Science.gov

Sample records for ocean wave power

  1. Power from Ocean Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, J. N.

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the utilization of surface ocean waves as a potential source of power. Simple and large-scale wave power devices and conversion systems are described. Alternative utilizations, environmental impacts, and future prospects of this alternative energy source are detailed. (BT)

  2. Hydroelectric power from ocean waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavendran, K.

    1981-02-01

    This paper describes a system which converts the variable energy of ocean waves into a steady supply of energy in a conventional form. The system consists of a set of floats and Persian wheels located off-shore and a storage reservoir on the shore. The floats oscillate vertically as the waves pass below them and turn their respective Persian wheels which lift sea water to a height and deliver to the reservoir through an interconnecting pipeline. The head of water in the reservoir operates a hydraulic turbine which in turn works a generator to supply electricity. Due to the recurrent wave action, water is maintained at the optimum level in the reservoir to ensure continuous power supply.

  3. Power inversion design for ocean wave energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebani, Anwar N.

    The needs for energy sources are increasing day by day because of several factors, such as oil depletion, and global climate change due to the higher level of CO2, so the exploration of various renewable energy sources is very promising area of study. The available ocean waves can be utilized as free source of energy as the water covers 70% of the earth surface. This thesis presents the ocean wave energy as a source of renewable energy. By addressing the problem of designing efficient power electronics system to deliver 5 KW from the induction generator to the grid with less possible losses and harmonics as possible and to control current fed to the grid to successfully harvest ocean wave energy. We design an AC-DC full bridge rectifier converter, and a DC-DC boost converter to harvest wave energy from AC to regulated DC. In order to increase the design efficiency, we need to increase the power factor from (0.5-0.6) to 1. This is accomplished by designing the boost converter with power factor correction in continues mode with RC circuit as an input to the boost converter power factor correction. This design results in a phase shift between the input current and voltage of the full bridge rectifier to generate a small reactive power. The reactive power is injected to the induction generator to maintain its functionality by generating a magnetic field in its stator. Next, we design a single-phase pulse width modulator full bridge voltage source DC-AC grid-tied mode inverter to harvest regulated DC wave energy to AC. The designed inverter is modulated by inner current loop, to control current injected to the grid with minimal filter component to maintain power quality at the grid. The simulation results show that our design successfully control the current level fed to the grid. It is noteworthy that the simulated efficiency is higher than the calculated one since we used an ideal switch in the simulated circuit.

  4. Floating type ocean wave power station equipped with hydroelectric unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Shun; Kanemoto, Toshiaki; Umekage, Toshihiko

    2013-10-01

    The authors have invented the unique ocean wave power station, which is composed of the floating type platform with a pair of the floats lining up at the interval of one wave pitch and the counter-rotating type wave power unit, its runners are submerged in the seawater at the middle position of the platform. Such profiles make the flow velocity at the runner is twice faster than that of the traditional fixed/caisson type OWC, on the ideal flow conditions. Besides, the runners counter-rotate the inner and the outer armatures of the peculiar generator, respectively, and the relative rotational speed is also twice faster than the speed of the single runner/armature. Such characteristics make the runner diameter large, namely the output higher, as requested, because the torque of the power unit never act on the floating type platform. At the preliminary reseach, this paper verifies to get the power using a Wells type single runner installed in the model station. The runner takes the output which is affected by the oscillating amplitude of the platform, the rotational speed and the inertia force of the runner, etc.

  5. Oceanic wave measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An oceanic wave measured system is disclosed wherein wave height is sensed by a barometer mounted on a buoy. The distance between the trough and crest of a wave is monitored by sequentially detecting positive and negative peaks of the output of the barometer and by combining (adding) each set of two successive half cycle peaks. The timing of this measurement is achieved by detecting the period of a half cycle of wave motion.

  6. Internal Waves, Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This photograph, taken in sunglint conditions, captures open ocean internal waves which are diffracting around shoals south of the Seychelle islands (4.5S, 55.5E) and recombining to form interference patterns. The clouds to the north of the waves cover two of the Seychelle islands: Silhouette and Mahe. Mahe is the main island of the archipelago. The small rocky island surrounded by reef around which the waves diffract is Platte Island.

  7. Ocean wave electric generators

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, H.R.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes an apparatus for generating electricity from ocean waves. It consists of: 1.) a hollow buoyant duck positioned in the path of waves including a core about the center axis of which the duck rotates, a lower chamber portion having liquid therein and an upper chamber portion having air therein. The air is alternately compressed and expanded by the liquid in the chamber during the rotational motion of the duck caused by waves. A turbine mounted in the upper portion of the duck is driven by the compressed and expanded air. A generator is coupled to the turbine and operated to produce electrical energy and an air bulb; 2.) a spine having a transverse axial shaft anchoring the spine to the ocean floor. The upper portion of the spine engages the duck to maintain the duck in position. The spine has a curved configuration to concentrate and direct wave energy. The spine configuration acts as a scoop to increase the height of wave peaks and as a foil to increase the depth of wave troughs.

