; Zhang, Yu; Henriques, Bruno

    2017-03-01

    Layered ceramic systems are usually hit by residual thermal stresses created during cooling from high processing temperature. The purpose of this study was to determine the thermal residual stresses at different ceramic multi-layered systems and evaluate their influence on the bending stress distribution. Finite elements method was used to evaluate the residual stresses in zirconia-porcelain and alumina-porcelain multi-layered discs and to simulate the 'piston-on-ring' test. Temperature-dependent material properties were used. Three different multi-layered designs were simulated: a conventional bilayered design; a trilayered design, with an intermediate composite layer with constant composition; and a graded design, with an intermediate layer with gradation of properties. Parameters such as the interlayer thickness and composition profiles were varied in the study. Alumina-porcelain discs present smaller residual stress than the zirconia-porcelain discs, regardless of the type of design. The homogeneous interlayer can yield a reduction of ~40% in thermal stress relative to bilayered systems. Thinner interlayers favoured the formation of lower thermal stresses. The graded discs showed the lowest thermal stresses for a gradation profile given by power law function with p=2. The bending stresses were significantly affected by the thermal stresses in the discs. The risk of failure for all-ceramic dental restorative systems can be significantly reduced by using trilayered systems (homogenous or graded interlayer) with the proper design.

  8. THERMAL RESIDUAL STRESSES IN BILAYERED, TRILAYERED AND GRADED DENTAL CERAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Fabris, Douglas; Souza, Júlio C.M.; Silva, Filipe S.; Fredel, Márcio; Mesquita-Guimarães, Joana; Zhang, Yu; Henriques, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Layered ceramic systems are usually hit by residual thermal stresses created during cooling from high processing temperature. The purpose of this study was to determine the thermal residual stresses at different ceramic multi-layered systems and evaluate their influence on the bending stress distribution. Finite elements method was used to evaluate the residual stresses in zirconia-porcelain and alumina-porcelain multi-layered discs and to simulate the ‘piston-on-ring’ test. Temperature-dependent material properties were used. Three different multi-layered designs were simulated: a conventional bilayered design; a trilayered design, with an intermediate composite layer with constant composition; and a graded design, with an intermediate layer with gradation of properties. Parameters such as the interlayer thickness and composition profiles were varied in the study. Alumina-porcelain discs present smaller residual stress than the zirconia-porcelain discs, regardless of the type of design. The homogeneous interlayer can yield a reduction of ~40% in thermal stress relative to bilayered systems. Thinner interlayers favoured the formation of lower thermal stresses. The graded discs showed the lowest thermal stresses for a gradation profile given by power law function with p=2. The bending stresses were significantly affected by the thermal stresses in the discs. The risk of failure for all-ceramic dental restorative systems can be significantly reduced by using trilayered systems (homogenous or graded interlayer) with the proper design. PMID:28163345

  9. Large-amplitude internal waves sustain coral health during thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gertraud M.; Wall, Marlene; Taylor, Marc; Jantzen, Carin; Richter, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    Ocean warming is a major threat for coral reefs causing widespread coral bleaching and mortality. Potential refugia are thus crucial for coral survival. Exposure to large-amplitude internal waves (LAIW) mitigated heat stress and ensured coral survival and recovery during and after an extreme heat anomaly. The physiological status of two common corals, Porites lutea and Pocillopora meandrina, was monitored in host and symbiont traits, in response to LAIW-exposure throughout the unprecedented 2010 heat anomaly in the Andaman Sea. LAIW-exposed corals of both species survived and recovered, while LAIW-sheltered corals suffered partial and total mortality in P. lutea and P. meandrina, respectively. LAIW are ubiquitous in the tropics and potentially generate coral refuge areas. As thermal stress to corals is expected to increase in a warming ocean, the mechanisms linking coral bleaching to ocean dynamics will be crucial to predict coral survival on a warming planet.

  10. Thermal stress analysis of composites in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element micromechanics approach was utilized to investigate the thermally induced stress fields in continuous fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites at temperatures typical of spacecraft operating environments. The influence of laminate orientation was investigated with a simple global/local formulation. Thermal stress calculations were used to predict probable damage initiation locations, and the results were compared to experimentally observed damage in several epoxy matrix composites. The influence of an interphase region on the interfacial stress states was investigated.

  11. Temperature, Thermal Stress, And Creep In A Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jerald M.

    1991-01-01

    Report presents comparison of predicted and measured temperatures, thermal stresses, and residual creep stresses in heated and loaded titanium structure. Study part of continuing effort to develop design capability to predict and reduce deleterious effects of creep, which include excessive deformations, residual stresses, and failure.

  12. Thermal stress fracture in elastic-brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    The reported investigation shows that the assessment of the possibility of the thermal fracture of brittle materials depends upon an accurate evaluation of the thermal stresses and the determination of the resulting stress intensity factors. The stress intensity factors can be calculated in a variety of ways ranging from the very precise to approximate, but only for a limited number of geometries. The main difficulty is related to the determination of the thermal stress field because of its unusual character and its dependence upon boundary conditions at points far from the region of thermal activity. Examination of a number of examples suggests that the best visualization of the thermal stresses and any associated fracture can be made by considering the problem to be the combination of thermal and isothermal problems or by considering that the prime effect of the temperature is in the generation of thermal strains and that the thermal stresses are simply the result of the region trying to accommodate these strains.

  13. Calibration of sonic flowmeters for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, D. F.; Salsman, G. G.; Hodges, C. E.

    1980-12-01

    Scientists at the Naval Coastal Systems Center (NCSC) at Panama City, Florida, have used a commercially available acoustic flowmeter to monitor critical flow conditions during an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) funded study of the effects of biofouling on the efficiency of a prototype heat transfer system. Flowmeters of this type are particularly useful in applications requiring unimpeded flow; i.e., no sensor projecting into the moving fluid. Unfortunately, sonic flowmeters are somewhat difficult to calibrate and may be subject to drift. A method of calibration devised by NCSC may thus be of some interest to other users. It is the purpose of this report to document the special procedures used by test personnel to calibrate the flowmeters. Briefly, the calibration consisted of pumping sea water through the flowmeter into a tank suspended beneath a special load cell which provided an output voltage proportional to the weight of water in the tank. A programmable desktop calculator system was used to monitor changes in voltage as a function of time and convert these changes into flow rates for direct comparison with values read from the sonic flowmeter's digital display. Calibration checks were made at metered flows of 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18 gallons per minute (gpm). It was found that computed flows were essentially linear but differed from metered values by as much as 9.0 percent.

  14. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Programmatic Environmental Analysis--Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Authors, Various

    1980-01-01

    The programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization. It is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties. This volume contains these appendices: Appendix A -- Deployment Scenario; Appendix B -- OTEC Regional Characterization; and Appendix C -- Impact and Related Calculations.

  15. Waterborne noise due to ocean thermal energy conversion plants

    SciTech Connect

    Janota, C.P.; Thompson, D.E.

    1983-07-01

    Public law reflects a United States national commitment to the rapid development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) as an alternate energy source. OTEC plants extract the stored solar energy from the world's tropical seas and in so doing pose a potential for altering the character of the ambient noise there. The sources of noise from an OTEC plant are analyzed in the context of four configurations, two of which were built and tested, and two which are concepts for future full-scale moored facilities. The analysis indicates that the noise resulting from the interaction of turbulence with the seawater pumps is expected to dominate in the frequency range 10 Hz to 1 kHz. Measured radiated noise data from the OTEC-I research plant, located near the island of Hawaii, are compared with the analysis. The measured data diverge from the predicted levels at frequencies above about 60 Hz because of dominant non-OTEC noise sources on this platform. However, at low frequency, the measured broadband noise is comparable to that predicted.

  16. Ocean thermal energy conversion: Historical highlights, status, and forecast

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, G.L.; Avery, W.H.; Francis, E.J.; Richards, D.

    1983-07-01

    In 1881, d'Arsonval conceived the closed-Rankine-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) system in which a working fluid is vaporized by heat exchange with cold water drawn from a 700-1200 m depth. In 1930, Claude demonstrated an open-cycle process in Cuba. Surface water was flash-vaporized at 3 kPa to drive a turbine directly (no secondary working fluid) and then was condensed by direct contact with water drawn from a 700-m depth through a 1.6m-diam, 1.75-km-long cold-water pipe (CWP). From a delta T of 14/sup 0/C his undersized turbine generated 22 kW. In 1956 a French team designed a 3.5-MW (net) open-cycle plant for installation off Abidjan on the Ivory Coast of Africa and demonstrated the necessary CWP deployment. The at-sea demonstrations by Mini-OTEC and OTEC-1 and other recent advances in OTEC technology summarized herein represent great progress. All of the types of plants proposed for the DOE's PON program may be worthy of development; certainly work on a grazing plant is needed. Our estimates indicate that the U.S. goals established by Public Law 96-310 leading to 10 GW of OTEC power and energy product equivalents by 1999 are achievable, provided that adequate federal financial incentives are retained to assure the building of the first few plants.

  17. Production of desalinated water using ocean thermal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabas, T.; Panchal, C.

    This paper describes an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) desalination plant that consists of a multistage flash evaporator (MSF), a closed-cycle OTEC power plant, and an appropriate seawater system depending if the desalination plant is land based or floating. OTEC desalination plants of this type are preferred because the production of desalinated water far exceeds that obtained from other OTEC plant types employing the same size seawater system. The focus of the paper is on the multistage flash evaporator. The similarities and differences between conventional MSF and OTEC multistage flash evaporators (OTEC-MSF) are first described. Then the details of the OTEC-MSF evaporator design are discussed and preliminary correlations are recommended for the three major elements: the flash chamber, the moisture removal device, and the condenser. Recent advances such as enhanced condenser tubes, condensers of the compact type, and corrugated-plate moisture separators are introduced into the design. Comparisons of the water production capability, evaporator shell volume, and material cost are then presented for state-of-the-art and the new design concepts.

  18. Production of desalinated water using ocean thermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.; Panchal, C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) desalination plant that consists of a multistage flash evaporator (MSF), a closed-cycle OTEC power plant, and an appropriate seawater system depending if the desalination plant is land based or floating. OTEC desalination plants of this type are preferred because the production of desalinated water far exceeds that obtained from other OTEC plant types employing the same size seawater system. The focus of the paper is on the multistage flash evaporator. The similarities and differences between conventional MSF and OTEC multistage flash evaporators (OTEC-MSF) are first described. Then the details of the OTEC-MSF evaporator design are discussed and preliminary correlations are recommended for the three major elements: the flash chamber, the moisture removal device, and the condenser. Recent advances such as enhanced condenser tubes, condensers of the compact type, and corrugated-plate moisture separators are introduced into the design. Comparisons of the water production capability, evaporator shell volume, and material cost are then presented for state-of-the-art and the new design concepts. 20 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  20. An experimental investigation of thermal stress relief in two steels

    SciTech Connect

    Cammett, J.T.; Luken, R.C.; Dotson, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    Thermal relief of residual stresses was studied in AISI 4340 alloy steel (38 HRC) and AISI 1070 spring steel (45 HRC). Residual Stresses in simple strip-geometry specimens introduced by shot peening, abusive grinding, and mechanical bending were measured by X-ray diffraction before and after thermal treatments for varying times over the temperature range of 375 F to 1,050 F. Results correlated well with a time-temperature parameter having the same form as the Larson-Miller parameter commonly used to correlate creep deformation and stress-rupture behavior of metallic materials. Thermal stress relief results exhibited not only a material dependence, but also an apparent dependence on the initial magnitude of residual stress before thermal treatment and, possibly, on the manner of their creation.

  1. Potential impact of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) on fisheries. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, E.P.; Hoss, D.E.; Matsumoto, W.M.; Peters, D.S.; Seki, M.P.

    1986-06-01

    The commercial development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) operations will involve some environmental perturbations for which there is no precedent experience. The pumping of very large volumes of warm surface water and cold deep water and its subsequent discharge will result in the impingement, entrainment, and redistribution of biota. Additional stresses to biota will be caused by biocide usage and temperature depressions. However, the artificial upwelling of nutrients associated with the pumping of cold deep water, and the artificial reef created by an OTEC plant may have positive effects on the local environment. Although more detailed information is needed to assess the net effect of an OTEC operation on fisheries, certain assumptions and calculations are made, supporting the conclusion that the potential risk to fisheries is not signnificant enough to deter the early development of OTEC. It will be necessary to monitor a commercial-scale plant in order to remove many of the remaining uncertainties.

  2. The evolution of impact basins - Cooling, subsidence, and thermal stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratt, S. R.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The present study is concerned with an assessment of the contribution of thermal contraction and thermal stress to the topography and tectonics of large lunar impact basins. Exploratory models are developed, giving attention to the temperature structure following basin formation, the subsequent cooling of the basin region, and the resulting thermal displacements and stresses as functions of time. The subsidence and stress at the surface are compared with topography and tectonic features in the comparatively well-preserved Orientale basin. The results of the comparison are used as a basis to derive approximate constraints on the quantity and distribution of heat implanted during the basin-formation process.

  3. Combustion characteristics of thermally stressed hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Colin William

    Liquid propelled propulsion systems, which range from rocket systems to hypersonic scramjet and ramjet engines, require active cooling in order to prevent additional payload requirements. In these systems, the liquid fuel is used as a coolant and is delivered through micro-channels that surround the combustion chambers, nozzles, as well as the exterior surfaces in order to extract heat from these affected areas. During this process, heat exchange occurs through phase change, sensible heat extraction, and endothermic reactions experienced by the liquid fuel. Previous research has demonstrated the significant modifications in fuel composition and changes to the fuel's physical properties that can result from these endothermic reactions. As a next step, we are experimentally investigating the effect that endothermic reactions have on fundamental flame behavior for real hydrocarbon fuels that are used as rocket and jet propellants. To achieve this goal, we have developed a counter-flow flame burner to measure extinction limits of the thermally stressed fuels. The counter-flow flame system is to be coupled with a high pressure reactor, capable of subjecting the fuel to 170 atm and 873 K, effectively simulating the extreme environment that cause the liquid fuel to experience endothermic reactions. The fundamental flame properties of the reacted fuels will be compared to those of unreacted fuels, allowing us to determine the role of endothermic reactions on the combustion behavior of current hydrocarbon jet and rocket propellants. To quantify the change in transport properties and chemical kinetics of the reacting mixture, simultaneous numerical simulations of the reactor portion of the experiment coupled with a counterflow flame simulation are performed using n-heptane and n-dodecane.

  4. The Warming Hiatus, Natural Variability and Thermal Ocean Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, A.; Moron, V.; Robertson, A. W.; Kondrashov, D. A.; Ghil, M.

    2015-12-01

    Long before the recent concern with the warming hiatus, Ghil and Vautard (1991, Nature) stated at the end of their abstract that "The oscillatory components [in global temperature time series] have combined (peak-to-peak) amplitudes of 0.2°C, and therefore limit our ability to predict whether the inferred secular warming of 0.005°C/yr will continue." Present capabilities of the advanced spectral methods introduced into the global warming problem by that paper permit us now to consider oscillatory aspects of natural variability in much greater detail. In a multivariate analysis of the upper-ocean thermal structure, we examine properties of the recent long-term changes and of the naturally occurring global-climate fluctuations on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. M. Ghil and associates (Ghil and Vautard 1991; Plaut et al. 1995, Science; Ghil et al. 2002, Rev. Geophys.), among others, have argued that this natural variability has some regularity embedded into it. Although the existence of such regularity on the interannual time scale is fairly well established by now, evidence for similar regularity on decadal and interdecadal time scales is more difficult to establish, due to the shortness of instrumental temperature data. To identify spatio-temporal patterns, we rely on the method of multichannel singular spectrum analysis [M-SSA; see Ghil et al. (2002) for a review] and on its recent improvements that help separate distinct patterns (Groth and Ghil 2011, Phys. Rev. E; Groth and Ghil 2015, J. Climate). Results on the temperature field from the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) reanalysis (Carton and Giese 2008, Mon. Wea. Rev.; Giese and Ray 2011, J. Geophys. Res.) will be shown and contrasted with results on the HadCRUT surface temperature dataset (Morice et al. 2012, J. Geophys. Res.). We will focus, in particular, on the robustness of the geographical distribution of long-term changes in both data sets and discuss the significance of superimposed

  5. The effects of volcanic eruptions on simulated ocean heat content and thermal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, P.; Achutarao, K.; Barnett, T.; Gregory, J.; Pierce, D.; Santer, B.; Taylor, K.; Wigley, T.

    2006-12-01

    We examine the ocean heat content in a recent suite of coupled ocean-atmosphere model simulations of the 20th Century. Our results suggest that 20th Century increases in ocean heat content and sea-level (via thermal expansion) were substantially reduced by the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa. The volcanically-induced cooling of the ocean surface is subducted into deeper ocean layers, where it persists for decades. Temporary reductions in ocean heat content associated with the comparable eruptions of El Chichon (1982) and Pinatubo (1991) were much shorter lived because they occurred relative to a non-stationary background of large, anthropogenically-forced ocean warming. To understand the response of these simulations to volcanic loadings, we focus on multiple realizations of the 20th Century experiment with three models (NCAR CCSM3, GFDL 2.0, and GISS HYCOM). By comparing these runs to control simulations of each model, we track the three dimensional oceanic response to Krakatoa using S/N analysis. Inter-model differences in the oceanic thermal response to Krakatoa are large and arise from differences in external forcing, model physics, and experimental design. Our results suggest that inclusion of the effects of Krakatoa (and perhaps even earlier eruptions) is important for reliable simulation of 20th century ocean heat uptake and thermal expansion. Systematic experimentation will be required to quantify the relative importance of these factors.

  6. Thermal stresses in composite tubes using complementary virtual work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Cooper, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses the computation of thermally induced stresses in layered, fiber-reinforced composite tubes subjected to a circumferential gradient. The paper focuses on using the principle of complementary virtual work, in conjunction with a Ritz approximation to the stress field, to study the influence on the predicted stresses of including temperature-dependent material properties. Results indicate that the computed values of stress are sensitive to the temperature dependence of the matrix-direction compliance and matrix-direction thermal expansion in the plane of the lamina. There is less sensitivity to the temperature dependence of the other material properties.

  7. Thermal stresses in composite tubes using complementary virtual work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Cooper, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses the computation of thermally induced stresses in layered, fiber-reinforced composite tubes subjected to a circumferential gradient. The paper focuses on using the principle of complementary virtual work, in conjunction with a Ritz approximation to the stress field, to study the influence on the predicted stresses of including temperature-dependent material properties. Results indicate that the computed values of stress are sensitive to the temperature dependence of the matrix-direction compliance and matrix-direction thermal expansion in the plane of the lamina. There is less sensitivity to the temperature dependence of the other material properties.

  8. Lipid biomarkers in Symbiodinium dinoflagellates: new indicators of thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneeland, J.; Hughen, K.; Cervino, J.; Hauff, B.; Eglinton, T.

    2013-12-01

    Lipid content and fatty acid profiles of corals and their dinoflagellate endosymbionts are known to vary in response to high-temperature stress. To better understand the heat-stress response in these symbionts, we investigated cultures of Symbiodinium goreauii type C1 and Symbiodinium sp. clade subtype D1 grown under a range of temperatures and durations. The predominant lipids produced by Symbiodinium are palmitic (C16) and stearic (C18) saturated fatty acids and their unsaturated analogs, the polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6, n-3; DHA), and a variety of sterols. Prolonged exposure to high temperature causes the relative amount of unsaturated acids within the C18 fatty acids in Symbiodinium tissue to decrease. Thermal stress also causes a decrease in abundance of fatty acids relative to sterols, as well as the more specific ratio of DHA to an algal 4-methyl sterol. These shifts in fatty acid unsaturation and fatty acid-to-sterol ratios are common to both types C1 and D1, but the apparent thermal threshold of lipid changes is lower for type C1. This work indicates that ratios among free fatty acids and sterols in Symbiodinium can be used as sensitive indicators of thermal stress. If the Symbiodinium lipid stress response is unchanged in hospite, the algal heat-stress biomarkers we have identified could be measured to detect thermal stress within the coral holobiont. These results provide new insights into the potential role of lipids in the overall Symbiodinium thermal stress response.

  9. When depth is no refuge: cumulative thermal stress increases with depth in Bocas del Toro, Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, B. P.; Condit, C.; Liu, G.; dos Santos, S.; Kahru, M.; Mitchell, B. G.; Kline, D. I.

    2014-03-01

    Coral reefs are increasingly affected by high-temperature stress events and associated bleaching. Monitoring and predicting these events have largely utilized sea surface temperature data, due to the convenience of using large-scale remotely sensed satellite measurements. However, coral bleaching has been observed to vary in severity throughout the water column, and variations in coral thermal stress across depths have not yet been well investigated. In this study, in situ water temperature data from 1999 to 2011 from three depths were used to calculate thermal stress on a coral reef in Bahia Almirante, Bocas del Toro, Panama, which was compared to satellite surface temperature data and thermal stress calculations for the same area and time period from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coral Reef Watch Satellite Bleaching Alert system. The results show similar total cumulative annual thermal stress for both the surface and depth-stratified data, but with a striking difference in the distribution of that stress among the depth strata during different high-temperature events, with the greatest thermal stress unusually recorded at the deepest measured depth during the most severe bleaching event in 2005. Temperature records indicate that a strong density-driven temperature inversion may have formed in this location in that year, contributing to the persistence and intensity of bleaching disturbance at depth. These results indicate that depth may not provide a stress refuge from high water temperature events in some situations, and in this case, the water properties at depth appear to have contributed to greater coral bleaching at depth compared to near-surface locations. This case study demonstrates the importance of incorporating depth-stratified temperature monitoring and small-scale oceanographic and hydrologic data for understanding and predicting local reef responses to elevated water temperature events.

  10. Transient thermal stress problem for a circumferentially cracked hollow cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nied, H. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the transient thermal stress problem for a long hollow circular cylinder containing an internal axisymmetric circumferential edge crack that is suddenly cooled from inside. It is assumed that the transient thermal stress problem is quasi-static, i.e., the inertial effects are negligible. Also, all thermoelastic coupling effects and the possible temperature dependence of the thermoelastic constants are neglected. The problem is considered in two parts. The first part is the evaluation of transient thermal stresses in an uncracked cylinder; the second part is the isothermal perturbation problem for the cracked cylinder in which the crack surface tractions, equal and opposite to the thermal stresses obtained from the first problem, are the only external loads. The superposition of the two solutions gives results for the cracked cylinder.

  11. Residual thermal stresses in composites for dimensionally stable spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.; Tompkins, Stephen S.; Funk, Joan G.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of NASA LaRC's research on thermal residual stresses and their effect on the dimensional stability of carbon fiber reinforced polymer-matrix composites is presented. The data show that thermal residual stresses can induce damage in polymer matrix composites and significantly affect the dimensional stability of these composites by causing permanent residual strains and changes in CTE. The magnitude of these stresses is primarily controlled by the laminate configuration and the applied temperature change. The damage caused by thermal residual stresses initiates at the fiber/matrix interface and micromechanics level analyses are needed to accurately predict it. An increased understanding of fiber/matrix interface interactions appears to be the best approach for improving a composite's resistance to thermally induced damage.

  12. Residual thermal stresses in composites for dimensionally stable spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.; Tompkins, Stephen S.; Funk, Joan G.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of NASA LaRC's research on thermal residual stresses and their effect on the dimensional stability of carbon fiber reinforced polymer-matrix composites is presented. The data show that thermal residual stresses can induce damage in polymer matrix composites and significantly affect the dimensional stability of these composites by causing permanent residual strains and changes in CTE. The magnitude of these stresses is primarily controlled by the laminate configuration and the applied temperature change. The damage caused by thermal residual stresses initiates at the fiber/matrix interface and micromechanics level analyses are needed to accurately predict it. An increased understanding of fiber/matrix interface interactions appears to be the best approach for improving a composite's resistance to thermally induced damage.

  13. Thermal stress tectonics on the satellites of Saturn and Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, John; Squyres, Steven W.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal stress histories of the Saturnian and Uranian satellites are investigated. To this end, the thermal evolution of an icy satellite subjected to accretional and radiogenic heating, thermal conduction, and solid-state convection is modeled, and changes in the internal stress that occur during satellite evolution are examined. Results show that internal temperature changes that occur during normal evolution of many of the satellites of Saturn and Uranus can be expected to generate large extensional stresses in the satellites' outer regions. These stresses arise from three sources: (1) radiogenic warming, causing thermal expansion of materials in the satellite's deep interior; (2) radiogenic warming in larger satellites that can induce a phase transition from ice II to ice I and to produce a volume increase in the deep interior; and (3) accretional heating depositing heat in the satellite'e outer regions.

  14. Influence of Coral Community Structure and Thermal Stress Exposure on Observed Patterns of Bleaching across the Northern Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, L.; Heron, S. F.; Johnson, S.; Okano, R.; Benavente, D.; Iguel, J.; Perez, D. I.; Liu, G.; Geiger, E.; Eakin, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    In 2013 and 2014, the Mariana Archipelago experienced consecutive thermal stress events that resulted in widespread coral bleaching and mortality. Using in situ survey data collected across seven of the Northern Mariana Islands during the 2014 event, we undertook the first quantitative comparison between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Coral Reef Watch 5 km satellite monitoring products and coral bleaching observations. Analysis of coral community characteristics, historical temperature conditions and thermal stress revealed a strong influence of coral biodiversity in the patterns of observed bleaching. This illustrates the importance of using local benthic characteristics to interpret the level of impact from thermal stress exposure. In an era of continuing climate change, accurate monitoring of thermal stress and prediction of coral bleaching are essential for resource managers and stakeholders to direct resources to the most effective management actions to conserve coral reefs.

  15. Substrate size mediates thermal stress in the rocky intertidal.

    PubMed

    Gedan, Keryn B; Bernhardt, Joanna; Bertness, Mark D; Leslie, Heather M

    2011-03-01

    Variation in physical factors, such as slope, orientation, and wind exposure, shapes thermal conditions. Variation in substrate size is common in many habitats, but its thermal consequences for organisms are not well characterized. Larger substrates should remain more thermally stable and act as thermal refuges for associated organisms during short, thermally stressful periods such as midday temperature peaks or tidal exposure. In observations and a transplant and thermal integration experiment, we found that larger rock substrates stayed cooler and facilitated greater survival of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides in the high intertidal relative to small substrates during the hot summer months in southern New England, USA. However, in thermally benign northern New England, rock substrate size had no effect on barnacle distributions, indicating that the thermal effects of substrate size are mediated by regional climate.

  16. Behavior of Materials Under Conditions of Thermal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S S

    1954-01-01

    A review is presented of available information on the behavior of brittle and ductile materials under conditions of thermal stress and thermal shock. For brittle materials, a simple formula relating physical properties to thermal-shock resistance is derived and used to determine the relative significance of two indices currently in use for rating materials. For ductile materials, thermal-shock resistance depends upon the complex interrelation among several metallurgical variables which seriously affect strength and ductility. These variables are briefly discussed and illustrated from literature sources. The importance of simulating operating conditions in tests for rating materials is especially to be emphasized because of the importance of testing conditions in metallurgy. A number of practical methods that have been used to minimize the deleterious effects of thermal stress and thermal shock are outlined.

  17. Analysis of thermal stresses and metal movement during welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraki, T.; Pattee, F. M.; Masubuchi, K.

    1974-01-01

    Finite element computer programs were developed to determine thermal stresses and metal movement during butt welding of flat plates and bead-on-plate welding along the girth of a cylindrical shell. Circular cylindrical shells of 6061 aluminum alloy were used for the tests. Measurements were made of changes in temperature and thermal strains during the welding process.

  18. Low thermal stress ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Glezer, Boris; Bagheri, Hamid; Fierstein, Aaron R.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of vanes therebetween. Each of the plurality of vanes have a device for heating and cooling a portion of each of the plurality of vanes. Furthermore, the inner shroud has a plurality of bosses attached thereto. A cylindrical member has a plurality of grooves formed therein and each of the plurality of bosses are positioned in corresponding ones of the plurality of grooves. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  19. Damage Assessment of Stress-Thermal Cycled High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Jach-Yung; Prochazka, Michael; Ronke, Ben; Morgan, Roger; Shin, Eugene

    2003-01-01

    We report on the characterization of bismaleimide and polyimide carbon fiber composite, microcrack development under stress thermal cycling loading. Such cycle range from cryogenic temperatures associated with cryogenic fuel (LN, LOX) containment to high temperatures of 300 degrees associated with future hypervelocity aeropropulsion systems. Microcrack development thresholds as a function of temperature range of the thermal cycle, the number of cycles, and the applied stress level imposed on the composite are reported. We have conducted stress-thermal cycles on thin bismaleimide-woven carbon fiber foils for three temperature range cycles. The principle findings are that the full cycles from -196 degree celsius up to 250 degree celsius cause the most significant microcrack development. These observations indicate that the high temperature portion of the cycle under load causes fiber-matrix interface failure and subsequent exposure to higher stresses at the cryogenic, low temperature region results in composite matrix microcracking as a result of the additional stresses associated with the fiber-matrix thermal expansion mismatch. Our initial studies for 12 ply PMR-II-50 polyimide/M6OJB carbon fabric [0f, 90f, 90f, 0f, 0f, 90f] composites will be presented. The stress-thermal cycle test procedure for these will be described. Moisture absorption characteristics between cycles will be used to monitor interconnected microcrack development. The applied stress level will be 75 percent of the composite cryogenic -196 degree celsius ultimate strength.

  20. High-intensity acoustic tests of a thermally stressed plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Chung Fai; Clevenson, Sherman A.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus at the Langley Research Center to study the acoustically excited random motion of an aluminum plate which is buckled due to thermal stresses. The thermal buckling displacements were measured and compared with theory. The general trends of the changes in resonances frequencies and random responses of the plate agree with previous theoretical prediction and experimental results for a mechanically buckled plate.

  1. Microstructural Evolution and Residual Stresses of Air-Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jae-Young; Kim, Jae-Hyoun; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Cho, Hyun; Yi, Dong-Kee; Paik, Ungyu

    Microstructural evolution and fracture behavior of zirconia (ZrO2)-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were investigated under thermal exposure. New ZrO2 granule with 8 wt.% yttria (Y2O3) with a deformed hollow morphology was developed through a spray drying process and employed to prepare TBCs. The thermal exposure tests were conducted at 1210°C with a dwell time of 100 h till 800 h. The residual stress at the interface between top coat and thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer was measured using a nanoindentation technique before and after thermal exposure. Vertical cracks on the top coat were newly formed and interlamellar cracks at the interface were enhanced after the thermal exposure of 800 h. Especially, partial delamination was observed at the interface after the thermal exposure of 800 h in TBC samples tested. The microstructural evolution in the top coat could be defined through load-displacement curves, showing a higher load or a less displacement after the thermal exposure of 800 h. The stress state was strongly dependent on the TGO geometry, resulting in the compressive stresses at the "valleys" or the "troughs," and the tensile stresses at the "crests" or peak areas, in the ranges of -500 to -75 MPa and of +168 to + 24 MPa, respectively. These stress terms incorporated with resintering during thermal exposure affected the mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus of the top coat.

  2. Possible Factors affecting the Thermal Contrast between Middle-Latitude Asian Continent and Adjacent Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Huaqiong; Wu, Tongwen; Dong, Wenjie

    2015-04-01

    A middle-latitude Land-Sea thermal contrast Index was used in this study which has close connection to the East Asian summer precipitation. The index has two parts which are land thermal index defined as JJA 500-hPa geopotential height anomalies at a land area (75°-90° E, 40° -55°N ) and ocean thermal index defined as that at an oceanic area (140° -150°E, 35° -42.5°N). The impact of the surface heat flux and atmospheric diabatic heating over the land and the ocean on the index was studied. The results show that the surface heat flux over Eurasian inner land has little influence to the land thermal index, while the variation of the surface latent heat flux and long-wave radiation over the Pacific adjacent to Japan has highly correlation with the ocean thermal index. The changes with height of the atmospheric diabatic heating rates over the Eurasian inner land and the Pacific adjacent to Japan have different features. The variations of the middle troposphere atmospheric long-wave and short-wave radiation heating have significantly influences on land thermal index, and that of the low troposphere atmospheric long-wave radiation, short-wave radiation and deep convective heating also have impact on the yearly variation of the land thermal index. For the ocean thermal index, the variations of the surface layer atmospheric vertical diffuse heating, large-scale latent heating and long-wave radiation heating are more important, low and middle troposphere atmospheric large-scale latent heating and shallow convective heating also have impact on the yearly variation of the ocean thermal index. And then the ocean thermal index has closely connection with the low troposphere atmospheric temperature, while the land thermal index has closely connection with the middle troposphere atmospheric temperature. The Effect of the preceding global SST anomalies on the index also was analyzed. The relations of land thermal index and ocean thermal index and the global SST anomalies

  3. The role of ocean gateways in the dynamics and sensitivity to wind stress of the early Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, D. R.; Johnson, H. L.; Marshall, D. P.

    2015-03-01

    The date of inception of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current is debated due to uncertainty in the relative opening times of Drake Passage and the Tasman Seaway. Using an idealized eddy-resolving numerical ocean model, we investigate whether both ocean gateways have to be open to allow for a substantial circumpolar current. We find that overlapping continental barriers do not impede a circumpolar transport in excess of 50Sv, as long as a circumpolar path can be traced around the barriers. However, the presence of overlapping barriers does lead to an increased sensitivity of the current's volume transport to changes in wind stress. This change in sensitivity is interpreted in terms of the role of pressure drops across continental barriers and submerged bathymetry in balancing the momentum input by the surface wind stress. Specifically, when the pressure drop across continents is the main balancing sink of momentum, the zonal volume transport is sensitive to changes in wind stress. Changes in zonal volume transport take place via altering the depth-independent part of the circumpolar transport rather than that arising from thermal wind shear. In such a scenario, isopycnals continue to slope steeply across the model Southern Ocean, implying a strong connection between the deep and surface oceans. This may have consequences for the meridional overturning circulation and its sensitivity to wind stress.

  4. Formation of the residual stress field under local thermal actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burenin, A. A.; Dats, E. P.; Murashkin, E. V.

    2014-03-01

    The one-dimensional process of material deformation due to local heating and subsequent cooling is analyzed in the framework of the classical theory of elastoplastic deformations. The problem of formation of residual stresses in a thin plate made of an elastoplastic material under a given thermal action is solved. The graphs of fields of residual stresses and displacements are constructed.

  5. Thermally induced micromechanical stresses in ceramic/ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhuang ); Bradt, R.C. . Mackay School of Mines)

    1992-11-01

    The internal micromechanical stresses which develop in ceramic-ceramic composites as a consequence of temperature changes and thermoelastic property differences between the reinforcing and matrix phases are addressed by the Eshelby method. Results for two whisker reinforced ceramic matrix composites and for quartz particles in porcelain are discussed. It is concluded that the stresses which develop in the second phase reinforcing inclusions are quite substantial (GPa-levels) and may be highly anisotropic in character. These stresses are additive to the macroscopic thermal stresses from temperature gradients which are encountered during heating and cooling, and also to externally apphed mechanical stresses (loads). These micromechanical stresses are expected to be highly significant for thermal cycling fatigue and other failure processes.

  6. Thermally induced micromechanical stresses in ceramic/ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhuang; Bradt, R.C.

    1992-11-01

    The internal micromechanical stresses which develop in ceramic-ceramic composites as a consequence of temperature changes and thermoelastic property differences between the reinforcing and matrix phases are addressed by the Eshelby method. Results for two whisker reinforced ceramic matrix composites and for quartz particles in porcelain are discussed. It is concluded that the stresses which develop in the second phase reinforcing inclusions are quite substantial (GPa-levels) and may be highly anisotropic in character. These stresses are additive to the macroscopic thermal stresses from temperature gradients which are encountered during heating and cooling, and also to externally apphed mechanical stresses (loads). These micromechanical stresses are expected to be highly significant for thermal cycling fatigue and other failure processes.

  7. Thermal stresses and buckling of elastic plates with reinforced edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, M.; Dillon, O. W., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An approximation method based on the method of Kantorovich is used to calculate the critical thickness necessary to prevent thermal buckling of a rectangular cantilever plate with edge stiffeners. The case where no external loads are applied is considered, and the only stresses are those due to the prescribed thermal profile. Stiffeners are found to play an important role in the thermal buckling by affecting the overall distribution of the in-plane stresses within the plate. Results show that edge stiffeners can cause less or more buckling, and that in most situations the edge stiffeners hinder buckling because a thicker plate is required than if the stiffeners were not present.

  8. Thermal stresses and buckling of elastic plates with reinforced edges

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.; Dillon, O.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An approximation method based on the method of Kantorovich is used to calculate the critical thickness necessary to prevent thermal buckling of a rectangular cantilever plate with edge stiffeners. The case where no external loads are applied is considered, and the only stresses are those due to the prescribed thermal profile. Stiffeners are found to play an important role in the thermal buckling by affecting the overall distribution of the in-plane stresses within the plate. Results show that edge stiffeners can cause less or more buckling, and that in most situations the edge stiffeners hinder buckling because a thicker plate is required than if the stiffeners were not present. 11 references.

  9. Constraints on lithospheric thermal structure for the Indian Ocean from depth and heat flow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoberg, Tom; Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1993-01-01

    Models for the thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere are primarily constrained by variations in seafloor depth and heat flow with age. These models have been largely based on data from the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean basins. We construct seafloor age relations for the Indian Ocean which we combine with bathymetric, sediment isopach and heat flow data to derive curves for depth and heat flow versus age. Comparison of these curves with predictions from three thermal models shows that they are better fit by the shallower depths and higher heat flow for the GDH1 model, which is characterized by a thinner and hotter lithosphere than previous models.

  10. Constraints on lithospheric thermal structure for the Indian Ocean from depth and heat flow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoberg, Tom; Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1993-01-01

    Models for the thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere are primarily constrained by variations in seafloor depth and heat flow with age. These models have been largely based on data from the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean basins. We construct seafloor age relations for the Indian Ocean which we combine with bathymetric, sediment isopach and heat flow data to derive curves for depth and heat flow versus age. Comparison of these curves with predictions from three thermal models shows that they are better fit by the shallower depths and higher heat flow for the GDH1 model, which is characterized by a thinner and hotter lithosphere than previous models.

  11. Constraints on lithospheric thermal structure for the Indian Ocean from depth and heat flow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoberg, Tom; Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1993-06-01

    Models for the thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere are primarily constrained by variations in seafloor depth and heat flow with age. These models have been largely based on data from the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean basins. We construct seafloor age relations for the Indian Ocean which we combine with bathymetric, sediment isopach and heat flow data to derive curves for depth and heat flow versus age. Comparison of these curves with predictions from three thermal models shows that they are better fit by the shallower depths and higher heat flow for the GDH1 model, which is characterized by a thinner and hotter lithosphere than previous models.

  12. Thermal stress analysis of a silicon carbide/aluminum composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gdoutos, E. E.; Karalekas, D.; Daniel, I. M.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal deformations and stresses were studied in a silicon-carbide/aluminum filamentary composite at temperatures up to 370 C (700 F). Longitudinal and transverse thermal strains were measured with strain gages and a dilatometer. An elastoplastic micromechanical analysis based on a one-dimensional rule-of-mixtures model and an axisymmetric two-material composite cylinder model was performed. It was established that beyond a critical temperature thermal strains become nonlinear with decreasing longitudinal and increasing transverse thermal-expansion coefficients. This behavior was attributed to the plastic stresses in the aluminum matrix above the critical temperature. An elastoplastic analysis of both micromechanical models was performed to determine the stress distributions and thermal deformation in the fiber and matrix of the composite. While only axial stresses can be determined by the rule-of-mixtures model, the complete triaxial state of stress is established by the composite cylinder model. Theoretical predictions for the two thermal-expansion coefficients were in satisfactory agreement with experimental results.

  13. Analytical method for thermal stress analysis of plasma facing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, J. H.; Bolt, H.

    2001-10-01

    The thermo-mechanical response of plasma facing materials (PFMs) to heat loads from the fusion plasma is one of the crucial issues in fusion technology. In this work, a fully analytical description of the thermal stress distribution in armour tiles of plasma facing components is presented which is expected to occur under typical high heat flux (HHF) loads. The method of stress superposition is applied considering the temperature gradient and thermal expansion mismatch. Several combinations of PFMs and heat sink metals are analysed and compared. In the framework of the present theoretical model, plastic flow and the effect of residual stress can be quantitatively assessed. Possible failure features are discussed.

  14. Stress measurements in glass by use of double thermal gratings.

    PubMed

    Cannon, B D; Shepard, C; Khaleel, M

    2001-10-20

    We developed a nondestructive and noncontact method for measuring stress at the midplane of tempered glass plates that uses Bragg scattering from a pair of thermal gratings. These gratings are formed by 1064-nm beams from a seeded Nd:YAG laser, and we measure the polarization state of light from a 532-nm beam that scatters from both thermal gratings. The change in polarization of the doubly scattered light with separation between the two gratings allows measurement of the in-plane stress. A model of the Bragg scattering efficiency, experimental investigations of the scattered beams, and stress measurements are reported.

  15. Ectotherm thermal stress and specialization across altitude and latitude.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Lauren B; Miller, Ethan F; Kingsolver, Joel G

    2013-10-01

    Gradients of air temperature, radiation, and other climatic factors change systematically but differently with altitude and latitude. We explore how these factors combine to produce altitudinal and latitudinal patterns of body temperature, thermal stress, and seasonal overlap that differ markedly from patterns based solely on air temperature. We use biophysical models to estimate body temperature as a function of an organism's phenotype and environmental conditions (air and surface temperatures and radiation). Using grasshoppers as a case study, we compare mean body temperatures and the incidence of thermal extremes along altitudinal gradients both under past and current climates. Organisms at high elevation can experience frequent thermal stress despite generally cooler air temperatures due to high levels of solar radiation. Incidences of thermal stress have increased more rapidly than have increases in mean conditions due to recent climate change. Increases in air temperature have coincided with shifts in cloudiness and solar radiation, which can exacerbate shifts in body temperature. We compare altitudinal thermal gradients and their seasonality between tropical and temperate mountains to ask whether mountain passes pose a greater physiological barrier in the tropics (Janzen's hypothesis). We find that considering body temperature rather than air temperature generally increases the amount of overlap in thermal conditions along gradients in elevation and thus decreases the physiological barrier posed by tropical mountains. Our analysis highlights the limitations of predicting thermal stress based solely on air temperatures, and the importance of considering how phenotypes influence body temperatures.

  16. Potential environmental consequences of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants. A workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J.J.

    1981-05-01

    The concept of generating electrical power from the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean waters was advanced over a century ago. A pilot plant was constructed in the Caribbean during the 1920's but commercialization did not follow. The US Department of Energy (DOE) earlier planned to construct a single operational 10MWe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant by 1986. However, Public Law P.L.-96-310, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Research, Development and Demonstration Act, and P.L.-96-320, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of 1980, now call for acceleration of the development of OTEC plants, with capacities of 100 MWe in 1986, 500 MWe in 1989, and 10,000 MWe by 1999 and provide for licensing and permitting and loan guarantees after the technology has been demonstrated.

  17. Nonlinear/linear unified thermal stress formulations - Transfinite element approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1987-01-01

    A new unified computational approach for applicability to nonlinear/linear thermal-structural problems is presented. Basic concepts of the approach including applicability to nonlinear and linear thermal structural mechanics are first described via general formulations. Therein, the approach is demonstrated for thermal stress and thermal-structural dynamic applications. The proposed transfinite element approach focuses on providing a viable hybrid computational methodology by combining the modeling versatility of contemporary finite element schemes in conjunction with transform techniques and the classical Bubnov-Galerkin schemes. Comparative samples of numerical test cases highlight the capabilities of the proposed concepts.

  18. Nonlinear/linear unified thermal stress formulations - Transfinite element approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1987-01-01

    A new unified computational approach for applicability to nonlinear/linear thermal-structural problems is presented. Basic concepts of the approach including applicability to nonlinear and linear thermal structural mechanics are first described via general formulations. Therein, the approach is demonstrated for thermal stress and thermal-structural dynamic applications. The proposed transfinite element approach focuses on providing a viable hybrid computational methodology by combining the modeling versatility of contemporary finite element schemes in conjunction with transform techniques and the classical Bubnov-Galerkin schemes. Comparative samples of numerical test cases highlight the capabilities of the proposed concepts.

  19. Coping with Commitment: Projected Thermal Stress on Coral Reefs under Different Future Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Simon D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Periods of anomalously warm ocean temperatures can lead to mass coral bleaching. Past studies have concluded that anthropogenic climate change may rapidly increase the frequency of these thermal stress events, leading to declines in coral cover, shifts in the composition of corals and other reef-dwelling organisms, and stress on the human populations who depend on coral reef ecosystems for food, income and shoreline protection. The ability of greenhouse gas mitigation to alter the near-term forecast for coral reefs is limited by the time lag between greenhouse gas emissions and the physical climate response. Methodology/Principal Findings This study uses observed sea surface temperatures and the results of global climate model forced with five different future emissions scenarios to evaluate the “committed warming” for coral reefs worldwide. The results show that the physical warming commitment from current accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere could cause over half of the world's coral reefs to experience harmfully frequent (p≥0.2 year−1) thermal stress by 2080. An additional “societal” warming commitment, caused by the time required to shift from a business-as-usual emissions trajectory to a 550 ppm CO2 stabilization trajectory, may cause over 80% of the world's coral reefs to experience harmfully frequent events by 2030. Thermal adaptation of 1.5°C would delay the thermal stress forecast by 50–80 years. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that adaptation – via biological mechanisms, coral community shifts and/or management interventions – could provide time to change the trajectory of greenhouse gas emissions and possibly avoid the recurrence of harmfully frequent events at the majority (97%) of the world's coral reefs this century. Without any thermal adaptation, atmospheric CO2 concentrations may need to be stabilized below current levels to avoid the degradation of coral reef ecosystems from frequent thermal

  20. Low thermal stress ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Glezer, B.; Bagheri, H.; Fierstein, A.R.

    1996-02-27

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and is attached to conventional metallic components, the metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of vanes there between. Each of the plurality of vanes have a device for heating and cooling a portion of each of the plurality of vanes. Furthermore, the inner shroud has a plurality of bosses attached thereto. A cylindrical member has a plurality of grooves formed therein and each of the plurality of bosses are positioned in corresponding ones of the plurality of grooves. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component. 4 figs.

  1. Micromechanics thermal stress analysis of composites for space structure applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents results from a finite element micromechanics analysis of thermally induced stresses in composites at cryogenic temperatures typical of spacecraft operating environments. The influence of microstructural geometry, constituent and interphase properties, and laminate orientation were investigated. Stress field results indicated that significant matrix stresses occur in composites exposed to typical spacecraft thermal excursions; these stresses varied with laminate orientation and circumferential position around the fiber. The major difference in the predicted response of unidirectional and multidirectional laminates was the presence of tensile radial stresses, at the fiber/matrix interface, in multidirectional laminates with off-axis ply angles greater than 15 deg. The predicted damage initiation temperatures and modes were in good agreement with experimental data for both low (207 GPa) and high (517 GPa) modulus carbon fiber/epoxy composites.

  2. Thermal preconditioning and heat-shock protein 72 preserve synaptic transmission during thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Kelty, Jonathan D; Noseworthy, Peter A; Feder, Martin E; Robertson, R Meldrum; Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2002-01-01

    As with other tissues, exposing the mammalian CNS to nonlethal heat stress (i.e., thermal preconditioning) increases levels of heat-shock proteins (Hsps) such as Hsp70 and enhances the viability of neurons under subsequent stress. Using a medullary slice preparation from a neonatal mouse, including the site of the neural network that generates respiratory rhythm (the pre-Bötzinger complex), we show that thermal preconditioning has an additional fundamental effect, protection of synaptic function. Relative to 30 degrees C baseline, initial thermal stress (40 degrees C) greatly increased the frequency of synaptic currents recorded without pharmacological manipulation by approximately 17-fold (p < 0.01) and of miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) elicited by GABA (20-fold) glutamate (10-fold), and glycine (36-fold). Thermal preconditioning (15 min at 40 degrees C) eliminated the increase in frequency of overall synaptic transmission during acute thermal stress and greatly attenuated the frequency increases of GABAergic, glutamatergic, and glycinergic mPSCs (for each, p < 0.05). Moreover, without thermal preconditioning, incubation of slices in solution containing inducible Hsp70 (Hsp72) mimicked the effect of thermal preconditioning on the stress-induced release of neurotransmitter. That preconditioning and exogenous Hsp72 can affect and preserve normal physiological function has important therapeutic implications.

  3. ZPPR FUEL ELEMENT THERMAL STRESS-STRAIN ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles W. Solbrig; Jason Andrus; Chad Pope

    2014-04-01

    The design temperature of high plutonium concentration ZPPR fuel assemblies is 600 degrees C. Cladding integrity of the 304L stainless steel cladding is a significant concern with this fuel since even small holes can lead to substantial fuel degradation. Since the fuel has a higher coefficient of thermal expansion than the cladding, an investigation of the stress induced in the cladding due to the differential thermal expansion of fuel and cladding up to the design temperature was conducted. Small holes in the cladding envelope would be expected to lead to the fuel hydriding and oxidizing into a powder over a long period of time. This is the same type of chemical reaction chain that exists in the degradion of the high uranium concentration ZPPR fuel. Unfortunately, the uranium fuel was designed with vents which allowed this degradation to occur. The Pu cladding is sealed so only fuel with damaged cladding would be subject to this damage. The thermal stresses that can be developed in the fuel cladding have been calculated in in this paper and compared to the ultimate tensile stress of the cladding. The conclusion is drawn that thermal stresses cannot induce holes in the cladding even for the highest storage temperatures predicted in calculations (292°C). In fact, thermal stress can not cause cladding failure as long as the fuel temperatures are below the design limit of 600 degrees C (1,112 degrees F).

  4. Thermal stresses in the microchannel heatsink cooled by liquid nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, R.A.

    1993-06-30

    Microchannel heatsinks represent a highly efficient and compact method for heat removal in high heat flux components. Excellent thermal performance of a silicon microchannel heatsink has been demonstrated using liquid nitrogen as the coolant. For the heating of a 1 square centimeter area, at a heat dissipation of 500 W, a typical silicon heatsink cooled by liquid nitrogen has a thermal resistance of 0.046 cm{sup 2}{degrees}K/W. The actual heatsink structure in this case is only 0.1 cm high. Silicon, although it has excellent thermal properties at liquid nitrogen temperatures, may fracture with very little plastic deformation due to mechanical and thermal stresses. Because the fracture strength of silicon depends on the presence of small defects, strength of the heatsink structures must be addressed to insure highly reliable heatsink devices. Microchannel heatsink reliability can be affected by thermal stresses that arise due to temperature gradients between the base and fin and along the film length. These stresses are combined with the bonding stresses that arise in attaching components at elevated temperatures to the silicon heatsink and then cooling the structure to the cryogenic operating temperatures. These bonding stresses are potentially large because of the differences in the values of the coefficients of thermal expansion in silicon heatsink material, and the attached component materials. The stress results are shown for a 17:1 aspect ratio heatsink cooled in liquid nitrogen. The temperature gradients are a result of a surface heat flux of 1.3 kW/cm{sup 2}, approximating the heat dissipation of an RF power chip. The chip is connected to an aluminum nitride substrate, then the chip and substrate module are attached to the heatsink at a bonding temperature of 600{degrees}K, as for a gold tin eutectic bond. The stresses are shown to be within the allowables of the materials involved.

  5. Non-thermal Plasma and Oxidative Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-09-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been used in medicine to cut and ablate tissues and for coagulation. Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP; non-thermal plasma) is a recently developed, non-thermal technique with possible biomedical applications. Although NEAPP reportedly generates reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, electrons, positive ions, and ultraviolet radiation, few research projects have been conducted to merge this technique with conventional free radical biology. Recently, Prof. Masaru Hori's group (Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University) developed a NEAPP device with high electron density. Here electron spin resonance revealed hydroxyl radicals as a major product. To merge non-thermal plasma biology with the preexisting free radical biology, we evaluated lipid peroxidation and DNA modifications in various in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Conjugated dienes increased after exposure to linoleic and alfa-linolenic acids. An increase in 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was also increased after exposure to phosphatidylcholine, liposomes or liver homogenate. Direct exposure to rat liver in medium produced immunohistochemical evidence of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal- and acrolein-modified proteins. Exposure to plasmid DNA induced dose-dependent single/double strand breaks and increased the amounts of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that oxidative biomolecular damage by NEAPP is dose-dependent and thus can be controlled in a site-specific manner. Simultaneous oxidative and UV-specific DNA damage may be useful in cancer treatment. Other recent advancements in the related studies of non-thermal plasma in Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine will also be discussed.

  6. Electromagnetic and Stress Analyses of the ITER Equatorial Thermal Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Mingzhun; Song, Yuntao; Wang, Songke; Wang, Xianwei

    2013-08-01

    The ITER equatorial thermal shield is located inside the cryostat and outside the vacuum vessel, and its purpose is to provide a thermal shield from hot components to the superconducting magnets. Electromagnetic analysis of the equatorial thermal shield was performed using the ANSYS code, because electromagnetic load was one of the main loads. The 40° sector finite element model was established including the vacuum vessel, equatorial thermal shield, and superconducting magnets. The main purpose of this analysis was to investigate the eddy current and electromagnetic force in the equatorial thermal shield during plasma disruption. Stress analysis was implemented under the electromagnetic load. The results show that the equatorial thermal shield can accommodate the calculated electromagnetic loads.

  7. STEP - A temperature profiler for measuring the oceanic thermal boundary layer at the ocean-air interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mammen, T.C.; Von bosse, N. Salzgitter Elektronik GmbH, Flintbek, )

    1990-04-01

    A fast measuring system has been designed and built to determine the oceanic thermal microstructure at the ocean-air interface. The system consists of a profiler sonde, which ascends through the uppermost few meters of the ocean with a speed of typically 1 m/s and carries a fast temperature sensor with a time constant of 0.5 ms and a surface detector. The data rate is 8000 measurements per second and the achieved resolution in temperature is 0.01 K. The instrument has been designed for rough off-shore treatment and to avoid any disturbance of the boundary layer during measurements. Some measurements of the cool skin are shown from in situ experiments. 26 refs.

  8. Krakatoa lives: The effect of volcanic eruptions on ocean heat content and thermal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, P. J.; AchutaRao, K.; Gregory, J. M.; Santer, B. D.; Taylor, K. E.; Wigley, T. M. L.

    2006-09-01

    A suite of climate model experiments indicates that 20th Century increases in ocean heat content and sea-level (via thermal expansion) were substantially reduced by the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa. The volcanically-induced cooling of the ocean surface is subducted into deeper ocean layers, where it persists for decades. Temporary reductions in ocean heat content associated with the comparable eruptions of El Chichón (1982) and Pinatubo (1991) were much shorter lived because they occurred relative to a non-stationary background of large, anthropogenically-forced ocean warming. Our results suggest that inclusion of the effects of Krakatoa (and perhaps even earlier eruptions) is important for reliable simulation of 20th century ocean heat uptake and thermal expansion. Inter-model differences in the oceanic thermal response to Krakatoa are large and arise from differences in external forcing, model physics, and experimental design. Systematic experimentation is required to quantify the relative importance of these factors. The next generation of historical forcing experiments may require more careful treatment of pre-industrial volcanic aerosol loadings.

  9. Thermal stresses investigation of a gas turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowreesh, S.; Pravin, V. K.; Rajagopal, K.; Veena, P. H.

    2012-06-01

    The analysis of structural and thermal stress values that are produced while the turbine is operating are the key factors of study while designing the next generation gas turbines. The present study examines structural, thermal, modal analysis of the first stage rotor blade of a two stage gas turbine. The design features of the turbine segment of the gas turbine have been taken from the preliminary design of a power turbine for maximization of an existing turbojet engine with optimized dump gap of the combustion chamber, since the allowable temperature on the turbine blade dependents on the hot gas temperatures from the combustion chamber. In the present paper simplified 3-D Finite Element models are developed with governing boundary conditions and solved using the commercial FEA software ANSYS. As the temperature has a significant effect on the overall stress on the rotor blades, a detail study on mechanical and thermal stresses are estimated and evaluated with the experimental values.

  10. Thermal mechanical stress modeling of GCtM seals

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Steve Xunhu; Chambers, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Finite-element thermal stress modeling at the glass-ceramic to metal (GCtM) interface was conducted assuming heterogeneous glass-ceramic microstructure. The glass-ceramics were treated as composites consisting of high expansion silica crystalline phases dispersed in a uniform residual glass. Interfacial stresses were examined for two types of glass-ceramics. One was designated as SL16 glass -ceramic, owing to its step-like thermal strain curve with an overall coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at 16 ppm/ºC. Clustered Cristobalite is the dominant silica phase in SL16 glass-ceramic. The other, designated as NL16 glass-ceramic, exhibited clusters of mixed Cristobalite and Quartz and showed a near-linear thermal strain curve with a same CTE value.

  11. Thermal stress weathering and the spalling of Antarctic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamp, J. L.; Marchant, D. R.; Mackay, S. L.; Head, J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Using in situ field measurements, laboratory analyses, and numerical modeling, we test the potential efficacy of thermal stress weathering in the flaking of millimeter-thick alteration rinds observed on cobbles and boulders of Ferrar Dolerite on Mullins Glacier, McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV). In particular, we examine whether low-magnitude stresses, arising from temperature variations over time, result in thermal fatigue weathering, yielding slow crack propagation along existing cracks and ultimate flake detachment. Our field results show that during summer months clasts of Ferrar Dolerite experience large-temperature gradients across partially detached alteration rinds (>4.7°C mm-1) and abrupt fluctuations in surface temperature (up to 12°C min-1); the latter are likely due to the combined effects of changing solar irradiation and cooling from episodic winds. The results of our thermal stress model, coupled with subcritical crack growth theory, suggest that thermal stresses induced at the base of thin alteration rinds 2 mm thick, common on rocks exposed for 105 years, may be sufficient to cause existing cracks to propagate under present-day meteorological forcing, eventually leading to rind detachment. The increase in porosity observed within alteration rinds relative to unaltered rock interiors, as well as predicted decreases in rind strength based on allied weathering studies, likely facilitates thermal stress crack propagation through a reduction of fracture toughness. We conclude that thermal stress weathering may be an active, though undervalued, weathering process in hyperarid, terrestrial polar deserts such as the stable upland region of the MDV.

  12. Damage Assessment of Stress-Thermal Cycled high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Jae-Hyung; Prochazka, Michael; Ronke, Ben; Morgan, Roger; Shin, Eugence

    2004-01-01

    We report on the characterization of bismaleimide and polyimide carbon fiber composite, microcrack development under stress thermal cycling loading. Such cycles range from cryogenic temperatures associated with cryogenic fuel (LN, LOX) containment to high temperatures of 300 degrees Celsius associated with future hypervelocity aeropropulsion systems. Microcrack development thresholds as a function of temperature range of the thermal cycle; the number of cycles; the applied stress level imposed on the composite are reported. We have conducted stress-thermal cycles on thin bismaleimide-woven carbon fiber foils for three temperature range cycles: 1. Ambient temperature - -196 degrees celsius. 2. Ambient temperature - 150 degrees Celsius; 200 degrees Celsius; 250 degrees Celsius. 3. -196 degrees Celsius - 250 degrees Celsius. The Principle findings are that the full cycles from -196 degrees Celsius to to 250 degrees Celsius cause the most significant microcrack of development. These observations indicate that the high temperature portion of the cycle under load causes fiber-matrix interface failure and subsequent exposure to higher stresses at the cryogenic, low temperature region results in composite matrix microcracking as a result of the additional stresses associate with the fiber-matrix thermal expansion mismatch. Our initial studies for 12 ply PMR-II-50 polyimide/M60JB carbon fabric [0f,90f,90f,0f,0f,90f]ls composites will be presented. The stress-thermal cycle test procedure for these will be described. Moisture absorption characteristics between cycles will be used to monitor interconnected microcrack development. The applied stress level will be 75% of the composite cryogenic (-196 degrees Celsius) ultimate strength.

  13. Boundary layer thermal stresses in angle-ply composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1979-01-01

    Boundary-layer thermal stress singularities and distributions of angle-ply composite laminates under uniform thermal loading are investigated through a system of sixth-order governing partial differential equations developed with the aid of the anisotropic elasticity field equations and Lekhnitskii's complex stress functions. Results are presented for cases of various angle-ply graphite/epoxy laminates, and it is shown that the boundary-layer thickness depends on the degree of anisotropy of each individual lamina, thermomechanical properties of each ply, and the relative thickness of adjacent layers.

  14. Thermal stress analysis of a new turbine shroud seal concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal stress field of a two piece turbine shroud seal concept was analyzed and results compared to one piece designs by finite element analysis. The two piece seal has independently formed structure (substrate) and ceramic components that are assembled at ambient conditions. The boundary conditions used for analysis were hot gas surface temperatures of 1370 and 1650 C (2500 and 3000 F) and cooled surface temperature of 700 C (1285 F). The resulting thermal stress field, of the two piece seal when compared to the one piece seals in the region of all ceramic material, was reduced substantially.

  15. Thermal-stress analysis for a wood composite blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, K. C.; Harb, A.

    1984-01-01

    A thermal-stress analysis of a wind turbine blade made of wood composite material is reported. First, the governing partial differential equation on heat conduction is derived, then, a finite element procedure using variational approach is developed for the solution of the governing equation. Thus, the temperature distribution throughout the blade is determined. Next, based on the temperature distribution, a finite element procedure using potential energy approach is applied to determine the thermal-stress distribution. A set of results is obtained through the use of a computer, which is considered to be satisfactory. All computer programs are contained in the report.

  16. Refined Estimation Of Thermal Tensile Stresses In Bolts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal changes in tensile stresses and strains in bolt and in corresponding compressive stresses and strains in bolted material estimated more accurately by use of equations incorporating two refinements over previous equations. Elasticity of bolted material and radial thermal expansion also taken into account. Refined equations improve design and analysis of bolted joints assembled at one temperature (e.g., room temperature) and in which specified minimum tension must be maintained (and/or specified maximum tension not exceeded) at higher or lower operational temperature.

  17. Refined Estimation Of Thermal Tensile Stresses In Bolts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal changes in tensile stresses and strains in bolt and in corresponding compressive stresses and strains in bolted material estimated more accurately by use of equations incorporating two refinements over previous equations. Elasticity of bolted material and radial thermal expansion also taken into account. Refined equations improve design and analysis of bolted joints assembled at one temperature (e.g., room temperature) and in which specified minimum tension must be maintained (and/or specified maximum tension not exceeded) at higher or lower operational temperature.

  18. Effects of hypoxia and ocean acidification on the upper thermal niche boundaries of coral reef fishes.

    PubMed

    Ern, Rasmus; Johansen, Jacob L; Rummer, Jodie L; Esbaugh, Andrew J

    2017-07-01

    Rising ocean temperatures are predicted to cause a poleward shift in the distribution of marine fishes occupying the extent of latitudes tolerable within their thermal range boundaries. A prevailing theory suggests that the upper thermal limits of fishes are constrained by hypoxia and ocean acidification. However, some eurythermal fish species do not conform to this theory, and maintain their upper thermal limits in hypoxia. Here we determine if the same is true for stenothermal species. In three coral reef fish species we tested the effect of hypoxia on upper thermal limits, measured as critical thermal maximum (CTmax). In one of these species we also quantified the effect of hypoxia on oxygen supply capacity, measured as aerobic scope (AS). In this species we also tested the effect of elevated CO2 (simulated ocean acidification) on the hypoxia sensitivity of CTmax We found that CTmax was unaffected by progressive hypoxia down to approximately 35 mmHg, despite a substantial hypoxia-induced reduction in AS. Below approximately 35 mmHg, CTmax declined sharply with water oxygen tension (PwO2). Furthermore, the hypoxia sensitivity of CTmax was unaffected by elevated CO2 Our findings show that moderate hypoxia and ocean acidification do not constrain the upper thermal limits of these tropical, stenothermal fishes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Thermal regime along the Antilles subduction zone: Influence of the oceanic lithosphere materials subducted in the oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biari, Youssef; Marcaillou, Boris; Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Francis, Lucazeau; Fréderique, Rolandone; Arnauld, Heuret; Thibaud, Pichot; Hélène, Bouquerel

    2017-04-01

    Heat-flow measurements acquired during the Antithesis Cruise in the Northern Lesser Antilles reveal an atypical heat-flow trend, from the trench to the margin forearc, where the subducting crust consists of exhumed and serpentinized mantle rocks (see Marcaillou et al. same session). We investigate the thermal structure of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone along two transects perpendicular to the margin located off Antigua and Martinique Islands. We perform 2-D steady-state finite elements thermal modelling constrained by newly-recorded and existing data: heat flow measurements, deep multichannel reflection and wide angle seismic data as well as earthquake hypocenters location at depth. Along the Martinique profile, the heat-flow decreases from the trench (45 mW.m-2) to minimum in the outer fore-arc (30 mW.m-2) and increases to a plateau (50 mW.m-2) toward the back-arc area. These trend and values are typical for the subduction of a steep 80-MYr old oceanic plate beneath an oceanic margin. As a result, the 150°-350°C temperature range along the interplate contact, commonly associated to the thermally-defined seismogenic zone, is estimated to be located between 200 - 350km from the trench. In contrast, along the Antigua profile, the heat-flow shows an atypical "flat" trend at 40 ± 15 mW.m-2 from the trench to the inner forearc. Purely conductive thermal models fail at fitting both the measured values and the flat trend. We propose that the subducting crust made of serpentinized exhumed mantle rock strongly affecting the heat-flow at the surface and the margin thermal structure. The geothermal gradient in the 5-km-thick serpentinized layer is expected to be low compared to "normal" oceanic crust because of cold water percolation and peridotite alteration. Moreover, from 50km depth, serpentine dehydration reactions provide significant amounts of hot water expelled toward the upper plate, generated heat beneath the forearc. As a result, in our preferred model: 1/ A

  20. Transient thermal stress problem for a circumferentially cracked hollow cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nied, H. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The transient thermal stress problem for a hollow elasticity cylinder containing an internal circumferential edge crack is considered. It is assumed that the problem is axisymmetric with regard to the crack geometry and the loading, and that the inertia effects are negligible. The problem is solved for a cylinder which is suddenly cooled from inside. First the transient temperature and stress distributions in an uncracked cylinder are calculated. By using the equal and opposite of this thermal stress as the crack surface traction in the isothermal cylinder the crack problem is then solved and the stress intensity factor is calculated. The numerical results are obtained as a function of the Fourier number tD/b(2) representing the time for various inner-to-outer radius ratios and relative crack depths, where D and b are respectively the coefficient of diffusivity and the outer radius of the cylinder.

  1. Effects of bonding stiffness on thermal stresses in sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, R.; Fazio, P.; Ha, K.

    1992-10-01

    Sandwich panels made of thin skins and a lightweight core expand and/or bow when subjected to temperature changes. The significance of induced thermal stresses in the panels depends on material properties. The effects of bonding layers on these stresses were not investigated in available works on the structural analysis of sandwich panels. This paper presents elasticity solutions for thermal stresses in sandwich panels with interlayer slip. The effects of finite bonding stiffnesses on the structural behavior of the panels are investigated. The numerical results show that the bonding stiffness, up to a certain level, has a strong effect on panel structural response. The answer to what constitutes perfect bonding is best answered in terms of the ratio of the core stiffness to the bonding stiffness. A heat chamber is designed and used to test sandwich specimens under different temperature changes. The experimental values for normal stresses in the skins are in good agreement with the present theory.

  2. [Thermal stress. Dangers, tolerance, prevention and cure].

    PubMed

    La Verde, R; Giulianelli, G

    1980-11-03

    The Authors after a description about the thermoregulation processes and after having considered the tolerance of the human body to the thermic stress, point out the dangers of the exposure to the high or low temperatures in some labour conditions and, in particular; in the aerospace ambient. A great importance is attached to the method of prediction of individual tolerance to varied temperatures. Lastly the Authors discuss the prevention and treatment of heat-stroke and of frost-bite.

  3. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; ...

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects ofmore » both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.« less

  4. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects of both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.

  5. Tidal stress in Enceladus' ice shell: dependence on the internal ocean width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behounkova, M.; Tobie, G.; Choblet, G.; Cadek, O.

    2013-12-01

    The eruptions of water vapor and ice particles on Enceladus' south pole together with huge heat production suggest the presence of a strong source of energy within Enceladus' interior. The abnormal endogenic power is most likely the consequence of strong tidal dissipation along the ridges and within the ice shell. Here, we study tidal stress associated to tidal flexing in Enceladus' ice shell for simulations described in Behounkova et al. (2013). In these simulations, we have investigated the conditions for the initiation of convection by systematically varying the orbital parameters (eccentricity), ice grain size and width of an internal ocean (D). For the current eccentricity and global ocean (D=360deg), our results show maximum tidal stress is approximately equal to 0.1MPa. For regional oceans of 120deg and 180deg, the maximum tidal stress is reduced by a factor of ~2.2 and ~1.3, respectively. Maximum tidal stresses differ less than 5% for internal oceans covering more than the southern hemisphere (D>180deg). Moreover, tidal stress patterns vary significantly with the ocean width. Whereas the tidal stresses above the rock interface are high even for areas without internal ocean, a considerable stress decrease is observed toward the surface above areas with no internal ocean. This effect is especially pronounced for cases with small internal ocean (D=<120 deg). The maximum tidal stress scales with eccentricity as expected and the tidal stress changes during onset of convection are rather low. Additionally, we will discuss the effect of rheological model (Maxwell vs. Andrade) on the tidal stress pattern and the heating distribution, as well as the possible effect of reduced viscosity in the active south polar terrain.

  6. Thermal stress analysis of reusable surface insulation for shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojalvo, I. U.; Levy, A.; Austin, F.

    1974-01-01

    An iterative procedure for accurately determining tile stresses associated with static mechanical and thermally induced internal loads is presented. The necessary conditions for convergence of the method are derived. An user-oriented computer program based upon the present method of analysis was developed. The program is capable of analyzing multi-tiled panels and determining the associated stresses. Typical numerical results from this computer program are presented.

  7. Thermal diffusion by Brownian-motion-induced fluid stress.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Jennifer; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2007-08-01

    The Ludwig-Soret effect, the migration of a species due to a temperature gradient, has been extensively studied without a complete picture of its cause emerging. Here we investigate the dynamics of DNA and spherical particles subjected to a thermal gradient using a combination of Brownian dynamics and the lattice Boltzmann method. We observe that the DNA molecules will migrate to colder regions of the channel, an observation also made in experiments. In fact, the thermal diffusion coefficient found agrees quantitatively with the experimentally measured value. We also observe that the thermal diffusion coefficient decreases as the radius of the studied spherical particles increases. Furthermore, we observe that the thermal-fluctuation-fluid-momentum-flux coupling induces a gradient in the stress which leads to thermal migration in both systems.

  8. Thermal diffusion by Brownian-motion-induced fluid stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreft, Jennifer; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2007-08-01

    The Ludwig-Soret effect, the migration of a species due to a temperature gradient, has been extensively studied without a complete picture of its cause emerging. Here we investigate the dynamics of DNA and spherical particles subjected to a thermal gradient using a combination of Brownian dynamics and the lattice Boltzmann method. We observe that the DNA molecules will migrate to colder regions of the channel, an observation also made in experiments. In fact, the thermal diffusion coefficient found agrees quantitatively with the experimentally measured value. We also observe that the thermal diffusion coefficient decreases as the radius of the studied spherical particles increases. Furthermore, we observe that the thermal-fluctuation-fluid-momentum-flux coupling induces a gradient in the stress which leads to thermal migration in both systems.

  9. Global representation of tropical cyclone-induced short-term ocean thermal changes using Argo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; Zhu, J.; Sriver, R. L.

    2015-09-01

    Argo floats are used to examine tropical cyclone (TC) induced ocean thermal changes on the global scale by comparing temperature profiles before and after TC passage. We present a footprint method that analyzes cross-track thermal responses along all storm tracks during the period 2004-2012. We combine the results into composite representations of the vertical structure of the average thermal response for two different categories: tropical storms/tropical depressions (TS/TD) and hurricanes. The two footprint composites are functions of three variables: cross-track distance, water depth and time relative to TC passage. We find that this footprint strategy captures the major features of the upper-ocean thermal response to TCs on timescales up to 20 days when compared against previous case study results using in situ measurements. On the global scale, TCs are responsible for 1.87 PW (11.05 W m-2) of heat transfer annually from the global ocean to the atmosphere during storm passage (0-3 days). Of this total, 1.05 ± 0.20 PW (4.80 ± 0.85 W m-2) is caused by TS/TD and 0.82 ± 0.21 PW (6.25 ± 1.5 W m-2) is caused by hurricanes. Our findings indicate that ocean heat loss by TCs may be a substantial missing piece of the global ocean heat budget. Changes in ocean heat content (OHC) after storm passage are estimated by analyzing the temperature anomalies during wake recovery following storm events (4-20 days after storm passage) relative to pre-storm conditions. Results indicate the global ocean experiences a 0.75 ± 0.25 PW (5.98 ± 2.1 W m-2) heat gain annually for hurricanes. In contrast, under TS/TD conditions, the ocean experiences 0.41 ± 0.21 PW (1.90 ± 0.96 W m-2) ocean heat loss, suggesting the overall oceanic thermal response is particularly sensitive to the intensity of the event. The ocean heat uptake caused by all storms during the restorative stage is 0.34 PW.

  10. Waterborne Noise due to Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-17

    ocean current. Nini -OTEC OTEC-1 TB V/ON Lockheed OTEC-I moor a, b correlation length Used, 2/b 300 150 50 3 1500 Aeoliani tone flow velocity (rn/sec...representative OTEC designs. Acoustic power in band Nini -OTEC OTEC-I TRW/GM Lockheed 10 Hz to 1 kHz (ao) For individual pumps cold-water 1.0 X 10-2

  11. The Effect of Thermal Cycling on Crystal-Liquid Separation During Lunar Magma Ocean Differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Ryan D.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of magma oceans likely involves a mixture of fractional and equilibrium crystallization [1]. The existence of: 1) large volumes of anorthosite in the lunar highlands and 2) the incompatible- rich (KREEP) reservoir suggests that fractional crystallization may have dominated during differentiation of the Moon. For this to have occurred, crystal fractionation must have been remarkably efficient. Several authors [e.g. 2, 3] have hypothesized that equilibrium crystallization would have dominated early in differentiation of magma oceans because of crystal entrainment during turbulent convection. However, recent numerical modeling [4] suggests that crystal settling could have occurred throughout the entire solidification history of the lunar magma ocean if crystals were large and crystal fraction was low. These results indicate that the crystal size distribution could have played an important role in differentiation of the lunar magma ocean. Here, I suggest that thermal cycling from tidal heating during lunar magma ocean crystallization caused crystals to coarsen, leading to efficient crystal-liquid separation.

  12. The relationship between bioclimatic thermal stress and subjective thermal sensation in pedestrian spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlmutter, David; Jiao, Dixin; Garb, Yaakov

    2014-12-01

    Outdoor thermal comfort has important implications for urban planning and energy consumption in the built environment. To better understand the relation of subjective thermal experience to bioclimatic thermal stress in such contexts, this study compares micrometeorological and perceptual data from urban spaces in the hot-arid Negev region of Israel. Pedestrians reported on their thermal sensation in these spaces, whereas radiation and convection-related data were used to compute the Index of Thermal Stress (ITS) and physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). The former is a straightforward characterization of energy exchanges between the human body and its surroundings, without any conversion to an "equivalent temperature." Although the relation of ITS to subjective thermal sensation has been analyzed in the past under controlled indoor conditions, this paper offers the first analysis of this relation in an outdoor setting. ITS alone can account for nearly 60 % of the variance in pedestrians' thermal sensation under outdoor conditions, somewhat more than PET. A series of regressions with individual contextual variables and ITS identified those factors which accounted for additional variance in thermal sensation, whereas multivariate analyses indicated the considerable predictive power ( R-square = 0.74) of models including multiple contextual variables in addition to ITS. Our findings indicate that pedestrians experiencing variable outdoor conditions have a greater tolerance for incremental changes in thermal stress than has been shown previously under controlled indoor conditions, with a tapering of responses at high values of ITS. However, the thresholds of ITS corresponding to thermal "neutrality" and thermal "acceptability" are quite consistent regardless of context.

  13. The relationship between bioclimatic thermal stress and subjective thermal sensation in pedestrian spaces.

    PubMed

    Pearlmutter, David; Jiao, Dixin; Garb, Yaakov

    2014-12-01

    Outdoor thermal comfort has important implications for urban planning and energy consumption in the built environment. To better understand the relation of subjective thermal experience to bioclimatic thermal stress in such contexts, this study compares micrometeorological and perceptual data from urban spaces in the hot-arid Negev region of Israel. Pedestrians reported on their thermal sensation in these spaces, whereas radiation and convection-related data were used to compute the Index of Thermal Stress (ITS) and physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). The former is a straightforward characterization of energy exchanges between the human body and its surroundings, without any conversion to an "equivalent temperature." Although the relation of ITS to subjective thermal sensation has been analyzed in the past under controlled indoor conditions, this paper offers the first analysis of this relation in an outdoor setting. ITS alone can account for nearly 60 % of the variance in pedestrians' thermal sensation under outdoor conditions, somewhat more than PET. A series of regressions with individual contextual variables and ITS identified those factors which accounted for additional variance in thermal sensation, whereas multivariate analyses indicated the considerable predictive power (R-square = 0.74) of models including multiple contextual variables in addition to ITS. Our findings indicate that pedestrians experiencing variable outdoor conditions have a greater tolerance for incremental changes in thermal stress than has been shown previously under controlled indoor conditions, with a tapering of responses at high values of ITS. However, the thresholds of ITS corresponding to thermal "neutrality" and thermal "acceptability" are quite consistent regardless of context.

  14. Meridional overturning in the thermally-driven ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaCasce, Joe; Gjermundsen, Ada

    2015-04-01

    As opposed to the wind-driven ocean circulation, there is no commonly accepted dynamical framework for rationalizing the buoyancy-driven circulation. However, an analytical model of the overturning exists, based on the quasigeostrophic model of Pedlosky (1969) and studied subsequently by Salmon (1986), LaCasce (2004) and Pedloksy and Spall (2005). A key aspect is that the overturning in the model is determined almost exclusively by upwelling and sinking occurring in the interior; the boundary layers have little net contribution to the vertical transport. Thus the overturning in the model can be understood by the baroclinic flow in the interior, which is conceptually simple. The only exception is when a form of "convection" is allowed, in which case the northern boundary can contribute significantly as well. We review key aspects of the model circulation and demonstrate how the boundary current dynamics are consistent between models with different frictional parameterizations. We also compare to numerical simulations using a full GCM in an idealized basin. References: Pedlosky, J. (1969). Linear theory of the circulation of a stratified ocean. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 35, 185-205. Salmon. R. (1986). A simplified linear ocean circulation theory. Journal of Marine Research, 44, 695-711. LaCasce, J. H. (2004). Diffusivity and viscosity dependence in the linear thermocline. Journal of Marine Research, 62, 743-769. Pedlosky, J. and M. A. Spall (2005). Boundary intensification of vertical velocity in a β-plane basin. Journal of Physical Oceanography, 35(12), 2487-2500.

  15. Open-cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): Status and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.

    1984-08-01

    Tropical oceans with a 20 C or more temperature difference between surface and deep water represent a vast resource of renewable thermal energy. One of the methods of harnessing this resource is an open-cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) system utilizing steam evaporated from the surface water for powering the turbine. In this paper, the state of the art of research and component development, as related to heat and mass transfer processes, power production, noncondensable gas handling, and seawater flow hydraulics, are described through an illustrated preliminary design study of a 1-MW facility.

  16. Minimizing thermal stress for data center servers through thermal-aware relocation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Muhammad Tayyab; Ling, T C; Hussain, S A; Manzoor, Atif

    2014-01-01

    A rise in inlet air temperature may lower the rate of heat dissipation from air cooled computing servers. This introduces a thermal stress to these servers. As a result, the poorly cooled active servers will start conducting heat to the neighboring servers and giving rise to hotspot regions of thermal stress, inside the data center. As a result, the physical hardware of these servers may fail, thus causing performance loss, monetary loss, and higher energy consumption for cooling mechanism. In order to minimize these situations, this paper performs the profiling of inlet temperature sensitivity (ITS) and defines the optimum location for each server to minimize the chances of creating a thermal hotspot and thermal stress. Based upon novel ITS analysis, a thermal state monitoring and server relocation algorithm for data centers is being proposed. The contribution of this paper is bringing the peak outlet temperatures of the relocated servers closer to average outlet temperature by over 5 times, lowering the average peak outlet temperature by 3.5% and minimizing the thermal stress.

  17. Minimizing Thermal Stress for Data Center Servers through Thermal-Aware Relocation

    PubMed Central

    Ling, T. C.; Hussain, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    A rise in inlet air temperature may lower the rate of heat dissipation from air cooled computing servers. This introduces a thermal stress to these servers. As a result, the poorly cooled active servers will start conducting heat to the neighboring servers and giving rise to hotspot regions of thermal stress, inside the data center. As a result, the physical hardware of these servers may fail, thus causing performance loss, monetary loss, and higher energy consumption for cooling mechanism. In order to minimize these situations, this paper performs the profiling of inlet temperature sensitivity (ITS) and defines the optimum location for each server to minimize the chances of creating a thermal hotspot and thermal stress. Based upon novel ITS analysis, a thermal state monitoring and server relocation algorithm for data centers is being proposed. The contribution of this paper is bringing the peak outlet temperatures of the relocated servers closer to average outlet temperature by over 5 times, lowering the average peak outlet temperature by 3.5% and minimizing the thermal stress. PMID:24987743

  18. Detection and classification of stress using thermal imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kan; Yuen, Peter; Chen, Tong; Tsitiridis, Aristeidis; Kam, Firmin; Jackman, James; James, David; Richardson, Mark; Oxford, William; Piper, Jonathan; Thomas, Francis; Lightman, Stafford

    2009-09-01

    This paper reports how Electro-Optics (EO) technologies such as thermal and hyperspectral [1-3] imaging methods can be used for the detection of stress remotely. Emotional or physical stresses induce a surge of adrenaline in the blood stream under the command of the sympathetic nerve system, which, cannot be suppressed by training. The onset of this alleviated level of adrenaline triggers a number of physiological chain reactions in the body, such as dilation of pupil and an increased feed of blood to muscles etc. The capture of physiological responses, specifically the increase of blood volume to pupil, have been reported by Pavlidis's pioneer thermal imaging work [4-7] who has shown a remarkable increase of skin temperature in the periorbital region at the onset of stress. Our data has shown that other areas such as the forehead, neck and cheek also exhibit alleviated skin temperatures dependent on the types of stressors. Our result has also observed very similar thermal patterns due to physical exercising, to the one that induced by other physical stressors, apparently in contradiction to Pavlidis's work [8]. Furthermore, we have found patches of alleviated temperature regions in the forehead forming patterns characteristic to the types of stressors, dependent on whether they are physical or emotional in origin. These stress induced thermal patterns have been seen to be quite distinct to the one resulting from having high fever.

  19. [Thermal dissipation pathway in cucumber seedling leaves under hypoxia stress].

    PubMed

    Jia, Yong-xi; Sun, Jin; Wang, Li-ping; Shu, Sheng; Guo, Shi-rong

    2011-03-01

    A water culture experiment was conducted to study the relationship between photosynthetic thermal dissipation and xanthophyll cycle in cucumber seedling leaves under hypoxia stress (the dissolved oxygen concentration in nutrient solution was 0.9-1.1 mg x L(-1)). Under the hypoxia stress, there was a significant decrease in the quantum yield of PS II photochemistry rate (phi(PS II)), net photosynthetic rate (Pn) under saturation light intensity, quanta yield (AQY), and maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), suggesting that the photoinhibition of the seedling leaves was induced. Meanwhile, the thermal dissipation (NPQ) and the allocation of dissipation energy (D) by antenna increased, but the photochemical quenching apparent (q(p)) decreased, suggesting the enhancement of thermal dissipation in cucumber leaves under hypoxia stress. A positive correlation was observed between NPQ and xanthophyll de-epoxidation state (DEPS), and both of them were promoted by ascorbic acid (AsA) and inhibited by 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT), suggesting that xanthophyll cycle was the major pathway of photosynthetic thermal dissipation in cucumber seedling leaves under hypoxia stress.

  20. Assessing the potential for tropical cyclone induced sea surface cooling to reduce thermal stress on the world's coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, A. D.; Puotinen, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Coral reefs face an uncertain future as rising sea surface temperature (SST) continues to lead to increasingly frequent and intense mass bleaching. At broad spatial scales, tropical cyclone (TC) induced cooling of the upper ocean (SST drops up to 6° C persisting for weeks) reduces thermal stress and accelerates recovery of bleached corals - yet the global prevalence and spatial distribution of this effect remains undocumented and unquantified. A global dataset (1985-2009) of TC wind exposure was constructed and examined against existing thermal stress data to address this. Significant correlations were found between TC activity and the severity of thermal stress at various spatial scales, particularly for Caribbean reefs. From this, it is apparent that TCs play a role in bleaching dynamics at a global scale. However, the prevalence and distribution of this interaction varies by region and requires further examination at finer spatial and temporal scales using actual SST data.

  1. Stress physiology and weapon integrity of intertidal mantis shrimp under future ocean conditions.

    PubMed

    deVries, Maya S; Webb, Summer J; Tu, Jenny; Cory, Esther; Morgan, Victoria; Sah, Robert L; Deheyn, Dimitri D; Taylor, Jennifer R A

    2016-12-15

    Calcified marine organisms typically experience increased oxidative stress and changes in mineralization in response to ocean acidification and warming conditions. These effects could hinder the potency of animal weapons, such as the mantis shrimp's raptorial appendage. The mechanical properties of this calcified weapon enable extremely powerful punches to be delivered to prey and aggressors. We examined oxidative stress and exoskeleton structure, mineral content, and mechanical properties of the raptorial appendage and the carapace under long-term ocean acidification and warming conditions. The predatory appendage had significantly higher % Mg under ocean acidification conditions, while oxidative stress levels as well as the % Ca and mechanical properties of the appendage remained unchanged. Thus, mantis shrimp tolerate expanded ranges of pH and temperature without experiencing oxidative stress or functional changes to their weapons. Our findings suggest that these powerful predators will not be hindered under future ocean conditions.

  2. Stress physiology and weapon integrity of intertidal mantis shrimp under future ocean conditions

    PubMed Central

    deVries, Maya S.; Webb, Summer J.; Tu, Jenny; Cory, Esther; Morgan, Victoria; Sah, Robert L.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.; Taylor, Jennifer R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Calcified marine organisms typically experience increased oxidative stress and changes in mineralization in response to ocean acidification and warming conditions. These effects could hinder the potency of animal weapons, such as the mantis shrimp’s raptorial appendage. The mechanical properties of this calcified weapon enable extremely powerful punches to be delivered to prey and aggressors. We examined oxidative stress and exoskeleton structure, mineral content, and mechanical properties of the raptorial appendage and the carapace under long-term ocean acidification and warming conditions. The predatory appendage had significantly higher % Mg under ocean acidification conditions, while oxidative stress levels as well as the % Ca and mechanical properties of the appendage remained unchanged. Thus, mantis shrimp tolerate expanded ranges of pH and temperature without experiencing oxidative stress or functional changes to their weapons. Our findings suggest that these powerful predators will not be hindered under future ocean conditions. PMID:27974830

  3. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion moored pipe/mobile platform design study

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, H.O.; McNatt, T.R.; Ross, J.M.; Stambaugh, K.A.; Watts, J.L.

    1982-07-30

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Moored Pipe/Mobile Platform (MP-Squared) Design Study was carried out to investigate an innovative approach to the moored floating OTEC plant. In the past, a number of concepts have been examined by NOAA for floating OTEC plants. These concepts have considered various configurations for platforms, cold water pipes and mooring systems. In most cases the cold water pipe (CWP) was permanently attached to the platform and the platform was permanently moored on station. Even though CWP concepts incorporating articulated joints or flexible pipes were used, the CWP stresses induced by platform motion were frequently excessive and beyond the design limits of the CWP. This was especially true in the survival (100-year storm) case. It may be feasible that the concept of a permanently moored CWP attached through a flexible transition CWP to the platform could reduce the degree of technical risk by de-coupling the CWP from the motions of the platform. In addition, if the platform is capable of disconnecting from the CWP during survival conditions, even less technical risk may be inherent in the OTEC system. The MP-Squared Design Study was an engineering evaluation of the concepts described above. The effort has been carried through to the conceptual design level, and culminated in model tests in an experimental wave basin.

  4. Heat Exchanger Cleaning in Support of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) - Mechanical Subsystem.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    Thermal E ergy Conversion ( OTEC ) - Mechanical 416ś Subsyste 7,6. AaM4-"GO. PAORT NUIBER 7. AUTHOR(*) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) Daniel ott 9...for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion ( OTEC ). Described in the report are the water supply and distribution and the flow driven brush, recirculating...Recirculating Sponge Rubber Balls .. .... ............. 17 Chlorination .. .............. ............. 19 OTEC MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES

  5. Near-Inertial and Thermal Upper Ocean Response to Atmospheric Forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    water is then subducted as the ocean restratifies during spring, and advected throughout the subtropical gyre by the large scale wind driven circulation...Luther, and W. C. Patzert, 1992: The heat budget in the north atlantic subtropical frontal zone . J. Geophys. Res., 97 (C11), 17 947–17 959. 131 Price, J

  6. Potential for adaptation in response to thermal stress in an intertidal macroalga.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jennifer S; Poore, Alistair G B; Ralph, Peter J; Doblin, Martina A

    2013-08-01

    Understanding responses of marine algae to changing ocean temperatures requires knowledge of the impacts of elevated temperatures and the likelihood of adaptation to thermal stress. The potential for rapid evolution of thermal tolerance is dependent on the levels of heritable genetic variation in response to thermal stress within a population. Here, we use a quantitative genetic breeding design to establish whether there is a heritable variation in thermal sensitivity in two populations of a habitat-forming intertidal macroalga, Hormosira banksii (Turner) Descaisne. Gametes from multiple parents were mixed and growth and photosynthetic performance were measured in the resulting embryos, which were incubated under control and elevated temperature (20°C and 28°C). Embryo growth was reduced at 28°C, but significant interactions between male genotype and temperature in one population indicated the presence of genetic variation in thermal sensitivity. Selection for more tolerant genotypes thus has the ability to result in the evolution of increased thermal tolerance. Furthermore, genetic correlations between embryos grown in the two temperatures were positive, indicating that those genotypes that performed well in elevated temperature also performed well in control temperature. Chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements showed a marked decrease in maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) under elevated temperature. There was an increase in the proportion of energy directed to photoinhibition (nonregulated nonphotochemical quenching) and a concomitant decrease in energy used to drive photochemistry and xanthophyll cycling (regulated nonphotochemical quenching). However, PSII performance between genotypes was similar, suggesting that thermal sensitivity is related to processes other than photosynthesis. © 2013 Phycological Society of America.