  8. Infragravity waves across the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Arshad; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Aucan, Jerome

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of transoceanic Infragravity (IG) wave was investigated using a global spectral wave model together with deep-ocean pressure recorders. IG waves are generated mostly at the shorelines due to non-linear hydrodynamic effects that transfer energy from the main windsea and swell band, with periods of 1 to 25 s, to periods up to 500 s. IG waves are important for the study of near-shore processes and harbor agitation, and can also be a potential source of errors in satellite altimetry measurements. Setting up a global IG model was motivated by the investigation of these errors for the future planned SWOT mission. Despite the fact that the infragravity waves exhibit much smaller vertical amplitudes than the usual high frequency wind-driven waves, of the order of 1 cm in the deep oceans, their propagation throughout the oceans and signature in the wave spectrum can be clearly observed. Using a simplified empirical parameterization of the nearshore source of free IG waves as a function of the incoming wave parameters we extended to WAVEWATCH III model, used so far for windseas and swell, to the IG band, up to periods of 300 s. The spatial and temporal variability of the modeled IG energy was well correlated to the DART station records, making it useful to interpret the records of IG waves. Open ocean IG wave records appear dominated by trans-oceanic events with well defined sources concentrated on a few days, usually on West coasts, and affecting the entire ocean basin, with amplitude patterns very similar to those of tsunamis. Three particular IG bursts during 2008 are studied, 2 in the Pacific Ocean and 1 in the North Atlantic. It was observed that the liberated IG waves can travel long distances often crossing whole oceans with negligible dissipation. The IG signatures are clearly observed at sensors along their propagation paths.

  9. Rogue waves in oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Francesco

    2008-08-01

    A stochastic model of wave groups is presented to explain the occurrence of exceptionally large waves, usually referred to as rogue waves. The model leads to the description of the non-Gaussian statistics of large waves in oceanic turbulence and to a new asymptotic distribution of their crest heights in a form that generalizes the Tayfun model. The new model explains the unusually large crests observed in flume experiments of narrow-band waves. However, comparisons with realistic oceanic measurements gathered in the North Sea during an intense storm indicate that the generalized model agrees with the original Tayfun distribution.

  10. Planetary Wave Signatures Across Three Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngs, M. K.; Johnson, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    Equatorial Deep Jets (EDJs) are vertically stacked east-west currents found around the equator below the thermocline that reverse every few hundred meters. This study evaluates their structure in all three oceans observationally using vertical strain of density profiles from new high-resolution Argo float conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) instrument profile data from augmented with historical shipboard CTD and lower-resolution Argo float profiles from 1972--2014. Strain profiles are analyzed in a stretched vertical coordinate system determined from the mean vertical density structure. Wavelet decomposition is used to analyze the power spectra in each basin. In the Indian and Pacific Oceans, we see two distinct peaks in the power spectra around the equator, the first a broader Kelvin Wave-like signal and the second a narrower feature consistent with the characteristics of a first-meridional-mode Rossby Wave. In all three ocean basins we find coherent basin-wide signals consistent with first-meridional-mode Rossby Waves, having periods of 5±1 years in the Indian and the Atlantic, and 12±3 years in the Pacific. The first-meridional-mode Rossby wave dispersion relation suggests basin-scale zonal wavelengths in all three oceans. These zonal scales are consistent with those from plane waves fit to the phase, within the large uncertainties of those fits.

  11. Equatorial Wave Line, Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This Equatorial Wave Line (2.0 N, 102.5W) seen in the Pacific Ocean is of great interest to oceanographers because of the twice annual upwelling of the oceans nutrients. As a result of nearly constant easterly winds, cool nutrient rich water wells up at the equator. The long narrow line is an equatorial front or boundry between warm surface equatorial water and cool recently upwelled water as the intermix of nutrients takes place.

  12. Internal Ocean Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Internal waves are waves that travel within the interior of a fluid. The waves propagate at the interface or boundary between two layers with sharp density differences, such as temperature. They occur wherever strong tides or currents and stratification occur in the neighborhood of irregular topography. They can propagate for several hundred kilometers. The ASTER false-color VNIR image off the island of Tsushima in the Korea Strait shows the signatures of several internal wave packets, indicating a northern propagation direction.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 60 by 120 kilometers (37.2 by 74.4 miles) Location: 34.6 degrees North latitude, 129.5 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1

  13. Ocean wave energy converting vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, P.F.

    1986-08-26

    An ocean wave energy conversion system is described comprised of a four beam quadrapod supported by bouyant members from which is suspended a pendulum. The pendulum contains a vertical generator shaft and a generator, the generator shaft being splined and fitted with two racheted pulleys, the pulleys being looped, one clockwise and one counterclockwise with separate cables. The cables are attached at their ends to the bow and stern of the quadrapod, whereby the generator shaft will pin when the quadrapod rocks over waves and the pendulum tends toward the center of earth.

  14. Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhiche, Mike; Downie, Bruce

    2013-10-21

    Ocean wave power can be a significant source of large‐scale, renewable energy for the US electrical grid. The Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) conservatively estimated that 20% of all US electricity could be generated by wave energy. Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. (OPT), with funding from private sources and the US Navy, developed the PowerBuoy to generate renewable energy from the readily available power in ocean waves. OPT's PowerBuoy converts the energy in ocean waves to electricity using the rise and fall of waves to move the buoy up and down (mechanical stroking) which drives an electric generator. This electricity is then conditioned and transmitted ashore as high‐voltage power via underwater cable. OPT's wave power generation system includes sophisticated techniques to automatically tune the system for efficient conversion of random wave energy into low cost green electricity, for disconnecting the system in large waves for hardware safety and protection, and for automatically restoring operation when wave conditions normalize. As the first utility scale wave power project in the US, the Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, OR, will consist of 10 PowerBuoys located 2.5 miles off the coast. This U.S. Department of Energy Grant funding along with funding from PNGC Power, an Oregon‐based electric power cooperative, was utilized for the design completion, fabrication, assembly and factory testing of the first PowerBuoy for the Reedsport project. At this time, the design and fabrication of this first PowerBuoy and factory testing of the power take‐off subsystem are complete; additionally the power take‐off subsystem has been successfully integrated into the spar.