  7. OBIC analysis of stressed, thermally-isolated polysilicon resistors

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Peterson, K.A.; Campbell, A.N.; Snyder, E.S.; Pierce, D.G.; Suehle, J.S.; Chaparala, P.

    1994-12-31

    High gain Optical Beam Induced Current (OBIC) imaging has been used for the first time to examine the internal structural effects of electrical stress on thermally-isolated polysilicon resistors. The resistors are examined over a wide range of current densities, producing Joule heating up to {approximately}1200{degrees}C. Throughout this current density range, the OBIC images indicate a clustering of dopant under dc stress and a more uniform distribution under ac conditions. The OBIC images also reveal areas that are precursors to catastrophic resistor failure. In addition to OBIC imaging, conventional electrical measurements were performed, examining the polysilicon resistance degradation and time-to-failure as a function of electrical stress. The electrical measurements show a monotonic increase in polysilicon resistor lifetime with frequency (up to 2 kHz) when subjected to a bipolar ac stress. The enhanced lifetime was observed even under high temperature (from Joule heating) stress conditions previously reported to be electromigration-free. The dopant redistribution indicated by the OBIC images is consistent with an electromigration stress experienced by the polysilicon resistors. The implications for thermally-isolated polysilicon resistor reliability are examined briefly.

  8. Thermal stress analysis of space shuttle orbiter wing skin panel and thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jenkins, Jerald M.

    1987-01-01

    Preflight thermal stress analysis of the space shuttle orbiter wing skin panel and the thermal protection system (TPS) was performed. The heated skin panel analyzed was rectangular in shape and contained a small square cool region at its center. The wing skin immediately outside the cool region was found to be close to the state of elastic instability in the chordwise direction based on the conservative temperature distribution. The wing skin was found to be quite stable in the spanwise direction. The potential wing skin thermal instability was not severe enough to tear apart the strain isolation pad (SIP) layer. Also, the preflight thermal stress analysis was performed on the TPS tile under the most severe temperature gradient during the simulated reentry heating. The tensile thermal stress induced in the TPS tile was found to be much lower than the tensile strength of the TPS material. The thermal bending of the TPS tile was not severe enough to cause tearing of the SIP layer.

  9. Geotechnical and geologic design considerations for a shelf mounted OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. S.; Smith, R. E.

    1984-04-01

    Topics relating to the siting of an ocean thermal energy conversion facility off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii are discussed. Anticipated site conditions which would affect information requirements; potential foundation schemes used to identify key geotechnical parameters; techniques available for exploration and site characterization; and geologic and geotechnical factors and uncertainties that may be associated with site exploration and design information are discussed.

  10. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure

    DOEpatents

    Wittig, J. Michael

    1980-01-01

    A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating

  11. Thermal Sensors for Wall-Shear Stress: Reality and Myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfdahl, L.; Johansson, P.; Bakchinov, A.; Sen, M.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    1999-11-01

    Instantaneous wall-shear stress is a quantity of fundamental importance in wall-bounded turbulent flows. While there are many methods capable of measuring the time-averaged value of the wall-shear stress, no reliable technique exists for measuring the time-resolved stress. One of the oldest strategies for wall-shear-stress measurements is based on the so-called thermal principle. Through the years, it has been argued and shown in many investigations that the thermal sensors suffer from large heat losses to the substrate, yielding a larger active sensor area and thus adversely affecting the temporal and spatial response of the probe. The MEMS technology offers possibilities to circumvent these drawbacks. But none of the MEMS-based sensors has gone through the mandatory validation to understand exactly what is being sensed. In this talk, we will present detailed measurements of a MEMS-based thermal sensor designed for an improved response. This is achieved by having a very small (60 μm × 300 μm) heated part separated from the surrounding wall by an insulating polyimide. Results and discussions about important features such as temperature of the surrounding material, response time and dependence on packaging will be presented. It seems that even microsensors are cursed by unacceptable levels of heat conduction to the surrounding solid.

  12. Correlation of predicted and measured thermal stresses on an advanced aircraft structure with similar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A laboratory heating test simulating hypersonic heating was conducted on a heat-sink type structure to provide basic thermal stress measurements. Six NASTRAN models utilizing various combinations of bar, shear panel, membrane, and plate elements were used to develop calculated thermal stresses. Thermal stresses were also calculated using a beam model. For a given temperature distribution there was very little variation in NASTRAN calculated thermal stresses when element types were interchanged for a given grid system. Thermal stresses calculated for the beam model compared similarly to the values obtained for the NASTRAN models. Calculated thermal stresses compared generally well to laboratory measured thermal stresses. A discrepancy of signifiance occurred between the measured and predicted thermal stresses in the skin areas. A minor anomaly in the laboratory skin heating uniformity resulted in inadequate temperature input data for the structural models.

  13. Thermal stress alters expression of genes involved in one carbon and DNA methylation pathways in Atlantic cod embryos.

    PubMed

    Skjærven, Kaja H; Hamre, Kristin; Penglase, Samuel; Finn, Roderick Nigel; Olsvik, Pål A

    2014-03-16

    One-carbon (1-C) metabolism is essential for normal embryonic development through its regulation of DNA methylation and cell proliferation. With consideration to the potential future anthropogenic oceanic warming, we studied the effects of both acute thermal stress and continuous thermal stress (10°C) during Atlantic cod embryo development on the expression levels of genes associated with the 1-C metabolism, including DNA methyltransferases. We conducted a phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate DNA methyltransferases to determine the number and similarity of DNMT found in Atlantic cod. This analysis revealed that Atlantic cod have one maintenance dnmt (dnmt1) and five de novo DNMTs (dnmt4, dnmt3, dnmt3b, dnmt3aa, dnmt3ab). Stage specific changes in expression levels occurred for all genes analyzed. The effect of acute thermal stress was evaluated during early development. Compared to controls these experiments showed significant alterations in expression levels of several genes, that in some instances were reversed at later stages of development. A significant effect of continuous thermal stress was found in gastrula embryos where lower mRNA expression levels of 1-C metabolism, de novo DNMTs and cell proliferation genes were detected. One exception was the maintenance DNMT, which was only sensitive to acute and not continuous thermal stress. DNA methylation status indicated that blastula embryos were hypomethylated compared to spermatozoa and late gastrula stages. In post-gastrula stage, however, continuous thermal stress resulted in a higher degree of DNA methylation compared to controls. These data reveal that the regulation of epigenetically important transcripts in the 1-C metabolism of Atlantic cod embryos is sensitive to thermal stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermal stress cycling of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Robert W.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal stress cycling was performed on gallium arsenide solar cells to investigate their electrical, mechanical, and structural integrity. Cells were cycled under low Earth orbit (LEO) simulated temperature conditions in vacuum. Cell evaluations consisted of power output values, spectral response, optical microscopy and ion microprobe mass analysis, and depth profiles on both front surface inter-grid areas and metallization contact grid lines. Cells were examined for degradation after 500, 5,000, 10,000 and 15,245 thermal cycles. No indication of performance degradation was found for any vendor's cell lot.

  15. Effect of thermal stresses on the mechanism of tooth pain.

    PubMed

    Oskui, Iman Z; Ashtiani, Mohammed N; Hashemi, Ata; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2014-11-01

    Daily hot and cold thermal loadings on teeth may result in structural deformation, mechanical stress, and pain signaling. The aim of this study was to compare the adverse effects of hot and cold beverages on an intact tooth and, then, to provide physical evidence to support the hydrodynamic theory of tooth pain sensation mechanism. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed on a premolar model subjected to hot and cold thermal loadings. Elapsed times for heat diffusion and stress detection at the pulp-dentin junction were calculated as measures of the pain sensation. Extreme tensile stress within the enamel resulted in damage in cold loadings. Also, extreme values of stress at the pulpal wall occurred 21.6 seconds earlier than extreme temperatures in hot and cold loadings. The intact tooth was remarkably vulnerable to cold loading. Earlier changes in mechanical stress rather than temperature at the pulp-dentin junction indicate that the dental pain caused by hot or cold beverages may be based on the hydrodynamic theory. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduction of thermal stresses in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites with interface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The potential of using interface layer to reduce thermal stresses in the matrix of composites with a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion of fiber and matrix has been investigated. It was found that compliant layers, with properties of readily available materials, do not have the potential to reduce thermal stresses significantly. However, interface layers with high coefficient of thermal expansion can compensate for the mismatch and reduce thermal stresses in the matrix significantly.

  17. Reduction of thermal stresses in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites with interface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    The potential of using an interface layer to reduce thermal stresses in the matrix of composites with a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion of fiber and matrix was investigated. It was found that compliant layers, with properties of readily available materials, do not have the potential to reduce thermal stresses significantly. However, interface layers with high coefficient of thermal expansion can compensate for the mismatch and reduce thermal stresses in the matrix significantly.

  18. Vibration of thermally stressed plates with various boundary conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    By discarding Lurie's (1952) assumption of mode identity, it is shown that linear theory correctly predicts the frequency of all modes of a thermally stressed cantilever plate as well as the frequency and modes of plates with other boundary conditions. The thermal stress distribution is obtained for whatever temperature distribution and boundary conditions that may be specified. Experimental results are compared to calculated results for several different plates. Boundary conditions for the plates range from a plate with edges completely clamped to a plate with edges completely free with various other combinations of mixed and uniform edge conditions. Comparison of calculated data to experimental data shows that accurate, quantitative results can be obtained from linear theory for 'as cut' real plates for a significant range of heating when the assumption of mode identity is discarded.

  19. Thermal stress analysis of the SLAC moveable mask. Addendum 2

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.L.

    1985-10-15

    X-ray beams emerging from the new SLAC electron-positron storage ring (PEP) can impinge on the walls of tangential divertor channels. A moveable mask made of 6061-T6 aluminum is installed in the channel to limit wall heating. The mask is cooled with water flowing axially at 30/sup 0/C. Beam strikes on the mask cause highly localized heating in the channel structure. Analyses were completed to determine the temperatures and thermally-induced stresses due to this heating. The current design and operating conditions should result in the entrance to the moveable mask operating at a peak temperature of 88/sup 0/C with a peak thermal stress at 19% of the yield of 6061-T6 aluminum.

  20. Thermal Viscoelastic Analysis of Plastic Components Considering Residual Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chel Woo; Jeoung, Kab Sik; Moon, Hyung-Il; Kim, Heon Young

    Plastics is commonly used in consumer electronics because of it is high strength per unit mass and good productivity, but plastic components may often become distorted after injection molding due to residual stress after the filling, packing, and cooling processes. In addition, plastic deteriorates depending on various temperature conditions and the operating time, which can be characterized by stress relaxation and creep. The viscoelastic behavior of plastic materials in the time domain can be expressed by the Prony series using the ABAQUS commercial software package. This paper suggests a process for predicting post-production deformation under cyclic thermal loading. The process was applied to real plastic panels, and the deformation predicted by the analysis was compared to that measured in actual testing, showing the possibility of using this process for predicting the post-production deformation of plastic products under thermal loading.

  1. On the strength of oceanic fracture zones and their influence on the intraplate stress field

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, E.A.; Solomon, S.C. )

    1992-10-01

    We use the locations and source mechanisms of oceanic intraplate earthquakes to test the hypothesis that the strength of oceanic fracture zones is less than that of normal oceanic lithosphere. The 77 earthquakes selected for the study have well-determined focal mechanisms and epicenters in regions where fracture zones are well mapped. We have search for dependence of faulting style, fault orientation, or principal stress direction on the distance from the nearest fracture zone. If fracture zones were generally weaker than the surrounding lithosphere, one of the principal horizontal stresses would be oriented nearly perpendicular to the fracture zone; we find no evidence that principal stresses near fracture zones are oriented preferentially in this manner. There is a slight tendency for earthquakes to occur near fracture zones, and patterns of fault orientation and sense of slip support the view that differential cooling and horizontal contraction on fracture zones may contribute seismogenic stress. 56 refs.

  2. On the strength of oceanic fracture zones and their influence on the intraplate stress field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Eric A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    We use the locations and source mechanisms of oceanic intraplate earthquakes to test the hypothesis that the strength of oceanic fracture zones is less than that of normal oceanic lithosphere. The 77 earthquakes selected for the study have well-determined focal mechanisms and epicenters in regions where fracture zones are well mapped. We have search for dependence of faulting style, fault orientation, or principal stress direction on the distance from the nearest fracture zone. If fracture zones were generally weaker than the surrounding lithosphere, one of the principal horizontal stresses would be oriented nearly perpendicular to the fracture zone; we find no evidence that principal stresses near fracture zones are oriented preferentially in this manner. There is a slight tendency for earthquakes to occur near fracture zones, and patterns of fault orientation and sense of slip support the view that differential cooling and horizontal contraction on fracture zones may contribute seismogenic stress.

  3. On the strength of oceanic fracture zones and their influence on the intraplate stress field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Eric A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    We use the locations and source mechanisms of oceanic intraplate earthquakes to test the hypothesis that the strength of oceanic fracture zones is less than that of normal oceanic lithosphere. The 77 earthquakes selected for the study have well-determined focal mechanisms and epicenters in regions where fracture zones are well mapped. We have search for dependence of faulting style, fault orientation, or principal stress direction on the distance from the nearest fracture zone. If fracture zones were generally weaker than the surrounding lithosphere, one of the principal horizontal stresses would be oriented nearly perpendicular to the fracture zone; we find no evidence that principal stresses near fracture zones are oriented preferentially in this manner. There is a slight tendency for earthquakes to occur near fracture zones, and patterns of fault orientation and sense of slip support the view that differential cooling and horizontal contraction on fracture zones may contribute seismogenic stress.

  4. Method for alleviating thermal stress damage in laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. A.; Weeton, J. W.; Orth, N. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The method is for metallic matrix composites, such as laminated sheet or foil composites. Non-intersecting discrete discontinuities are positively introduced into the interface between the layers so as to reduce the thermal stress produced by unequal expansion of the materials making up the composite. The discontinuities are preferably produced by drilling holes in the metallic matrix layer. However, a plurality of discrete elements may be used between the layers to carry out this purpose.

  5. Effect of element density on the NASTRAN calculated mechanical and thermal stresses of a spar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A NASTRAN model of a spar was examined to determine the sensitivity of calculated axial thermal stresses and bending stresses to changes in element density of the model. The thermal stresses calculated with three different element densities resulted in drastically differing values. The position of the constraint also significantly affected the value of the calculated thermal stresses. Mechanical stresses calculated from an applied loading were insensitive to element density.

  6. Investigating Earthquake Stress Drops on Mid-Ocean Ridge Transform Faults (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, M. S.; Moyer, P. A.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    A key question concerning the development of mid-ocean ridge transform faults (RTFs) is why have full fault ruptures not been observed in the historic record? Similarly, why do the rupture areas of the largest earthquakes on RTFs not scale directly with area above the 600°C isotherm? Recent studies have shown that Blanco, Discovery, Gofar, Heezen, Tharp, and Hollister RTFs all have multiple rupture patches on a single fault segment that repeatedly fail in characteristic largest (Mc) earthquakes. We develop a scaling relation for the stress drop of repeating Mc earthquakes assuming full-coupling on Mc rupture patches, such that slip (Dc) in Mc earthquakes is given by the product of the repeat time (tR) and plate tectonic slip (V), and assuming that slip scales with the square root of rupture area (Ac), Dc = ΔσAc1/2μ-1, where μ is the shear modulus. Using the definition of seismic moment, Mc = μAcDc, we directly solve for stress drop given observed repeat times: Δσ = μVtR3/2Mc-1/2. For stress drops in the range of 1-2 MPa, slip in repeating Mc earthquakes on each of the RTFs noted above is approximately equal to the accumulated plate tectonic motion. We analyze the source parameters of 3.0 < Mw < 5.0 earthquakes recorded in 2008 during a yearlong ocean bottom seismic (OBS) experiment on Gofar transform fault to determine the stress drop of earthquakes in both repeating Mc patches and the rupture barriers between the rupture patches. The OBS deployment captured the end of a seismic cycle, including a foreshock sequence that was both extensive (~20,000 earthquakes within the week prior to the mainshock) and localized (within a ~10 km region), as well as the Mw 6.0 mainshock and its aftershock sequence [McGuire et. al, 2012]. The foreshocks occurred in a rupture barrier on the western segment of Gofar and the aftershocks occurred in the rupture patch. Using waveforms recorded with a sample rate of 50 Hz on OBS accelerometers, we investigate the corner

  7. Investigating Earthquake Stress Drops on Mid-Ocean Ridge Transform Faults (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, M. S.; Moyer, P. A.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    A key question concerning the development of mid-ocean ridge transform faults (RTFs) is why have full fault ruptures not been observed in the historic record? Similarly, why do the rupture areas of the largest earthquakes on RTFs not scale directly with area above the 600°C isotherm? Recent studies have shown that Blanco, Discovery, Gofar, Heezen, Tharp, and Hollister RTFs all have multiple rupture patches on a single fault segment that repeatedly fail in characteristic largest (Mc) earthquakes. We develop a scaling relation for the stress drop of repeating Mc earthquakes assuming full-coupling on Mc rupture patches, such that slip (Dc) in Mc earthquakes is given by the product of the repeat time (tR) and plate tectonic slip (V), and assuming that slip scales with the square root of rupture area (Ac), Dc = ΔσAc1/2μ-1, where μ is the shear modulus. Using the definition of seismic moment, Mc = μAcDc, we directly solve for stress drop given observed repeat times: Δσ = μVtR3/2Mc-1/2. For stress drops in the range of 1-2 MPa, slip in repeating Mc earthquakes on each of the RTFs noted above is approximately equal to the accumulated plate tectonic motion. We analyze the source parameters of 3.0 < Mw < 5.0 earthquakes recorded in 2008 during a yearlong ocean bottom seismic (OBS) experiment on Gofar transform fault to determine the stress drop of earthquakes in both repeating Mc patches and the rupture barriers between the rupture patches. The OBS deployment captured the end of a seismic cycle, including a foreshock sequence that was both extensive (~20,000 earthquakes within the week prior to the mainshock) and localized (within a ~10 km region), as well as the Mw 6.0 mainshock and its aftershock sequence [McGuire et. al, 2012]. The foreshocks occurred in a rupture barrier on the western segment of Gofar and the aftershocks occurred in the rupture patch. Using waveforms recorded with a sample rate of 50 Hz on OBS accelerometers, we investigate the corner

  8. Countermeasures to Microbiofouling in Simulated Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Heat Exchangers with Surface and Deep Ocean Waters in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Leslie Ralph; Berger, Joyce A.

    1986-01-01

    Countermeasures to biofouling in simulated ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers have been studied in single-pass flow systems, using cold deep and warm surface ocean waters off the island of Hawaii. Manual brushing of the loops after free fouling periods removed most of the biofouling material. However, over a 2-year period a tenacious film formed. Daily free passage of sponge rubber balls through the tubing only removed the loose surface biofouling layer and was inadequate as a countermeasure in both titanium and aluminum alloy tubes. Chlorination at 0.05, 0.07, and 0.10 mg liter-1 for 1 h day-1 lowered biofouling rates. Only at 0.10 mg liter-1 was chlorine adequate over a 1-year period to keep film formation and heat transfer resistance from rising above the maximum tolerated values. Lower chlorination regimens led to the buildup of uneven or patchy films which produced increased flow turbulence. The result was lower heat transfer resistance values which did not correlate with the amount of biofouling. Surfaces which were let foul and then treated with intermittent or continuous chlorination at 0.10 mg of chlorine or less per liter were only partially or unevenly cleaned, although heat transfer measurements did not indicate that fact. It took continuous chlorination at 0.25 mg liter-1 to bring the heat transfer resistance to zero and eliminate the fouling layer. Biofouling in deep cold seawater was much slower than in the warm surface waters. Tubing in one stainless-steel loop had a barely detectable fouling layer after 1 year in flow. With aluminum alloys sufficient corrosion and biofouling material accumulated to require that some fouling coutermeasure be used in long-term operation of an ocean thermal energy conversion plant. Images PMID:16347076

  9. Modeling Oxidation Induced Stresses in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, B. L.; Freborg, A. M.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, William J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) in gas turbines has increased dramatically in recent years, due mainly to the need for component protection from ever increasing service temperatures. Oxidation of the bond coat has been identified as an important contributing factor to spallation of the ceramic top coat during service. Additional variables found to influence TBC thermal cycle life include bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers, and modulus of elasticity. The purpose of this work was to characterize the effects of oxidation on the stress states within the TBC system, as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with other factors affecting TBC life.

  10. The kinetics of thermal stress induced denaturation of Aquaporin 0.

    PubMed

    Hansen, John E; Leslie, Logan; Swamy-Mruthinti, Satyanarayana

    2014-08-08

    Aquaporin 0 (AQP0) is an integral membrane protein that facilitates water transport and cellular adhesion in the lens. Its dysfunction has been associated with cataractogenesis. Our earlier studies showed AQP0 undergoes aggregation when subjected to thermal stress and this aggregation seems to have been facilitated by mechanical agitation brought about by gentle stirring. The purpose of this study is to determine the secondary structural changes that precede aggregation and the role that α-crystallin plays in inhibiting those structural changes. Detergent solubilized calf lens AQP0 was subjected to thermal stress at 50°C for varying times. Secondary structural changes were measured by Circular Dichroism (CD) spectropolarimetry. Convex constraint analysis was used to deconvolute the CD spectra into pure component curves representing the secondary structural elements. Our results showed that under thermal stress, the α-helix content of AQP0 decreased from 50% to 7% with a concomitant increase from 0% to 52% in β-sheet content. The time-dependent loss of α-helical structure and gain of β-sheet structure appear to follow first-order kinetics with very similar values (∼30min) suggesting a single transition. In the presence of α-crystallin, this conversion to β-sheet is minimized, suggesting that the protein structure that binds to the molecular chaperone is mostly the α-helical structure of AQP0. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. On the response of northwest Greenland glaciers to ocean thermal forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M.; Rignot, E. J.; Menemenlis, D.; Fenty, I. G.; Millan, R.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Over the past 25 years, the tidewater glaciers of northwest Greenland have exhibited widespread retreat synchronous with warming ocean temperatures in northeast Baffin Bay, yet we also observe different behaviors from one glacier to the next, sometimes within the same fjord. Here, we calculate the ocean-induced melt rate of glaciers in the northwest using simulations from the MITgcm ocean model for various water depths, ocean thermal forcing (TF) and subglacial water fluxes (SG). We use water depth from Ocean Melting Greenland (OMG) bathymetry, ocean thermal forcing from the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (Phase II, ECCO2) combined with CTD data from 2012 and 2015, and time series of subglacial water flux combining runoff production from the 1-km Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO2.3) with basal melt beneath land ice from the JPL/UCI ISSM model. Time series of melt rates are formed as a function of grounding line depth, SG flux and TF. We compare the results with the calving speed of the glaciers and history of retreat rate to assess the relative glacier control between calving rate and ice melt by the ocean over the past two and a half decades. In some cases, we find that the front position is highly modulated by ocean-induced melt. For example, the melt rates at Docker Smith Gletscher and the southern-most branch of Hayes Gletscher (Hayes SS) have been comparable to or have exceeded the frontal speeds since the late 1990's, which coincides with their 5-km and 2-km retreats, respectively, despite moving into water 100 m shallower than at the start of the retreat. In other, often adjacently positioned, cases such as Gade Gletscher or another sub-branch of Hayes Gletscher (Hayes M), the frontal speeds far exceeded ocean-induced melt rates, the glaciers are dominantly controlled by calving processes, and the glacier retreat has been minimal (<300m) in the past two decades. These results illustrate the sensitivity of northwestern glaciers

  12. Nutritional and environmental studies on an ocean-going oil tanker. 1. Thermal environment

    PubMed Central

    Collins, K. J.; Eddy, T. P.; Lee, D. E.; Swann, P. G.

    1971-01-01

    Collins, K. J., Eddy, T. P., Lee, D. E., and Swann, P. G. (1971).Brit. J. industr. Med.,28, 237-245. Nutritional and environmental studies on an ocean-going oil tanker. I. Thermal environment. Investigations were made on board a modern, air-conditioned oil tanker (S.S. Esso Newcastle) en route to the Persian Gulf in July to August 1967 in order to study thermal conditions in the working environment, and the nutritional status of the crew, and to examine the interrelationship between climate and nutritional balance. In this introductory paper an account is given of the aims and design of the experiments together with details of the environmental survey. The voyage round Africa lasted one month, with high ambient temperatures of 37·7°C dry bulb, 30·8°C wet bulb (100/87°F) occurring only on the last few days into and out of the Persian Gulf. Mean accommodation temperature was maintained in the zone of comfort throughout, and at 23·9°C (75°F) Corrected Effective Temperature (CET) in the Gulf. On a previous voyage in a tanker without air-conditioning CETs up to 31·6°C (89°F) had been recorded in the accommodation in the same ambient conditions. With exposure to high solar radiation in the Gulf, the deck officer's cabins and bridge house in the upper superstructure became uncomfortably warm (CET exceeding 26·6°C (80°F)) and in these temperatures skilled performance is likely to deteriorate. The main thermal problems in the working environment were associated with the engine and boiler rooms which were consistently 11 to 17°C (20 to 30°F) higher than ambient temperature. For personnel on watch, the levels of heat stress were high but not intolerable if advantage was taken of the air blowers. Conditions under which emergency or repair tasks were carried out in very hot engine-room spaces were examined and often found to allow only a small margin of safety. Predicted average tolerance times were deduced from the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) scale of

  13. Thermal stress models for hydrothermal circulation, and relation to microseismicity near 9 degrees 50'N along the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Karen E.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges plays an important role in the interaction between oceanic lithosphere and the overlying ocean. Changes in fluid flux within hydrothermal systems may directly impact ocean circulation, temperature, and chemistry, and hence the lives of biological organisms in hydrothermal vent environments. The permeability structure within a hydrothermal environment is an important control on fluid flow throughout the system. Common suggestions for mechanisms that might increase permeability within the system include thermal cracking due to contraction of the hot rock from interaction with cold seawater, fluid pressure of the water moving through the rock, tectonics, or tidal forces. Additional factors such as mineral precipitation can decrease permeability in the system, further complicating the permeability structure. Though there are many factors to consider within a hydrothermal system, few quantitative studies of these cracking mechanisms exist. This study examines the role of thermal cracking near hydrothermal vents via a numerical model created in Matlab. Flow was modeled using the Laplace equation, and the heat transfer equation was used to determine temperature differences in the rock, which lead to thermal cracking. The numerical results were compared with microearthquakes observed by Tolstoy et al. (2008) near a hydrothermal vent field along the East Pacific Rise. The model suggests that thermal cracking does occur, and this cracking occurs within the area of microearthquakes observed. Though thermal cracking is important for increasing permeability within the system, there are no obvious spatial or temporal trends within the earthquake data that support a direct relation between the modeled thermal cracking and observed earthquakes. It is likely that the observed earthquakes are due to a combination of cracking mechanisms, such as cracking due to fluid pressure, tectonics, or tides, in addition to the modeled thermal

  14. Microbial dinitrogen fixation in coral holobionts exposed to thermal stress and bleaching.

    PubMed

    Cardini, Ulisse; van Hoytema, Nanne; Bednarz, Vanessa N; Rix, Laura; Foster, Rachel A; Al-Rshaidat, Mamoon M D; Wild, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Coral holobionts (i.e., coral-algal-prokaryote symbioses) exhibit dissimilar thermal sensitivities that may determine which coral species will adapt to global warming. Nonetheless, studies simultaneously investigating the effects of warming on all holobiont members are lacking. Here we show that exposure to increased temperature affects key physiological traits of all members (herein: animal host, zooxanthellae and diazotrophs) of both Stylophora pistillata and Acropora hemprichii during and after thermal stress. S. pistillata experienced severe loss of zooxanthellae (i.e., bleaching) with no net photosynthesis at the end of the experiment. Conversely, A. hemprichii was more resilient to thermal stress. Exposure to increased temperature (+ 6°C) resulted in a drastic increase in daylight dinitrogen (N2 ) fixation, particularly in A. hemprichii (threefold compared with controls). After the temperature was reduced again to in situ levels, diazotrophs exhibited a reversed diel pattern of activity, with increased N2 fixation rates recorded only in the dark, particularly in bleached S. pistillata (twofold compared to controls). Concurrently, both animal hosts, but particularly bleached S. pistillata, reduced both organic matter release and heterotrophic feeding on picoplankton. Our findings indicate that physiological plasticity by coral-associated diazotrophs may play an important role in determining the response of coral holobionts to ocean warming. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Local adaptation of reproductive performance during thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, D; Gaston, K J; Butlin, R K; Snook, R R

    2017-02-01

    Considerable evidence exists for local adaptation of critical thermal limits in ectotherms following adult temperature stress, but fewer studies have tested for local adaptation of sublethal heat stress effects across life-history stages. In organisms with complex life cycles, such as holometabolous insects, heat stress during juvenile stages may severely impact gametogenesis, having downstream consequences on reproductive performance that may be mediated by local adaptation, although this is rarely studied. Here, we tested how exposure to either benign or heat stress temperature during juvenile and adult stages, either independently or combined, influences egg-to-adult viability, adult sperm motility and fertility in high- and low-latitude populations of Drosophila subobscura. We found both population- and temperature-specific effects on survival and sperm motility; juvenile heat stress decreased survival and subsequent sperm motility and each trait was lower in the northern population. We found an interaction between population and temperature on fertility following application of juvenile heat stress; although fertility was negatively impacted in both populations, the southern population was less affected. When the adult stage was also subject to heat stress, the southern population exhibited positive carry-over effects whereas the northern population's fertility remained low. Thus, the northern population is more susceptible to sublethal reproductive consequences following exposure to juvenile heat stress. This may be common in other organisms with complex life cycles and current models predicting population responses to climate change, which do not take into account the impact of juvenile heat stress on reproductive performance, may be too conservative.

  16. Ocean thermal energy at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy's Division of Ocean Energy Technology (DOE/DOET), is engaged in developing Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that will provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy-intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal-OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. APL has been designated the Lead Laboratory in these areas by DOE/DOET. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1981.

  17. Ocean thermal energy conversion: environmental effects assessment program plan, 1981-85. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Act of 1980 calls for a legal regime to encourage commercial OTEC while protecting the oceanic and coastal environments. The Act also requires a generic plan for assessing the environmental effects of OTEC development. The plan outlined in this report establishes a priority list of nine environmental effects and a research strategy for reducing uncertainties, with an emphasis on large-scale and long-term ecosystem implications and on the impacts of multiple facilities. 70 references, 4 figures, 4 tables. (DCK)

  18. Ocean thermal energy conversion report to congress: fiscal year 1981. public law 96-320

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    After a section on the background of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, which deals with the national interest and the nature of the industry, this report discusses OTEC technology, the legal regime, environmental considerations and the international impact and future of OTEC. At the current time no amendments to the ACT are recommended. NOAA is analyzing several areas in which technical amendments would clarify the original intent of the Act. The most significant of these relates to the specific requirements for issuance of OTEC licenses for facilities that are located partly on land and partly in ocean waters.

  19. Equilibrium Ocean Thermal Expansion Depends Non-Linearly on the Forcing Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugenstein, M.; Knutti, R.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean dominates the planetary heat budget and takes thousands of years to equilibrate to perturbedsurface conditions. We show two commonly held assumptions to be inaccurate: (a) A temperature perturbationin the atmosphere translates to a roughly uniform equilibrium ocean temperature anomaly.(b) Equilibrium global sea level rise due to thermal expansion is proportional to global surface warming.We analyze a vast range forcing levels and equilibration time scales of up to 10 000 years, for one model ofintermediate complexity and one state-of-the-art global climate model.The response time scales and regions of anomalous ocean heat storage depend non-linearly on the forcinglevel and equilibrium surface warming. The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation is only proportionalto the forcing in its initial response, but not in its centennial to millennial recovery. In the SouthernOcean, water mass properties and surface air temperature response do not scale linearly with the forcinglevel. Interior and deep oceans warm very little compared to the surface layers for small perturbations, butdo so increasingly for higher forcing levels. The deep ocean temperature anomaly does not correspond toeither high or low latitude atmospheric surface temperature anomaly. Depending on where the excess heatis stored in the long term, the global sea level due to thermal expansion varies. We discuss the scalability ofequilibrium climate sensitivity between these simulations and their relation to different definitions of radiativeforcing.Two far reaching consequences are: (1) that one cannot deduce long term (centennial to millennial) fromshort term (decadal to centennial) behavior of ocean circulation and heat uptake. (2) The explanatory powerof deep sea proxies of past climate change to represent surface temperature perturbations, might be limiteddue to the uncertainty of the detailed forcing history.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Gravity, Geoid, and the Thermal Structure of Oceanic Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, D.; Grose, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to better understand links between the thermal and density structure of oceanic lithosphere with its surface manifestations, we implement numerical techniques to predict both the thermal structure of oceanic lithosphere and the consequent gravity field and geoid height. The two principal problems of our potential field numerical algorithm are the transposition of density data in two-dimensional Cartesian space into a three-dimensional spherical shell model, and accurately quantifying deformation in the Cartesian grid associated with contraction and isostatic adjustment. Using this model we investigate anomalies in gravity and the geoid due to density heterogeneities associated with varying properties and boundary conditions of the oceanic lithosphere. Such sources of thermal and density structure include the impact of variable heat transport properties, lattice preferred orientation, mantle potential temperature and adiabate, plate thickness, and the composite mineral assemblage. Variable transport properties are known to result in substantial deviations in the geotherm relative to that expected from models with constant thermal parameters. Since the near-surface lithosphere is cooler, the impact on geoid height should be smaller and this is important for constraining the effective diffusivity of the lithosphere. In addition, composite mineralogy is important due to phase changes. In particular, the spinel-garnet transition rapidly elevates in lithosphere around ages of 20 to 40 Mya. Such a density anomaly is likely to be observable in the geoid height, and this may account for unexplained features of geoid slope at young ages.

  1. Thermally induced stresses and deformations in layered composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. E.; Cohen, D.; Rousseau, C. Q.; Hyer, M. W.; Tompkins, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The thermally induced stresses and deformations in layered, orthotropic tubes are studied. The motivation for studying tubes is their likely application for use in space structures. Tubes are a strong candidate for this application because of their high structural efficiency, as measured by stiffness per unit weight, and their relative ease of fabrication. Also, tubes have no free edges to deteriorate or delaminate. An anticipated thermal condition for tubes in space is a circumferential temperature gradient. This type of gradient will introduce dimensional changes into the structure and may cause stresses large enough to cause damage to the material. There are potentially large differences in temperatures at different circumferential locations on the tube. Because of this, the effects of temperature dependent material properties on the stresses and deformations may be important. The study is composed of three parts: experiments to determine the functional form of the circumferential gradient and to measure tube deflections; an elasticity solution to compute the stresses and deformations; and an approximate approach to determine the effects of temperature dependent material properties.

  2. Thermally induced stresses and deformations in layered composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. E.; Cohen, D.; Rousseau, C. Q.; Hyer, M. W.; Tompkins, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The thermally induced stresses and deformations in layered, orthotropic tubes are studied. The motivation for studying tubes is their likely application for use in space structures. Tubes are a strong candidate for this application because of their high structural efficiency, as measured by stiffness per unit weight, and their relative ease of fabrication. Also, tubes have no free edges to deteriorate or delaminate. An anticipated thermal condition for tubes in space is a circumferential temperature gradient. This type of gradient will introduce dimensional changes into the structure and may cause stresses large enough to cause damage to the material. There are potentially large differences in temperatures at different circumferential locations on the tube. Because of this, the effects of temperature dependent material properties on the stresses and deformations may be important. The study is composed of three parts: experiments to determine the functional form of the circumferential gradient and to measure tube deflections; an elasticity solution to compute the stresses and deformations; and an approximate approach to determine the effects of temperature dependent material properties.

  3. Ocean Warming Enhances Malformations, Premature Hatching, Metabolic Suppression and Oxidative Stress in the Early Life Stages of a Keystone Squid

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rui; Pimentel, Marta S.; Boavida-Portugal, Joana; Teixeira, Tatiana; Trübenbach, Katja; Diniz, Mário

    2012-01-01

    Background The knowledge about the capacity of organisms’ early life stages to adapt to elevated temperatures is very limited but crucial to understand how marine biota will respond to global warming. Here we provide a comprehensive and integrated view of biological responses to future warming during the early ontogeny of a keystone invertebrate, the squid Loligo vulgaris. Methodology/Principal Findings Recently-spawned egg masses were collected and reared until hatching at present day and projected near future (+2°C) temperatures, to investigate the ability of early stages to undergo thermal acclimation, namely phenotypic altering of morphological, behavioural, biochemical and physiological features. Our findings showed that under the projected near-future warming, the abiotic conditions inside the eggs promoted metabolic suppression, which was followed by premature hatching. Concomitantly, the less developed newborns showed greater incidence of malformations. After hatching, the metabolic burst associated with the transition from an encapsulated embryo to a planktonic stage increased linearly with temperature. However, the greater exposure to environmental stress by the hatchlings seemed to be compensated by physiological mechanisms that reduce the negative effects on fitness. Heat shock proteins (HSP70/HSC70) and antioxidant enzymes activities constituted an integrated stress response to ocean warming in hatchlings (but not in embryos). Conclusions/Significance The stressful abiotic conditions inside eggs are expected to be aggravated under the projected near-future ocean warming, with deleterious effects on embryo survival and growth. Greater feeding challenges and the lower thermal tolerance limits of the hatchlings are strictly connected to high metabolic demands associated with the planktonic life strategy. Yet, we found some evidence that, in the future, the early stages might support higher energy demands by adjusting some cellular functional properties

  4. Ocean warming enhances malformations, premature hatching, metabolic suppression and oxidative stress in the early life stages of a keystone squid.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rui; Pimentel, Marta S; Boavida-Portugal, Joana; Teixeira, Tatiana; Trübenbach, Katja; Diniz, Mário

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge about the capacity of organisms' early life stages to adapt to elevated temperatures is very limited but crucial to understand how marine biota will respond to global warming. Here we provide a comprehensive and integrated view of biological responses to future warming during the early ontogeny of a keystone invertebrate, the squid Loligo vulgaris. Recently-spawned egg masses were collected and reared until hatching at present day and projected near future (+2°C) temperatures, to investigate the ability of early stages to undergo thermal acclimation, namely phenotypic altering of morphological, behavioural, biochemical and physiological features. Our findings showed that under the projected near-future warming, the abiotic conditions inside the eggs promoted metabolic suppression, which was followed by premature hatching. Concomitantly, the less developed newborns showed greater incidence of malformations. After hatching, the metabolic burst associated with the transition from an encapsulated embryo to a planktonic stage increased linearly with temperature. However, the greater exposure to environmental stress by the hatchlings seemed to be compensated by physiological mechanisms that reduce the negative effects on fitness. Heat shock proteins (HSP70/HSC70) and antioxidant enzymes activities constituted an integrated stress response to ocean warming in hatchlings (but not in embryos). The stressful abiotic conditions inside eggs are expected to be aggravated under the projected near-future ocean warming, with deleterious effects on embryo survival and growth. Greater feeding challenges and the lower thermal tolerance limits of the hatchlings are strictly connected to high metabolic demands associated with the planktonic life strategy. Yet, we found some evidence that, in the future, the early stages might support higher energy demands by adjusting some cellular functional properties to increase their thermal tolerance windows.

  5. Investigation of Thermal Stress Convection in Nonisothermal Gases Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, Daniel W.; Knight, Roy W.

    1996-01-01

    Microgravity conditions offer an environment in which convection in a nonisothermal gas could be driven primarily by thermal stress. A direct examination of thermal stress flows would be invaluable in assessing the accuracy of the Burnett terms in the fluid stress tensor. We present a preliminary numerical investigation of the competing effects of thermal stress, thermal creep at the side walls, and buoyancy on gas convection in nonuniformly heated containers under normal and reduced gravity levels. Conditions in which thermal stress convection becomes dominant are identified, and issues regarding the experimental measurement of the flows are discussed.

  6. Ocean acidification has little effect on developmental thermal windows of echinoderms from Antarctica to the tropics.

    PubMed

    Karelitz, Sam E; Uthicke, Sven; Foo, Shawna A; Barker, Mike F; Byrne, Maria; Pecorino, Danilo; Lamare, Miles D

    2017-02-01

    As the ocean warms, thermal tolerance of developmental stages may be a key driver of changes in the geographical distributions and abundance of marine invertebrates. Additional stressors such as ocean acidification may influence developmental thermal windows and are therefore important considerations for predicting distributions of species under climate change scenarios. The effects of reduced seawater pH on the thermal windows of fertilization, embryology and larval morphology were examined using five echinoderm species: two polar (Sterechinus neumayeri and Odontaster validus), two temperate (Fellaster zelandiae and Patiriella regularis) and one tropical (Arachnoides placenta). Responses were examined across 12-13 temperatures ranging from -1.1 °C to 5.7 °C (S. neumayeri), -0.5 °C to 10.7 °C (O. validus), 5.8 °C to 27 °C (F. zelandiae), 6.0 °C to 27.1 °C (P. regularis) and 13.9 °C to 34.8 °C (A. placenta) under present-day and near-future (2100+) ocean acidification conditions (-0.3 pH units) and for three important early developmental stages 1) fertilization, 2) embryo (prehatching) and 3) larval development. Thermal windows for fertilization were broad and were not influenced by a pH decrease. Embryological development was less thermotolerant. For O. validus, P. regularis and A. placenta, low pH reduced normal development, albeit with no effect on thermal windows. Larval development in all five species was affected by both temperature and pH; however, thermal tolerance was not reduced by pH. Results of this study suggest that in terms of fertilization and development, temperature will remain as the most important factor influencing species' latitudinal distributions as the ocean continues to warm and decrease in pH, and that there is little evidence of a synergistic effect of temperature and ocean acidification on the thermal control of species ranges. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Design and cost of near-term OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) plants for the production of desalinated water and electric power. [Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.; Panchal, C.; Genens, L.

    1990-01-01

    There currently is an increasing need for both potable water and power for many islands in the Pacific and Caribbean. The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology fills these needs and is a viable option because of the unlimited supply of ocean thermal energy for the production of both desalinated water and electricity. The OTEC plant design must be flexible to meet the product-mix demands that can be very different from site to site. This paper describes different OTEC plants that can supply various mixes of desalinated water and vapor -- the extremes being either all water and no power or no water and all power. The economics for these plants are also presented. The same flow rates and pipe sizes for both the warm and cold seawater streams are used for different plant designs. The OTEC plant designs are characterized as near-term because no major technical issues need to be resolved or demonstrated. The plant concepts are based on DOE-sponsored experiments dealing with power systems, advanced heat exchanger designs, corrosion and fouling of heat exchange surfaces, and flash evaporation and moisture removal from the vapor using multiple spouts. In addition, the mature multistage flash evaporator technology is incorporated into the plant designs were appropriate. For the supply and discharge warm and cold uncertainties do exist because the required pipe sizes are larger than the maximum currently deployed -- 40-inch high-density polyethylene pipe at Keahole Point in Hawaii. 30 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Transition from stress-driven to thermally activated stress relaxation in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, J. C.; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Zhao, L. Z.; Dai, L. H.; Crespo, D.; Pelletier, J. M.; Keer, L. M.; Yao, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The short-range ordered but long-range disordered structure of metallic glasses yields strong structural and dynamic heterogeneities. Stress relaxation is a technique to trace the evolution of stress in response to a fixed strain, which reflects the dynamic features phenomenologically described by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) equation. The KWW equation describes a broad distribution of relaxation times with a small number of empirical parameters, but it does not arise from a particular physically motivated mechanistic picture. Here we report an anomalous two-stage stress relaxation behavior in a Cu46Zr46Al8 metallic glass over a wide temperature range and generalize the findings in other compositions. Thermodynamic analysis identifies two categories of processes: a fast stress-driven event with large activation volume and a slow thermally activated event with small activation volume, which synthetically dominates the stress relaxation dynamics. Discrete analyses rationalize the transition mechanism induced by stress and explain the anomalous variation of the KWW characteristic time with temperature. Atomistic simulations reveal that the stress-driven event involves virtually instantaneous short-range atomic rearrangement, while the thermally activated event is the percolation of the fast event accommodated by the long-range atomic diffusion. The insights may clarify the underlying physical mechanisms behind the phenomenological description and shed light on correlating the hierarchical dynamics and structural heterogeneity of amorphous solids.

  9. Effect of Multiple Stresses (Thermal, Nutritional, and Walking Stress) on the Reproductive Performance of Malpura Ewes

    PubMed Central

    Sejian, V.; Maurya, V. P.; Kumar, K.; Naqvi, S. M. K.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the effect of multiple stresses (thermal, nutritional, and walking stress) on the reproductive performance of Malpura ewes. The study was conducted for a period of 35 days covering two estrous cycles during summer season (April-May). The ewes were randomly allocated into two groups of twelve animals each namely, GI (n=12; Control), and GII (n=1 2; Multiple stresses). GI ewes were maintained in the shed, while GII ewes were subjected to multiple stresses (thermal, nutritional, and walking stress). The estrus % differed significantly (P< 0.05) between the groups. Estrus duration also showed similar trend to that of estrus %. Both conception and lambing rate also differed significantly (P< 0.05) between the control and multiple-stress group. In addition plasma estradiol and progesterone also showed significant difference between the groups. The study proved the detrimental effects of multiple-stresses on various reproductive parameters studied. Hence it is very pertinent to conclude that when two or more than two stressors occur simultaneously, the total impact may be severe on reproductive functions of the animals. PMID:22448337

  10. Thermal imaging to detect physiological indicators of stress in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Carl B.; Skipper, Julie A.; Petkie, Douglas T.

    2013-05-01

    Real-time, stand-off sensing of human subjects to detect emotional state would be valuable in many defense, security and medical scenarios. We are developing a multimodal sensor platform that incorporates high-resolution electro-optical and mid-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras and a millimeter-wave radar system to identify individuals who are psychologically stressed. Recent experiments have aimed to: 1) assess responses to physical versus psychological stressors; 2) examine the impact of topical skin products on thermal signatures; and 3) evaluate the fidelity of vital signs extracted from thermal imagery and radar signatures. Registered image and sensor data were collected as subjects (n=32) performed mental and physical tasks. In each image, the face was segmented into 29 non-overlapping segments based on fiducial points automatically output by our facial feature tracker. Image features were defined that facilitated discrimination between psychological and physical stress states. To test the ability to intentionally mask thermal responses indicative of anxiety or fear, subjects applied one of four topical skin products to one half of their face before performing tasks. Finally, we evaluated the performance of two non-contact techniques to detect respiration and heart rate: chest displacement extracted from the radar signal and temperature fluctuations at the nose tip and regions near superficial arteries to detect respiration and heart rates, respectively, extracted from the MWIR imagery. Our results are very satisfactory: classification of physical versus psychological stressors is repeatedly greater than 90%, thermal masking was almost always ineffective, and accurate heart and respiration rates are detectable in both thermal and radar signatures.

  11. Flexible retractable cold water pipe for an ocean thermal energy conversion system

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, J.G.; Trimble, L.C.

    1985-02-05

    A cold water pipe for an ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) system comprises a tubular membrane made of a fabric such as a canvas, which is substantially impervious to flowing water. A proximal end of the pipe is secured to a surface structure such as a ship, and a distal end of the pipe is extendible from the surface structure to a selected ocean depth. The pipe functions as a conduit through which cold water from the selected ocean depth can be drawn to the surface structure for use in a thermodynamic process of the OTEC system. The distal end of the pipe can be quickly retracted to the surface structure when it becomes desirable to move the surface structure.

  12. Multiple nutrient stresses at intersecting Pacific Ocean biomes detected by protein biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mak A; McIlvin, Matthew R; Moran, Dawn M; Goepfert, Tyler J; DiTullio, Giacomo R; Post, Anton F; Lamborg, Carl H

    2014-09-05

    Marine primary productivity is strongly influenced by the scarcity of required nutrients, yet our understanding of these nutrient limitations is informed by experimental observations with sparse geographical coverage and methodological limitations. We developed a quantitative proteomic method to directly assess nutrient stress in high-light ecotypes of the abundant cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus across a meridional transect in the central Pacific Ocean. Multiple peptide biomarkers detected widespread and overlapping regions of nutritional stress for nitrogen and phosphorus in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre and iron in the equatorial Pacific. Quantitative protein analyses demonstrated simultaneous stress for these nutrients at biome interfaces. This application of proteomic biomarkers to diagnose ocean metabolism demonstrated Prochlorococcus actively and simultaneously deploying multiple biochemical strategies for low-nutrient conditions in the oceans.

  13. Evanescent pressure gradient response in the upper ocean to subinertial wind stress forcing of finite wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Warren B.; Mcnally, Gerard

    1987-01-01

    A schematic model is used to interpret field observations related to the mixed layer response to wind stress at subinertial frequencies. It is shown that subinertial density and pressure fluctuations can arise locally from the finite wavelength character of the wind stress forcing as a fundamental part of the upper ocean transient, wind-driven response on time scales of 2-10 pendulum days. Evanescent vertical motions arise which alter the density field of the pycnocline, and hence the pressure field over the entire upper ocean. It is thus found that in the real ocean driven by wind stress, a transient geostrophic response exists which can be as large or larger than the transient Eckman response.

  14. Modeling Residual Stress Development in Thermal Spray Coatings: Current Status and Way Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, Abba A.; Arif, Abul Fazal M.; Al-Athel, Khaled S.; Akhtar, S. Sohail; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2017-07-01

    An overview of analytical and numerical methods for prediction of residual stresses in thermal spray coatings is presented. The various sources and mechanisms underlying residual stress development in thermal spray coatings are discussed, then the various difficulties associated with experimental residual stress measurement in thermal spray coatings are highlighted. The various analytical and numerical models used for prediction of residual stresses in thermal spray coatings are thoroughly discussed. While analytical models for prediction of postdeposition thermal mismatch stresses are fully developed, analytical quenching and peening stress models still require extensive development. Various schemes for prediction of residual stresses using the finite element method are identified. The results of the various numerical and analytical models are critically analyzed, and their accuracy and validity, when compared with experiments, are discussed. Issues regarding the accuracy and applicability of the models for predicting residual stresses in thermal spray coatings are highlighted, and several suggestions for future development of the models are given.

  15. Modeling Residual Stress Development in Thermal Spray Coatings: Current Status and Way Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, Abba A.; Arif, Abul Fazal M.; Al-Athel, Khaled S.; Akhtar, S. Sohail; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2017-08-01

    An overview of analytical and numerical methods for prediction of residual stresses in thermal spray coatings is presented. The various sources and mechanisms underlying residual stress development in thermal spray coatings are discussed, then the various difficulties associated with experimental residual stress measurement in thermal spray coatings are highlighted. The various analytical and numerical models used for prediction of residual stresses in thermal spray coatings are thoroughly discussed. While analytical models for prediction of postdeposition thermal mismatch stresses are fully developed, analytical quenching and peening stress models still require extensive development. Various schemes for prediction of residual stresses using the finite element method are identified. The results of the various numerical and analytical models are critically analyzed, and their accuracy and validity, when compared with experiments, are discussed. Issues regarding the accuracy and applicability of the models for predicting residual stresses in thermal spray coatings are highlighted, and several suggestions for future development of the models are given.

  16. Combined thermal and herbicide stress in functionally diverse coral symbionts.

    PubMed

    van Dam, J W; Uthicke, S; Beltran, V H; Mueller, J F; Negri, A P

    2015-09-01

    Most reef building corals rely on symbiotic microalgae (genus Symbiodinium) to supply a substantial proportion of their energy requirements. Functional diversity of different Symbiodinium genotypes, endorsing the host with physiological advantages, has been widely reported. Yet, the influence of genotypic specificity on the symbiont's susceptibility to contaminants or cumulative stressors is unknown. Cultured Symbiodinium of presumed thermal-tolerant clade D tested especially vulnerable to the widespread herbicide diuron, suggesting important free-living populations may be at risk in areas subjected to terrestrial runoff. Co-exposure experiments where cultured Symbiodinium were exposed to diuron over a thermal stress gradient demonstrated how fast-growing clade C1 better maintained photosynthetic capability than clade D. The mixture toxicity model of Independent Action, considering combined thermal stress and herbicide contamination, revealed response additivity for inhibition of photosynthetic yield in both tested cultures, emphasizing the need to account for cumulative stressor impacts in ecological risk assessment and resource management. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. TPX vacuum vessel transient thermal and stress conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Feldshteyn, Y.; Dinkevich, S.; Feng, T.; Majumder, D.

    1995-12-31

    The TPX vacuum vessel provides the vacuum boundary for the plasma and the mechanical support for the internal components. Another function of the vacuum vessel is to contain neutron shielding water in the double wall space during normal operation. This double wall space serves as a heat reservoir for the entire vacuum vessel during bakeout. The vacuum vessel and the internal components are subjected to thermal stresses induced by a nonuniform temperature distribution within the structure during bakeout. A successful Conceptual Design Review in March 1993 has established superheated steam as the heating source of the vacuum vessel. A transient bakeout mode of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components has been analyzed to evaluate transient period duration, proper temperature level, actual thermal stresses and performance of the steam equipment. Thermally, the vacuum vessel structure may be considered as an adiabatic system because it is perfectly insulated by the strong surrounding vacuum and multiple layers of superinsulation. Important aspects of the analysis are described herein.

  18. Thermal stress impacts reproductive development and grain yield in rice.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Muhammad Shakeel; Farooq, Muhammad; Asch, Folkard; Krishna, Jagadish S V; Prasad, P V Vara; Siddique, Kadambot H M

    2017-03-16

    Rice is highly sensitive to temperature stress (cold and heat), particularly during the reproductive and grain-filling stages. In this review, we discuss the effects of low- and high-temperature sensitivity in rice at various reproductive stages (from meiosis to grain development) and propose strategies for improving the tolerance of rice to terminal thermal stress. Cold stress impacts reproductive development through (i) delayed heading, due to its effect on anther respiration, which increases sucrose accumulation, protein denaturation and asparagine levels, and decreases proline accumulation, (ii) pollen sterility owing to tapetal hypertrophy and related nutrient imbalances, (iii) reduced activity of cell wall bound invertase in the tapetum of rice anthers, (iv) impaired fertilization due to inhibited anther dehiscence, stigma receptivity and ability of the pollen tube to germinate through the style towards the ovary, and (v) floret sterility, which increases grain abortion, restricts grain size, and thus reduces grain yield. Heat stress affects grain formation and development through (i) poor anther dehiscence due to restricted closure of the locules, leading to reduced pollen dispersal and fewer pollen on the stigma, (ii) changes in pollen proteins resulting in significant reductions in pollen viability and pollen tube growth, leading to spikelet sterility, (iii) delay in heading, (iv) reduced starch biosynthesis in developing grain, which reduces starch accumulation, (v) increased chalkiness of grain with irregular and round-shaped starch granules, and (vi) a shortened grain-filling period resulting in low grain weight. However, physiological and biotechnological tools, along with integrated management and adaptation options, as well as conventional breeding, can help to develop new rice genotypes possessing better grain yield under thermal stress during reproductive and grain-filling phases.

  19. Ocean thermal energy at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plant conceptual design review is given. OTEC methanol production from coal is discussed. A review of electrolyzer development programs and requirements is given. Financial and legal considerations in OTEC implementation, potential navy sites for GEOTEC system, hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants, single-cycle performance estimates, and supervision of testing of a pneumatic wave energy conversion system are discussed.

  20. Sensitivity of ocean oxygenation to variations in tropical zonal wind stress magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridder, Nina N.; England, Matthew H.

    2014-09-01

    Ocean oxygenation has been observed to have changed over the past few decades and is projected to change further under global climate change due to an interplay of several mechanisms. In this study we isolate the effect of modified tropical surface wind stress conditions on the evolution of ocean oxygenation in a numerical climate model. We find that ocean oxygenation varies inversely with low-latitude surface wind stress. Approximately one third of this response is driven by sea surface temperature anomalies; the remaining two thirds result from changes in ocean circulation and marine biology. Global mean O2 concentration changes reach maximum values of +4 μM and -3.6 μM in the two most extreme perturbation cases of -30% and +30% wind change, respectively. Localized changes lie between +92 μM under 30% reduced winds and -56 μM for 30% increased winds. Overall, we find that the extent of the global low-oxygen volume varies with the same sign as the wind perturbation; namely, weaker winds reduce the low-oxygen volume on the global scale and vice versa for increased trade winds. We identify two regions, one in the Pacific Ocean off Chile and the other in the Indian Ocean off Somalia, that are of particular importance for the evolution of oxygen minimum zones in the global ocean.

  1. 1997-98: Unprecedented thermal stress to coral reefs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lough, J. M.

    2000-12-01

    Mass bleaching is a stress response of corals subjected to warmer-than-normal seawater temperatures during the warm season. During 1997-98 there were unprecedented numbers of reports of bleaching on many of the world's coral reefs. Observational evidence suggests an increase in frequency of mass coral bleaching events since the late 1970s. Two indices of warm season sea surface temperatures (SSTs; SST maximum anomaly and degree-months) are presented for 47 reef sites where bleaching occurred during 1997-98. The level of thermal stress at the vast majority of these coral reef sites during 1997-98 was unmatched in the period 1903-99. Warm season SSTs at these coral reef sites have significantly warmed over this period and the frequency of warm season SST extremes has increased since the late 1970s. Continued warming of tropical SSTs, as is likely due to the enhanced greenhouse effect, will increase the level of thermal stress to coral reefs. Increased frequency of bleaching events will reduce corals' capacity to recover and may significantly alter the make-up of present day coral reef ecosystems.

  2. Sympathetic regulation during thermal stress in human aging and disease

    PubMed Central

    Greaney, Jody L.; Kenney, W. Larry; Alexander, Lacy M.

    2015-01-01

    Humans control their core temperature within a narrow range via precise adjustments of the autonomic nervous system. In response to changing core and/or skin temperature, several critical thermoregulatory reflex effector responses are initiated and include shivering, sweating, and changes in cutaneous blood flow. Cutaneous vasomotor adjustments, mediated by modulations in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), aid in the maintenance of thermal homeostasis during cold and heat stress since (1) they serve as the first line of defense of body temperature and are initiated before other thermoregulatory effectors, and (2) they are on the efferent arm of non-thermoregulatory reflex systems, aiding in the maintenance of blood pressure and organ perfusion. This review article highlights the sympathetic responses of humans to thermal stress, with a specific focus on primary aging as well as impairments that occur in both heart disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Age- and pathology-related changes in efferent muscle and skin SNA during cold and heat stress, measured directly in humans using microneurography, are discussed. PMID:26627337

  3. Ocean thermal plantships for production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier.

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Pandolfini, P. P.; Kumm, W. H.; Energy Systems; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Arctic Energies, Ltd.

    2009-12-02

    Conventional petroleum, natural gas, and coal are the primary sources of energy that have underpinned modern civilization. Their continued availability in the projected quantities required and the impacts of emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the environment are issues at the forefront of world concerns. New primary sources of energy are being sought that would significantly reduce the emissions of GHGs. One such primary source that can help supply energy, water, and fertilizer without GHG emissions is available in the heretofore unexploited thermal gradients of the tropical oceans. The world's oceans are the largest natural collector and reservoir of solar energy. The potential of ocean energy is limitless for producing base-load electric power or ammonia as the hydrogen carrier and fresh water from seawater. However, until now, ocean energy has been virtually untapped. The general perception is that ocean thermal energy is limited to tropical countries. Therefore, the full potential of at-sea production of (1) ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and (2) desalinated water has not been adequately evaluated. Using ocean thermal plantships for the at-sea co-production of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and desalinated water offer potential energy, environmental, and economic benefits that support the development of the technology. The introduction of a new widespread solution to our projected energy supply requires lead times of a decade or more. Although continuation of the ocean thermal program from the 1970s would likely have put us in a mitigating position in the early 2000s, we still have a window of opportunity to dedicate some of our conventional energy sources to the development of this renewable energy by the time new sources would be critically needed. The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the technical and economic viability of ocean thermal plantships for the production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier. This objective is achieved by

  4. Superoxide dismutase activity in thermally stressed Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Bucker, E R; Martin, S E

    1981-01-01

    The effects of heat and NaCl on the activity of superoxide dismutase from Staphylococcus aureus were examined. A linear decrease in superoxide dismutase activity occurred when S. aureus MF-31 cells were thermally stressed for 90 min at 52% C in 100 mM potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2). After 20 min of heating, only 5% of the superoxide dismutase activity was lost. Heating for 60, 90 and 120 min resulted in decreases of approximately 10, 22, and 68%, respectively. The rates of thermal inactivation of superoxide dismutase from S. aureus strains 196E and 210 were similar and slightly greater than those of strains MF-31, S-6, and 181. The addition of NaCl before or after heating resulted in increased losses of superoxide dismutase activity. PMID:7235693

  5. Crop water-stress assessment using an airborne thermal scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Goettelman, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    An airborne thermal scanner was used to measure the temperature of a wheat crop canopy in Phoenix, Arizona. The results indicate that canopy temperatures acquired about an hour and a half past solar noon were well correlated with presunrise plant water tension, a parameter directly related to plant growth and development. Pseudo-colored thermal images reading directly in stress degree days, a unit indicative of crop irrigation needs and yield potential, were produced. The aircraft data showed significant within-field canopy temperature variability, indicating the superiority of the synoptic view provided by aircraft over localized ground measurements. The standard deviation between airborne and ground-acquired canopy temperatures was 2 C or less.

  6. Crop water-stress assessment using an airborne thermal scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Goettelman, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    An airborne thermal scanner was used to measure the temperature of a wheat crop canopy in Phoenix, Arizona. The results indicate that canopy temperatures acquired about an hour and a half past solar noon were well correlated with presunrise plant water tension, a parameter directly related to plant growth and development. Pseudo-colored thermal images reading directly in stress degree days, a unit indicative of crop irrigation needs and yield potential, were produced. The aircraft data showed significant within-field canopy temperature variability, indicating the superiority of the synoptic view provided by aircraft over localized ground measurements. The standard deviation between airborne and ground-acquired canopy temperatures was 2 C or less.

  7. Thermal Stress Effect on Density Changes of Hemp Hurds Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzova, Ivana; Cigasova, Julia; Stevulova, Nadezda

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this article is to study the behavior of prepared biocomposites based on hemp hurds as a filling agent in composite system. In addition to the filler and water, an alternative binder, called MgO-cement was used. For this objective were prepared three types of samples; samples based on untreated hemp hurds as a referential material and samples based on chemically (with NaOH solution) and physically (by ultrasonic procedure) treated hemp hurds. The thermal stress effect on bulk density changes of hemp hurds composites was monitored. Gradual increase in temperature led to composites density reduction of 30-40 %. This process is connected with mass loss of the adsorbed moisture and physically bound water and also with degradation of organic compounds present in hemp hurds aggregates such as pectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose. Therefore the changes in the chemical composition of treated hemp hurds in comparison to original sample and its thermal decomposition were also studied.

  8. Rapid and sustained surface ocean acidification during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penman, Donald E.; Hönisch, Bärbel; Zeebe, Richard E.; Thomas, Ellen; Zachos, James C.

    2014-05-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) has been associated with the release of several thousands of petagrams of carbon (Pg C) as methane and/or carbon dioxide into the ocean-atmosphere system within ~10 kyr, on the basis of the co-occurrence of a carbon isotope excursion (CIE), widespread dissolution of deep sea carbonates, and global warming. In theory, this rapid carbon release should have severely acidified the surface ocean, though no geochemical evidence has yet been presented. Using boron-based proxies for surface ocean carbonate chemistry, we present the first observational evidence for a drop in the pH of surface and thermocline seawater during the PETM. Planktic foraminifers from a drill site in the North Pacific (Ocean Drilling Program Site 1209) show a ~0.8‰ decrease in boron isotopic composition (δ11B) at the onset of the event, along with a 30-40% reduction in shell B/Ca. Similar trends in δ11B are present in two lower-resolution records from the South Atlantic and Equatorial Pacific. These observations are consistent with significant, global acidification of the surface ocean lasting at least 70 kyr and requiring sustained carbon release. The anomalies in the B records are consistent with an initial surface pH drop of ~0.3 units, at the upper range of model-based estimates of acidification.

  9. Constraints on ocean circulation at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum from neodymium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, April N.; Haley, Brian A.; Tripati, Aradhna K.; Frank, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Global warming during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) ˜ 55 million years ago (Ma) coincided with a massive release of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere system, as indicated by carbon isotopic data. Previous studies have argued for a role of changing ocean circulation, possibly as a trigger or response to climatic changes. We use neodymium (Nd) isotopic data to reconstruct short high-resolution records of deep-water circulation across the PETM. These records are derived by reductively leaching sediments from seven globally distributed sites to reconstruct past deep-ocean circulation across the PETM. The Nd data for the leachates are interpreted to be consistent with previous studies that have used fish teeth Nd isotopes and benthic foraminiferal δ13C to constrain regions of convection. There is some evidence from combining Nd isotope and δ13C records that the three major ocean basins may not have had substantial exchanges of deep waters. If the isotopic data are interpreted within this framework, then the observed pattern may be explained if the strength of overturning in each basin varied distinctly over the PETM, resulting in differences in deep-water aging gradients between basins. Results are consistent with published interpretations from proxy data and model simulations that suggest modulation of overturning circulation had an important role for initiation and recovery of the ocean-atmosphere system associated with the PETM.

  10. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. To meet the aggressive Advanced Turbine Systems goals for efficiency, durability and the environment, it will be necessary to employ thermal barrier coatings on turbine airfoils and other hot section components. For The successful application of TBCs to ATS engines with 2600{degrees}F turbine inlet temperatures and required component lives 10 times greater than those for aircraft gas turbine engines, it is necessary to develop quantitative assessment techniques for TBC coating integrity with time and cycles in ATS engines. Thermal barrier coatings in production today consist of a metallic bond coat, such as an MCrAlY overlay coating or a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) diffusion coating. During heat treatment, both these coatings form a thin, tightly adherent alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film. Failure of TBC coatings in engine service occurs by spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the bond coat to alumina or the alumina to zirconia bonds. Thus, it is the initial strength of these bonds and the stresses at the bond plane, and their changes with engine exposure, that determines coating durability. The purpose of this program is to provide, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of TBC bond strength and bond plane stresses as a function of engine time and cycles.

  11. Thermal evaporation of spherical clouds - Effects of viscous stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giuliani, J. L., Jr.; Draine, B. T.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal evaporation of a cold spherical cloud embedded in hot gas is analyzed, including the effects of viscous stresses as well as 'saturation' of the conductive heat flux, for the case of equal electron and ion temperatures. The relevant transport properties for an H-He plasma are discussed, including the modification of these transport coefficients when temperature or velocity gradients become large. The fluid-dynamical equations for steady spherical evaporation are given and cast into dimensinless form. Numerical integration of these equations and the results are discussed, emphasizing the novel features of the viscous solutions, astrophysical implications, and uncertainties in the physics.

  12. Thermal evaporation of spherical clouds - Effects of viscous stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giuliani, J. L., Jr.; Draine, B. T.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal evaporation of a cold spherical cloud embedded in hot gas is analyzed, including the effects of viscous stresses as well as 'saturation' of the conductive heat flux, for the case of equal electron and ion temperatures. The relevant transport properties for an H-He plasma are discussed, including the modification of these transport coefficients when temperature or velocity gradients become large. The fluid-dynamical equations for steady spherical evaporation are given and cast into dimensinless form. Numerical integration of these equations and the results are discussed, emphasizing the novel features of the viscous solutions, astrophysical implications, and uncertainties in the physics.

  13. Influence of residual thermal stresses and geometric parameters on stress and electric fields in multilayer ceramic capacitors under electric bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wu-Gui; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2008-07-01

    The stress and electric fields in multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) under an applied electric bias were investigated by using a three-dimensional finite element model of ferroelectric ceramics. A coupled thermal-mechanical analysis was first made to calculate the residual thermal stress induced by the sintering process, and then a coupled electrical-mechanical analysis was performed to predict the total stress distribution in the MLCCs under a representative applied electric bias. The effects of the number of dielectric layers, the single layer thickness as well as the residual thermal stresses on the total stresses were all examined. The numerical results show that the residual thermal stress induced by the sintering process has a significant influence on the contribution of the total stresses and, therefore, should be taken into account in the design and evaluation of MLCC devices.

  14. Thermal Elasticity Stresses Study in Composite System 'Porous Silicon - Liquid'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaiev, M.; Voitenko, K.; Doroshchuk, V.; Andrusenko, D.; Kuzmich, A.; Skryshevskii, A.; Lysenko, V.; Burbelo, R.

    In this report the study of the elasticity stresses arising in the composite system "porous silicon -etching solution" will be discussed. For this purpose, the modified etching cell with piezoelectric transducer was adopted It was shown that the thermally induced pressures of the liquid confined inside of pores influenced dramatically on the time-domain shape of voltage signal detected on electrodes of the piezoelectric transducer. Therefore, the significant role of these pressures on the formation of general elastic stresses in the system was stated. The dependence of their magnitude and time delay on the thickness of porous silicon layer was found. Thus, the obtained experimental results could be a background for the new technique for the porous silicon in-situ study.

  15. Deposition stress effects on thermal barrier coating burner rig life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. W.; Levine, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the effect of plasma spray processing parameters on the life of a two layer thermal barrier coating was conducted. The ceramic layer was plasma sprayed at plasma arc currents of 900 and 600 amps onto uncooled tubes, cooled tubes, and solid bars of Waspalloy in a lathe with 1 or 8 passes of the plasma gun. These processing changes affected the residual stress state of the coating. When the specimens were tested in a Mach 0.3 cyclic burner rig at 1130 deg C, a wide range of coating lives resulted. Processing factors which reduced the residual stress state in the coating, such as reduced plasma temperature and increased heat dissipation, significantly increased coating life.

  16. The Response of the Ocean Thermal Skin Layer to Air-Sea Surface Heat Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Elizabeth Wing-See

    There is much evidence that the ocean is heating as a result of an increase in concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere from human activities. GHGs absorb infrared radiation and re-emit infrared radiation back to the ocean's surface which is subsequently absorbed. However, the incoming infrared radiation is absorbed within the top micrometers of the ocean's surface which is where the thermal skin layer exists. Thus the incident infrared radiation does not directly heat the upper few meters of the ocean. We are therefore motivated to investigate the physical mechanism between the absorption of infrared radiation and its effect on heat transfer at the air-sea boundary. The hypothesis is that since heat lost through the air-sea interface is controlled by the thermal skin layer, which is directly influenced by the absorption and emission of infrared radiation, the heat flow through the thermal skin layer adjusts to maintain the surface heat loss, assuming the surface heat loss does not vary, and thus modulates the upper ocean heat content. This hypothesis is investigated through utilizing clouds to represent an increase in incoming longwave radiation and analyzing retrieved thermal skin layer vertical temperature profiles from a shipboard infrared spectrometer from two research cruises. The data are limited to night-time, no precipitation and low winds of less than 2 m/s to remove effects of solar radiation, wind-driven shear and possibilities of thermal skin layer disruption. The results show independence of the turbulent fluxes and emitted radiation on the incident radiative fluxes which rules out the immediate release of heat from the absorption of the cloud infrared irradiance back into the atmosphere through processes such as evaporation and increase infrared emission. Furthermore, independence was confirmed between the incoming and outgoing radiative flux which implies the heat sink for upward flowing heat at the air-sea interface is more

  17. Information on stress conditions in the oceanic crust from oval fractures in a deep borehole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    Oval images etched into the wall of a deep borehole were detected in DSDP Hole 504B, eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, from analysis of an acoustic televiewer log. A systematic inspection of these ovals has identified intriguing consistencies in appearance that cannot be explained satisfactorily by a random, coincidental distribution of pillow lavas. As an alternative hypothesis, Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion is used to account for the generation and orientation of similarly curved, stress-induced fractures. Consequently, these oval features can be interpreted as fractures and related directly to stress conditions in the oceanic crust at this site. The azimuth of the oval center corresponds to the orientation of maximum horizontal principal stress (SH), and the oval width, which spans approximately 180?? of the borehole, is aligned with the azimuth of minimum horizontal principal stress (Sh). The oval height is controlled by the fracture angle and thus is a function of the coefficient of internal friction of the rock. -from Author

  18. Effects of Drake Passage on the Ocean's Thermal and Mechanical Energy Budget in a Coupled AOGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Heydt, A. S.; Viebahn, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    the Southern Ocean sub-polar gyres inevitably leads to widespread warming around Antarctica. Moreover, we provide a framework to characterise the ocean temperature response to a closed Drake Passage in terms of both the mechanical and thermal energy budget of the ocean.

  19. The effect of thermal stresses on the integrity of three built-up aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    A Mach 6 flight was simulated in order to examine heating effects on three frame/skin specimens. The specimens included: a titanium truss frame with a lockalloy skin; a stainless steel z-frame with a lockalloy skin; and a titanium z-frame with a lockalloy skin. Thermal stresses and temperature were measured on these specimens for the purpose of examining their efficiency, performance, and integrity. Measured thermal stresses were examined with respect to material yield strengths, buckling criteria, structural weight, and geometric locations. Principal thermal stresses were studied from the standpoint of uniaxial stress assumptions. Measured thermal stresses were compared to predicted values.

  20. Ocean thermal gradient as a generator of electricity. OTEC power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrique, Luna-Gomez Victor; Angel, Alatorre-Mendieta Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) is a power plant that uses the thermal gradient of the sea water between the surface and a depth of about 700 meters. It works by supplying the heat to a steam machine, for evaporation, with sea water from the surface and cold, to condense the steam, with deep sea water. The energy generated by the power plant OTEC can be transferred to the electric power grid, another use is to desalinate seawater. During the twentieth century in some countries experimental power plants to produce electricity or obtaining drinking water they were installed. On the Mexico's coast itself this thermal gradient, as it is located in tropical seas it occurs, so it has possibilities of installing OTEC power plant type. In this paper one type OTEC power plant operation is represented in most of its components.

  1. Anisotropy of thermal contraction controls deep hydrothermal circulation at oceanic ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudier, F.; Nicolas, A.; Mainprice, D.; Baronnet, A.

    2003-04-01

    A deep and high-T (up to 1000^oC) hydrothermal contamination of the oceanic crust at the ridge axis has been documented in the Oman ophiolite. In the deep and hot gabbros, the main water channels are submillimetric microcracks with a dominantly vertical attitude (Nicolas et al, in press). Sr and O isotopic investigations point to seawater as the most likely hydrothermal contaminant (Bosch et al. submitted). We propose that the mechanism allowing seawater ingression at temperatures above 700^oC is anisotropy of thermal contraction, opening microcracks that are controlled by fabric. The exceptionally large anisotropy of thermal contraction of single crystal of calcic plagioclase, when introduced in the strong lattice fabrics in the lower gabbros results in finding the maximum thermal contraction direction parallel to maximum crystals elongation L1. This direction in the oceanic ridge referential is horizontal and perpendicular to microcracks dominant orientation. This high-T hydrothermal alteration in gabbros reaches the Moho. In the underlying peridotites, preliminary Sr isotopic data on clinopyroxene from wehrlites suggest that seawater was able to ingress at crystallization temperature for clinopyroxene. Interestingly, in these peridotites with horizontal foliation, thermal contraction, calculated as above from fabrics and thermal expansion coefficients in olivine, is vertical, being responsible for subhorizontal cracking, as deduced from serpentine dominant veining. Thus, during off-axis drifting of newly accreted lithosphere, thermal contraction opens vertical cracks, favoring seawater ingression down to the Moho. Below, in peridotites, the horizontal microcrack system would favor closing of hydrothermal circuit at Moho level.

  2. Resistance to thermal stress in corals without changes in symbiont composition.

    PubMed

    Bellantuono, Anthony J; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2012-03-22

    Discovering how corals can adjust their thermal sensitivity in the context of global climate change is important in understanding the long-term persistence of coral reefs. In this study, we showed that short-term preconditioning to higher temperatures, 3°C below the experimentally determined bleaching threshold, for a period of 10 days provides thermal tolerance for the symbiosis stability between the scleractinian coral, Acropora millepora and Symbiodinium. Based on genotypic analysis, our results indicate that the acclimatization of this coral species to thermal stress does not come down to simple changes in Symbiodinium and/or the bacterial communities that associate with reef-building corals. This suggests that the physiological plasticity of the host and/or symbiotic components appears to play an important role in responding to ocean warming. The further study of host and symbiont physiology, both of Symbiodinium and prokaryotes, is of paramount importance in the context of global climate change, as mechanisms for rapid holobiont acclimatization will become increasingly important to the long-standing persistence of coral reefs.

  3. Fluid shifts during thermal stress with and without fluid replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myhre, L. G.; Robinson, S.

    1977-01-01

    Six unacclimatized men rested for 4 hr in a hot, dry environment without fluid replacement (DH). Another group of six men were exposed to the same thermal stress, replacing evaporative fluid loss with warm 0.1% NaCl solution (FRP). Total grams of circulating hemoglobin, determined by CO immediately prior to and again during the last minutes of heat exposure, increased an insignificant 1.6 and 1.3% during DH and FRP, respectively. With DH, body weight loss of 2.6% was accompanied by a 7.8% reduction in calculated plasma volume (PV). Even when body weight was maintained (FRP), PV decreased 2.9% during the heat exposure. Total circulating serum protein did not change as a result of the heat stress with either DH or FRP. In a test-retest series of experiments on four men, DH was not detrimental to sweat rate. It is shown that hemodilution is not a general response to acute heat exposure. The disproportionately large reduction in PV during thermal dehydration is confirmed.

  4. Fluid shifts during thermal stress with and without fluid replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myhre, L. G.; Robinson, S.

    1977-01-01

    Six unacclimatized men rested for 4 hr in a hot, dry environment without fluid replacement (DH). Another group of six men were exposed to the same thermal stress, replacing evaporative fluid loss with warm 0.1% NaCl solution (FRP). Total grams of circulating hemoglobin, determined by CO immediately prior to and again during the last minutes of heat exposure, increased an insignificant 1.6 and 1.3% during DH and FRP, respectively. With DH, body weight loss of 2.6% was accompanied by a 7.8% reduction in calculated plasma volume (PV). Even when body weight was maintained (FRP), PV decreased 2.9% during the heat exposure. Total circulating serum protein did not change as a result of the heat stress with either DH or FRP. In a test-retest series of experiments on four men, DH was not detrimental to sweat rate. It is shown that hemodilution is not a general response to acute heat exposure. The disproportionately large reduction in PV during thermal dehydration is confirmed.

  5. Graphite having improved thermal stress resistance and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, Charles R.

    1980-01-01

    An improved method for fabricating a graphite article comprises the steps of impregnating a coke article by first heating the coke article in contact with a thermoplastic pitch at a temperature within the range of 250.degree.-300.degree. C. at a pressure within the range of 200-2000 psig for at least 4-10 hours and then heating said article at a temperature within the range of 450.degree.-485.degree. C. at a pressure of 200-2000 psig for about 16-24 hours to provide an impregnated article; heating the impregnated article for sufficient time to carbonize the impregnant to provide a second coke article, and graphitizing the second coke article. A graphite having improved thermal stress resistance results when the coke to be impregnated contains 1-3 wt.% sulfur and no added puffing inhibitors. An additional improvement in thermal stress resistance is achieved when the second coke article is heated above about 1400.degree. C. at a rate of at least 10.degree. C./minute to a temperature above the puffing temperature.

  6. THERMAL STRESS CALCULATIONS FOR HEATPIPE-COOLED REACTOR POWER SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    Kapernick, R. J.; Guffee, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    A heatpipe-cooled fast reactor concept has been under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the past several years, to be used as a power source for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) or as a planetary surface power system. The reactor core consists of an array of modules that are held together by a core lateral restraint system. Each module comprises a single heatpipe surrounded by 3-6 clad fuel pins. As part of the design development and performance assessment activities for these reactors, specialized methods and models have been developed to perform thermal and stress analyses of the core modules. The methods have been automated so that trade studies can be readily performed, looking at design options such as module size, heatpipe and clad thickness, use of sleeves to contain the fuel, material type, etc. This paper describes the methods and models that have been developed, and presents thermal and stress analysis results for a Mars surface power system and a NEP power source.

  7. Heat stress and thermal strain challenges in running.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Michael F

    2014-10-01

    Running well and safely in the heat is challenging for all runners, from recreational to elite. As environmental heat stress (heat stress modulated or augmented by air temperature, humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation) and the intensity and duration of a training run or race increase, so are metabolic heat production, the parallel need for heat transfer from the body to maintain thermal equilibrium, the consequent increase in blood flow to the skin, and the concomitant sweating response progressively and proportionally amplified. An accumulating total body-water deficit from extensive sweating and escalating level of cardiovascular and thermal strain will, in due course, considerably challenge a runner's physiology, perception of effort, and on-course well-being and performance. However, with the appropriate preparation and modifications to planned running intensity and distance, runners can safely tolerate and effectively train and compete in a wide range of challenging environmental conditions. Clinicians play a key role in this regard as an effective resource for providing the most effective guidelines and making the best overall individual recommendations regarding training and competing in the heat.

  8. Validation and Application of Altimetry-Derived Upper Ocean Thermal Structure in the Western North Pacific Ocean for Typhoon-Intensity Forecast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    structure and causes a large under- estimation of the tropical cyclone heat potential ( TCHP ) by up to 60 kJ/cml. After validation, the derived upper ocean...self-induced cooling and the during-typhoon TCHP , are the most sensitive parameters (with R1 - 0.7) to the 6-h intensity change of Dianmu during the...upper heat potential ( TCHP ) by up to 60 kJ/cm2 . After validation, ocean termal profile. the derived upper ocean thermal profiles are used to study the

  9. Thermal Convection in High-Pressure Ice Layers Beneath a Buried Ocean within Titan and Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobie, G.; Choblet, G.; Dumont, M.

    2014-12-01

    Deep interiors of large icy satellites such as Titan and Ganymede probably harbor a buried ocean sandwiched between low pressure ice and high-pressure ice layers. The nature and location of the lower interface of the ocean involves equilibration of heat and melt transfer in the HP ices and is ultimately controlled by the amount heat transferred through the surface ice Ih layer. Here, we perform 3D simulations of thermal convection, using the OEDIPUS numerical tool (Choblet et al. GJI 2007), to determine the efficiency of heat and mass transfer through these HP ice mantles. In a first series of simulations with no melting, we show that a significant fraction of the HP layer reaches the melting point. Using a simple description of water production and transport, our simulations demonstrate that the melt generation in the outermost part of the HP ice layer and its extraction to the overlying ocean increase the efficiency of heat transfer and reduce strongly the internal temperature. structure and the efficiency of the heat transfer. Scaling relationships are proposed to describe the cooling effect of melt production/extraction and used to investigate the consequences of internal melting on the thermal history of Titan and Ganymede's interior.

  10. Satellite-derived Ocean Thermal Structure for the North Atlantic Hurricane Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, I. F.; Price, J.; Jayne, S. R.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes a new model (method) called SNAP (Satellite-derived North Atlantic Profiles) that seeks to provide a high resolution, near real-time ocean thermal field to aid TC forecasting. The heart of the method is a regression of sea surface height anomaly upon the depth of ocean isotherms. Using about 139000 profiles from Argo floats and historical in situ observations, a spatially-dependent regression model is developed for the North Atlantic Ocean during the hurricane season, June to November. A new step introduced in this work is that the daily mixed layer depth (MLD) is derived from the output of a one-dimensional Price-Weller-Pinkel ocean mixed layer model with time-dependent wind and radiation forcing. The surface layer temperature and thickness of a SNAP temperature profile is a satellite-observed sea surface temperature and this model-computed MLD. The accuracy of SNAP is assessed by comparison to 10761 independent Argo profiles from the hurricane seasons of 2011 and 2012. The root-mean-squared differences (RMSDs) of the SNAP-estimated isotherm depths are found to be 10-20 m for upper thermocline isotherms (29°C to 20°C), 35-55 m for middle isotherms (18°C to 11°C), and 60-90 m for lower isotherms (6°C to 4°C). The primary error sources for SNAP-derived isotherm depths include SSHA uncertainty, high frequency fluctuations of isotherm depths, salinity effects and the barotropic component of SSHA. These account for roughly 29%, 25%, 19% and 10% of the overall estimated isotherm depth errors, respectively. The RMSDs of TC-related ocean parameters, upper ocean heat content and averaged temperature of the upper 100 m, are 10 kJ cm-2 and 0.82°C, respectively.

  11. Prognostics Approach for Power MOSFET Under Thermal-Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, Jose Ramon Celaya; Saxena, Abhinav; Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The prognostic technique for a power MOSFET presented in this paper is based on accelerated aging of MOSFET IRF520Npbf in a TO-220 package. The methodology utilizes thermal and power cycling to accelerate the life of the devices. The major failure mechanism for the stress conditions is dieattachment degradation, typical for discrete devices with leadfree solder die attachment. It has been determined that dieattach degradation results in an increase in ON-state resistance due to its dependence on junction temperature. Increasing resistance, thus, can be used as a precursor of failure for the die-attach failure mechanism under thermal stress. A feature based on normalized ON-resistance is computed from in-situ measurements of the electro-thermal response. An Extended Kalman filter is used as a model-based prognostics techniques based on the Bayesian tracking framework. The proposed prognostics technique reports on preliminary work that serves as a case study on the prediction of remaining life of power MOSFETs and builds upon the work presented in [1]. The algorithm considered in this study had been used as prognostics algorithm in different applications and is regarded as suitable candidate for component level prognostics. This work attempts to further the validation of such algorithm by presenting it with real degradation data including measurements from real sensors, which include all the complications (noise, bias, etc.) that are regularly not captured on simulated degradation data. The algorithm is developed and tested on the accelerated aging test timescale. In real world operation, the timescale of the degradation process and therefore the RUL predictions will be considerable larger. It is hypothesized that even though the timescale will be larger, it remains constant through the degradation process and the algorithm and model would still apply under the slower degradation process. By using accelerated aging data with actual device measurements and real

  12. Thermal stress prediction in mirror and multilayer coatings.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xianchao; Zhang, Lin; Morawe, Christian; Sanchez Del Rio, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    Multilayer optics for X-rays typically consist of hundreds of periods of two types of alternating sub-layers which are coated on a silicon substrate. The thickness of the coating is well below 1 µm (tens or hundreds of nanometers). The high aspect ratio (∼10(7)) between the size of the optics and the thickness of the multilayer can lead to a huge number of elements (∼10(16)) for the numerical simulation (by finite-element analysis using ANSYS code). In this work, the finite-element model for thermal-structural analysis of multilayer optics has been implemented using the ANSYS layer-functioned elements. The number of meshed elements is considerably reduced and the number of sub-layers feasible for the present computers is increased significantly. Based on this technique, single-layer coated mirrors and multilayer monochromators cooled by water or liquid nitrogen are studied with typical parameters of heat-load, cooling and geometry. The effects of cooling-down of the optics and heating of the X-ray beam are described. It is shown that the influences from the coating on temperature and deformation are negligible. However, large stresses are induced in the layers due to the different thermal expansion coefficients between the layer and the substrate materials, which is the critical issue for the survival of the optics. This is particularly true for the liquid-nitrogen cooling condition. The material properties of thin multilayer films are applied in the simulation to predict the layer thermal stresses with more precision.

  13. Modeling thermal stress propagation during hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Gunnar; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    A large fraction of the world's water and energy resources are located in naturally fractured reservoirs within the earth's crust. Depending on the lithology and tectonic history of a formation, fracture networks can range from dense and homogeneous highly fractured networks to single large scale fractures dominating the flow behavior. Understanding the dynamics of such reservoirs in terms of flow and transport is crucial to successful application of engineered geothermal systems (also known as enhanced geothermal systems or EGS) for geothermal energy production in the future. Fractured reservoirs are considered to consist of two distinct separate media, namely the fracture and matrix space respectively. Fractures are generally thin, highly conductive containing only small amounts of fluid, whereas the matrix rock provides high fluid storage but typically has much smaller permeability. Simulation of flow and transport through fractured porous media is challenging due to the high permeability contrast between the fractures and the surrounding rock matrix. However, accurate and efficient simulation of flow through a fracture network is crucial in order to understand, optimize and engineer reservoirs. It has been a research topic for several decades and is still under active research. Accurate fluid flow simulations through field-scale fractured reservoirs are still limited by the power of current computer processing units (CPU). We present an efficient implementation of the embedded discrete fracture model, which is a promising new technique in modeling the behavior of enhanced geothermal systems. An efficient coupling strategy is determined for numerical performance of the model. We provide new insight into the coupled modeling of fluid flow, heat transport of engineered geothermal reservoirs with focus on the thermal stress changes during the stimulation process. We further investigate the interplay of thermal and poro-elastic stress changes in the reservoir

  14. Influence of head position on thermal stress in newborns: simulation using a thermal mannequin.

    PubMed

    Elabbassi, Elmountacer Billah; Chardon, Karen; Telliez, Frédéric; Bach, Véronique; Libert, Jean-Pierre

    2002-10-01

    The influence of head position on thermal stress was assessed by using a heavily clothed thermal mannequin in three different body positions [supine, face straight up (FSU); supine, face to the side (FTS); prone, FTS] and with or without the head covered by a bonnet. The mannequin was exposed to air temperatures of 29, 32, 34, and 36 degrees C. When the head is uncovered, body or head position has no impact on heat loss. When the head is covered, dry heat loss from the mannequin as a whole (and that from the head in particular) is lower (-0.35 to -0.40 W) in the FTS position than in the FSU position as a result of decreased heat loss from the surface area of the face in contact with the mattress. In the FTS position and with the head covered, there was no difference in heat loss between the prone and supine positions. The results suggest that in heavily clothed newborns whose head is covered by a bonnet, thermal stress depends on the head position.