  15. Rogue Waves in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waseda, Takuji

    2010-03-01

    Giant episodic ocean waves that suddenly soar like a wall of water out of an otherwise calm sea are not just a legend. Such waves—which in the past have been called “abnormal,” “exceptional,” “extreme,” and even “vicious killer” waves—are now commonly known as “rogue waves” or “freak waves.” These waves have sunk or severely damaged 22 supercarriers in the world and caused the loss of more than 500 lives in the past 40 years. The largest wave registered by reliable instruments reached 30 meters in height, and the largest wave recorded by visual observation reached about 34 meters, equivalent to the height of an eight-story building. Tales of seafarers from Christopher Columbus to the passengers of luxury cruise ships had long been undervalued by scientists, but in the past 10 or so years, those historical notes and modern testimonies have been scientifically dissected to reveal the nature of these monster waves.

  16. Ocean Wave Simulation Based on Wind Field.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyi; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Ocean wave simulation has a wide range of applications in movies, video games and training systems. Wind force is the main energy resource for generating ocean waves, which are the result of the interaction between wind and the ocean surface. While numerous methods to handle simulating oceans and other fluid phenomena have undergone rapid development during the past years in the field of computer graphic, few of them consider to construct ocean surface height field from the perspective of wind force driving ocean waves. We introduce wind force to the construction of the ocean surface height field through applying wind field data and wind-driven wave particles. Continual and realistic ocean waves result from the overlap of wind-driven wave particles, and a strategy was proposed to control these discrete wave particles and simulate an endless ocean surface. The results showed that the new method is capable of obtaining a realistic ocean scene under the influence of wind fields at real time rates. PMID:26808718

  17. Ocean Wave Simulation Based on Wind Field.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyi; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Ocean wave simulation has a wide range of applications in movies, video games and training systems. Wind force is the main energy resource for generating ocean waves, which are the result of the interaction between wind and the ocean surface. While numerous methods to handle simulating oceans and other fluid phenomena have undergone rapid development during the past years in the field of computer graphic, few of them consider to construct ocean surface height field from the perspective of wind force driving ocean waves. We introduce wind force to the construction of the ocean surface height field through applying wind field data and wind-driven wave particles. Continual and realistic ocean waves result from the overlap of wind-driven wave particles, and a strategy was proposed to control these discrete wave particles and simulate an endless ocean surface. The results showed that the new method is capable of obtaining a realistic ocean scene under the influence of wind fields at real time rates.

  18. Ocean Wave Simulation Based on Wind Field

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ocean wave simulation has a wide range of applications in movies, video games and training systems. Wind force is the main energy resource for generating ocean waves, which are the result of the interaction between wind and the ocean surface. While numerous methods to handle simulating oceans and other fluid phenomena have undergone rapid development during the past years in the field of computer graphic, few of them consider to construct ocean surface height field from the perspective of wind force driving ocean waves. We introduce wind force to the construction of the ocean surface height field through applying wind field data and wind-driven wave particles. Continual and realistic ocean waves result from the overlap of wind-driven wave particles, and a strategy was proposed to control these discrete wave particles and simulate an endless ocean surface. The results showed that the new method is capable of obtaining a realistic ocean scene under the influence of wind fields at real time rates. PMID:26808718

  19. The Promise of Wave Power (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekken, T.

    2010-12-01

    The solutions to today's energy challenges need to be explored through alternative, renewable and clean energy sources to enable diverse energy resource plans. An extremely abundant and promising source of energy exists in the world's oceans: it is estimated that if 0.2 % of the oceans' untapped energy could be harnessed, it could provide power sufficient for the entire world. Ocean energy exists in the forms of wave, tidal, marine currents, thermal (temperature gradient) and salinity. Among these forms, significant opportunities and benefits have been identified in the area of ocean wave energy extraction, i.e., harnessing the motion of the ocean waves, and converting that motion into electrical energy. Ocean wave energy refers to the kinetic and potential energy in the heaving motion of ocean waves. Wave energy is essentially concentrated solar energy (as is wind energy). The heating of the earth’s surface by the sun (with other complex processes) drives the wind, which in turn blows across the surface of the ocean to create waves. At each stage of conversion, the power density increases. Ocean wave power offers several attractive qualities, including high power density, low variability, and excellent forecastability. A typical large ocean wave propogates at around 12 m/s with very little attenuation across the ocean. If the waves can be detected several hundred kilometers off shore, there can be 10 hours or more of accurate forecast horizon. In fact, analysis has shown good forecast accuracy up to 48 hours in advance. Off the coast Oregon, the yearly average wave power is approximately 30 kW per meter of crestlength (i.e., unit length transverse to the direction of wave propagation and parallel to the shore.) This compares very favorably with power densities of solar and wind, which typically range in the several hundreds of Watts per square meter. Globally, the wave energy resource is stronger on the west coasts of large landmasses and increases in strength

  20. Ocean energy-waves, currents, and tides

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, J.; Shelpuk, B.

    1981-05-01

    An overview is presented on the mechanical forms of ocean energy; i.e., waves, currents, and tides. Following an introductory section on wave mechanics, each of the three forms of ocean energy is considered under the headings of the resource, device types for energy extraction, and prognosis for practical implementation.

  1. A reappraisal of ocean wave studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yeli; Huang, Norden E.

    2012-11-01

    A reappraisal of wave theory from the beginning to the present day is made here. On the surface, the great progress in both theory and applications seems to be so successful that there would be no great challenge in wave studies anymore. On deeper examination, we found problems in many aspects of wave studies starting from the definition of frequency, the governing equations, the various source functions of wave models, the directional development of wind wavefield, the wave spectral form and finally the role of waves as they affect coastal and global ocean dynamics. This is a call for action for the wave research community. For future research, we have to consider these problems seriously and also to examine the basic physics of wave motion to determine their effects on other ocean dynamic processes quantitatively, rather than relying on parameterization in oceanic and geophysical applications.

  2. The physics of anomalous ('rogue') ocean waves.

    PubMed

    Adcock, Thomas A A; Taylor, Paul H

    2014-10-01

    There is much speculation that the largest and steepest waves may need to be modelled with different physics to the majority of the waves on the open ocean. This review examines the various physical mechanisms which may play an important role in the dynamics of extreme waves. We examine the evidence for these mechanisms in numerical and physical wavetanks, and look at the evidence that such mechanisms might also exist in the real ocean.

  3. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  4. Oceanic-wave-measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Barometer mounted on bouy senses wave heights. As wave motion raises and lowers barometer, pressure differential is proportional to wave height. Monitoring circuit samples barometer output every half cycle of wave motion and adds magnitudes of adjacent positive and negative peaks. Resulting output signals, proportional to wave height, are transmitted to central monitoring station.

  5. Wave action power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, L.V.

    1982-03-16

    A wave action power plant powered by the action of water waves has a drive shaft rotated by a plurality of drive units, each having a lever pivotally mounted on and extending from said shaft and carrying a weight, in the form of a float, which floats on the waves and rocks the lever up and down on the shaft. A ratchet mechanism causes said shaft to be rotated in one direction by the weight of said float after it has been raised by wave and the wave has passed, leaving said float free to move downwardly by gravity and apply its full weight to pull down on the lever and rotate the drive shaft. There being a large number of said drive units so that there are always some of the weights pulling down on their respective levers while other weights are being lifted by waves and thereby causing continuous rotation of the drive shaft in one direction. The said levers are so mounted that they may be easily raised to bring the weights into a position wherein they are readily accessible for cleaning the bottoms thereof to remove any accumulation of barnacles, mollusks and the like. There is also provided means for preventing the weights from colliding with each other as they independently move up and down on the waves.

  6. Making Waves about Our Oceans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, Karin

    1992-01-01

    Describes a Nevada elementary school's yearly Oceans Week program with schoolwide activities and integrated curricula focusing on the ocean. Each grade emphasizes different ocean habitats, and all subject areas support the theme. Hallways are decorated to look like assigned habitat, and PTA volunteers supervise activity stations. (SM)

  7. Open ocean Internal Waves, Namibia Coast, Africa.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    These open ocean Internal Waves were seen off the Namibia Coast, Africa (23.0S, 14.0E). The periodic and regularly spaced sets of internal waves most likely coincide with tidal periods about 12 hours apart. The wave length (distance from crest to crest) varies between 1.5 and 5.0 miles and the crest lengths stretch across and beyond the distance of the photo. The waves are intersecting the Namibia coastline at about a 30 degree angle.

  8. Book review: Rogue waves in the ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Review info: Rogue Waves in the Ocean. Advances in Geophysical and Environmental Mechanics and Mathematics. By Christian Kharif, Efim Pelinovsky and Alexey Slunyaev, 2009. ISBN: 978-3540884187, xiii, 216 pp.

  9. Modelling Ocean Surface Waves in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosekova, Lucia; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Coward, Andrew; Bertino, Laurent; Williams, Timothy; Nurser, George A. J.

    2015-04-01

    In the Polar Oceans, the surface ocean waves break up sea ice cover and create the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ), an area between the sea-ice free ocean and pack ice characterized by highly fragmented ice. This band of sea ice cover is undergoing dramatic changes due to sea ice retreat, with up to a 39% widening in the Arctic Ocean reported over the last three decades and projections predicting a continuing increase. The surface waves, sea ice and ocean interact in the MIZ through multiple complex feedbacks and processes which are not accounted for in any of the present-day climate models. To address this issue, we present a model development which implements surface ocean wave effects in the global Ocean General Circulation Model NEMO, coupled to the CICE sea ice model. Our implementation takes into account a number of physical processes specific to the MIZ dynamics. Incoming surface waves are attenuated due to reflection and energy dissipation induced by the presence of ice cover, which is in turn fragmented in response to external stresses. This process generates a distribution of floe sizes and impacts the dynamics of sea ice by the means of combined rheology that takes into account floe collisions and allows for a more realistic representation of the MIZ. We present results from the NEMO OGCM at 1 degree resolution with a wave-ice interaction module described above. The module introduces two new diagnostics previously unavailable in GCM's: surface wave spectra in sea ice covered areas, and floe size distribution due to wave-induced fragmentation. We discuss the impact of these processes on the ocean and sea ice state, including ocean circulation, mixing, stratification and the role of the MIZ in the ocean variability. The model predictions for the floe sizes in the summer Arctic Ocean range from 60 m in the inner MIZ to a few tens of meters near the open ocean, which agrees with estimates from the satellites. The extent of the MIZ throughout the year is also in