  15. Thermal Stress and Toxicity | Science Inventory | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Elevating ambient temperature above thermoneutrality exacerbates toxicity of most air pollutants, insecticides, and other toxic chemicals. On the other hand, safety and toxicity testing of toxicants and drugs is usually performed in mice and rats maintained at subthermoneutral temperatures of —22 °C. When exposed to chemical toxicants under these relatively cool conditions, rodents typically undergo a regulated hypothermic response, characterized by preference for cooler ambient temperatures and controlled reduction in core temperature. Reducing core temperature delays the clearance of most toxicants from the body; however, a mild hypothermia also improves recovery and survival from the toxicant. Raising ambient temperature to thermoneutrality and above increases the rate of clearance of the toxicant but also exacerbates toxicity. Furthermore, heat stress combined with work or exercise is likely to worsen toxicity. Body temperature of large mammals, including humans, does not decrease as much in response to exposure to a toxicant. However, heat stress tan nonetheless worsen toxic outcome in humans through a variety of mechanisms. For example, heat-induced sweating and elevation in skin blood flow accelerates uptake of some insecticides. Epidemiological studies suggest that thermal stress may exacerbate the toxicity of airborne pollutants such as ozone and particulate matter. Overall, translating results of studies in rodents to that of humans is a formidable

  16. Analysis of thermal stresses in horizontal delivery water heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilan, A. V.; Plotnikov, P. N.

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of thermal stresses in tubes and a compensator, taking into account water heating in each heater bunch and temperature at which its mounting is implemented, and of stresses on pressure is presented. The 3D-model of the horizontal delivery water heater of PSG-4900-0.3-1.14 type is used. The tube plate is represented as the 3D-body with 6863 holes with offset center of the perforated area, the steam space shell is represented as a cylindrical casing, the bottoms of water chambers are considered as elliptical casings, the four-lens compensator is represented in the form of toroidal casings, and the tubes are considered as beams operating in tensile-compression and bending in two planes. Calculations were carried out for different temperatures of superheated steam and a steam space shell, respectively, as well as designs with compensator and without it. Various temperature values of the tubes on the passes were calculated and set. The studies were carried out taking into account nonaxis-symmetrical spacing the tube plate and compensator deformation. The calculation results of tensile-compression stresses in the tubes are presented. Furthermore, the central tubes experience compressive stresses, whose maximal values take place on the border between the tubes of the fourth and of the first passes. For its decrease, it is recommended to increase the distance between the tubes of these passes. The tension stresses in the peripheral tubes are the maximal stresses. To reduce the stresses and, therefore, increase service life of the delivery water heater at using wet or superheated (not more than by 30-50°C) steam in it (the larger value refers to the brass tubes and the water pressure of 1.6-2.5 MPa), it is necessary to recommend the noncompensatory design at using the steam superheated by more than 30-50°C (at Ural Turbine Works, it is the turbines of T-250/300-23.5 and T-113/145-12.4 types with intermediate superheating) and to recommend the installation of the

  17. Evaluation of thermally induced non-Fourier stress wave disturbances via tailored hybrid transfinite element formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate solutions have been obtained for a class of non-Fourier models in dynamic thermoelasticity which are relevant to the understanding of thermally-induced stress wave disturbances. The method employs tailored hybrid formulations based on the transfinite element approach. The results show that significant thermal stresses may arise due to non-Fourier effects, especially when the speeds of propagation of the thermal and stress waves are equal.

  18. Thermal-stress analysis for wood composite blade. [horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, K. C.; Harb, A.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal-stress induced by solar insolation on a wood composite blade of a Mod-OA wind turbine was investigated. The temperature distribution throughout the blade (a heat conduction problem) was analyzed and the thermal-stress distribution of the blades caused by the temperature distribution (a thermal-stress analysis problem) was then determined. The computer programs used for both problems are included along with output examples.

  19. The impact of atmospheric storminess on the sensitivity of Southern Ocean circulation to wind stress changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, D. R.; Zhai, X.

    2017-07-01

    The influence of changing the mean wind stress felt by the ocean through alteration of the variability of the atmospheric wind, as opposed to the mean atmospheric wind, on Southern Ocean circulation is investigated using an idealised channel model. Strongly varying atmospheric wind is found to increase the (parameterised) near-surface viscous and diffusive mixing. Analysis of the kinetic energy budget indicates a change in the main energy dissipation mechanism. For constant wind stress, dissipation of the power input by surface wind work is always dominated by bottom kinetic energy dissipation. However, with time-varying atmospheric wind, near surface viscous dissipation of kinetic energy becomes increasingly important as mean wind stress increases. This increased vertical diffusivity leads to thicker mixed layers and higher sensitivity of the residual circulation to increasing wind stress, when compared to equivalent experiments with the same wind stress held constant in time. This may have implications for Southern Ocean circulation in different climate change scenarios should the variability of the atmospheric wind change rather than the mean atmospheric wind.

  20. Thermal stress analysis of symmetric shells subjected to asymmetric thermal loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negaard, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The performance of the NASTRAN level 16.0 axisymmetric solid elements when subjected to both symmetric and asymmetric thermal loading was investigated. A ceramic radome was modeled using both the CTRAPRG and the CTRAPAX elements. The thermal loading applied contained severe gradients through the thickness of the shell. Both elements were found to be more sensitive to the effect of the thermal gradient than to the aspect ratio of the elements. Analysis using the CTRAPAX element predicted much higher thermal stresses than the analysis using the CTRAPRG element, prompting studies of models for which theoretical solutions could be calculated. It was found that the CTRAPRG element solutions were satisfactory, but that the CTRAPAX element was very geometry dependent. This element produced erroneous results if the geometry was allowed to vary from a rectangular cross-section. The most satisfactory solution found for this type of problem was to model a small segment of a symmetric structure with isoparametric solid elements and apply the cyclic symmetry option in NASTRAN.

  1. The regulation of thermal stress induced apoptosis in corals reveals high similarities in gene expression and function to higher animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvitt, Hagit; Rosenfeld, Hanna; Tchernov, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that controlled apoptotic response provides an essential mechanism, enabling corals to respond to global warming and ocean acidification. However, the molecules involved and their functions are still unclear. To better characterize the apoptotic response in basal metazoans, we studied the expression profiles of selected genes that encode for putative pro- and anti-apoptotic mediators in the coral Stylophora pistillata under thermal stress and bleaching conditions. Upon thermal stress, as attested by the elevation of the heat-shock protein gene HSP70’s mRNA levels, the expression of all studied genes, including caspase, Bcl-2, Bax, APAF-1 and BI-1, peaked at 6–24 h of thermal stress (hts) and declined at 72 hts. Adversely, the expression levels of the survivin gene showed a shifted pattern, with elevation at 48–72 hts and a return to basal levels at 168 hts. Overall, we show the quantitative anti-apoptotic traits of the coral Bcl-2 protein, which resemble those of its mammalian counterpart. Altogether, our results highlight the similarities between apoptotic networks operating in simple metazoans and in higher animals and clearly demonstrate the activation of pro-cell survival regulators at early stages of the apoptotic response, contributing to the decline of apoptosis and the acclimation to chronic stress.

  2. The regulation of thermal stress induced apoptosis in corals reveals high similarities in gene expression and function to higher animals

    PubMed Central

    Kvitt, Hagit; Rosenfeld, Hanna; Tchernov, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that controlled apoptotic response provides an essential mechanism, enabling corals to respond to global warming and ocean acidification. However, the molecules involved and their functions are still unclear. To better characterize the apoptotic response in basal metazoans, we studied the expression profiles of selected genes that encode for putative pro- and anti-apoptotic mediators in the coral Stylophora pistillata under thermal stress and bleaching conditions. Upon thermal stress, as attested by the elevation of the heat-shock protein gene HSP70’s mRNA levels, the expression of all studied genes, including caspase, Bcl-2, Bax, APAF-1 and BI-1, peaked at 6–24 h of thermal stress (hts) and declined at 72 hts. Adversely, the expression levels of the survivin gene showed a shifted pattern, with elevation at 48–72 hts and a return to basal levels at 168 hts. Overall, we show the quantitative anti-apoptotic traits of the coral Bcl-2 protein, which resemble those of its mammalian counterpart. Altogether, our results highlight the similarities between apoptotic networks operating in simple metazoans and in higher animals and clearly demonstrate the activation of pro-cell survival regulators at early stages of the apoptotic response, contributing to the decline of apoptosis and the acclimation to chronic stress. PMID:27460544

  3. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, Laura; Smith, Paul; Rizea, Steven; Van Ryzin, Joe; Morgan, Charles; Noland, Gary; Pavlosky, Rick; Thomas, Michael; Halkyard, John

    2012-05-30

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawaii and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the

  4. Definitional mission: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, S.R.; Ross, J.M.

    1990-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the commercial viability of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) electric power plant at the Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands. It was concluded that various technology improvements and economic factors have converged to present a feasible opportunity. United States industrial and research organizations are technically capable of developing a commercial OTEC industry for domestic and export markets. It is estimated that 100% of OTEC equipment and services could be supplied by United States firms. However, Japan has aggressively pursued OTEC development with an apparent goal of dominating the export market.

  5. Preliminary Thermal Stress Analysis of a High-Pressure Cryogenic Storage Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. Mark

    2003-01-01

    The thermal stresses on a cryogenic storage tank strongly affect the condition of the tank and its ability to withstand operational stresses. These thermal stresses also affect the growth of any surface damage that might occur in the tank walls. These stresses are particularly of concern during the initial cooldown period for a new tank placed into service, and during any subsequent thermal cycles. A preliminary thermal stress analysis of a high-pressure cryogenic storage tank was performed. Stresses during normal operation were determined, as well as the transient temperature distribution. An elastic analysis was used to determine the thermal stresses in the inner wall based on the temperature data. The results of this elastic analysis indicate that the inner wall of the storage tank will experience thermal stresses of approximately 145,000 psi (1000 MPa). This stress level is well above the room-temperature yield strength of 304L stainless steel, which is about 25,000 psi (170 MPa). For this preliminary analysis, several important factors have not yet been considered. These factors include increased strength of 304L stainless steel at cryogenic temperatures, plastic material behavior, and increased strength due to strain hardening. In order to more accurately determine the thermal stresses and their affect on the tank material, further investigation is required, particularly in the area of material properties and their relationship to stress.

  6. Thermal diffusion of the lunar magma ocean and the formation of the lunar crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.; Wang, S.

    2010-12-01

    The magma ocean hypothesis is consistent with several lines of evidence including planet formation, core-mantle differentiation and geochemical observations, and it is proved as an inevitable stage in the early evolution of planets. The magma ocean is assumed to be homogeneous in previous models during solidification or crystallization[1]. Based on the recent advance and our new data in experimental igneous petrology[2], we question this assumption and propose that an gabbrotic melt, from which the anorthositic lunar crust crystallized, can be produced by thermal diffusion, rather than by magma fractionation. This novel model can provide explanations for the absence of the advection in lunar magma ocean[3] and the old age of the anorthositic lunar crust[4-5]. 1. Solomatov, V., Magma Oceans and Primordial Mantle Differentiation, in Treatise on Geophysics, S. Gerald, Editor. 2007, Elsevier: Amsterdam. p. 91-119. 2. Huang, F., et al., Chemical and isotopic fractionation of wet andesite in a temperature gradient: Experiments and models suggesting a new mechanism of magma differentiation. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta, 2009. 73(3): p. 729-749. 3. Turcotte, D.L. and L.H. Kellogg, Implications of isotope data for the origin of the Moon, in Origin of the Moon, W.K. Hartmann, R.J. Phillips, and G.J. Taylor, Editors. 1986, Lunar and Planet. Inst.: Houston, TX. p. 311-329. 4. Alibert, C., M.D. Norman, and M.T. McCulloch, An ancient Sm-Nd age for a ferroan noritic anorthosite clast from lunar breccia 67016. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta, 1994. 58(13): p. 2921-2926. 5. Touboul, M., et al., Tungsten isotopes in ferroan anorthosites: Implications for the age of the Moon and lifetime of its magma ocean. Icarus, 2009. 199(2): p. 245-249.

  7. Cracking of coated materials under transient thermal stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Rizk, A.A.; Erdogan, F. )

    1989-01-01

    The crack problem for a relatively thin layer bonded to a very thick substrate under thermal shock conditions is considered. The effect of surface cooling rate is studied by assuming the temperature boundary condition to be a ramp function. Among the crack geometries considered are the edge crack in the coating layer, the broken layer, the edge crack going through the interface, the undercoat crack in the substrate and the embedded crack crossing the interface. The primary calculated quantity is the stress intensity factor at various singular points and the main variables are the relative sizes and locations of cracks, the time, and the duration of the cooling ramp. The problem is solved and rather extensive results are given for two material pairs, namely a stainless steel layer welded on a ferritic medium and a ceramic coating on a steel substrate. 12 refs.

  8. The effect of water on thermal stresses in polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    1994-01-01

    The fundamentals of the thermodynamic theory of mixtures and continuum thermochemistry are reviewed for a mixture of condensed water and polymer. A specific mixture which is mechanically elastic with temperature and water concentration gradients present is considered. An expression for the partial pressure of water in the mixture is obtained based on certain assumptions regarding the thermodynamic state of the water in the mixture. Along with a simple diffusion equation, this partial pressure expression may be used to simulate the thermostructural behavior of polymer composite materials due to water in the free volumes of the polymer. These equations are applied to a specific polymer composite material during isothermal heating conditions. The thermal stresses obtained by the application of the theory are compared to measured results to verify the accuracy of the approach.

  9. Cracking of coated materials under transient thermal stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, A. A.; Erdogan, F.

    1989-01-01

    The crack problem for a relatively thin layer bonded to a very thick substrate under thermal shock conditions is considered. The effect of surface cooling rate is studied by assuming the temperature boundary condition to be a ramp function. Among the crack geometries considered are the edge crack in the coating layer, the broken layer, the edge crack going through the interface, the undercoat crack in the substrate and the embedded crack crossing the interface. The primary calculated quantity is the stress intensity factor at various singular points and the main variables are the relative sizes and locations of cracks, the time, and the duration of the cooling ramp. The problem is solved and rather extensive results are given for two material pairs, namely a stainless steel layer welded on a ferritic medium and a ceramic coating on a steel substrate.

  10. Cracking of coated materials under transient thermal stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, A. A.; Erdogan, Fazil

    1988-01-01

    The crack problem for a relatively thin layer bonded to a very thick substrate under thermal shock conditions is considered. The effect of surface cooling rate is studied by assuming the temperature boundary condition to be a ramp function. Among the crack geometries considered are the edge crack in the coating layer, the broken layer, the edge crack going through the interface, the undercoat crack in the substrate and the embedded crack crossing the interface. The primary calculated quantity is the stress intensity factor at various singular points and the main variables are the relative sizes and locations of cracks, the time, and the duration of the cooling ramp. The problem is solved and rather extensive results are given for two material pairs, namely a stainless steel layer welded on a ferritic medium and a ceramic coating on a steel substrate.

  11. Thermal stress-relief treatments for 2219 aluminum alloy are evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Evaluation of three thermal stress relief treatments for 2219 aluminum alloy in terms of their effect on residual stress, mechanical properties, and stress corrosion resistance. The treatments are post aging and stress relieving fullscale and subscale parts formed in the aged T81 condition, and aging subscale parts formed in the unaged T31 condition.

  12. Seawater test results of Open-Cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OC-OTEC) components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangrando, F.; Bharathan, D.; Link, H.; Panchal, C. B.

    Key components of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion systems- the flash evaporator, mist eliminator, passive predeaerator, two surface condenser stages, and two direct-contact condenser stages- have been tested using seawater. These components operate at lower steam pressures and higher inlet noncondensable gas concentrations than do conventional power plant heat exchangers. The rate of heat exchanged between the evaporator and the condenser is on the order of 1.25MW-thermal, requiring a warm seawater flow of about 0.1 cu m/s; the cold seawater flow is on the order of half the warm water flow. In addition to characterizing the performance of the various components, the system has produced potable water from condensation of the steam produced in the evaporator. The information obtained in these tests is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which net power production is expected to be demonstrate for the first time using OC-OTEC technology.

  13. Evidence for the stress-thermal rule in an elastomer subjected to simple elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broerman, A. W.; Venerus, D. C.; Schieber, J. D.

    1999-10-01

    Anisotropic thermal diffusivity is examined in a cross-linked silicone elastomer deformed in simple elongation. Thermal diffusivity both parallel and perpendicular to the stretch direction is measured using an optical technique called forced Rayleigh scattering. The thermal diffusivity is found to increase linearly with stretch ratio to a value 10% larger than the equilibrium value for a stretch ratio of two. Measurements of the birefringence and tensile stress were used to evaluate the stress-optic rule, which was found to be valid. The difference between measured thermal diffusivities parallel and perpendicular to the stretch direction and tensile stress data were used to show the thermal conductivity and stress tensors are linearly related. These data appear to be the first direct evaluation of the stress-thermal rule in a deformed polymeric material.

  14. Exploring the use of thermal infrared imaging in human stress research.

    PubMed

    Engert, Veronika; Merla, Arcangelo; Grant, Joshua A; Cardone, Daniela; Tusche, Anita; Singer, Tania

    2014-01-01

    High resolution thermal infrared imaging is a pioneering method giving indices of sympathetic activity via the contact-free recording of facial tissues (thermal imprints). Compared to established stress markers, the great advantage of this method is its non-invasiveness. The goal of our study was to pilot the use of thermal infrared imaging in the classical setting of human stress research. Thermal imprints were compared to established stress markers (heart rate, heart rate variability, finger temperature, alpha-amylase and cortisol) in 15 participants undergoing anticipation, stress and recovery phases of two laboratory stress tests, the Cold Pressor Test and the Trier Social Stress Test. The majority of the thermal imprints proved to be change-sensitive in both tests. While correlations between the thermal imprints and established stress markers were mostly non-significant, the thermal imprints (but not the established stress makers) did correlate with stress-induced mood changes. Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that in contrast to the established stress markers the thermal imprints could not disambiguate anticipation, stress and recovery phases of both tests. Overall, these results suggest that thermal infrared imaging is a valuable method for the estimation of sympathetic activity in the stress laboratory setting. The use of this non-invasive method may be particularly beneficial for covert recordings, in the study of special populations showing difficulties in complying with the standard instruments of data collection and in the domain of psychophysiological covariance research. Meanwhile, the established stress markers seem to be superior when it comes to the characterization of complex physiological states during the different phases of the stress cycle.

  15. Exploring the Use of Thermal Infrared Imaging in Human Stress Research

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Joshua A.; Cardone, Daniela; Tusche, Anita; Singer, Tania

    2014-01-01

    High resolution thermal infrared imaging is a pioneering method giving indices of sympathetic activity via the contact-free recording of facial tissues (thermal imprints). Compared to established stress markers, the great advantage of this method is its non-invasiveness. The goal of our study was to pilot the use of thermal infrared imaging in the classical setting of human stress research. Thermal imprints were compared to established stress markers (heart rate, heart rate variability, finger temperature, alpha-amylase and cortisol) in 15 participants undergoing anticipation, stress and recovery phases of two laboratory stress tests, the Cold Pressor Test and the Trier Social Stress Test. The majority of the thermal imprints proved to be change-sensitive in both tests. While correlations between the thermal imprints and established stress markers were mostly non-significant, the thermal imprints (but not the established stress makers) did correlate with stress-induced mood changes. Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that in contrast to the established stress markers the thermal imprints could not disambiguate anticipation, stress and recovery phases of both tests. Overall, these results suggest that thermal infrared imaging is a valuable method for the estimation of sympathetic activity in the stress laboratory setting. The use of this non-invasive method may be particularly beneficial for covert recordings, in the study of special populations showing difficulties in complying with the standard instruments of data collection and in the domain of psychophysiological covariance research. Meanwhile, the established stress markers seem to be superior when it comes to the characterization of complex physiological states during the different phases of the stress cycle. PMID:24675709

  16. Effects of ocean acidification increase embryonic sensitivity to thermal extremes in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Flemming T; Leo, Elettra; Mark, Felix C; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Bickmeyer, Ulf; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Storch, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Thermal tolerance windows serve as a powerful tool for estimating the vulnerability of marine species and their life stages to increasing temperature means and extremes. However, it remains uncertain to which extent additional drivers, such as ocean acidification, modify organismal responses to temperature. This study investigated the effects of CO2 -driven ocean acidification on embryonic thermal sensitivity and performance in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, from the Kattegat. Fertilized eggs were exposed to factorial combinations of two PCO2 conditions (400 μatm vs. 1100 μatm) and five temperature treatments (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 °C), which allow identifying both lower and upper thermal tolerance thresholds. We quantified hatching success, oxygen consumption (MO2 ) and mitochondrial functioning of embryos as well as larval morphometrics at hatch and the abundance of acid-base-relevant ionocytes on the yolk sac epithelium of newly hatched larvae. Hatching success was high under ambient spawning conditions (3-6 °C), but decreased towards both cold and warm temperature extremes. Elevated PCO2 caused a significant decrease in hatching success, particularly at cold (3 and 0 °C) and warm (12 °C) temperatures. Warming imposed limitations to MO2 and mitochondrial capacities. Elevated PCO2 stimulated MO2 at cold and intermediate temperatures, but exacerbated warming-induced constraints on MO2 , indicating a synergistic interaction with temperature. Mitochondrial functioning was not affected by PCO2 . Increased MO2 in response to elevated PCO2 was paralleled by reduced larval size at hatch. Finally, ionocyte abundance decreased with increasing temperature, but did not differ between PCO2 treatments. Our results demonstrate increased thermal sensitivity of cod embryos under future PCO2 conditions and suggest that acclimation to elevated PCO2 requires reallocation of limited resources at the expense of embryonic growth. We conclude that ocean acidification constrains

  17. Assessment of microbial fouling in an ocean thermal energy conversion experiment.

    PubMed

    Aftring, R P; Taylor, B F

    1979-10-01

    A project to investigate biofouling, under conditions relevant to ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers, was conducted during July through September 1977 at a site about 13 km north of St. Croix (U.S. Virgin Islands). Seawater was drawn from a depth of 20 m, within the surface mixed layer, through aluminum pipes (2.6 m long, 2.5-cm internal diameter) at flow velocities of about 0.9 and 1.8 m/s. The temperature of the seawater entering the mock heat exchanger units was between 27.8 and 28.6 degrees C. After about 10 weeks of exposure to seawater, when their thermal conductivity was reported to be significantly impaired, the pipes were assayed for the accumulation of biological material on their inner surfaces. The extent of biofouling was very low and independent of flow velocity. Bacterial populations, determined from plate counts, were about 10 cells per cm. The ranges of mean areal densities for other biological components were: organic carbon, 18 to 27 mug/cm; organic nitrogen, 1.5 to 3.0 mug/cm; adenosine 5'-triphosphate, 4 to 28 ng/cm; carbohydrate (as glucose in the phenol assay), 3.8 to 7.0 mug/cm; chlorophyll a, 0.2 to 0.8 ng/cm. It was estimated from the adenosine 5'-triphosphate and nitrogen contents that the layer of live bacteria present after 10 weeks was only of the order of 1mum thick. The C/N ratio of the biological material suggested the presence of extracellular polysaccharidic material. Such compounds, because of their water-retaining capacities, could account for the related increase in thermal resistance associated with the pipes. This possibility merits further investigation, but the current results emphasize the minor degree of biofouling which is likely to be permissible in ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers.

  18. Thermal stress analysis of space shuttle orbiter subjected to reentry aerodynamic heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fields, Roger A.

    1987-01-01

    A structural performance and resizing (SPAR) finite-element computer program and NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) finite-element computer programs were used in the thermal stress analysis of the space shuttle orbiter subjected to reentry aerodynamic heating. A SPAR structural model was set up for the entire left wing of the orbiter, and NASTRAN structural models were set up for: (1) a wing segment located at midspan of the orbiter left wing, and (2) a fuselage segment located at midfuselage. The thermal stress distributions in the orbiter structure were obtained and the critical high thermal stress regions were identified. It was found that the thermal stresses induced in the orbiter structure during reentry were relatively low. The thermal stress predictions from the whole wing model were considered to be more accurate than those from the wing segment model because the former accounts for temperature and stress effects throughout the entire wing.

  19. Variability in the coupling between sea surface temperature and wind stress in the global coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuntao; Castelao, Renato M.

    2016-08-01

    Mesoscale ocean-atmosphere interaction between sea surface temperature (SST) and wind stress throughout the global coastal ocean was investigated using 7 years of satellite observations. Coupling coefficients between crosswind SST gradients and wind stress curl and between downwind SST gradients and wind stress divergence were used to quantify spatial and temporal variability in the strength of the interaction. The use of a consistent data set and standardized methods allow for direct comparisons between coupling coefficients in the different coastal regions. The analysis reveals that strong coupling is observed in many mid-latitude regions throughout the world, especially in regions with strong fronts like Eastern and Western Boundary Currents. Most upwelling regions in Eastern Boundary Currents are characterized by strong seasonal variability in the strength of the coupling, which generally peaks during summer in mid latitudes and during winter at low latitudes. Seasonal variability in coastal regions along Western Boundary Currents is comparatively smaller. Intraseasonal variability is especially important in regions of strong eddy activity (e.g., Western Boundary Currents), being particularly relevant for the coupling between crosswind SST gradients and wind stress curl. Results from the analysis can be used to guide modeling studies, since it allows for the a priori identification of regions in which regional models need to properly represent the ocean-atmosphere interaction to accurately represent local variability.

  20. Derivation and test of elevated temperature thermal-stress-free fastener concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.; Blosser, M. L.; Mcwithey, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Future aerospace vehicles must withstand high temperatures and be able to function over a wide temperature range. New composite materials are being developed for use in designing high-temperature lightweight structures. Due to the difference between coefficients of thermal expansion for the new composite materials and conventional high-temperature metallic fasteners, innovative joining techniques are needed to produce tight joints at all temperatures without excessive thermal stresses. A thermal-stress-free fastening technique is presented that can be used to provide structurally tight joints at all temperatures even when the fastener and joined materials have different coefficients of thermal expansion. The derivation of thermal-stress-free fasteners and joint shapes is presented for a wide variety of fastener materials and materials being joined together. Approximations to the thermal-stress-free shapes that result in joints with low-thermal-stresses and that simplify the fastener/joint shape are discussed. The low-thermal-stress fastener concept is verified by thermal and shear tests in joints using oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy fasteners in carbon-carbon material. The test results show no evidence of thermal stress damage for temperatures up to 2000 F and the resulting joints carried shear loads at room temperature typical of those for conventional joints.

  1. Thermal Indices and Thermophysiological Modeling for Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Fiala, Dusan

    2015-12-15

    The assessment of the risk of human exposure to heat is a topic as relevant today as a century ago. The introduction and use of heat stress indices and models to predict and quantify heat stress and heat strain has helped to reduce morbidity and mortality in industrial, military, sports, and leisure activities dramatically. Models used range from simple instruments that attempt to mimic the human-environment heat exchange to complex thermophysiological models that simulate both internal and external heat and mass transfer, including related processes through (protective) clothing. This article discusses the most commonly used indices and models and looks at how these are deployed in the different contexts of industrial, military, and biometeorological applications, with focus on use to predict related thermal sensations, acute risk of heat illness, and epidemiological analysis of morbidity and mortality. A critical assessment is made of tendencies to use simple indices such as WBGT in more complex conditions (e.g., while wearing protective clothing), or when employed in conjunction with inappropriate sensors. Regarding the more complex thermophysiological models, the article discusses more recent developments including model individualization approaches and advanced systems that combine simulation models with (body worn) sensors to provide real-time risk assessment. The models discussed in the article range from historical indices to recent developments in using thermophysiological models in (bio) meteorological applications as an indicator of the combined effect of outdoor weather settings on humans.

  2. Impact of anthropogenic ocean acidification on thermal tolerance of the spider crab Hyas araneus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, K.; Sartoris, F. J.; Bock, C.; Pörtner, H. O.

    2009-10-01

    Future scenarios for the oceans project combined developments of CO2 accumulation and global warming and their impact on marine ecosystems. The synergistic impact of both factors was addressed by studying the effect of elevated CO2 concentrations on thermal tolerance of the cold-eurythermal spider crab Hyas araneus from the population around Helgoland. Here ambient temperatures characterize the southernmost distribution limit of this species. Animals were exposed to present day normocapnia (380 ppm CO2), CO2 levels expected towards 2100 (710 ppm) and beyond (3000 ppm). Heart rate and haemolymph PO2 (PeO2) were measured during progressive short term cooling from 10 to 0°C and during warming from 10 to 25°C. An increase of PeO2 occurred during cooling, the highest values being reached at 0°C under all three CO2 levels. Heart rate increased during warming until a critical temperature (Tc) was reached. The putative Tc under normocapnia was presumably >25°C, from where it fell to 23.5°C under 710 ppm and then 21.1°C under 3000 ppm. At the same time, thermal sensitivity, as seen in the Q10 values of heart rate, rose with increasing CO2 concentration in the warmth. Our results suggest a narrowing of the thermal window of Hyas araneus under moderate increases in CO2 levels by exacerbation of the heat or cold induced oxygen and capacity limitation of thermal tolerance.

  3. Dual Reciprocity Boundary Element Method for studying thermal flow in cooling Magma Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drombosky, T.; Hier-Majumder, S.

    2011-12-01

    Earth's early history is marked by a giant impact with a Mars-sized object which lead to the formation of the moon. This impact event likely led to a substantial amount of melting of the Earth's interior. Subsequent cooling of the Earth involved extensive crystallization in this "magma ocean" over a relatively short period of time. While chemical evidence from ancient sources provides some clues on the rate of cooling, computational models of such phenomena are sparse. Modeling the crystal settling behavior requires solving a coupled system of partial differential equations, specifically the Stokes flow equation coupled with the heat equation through an advection term. Our work uses the dual reciprocity boundary element method (DRBEM) to model such a system. DRBEM extends on the boundary element method (BEM) to solve the heat equation for a multiparticle system in an infinite suspension fluid while avoiding the expensive rediscretization inherit in other methods. In DRBEM, terms arising from the material time derivative of temperature are expanded in a series of function, known as radial basis functions. By modeling this system we are able to simulate thermal interactions among an arbitrary number of crystals settling in a magma ocean. The types of interactions include the enhanced cooling of the magma due to an advecting matrix of cold crystal particles. We are also able to observe the interactions of the crystals' thermal profiles. As a crystal settles, it leaves behind a trail of lower temperature suspension fluid, which then interacts with surrounding particles.

  4. Subtropical Arctic Ocean temperatures during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sluijs, A.; Schouten, S.; Pagani, M.; Woltering, M.; Brinkhuis, H.; Damste, J.S.S.; Dickens, G.R.; Huber, M.; Reichart, G.-J.; Stein, R.; Matthiessen, J.; Lourens, L.J.; Pedentchouk, N.; Backman, J.; Moran, K.; Clemens, S.; Cronin, T.; Eynaud, F.; Gattacceca, J.; Jakobsson, M.; Jordan, R.; Kaminski, M.; King, J.; Koc, N.; Martinez, N.C.; McInroy, D.; Moore, T.C.; O'Regan, M.; Onodera, J.; Palike, H.; Rea, B.; Rio, D.; Sakamoto, T.; Smith, D.C.; St John, K.E.K.; Suto, I.; Suzuki, N.; Takahashi, K.; Watanabe, M. E.; Yamamoto, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum, ???55 million years ago, was a brief period of widespread, extreme climatic warming, that was associated with massive atmospheric greenhouse gas input. Although aspects of the resulting environmental changes are well documented at low latitudes, no data were available to quantify simultaneous changes in the Arctic region. Here we identify the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum in a marine sedimentary sequence obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition. We show that sea surface temperatures near the North Pole increased from ???18??C to over 23??C during this event. Such warm values imply the absence of ice and thus exclude the influence of ice-albedo feedbacks on this Arctic warming. At the same time, sea level rose while anoxic and euxinic conditions developed in the ocean's bottom waters and photic zone, respectively. Increasing temperature and sea level match expectations based on palaeoclimate model simulations, but the absolute polar temperatures that we derive before, during and after the event are more than 10??C warmer than those model-predicted. This suggests that higher-than-modern greenhouse gas concentrations must have operated in conjunction with other feedback mechanisms-perhaps polar stratospheric clouds or hurricane-induced ocean mixing-to amplify early Palaeogene polar temperatures. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  5. Subtropical Arctic Ocean temperatures during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum.

    PubMed

    Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark; Woltering, Martijn; Brinkhuis, Henk; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Dickens, Gerald R; Huber, Matthew; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Stein, Ruediger; Matthiessen, Jens; Lourens, Lucas J; Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Backman, Jan; Moran, Kathryn

    2006-06-01

    The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum, approximately 55 million years ago, was a brief period of widespread, extreme climatic warming, that was associated with massive atmospheric greenhouse gas input. Although aspects of the resulting environmental changes are well documented at low latitudes, no data were available to quantify simultaneous changes in the Arctic region. Here we identify the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum in a marine sedimentary sequence obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition. We show that sea surface temperatures near the North Pole increased from 18 degrees C to over 23 degrees C during this event. Such warm values imply the absence of ice and thus exclude the influence of ice-albedo feedbacks on this Arctic warming. At the same time, sea level rose while anoxic and euxinic conditions developed in the ocean's bottom waters and photic zone, respectively. Increasing temperature and sea level match expectations based on palaeoclimate model simulations, but the absolute polar temperatures that we derive before, during and after the event are more than 10 degrees C warmer than those model-predicted. This suggests that higher-than-modern greenhouse gas concentrations must have operated in conjunction with other feedback mechanisms--perhaps polar stratospheric clouds or hurricane-induced ocean mixing--to amplify early Palaeogene polar temperatures.

  6. Caribbean corals in crisis: record thermal stress, bleaching, and mortality in 2005.

    PubMed

    Eakin, C Mark; Morgan, Jessica A; Heron, Scott F; Smith, Tyler B; Liu, Gang; Alvarez-Filip, Lorenzo; Baca, Bart; Bartels, Erich; Bastidas, Carolina; Bouchon, Claude; Brandt, Marilyn; Bruckner, Andrew W; Bunkley-Williams, Lucy; Cameron, Andrew; Causey, Billy D; Chiappone, Mark; Christensen, Tyler R L; Crabbe, M James C; Day, Owen; de la Guardia, Elena; Díaz-Pulido, Guillermo; DiResta, Daniel; Gil-Agudelo, Diego L; Gilliam, David S; Ginsburg, Robert N; Gore, Shannon; Guzmán, Héctor M; Hendee, James C; Hernández-Delgado, Edwin A; Husain, Ellen; Jeffrey, Christopher F G; Jones, Ross J; Jordán-Dahlgren, Eric; Kaufman, Les S; Kline, David I; Kramer, Philip A; Lang, Judith C; Lirman, Diego; Mallela, Jennie; Manfrino, Carrie; Maréchal, Jean-Philippe; Marks, Ken; Mihaly, Jennifer; Miller, W Jeff; Mueller, Erich M; Muller, Erinn M; Orozco Toro, Carlos A; Oxenford, Hazel A; Ponce-Taylor, Daniel; Quinn, Norman; Ritchie, Kim B; Rodríguez, Sebastián; Ramírez, Alberto Rodríguez; Romano, Sandra; Samhouri, Jameal F; Sánchez, Juan A; Schmahl, George P; Shank, Burton V; Skirving, William J; Steiner, Sascha C C; Villamizar, Estrella; Walsh, Sheila M; Walter, Cory; Weil, Ernesto; Williams, Ernest H; Roberson, Kimberly Woody; Yusuf, Yusri

    2010-11-15

    The rising temperature of the world's oceans has become a major threat to coral reefs globally as the severity and frequency of mass coral bleaching and mortality events increase. In 2005, high ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean resulted in the most severe bleaching event ever recorded in the basin. Satellite-based tools provided warnings for coral reef managers and scientists, guiding both the timing and location of researchers' field observations as anomalously warm conditions developed and spread across the greater Caribbean region from June to October 2005. Field surveys of bleaching and mortality exceeded prior efforts in detail and extent, and provided a new standard for documenting the effects of bleaching and for testing nowcast and forecast products. Collaborators from 22 countries undertook the most comprehensive documentation of basin-scale bleaching to date and found that over 80% of corals bleached and over 40% died at many sites. The most severe bleaching coincided with waters nearest a western Atlantic warm pool that was centered off the northern end of the Lesser Antilles. Thermal stress during the 2005 event exceeded any observed from the Caribbean in the prior 20 years, and regionally-averaged temperatures were the warmest in over 150 years. Comparison of satellite data against field surveys demonstrated a significant predictive relationship between accumulated heat stress (measured using NOAA Coral Reef Watch's Degree Heating Weeks) and bleaching intensity. This severe, widespread bleaching and mortality will undoubtedly have long-term consequences for reef ecosystems and suggests a troubled future for tropical marine ecosystems under a warming climate.

  7. Caribbean Corals in Crisis: Record Thermal Stress, Bleaching, and Mortality in 2005

    PubMed Central

    Eakin, C. Mark; Morgan, Jessica A.; Heron, Scott F.; Smith, Tyler B.; Liu, Gang; Alvarez-Filip, Lorenzo; Baca, Bart; Bartels, Erich; Bastidas, Carolina; Bouchon, Claude; Brandt, Marilyn; Bruckner, Andrew W.; Bunkley-Williams, Lucy; Cameron, Andrew; Causey, Billy D.; Chiappone, Mark; Christensen, Tyler R. L.; Crabbe, M. James C; Day, Owen; de la Guardia, Elena; Díaz-Pulido, Guillermo; DiResta, Daniel; Gil-Agudelo, Diego L.; Gilliam, David S.; Ginsburg, Robert N.; Gore, Shannon; Guzmán, Héctor M.; Hendee, James C.; Hernández-Delgado, Edwin A.; Husain, Ellen; Jeffrey, Christopher F. G.; Jones, Ross J.; Jordán-Dahlgren, Eric; Kaufman, Les S.; Kline, David I.; Kramer, Philip A.; Lang, Judith C.; Lirman, Diego; Mallela, Jennie; Manfrino, Carrie; Maréchal, Jean-Philippe; Marks, Ken; Mihaly, Jennifer; Miller, W. Jeff; Mueller, Erich M.; Muller, Erinn M.; Orozco Toro, Carlos A.; Oxenford, Hazel A.; Ponce-Taylor, Daniel; Quinn, Norman; Ritchie, Kim B.; Rodríguez, Sebastián; Ramírez, Alberto Rodríguez; Romano, Sandra; Samhouri, Jameal F.; Sánchez, Juan A.; Schmahl, George P.; Shank, Burton V.; Skirving, William J.; Steiner, Sascha C. C.; Villamizar, Estrella; Walsh, Sheila M.; Walter, Cory; Weil, Ernesto; Williams, Ernest H.; Roberson, Kimberly Woody; Yusuf, Yusri

    2010-01-01

    Background The rising temperature of the world's oceans has become a major threat to coral reefs globally as the severity and frequency of mass coral bleaching and mortality events increase. In 2005, high ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean resulted in the most severe bleaching event ever recorded in the basin. Methodology/Principal Findings Satellite-based tools provided warnings for coral reef managers and scientists, guiding both the timing and location of researchers' field observations as anomalously warm conditions developed and spread across the greater Caribbean region from June to October 2005. Field surveys of bleaching and mortality exceeded prior efforts in detail and extent, and provided a new standard for documenting the effects of bleaching and for testing nowcast and forecast products. Collaborators from 22 countries undertook the most comprehensive documentation of basin-scale bleaching to date and found that over 80% of corals bleached and over 40% died at many sites. The most severe bleaching coincided with waters nearest a western Atlantic warm pool that was centered off the northern end of the Lesser Antilles. Conclusions/Significance Thermal stress during the 2005 event exceeded any observed from the Caribbean in the prior 20 years, and regionally-averaged temperatures were the warmest in over 150 years. Comparison of satellite data against field surveys demonstrated a significant predictive relationship between accumulated heat stress (measured using NOAA Coral Reef Watch's Degree Heating Weeks) and bleaching intensity. This severe, widespread bleaching and mortality will undoubtedly have long-term consequences for reef ecosystems and suggests a troubled future for tropical marine ecosystems under a warming climate. PMID:21125021

  8. Stress analysis in curved composites due to thermal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, Jared Cornelius

    Many structures in aircraft, cars, trucks, ships, machines, tools, bridges, and buildings, consist of curved sections. These sections vary from straight line segments that have curvature at either one or both ends, segments with compound curvatures, segments with two mutually perpendicular curvatures or Gaussian curvatures, and segments with a simple curvature. With the advancements made in multi-purpose composites over the past 60 years, composites slowly but steadily have been appearing in these various vehicles, compound structures, and buildings. These composite sections provide added benefits over isotropic, polymeric, and ceramic materials by generally having a higher specific strength, higher specific stiffnesses, longer fatigue life, lower density, possibilities in reduction of life cycle and/or acquisition cost, and greater adaptability to intended function of structure via material composition and geometry. To be able to design and manufacture a safe composite laminate or structure, it is imperative that the stress distributions, their causes, and effects are thoroughly understood in order to successfully accomplish mission objectives and manufacture a safe and reliable composite. The objective of the thesis work is to expand upon the knowledge of simply curved composite structures by exploring and ascertaining all pertinent parameters, phenomenon, and trends in stress variations in curved laminates due to thermal loading. The simply curved composites consist of composites with one radius of curvature throughout the span of the specimen about only one axis. Analytical beam theory, classical lamination theory, and finite element analysis were used to ascertain stress variations in a flat, isotropic beam. An analytical method was developed to ascertain the stress variations in an isotropic, simply curved beam under thermal loading that is under both free-free and fixed-fixed constraint conditions. This is the first such solution to Author's best knowledge

  9. Thermal elasto-plastic stress analysis during laser heating of a metal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanbei; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2008-03-01

    During laser heating of a metal material, the continuity of material confines its free expansion, thermal stresses arise. On one hand the thermal expansion of the heated zone of the material increases with the increase of temperature, the thermal stress level increases correspondingly; on the other hand the mechanical properties of the material will change with the increase of temperature, especially the elastic modulus, yield strength and tensile strength drop significantly, which is the so-called thermal softening problem. Due to the effect of the two factors, as the heating time or the intensity of the laser beam increases, it is possible that the stress levels of the heated zone of the material exceed the yield strength, which leads the material to come into a plastic stage. Thus, a thermal plastic problem occurs. In this study, thermal elasto-plastic stresses during laser heating of a metal plate are computed by the finite element method (FEM) based on thermal elasto-plastic constitutive theory. The mechanical behaviors of the metal material during the laser heating are analyzed. By the analysis of the results, it is found that thermal expansion leads to the increase of stress level early during the laser irradiating, and thermal softening causes the decrease of stress levels in the plastic zone and the slow growth and even decrease of stress levels in elastic zone later. The radial stresses are all compressive stresses, and the hoop stresses are compressive stresses within about the laser spot and are tensile stresses at other place. This work may be beneficial to the laser processing of metal materials.

  10. Subduction of young oceanic plates: A numerical study with application to aborted thermal-chemical plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Quintero, Idael Francisco; Gerya, Taras V.; GarcíA-Casco, Antonio; Castro, Antonio

    2011-10-01

    We investigated numerical models of initiation and subsequent evolution of subduction of young (10-30 Myr) oceanic lithosphere. Systematic numerical experiments were carried out by varying the age of the subducting plate (10, 12.5, 15, 17.5, 20, 25 and 30 Myr), the rate of induced convergence (2, 4 and 5 cm/yr) and the degree of hydration (0 and 2 wt% H2O) of the pre-existing weak oceanic fracture zone along which subduction is initiated. Despite the prescribed plate forcing, spontaneously retreating oceanic subduction with a pronounced magmatic arc and a backarc basin was obtained in a majority of the experiments. It was also found that the younger age of oceanic lithosphere results in more intense dehydration and partial melting of the slab during and after the induced subduction initiation due to the shallow dispositions of the isotherms. Partial melting of the subducted young crust may create thermal-chemical instabilities (cold plumes) that ascend along the slab-mantle interface until they either freeze at depth or detach from the slab and penetrate the upper plate lithosphere contributing to the nucleation and growth of a volcanic arc. Freezing of the plumes in the slab-mantle interface is favored by subduction of very young lithosphere (i.e., 10 Myr) at moderate rate (4 cm/yr) of convergence. Such aborted plumes may correspond to Cretaceous partially melted MORB-derived slab material and associated adakitic tonalitic-trondhjemitic rocks crystallized at ca. 50 km depth in the slab-mantle interface and exhumed in a subduction channel (serpentinite mélanges) in eastern Cuba.

  11. Thermal stress and predation risk trigger distinct transcriptomic responses in the intertidal snail Nucella lapillus.

    PubMed

    Chu, Nathaniel D; Miller, Luke P; Kaluziak, Stefan T; Trussell, Geoffrey C; Vollmer, Steven V

    2014-12-01

    Thermal stress and predation risk have profound effects on rocky shore organisms, triggering changes in their feeding behaviour, morphology and metabolism. Studies of thermal stress have shown that underpinning such changes in several intertidal species are specific shifts in gene and protein expression (e.g. upregulation of heat-shock proteins). But relatively few studies have examined genetic responses to predation risk. Here, we use next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to examine the transcriptomic (mRNA) response of the snail Nucella lapillus to thermal stress and predation risk. We found that like other intertidal species, N. lapillus displays a pronounced genetic response to thermal stress by upregulating many heat-shock proteins and other molecular chaperones. In contrast, the presence of a crab predator (Carcinus maenas) triggered few significant changes in gene expression in our experiment, and this response showed no significant overlap with the snail's response to thermal stress. These different gene expression profiles suggest that thermal stress and predation risk could pose distinct and potentially additive challenges for N. lapillus and that genetic responses to biotic stresses such as predation risk might be more complex and less uniform across species than genetic responses to abiotic stresses such as thermal stress. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. On thermal stress failure of the SNAP-19A RTG heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, W. C.; Anderson, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    Results of a study on thermal stress problems in an amorphous graphite heat shield that is part of the launch-abort protect system for the SNAP-19A radio-isotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) that will be used on the Viking Mars Lander are presended. The first result is from a thermal stress analysis of a full-scale RTG heat source that failed to survive a suborbital entry flight test, possibly due to thermal stress failure. It was calculated that the maximum stress in the heat shield was only 50 percent of the ultimate strength of the material. To provide information on the stress failure criterion used for this calculation, some heat shield specimens were fractured under abort entry conditions in a plasma arc facility. It was found that in regions free of stress concentrations the POCO graphite heat shield material did fracture when the local stress reached the ultimate uniaxial stress of the material.