  10. Waves in Oceanic and Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthuijsen, Leo H.

    2007-01-01

    Waves in Oceanic and Coastal Waters describes the observation, analysis and prediction of wind-generated waves in the open ocean, in shelf seas, and in coastal regions with islands, channels, tidal flats and inlets, estuaries, fjords and lagoons. The book brings graduate students, researchers and engineers up-to-date with the science and technology involved, assuming only a basic understanding of physics, mathematics and statistics. Most of this richly illustrated book is devoted to the physical aspects of waves. After introducing observation techniques for waves, both at sea and from space, the book defines the parameters that characterize waves. Using basic statistical and physical concepts, the author discusses the prediction of waves in oceanic and coastal waters, first in terms of generalized observations, and then in terms of the more theoretical framework of the spectral energy balance. He gives the results of established theories and also the direction in which research is developing. The book ends with a description of SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore), the preferred computer model of the engineering community for predicting waves in coastal waters. Illustrations from the book are featured in color, along with student questions and answers on a web site Includes a detailed description of the wave model SWAN, the preferred computer model of the engineering community for predicting waves in coastal waters Appendices briefly review pre-requisite information on mathematics, statistics and physics

  11. Meteorological waves (by Ocean Color Scanner Data)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evdoshenko, M. A.

    2014-10-01

    Data of normalized water leaving radiance at a wavelength 859 nm Lwn(859) of 250-m spatial resolution obtained from Moderate Ocean Color Scanners (MODIS) installed on Aqua and Terra satellites were used to study meteorological waves. These waves are caused by atmospheric internal gravity waves at the expense of a change of atmospheric pressure impacting the sea surface and bringing a change in its level; they are observable everywhere in the ocean. Examples of meteorological waves were considered for the eastern part of the Black Sea, where they appeared as stripes of alternate brightness on Lwn(859) images. It is shown that meteorological waves at one and the same place can be totally generated by atmospheric waves spreading at different heights of the lower troposphere. The 3D characteristics of meteorological waves were evaluated including the direction of wave propagation, crest length reaching more than one hundred kilometers, wavelength of several tens centimeters, and wave amplitude of several tens of centimeters. For conditions of intermittent cloudiness, imposition in a difference mode of the level L1b radiance image with the signature of atmospheric waves in a cloud and of the level L2 water leaving the radiance image with the signature of meteorological waves enabled us to examine the phase structure of waves and to reveal the existence of resonance.

  12. Open Ocean Internal Waves, South China Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    These open ocean internal waves were seen in the south China Sea (19.5N, 114.5E). These sets of internal waves most likely coincide with tidal periods about 12 hours apart. The wave length (distance from crest to crest) varies between 1.5 and 5.0 miles and the crest lengths stretch across and beyond this photo for over 75 miles. At lower right, the surface waves are moving at a 30% angle to the internal waves, with parallel low level clouds.

  13. The Coordinated Ocean Wave Climate Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemer, Mark; Dobrynin, Mikhail; Erikson, Li; Lionello, Piero; Mori, Nobuhito; Semedo, Alvaro; Wang, Xiaolan

    2016-04-01

    Future 21st Century changes in wind-wave climate have broad implications for marine and coastal infrastructure and ecosystems. Atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (GCM) are now routinely used for assessing and providing future projections of climatological parameters such as temperature and precipitation, but generally these provide no information on ocean wind-waves. To fill this information gap a growing number of studies are using GCM outputs and independently producing global and regional scale wind-wave climate projections. Furthermore, additional studies are actively coupling wind-wave dependent atmosphere-ocean exchanges into GCMs, to improve physical representation and quantify the impact of waves in the coupled climate system, and can also deliver wave characteristics as another variable in the climate system. To consolidate these efforts, understand the sources of variance between projections generated by different methodologies and International groups, and ultimately provide a robust picture of the role of wind-waves in the climate system and their projected changes, we present outcomes of the JCOMM supported Coordinated Ocean Wave Climate Project (COWCLIP). The objective of COWCLIP is twofold: to make community based ensembles of wave climate projections openly accessible, to provide the necessary information to support diligent marine and coastal impacts of climate change studies; and to understand the effects and feedback influences of wind-waves in the coupled ocean-atmosphere climate system. We will present the current status of COWCLIP, providing an overview of the objectives, analysis and results of the initial phase - now complete - and the progress of ongoing phases of the project.

  14. Determination of ocean surface wave shape from forward scattered sound.

    PubMed

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2016-08-01

    Forward scattered sound from the ocean surface is inverted for wave shape during three periods: low wind, mix of wind and swell, and stormy. Derived wave profiles are spatially limited to a Fresnel region at or near the nominal surface specular reflection point. In some cases, the surface wave profiles exhibit unrealistic temporal and spatial properties. To remedy this, the spatial gradient of inverted waves is constrained to a maximum slope of 0.88. Under this global constraint, only surface waves during low wind conditions result in a modeled surface multipath that accurately matches data. The power spectral density of the inverted surface wave field saturates around a frequency of 8 Hz while upward looking SONAR saturates at 1 Hz. Each shows a high frequency spectral slope of -4 that is in agreement with various empirical ocean wave spectra. The improved high frequency resolution provided by the scattering inversion indicates that it is possible to remotely gain information about high frequency components of ocean waves. The inability of the inversion algorithm to determine physically realistic surface waves in periods of high wind indicates that bubbles and out of plane scattering become important in those operating scenarios.

  15. Determination of ocean surface wave shape from forward scattered sound.

    PubMed

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2016-08-01

    Forward scattered sound from the ocean surface is inverted for wave shape during three periods: low wind, mix of wind and swell, and stormy. Derived wave profiles are spatially limited to a Fresnel region at or near the nominal surface specular reflection point. In some cases, the surface wave profiles exhibit unrealistic temporal and spatial properties. To remedy this, the spatial gradient of inverted waves is constrained to a maximum slope of 0.88. Under this global constraint, only surface waves during low wind conditions result in a modeled surface multipath that accurately matches data. The power spectral density of the inverted surface wave field saturates around a frequency of 8 Hz while upward looking SONAR saturates at 1 Hz. Each shows a high frequency spectral slope of -4 that is in agreement with various empirical ocean wave spectra. The improved high frequency resolution provided by the scattering inversion indicates that it is possible to remotely gain information about high frequency components of ocean waves. The inability of the inversion algorithm to determine physically realistic surface waves in periods of high wind indicates that bubbles and out of plane scattering become important in those operating scenarios. PMID:27586711

  16. Refraction of coastal ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Kasischke, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    Refraction of gravity waves in the coastal area off Cape Hatteras, NC as documented by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery from Seasat orbit 974 (collected on September 3, 1978) is discussed. An analysis of optical Fourier transforms (OFTs) from more than 70 geographical positions yields estimates of wavelength and wave direction for each position. In addition, independent estimates of the same two quantities are calculated using two simple theoretical wave-refraction models. The OFT results are then compared with the theoretical results. A statistical analysis shows a significant degree of linear correlation between the data sets. This is considered to indicate that the Seasat SAR produces imagery whose clarity is sufficient to show the refraction of gravity waves in shallow water.

  17. Bragg Reflection of Ocean Waves from Sandbars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgar, S.; Raubenheimer, B.; Herbers, T. H.

    2002-12-01

    Resonant Bragg reflection of surface waves from a field of roughly shore-parallel sandbars was observed in Cape Cod Bay near Truro, MA during low energy wave conditions and during a storm. Although the Bragg resonance mechanism for wave reflection has been demonstrated convincingly in the laboratory, the corresponding impact of natural sandbars on ocean waves is not known. Multiple shore-parallel sandbars frequently are found in bays and gulfs, but observations of associated wave reflection have not been reported. Here, we present the first observations of resonant Bragg reflection of ocean surface waves by a natural field of sandbars. The waves were reflected both from the bars and from the steep beach shoreward of the bars, causing complicated interference patterns of seaward and shoreward propagating waves. The observed cross-shore variations in the onshore- and offshore-directed energy fluxes are consistent with theory (Yu and Mei JFM 2000) for resonant Bragg reflection, including a 20% decay of the incident wave energy flux that is an order of magnitude greater than expected for wave-orbital velocity induced bottom friction. When offshore wave heights were small (less than 0.25 m) there was no wave breaking across the sandbars, and the near-bottom velocities associated with the Bragg reflecting waves likely were too small to cause significant sediment transport. However, sediment mobilized during storms may be transported by velocity convergences and divergences associated with nodes and antinodes of the reflecting Bragg waves, possibly resulting in growth of the sandbars. Funding was provided by the Mellon Foundation, ONR, and NSF.

  18. Ocean, Wave, and Tidal Energy Systems: Current abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L.; Lane, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    Ocean, Wave, and Tidal Energy Systems (OES) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on all aspects of ocean thermal energy conversion systems based on exploitation of the temperature difference between the surface water and ocean depth. All aspects of salinity gradient power systems based on extracting energy from mixing fresh water with seawater are included, along with information on wave and tidal power. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Data Base (EDB) during the past two months. Also included are U.S. information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements.

  19. Open ocean Internal Waves, Namibia Coast, Africa.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    These open ocean Internal Waves were seen off the Namibia Coast, Africa (19.5S, 11.5E). The periodic and regularly spaced sets of incoming internal appear to be diffracting against the coastline and recombining to form a network of interference patterns. They seem to coincide with tidal periods about 12 hours apart and wave length (distance from crest to crest) varies between 1.5 and 5.0 miles and the crest lengths stretch beyond the image.

  20. Production simulator for wave power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsethaugen, K.

    1994-07-01

    The report gives plans and specifications for a wave power production simulator. The simulator is a computer program that computes how much of the energy in the open ocean that can be converted to usable energy at a site off or onshore. The production of wave power from sea waves is not an easy task. Efforts have been made in several countries to develop devices that can extract energy from the ocean, but very few have so far been successful. During the last 15 years a considerable know-how has been established in Norway on wave energy utilization. Part of this know-how will be included in the proposed production simulator. Evaluation of new devices and new sites can be done in a more comparative and efficient way by this tool. It will contribute to interdisciplinary activity in the field of wave power utilization, and should be applicable for the nonexpert. The simulator consists of several modules, joined together by computer software. The plans so far include purpose, needs and background for the development of a wave power plant simulator and a high level specification of the software and scope of work.