  13. Thermal stress evolution in embedded Cu/low-k dielectric composite features

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Conal E.; Goldsmith, Charles C.; Shaw, Thomas M.; Doyle, James P.; Noyan, I. C.

    2006-07-03

    To determine the effect of low-modulus materials on the thermal stress evolution within interconnect metallization, thermal and residual stresses in copper features, embedded in an organosilicate glass (SiCOH) on a silicon substrate, were measured by x-ray diffraction as a function of temperature and calculated using finite element modeling. The elastic response of the structures was dictated by the thermal expansion mismatch between copper and silicon, the copper and SiCOH elastic moduli, and the composite geometry. The presence of a low-modulus layer between the features and underlying substrate plays a major role in the elastic stress relaxation generated during thermal cycling.

  14. Study on three dimensional transient thermal stress analysis for laminated composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Kin`ya; Zako, Masaru

    1995-11-01

    Transient heat conduction and thermal stress analysis of laminated composite materials are very important because they are hated during manufacturing process. Anisotropy of thermal conductivity has to be considered for heat conduction analysis of composite materials such as FRP. Assuming that heat conducts uniformly in normal direction in thin structures, laminated plates can be modeled as single layers with the equivalent heat conductivities. With this assumption, FEM three dimensional transient heat conduction and thermal stress analysis programs for laminated composite materials are developed. As numerical examples, the heat conduction and thermal stresses of laminated CFRP structure are investigated.

  15. The Impact of the Ocean Thermal Skin Layer on Air-Sea Interfacial Heat Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, P. J.; Wong, E.

    2015-12-01

    The upper ocean heat content has been observed to be increasing over the past few decades much of which has been attributed to anthropogenic effects resulting in an increase in greenhouse gases thereby increasing the amounts of incoming longwave (LWin) radiation impinging onto the ocean's surface. However, the penetration depth of LWin extends to micrometer scales, where the ocean's thermal skin layer (TSL) exists, and does not directly heat the upper few meters of the ocean thereby raising the conundrum of how does the upper ocean warm with increasing levels of infrared (IR) radiation. The TSL consists of a strong temperature gradient on the aqueous side of the interface that sustains the upward heat flux by molecular conduction. As such, we hypothesize the heat lost through the air-sea interface which is controlled by the TSL, modulates the amount of heat stored in the upper few meters of the ocean. An analysis of properties of the retrieved TSL profiles from a shipboard IR spectrometer with heat fluxes (specifically LWin) and wind speeds from two cruises limited to night-time data are presented. We also show a comparison between these properties with current published viscous layer models. The results indicate that the data have an inherent wind speed dependence with net flux thereby requiring a segregation of the data into wind speed bins to acknowledge the effects of wind-driven shear in the analysis. The temperature differences derived from the models indicates that at low wind speeds (<2 m/s), where wind-driven shear effects are negligible and buoyancy effects dominate, the TSL profile's gradient is decreasing with increased LWin which leads to a lowered net heat flux and is in agreement with our hypothesis. However our field results show an opposite effect (higher gradient at higher LWin) which is believed to be due to the formation of a thicker TSL at low winds. The presence of a thicker TSL suggests that more of the vertical temperature gradient lies

  16. Solution accuracies of finite element reentry heat transfer and thermal stress analyses of Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Accuracies of solutions (structural temperatures and thermal stresses) obtained from different thermal and structural FEMs set up for the Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO) are compared and discussed. For studying the effect of element size on the solution accuracies of heat-transfer and thermal-stress analyses of the SSO, five SPAR thermal models and five NASTRAN structural models were set up for wing midspan bay 3. The structural temperature distribution over the wing skin (lower and upper) surface of one bay was dome shaped and induced more severe thermal stresses in the chordwise direction than in the spanwise direction. The induced thermal stresses were extremely sensitive to slight variation in structural temperature distributions. Both internal convention and internal radiation were found to have equal effects on the SSO.

  17. Investigation of Thermal Stress Convection in Nonisothermal Gases under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, Daniel W.

    1999-01-01

    The project has sought to ascertain the veracity of the Burnett relations, as applied to slow moving, highly nonisothermal gases, by comparison of convection and stress predictions with those generated by the DSMC method. The Burnett equations were found to provide reasonable descriptions of the pressure distribution and normal stress in stationary gases with a 1-D temperature gradient. Continuum/Burnett predictions of thermal stress convection in 2-D heated enclosures, however, are not quantitatively supported by DSMC results. For such situations, it appears that thermal creep flows, generated at the boundaries of the enclosure, will be significantly larger than the flows resulting from thermal stress in the gas.

  18. Comparison of the effects of thermal stress and CO₂-driven acidified seawater on fertilization in coral Acropora digitifera.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Akira; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    2015-08-01

    Global warming (GW) and ocean acidification (OA) have been recognized as severe threats for reef-building corals that support coral reef ecosystems, but these effects on the early life history stage of corals are relatively unknown compared with the effects on calcification of adult corals. In this study, we evaluated the effects of thermal stress and CO2-driven acidified seawater on fertilization in a reef-building coral, Acropora digitifera. The fertilization rates of A. digitifera decreased in response to thermal stress compared with those under normal seawater conditions. In contrast, the changes of fertilization rates were not evident in the acidified seawater. Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM) predicted that sperm/egg crosses and temperature were explanatory variables in the best-fitted model for the fertilization data. In the best model, interactions between thermal stress and acidified seawater on the fertilization rates were not selected. Our results suggested that coral fertilization is more sensitive to future GW than OA. Taking into consideration the previous finding that sperm motility of A. digitifera was decreased by acidified seawater, the decrease in coral cover followed by that of sperm concentration might cause the interacting effects of GW and OA on coral fertilization.

  19. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Project: OTEC support services. Monthly technical status report, October 1-31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-14

    The objective of this project is to provide technical engineering and management support services for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program of the Division of Ocean Energy Systems, DOE. The principal contributions made are outlined for the following tasks: (1) Survey, analysis and recommendation concerning program performance; (2) Program technical monitoring; (3) Technical assessments; (4) OTEC system integration; (5) Environment and siting considerations; and (6) Transmission subsystem considerations.

  20. Thermal response of mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems to perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shreya; Lowell, Robert P.

    2015-11-01

    Mid-ocean ridges are subject to episodic disturbances in the form of magmatic intrusions and earthquakes. Following these events, the temperature of associated hydrothermal vent fluids is observed to increase within a few days. In this paper, we aim to understand the rapid thermal response of hydrothermal systems to such disturbances. We construct a classic single-pass numerical model and use the examples of the 1995 and 1999 non-eruptive events at East Pacific Rise (EPR) 9°50‧N and Main Endeavour Field (MEF), respectively. We model both the thermal effects of dikes and permeability changes that might be attributed to diking and/or earthquake swarms. We find that the rapid response of vent temperatures results from steep thermal gradients close to the surface. When the perturbations are accompanied by an increase in permeability, the response on the surface is further enhanced. For EPR9°50‧N, the observed ~7 °C rise can be obtained for a ~50% increase in permeability in the diking zone. The mass flow rate increases as a result of change in permeability deeper in the system, and, therefore, the amount of hot fluid in the diffused flow also increases. Using a thermal energy balance, we show that the ~10 °C increase in diffuse flow temperatures recorded for MEF after the 1999 event may result from a 3-4 times increase in permeability. The rapid thermal response of the system resulting from a change in permeability also occurs for cases in which there is no additional heat input, indicating that hydrothermal systems may respond similarly to purely seismic and non-eruptive magmatic events.

  1. The Thermal Response of Mid-Ocean Ridge Hydrothermal Systems to Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Lowell, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges are subject to episodic disturbances in the form of magmatic intrusions and earthquakes. Following these events, the temperature of associated hydrothermal vent fluids is observed to increase within a few days. In this paper, we aim to understand the rapid thermal response of hydrothermal systems to such disturbances. We construct a classic single-pass numerical model and use the examples of the 1995 and 1999 non-eruptive events at East Pacific Rise 9⁰50' N and Main Endeavour Field, respectively. We model both the thermal effects of dikes and permeability changes that might be attributed to diking and/or earthquake swarms. We find that the rapid response of vent temperatures results from steep thermal gradients close to the surface. When the perturbations are accompanied by an increase in permeability, the response on the surface is enhanced further. For East Pacific Rise 9⁰50' N, the observed ~7°C rise can be obtained for a ~ 50% increase in permeability in the diking zone. The mass flow rate increases as a result of change in permeability deeper in the system, and, therefore, the amount of hot fluid in the diffused flow also increases. Using a thermal energy balance, we show that the ~ 10 ⁰C increase in diffuse flow temperatures recorded for MEF after the 1999 event may result from a 3-4 times increase in permeability. The rapid thermal response of the system resulting from a change in permeability also occurs for cases in which there is no additional heat input, indicating that hydrothermal systems may respond similarly to purely seismic and non-eruptive magmatic events.

  2. Extreme subseasonal tropical air-sea interactions and their relation to ocean thermal stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Ian D.

    2011-12-01

    representation of warm core eddies and the loop current in the Gulf of Mexico, and a new parameterization of the drag coefficient. The 2006--2009 period contains more intense hurricanes (category 4 and 5) and the non-monotonic nature of the SST-intensity response is more similar to observations than in 2005. This result was attributed to weaker ocean thermal stratification in the Gulf of Mexico allowing for greater storm intensification. A very simple Conceptual Hurricane Intensity Model consisting of two coupled equations was formulated to account for the non-monotonic SST-intensity response. Finally, dynamical oceanic changes in the tropical North Atlantic under climate change were examined across a range of climate models. Given the sensitivity of hurricane intensity to stratification, large-scale ocean changes must be understood in order to make robust intensity predictions. The models' mean state contained significant biases, and it is not clear whether these mean state biases are reduced in models with higher resolution. However, climate change projections indicate a robust subsurface warming response in the tropical North Atlantic that could impact hurricane intensity. The non-local air-sea processes that account for water mass biases were highlighted as an area for future research.

  3. Teratogenic actions of thermally-stressed culinary oils in rats.

    PubMed

    Indart, Ana; Viana, Marta; Grootveld, Martin C; Silwood, Christopher J L; Sanchez-Vera, Isabel; Bonet, Bartolomé

    2002-10-01

    Lipid oxidation products (LOPs), generated in culinary oils during episodes of thermal stressing can give rise to cellular damage. The aims of this study were to determine whether orally-administered, LOP-containing thermally-stressed safflower oil exerts teratogenic actions in rats, and whether this effect could be prevented by co-administration of alpha-tocopherol (alpha-TOH). Safflower oil was heated for a period of 20 min according to standard frying practices and stored at -20 degrees C under N2. Four experimental groups of pregnant Wistar rats were employed; two received 0.30 ml of pre-heated oil (HO), one of which was also supplemented with 150 mg of alpha-TOH (HOE), and two served as controls, one treated with the non-heated oil (O) and the other without any treatment (C). The oil was administered daily by gavage from day 1 of pregnancy to day 11.5, when the animals were killed and the embryos examined. LOPs and alpha-TOH were determined both in the heated and non-heated oils. The percentage of embryo malformations and reabsorptions were determined in the above four experimental groups. Heating the oil substantially increased its concentration of LOPs and decreased its alpha-TOH content. The percentage of embryo malformations in the HO group was 21.73%, compared with 5.6 and 7% in the O and C groups, respectively. Supplementation of the pre-heated oil with alpha-TOH was found to decrease the percentage of malformations to 7%. The results obtained from these investigations indicate that LOPs detectable at millimolar levels in the heated cooking oils administered (e.g. saturated and alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, and/or their conjugated hydroperoxydiene precursors) exert potent teratogenic actions in experimental animals which are at least partially circumventable by co-administration of the chain-breaking antioxidant alpha-TOH. Plausible mechanisms for these processes and their health relevance to humans regarding diet and methods of frying/cooking are

  4. Forced and intrinsic variability in the response to increased wind stress of an idealized Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Chris; Hughes, Chris W.; Blundell, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    use ensemble runs of a three layer, quasi-geostrophic idealized Southern Ocean model to explore the roles of forced and intrinsic variability in response to a linear increase of wind stress imposed over a 30 year period. We find no increase of eastward circumpolar volume transport in response to the increased wind stress. A large part of the resulting time series can be explained by a response in which the eddy kinetic energy is linearly proportional to the wind stress with a possible time lag, but no statistically significant lag is found. However, this simple relationship is not the whole story: several intrinsic time scales also influence the response. We find an e-folding time scale for growth of small perturbations of 1-2 weeks. The energy budget for intrinsic variability at periods shorter than a year is dominated by exchange between kinetic and potential energy. At longer time scales, we find an intrinsic mode with period in the region of 15 years, which is dominated by changes in potential energy and frictional dissipation in a manner consistent with that seen by Hogg and Blundell (2006). A similar mode influences the response to changing wind stress. This influence, robust to perturbations, is different from the supposed linear relationship between wind stress and eddy kinetic energy, and persists for 5-10 years in this model, suggestive of a forced oscillatory mode with period of around 15 years. If present in the real ocean, such a mode would imply a degree of predictability of Southern Ocean dynamics on multiyear time scales.

  5. A database for the monitoring of thermal anomalies over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan C; Mattar, Cristian; Sobrino, José A; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2015-01-01

    Advances in information technologies and accessibility to climate and satellite data in recent years have favored the development of web-based tools with user-friendly interfaces in order to facilitate the dissemination of geo/biophysical products. These products are useful for the analysis of the impact of global warming over different biomes. In particular, the study of the Amazon forest responses to drought have recently received attention by the scientific community due to the occurrence of two extreme droughts and sustained warming over the last decade. Thermal Amazoni@ is a web-based platform for the visualization and download of surface thermal anomalies products over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans using Google Earth as a baseline graphical interface (http://ipl.uv.es/thamazon/web). This platform is currently operational at the servers of the University of Valencia (Spain), and it includes both satellite (MODIS) and climatic (ERA-Interim) datasets. Thermal Amazoni@ is composed of the viewer system and the web and ftp sites with ancillary information and access to product download.

  6. A database for the monitoring of thermal anomalies over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan C.; Mattar, Cristian; Sobrino, José A.; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2015-01-01

    Advances in information technologies and accessibility to climate and satellite data in recent years have favored the development of web-based tools with user-friendly interfaces in order to facilitate the dissemination of geo/biophysical products. These products are useful for the analysis of the impact of global warming over different biomes. In particular, the study of the Amazon forest responses to drought have recently received attention by the scientific community due to the occurrence of two extreme droughts and sustained warming over the last decade. Thermal Amazoni@ is a web-based platform for the visualization and download of surface thermal anomalies products over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans using Google Earth as a baseline graphical interface (http://ipl.uv.es/thamazon/web). This platform is currently operational at the servers of the University of Valencia (Spain), and it includes both satellite (MODIS) and climatic (ERA-Interim) datasets. Thermal Amazoni@ is composed of the viewer system and the web and ftp sites with ancillary information and access to product download. PMID:26029379

  7. A database for the monitoring of thermal anomalies over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan C.; Mattar, Cristian; Sobrino, José A.; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2015-05-01

    Advances in information technologies and accessibility to climate and satellite data in recent years have favored the development of web-based tools with user-friendly interfaces in order to facilitate the dissemination of geo/biophysical products. These products are useful for the analysis of the impact of global warming over different biomes. In particular, the study of the Amazon forest responses to drought have recently received attention by the scientific community due to the occurrence of two extreme droughts and sustained warming over the last decade. Thermal Amazoni@ is a web-based platform for the visualization and download of surface thermal anomalies products over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans using Google Earth as a baseline graphical interface (http://ipl.uv.es/thamazon/web). This platform is currently operational at the servers of the University of Valencia (Spain), and it includes both satellite (MODIS) and climatic (ERA-Interim) datasets. Thermal Amazoni@ is composed of the viewer system and the web and ftp sites with ancillary information and access to product download.

  8. Modeling conductive cooling for thermally stressed dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gebremedhin, Kifle G; Wu, Binxin; Perano, K

    2016-02-01

    Conductive cooling, which is based on direct contact between a cow lying down and a cooled surface (water mattress, or any other heat exchanger embedded under the bedding), allows heat transfer from the cow to the cooled surface, and thus alleviate heat stress of the cow. Conductive cooling is a novel technology that has the potential to reduce the consumption of energy and water in cooling dairy cows compared to some current practices. A three-dimensional conduction model that simulates cooling thermally-stressed dairy cows was developed. The model used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method to characterize the air-flow field surrounding the animal model. The flow field was obtained by solving the continuity and the momentum equations. The heat exchange between the animal and the cooled water mattress as well as between the animal and ambient air was determined by solving the energy equation. The relative humidity was characterized using the species transport equation. The conduction 3-D model was validated against experimental temperature data and the agreement was very good (average error is 4.4% and the range is 1.9-8.3%) for a mesh size of 1117202. Sensitivity analyses were conducted between heat losses (sensible and latent) with respect to air temperature, relative humidity, air velocity, and level of wetness of skin surface to determine which of the parameters affect heat flux more than others. Heat flux was more sensitive to air temperature and level of wetness of the skin surface and less sensitive to relative humidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Corals escape bleaching in regions that recently and historically experienced frequent thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D M; van Woesik, R

    2009-08-22

    The response of coral-reef ecosystems to contemporary thermal stress may be in part a consequence of recent or historical sea-surface temperature (SST) variability. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether: (i) there was a relationship between the historical frequency of SST variability and stress experienced during the most recent thermal-stress events (in 1998 and 2005-2006) and (ii) coral reefs that historically experienced frequent thermal anomalies were less likely to experience coral bleaching during these recent thermal-stress events. Examination of nine detrended coral delta(18)O and Sr/Ca anomaly records revealed a high- (5.7-year) and low-frequency (>54-year) mode of SST variability. There was a positive relationship between the historical frequency of SST anomalies and recent thermal stress; sites historically dominated by the high-frequency mode experienced greater thermal stress than other sites during both events, and showed extensive coral bleaching in 1998. Nonetheless, in 2005-2006, corals at sites dominated by high-frequency variability showed reduced bleaching, despite experiencing high thermal stress. This bleaching resistance was most likely a consequence of rapid directional selection that followed the extreme thermal event of 1998. However, the benefits of regional resistance could come at the considerable cost of shifts in coral species composition.

  10. Thermal Stresses Of A Trimaterial Medium In A Nonuniform Temperature Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Ref. 11] all state that the primary cause of mechanical stresses that are induced in electronic packages are a result of the difference in...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL SV Monterey, California IDTIC %JUL 28 1993U THESIS THERMAL STRESSES OF A TRIMATERIAL MEDIUM IN A NONUNIFORM TEMPERATURE...AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Thermal Stresses of a Trimaterial Medium in a Nonuniform Temperature Field 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael Joseph Neibert 7

  11. Coupling Mechanism of Electromagnetic Field and Thermal Stress on Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Yan; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Yu, Hui; Huang, Xiao-Mei; Cai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is an important factor in research on the biological effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF), but interactions between ELF-EMF and temperature remain unknown. The effects of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 3 mT) on the lifespan, locomotion, heat shock response (HSR), and oxidative stress (OS) of Canton-Special (CS) and mutant w1118 flies were investigated at 25°C and 35°C (thermal stress). Results showed that thermal stress accelerated the death rates of CS and w1118 flies, shortened their lifespan, and influenced their locomotion rhythm and activity. The upregulated expression levels of heat shock protein (HSP) 22, HSP26, and HSP70 indicated that HSR was enhanced. Thermal stress-induced OS response increased malondialdehyde content, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity, and decreased reactive oxygen species level. The effects of thermal stress on the death rates, lifespan, locomotion, and HSP gene expression of flies, especially w1118 line, were also enhanced by ELF-EMF. In conclusion, thermal stress weakened the physiological function and promoted the HSR and OS of flies. ELF-EMF aggravated damages and enhanced thermal stress-induced HSP and OS response. Therefore, thermal stress and ELF-EMF elicited a synergistic effect.

  12. Coupling Mechanism of Electromagnetic Field and Thermal Stress on Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Yu, Hui; Huang, Xiao-Mei; Cai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is an important factor in research on the biological effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF), but interactions between ELF-EMF and temperature remain unknown. The effects of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 3 mT) on the lifespan, locomotion, heat shock response (HSR), and oxidative stress (OS) of Canton-Special (CS) and mutant w1118 flies were investigated at 25°C and 35°C (thermal stress). Results showed that thermal stress accelerated the death rates of CS and w1118 flies, shortened their lifespan, and influenced their locomotion rhythm and activity. The upregulated expression levels of heat shock protein (HSP) 22, HSP26, and HSP70 indicated that HSR was enhanced. Thermal stress-induced OS response increased malondialdehyde content, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity, and decreased reactive oxygen species level. The effects of thermal stress on the death rates, lifespan, locomotion, and HSP gene expression of flies, especially w1118 line, were also enhanced by ELF-EMF. In conclusion, thermal stress weakened the physiological function and promoted the HSR and OS of flies. ELF-EMF aggravated damages and enhanced thermal stress-induced HSP and OS response. Therefore, thermal stress and ELF-EMF elicited a synergistic effect. PMID:27611438

  13. Influence of Interlayer Design on Residual Thermal Stresses in Trilayered and Graded All-Ceramic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Bruno; Fabris, Douglas; Souza, Júlio C. M.; Silva, Filipe S.; Mesquita-Guimarães, Joana; Zhang, Yu; Fredel, Márcio

    2017-01-01

    Residual thermal stresses are formed in dental restorations during cooling from high temperature processing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of constructive design variables (composition and interlayer thickness) on residual stresses in alumina- and zirconia-graded restorations. Restorations' real-like cooling conditions were simulated using finite elements method and temperature-dependent material properties were used. Three different designs were evaluated: a bilayered restoration (sharp transition between materials); a trilayered restoration with a homogenous interlayer between core and veneer; and a trilayered restoration with a graded interlayer. The interlayer thickness and composition were varied. Zirconia restorations presented overall higher thermal stress values than alumina ones. Thermal stresses were significantly reduced by the presence of a homogeneous interlayer. The composition of the interlayer showed great influence on the thermal stresses, with the best results for homogeneous interlayers being observed for porcelain contents in the composite ranging between 30%-50% (vol.%), for both alumina and zirconia restorations. The interlayer's thickness showed a minor contribution in the thermal stress reduction. The graded interlayer showed an optimized reduction in restorations' thermal stresses. The use of graded interlayer, favoring enhanced thermal stress distributions and lower magnitude is expected to reduce the risk of catastrophic failure. PMID:27987657

  14. Influence of interlayer design on residual thermal stresses in trilayered and graded all-ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Bruno; Fabris, Douglas; Souza, Júlio C M; Silva, Filipe S; Mesquita-Guimarães, Joana; Zhang, Yu; Fredel, Márcio

    2017-02-01

    Residual thermal stresses are formed in dental restorations during cooling from high temperature processing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of constructive design variables (composition and interlayer thickness) on residual stresses in alumina- and zirconia-graded restorations. Restorations' real-like cooling conditions were simulated using finite elements method and temperature-dependent material properties were used. Three different designs were evaluated: a bilayered restoration (sharp transition between materials); a trilayered restoration with a homogenous interlayer between core and veneer; and a trilayered restoration with a graded interlayer. The interlayer thickness and composition were varied. Zirconia restorations presented overall higher thermal stress values than alumina ones. Thermal stresses were significantly reduced by the presence of a homogeneous interlayer. The composition of the interlayer showed great influence on the thermal stresses, with the best results for homogeneous interlayers being observed for porcelain contents in the composite ranging between 30%-50% (vol.%), for both alumina and zirconia restorations. The interlayer's thickness showed a minor contribution in the thermal stress reduction. The graded interlayer showed an optimized reduction in restorations' thermal stresses. The use of graded interlayer, favoring enhanced thermal stress distributions and lower magnitude is expected to reduce the risk of catastrophic failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors Influencing Residual Stresses in Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrann, Roy T. R.; Rybicki, Edmund F.; Shadley, John R.; Brindley, William J.

    1997-01-01

    To improve gas turbine and diesel engine performance using thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) requires an understanding of the factors that influence the in-service behavior of thermal barrier coatings. One of the many factors related to coating performance is the state of stress in the coating. The total stress state is composed of the stresses due to the in-service loading history and the residual stresses. Residual stresses have been shown to affect TBC life, the bond strength of thermal spray coatings, and the fatigue life of tungsten carbide coatings. Residual stresses are first introduced in TBC's by the spraying process due to elevated temperatures during processing and the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion of the top coat, bond coat, and substrate. Later, the residual stresses can be changed by the in-service temperature history due to a number of time and temperature dependent mechanisms, such as oxidation, creep, and sintering. Silica content has also been shown to affect sintering and the cyclic life of thermal barrier coatings. Thus, it is important to understand how the spraying process, the in-service thermal cycles, and the silica content can create and alter residual stresses in thermal barrier coatings.

  16. Elastic-Plastic Thermal Stress Analysis of a High-Pressure Cryogenic Storage Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. Mark; Field, Robert E. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The thermal stresses on a cryogenic storage tank contribute strongly to the state of stress of the tank material and its ability to withstand operational stresses. These thermal stresses also affect the growth of any surface damage that might occur in the tank walls. These stresses are particularly of concern during the initial cooldown period for a new tank placed into service, and during any subsequent thermal cycles. A previous preliminary elastic analysis showed that the thermal stress on the inner wall would reach approximately 1,000MPa (145,000 psi). This stress far exceeds the ASTM specified room temperature values for both yield (170MPa) and ultimate (485 MPa) strength for 304L stainless steel. The present analysis determines the thermal stresses using an elastic-plastic model. The commercial software application ANSYS was used to determine the transient spatial temperature profile and the associated spatial thermal stress profiles in a segment of a thick-walled vessel during a typical cooldown process. A strictly elastic analysis using standard material properties for 304L stainless steel showed that the maximum thermal stress on the inner and outer walls was approximately 960 MPa (tensile) and - 270 MPa (compressive) respectively. These values occurred early in the cooldown process, but at different times, An elastic-plastic analysis showed significantly reducing stress, as expected due to the plastic deformation of the material. The maximum stress for the inner wall was approximately 225 MPa (tensile), while the maximum stress for the outer wall was approximately - 130 MPa (compressive).

  17. Prior stress exposure increases pain behaviors in a rat model of full thickness thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Nyland, Jennifer E; McLean, Samuel A; Averitt, Dayna L

    2015-12-01

    Thermal burns among individuals working in highly stressful environments, such as firefighters and military Service Members, are common. Evidence suggests that pre-injury stress may exaggerate pain following thermal injury; however current animal models of burn have not evaluated the potential influence of pre-burn stress. This sham-controlled study evaluated the influence of prior stress exposure on post-burn thermal and mechanical sensitivity in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were exposed to 20 min of inescapable swim stress or sham stress once per day for three days. Exposure to inescapable swim stress (1) increased the intensity and duration of thermal hyperalgesia after subsequent burn and (2) accelerated the onset of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia after subsequent burn. This stress-induced exacerbation of pain sensitivity was reversed by pretreatment and concurrent treatment with the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine. These data suggest a better understanding of mechanisms by which prior stress augments pain after thermal burn may lead to improved pain treatments for burn survivors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Stress generation in thermally grown oxide films. [oxide scale spalling from superalloy substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumnick, A. J.; Ebert, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    A three dimensional finite element analysis was conducted, using the ANSYS computer program, of the stress state in a thin oxide film thermally formed on a rectangular piece of NiCrAl alloy. The analytical results indicate a very high compressive stress in the lateral directions of the film (approximately 6200 MPa), and tensile stresses in the metal substrate that ranged from essentially zero to about 55 MPa. It was found further that the intensity of the analytically determined average stresses could be approximated reasonably well by the modification of an equation developed previously by Oxx for stresses induced into bodies by thermal gradients.

  19. Transcriptomic Analysis of Thermally Stressed Symbiodinium Reveals Differential Expression of Stress and Metabolism Genes.

    PubMed

    Gierz, Sarah L; Forêt, Sylvain; Leggat, William

    2017-01-01

    Endosymbioses between dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium sp.) and scleractinian coral species form the foundation of coral reef ecosystems. The coral symbiosis is highly susceptible to elevated temperatures, resulting in coral bleaching, where the algal symbiont is released from host cells. This experiment aimed to determine the transcriptional changes in cultured Symbiodinium, to better understand the response of cellular mechanisms under future temperature conditions. Cultures were exposed to elevated temperatures (average 31°C) or control conditions (24.5°C) for a period of 28 days. Whole transcriptome sequencing of Symbiodinium cells on days 4, 19, and 28 were used to identify differentially expressed genes under thermal stress. A large number of genes representing 37.01% of the transcriptome (∼23,654 unique genes, FDR < 0.05) with differential expression were detected at no less than one of the time points. Consistent with previous studies of Symbiodinium gene expression, fold changes across the transcriptome were low, with 92.49% differentially expressed genes at ≤2-fold change. The transcriptional response included differential expression of genes encoding stress response components such as the antioxidant network and molecular chaperones, cellular components such as core photosynthesis machinery, integral light-harvesting protein complexes and enzymes such as fatty acid desaturases. Differential expression of genes encoding glyoxylate cycle enzymes were also found, representing the first report of this in Symbiodinium. As photosynthate transfer from Symbiodinium to coral hosts provides up to 90% of a coral's daily energy requirements, the implications of altered metabolic processes from exposure to thermal stress found in this study on coral-Symbiodinium associations are unknown and should be considered when assessing the stability of the symbiotic relationship under future climate conditions.

  20. Transcriptomic Analysis of Thermally Stressed Symbiodinium Reveals Differential Expression of Stress and Metabolism Genes

    PubMed Central

    Gierz, Sarah L.; Forêt, Sylvain; Leggat, William

    2017-01-01

    Endosymbioses between dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium sp.) and scleractinian coral species form the foundation of coral reef ecosystems. The coral symbiosis is highly susceptible to elevated temperatures, resulting in coral bleaching, where the algal symbiont is released from host cells. This experiment aimed to determine the transcriptional changes in cultured Symbiodinium, to better understand the response of cellular mechanisms under future temperature conditions. Cultures were exposed to elevated temperatures (average 31°C) or control conditions (24.5°C) for a period of 28 days. Whole transcriptome sequencing of Symbiodinium cells on days 4, 19, and 28 were used to identify differentially expressed genes under thermal stress. A large number of genes representing 37.01% of the transcriptome (∼23,654 unique genes, FDR < 0.05) with differential expression were detected at no less than one of the time points. Consistent with previous studies of Symbiodinium gene expression, fold changes across the transcriptome were low, with 92.49% differentially expressed genes at ≤2-fold change. The transcriptional response included differential expression of genes encoding stress response components such as the antioxidant network and molecular chaperones, cellular components such as core photosynthesis machinery, integral light-harvesting protein complexes and enzymes such as fatty acid desaturases. Differential expression of genes encoding glyoxylate cycle enzymes were also found, representing the first report of this in Symbiodinium. As photosynthate transfer from Symbiodinium to coral hosts provides up to 90% of a coral’s daily energy requirements, the implications of altered metabolic processes from exposure to thermal stress found in this study on coral-Symbiodinium associations are unknown and should be considered when assessing the stability of the symbiotic relationship under future climate conditions. PMID:28293249

  1. Large-amplitude internal waves benefit corals during thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Wall, M; Putchim, L; Schmidt, G M; Jantzen, C; Khokiattiwong, S; Richter, C

    2015-01-22

    Tropical scleractinian corals are particularly vulnerable to global warming as elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) disrupt the delicate balance between the coral host and their algal endosymbionts, leading to symbiont expulsion, mass bleaching and mortality. While satellite sensing of SST has proved a reliable predictor of coral bleaching at the regional scale, there are large deviations in bleaching severity and mortality on the local scale that are poorly understood. Here, we show that internal waves play a major role in explaining local coral bleaching and mortality patterns in the Andaman Sea. Despite a severe region-wide SST anomaly in May 2010, frequent upslope intrusions of cold sub-pycnocline waters due to breaking large-amplitude internal waves (LAIW) mitigated coral bleaching and mortality in shallow waters. In LAIW-sheltered waters, by contrast, bleaching-susceptible species suffered severe bleaching and total mortality. These findings suggest that LAIW benefit coral reefs during thermal stress and provide local refugia for bleaching-susceptible corals. LAIW are ubiquitous in tropical stratified waters and their swash zones may thus be important conservation areas for the maintenance of coral diversity in a warming climate. Taking LAIW into account can significantly improve coral bleaching predictions and provide a valuable tool for coral reef conservation and management. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Large-amplitude internal waves benefit corals during thermal stress

    PubMed Central

    Wall, M.; Putchim, L.; Schmidt, G. M.; Jantzen, C.; Khokiattiwong, S.; Richter, C.

    2015-01-01

    Tropical scleractinian corals are particularly vulnerable to global warming as elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) disrupt the delicate balance between the coral host and their algal endosymbionts, leading to symbiont expulsion, mass bleaching and mortality. While satellite sensing of SST has proved a reliable predictor of coral bleaching at the regional scale, there are large deviations in bleaching severity and mortality on the local scale that are poorly understood. Here, we show that internal waves play a major role in explaining local coral bleaching and mortality patterns in the Andaman Sea. Despite a severe region-wide SST anomaly in May 2010, frequent upslope intrusions of cold sub-pycnocline waters due to breaking large-amplitude internal waves (LAIW) mitigated coral bleaching and mortality in shallow waters. In LAIW-sheltered waters, by contrast, bleaching-susceptible species suffered severe bleaching and total mortality. These findings suggest that LAIW benefit coral reefs during thermal stress and provide local refugia for bleaching-susceptible corals. LAIW are ubiquitous in tropical stratified waters and their swash zones may thus be important conservation areas for the maintenance of coral diversity in a warming climate. Taking LAIW into account can significantly improve coral bleaching predictions and provide a valuable tool for coral reef conservation and management. PMID:25473004

  3. Tensile stress and creep in thermally grown oxide.

    PubMed

    Veal, Boyd W; Paulikas, Arvydas P; Hou, Peggy Y

    2006-05-01

    Structural components that operate at high temperatures (for example, turbine blades) rely on thermally grown oxide (TGO), commonly alumina, for corrosion protection. Strains that develop in TGOs during operation can reduce the protectiveness of the TGO. However, the occurrence of growth strains in TGOs, and mechanisms that cause them, are poorly understood. It is accepted that compressive strains can develop as oxygen and metal atoms meet to form new growth within constrained oxide. More controversial is the experimental finding that large tensile stresses, close to 1 GPa, develop during isothermal growth conditions in alumina TGO formed on a FeCrAlY alloy. Using a novel technique based on synchrotron radiation, we have confirmed these previous results, and show that the tensile strain develops as the early oxide, (Fe,Cr,Al)(2)O(3), converts to alpha-Al2O3 during the growth process. This allows us to model the strain behaviour by including creep and this diffusion-controlled phase change.

  4. Boron Proxy Evidence for Ocean Acidification during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoenisch, B.; Penman, D. E.; Zeebe, R. E.; Zachos, J. C.; Thomas, E.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the magnitude and rate of carbon cycle perturbations is key to identifying and interpreting past intervals of ocean acidification. However, paleocean acidification has commonly been inferred from biotic changes, which could have been caused by other environmental changes, including temperature, nutrient supply and oxygenation. Independent geochemical proxy evidence for paleo- seawater pH and carbonate saturation is therefore critical to confirm that ocean acidification did indeed take place, and how severe it was. We focus on the Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum (56 Ma), an extreme climate perturbation that closely resembles worst-case scenarios for the future, in terms of massive carbon release (~4,500 Pg C) as expressed in a global negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE), and associated global warming (5-9°C). We used samples from the central equatorial Pacific to perform high resolution boron isotope and B/Ca analyses in shells of the surface dwelling, symbiont-bearing planktic foraminifer Morozovella velascoensis, to quantify the extent of ocean acidification during this event. We found a significant decrease in values of both proxies, paralleling the CIE, and followed by recovery to pre-event conditions. Onset and duration of the observed geochemical anomalies are similar to carbon cycle model simulations, but the magnitude of both the boron isotope and B/Ca excursions is larger than suggested by the model. Quantification of the pH change is difficult because of a number of uncertainties, including the largely unknown boron isotopic composition of seawater, the baseline-pH prior to the event, temperature and salinity, and the effects of partial dissolution, recrystallization, and potential loss of symbionts. Complementary analyses of M. velascoensis from two sites in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans yield similar results, confirming that diagenesis likely did not bias the records. Using the best possible constraints, we estimate that the ocean

  5. Large-scale stress factors affecting coral reefs: open ocean sea surface temperature and surface seawater aragonite saturation over the next 400 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, K. J.; Lippmann, T.; Sen Gupta, A.

    2012-06-01

    One-third of the world's coral reefs have disappeared over the last 30 years, and a further third is under threat today from various stress factors. The main global stress factors on coral reefs have been identified as changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and changes in surface seawater aragonite saturation (Ωarag). Here, we use a climate model of intermediate complexity, which includes an ocean general circulation model and a fully coupled carbon cycle, in conjunction with present-day observations of inter-annual SST variability to investigate three IPCC representative concentration pathways (RCP 3PD, RCP 4.5, and RCP 8.5), and their impact on the environmental stressors of coral reefs related to open ocean SST and open ocean Ωarag over the next 400 years. Our simulations show that for the RCP 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios, the threshold of 3.3 for zonal and annual mean Ωarag would be crossed in the first half of this century. By year 2030, 66-85% of the reef locations considered in this study would experience severe bleaching events at least once every 10 years. Regardless of the concentration pathway, virtually every reef considered in this study (>97%) would experience severe thermal stress by year 2050. In all our simulations, changes in surface seawater aragonite saturation lead changes in temperatures.

  6. Crustal Thickness Mapping of the Rifted Margin Ocean-Continent Transition using Satellite Gravity Inversion Incorporating a Lithosphere Thermal Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, N. W.; Kusznir, N. J.

    2005-05-01

    A new method of inverting satellite gravity at rifted continental margins to give crustal thickness, incorporating a lithosphere thermal correction, has been developed which does not use a priori information about the location of the ocean-continent transition (OCT) and provides an independent prediction of OCT location. Satellite derived gravity anomaly data (Sandwell and Smith 1997) and bathymetry data (Gebco 2003) are used to derive the mantle residual gravity anomaly which is inverted in 3D in the spectral domain to give Moho depth. Oceanic lithosphere and stretched continental margin lithosphere produce a large negative residual thermal gravity anomaly (up to -380 mgal), which must be corrected for in order to determine Moho depth. This thermal gravity correction may be determined for oceanic lithosphere using oceanic isochron data, and for the thinned continental margin lithosphere using margin rift age and beta stretching estimates iteratively derived from crustal basement thickness determined from the gravity inversion. The gravity inversion using the thermal gravity correction predicts oceanic crustal thicknesses consistent with seismic observations, while that without the thermal correction predicts much too great oceanic crustal thicknesses. Predicted Moho depth and crustal thinning across the Hatton and Faroes rifted margins, using the gravity inversion with embedded thermal correction, compare well with those produced by wide-angle seismology. A new gravity inversion method has been developed in which no isochrons are used to define the thermal gravity correction. The new method assumes all lithosphere to be initially continental and a uniform lithosphere stretching age is used corresponding to the time of continental breakup. The thinning factor produced by the gravity inversion is used to predict the thickness of oceanic crust. This new modified form of gravity inversion with embedded thermal correction provides an improved estimate of rifted

  7. Thermal Gradient-Induced Deflection of a Thick-Walled Cylinder with Bending Residual Stresses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    associated tube bending. Results from the two approaches for a 200"C temperature gradient show a maximum angular displacement of 0.004 to 0.008 deg/m and...the displacement returning to zero as the thermal gradient diminishes with tune. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Thermal Gradient, Thermal Stress...cylinder and bar ......................... 10 5. Change in angular displacement for bar due to moving step thermal gradient ................. 11 6

  8. Assessment of Microbial Fouling in an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Aftring, R. Paul; Taylor, Barrie F.

    1979-01-01

    A project to investigate biofouling, under conditions relevant to ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers, was conducted during July through September 1977 at a site about 13 km north of St. Croix (U.S. Virgin Islands). Seawater was drawn from a depth of 20 m, within the surface mixed layer, through aluminum pipes (2.6 m long, 2.5-cm internal diameter) at flow velocities of about 0.9 and 1.8 m/s. The temperature of the seawater entering the mock heat exchanger units was between 27.8 and 28.6°C. After about 10 weeks of exposure to seawater, when their thermal conductivity was reported to be significantly impaired, the pipes were assayed for the accumulation of biological material on their inner surfaces. The extent of biofouling was very low and independent of flow velocity. Bacterial populations, determined from plate counts, were about 107 cells per cm2. The ranges of mean areal densities for other biological components were: organic carbon, 18 to 27 μg/cm2; organic nitrogen, 1.5 to 3.0 μg/cm2; adenosine 5′-triphosphate, 4 to 28 ng/cm2; carbohydrate (as glucose in the phenol assay), 3.8 to 7.0 μg/cm2; chlorophyll a, 0.2 to 0.8 ng/cm2. It was estimated from the adenosine 5′-triphosphate and nitrogen contents that the layer of live bacteria present after 10 weeks was only of the order of 1μm thick. The C/N ratio of the biological material suggested the presence of extracellular polysaccharidic material. Such compounds, because of their water-retaining capacities, could account for the related increase in thermal resistance associated with the pipes. This possibility merits further investigation, but the current results emphasize the minor degree of biofouling which is likely to be permissible in ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers. Images PMID:16345450

  9. Study of hydraulic air compression for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion open-cycle application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golshani, A.; Chen, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    A hydraulic air compressor, which requires no mechanical moving parts and operates in a nearly isothermal mode, can be an alternative for the noncondensible gas disposal of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) open-cycle power system. The compressor requires only a downward flow of water to accomplish air compression. An air compressor test loop was assembled and operated to obtain test data that would lead to the design of an OTEC hydraulic air compressor. A one dimensional, hydraulic gas compressor, computer model was employed to simulate the laboratory experiments, and it was tuned to fit the test results. A sensitivity study that shows the effects of various parameters on the applied head of the hydraulic air compression is presented.

  10. Integration of ocean thermal energy conversion power plants with existing power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, N.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of integrating an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant with existing power systems is studied. A nonlinear model of an OTEC power system is developed. The dynamics of the large local induction motor load, and the coaxial cable connection to the mainland are included in the model. The effect of the motor load and the coaxial cable on the steady-state stability of the OTEC power plant is investigated using linearized analysis. The transient stability of the OTEC system is investigated through simulation. The contribution made by the motor load and the coaxial cable to the transient stability is studied. The occurrence of self excitation phenomena is analyzed using linear methods and simulation. The effects of wave and vessel motion on the electrical power output of the OTEC plant is investigated.

  11. Sensitivity of Southern Ocean overturning to wind stress changes: Role of surface restoring time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiaoming; Munday, David R.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of different surface restoring time scales on the response of the Southern Ocean overturning circulation to wind stress changes is investigated using an idealised channel model. Regardless of the restoring time scales chosen, the eddy-induced meridional overturning circulation (MOC) is found to compensate for changes of the direct wind-driven Eulerian-mean MOC, rendering the residual MOC less sensitive to wind stress changes. However, the extent of this compensation depends strongly on the restoring time scale: residual MOC sensitivity increases with decreasing restoring time scale. Strong surface restoring is shown to limit the ability of the eddy-induced MOC to change in response to wind stress changes and as such suppresses the eddy compensation effect. These model results are consistent with qualitative arguments derived from residual-mean theory and may have important implications for interpreting past and future observations.

  12. Changes in benthic ecosystems and ocean circulation in the Southeast Atlantic across Eocene Thermal Maximum 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennions, S. M.; Thomas, E.; Schmidt, D. N.; Lunt, D.; Ridgwell, A.

    2015-08-01

    Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2) occurred 1.8 Myr after the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and, like the PETM, was characterized by a negative carbon isotope excursion and warming. We combined benthic foraminiferal and sedimentological records for Southeast Atlantic Sites 1263 (1500 m paleodepth) and 1262 (3600 m paleodepth) to show that benthic foraminiferal diversity and accumulation rates declined more precipitously and severely at the shallower site during peak ETM2. As the sites are in close proximity, differences in surface productivity cannot have caused this differential effect. Instead, we infer that changes in ocean circulation across ETM2 may have produced more pronounced warming at intermediate depths (Site 1263). The effects of warming include increased metabolic rates, a decrease in effective food supply and increased deoxygenation, thus potentially explaining the more severe benthic impacts at Site 1263. In response, bioturbation may have decreased more at Site 1263 than at Site 1262, differentially affecting bulk carbonate records. We use a sediment-enabled Earth system model to test whether a reduction in bioturbation and/or the likely reduced carbonate saturation of more poorly ventilated waters can explain the more extreme excursion in bulk δ13C and sharper transition in wt % CaCO3 at Site 1263. We find that both enhanced acidification and reduced bioturbation during the ETM2 peak are needed to account for the observed features. Our combined ecological and modeling analysis illustrates the potential role of ocean circulation changes in amplifying local environmental changes and driving temporary, but drastic, loss of benthic biodiversity and abundance.