  1. Energy absorption from ocean waves: a free ride for cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Bose, N; Lien, J

    1990-06-22

    Flukes of cetaceans are capable of absorbing energy from ocean waves for propulsion. The extent of this energy absorption is demonstrated by considering the flukes of an immature fin whale, Balaenoptera physalus. In a fully developed seaway corresponding to a wind speed of 20 knots (around Beaufort force 5) and at a low swimming speed, of 2.5 m s-1, this whale was able to absorb up to 25% of its required propulsive power in head seas and 33% of propulsive power in following seas. Consequences of wave-energy absorption for energetics of cetacean migrations are discussed.

  2. Deep-Ocean Measurements of Tsunami Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Eblé, Marie C.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-ocean tsunami measurements play a major role in understanding the physics of tsunami wave generation and propagation, and in improving the effectiveness of tsunami warning systems. This paper provides an overview of the history of tsunami recording in the open ocean from the earliest days, approximately 50 years ago, to the present day. Modern tsunami monitoring systems such as the self-contained Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis and innovative cabled sensing networks, including, but not limited to, the Japanese bottom cable projects and the NEPTUNE-Canada geophysical bottom observatory, are highlighted. The specific peculiarities of seafloor longwave observations in the deep ocean are discussed and compared with observations recorded in coastal regions. Tsunami detection in bottom pressure observations is exemplified through analysis of distant (22,000 km from the source) records of the 2004 Sumatra tsunami in the northeastern Pacific.

  3. Ocean wave dynamics and El Nino

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, E.K.; Huang, B.; Shukla, J.

    1995-10-01

    The response of an ocean general circulation model to specified wind stress is used to understand the role of ocean wave propagation in the evolution of El Nino events in sea surface temperatures (SST) in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. In a control experiment the ocean model reproduces observed equatorial Pacific interannual variability in response to forcing by the observed wind stress. The ocean model is then forced with the same wind stress but with the time evolution of the wind stress forcing reversed. An analysis of the anomalies from the annual cycle in these two experiments delineates the parts of the response that are in equilibrium with and out of equilibrium with the wind stress forcing. The experiment demonstrates that the heat content is not in equilibrium with the wind stress forcing either on or near the equator. Very close to the equator the slope of the thermocline is in equilibrium with the wind stress, but the mean heat content is far from equilibrium. Slightly off of the equator in the western Pacific westward propagating heat content anomalies appear to originate in regions of strong wind stress forcing and then propagate to the western boundary. These westward propagating anomalies also depart significantly from equilibrium with the wind stress forcing. Additional experiments allow these westward propagating anomalies to be identified as freely propagating Rossby waves. The Rossby waves are shown to determine the equatorial heat content response to the wind stress forcing when they arrive at the western boundary and to be responsible for the nonequilibrium behavior of the equatorial mean heat content. A simplified coupled model is derived by fitting the results and estimating parameter values from the numerical experiments. 45 refs., 16 figs.

  4. Wave power potential in Malaysian territorial waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmida Mohd Nasir, Nor; Maulud, Khairul Nizam Abdul

    2016-06-01

    Up until today, Malaysia has used renewable energy technology such as biomass, solar and hydro energy for power generation and co-generation in palm oil industries and also for the generation of electricity, yet, we are still far behind other countries which have started to optimize waves for similar production. Wave power is a renewable energy (RE) transported by ocean waves. It is very eco-friendly and is easily reachable. This paper presents an assessment of wave power potential in Malaysian territorial waters including waters of Sabah and Sarawak. In this research, data from Malaysia Meteorology Department (MetMalaysia) is used and is supported by a satellite imaginary obtained from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Malaysia Remote Sensing Agency (ARSM) within the time range of the year 1992 until 2007. There were two types of analyses conducted which were mask analysis and comparative analysis. Mask analysis of a research area is the analysis conducted to filter restricted and sensitive areas. Meanwhile, comparative analysis is an analysis conducted to determine the most potential area for wave power generation. Four comparative analyses which have been carried out were wave power analysis, comparative analysis of wave energy power with the sea topography, hot-spot area analysis and comparative analysis of wave energy with the wind speed. These four analyses underwent clipping processes using Geographic Information System (GIS) to obtain the final result. At the end of this research, the most suitable area to develop a wave energy converter was found, which is in the waters of Terengganu and Sarawak. Besides that, it was concluded that the average potential energy that can be generated in Malaysian territorial waters is between 2.8kW/m to 8.6kW/m.