  13. Rapid acidification of the ocean during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum.

    PubMed

    Zachos, James C; Röhl, Ursula; Schellenberg, Stephen A; Sluijs, Appy; Hodell, David A; Kelly, Daniel C; Thomas, Ellen; Nicolo, Micah; Raffi, Isabella; Lourens, Lucas J; McCarren, Heather; Kroon, Dick

    2005-06-10

    The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) has been attributed to the rapid release of approximately 2000 x 10(9) metric tons of carbon in the form of methane. In theory, oxidation and ocean absorption of this carbon should have lowered deep-sea pH, thereby triggering a rapid (<10,000-year) shoaling of the calcite compensation depth (CCD), followed by gradual recovery. Here we present geochemical data from five new South Atlantic deep-sea sections that constrain the timing and extent of massive sea-floor carbonate dissolution coincident with the PETM. The sections, from between 2.7 and 4.8 kilometers water depth, are marked by a prominent clay layer, the character of which indicates that the CCD shoaled rapidly (<10,000 years) by more than 2 kilometers and recovered gradually (>100,000 years). These findings indicate that a large mass of carbon (>2000 x 10(9) metric tons of carbon) dissolved in the ocean at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary and that permanent sequestration of this carbon occurred through silicate weathering feedback.

  14. An assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion as an advanced electric generation methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydt, Gerald T.

    1993-03-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a process that employs the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean water to alternately evaporate and condense a working fluid. In the open-cycle OTEC configuration, the working fluid is seawater. In the closed-cycle configuration, a working fluid such as propane is used. In this paper, OTEC is assessed for its practical merits for electric power generation, and the history of the process is reviewed. Because the OTEC principle operates under a small net temperature difference regime, rather large amounts of seawater and working fluid are required. The energy requirements for pumping these fluids may be greater than the energy recovered from the OTEC engine itself. The concept of net power production is discussed. The components of a typical OTEC plant are discussed with emphasis on the evaporator heat exchanger. Operation of an OTEC electric generating station is discussed, including transient operation. Perhaps the most encouraging aspect of OTEC is the recent experiments and efforts at the Natural Energy Laboratory in Hawaii, which are discussed in the paper. Remarks are made on bottlenecks and the future of OTEC as an advanced electric generation methodology.

  15. An assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion as an advanced electric generation methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Heydt, G.T. . School of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a process that employs the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean water to alternately evaporate and condense a working fluid. In the open-cycle OTEC configuration, the working fluid is seawater. In the closed-cycle configuration, a working fluid such as propane is used. In this paper, OTEC is assessed for its practical merits for electric power generation. The process is not new--and its history is reviewed. Because the OTEC principle operates under a small net temperature difference regime, rather large amounts of seawater and working fluid are required. The energy requirements for pumping these fluids may be greater than the energy recovered from the OTEC engine itself. The concept of net power production is discussed. The components of a typical OTEC plant are discussed with emphasis on the evaporator heat exchanger. Operation of an OTEC electric generating station is discussed, including transient operation. Perhaps the most encouraging aspect of OTEC is the recent experiments and efforts at the Natural Energy Laboratory--Hawaii (NELH). The NELH work is summarized in the paper. Remarks are made on bottlenecks and the future of OTEC as an advanced electric generation methodology.

  16. Convection beneath young oceanic lithosphere - Implications for thermal structure and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, W. R.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    Small-scale convection under the oceanic lithosphere which begins in the first 5 m.y. of cooling can produce a gravity signal with the amplitude and wavelength observed for large areas of the central Pacific and southern Indian oceans using Seasat altimeter data. The trend of the observed anomalies is parallel to the direction of plate motion as might be expected if they were produced by small-scale convection. Models predict that the wavelengths of gravity anomalies increase more rapidly with age than is observed. The persistence of short relatively uniform wavelength anomalies (less than 200 km) to crustal ages of 50 Ma may indicate that they were produced when the lithosphere was very young and thin and were 'frozen in' as cooling thickened the elastic lithosphere. Small-scale convection which begins under very young lithosphere does not violate other geophysical data such as the rate of seafloor subsidence and variations of geoid height with age. After convection has begun, the subsidence due to thermal contraction within the lithosphere varies linearly with age, in the absence of mantle heat sources, although the rate of change of these quantities is affected by convection. Much of the variation of the geoid height across fracture zones can be fit by a model which includes small-scale convection.

  17. Strike-slip earthquakes in the oceanic lithosphere: Observations of exceptionally high apparent stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; McGarr, A.

    2002-01-01

    The radiated energies, Es, and seismic moments, Mo, for 942 globally distributed earthquakes that occurred between 1987 to 1998 are examined to find the earthquakes with the highest apparent stresses (??a = ?? Es/Mo, where ?? is the modulus of rigidity). The globally averaged ??a for shallow earthquakes in all tectonic environments and seismic regions is 0.3 MPa. However, the subset of 49 earthquakes with the highest apparent stresses (??a greater than about 5.0 MPa) is dominated almost exclusively by strike-slip earthquakes that occur in oceanic environments. These earthquakes are all located in the depth range 7-29 km in the upper mantle of the young oceanic lithosphere. Many of these events occur near plate-boundary triple junctions where there appear to be high rates of intraplate deformation. Indeed, the small rapidly deforming Gorda Plate accounts for 10 of the 49 high-??a events. The depth distribution of ??a, which shows peak values somewhat greater than 25 MPa in the depth range 20-25 km, suggests that upper bounds on this parameter are a result of the strength of the oceanic lithosphere. A recently proposed envelope for apparent stress, derived by taking 6 per cent of the strength inferred from laboratory experiments for young (less than 30 Ma) deforming oceanic lithosphere, agrees well with the upper-bound envelope of apparent stresses over the depth range 5-30 km. The corresponding depth-dependent shear strength for young oceanic lithosphere attains a peak value of about 575 MPa at a depth of 21 km and then diminishes rapidly as the depth increases. In addition to their high apparent stresses, which suggest that the strength of the young oceanic lithosphere is highest in the depth range 10-30 km, our set of high-??a earthquakes show other features that constrain the nature of the forces that cause interplate motion. First, our set of events is divided roughly equally between intraplate and transform faulting with similar depth distributions of ??a for

  18. Thermal expansion coefficients of obliquely deposited MgF2 thin films and their intrinsic stress.

    PubMed

    Jaing, Cheng-Chung

    2011-03-20

    This study elucidates the effects of columnar angles and deposition angles on the thermal expansion coefficients and intrinsic stress behaviors of MgF2 films with columnar microstructures. The behaviors associated with temperature-dependent stresses in the MgF2 films are measured using a phase-shifting Twyman-Green interferometer with a heating stage and the application of a phase reduction algorithm. The thermal expansion coefficients of MgF2 films at various columnar angles were larger than those of glass substrates. The intrinsic stress in the MgF2 films with columnar microstructures was compressive, while the thermal stress was tensile. The thermal expansion coefficients of MgF2 films with columnar microstructures and their intrinsic stress evidently depended on the deposition angle and the columnar angle.

  19. A deformation-based parametrization of ocean mesoscale eddy reynolds stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anstey, James A.; Zanna, Laure

    2017-04-01

    Ocean mesoscale eddies strongly affect the strength and variability of large-scale ocean jets such as the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio Extension. Their spatial scales are too small to be fully resolved in many current climate models and hence their effects on the large-scale circulation need to be parametrized. Here we propose a parametrization of mesoscale eddy momentum fluxes based on large-scale flow deformation. The parametrization is argued to be suitable for use in eddy-permitting ocean general circulation models, and is motivated by an analogy between turbulence in Newtonian fluids (such as water) and laminar flow in non-Newtonian fluids. A primitive-equations model in an idealised double-gyre configuration at eddy-resolving horizontal resolution is used to diagnose the relationship between the proposed closure and the eddy fluxes resolved by the model. Favourable correlations suggest the closure could provide an appropriate deterministic parametrization of mesoscale eddies. The relationship between the closure and different representations of the Reynolds stress tensor is also described. The parametrized forcing possesses the key quasi-geostrophic turbulence properties of energy conservation and enstrophy dissipation, and allows for upgradient fluxes leading to the sharpening of vorticity gradients. The implementation of the closure for eddy-permitting ocean models requires only velocity derivatives and a single parameter that scales with model resolution.

  20. Free vibrations of thermally stressed orthotropic plates with various boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.; Greetham, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical investigation of the vibrations of thermally stressed orthotropic plates in the prebuckled region is presented. The investigation covers the broad class of trapezoidal plates with two opposite sides parallel. Each edge of the plate may be subjected to different uniform boundary conditions. variable thickness and arbitrary temperature distributions (analytical or experimental) for any desired combination of boundary conditions may be prescribed. Results obtained using this analysis are compared to experimental results obtained for isotropic plates with thermal stress, and to results contained in the literature for orthotropic plates without thermal stress. Good agreement exists for both sets of comparisons.

  1. Estimates of the contribution of thermal oceanic inertia to the potentials of greenhouse warming caused by freons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karol', I. L.; Iagovkina, S. V.

    1992-07-01

    Model assessments are presented of the contribution of the ocean's thermal inertia to magnitudes of greenhouse potentials and relative greenhouse potentials which characterize the warming of the lower atmosphere caused by the increase of the freon content there. The influence on these estimates of different variants of changes of the greenhouse gas content, gas lifetime, and initial state of the system is considered.

  2. Ocean thermal energy at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, quarterly report. Report for Jan-Mar 82

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The following are included: Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)--OTEC pilot plant conceptual design review; OTEC methanol; review of electrolyzer development programs and requirements; financial and legal considerations in OTEC implementation; potential navy sites for GEOTEC systems; hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: single-cycle performance estimates; and supervision of testing of pneumatic wave energy conversion system.

  3. Effects of Recovery Behavior and Strain-Rate Dependence of Stress-Strain Curve on Prediction Accuracy of Thermal Stress Analysis During Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoyama, Yuichi; Shiga, Hidetoshi; Sato, Takeshi; Kambe, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Makoto

    2017-03-01

    Recovery behavior (recovery) and strain-rate dependence of the stress-strain curve (strain-rate dependence) are incorporated into constitutive equations of alloys to predict residual stress and thermal stress during casting. Nevertheless, few studies have systematically investigated the effects of these metallurgical phenomena on the prediction accuracy of thermal stress in a casting. This study compares the thermal stress analysis results with in situ thermal stress measurement results of an Al-Si-Cu specimen during casting. The results underscore the importance for the alloy constitutive equation of incorporating strain-rate dependence to predict thermal stress that develops at high temperatures where the alloy shows strong strain-rate dependence of the stress-strain curve. However, the prediction accuracy of the thermal stress developed at low temperatures did not improve by considering the strain-rate dependence. Incorporating recovery into the constitutive equation improved the accuracy of the simulated thermal stress at low temperatures. Results of comparison implied that the constitutive equation should include strain-rate dependence to simulate defects that develop from thermal stress at high temperatures, such as hot tearing and hot cracking. Recovery should be incorporated into the alloy constitutive equation to predict the casting residual stress and deformation caused by the thermal stress developed mainly in the low temperature range.

  4. Effects of Recovery Behavior and Strain-Rate Dependence of Stress-Strain Curve on Prediction Accuracy of Thermal Stress Analysis During Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoyama, Yuichi; Shiga, Hidetoshi; Sato, Takeshi; Kambe, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Makoto

    2017-06-01

    Recovery behavior (recovery) and strain-rate dependence of the stress-strain curve (strain-rate dependence) are incorporated into constitutive equations of alloys to predict residual stress and thermal stress during casting. Nevertheless, few studies have systematically investigated the effects of these metallurgical phenomena on the prediction accuracy of thermal stress in a casting. This study compares the thermal stress analysis results with in situ thermal stress measurement results of an Al-Si-Cu specimen during casting. The results underscore the importance for the alloy constitutive equation of incorporating strain-rate dependence to predict thermal stress that develops at high temperatures where the alloy shows strong strain-rate dependence of the stress-strain curve. However, the prediction accuracy of the thermal stress developed at low temperatures did not improve by considering the strain-rate dependence. Incorporating recovery into the constitutive equation improved the accuracy of the simulated thermal stress at low temperatures. Results of comparison implied that the constitutive equation should include strain-rate dependence to simulate defects that develop from thermal stress at high temperatures, such as hot tearing and hot cracking. Recovery should be incorporated into the alloy constitutive equation to predict the casting residual stress and deformation caused by the thermal stress developed mainly in the low temperature range.

  5. Ocean acidification narrows the acute thermal and salinity tolerance of the Sydney rock oyster Saccostrea glomerata.

    PubMed

    Parker, Laura M; Scanes, Elliot; O'Connor, Wayne A; Coleman, Ross A; Byrne, Maria; Pörtner, Hans-O; Ross, Pauline M

    2017-09-15

    Coastal and estuarine environments are characterised by acute changes in temperature and salinity. Organisms living within these environments are adapted to withstand such changes, yet near-future ocean acidification (OA) may challenge their physiological capacity to respond. We tested the impact of CO2-induced OA on the acute thermal and salinity tolerance, energy metabolism and acid-base regulation capacity of the oyster Saccostrea glomerata. Adult S. glomerata were acclimated to three CO2 levels (ambient 380μatm, moderate 856μatm, high 1500μatm) for 5weeks (24°C, salinity 34.6) before being exposed to a series of acute temperature (15-33°C) and salinity (34.2-20) treatments. Oysters acclimated to elevated CO2 showed a significant metabolic depression and extracellular acidosis with acute exposure to elevated temperature and reduced salinity, especially at the highest CO2 of 1500μatm. Our results suggest that the acute thermal and salinity tolerance of S. glomerata and thus its distribution will reduce as OA continues to worsen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion surface-condenser design analysis and computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Rabas, T.J.

    1991-05-01

    This report documents a computer program for designing a surface condenser that condenses low-pressure steam in an ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power plant. The primary emphasis is on the open-cycle (OC) OTEC power system, although the same condenser design can be used for conventional and hybrid cycles because of their highly similar operating conditions. In an OC-OTEC system, the pressure level is very low (deep vacuums), temperature differences are small, and the inlet noncondensable gas concentrations are high. Because current condenser designs, such as the shell-and-tube, are not adequate for such conditions, a plate-fin configuration is selected. This design can be implemented in aluminum, which makes it very cost-effective when compared with other state-of-the-art vacuum steam condenser designs. Support for selecting a plate-fin heat exchanger for OC-OTEC steam condensation can be found in the sizing (geometric details) and rating (heat transfer and pressure drop) calculations presented. These calculations are then used in a computer program to obtain all the necessary thermal performance details for developing design specifications for a plate-fin steam condenser. 20 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. A resource assessment of Southeast Florida as related to ocean thermal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leland, Anna E.

    2009-11-01

    An assessment of the thermal resource in the Straits of Florida was performed to estimate the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) potential. Direct measurements of the temperature profile across the Florida Straits were taken from nearshore Southeast Florida to the Exclusive Economic Zone boundary along four evenly spaced transects perpendicular to Florida's Southeast coast, spanning 160 km. Along the southern transects in summer, nearshore cold and warm water resources meet or exceed the average 20°C temperature difference required for OTEC. In winter, the nearshore average Delta T of 17.76°C can produce 59-75% design net power and 70-86% in spring with DeltaT averaging 18.25°C. Offshore along the southern transects, a high steady DeltaT from 18.5-24°C creates an annual average net power of 120-125MW. Along the northern transects, the nearshore resource does not exist, but a consistent OTEC resource is present offshore, providing 70-80% design net power in winter, and 100-158% in spring and summer.

  8. Seawater test results of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) components

    SciTech Connect

    Zangrando, F.; Bharathan, D.; Link, H. ); Panchal, C.B. )

    1994-01-01

    Key components of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion systems--the flash evaporator, mist eliminator, passive predeaerator, two surface condenser stages, and two direct-contact condenser stages--have been tested using seawater. These components operate at lower steam pressures and higher inlet noncondensable gas concentrations than do conventional power plant heat exchangers. The rate of heat exchanged between the evaporator and the condenser is on the order of 1.25MW-thermal, requiring a warm seawater flow of about 0.1 m[sup 3]/s; the cold seawater flow is on the order of half the warm water flow. In addition to characterizing the performance of the various components, the system has produced potable water from condensation of the steam produced in the evaporator. The information obtained in these tests is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which net power production is expected to be demonstrate for the first time using OC-OTEC technology.

  9. Thermodynamic systems analysis of open-cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, B. K.; Bharathan, D.; Althof, J. A.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes an updated thermal-hydraulic systems analysis program called OTECSYS that studies the integrated performance of an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant, specifically, the effects of component performance, design parameters, and site specific resource data on the total system performance and plant size. OTECSYS can size the various open-cycle power cycle and hydraulic components. Models for the evaporator, mist eliminator, turbine-generator diffuser, direct-contact condenser, exhaust compressors, seawater pumps, and seawater piping are included, as are evaluations of the pressure drops associated with the intercomponent connections. It can also determine the required steam, cold seawater, and warm seawater flow rates. OTECSYS uses an approach similar to earlier work and integrates the most up-to-date developments in component performance and configuration. The program format allows the user to examine subsystem concepts not currently included by creating new component models. It will be useful to the OTEC plant designer who wants to quantify the design point sizing, performance, and power production using site-specific resource data. Detailed design trade-offs are easily evaluated, and several examples of these types of investigations are presented using plant size and power as criteria.

  10. Open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion surface-condenser design analysis and computer program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, C. B.; Rabas, T. J.

    1991-05-01

    This report documents a computer program for designing a surface condenser that condenses low-pressure steam in an ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power plant. The primary emphasis is on the open-cycle (OC) OTEC power system, although the same condenser design can be used for conventional and hybrid cycles because of their highly similar operating conditions. In an OC-OTEC system, the pressure level is very low (deep vacuums), temperature differences are small, and the inlet noncondensable gas concentrations are high. Because current condenser designs, such as the shell-and-tube, are not adequate for such conditions, a plate-fin configuration is selected. This design can be implemented in aluminum, which makes it very cost-effective when compared with other state-of-the-art vacuum steam condenser designs. Support for selecting a plate-fin heat exchanger for OC-OTEC steam condensation can be found in the sizing (geometric details) and rating (heat transfer and pressure drop) calculations presented. These calculations are then used in a computer program to obtain all the necessary thermal performance details for developing design specifications for a plate-fin steam condenser.

  11. Review of electrochemical energy conversion and storage for ocean thermal and wind energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgrebe, A. R.; Donley, S. W.

    A literature review on electrochemical storage techniques related to ocean thermal (OTEC) and wind energy conversion systems (WECS) is presented. Battery use for WECS is foreseen because of siting size, variable capacity, quiet operation, and high efficiency; high cost and the necessity for further input voltage regulation is noted, as are prospects for technology transfer from existing programs for photovoltaic panel battery development. Fuel cells, which can run on hydrogen, ammonia, methanol, naphtha, etc., are encouraging because capacity increases are possible by simple addition of more fuel, and high thermal efficiency. Electrolytic use is seen as a cheap replacement source of electricity for metals refining and brine electrolysis. Systems of energy 'bridges' for OTEC plants, to transmit power to users, are reviewed as redox-flow, lithium-water-air, and aluminum batteries, fuel cells, electrolytic hydrogen, methane, and ammonia production, and the use of OTECs as power sources for floating factories. Directions of future research are indicated, noting that WECS will be in commercial production by 1985, while OTEC is far term, around 2025.

  12. State of stress and age offsets at oceanic fracture zones and implications for subduction initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M. D.; Long, M. D.; Silver, P. G.

    2009-12-01

    The recycling of oceanic lithosphere back into the Earth’s interior through subduction is a central component of plate tectonics. The process by which new subduction zones initiate, however, remains poorly understood. A variety of mechanisms has been proposed by which a new subduction zone might initiate, including passive margin collapse (aided by sediment loading and/or rheological weakening due to the presence of volatiles) and forced convergence across a zone of preexisting lithospheric weakness. In this paper we focus on the latter model, which identifies three conditions necessary for subduction initiation: a zone of weakness such as a fracture zone, an age (and therefore density) offset along the fracture zone, and significant normal compressive stress which leads to shortening. We identify regions on the present-day Earth that meet these conditions and that may correspond to regions of relatively likely subduction initiation in the near future. Using a digital seafloor age model, we have created a database of oceanic fractures and quantified the associated age offsets. We have evaluated the state of stress on these lithospheric weak zones using two different global stress models. We find that the conditions needed to initiate subduction via the forced convergence model are relatively rare on the present-day Earth, and that there is no indication of incipient subduction at regions identified as relatively likely for subduction initiation. Using the same technique, we have evaluated the state of stress and seafloor age offset at regions of inferred present-day incipient subduction, and find that most of these regions are not associated with both high far-field compressive stresses and large age (and thus density) offsets. Subduction has likely initiated via forced convergence across preexisting zones of lithospheric weakness in the past, but our results indicate that the conditions needed for this type of subduction initiation are rare on the present

  13. Thermal stress analysis of eccentric tube receiver using concentrated solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Fuqiang; Shuai, Yong; Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Guo; Tan, Heping

    2010-10-15

    In the parabolic trough concentrator with tube receiver system, the heat transfer fluid flowing through the tube receiver can induce high thermal stress and deflection. In this study, the eccentric tube receiver is introduced with the aim to reduce the thermal stresses of tube receiver. The ray-thermal-structural sequential coupled numerical analyses are adopted to obtain the concentrated heat flux distributions, temperature distributions and thermal stress fields of both the eccentric and concentric tube receivers. During the sequential coupled numerical analyses, the concentrated heat flux distribution on the bottom half periphery of tube receiver is obtained by Monte-Carlo ray tracing method, and the fitting function method is introduced for the calculated heat flux distribution transformation from the Monte-Carlo ray tracing model to the CFD analysis model. The temperature distributions and thermal stress fields are obtained by the CFD and FEA analyses, respectively. The effects of eccentricity and oriented angle variation on the thermal stresses of eccentric tube receiver are also investigated. It is recommended to adopt the eccentric tube receiver with optimum eccentricity and 90 oriented angle as tube receiver for the parabolic trough concentrator system to reduce the thermal stresses. (author)

  14. Microhabitats, thermal heterogeneity, and patterns of physiological stress in the rocky intertidal zone.

    PubMed

    Helmuth, B S; Hofmann, G E

    2001-12-01

    Thermal stress has been considered to be among the most important determinants of organismal distribution in the rocky intertidal zone. Yet our understanding of how body temperatures experienced under field conditions vary in space and time, and of how these temperatures translate into physiological performance, is still rudimentary. We continuously monitored temperatures at a site in central California for a period of two years, using loggers designed to mimic the thermal characteristics of mussels, Mytilus californianus. Model mussel temperatures were recorded on both a horizontal and a vertical, north-facing microsite, and in an adjacent tidepool. We periodically measured levels of heat shock proteins (Hsp70), a measure of thermal stress, from mussels at each microsite. Mussel temperatures were consistently higher on the horizontal surface than on the vertical surface, and differences in body temperature between these sites were reflected in the amount of Hsp70. Seasonal peaks in extreme high temperatures ("acute" high temperatures) did not always coincide with peaks in average daily maxima ("chronic" high temperatures), suggesting that the time history of body temperature may be an important factor in determining levels of thermal stress. Temporal patterns in body temperature during low tide were decoupled from patterns in water temperature, suggesting that water temperature is an ineffective metric of thermal stress for intertidal organisms. This study demonstrates that spatial and temporal variability in thermal stress can be highly complex, and "snapshot" sampling of temperature and biochemical indices may not always be a reliable method for defining thermal stress at a site.

  15. Seawater Circulation and Thermal Sink at OCEAN Ridges - FIELD Evidence in Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A. A.; Boudier, F. I.; Cathles, L. M.; Buck, W. R.; Celerier, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    Exceptionally, the lowermost gabbros in the Oman ophiolite are black and totally fresh, except for minute traces of impregnation by seawater fluids at very high temperature (~1000°C). These black gabbros sharply contrast with normal, whitish gabbros altered down to Low-T~500-350°C. These hydrous alterations are ascribed to an unconventional model of seawater circulation and cooling of the permanent magma chambers of fast spreading ocean ridges. In this model, gabbros issued from the magma chamber cross a ~100 m thick thermal boundary layer (TBL) before reaching a narrow, Low-T high permeability channel where the heated return seawater is flowing towards black smokers and the local gabbros are altered. Uprising mantle diapirs in Oman diverge at ~5 km on each side of the palaeo-ridge axis and feed an overlying magma chamber that closes at this distance from axis. Preservation of black gabbros along the Moho implies that the loop of seawater alteration locally does not reach Moho beyond this ~5km distance (otherwise black gabbros would be altered in whitish gabbros). This defines an internal "thermal sink" within ~5 km to the ridge axis. There, the sink is efficiently cooled by the active hydrothermal convection that is ridge transverse. This has been documented near the Galapagos ridge by marine geophysical data, within the same distance. Beyond this critical distance, the cooling system becomes dominantly conductive and ridge-parallel. The TBL and attached return flow channels must be rising into the overcooled, accreted crust. Beyond the thermal sink, the 500°C isotherm rebounds into the crust. It is only after ~ 1My of crustal drift that this isotherm penetrates into the uppermost mantle in a sustained fashion, developing serpentinites at the expense of peridotites.

  16. How thermal stress alters the confinement of polymers vitrificated in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Teng, Chao; Li, Linling; Wang, Yong; Wang, Rong; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xiaoliang; Xue, Gi

    2017-05-28

    Understanding and controlling the glass transition temperature (Tg) and dynamics of polymers in confined geometries are of significance in both academia and industry. Here, we investigate how the thermal stress induced by a mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion affects the Tg behavior of polystyrene (PS) nanorods located inside cylindrical alumina nanopores. The size effects and molecular weight dependence of the Tg are also studied. A multi-step relaxation process was employed to study the relationship between thermal stress and cooling rate. At fast cooling rates, the imparted thermal stress would overcome the yield stress of PS and peel chains off the pore walls, while at slow cooling rates, chains are kept in contact with the pore walls due to timely dissipation of the produced thermal stress during vitrification. In smaller nanopores, more PS chains closely contact with pore walls, then stronger internal thermal stress would be generated between core and shell of PS nanorod, which results in a larger deviation between two Tgs. The core part of PS shows lower Tg than bulk value, which can induce faster dynamics in the center region. A complex and important role stress plays is supposed in complex confinement condition, e.g., in nanopores, during vitrification.

  17. How thermal stress alters the confinement of polymers vitrificated in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chao; Li, Linling; Wang, Yong; Wang, Rong; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xiaoliang; Xue, Gi

    2017-05-01

    Understanding and controlling the glass transition temperature (Tg) and dynamics of polymers in confined geometries are of significance in both academia and industry. Here, we investigate how the thermal stress induced by a mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion affects the Tg behavior of polystyrene (PS) nanorods located inside cylindrical alumina nanopores. The size effects and molecular weight dependence of the Tg are also studied. A multi-step relaxation process was employed to study the relationship between thermal stress and cooling rate. At fast cooling rates, the imparted thermal stress would overcome the yield stress of PS and peel chains off the pore walls, while at slow cooling rates, chains are kept in contact with the pore walls due to timely dissipation of the produced thermal stress during vitrification. In smaller nanopores, more PS chains closely contact with pore walls, then stronger internal thermal stress would be generated between core and shell of PS nanorod, which results in a larger deviation between two Tgs. The core part of PS shows lower Tg than bulk value, which can induce faster dynamics in the center region. A complex and important role stress plays is supposed in complex confinement condition, e.g., in nanopores, during vitrification.

  18. Bioenergetic response by steelhead to variation in diet, thermal habitat, and climate in the north Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atcheson, Margaret E.; Myers, Katherine W.; Beauchamp, David A.; Mantua, Nathan J.

    2012-01-01

    Energetic responses of steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss to climate-driven changes in marine conditions are expected to affect the species’ ocean distribution, feeding, growth, and survival. With a unique 18-year data series (1991–2008) for steelhead sampled in the open ocean, we simulated interannual variation in prey consumption and growth efficiency of steelhead using a bioenergetics model to evaluate the temperature-dependent growth response of steelhead to past climate events and to estimate growth potential of steelhead under future climate scenarios. Our results showed that annual ocean growth of steelhead is highly variable depending on prey quality, consumption rates, total consumption, and thermal experience. At optimal growing temperatures, steelhead can compensate for a low-energy diet by increasing consumption rates and consuming more prey, if available. Our findings suggest that steelhead have a narrow temperature window in which to achieve optimal growth, which is strongly influenced by climate-driven changes in ocean temperature.

  19. On plane stress state and stress free deformation of thick plate with FGM interface under thermal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szubartowski, Damian; Ganczarski, Artur

    2016-10-01

    This paper demonstrates the plane stress state and the stress free thermo-elastic deformation of FGM thick plate under thermal loading. First, the Sneddon-Lockett theorem on the plane stress state in an isotropic infinite thick plate is generalized for a case of FGM problem in which all thermo-mechanical properties are optional functions of depth co-ordinate. The proof is based on application of the Iljushin thermo-elastic potential to displacement type system of equations that reduces it to the plane stress state problem. Then an existence of the purely thermal deformation is proved in two ways: first, it is shown that the unique solution fulfils conditions of simultaneous constant temperature and linear gradation of thermal expansion coefficient, second, proof is based directly on stress type system of equations which straightforwardly reduces to compatibility equations for purely thermal deformation if only stress field is homogeneous in domain and at boundary. Finally, couple examples of application to an engineering problem are presented.

  20. Thermal stress analysis of the NASA Dryden hypersonic wing test structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Present interest in hypersonic vehicles has resulted in a renewed interest in thermal stress analysis of airframe structures. While there are numerous texts and papers on thermal stress analysis, practical examples and experience on light gage aircraft structures are fairly limited. A research program has been undertaken at General Dynamics to demonstrate the present state of the art, verify methods of analysis, gain experience in their use, and develop engineering judgement in thermal stress analysis. The approach for this project has been to conduct a series of analyses of this sample problem and compare analysis results with test data. This comparison will give an idea of how to use our present methods of thermal stress analysis, and how accurate we can expect them to be.

  1. Micromechanics analysis of space simulated thermal deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Space simulated thermally induced deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites were investigated with a micromechanics analysis. The investigation focused on two primary areas. First, available explicit expressions for predicting the effective coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) for a composite were compared with each other, and with a finite element (FE) analysis, developed specifically for this study. Analytical comparisons were made for a wide range of fiber/matrix systems, and predicted values were compared with experimental data. The second area of investigation focused on the determination of thermally induced stress fields in the individual constituents. Stresses predicted from the FE analysis were compared to those predicted from a closed-form solution to the composite cylinder (CC) model, for two carbon fiber/epoxy composites. A global-local formulation, combining laminated plate theory and FE analysis, was used to determine the stresses in multidirectional laminates. Thermally induced damage initiation predictions were also made.

  2. Thermal stress analysis of the NASA Dryden hypersonic wing test structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Present interest in hypersonic vehicles has resulted in a renewed interest in thermal stress analysis of airframe structures. While there are numerous texts and papers on thermal stress analysis, practical examples and experience on light gage aircraft structures are fairly limited. A research program has been undertaken at General Dynamics to demonstrate the present state of the art, verify methods of analysis, gain experience in their use, and develop engineering judgement in thermal stress analysis. The approach for this project has been to conduct a series of analyses of this sample problem and compare analysis results with test data. This comparison will give an idea of how to use our present methods of thermal stress analysis, and how accurate we can expect them to be.

  3. SO(2) protects the amino nitrogen metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Ancín-Azpilicueta, Carmen; Barriuso-Esteban, Blanca; Nieto-Rojo, Rodrigo; Aristizábal-López, Nerea

    2012-09-01

    Thermal stress conditions during alcoholic fermentation modify yeasts' plasma membrane since they become more hyperfluid, which results in a loss of bilayer integrity. In this study, the influence of elevated temperatures on nitrogen metabolism of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain was studied, as well as the effect of different concentrations of SO(2) on nitrogen metabolism under thermal stress conditions. The results obtained revealed that amino nitrogen consumption was lower in the fermentation sample subjected to thermal stress than in the control, and differences in amino acid consumption preferences were also detected, especially at the beginning of the fermentation. Under thermal stress conditions, among the three doses of SO(2) studied (0, 35, 70 mg l(-1) SO(2) ), the highest dose was observed to favour amino acid utilization during the fermentative process, whereas sugar consumption presented higher rates at medium doses.

  4. Reducing thermal mismatch stress in anodically bonded silicon-glass wafers: theoretical estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, Leonid S.; Ryabov, Vladimir T.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the theoretical study and estimations of thermal mismatch stress reduction in anodically bonded silicon-glass stacks by justifiable selection of bonding temperature and glass thickness. This can be done only after prior thorough study of temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion coefficient of the glass and silicon to be used. We show by analyzing such a dependence of several glass brands that the usual idea of decreasing the bonding process temperature as a solution to the thermal mismatch stress problem can be a failure. Interchanging glass brands during device design is shown to produce very contrasting changes in residual stresses. These results are in good agreement with finite-element modeling. This paper reports there is proportion between glass and silicon wafer thicknesses minimizing thermal mismatch stress at unbonded side of the silicon independently of the bonding or working temperatures chosen.

  5. Temperature and thermal stress evolutions in sapphire crystal during the cooling process by heat exchanger method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wencheng; Zhao, Wenhan; Wu, Ming; Ding, Guoqiang; Liu, Lijun

    2017-09-01

    Transient numerical calculations were carried out to predict the evolutions of temperature and thermal stress in sapphire single crystal during the cooling process by heat exchanger method (HEM). Internal radiation in the semitransparent sapphire crystal was taken into account using the finite volume method (FVM) in the global heat transfer model. The numerical results seem to indicate that the narrow bottom region of the sapphire crystal is subjected to high thermal stress during the cooling process, which could be responsible for the seed cracking of the as-grown crystal, while the thermal stress is relatively small in the central main body of the crystal, and is less than 10 MPa during the whole cooling process. The fast decrease of the thermal stress in the bottom region of the crystal during the initial stage of cooling process is dominated by the reduction of the cooling helium gas in the heat exchanger shaft, and is not significantly affected by the heating power reduction rate.

  6. Thermal stresses in the laser disc from a tetragonal c-cut crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumashev, K. V.; Loiko, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Analytical expressions for thermal stresses and strains, as well as displacements, are obtained for the laser disc from a tetragonal crystal cut along the [0 0 1] axis under plane stress approximation, for the first time, to our knowledge. This study illustrates that, in polar coordinates, the normal stresses, σr and σθ, are angular independent, while the shear one τrθ is zero. The thermal strains, εr and εθ, and displacements, u and υ, depend on both radial and tangential coordinates; this dependence has the shape of a four-leaf rose. For considered crystal cutting with isotropic in-plane thermal expansion, the displacements are not pure radial (υ≠0). The values of stresses, strains and displacements are calculated for the disc from a c-cut yttrium vanadate laser crystal, Nd:YVO4. The thermal fracture issues are analyzed for this crystal.

  7. Study on Stress Development in the Phase Transition Layer of Thermal Barrier Coatings.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yijun; Lin, Chen; Wang, Xian; Li, Yueming

    2016-09-13

    Stress development is one of the significant factors leading to the failure of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. In this work, stress development in the two phase mixed zone named phase transition layer (PTL), which grows between the thermally grown oxide (TGO) and the bond coat (BC), is investigated by using two different homogenization models. A constitutive equation of the PTL based on the Reuss model is proposed to study the stresses in the PTL. The stresses computed with the proposed constitutive equation are compared with those obtained with Voigt model-based equation in detail. The stresses based on the Voigt model are slightly higher than those based on the Reuss model. Finally, a further study is carried out to explore the influence of phase transition proportions on the stress difference caused by homogenization models. Results show that the stress difference becomes more evident with the increase of the PTL thickness ratio in the TGO.

  8. Regulation of bovine pyruvate carboxylase mRNA and promoter expression by thermal stress.

    PubMed

    White, H M; Koser, S L; Donkin, S S

    2012-09-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in gluconeogenesis from lactate and is a determinant of tricarboxylic acid cycle carbon flux. Bovine PC 5' untranslated region (UTR) mRNA variants are the products of a single PC gene containing 3 promoter regions (P3, P2, and P1, 5' to 3') that are responsive to physiological and nutritional stressors. The objective of this study was to determine the direct effects of thermal stress on PC mRNA and gene expression in bovine hepatocyte monolayer cultures, rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells, and Madin-Darby bovine kidney epithelial (MDBK) cells. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3 Holstein bull calves and used to prepare monolayer cultures. Rat hepatoma cells and MDBK cells were obtained from American Type Culture Collection, Manassas, VA. Beginning 24 h after initial seeding, cells were subjected to either 37°C (control) or 42°C (thermal stress) for 24 h. Treatments were applied in triplicate in a minimum of 3 independent cell preparations. For bovine primary hepatocytes, endogenous expression of bovine PC mRNA increased (P < 0.1) with 24 h of thermal stress (1.31 vs. 2.79 ± 0.49, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively), but there was no change (P ≥ 0.1) in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) mRNA expression. Similarly, exposure of MDBK cells to thermal stress increased (P < 0.1) expression of bovine PC mRNA without altering (P ≥ 0.1) PEPCK-C mRNA expression. Conversely, there was no effect (P ≥ 0.1) of thermal stress on endogenous rat PC (0.47 vs. 0.30 ± 0.08, control vs. thermal stress) or PEPCK-C (1.61 vs. 1.20 ± 0.48, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively) mRNA expressions in H4IIE cells. To further investigate the regulation of PC, H4IIE cells were transiently transfected with bovine promoter-luciferase constructs containing either P1, P2, or P3, and exposed to thermal stress for 23 h. Activity of P1 was suppressed (P < 0.1) 5-fold, activity of P2

  9. Thermal-stress modeling of an optical microphone at high temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, Casey Anderson

    2010-08-01

    To help determine the capability range of a MEMS optical microphone design in harsh conditions computer simulations were carried out. Thermal stress modeling was performed up to temperatures of 1000 C. Particular concern was over stress and strain profiles due to the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the polysilicon device and alumina packaging. Preliminary results with simplified models indicate acceptable levels of deformation within the device.

  10. Finite element modeling of the effect of interface anomalies on thermal stresses in alumina scales

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.K.; Williamson, R.L.; Hou, P.Y.; Cannon, R.M.; Renusch, D.; Veal, B.; Grimsditch, M.

    1998-07-01

    The scales that grow from oxidation often develop a convoluted morphology or interface pores. High thermal stresses can develop locally and are potentially detrimental to the scale or interface integrity. Finite element simulations are used to examine residual thermal stresses and strains that result when these deviations from a flat interface have formed, and the resulting geometry is subsequently cooled to room temperature. A variety of geometries will be considered for alumina scales on a FeCrAl substrate.

  11. Finite element modeling of the effect of interface anomalies on thermal stresses in alumina scales.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. K.

    1998-06-10

    The scales that grow from oxidation often develop a convoluted morphology or interface pores. High thermal stresses can develop locally and are potentially detrimental to the scale or interface integrity. Finite element simulations are used to examine residual thermal stresses and strains that result when these deviations from a flat interface have formed, and the resulting geometry is subsequently cooled to room temperature. A variety of geometries will be considered for alumina scales on a FeCrAl substrate.

  12. Effect of Thermal Annealing on Machining-Induced Residual Stresses in Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madariaga, A.; Aperribay, J.; Arrazola, P. J.; Esnaola, J. A.; Hormaetxe, E.; Garay, A.; Ostolaza, K.

    2017-08-01

    Nickel-based alloys are widely employed in the manufacturing of aero-engines. These alloys are difficult to machine, and tensile residual stresses are generated during machining. These tensile residual stresses can negatively affect the performance of aero-engine components. Nevertheless, residual stresses can vary due to thermal or mechanical loading. These variations must be considered to evaluate the real influence of residual stresses on component behavior. This paper studies the effect of thermal loads on machining-induced residual stresses in the alloy Inconel 718. A ring-shaped Inconel 718 part was face-turned, and specimens were extracted from it. Specimens were exposed at 550 and 650 °C for 10 min, 1 and 10 h. Residual stresses were measured, and microstructure was observed before and after thermal exposure. Residual stress variations found after thermal exposure were the consequence of two factors: relaxation of strain bands during the early stage of exposure and diffusion-controlled creep. In addition, a modified Zener-Wert-Avrami model is proposed to predict residual stress relaxation caused by the diffusion-controlled creep. Once having fitted the modified Zener-Wert-Avrami model, the study was extended for a wider range of temperatures (400-650 °C). This analysis showed that surface residual stresses do not relax significantly at temperatures below 500 °C.

  13. Determination of Creep Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Laser Imposed High Thermal and Stress Gradient Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    A laser sintering/creep technique has been established to determine the creep behavior of thermal barrier coatings under steady-state high heat flux conditions. For a plasma sprayed zirconia-8 wt. % yttria coating, a significant primary creep strain and a low apparent creep activation energy were observed. Possible creep mechanisms involved include stress induced mechanical sliding and temperature and stress enhanced cation diffusion through the splat and grain boundaries. The elastic modulus evolution, stress response, and total accumulated creep strain variation across the ceramic coating are simulated using a finite difference approach. The modeled creep response is consistent with experimental observations.

  14. Assessing Cumulative Thermal Stress in Fish During Chronic Exposure to High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bevelhimer, M.S.; Bennett, W.R.

    1999-11-14

    As environmental laws become increasingly protective, and with possible future changes in global climate, thermal effects on aquatic resources are likely to receive increasing attention. Lethal temperatures for a variety of species have been determined for situations where temperatures rise rapidly resulting in lethal effects. However, less is known about the effects of chronic exposure to high (but not immediately lethal) temperatures and even less about stress accumulation during periods of fluctuating temperatures. In this paper we present a modeling framework for assessing cumulative thermal stress in fish. The model assumes that stress accumulation occurs above a threshold temperature at a rate depending on the degree to which the threshold is exceeded. The model also includes stress recovery (or alleviation) when temperatures drop below the threshold temperature as in systems with large daily variation. In addition to non-specific physiological stress, the model also simulates thermal effects on growth.

  15. Tasco(®), a product of Ascophyllum nodosum, imparts thermal stress tolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Saveetha; Fan, Di; Sangha, Jatinder Singh; Khan, Wajahatullah; Evans, Franklin; Critchley, Alan T; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Tasco(®), a commercial product manufactured from the brown alga Ascophyllum nodosum, has been shown to impart thermal stress tolerance in animals. We investigated the physiological, biochemical and molecular bases of this induced thermal stress tolerance using the invertebrate animal model, Caenorhabiditis elegans. Tasco(®) water extract (TWE) at 300 μg/mL significantly enhanced thermal stress tolerance as well as extended the life span of C. elegans. The mean survival rate of the model animals under thermal stress (35 °C) treated with 300 μg/mL and 600 μg/mL TWE, respectively, was 68% and 71% higher than the control animals. However, the TWE treatments did not affect the nematode body length, fertility or the cellular localization of daf-16. On the contrary, TWE under thermal stress significantly increased the pharyngeal pumping rate in treated animals compared to the control. Treatment with TWE also showed differential protein expression profiles over control following 2D gel-electrophoresis analysis. Furthermore, TWE significantly altered the expression of at least 40 proteins under thermal stress; among these proteins 34 were up-regulated while six were down-regulated. Mass spectroscopy analysis of the proteins altered by TWE treatment revealed that these proteins were related to heat stress tolerance, energy metabolism and a muscle structure related protein. Among them heat shock proteins, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, saposin-like proteins 20, myosin regulatory light chain 1, cytochrome c oxidase RAS-like, GTP-binding protein RHO A, OS were significantly up-regulated, while eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A-1 OS, 60S ribosomal protein L18 OS, peroxiredoxin protein 2 were down regulated by TWE treatment. These results were further validated by gene expression and reporter gene expression analyses. Overall results indicate that the water soluble components of Tasco(®) imparted thermal stress tolerance in

  16. Moderate Thermal Stress Causes Active and Immediate Expulsion of Photosynthetically Damaged Zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium) from Corals

    PubMed Central

    Fujise, Lisa; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Go; Sasaki, Kengo; Liao, Lawrence M.; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The foundation of coral reef biology is the symbiosis between corals and zooxanthellae (dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium). Recently, coral bleaching, which often results in mass mortality of corals and the collapse of coral reef ecosystems, has become an important issue around the world as coral reefs decrease in number year after year. To understand the mechanisms underlying coral bleaching, we maintained two species of scleractinian corals (Acroporidae) in aquaria under non-thermal stress (27°C) and moderate thermal stress conditions (30°C), and we compared the numbers and conditions of the expelled Symbiodinium from these corals. Under non-thermal stress conditions corals actively expel a degraded form of Symbiodinium, which are thought to be digested by their host coral. This response was also observed at 30°C. However, while the expulsion rates of Symbiodinium cells remained constant, the proportion of degraded cells significantly increased at 30°C. This result indicates that corals more actively digest and expel damaged Symbiodinium under thermal stress conditions, likely as a mechanism for coping with environmental change. However, the increase in digested Symbiodinium expulsion under thermal stress may not fully keep up with accumulation of the damaged cells. There are more photosynthetically damaged Symbiodinium upon prolonged exposure to thermal stress, and corals release them without digestion to prevent their accumulation. This response may be an adaptive strategy to moderate stress to ensure survival, but the accumulation of damaged Symbiodinium, which causes subsequent coral deterioration, may occur when the response cannot cope with the magnitude or duration of environmental stress, and this might be a possible mechanism underlying coral bleaching during prolonged moderate thermal stress. PMID:25493938

  17. Tasco®, a Product of Ascophyllum nodosum, Imparts Thermal Stress Tolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Saveetha; Fan, Di; Sangha, Jatinder Singh; Khan, Wajahatullah; Evans, Franklin; Critchley, Alan T.; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Tasco®, a commercial product manufactured from the brown alga Ascophyllum nodosum, has been shown to impart thermal stress tolerance in animals. We investigated the physiological, biochemical and molecular bases of this induced thermal stress tolerance using the invertebrate animal model, Caenorhabiditis elegans. Tasco® water extract (TWE) at 300 μg/mL significantly enhanced thermal stress tolerance as well as extended the life span of C. elegans. The mean survival rate of the model animals under thermal stress (35 °C) treated with 300 μg/mL and 600 μg/mL TWE, respectively, was 68% and 71% higher than the control animals. However, the TWE treatments did not affect the nematode body length, fertility or the cellular localization of daf-16. On the contrary, TWE under thermal stress significantly increased the pharyngeal pumping rate in treated animals compared to the control. Treatment with TWE also showed differential protein expression profiles over control following 2D gel-electrophoresis analysis. Furthermore, TWE significantly altered the expression of at least 40 proteins under thermal stress; among these proteins 34 were up-regulated while six were down-regulated. Mass spectroscopy analysis of the proteins altered by TWE treatment revealed that these proteins were related to heat stress tolerance, energy metabolism and a muscle structure related protein. Among them heat shock proteins, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, saposin-like proteins 20, myosin regulatory light chain 1, cytochrome c oxidase RAS-like, GTP-binding protein RHO A, OS were significantly up-regulated, while eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A-1 OS, 60S ribosomal protein L18 OS, peroxiredoxin protein 2 were down regulated by TWE treatment. These results were further validated by gene expression and reporter gene expression analyses. Overall results indicate that the water soluble components of Tasco® imparted thermal stress tolerance in the C

  18. Moderate Thermal Stress Causes Active and Immediate Expulsion of Photosynthetically Damaged Zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium) from Corals.

    PubMed

    Fujise, Lisa; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Go; Sasaki, Kengo; Liao, Lawrence M; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The foundation of coral reef biology is the symbiosis between corals and zooxanthellae (dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium). Recently, coral bleaching, which often results in mass mortality of corals and the collapse of coral reef ecosystems, has become an important issue around the world as coral reefs decrease in number year after year. To understand the mechanisms underlying coral bleaching, we maintained two species of scleractinian corals (Acroporidae) in aquaria under non-thermal stress (27°C) and moderate thermal stress conditions (30°C), and we compared the numbers and conditions of the expelled Symbiodinium from these corals. Under non-thermal stress conditions corals actively expel a degraded form of Symbiodinium, which are thought to be digested by their host coral. This response was also observed at 30°C. However, while the expulsion rates of Symbiodinium cells remained constant, the proportion of degraded cells significantly increased at 30°C. This result indicates that corals more actively digest and expel damaged Symbiodinium under thermal stress conditions, likely as a mechanism for coping with environmental change. However, the increase in digested Symbiodinium expulsion under thermal stress may not fully keep up with accumulation of the damaged cells. There are more photosynthetically damaged Symbiodinium upon prolonged exposure to thermal stress, and corals release them without digestion to prevent their accumulation. This response may be an adaptive strategy to moderate stress to ensure survival, but the accumulation of damaged Symbiodinium, which causes subsequent coral deterioration, may occur when the response cannot cope with the magnitude or duration of environmental stress, and this might be a possible mechanism underlying coral bleaching during prolonged moderate thermal stress.

  19. The role of farfield tectonic stress in oceanic intraplate deformation, Gulf of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reece, Robert S.; Gulick, Sean P. S.; Christesen, Gail L.; Horton, Brian K.; VanAvendonk, Harm J.; Barth, Ginger

    2013-01-01

    An integration of geophysical data from the Pacific Plate reveals plate bending anomalies, massive intraplate shearing and deformation, and a lack of oceanic crust magnetic lineaments in different regions across the Gulf of Alaska. We argue that farfield stress from the Yakutat Terrane collision with North America is the major driver for these unusual features. Similar plate motion vectors indicate that the Pacific plate and Yakutat Terrane are largely coupled along their boundary, the Transition Fault, with minimal translation. Our study shows that the Pacific Plate subduction angle shallows toward the Yakutat Terrane and supports the theory that the Pacific Plate and Yakutat Terranemaintain coupling along the subducted region of the Transition Fault. We argue that the outboard transfer of collisional stress to the Pacific Plate could have resulted in significant strain in the NE corner of the Pacific Plate, which created pathways for igneous sill formation just above the Pacific Plate crust in the Surveyor Fan. A shift in Pacific Plate motion during the late Miocene altered the Yakutat collision with North America, changing the stress transfer regime and potentially terminating associated strain in the NE corner of the Pacific Plate. The collision further intensified as the thickest portion of the Yakutat Terrane began to subduct during the Pleistocene, possibly providing the impetus for the creation of the Gulf of Alaska Shear Zone, a>200 km zone of intraplate strike-slip faults that extend from the Transition Fault out into the Pacific Plate. This study highlights the importance of farfield stress from complex tectonic regimes in consideration of large-scale oceanic intraplate deformation.

  20. Tracking Stress and Hydrothermal Activity Along Oceanic Spreading Centers Using Tomographic Images of Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, R. A.; Conder, J. A.; Canales, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Marine controlled-source seismic tomography experiments now utilize 50+ ocean-bottom seismographs and source grids consisting of many tens of seismic lines with <500 m shot spacing. These dense experiments focus on the upper 10 km of the lithosphere over areas approaching 9000 sq-km. Because of the dense sampling and large azimuthal coverage of ray paths (200,000+ travel time measurements possible), it is now feasible to solve for 3-D images of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy with resolving lengths approaching 1km. Recent examples include the L-SCAN and MARINER experiments, performed at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Mid-Atlantic Ridge (36N), respectively. In each case, background anisotropy of ~4% is found in the upper 3-4 km of lithosphere and is consistent with pervasive stress-aligned cracks and microcracks. The fast axes are generally oriented parallel to the trend of the spreading center, as expected for cracks that form in association with seafloor spreading. Three-dimensional images of anisotropy magnitude and orientation reveal variations interpreted as arising from changes in the ambient stress field. Near the ends of ridge segments, where the ridge axis jumps from one spreading center to the next, anisotropy is high with orientations that are out of alignment relative to the background trend. This agrees with numerical models and seafloor morphology that suggest tensile stress concentration and brittle crack formation in these areas. Anisotropy also increases in areas along the ridges where the underlying magma supply and hydrothermal output are greater. This is opposite the trend expected if simple tectonic stress models govern anisotropy. Increased hydrothermal activity, due to increased magma supply, can explain higher anisotropy via increased pore pressure and hydrofracturing. These studies provide the first evidence that images of seismic anisotropy can be used to map variations in hydrologic activity along the crests of oceanic spreading centers.

  1. A comparison of measured and calculated thermal stresses in a hybrid metal matrix composite spar cap element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Taylor, A. H.; Sakata, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid spar of titanium with an integrally brazed composite, consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with boron-carbide-coated fibers, was heated in an oven and the resulting thermal stresses were measured. Uniform heating of the spar in an oven resulted in thermal stresses arising from the effects of dissimilar materials and anisotropy of the metal matrix composite. Thermal stresses were calculated from a finite element structural model using anisotropic material properties deduced from constituent properties and rules of mixtures. Comparisons of calculated thermal stresses with measured thermal stresses on the spar are presented. It was shown that failure to account for anisotropy in the metal matrix composite elements would result in large errors in correlating measured and calculated thermal stresses. It was concluded that very strong material characterization efforts are required to predict accurate thermal stresses in anisotropic composite structures.

  2. Scaling Relations for the Thermal Structure of Segmented Oceanic Transform Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson-Schwehr, M.; Boettcher, M. S.; Behn, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridge-transform faults (RTFs) are a natural laboratory for studying strike-slip earthquake behavior due to their relatively simple geometry, well-constrained slip rates, and quasi-periodic seismic cycles. However, deficiencies in our understanding of the limited size of the largest RTF earthquakes are due, in part, to not considering the effect of short intra-transform spreading centers (ITSCs) on fault thermal structure. We use COMSOL Multiphysics to run a series of 3D finite element simulations of segmented RTFs with visco-plastic rheology. The models test a range of RTF segment lengths (L = 10-150 km), ITSC offset lengths (O = 1-30 km), and spreading rates (V = 2-14 cm/yr). The lithosphere and upper mantle are approximated as steady-state, incompressible flow. Coulomb failure incorporates brittle processes in the lithosphere, and a temperature-dependent flow law for dislocation creep of olivine activates ductile deformation in the mantle. ITSC offsets as small as 2 km affect the thermal structure underlying many segmented RTFs, reducing the area above the 600˚C isotherm, A600, and thus the size of the largest expected earthquakes, Mc. We develop a scaling relation for the critical ITSC offset length, OC, which significantly reduces the thermal affect of adjacent fault segments of length L1 and L2. OC is defined as the ITSC offset that results in an area loss ratio of R = (Aunbroken - Acombined)/Aunbroken - Adecoupled) = 63%, where Aunbroken = C600(L1+L2)1.5V-0.6 is A600 for an RTF of length L1 + L2; Adecoupled = C600(L11.5+L21.5)V-0.6 is the combined A600 of RTFs of lengths L1 and L2, respectively; and Acombined = Aunbroken exp(-O/ OC) + Adecoupled (1-exp(-O/ OC)). C600 is a constant. We use OC and kinematic fault parameters (L1, L2, O, and V) to develop a scaling relation for the approximate seismogenic area, Aseg, for each segment of a RTF system composed of two fault segments. Finally, we estimate the size of Mc on a fault segment based on Aseg. We

  3. Effects of melatonin on the proliferation and apoptosis of sheep granulosa cells under thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; He, Chang-Jiu; Ji, Peng-Yun; Zhuo, Zhi-Yong; Tian, Xiu-Zhi; Wang, Feng; Tan, Dun-Xian; Liu, Guo-Shi

    2014-11-14

    The cross-talk between oocyte and somatic cells plays a crucial role in the regulation of follicular development and oocyte maturation. As a result, granulosa cell apoptosis causes follicular atresia. In this study, sheep granulosa cells were cultured under thermal stress to induce apoptosis, and melatonin (MT) was examined to evaluate its potential effects on heat-induced granulosa cell injury. The results demonstrated that the Colony Forming Efficiency (CFE) of granulosa cells was significantly decreased (heat 19.70% ± 1.29% vs. control 26.96% ± 1.81%, p < 0.05) and the apoptosis rate was significantly increased (heat 56.16% ± 13.95% vs. control 22.80% ± 12.16%, p < 0.05) in granulosa cells with thermal stress compared with the control group. Melatonin (10⁻⁷ M) remarkably reduced the negative effects caused by thermal stress in the granulosa cells. This reduction was indicated by the improved CFE and decreased apoptotic rate of these cells. The beneficial effects of melatonin on thermal stressed granulosa cells were not inhibited by its membrane receptor antagonist luzindole. A mechanistic exploration indicated that melatonin (10⁻⁷ M) down-regulated p53 and up-regulated Bcl-2 and LHR gene expression of granulosa cells under thermal stress. This study provides evidence for the molecular mechanisms of the protective effects of melatonin on granulosa cells during thermal stress.

  4. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

  5. Coping with commitment: Projecting future thermal stress on coral reefs worldwide and the potential importance of the Central Equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, S. D.

    2009-05-01

    projected ocean warming. These coral reefs are critical areas for further monitoring, research and conservation, as they may serve as a natural model for understanding the response of coral reef ecosystems to projected increase in the frequency of thermal stress events.

  6. High intensity acoustic tests of a thermally stressed aluminum plate in TAFA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Chung Fai; Clevenson, Sherman A.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus at the Langley Research Center to study the acoustically excited random motion of an aluminum plate which is buckled due to thermal stresses. The thermal buckling displacements were measured and compared with theory. The general trends of the changes in resonances frequencies and random responses of the plate agree with previous theoretical prediction and experimental results for a mechanically buckled plate.

  7. EOFs of Pseudo-Stress over the Indian Ocean (1977-85).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidenbach, Jay

    1990-10-01

    The method of empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis is applied to pseudo-stress vectors over the Indian Ocean from 1977 to 1984. The EOF method is first reviewed, as it provides an easy method for comprehensive study of the climatology and variance of the pseudo-stress dataset.The results confirm that the monsoon flow is the dominant feature in the Indian Ocean, with strong southeasterly trades near the equator in summer and strong southwesterlies in the Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal, and South China Sea. During the Northern Hemisphere winter, the pattern is weaker, with the wind switching to northeasterlies in these areas. Strong summer monsoons occurred in 1980, 1982, and 1984. Strong winter monsoons occurred in 1980, 1983, and 1984. An interesting pattern contributing to the decay and reversal of the monsoon flow is examined here. During the 1977-83 period, most of the interannual variability occurred in the Southern Hemisphere in the southeast trades. Strong southeast trades occurred in 1981 and 1982. Weaker periods of southeast trades were present from 1977 to 1979, with more northerly southeast trades in 1978 and 1979. Weak southeast trades occurred in 1983 but slowly changed to strong southeast trades by 1985.

  8. Thermal surface free energy and stress of iron

    PubMed Central

    Schönecker, Stephan; Li, Xiaoqing; Johansson, Börje; Kwon, Se Kyun; Vitos, Levente

    2015-01-01

    Absolute values of surface energy and surface stress of solids are hardly accessible by experiment. Here, we investigate the temperature dependence of both parameters for the (001) and (110) surface facets of body-centered cubic Fe from first-principles modeling taking into account vibrational, electronic, and magnetic degrees of freedom. The monotonic decrease of the surface energies of both facets with increasing temperature is mostly due to lattice vibrations and magnetic disorder. The surface stresses exhibit nonmonotonic behaviors resulting in a strongly temperature dependent excess surface stress and surface stress anisotropy. PMID:26439916

  9. Thermal surface free energy and stress of iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönecker, Stephan; Li, Xiaoqing; Johansson, Börje; Kwon, Se Kyun; Vitos, Levente

    2015-10-01

    Absolute values of surface energy and surface stress of solids are hardly accessible by experiment. Here, we investigate the temperature dependence of both parameters for the (001) and (110) surface facets of body-centered cubic Fe from first-principles modeling taking into account vibrational, electronic, and magnetic degrees of freedom. The monotonic decrease of the surface energies of both facets with increasing temperature is mostly due to lattice vibrations and magnetic disorder. The surface stresses exhibit nonmonotonic behaviors resulting in a strongly temperature dependent excess surface stress and surface stress anisotropy.

  10. Differential effects of stress on escape and reflex responses to nociceptive thermal stimuli in the rat.

    PubMed

    King, C D; Devine, D P; Vierck, C J; Rodgers, J; Yezierski, R P

    2003-10-17

    Acute stress has been shown to increase latencies of nociceptive reflexes, and this effect is considered evidence for stress-induced analgesia. However, tests for nociception that rely on motivated operant escape assess cerebral processing of pain and could be modulated independent of reflex responses. We therefore compared the effects of an acute stressor (restraint) on escape responses and lick/guard reflexes to stimulation of the paws by a thermally regulated floor. Testing sessions included a pre-test exposure to 36 degrees C, followed by a test trial in which either escape from 44 or 36 degrees C or reflex responses to 44 degrees C were observed. Behavioral responses to stress were assessed during a three day period, with baseline testing on day 1, post-stress or control testing on day 2, and evaluation of long-term stress effects on day 3. On day 2, half the animals received 15 min of restraint stress, followed by 15-min pre-test and test trials. Licking and guarding responses to thermal stimulation during 44 degrees C test trials were significantly reduced by restraint stress, confirming previously reported stress effects on nociceptive reflexes. In contrast, learned escape responses to the same thermal stimulus were significantly enhanced after stress. The increase in operant sensitivity suggests that acute restraint, a form of psychological stress, produces hyperalgesia for a level of thermal stimulation that preferentially activates C nociceptors. These results are discussed in relation to studies involving physical or psychological forms of stress, different nociceptive stimuli, and assessment strategies used to evaluate thermal pain sensitivity.

  11. Stress Analysis and Failure Mechanisms of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiasheng; Wang, Liang; Li, Dachuan; Zhong, Xinghua; Zhao, Huayu; Tao, Shunyan

    2017-06-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings were deposited by plasma spraying and heat-treated at 1100 °C for 50, 100, 150, and 200 h in air, respectively. Mechanical properties including microhardness and Young's modulus were evaluated using the nanoindentation test. Residual stresses in the ceramic topcoat and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer were measured using Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence piezo-spectroscopy (PLPS) techniques, respectively. The results showed that both the modulus and hardness increased with the thermal exposure time up to 100 h and then gradually decreased. The accumulated tensile stress in the as-sprayed topcoat changed to compressive stress after thermal exposure, and the compressive stress in the topcoat increased with an increase of thermal exposure time up to 150 h. The average compressive stresses in the TGO layer were higher than that of the cross-sectional topcoat, and the measured in-plane compressive stress increased firstly and then gradually decreased with increasing exposure time. The local interface geometry strongly affect the nature and evolution of hydrostatic stresses in the TGO. Finally, the crack initiation and propagation at the topcoat/TGO/bondcoat interface has been discussed with respect to the residual stresses in the plasma-sprayed TBC system.

  12. Differential gene expression during thermal stress and bleaching in the Caribbean coral Montastraea faveolata.

    PubMed

    DeSalvo, M K; Voolstra, C R; Sunagawa, S; Schwarz, J A; Stillman, J H; Coffroth, M A; Szmant, A M; Medina, M

    2008-09-01

    The declining health of coral reefs worldwide is likely to intensify in response to continued anthropogenic disturbance from coastal development, pollution, and climate change. In response to these stresses, reef-building corals may exhibit bleaching, which marks the breakdown in symbiosis between coral and zooxanthellae. Mass coral bleaching due to elevated water temperature can devastate coral reefs on a large geographical scale. In order to understand the molecular and cellular basis of bleaching in corals, we have measured gene expression changes associated with thermal stress and bleaching using a complementary DNA microarray containing 1310 genes of the Caribbean coral Montastraea faveolata. In a first experiment, we identified differentially expressed genes by comparing experimentally bleached M. faveolata fragments to control non-heat-stressed fragments. In a second experiment, we identified differentially expressed genes during a time course experiment with four time points across 9 days. Results suggest that thermal stress and bleaching in M. faveolata affect the following processes: oxidative stress, Ca(2+) homeostasis, cytoskeletal organization, cell death, calcification, metabolism, protein synthesis, heat shock protein activity, and transposon activity. These results represent the first medium-scale transcriptomic study focused on revealing the cellular foundation of thermal stress-induced coral bleaching. We postulate that oxidative stress in thermal-stressed corals causes a disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis, which in turn leads to cytoskeletal and cell adhesion changes, decreased calcification, and the initiation of cell death via apoptosis and necrosis.

  13. Three-dimensional finite element heat transfer and thermal stress analysis of rf structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Ngoc, Truc; Labrie, Jean-Pierre; Baset, Saleh

    1987-04-01

    Thermal expansion and thermal stress induced strain cause the detuning and limit the power level of radiofrequency (rf) structures. Two-dimensional finite element modeling has been used to determine the operating power limits of coupled cavity systems [1], but for complex high power accelerator structures without axial symmetry, a three-dimensional analysis is necessary. This paper describes results of a three-dimensional finite element temperature and thermal stress analysis. The analysis was performed for a high power coupled cavity linac structure operating at 1350 MHz. The results of the analysis are used to determine changes in the structure rf parameters as a function of power level and cooling water velocity.

  14. Thermal stress studies on selected zooplankton species and an isopod

    SciTech Connect

    Bunting, D.L.; Cheper, N.J.

    1980-06-01

    Laboratory determination of temperature stress levels and assessment of their ecological consequences was carried out for selected zooplankton species to develop data for ecological impact associated with industrial use of natural water for cooling. An included literature search revealed substantial fish and benthos data, but little on stress temperature effects on zooplankton. Information was gathered on two cladocerans, four copepods and an isopod.

  15. Comparison of plate and asthenospheric flow models for the thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1994-04-01

    Although seafloor depth and heat flow for young oceanic lithosphere can be descibed by modeling the lithosphere as the boundary layer of a cooling halfspace, a long standing question has been why data at older ages deviate from those expected for a halfspace. Two classes of models have been proposed for these deviations. In one, heat added from below 'flattens' depth and heat flow. In the other, asthenospheric flow beneath the lithosphere perturbs the depths. We compare recent versions of the model classes: the GDH1 thin-lithosphere plate model (Stein and Stein, 1992) and an asthenospehric flow model (Phipps Morgan and Smith, 1992). The plate model fits heat flow data better than the flow model for all cases considered, and topographic data in all but one case. The flow model significantly overpredicts depths for the North Atlantic, because the assumed asthenospheric flow in the plate motion direction would yield deepening for old ages rather than the observed flattening. Overall, the GDH1 global average model does better than this flow model, whose parameters were fit to specific plates. Moreover, the plate models fit to specific plates do better than the flow model. Plate models thus appear more useful than this flow model, suggesting that deviations from a cooling halfspace are largely thermal in origin.

  16. Experiments on oxygen desorption from surface warm seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper presents the results of scoping deaeration experiments conducted with warm surface seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) conditions. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in seawater at three locations (in the supply water, water leaving the predeaerator, and discharge water from an evaporator) were measured and used to estimate oxygen desorption levels. The results suggest that 7 percent to 60 percent of the dissolved oxygen in the supply water was desorbed from seawater in the predeaerator for pressures ranging from 35 to 9 kPa. Bubble injection in the upcomer increased the oxygen desorption rate by 20 percent to 60 percent. The data also indicated that at typical OC-OTEC evaporator pressures, when flash evaporation in the evaporator occurred, 75 percent to 95 percent of the dissolved oxygen was desorbed overall from the warm seawater. The results were used to find the impact of a single-stage predeaeration scheme on the power to remove noncondensable gases in an OC-OTEC plant.

  17. Technology development plan: Geotechnical survey systems for OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) cold water pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valent, Philip J.; Riggins, Michael

    1989-04-01

    An overview is given of current and developing technologies and techniques for performing geotechnical investigations for siting and designing Cold Water Pipes (CWP) for shelf-resting Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants. The geotechnical in situ tools used to measure the required parameters and the equipment/systems used to deploy these tools are identified. The capabilities of these geotechnical tools and deployment systems are compared to the data requirements for the CWP foundation/anchor design, and shortfalls are identified. For the last phase of geotechnical data gathering for design, a drillship will be required to perform soil boring work, to obtain required high quality sediment samples for laboratory dynamic testing, and to perform deep penetration in situ tests. To remedy shortfalls and to reduce the future OTEC CWP geotechnical survey costs, it is recommended that a seafloor resting machine be developed to advance the friction cone penetrometer, and also probably a pressuremeter, to provide geotechnical parameters to shallow subseafloor penetrations on slopes of 35 deg and in water depths to 1300 m.

  18. Innovative turbine concepts for open-cycle OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-12-01

    The results are summarized of preliminary studies conducted to identify and evaluate three innovative concepts for an open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) steam turbine that could significantly reduce the cost of OTEC electrical power plants. The three concepts are: (1) a crossflow turbine, (2) a vertical axis, axial flow turbine, and (3) a double flow, radial inflow turbine with mixed flow blading. In all cases, the innovation involves the use of lightweight, composite plastic blading and a physical geometry that facilitates efficient fluid flow to and from the other major system components and reduces the structural requirements for both the turbine or the system vacuum enclosure, or both. The performance, mechanical design, and cost of each of the concepts are developed to varying degrees but in sufficient detail to show that the potential exists for cost reductions to the goals established in the U.S. Department of Energy's planning documents. Specifically, results showed that an axial turbine operating with 33 percent higher steam throughput and 7 percent lower efficiency than the most efficient configuration provides the most cost effective open-cycle OTEC system. The vacuum enclosure can be significantly modified to reduce costs by establishing better interfaces with the system.

  19. Innovative turbine concepts for open-cycle OTEC (ocean thermal energy conversion)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of preliminary studies conducted to identify and evaluate three innovative concepts for an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) steam turbine that could significantly reduce the cost of OTEC electrical power plants. The three concepts are (1) a crossflow turbine, (2) a vertical-axis, axial-flow turbine, and (3) a double-flow, radial-inflow turbine with mixed-flow blading. In all cases, the innovation involves the use of lightweight, composite plastic blading and a physical geometry that facilitates efficient fluid flow to and from the other major system components and reduces the structural requirements for both the turbine or the system vacuum enclosure, or both. The performance, mechanical design, and cost of each of the concepts are developed to varying degrees but in sufficient detail to show that the potential exists for cost reductions to the goals established in the US Department of Energy's planning documents. Specifically, results showed that an axial turbine operating with 33% higher steam throughput and 7% lower efficiency than the most efficient configuration provides the most cost-effective open-cycle OTEC system. The vacuum enclosure can be significantly modified to reduce costs by establishing better interfaces with the system. 33 refs., 26 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Waterborne noise due to ocean thermal energy conversion plants. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Janota, C.P.; Thompson, D.E.

    1982-06-17

    Public law reflects a United States national commitment to the rapid development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) as an alternate energy source. OTEC plants extract the stored solar energy from the world's tropical seas and in so doing pose a potential for altering the character of the ambient noise there. The sources of noise from an OTEC plant are analyzed in the context of four configurations, two of which were built and tested, and two which are concepts for future full-scale moored facilities. The analysis indicates that the noise resulting from the interaction of turbulence with the sea-water pumps is expected to dominate in the frequency range 10 Hz to 1 kHZ. Measured radiated noise data from the OTEC-I research plant, located near the island of Hawaii, are compared with the analysis. The measured data diverge from the predicted levels at frequencies above about 60 Hz because of dominant non-OTEC noise sources on this platform. However, at low frequency, the measured broadband noise is comparable to that predicted.

  1. Comparison of plate and asthenospheric flow models for the thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    Although seafloor depth and heat flow for young oceanic lithosphere can be descibed by modeling the lithosphere as the boundary layer of a cooling halfspace, a long standing question has been why data at older ages deviate from those expected for a halfspace. Two classes of models have been proposed for these deviations. In one, heat added from below 'flattens' depth and heat flow. In the other, asthenospheric flow beneath the lithosphere perturbs the depths. We compare recent versions of the model classes: the GDH1 thin-lithosphere plate model (Stein and Stein, 1992) and an asthenospehric flow model (Phipps Morgan and Smith, 1992). The plate model fits heat flow data better than the flow model for all cases considered, and topographic data in all but one case. The flow model significantly overpredicts depths for the North Atlantic, because the assumed asthenospheric flow in the plate motion direction would yield deepening for old ages rather than the observed flattening. Overall, the GDH1 global average model does better than this flow model, whose parameters were fit to specific plates. Moreover, the plate models fit to specific plates do better than the flow model. Plate models thus appear more useful than this flow model, suggesting that deviations from a cooling halfspace are largely thermal in origin.

  2. Productivity responses of a widespread marine piscivore, Gadus morhua, to oceanic thermal extremes and trends.

    PubMed

    Mantzouni, Irene; MacKenzie, Brian R

    2010-06-22

    Climate change will have major consequences for population dynamics and life histories of marine biota as it progresses in the twenty-first century. These impacts will differ in magnitude and direction for populations within individual marine species whose geographical ranges span large gradients in latitude and temperature. Here we use meta-analytical methods to investigate how recruitment (i.e. the number of new fish produced by spawners in a given year which subsequently grow and survive to become vulnerable to fishing gear) has reacted to temperature fluctuations, and in particular to extremes of temperature, in cod populations throughout the north Atlantic. Temperature has geographically explicit effects on cod recruitment. Impacts differ depending on whether populations are located in the upper (negative effects) or in the lower (positive effects) thermal range. The probabilities of successful year-classes in populations living in warm areas is on average 34 per cent higher in cold compared with warm seasons, whereas opposite patterns exist for populations living in cold areas. These results have implications for cod dynamics, distributions and phenologies under the influence of ocean warming, particularly related to not only changes in the mean temperature, but also its variability (e.g. frequency of exceptionally cold or warm seasons).

  3. Thermal stress and end-bulging in monoclinic crystals: the case study of double tungstates.

    PubMed

    Yumashev, Konstantin; Loiko, Pavel

    2017-05-01

    An analytical description of the thermal stress and end-bulging component of thermal lensing is presented for monoclinic laser crystals, taking into account the anisotropy of their optical, thermal, and elastic properties for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geometry of longitudinal diode-pumping (plane stress approximation) is considered. The developed approach is applied to the monoclinic double tungstates (MDTs), Yb:KGW, Yb:KYW, and Yb:KLuW, yielding values of normal and shear stresses, tensile stress, and the end-bulging term. We show that for low-symmetry crystals, end-bulging is responsible for the astigmatism of the thermal lens. The geometry of this astigmatism is explained in terms of the principal meridional planes. We show that the crystal cut of the MDTs along the optical indicatrix axis Ng (propagation direction) provides low thermal stress and a purely positive and weakly astigmatic thermal lens, which is a key condition for power scaling and diffraction-limited laser output.

  4. Transient thermal stresses in a reinforced hollow disk or cylinder containing a radial crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, R.; Erdogan, F.

    1984-01-01

    The transient thermal stress problem in a hollow cylinder or a disk containing a radial crack is considered. It is assumed that the cylinder is reinforced on its inner boundary by a membrane which has thermoelastic constants different than those of the base material. The transient temperature, thermal stresses and the crack tip stress intensity factors are calculated in a cylinder which is subjected to a sudden change of temperature on the inside surface. The results are obtained for various dimensionless parameters and material constants. The special cases of the crack terminating at the cylinder-membrane interface and of the broken membrane are separately considered and some examples are given.

  5. Transient thermal stresses in a reinforced hollow disk or cylinder containing a radial crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, R.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The transient thermal stress problem in a hollow cylinder or a disk containing a radial crack is considered. It is assumed that the cylinder is reinforced on its inner boundary by a membrane which has thermoelastic constants different than those of the base material. The transient temperature, thermal stresses and the crack tip stress intensity factors are calculated in a cylinder which is subjected to a sudden change of temperature on the inside surface. The results are obtained for various dimensionless parameters and material constants. The special cases of the crack terminating at the cylinder-membrane interface and of the broken membrane are separately considered and some examples are given.

  6. Thermally induced stresses and deformations in angle-ply composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1987-01-01

    Cure-induced uniform temperature change effects on the stresses, axial expansion, and thermally-induced twist of four specific angle-ply tube designs are discussed with a view to the tubes' use as major space structure components. The stresses and deformations in the tubes are studied as a function of the four designs, the off-axis angle, and the single-material and hybrid reinforcing-material construction used. It is found that tube design has a minor influence on the stresses, axial stiffness, and axial thermal expansion characteristics, which are more directly a function of off-axis angle and material selection; tube design is, however, the primary influence in the definition of thermally-induced twist and torsional stiffness characteristics. None of the designs is free of thermally induced twist.

  7. Temperature propagation in prismatic lithium-ion-cells after short term thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Pamina; Liebig, Gerd; Komsiyska, Lidiya; Wittstock, Gunther

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a 3D model based on the thermal material characteristics of an automotive prismatic Li-NiMnCoO2 (NMC) cell was created in COMSOL Multiphysics® in order to simulate the temperature propagation in the cell during short term thermal stress. The thermal characteristics of the battery components were experimentally determined via laser flash analysis (LFA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and used as an input parameter for the models. In order to validate the modelling approach, an experimental setup was built to measure the temperature propagation during thermal stresses within a dummy cell, equipped with temperature sensors. After validating, the model is used to describe the temperature propagation after a short-term temperature stress on automotive prismatic lithium-ion cells, simulating welding of the contact leads.

  8. Thermally induced stresses and deformations in angle-ply composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1987-01-01

    Cure-induced uniform temperature change effects on the stresses, axial expansion, and thermally-induced twist of four specific angle-ply tube designs are discussed with a view to the tubes' use as major space structure components. The stresses and deformations in the tubes are studied as a function of the four designs, the off-axis angle, and the single-material and hybrid reinforcing-material construction used. It is found that tube design has a minor influence on the stresses, axial stiffness, and axial thermal expansion characteristics, which are more directly a function of off-axis angle and material selection; tube design is, however, the primary influence in the definition of thermally-induced twist and torsional stiffness characteristics. None of the designs is free of thermally induced twist.

  9. Texture formation in FePt thin films via thermal stress management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, P.; Rui, X.; Shield, J. E.

    2005-05-01

    The transformation variant of the fcc to fct transformation in FePt thin films was tailored by controlling the stresses in the thin films, thereby allowing selection of in- or out-of-plane c-axis orientation. FePt thin films were deposited at ambient temperature on several substrates with differing coefficients of thermal expansion relative to the FePt, which generated thermal stresses during the ordering heat treatment. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed preferential out-of-plane c-axis orientation for FePt films deposited on substrates with a similar coefficients of thermal expansion, and random orientation for FePt films deposited on substrates with a very low coefficient of thermal expansion, which is consistent with theoretical analysis when considering residual stresses.

  10. Adaptability and growth of Malpura ewes subjected to thermal and nutritional stress.

    PubMed

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Maurya, Vijai Prakash; Naqvi, Sayeed M K

    2010-12-01

    A study was conducted to assess the effect of combined stresses (thermal and nutritional) on physiological adaptability and growth performance of Malpura ewes. Twenty-eight adult Malpura ewes (average BW 33.56 kg) were used in the present study. The ewes were divided into four groups, viz., GI (n=7; control), GII (n=7; thermal stress), GIII (n=7; nutritional stress), and GIV (n=7; combined stress). The animals were stall-fed with a diet consisting of 60% roughage and 40% concentrate. GI and GII ewes were provided with ad libitum feeding, while GIII and GIV ewes were provided with restricted feed (30% intake of GI ewes) to induce nutritional stress. GII and GIV ewes were kept in climatic chamber at 40 °C and 55% RH for 6 h/day between 1000 and 1600 hours to induce thermal stress. The study was conducted for a period of two estrus cycles. The parameters studied were feed intake, water intake, physiological responses (viz., respiration rate, pulse rate, and rectal temperature), body weight, and body condition scoring (BCS) of ewes. Both thermal and combined stress significantly (P<0.05) affected the feed intake, water intake, respiration rate, and rectal temperature. The feeding schedule followed in the experiment significantly (P<0.05) altered the body weight and BCS between the groups. The results reveal that when compared with thermal stress, nutritional stress had less significant effect on the parameters studied. However, when both these stresses were coupled, it had a significant influence on all the parameters studied in these ewes. It can be concluded from this study that when two stressors occur simultaneously, the total cost may have severe impact on biological function.

  11. Solid oxide fuel cell interconnect design optimization considering the thermal stresses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Li, Tingshuai; Yang, Ming; Andersson, Martin

    The mechanical failure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) components may cause cracks with consequences such as gas leakage, structure instability and reduction of cell lifetime. A comprehensive 3D model of the thermal stresses of an anode-supported planar SOFC is presented in this work. The main objective of this paper is to get an interconnect optimized design by evaluating the thermal stresses of an anode-supported SOFC for different designs, which would be a new criterion for interconnect design. The model incorporates the momentum, mass, heat, ion and electron transport, as well as steady-state mechanics. Heat from methane steam reforming and water-gas shift reaction were considered in our model. The results examine the relationship between the interconnect structures and thermal stresses in SOFC at certain mechanical properties. A wider interconnect of the anode side lowers the stress obviously. The simulation results also indicate that thermal stress of coflow design is smaller than that of counterflow, corresponding to the temperature distribution. This study shows that it is possible to design interconnects for an optimum thermal stress performance of the cell.

  12. Analytical Predictions of Thermal Stress in the Stardust PICA Heatshield Under Reentry Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Thomas; Milos, Frank; Agrawal, Parul

    2009-01-01

    We performed finite element analyses on a model of the Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heatshield from the Stardust sample return capsule (SRC) to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA material during reentry. The heatshield on the Stardust SRC was a 0.83 m sphere cone, fabricated from a single piece of 5.82 cm-thick PICA. The heatshield performed successfully during Earth reentry of the SRC in January 2006. Material response analyses of the full, axisymmetric PICA heatshield were run using the Two-Dimensional Implicit Ablation, Pyrolysis, and Thermal Response Program (TITAN). Peak surface temperatures were predicted to be 3385K, while the temperature at the PICA backface remained at the estimated initial cold-soak temperature of 278K. Surface recession and temperature distribution results from TITAN, at several points in the reentry trajectory, were mapped onto an axisymmetric finite element model of the heatshield. We used the finite element model to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA from differential thermal expansion. The predicted peak compressive stress in the PICA heatshield was 1.38 MPa. Although this level of stress exceeded the chosen design limit for compressive stresses in PICA tiles for the design of the Orion crew exploration vehicle heatshield, the Stardust heatshield exhibited no obvious mechanical failures from thermal stress. The analyses of the Stardust heatshield were used to assess and adjust the level of conservatism in the finite element analyses in support of the Orion heatshield design.

  13. Analytical Predictions of Thermal Stress in the Stardust PICA Heatshield Under Reentry Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Thomas; Milos, Frank; Agrawal, Parul

    2009-01-01

    We performed finite element analyses on a model of the Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heatshield from the Stardust sample return capsule (SRC) to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA material during reentry. The heatshield on the Stardust SRC was a 0.83 m sphere cone, fabricated from a single piece of 5.82 cm-thick PICA. The heatshield performed successfully during Earth reentry of the SRC in January 2006. Material response analyses of the full, axisymmetric PICA heatshield were run using the Two-Dimensional Implicit Ablation, Pyrolysis, and Thermal Response Program (TITAN). Peak surface temperatures were predicted to be 3385K, while the temperature at the PICA backface remained at the estimated initial cold-soak temperature of 278K. Surface recession and temperature distribution results from TITAN, at several points in the reentry trajectory, were mapped onto an axisymmetric finite element model of the heatshield. We used the finite element model to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA from differential thermal expansion. The predicted peak compressive stress in the PICA heatshield was 1.38 MPa. Although this level of stress exceeded the chosen design limit for compressive stresses in PICA tiles for the design of the Orion crew exploration vehicle heatshield, the Stardust heatshield exhibited no obvious mechanical failures from thermal stress. The analyses of the Stardust heatshield were used to assess and adjust the level of conservatism in the finite element analyses in support of the Orion heatshield design.

  14. The relationship between oceanic transform fault segmentation, seismicity, and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson-Schwehr, Monica

    Mid-ocean ridge transform faults (RTFs) are typically viewed as geometrically simple, with fault lengths readily constrained by the ridge-transform intersections. This relative simplicity, combined with well-constrained slip rates, make them an ideal environment for studying strike-slip earthquake behavior. As the resolution of available bathymetric data over oceanic transform faults continues to improve, however, it is being revealed that the geometry and structure of these faults can be complex, including such features as intra-transform pull-apart basins, intra-transform spreading centers, and cross-transform ridges. To better determine the resolution of structural complexity on RTFs, as well as the prevalence of RTF segmentation, fault structure is delineated on a global scale. Segmentation breaks the fault system up into a series of subparallel fault strands separated by an extensional basin, intra-transform spreading center, or fault step. RTF segmentation occurs across the full range of spreading rates, from faults on the ultraslow portion of the Southwest Indian Ridge to faults on the ultrafast portion of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). It is most prevalent along the EPR, which hosts the fastest spreading rates in the world and has undergone multiple changes in relative plate motion over the last couple of million years. Earthquakes on RTFs are known to be small, to scale with the area above the 600°C isotherm, and to exhibit some of the most predictable behaviors in seismology. In order to determine whether segmentation affects the global RTF scaling relations, the scalings are recomputed using an updated seismic catalog and fault database in which RTF systems are broken up according to their degree of segmentation (as delineated from available bathymetric datasets). No statistically significant differences between the new computed scaling relations and the current scaling relations were found, though a few faults were identified as outliers. Finite element

  15. Modeling of Thermally Induced Stresses in Three-Dimensional Bonded Integrated Circuit Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing

    2011-05-01

    A finite-element model has been developed to investigate the potential reliability issues of thermally induced stresses in interwafer Cu via structures in three-dimensional (3D) integrated circuit (IC) wafers. The model is first partially validated by comparing computed results against experimental data on via test structures from planar ICs. Computed von Mises stresses show that the predicted failure agrees with the results of thermal cycle experiments. The model is then employed to study thermal stresses in interwafer Cu vias in 3D bonded IC structures. The results illustrate that there is a concern regarding the stability of interwafer Cu vias. Simulations show that the von Mises stresses in interwafer Cu vias decrease with decreasing pitch length at constant via size, increase with decreasing via size at constant pitch, and decrease with decreasing bonding thickness.

  16. Modeling of thermal stress development during the vacuum arc remelting process

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Z.; Alam, M.K.; Semiatin, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    The development of thermal stresses during the vacuum arc remelting (VAR) process was investigated through numerical solution of the two-dimensional, non-steady state heat conduction and stress equilibrium equations. Solutions were obtained for various levels of input power efficiency, values of the crucible-ingot interface heat transfer coefficients, and lengths of the melted and resolidified ingot. Model predictions revealed that the maximum tensile thermal stresses are developed at the bottom of the ingot for cases involving low input power efficiency and high interface heat transfer coefficients. The predicted development of large tensile stresses at the mid-radius position correlates well with observations of thermal cracking during VAR of near-gamma titanium aluminide alloy ingots.

  17. Effect of Rotor Diameter on the Thermal Stresses of a Turbine Rotor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dávalos, J. O.; García, J. C.; Urquiza, G.; Castro-Gómez, L. L.; Rodríguez, J. A.; De Santiago, O.

    2016-04-01

    Thermal stresses in a simplified steam turbine rotor model during a cold startup are analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA). In order to validate the numerical model, an experimental array is developed in which a hollow cylinder is heated with hot air in the external surface. At the thick wall of the cylinder, temperature distribution is measured in real time, while at the same time an algorithm computes thermal stresses. Additional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations are made to obtain magnitudes of velocity and pressure in order to compute convective heat transfer coefficient. The experimental results show good agreement with the FEA computations. To evaluate the effect of rotor diameter size, FEA computations with variation in external and internal diameters are performed. Results show that thermal stresses are proportional to rotor diameter size. Also, zones of higher stress concentration are found in the external and internal surfaces of the rotor.

  18. Biogenic amines and acute thermal stress in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. A.; Moberg, G. P.

    1975-01-01

    A study is summarized which demonstrates that depletion of the biogenic amines 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) or norepinephrine (NE) alters the normal thermoregulatory responses to acute temperature stress. Specifically, NE depletion caused a significant depression in equilibrium rectal temperature at 22 C and a greater depression in rectal temperature than controls in response to cold (6 C) stress; NE depletion also resulted in a significantly higher rectal temperature response to acute heat (38 C) stress. Depletion of 5-HT had less severe effects. It remains unclear whether the primary site of action of these agents is central or peripheral.

  19. Thermal stress effect in diode end-pumped Nd:YVO4 bar laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidin, Noriah; Krishnan, Ganesan; Khamsan, Nur Ezaan; Zainal, Roslinda; Bakhtiar, Hazri

    2012-06-01

    The thermal stress effect on various doping levels of yttrium vanadate crystal Nd:YVO4 is investigated. Diode end-pumped source was used to obtain the input-output characteristics of the vanadate crystal. The laser performance of the low doping crystal is poor since the optical conversion efficiency is small and high threshold pump power. However the low Dopant crystal is not associated with thermal stress thus no thermal damage. Differently with higher concentration of Nd ions crystal, the laser performance is relatively high but it is accompanied with thermal damage which comprised of microcrack, microfracture and contamination. The high absorption on the doping ions with additional external impurities causes extra heat generation which leads to thermal fracture.

  20. A quantitative evaluation of closed-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) technology in central station applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritton, E. C.; Pei, R. Y.; Aroesty, J.; Balaban, M. M.; Gazley, C.; Hess, R. W.; Krase, W. H.

    1980-05-01

    An evaluation of a closed cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) system for delivery of electric power to the United States is presented. Performance and costs of complete commercial OTEC systems are analyzed at the system level using inputs from component analyses and thermal resource data in the Gulf of Mexico. Such sites could feed the Gulf Coast from the west coast of Florida to the New Orleans area. By exploiting the temperature difference between warm surface waters and cold water from the depths to operate a thermodynamic cycle to generate electricity, OTEC acts as a heat engine that taps the surface waters of tropical and subtropical oceans as a heat source and the cold water originating in the polar regions as a heat sink. Results of the engineering analysis indicate that the system and platform appear to be within the state-of-the-art.