  5. Oceanic lithospheric S wave velocities from the analysis of P wave polarization at the ocean floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, Katrin; Krüger, Frank; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-09-01

    Our knowledge of the absolute S wave velocities of the oceanic lithosphere is mainly based on global surface wave tomography, local active seismic or compliance measurements using oceanic infragravity waves. The results of tomography give a rather smooth picture of the actual S wave velocity structure and local measurements have limitations regarding the range of elastic parameters or the geometry of the measurement. Here, we use the P wave polarization (apparent P wave incidence angle) of teleseismic events to investigate the S wave velocity structure of the oceanic crust and the upper tens of kilometres of the mantle beneath single stations. In this study, we present an up to our knowledge new relation of the apparent P wave incidence angle at the ocean bottom dependent on the half space S wave velocity. We analyse the angle in different period ranges at ocean bottom stations (OBS) to derive apparent S wave velocity profiles. These profiles are dependent on the S wave velocity as well as on the thickness of the layers in the subsurface. Consequently, their interpretation results in a set of equally valid models. We analyse the apparent P wave incidence angles of an OBS data set which was collected in the Eastern Mid Atlantic. We are able to determine reasonable S wave velocity-depth models by a three step quantitative modelling after a manual data quality control, although layer resonance sometimes influences the estimated apparent S wave velocities. The apparent S wave velocity profiles are well explained by an oceanic PREM model in which the upper part is replaced by four layers consisting of a water column, a sediment, a crust and a layer representing the uppermost mantle. The obtained sediment has a thickness between 0.3 km and 0.9 km with S wave velocities between 0.7 km s-1 and 1.4 km s-1. The estimated total crustal thickness varies between 4 km and 10 km with S wave velocities between 3.5 km s-1 and 4.3 km s-1. We find a slight increase of the total

  6. Wave-wave interactions and deep ocean acoustics.

    PubMed

    Guralnik, Z; Bourdelais, J; Zabalgogeazcoa, X; Farrell, W E

    2013-10-01

    Deep ocean acoustics, in the absence of shipping and wildlife, is driven by surface processes. Best understood is the signal generated by non-linear surface wave interactions, the Longuet-Higgins mechanism, which dominates from 0.1 to 10 Hz, and may be significant for another octave. For this source, the spectral matrix of pressure and vector velocity is derived for points near the bottom of a deep ocean resting on an elastic half-space. In the absence of a bottom, the ratios of matrix elements are universal constants. Bottom effects vitiate the usual "standing wave approximation," but a weaker form of the approximation is shown to hold, and this is used for numerical calculations. In the weak standing wave approximation, the ratios of matrix elements are independent of the surface wave spectrum, but depend on frequency and the propagation environment. Data from the Hawaii-2 Observatory are in excellent accord with the theory for frequencies between 0.1 and 1 Hz, less so at higher frequencies. Insensitivity of the spectral ratios to wind, and presumably waves, is indeed observed in the data.

  7. Spatial characteristics of ocean surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmrich, Johannes; Thomson, Jim; Rogers, W. Erick; Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Lehner, Susanne

    2016-08-01

    The spatial variability of open ocean wave fields on scales of O (10km) is assessed from four different data sources: TerraSAR-X SAR imagery, four drifting SWIFT buoys, a moored waverider buoy, and WAVEWATCH III Ⓡ model runs. Two examples from the open north-east Pacific, comprising of a pure wind sea and a mixed sea with swell, are given. Wave parameters attained from observations have a natural variability, which decreases with increasing record length or acquisition area. The retrieval of dominant wave scales from point observations and model output are inherently different to dominant scales retrieved from spatial observations. This can lead to significant differences in the dominant steepness associated with a given wave field. These uncertainties have to be taken into account when models are assessed against observations or when new wave retrieval algorithms from spatial or temporal data are tested. However, there is evidence of abrupt changes in wave field characteristics that are larger than the expected methodological uncertainties.

  8. Feature Analysis of Ocean Waves in North Central Pacific Ocean Based ASAR Wave Spectral Data and Wave Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jichao; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Jungang; Meng, Junmin

    2013-01-01

    Directional Spectrum of the ocean waves could be obtained form Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) wave spectral data. The wave model WAVEWATCH III (WW3) is applied to simulate the ocean wave field. Study area is 185°E-215°E and 15°N-30°N, time range is from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2008. Based on ASAR and buoy data, the wave numerical simulation and assimilation of the north central Pacific Ocean is carried out. The validation and assessment of ASAR ocean wave spectra products is performed. The optimal interpolation (OI) algorithm is used in model WW3 for assimilating ASAR wave spectra data. Based on the result of the simulation and assimilation, mean waves direction (MWD), significant wave height (SWH) and mean wave period (MWP) are analysed. SWH and MWP are larger in winter and SWH reach to more than 2.5 meters. Seasonal change of SWH and MWP are significant.

  9. Numerical study of ocean wave effect on offshore wind farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lian; Yang, Di; Meneveau, Charles

    2013-11-01

    Wind power at sea has become increasingly important in renewable energy study. For energy harvesting, winds over oceans have many advantages over winds on land, for example, larger and open surface area, faster wind speed, and more wind resource close to high population regions. On the other hand, the presence of ocean waves introduces complexities to wind turbines. There is a critical need to study the dynamical interactions among marine atmospheric boundary layer, ocean wave field, and floating turbines. In this research, we study offshore wind farm by performing large-eddy simulations for winds coupled with potential-flow-theory based simulations for broadband irregular waves, with the wind turbines represented by an actuator disk model. Our results show that windseas at different development stages result in different sea-surface roughness and have an appreciable effect on wind profile and the energy extraction rate of the turbines. If swells are present, swell-to-wind momentum and energy transfer further changes the wind field to introduce oscillations in as well as modify the mean of the wind power. DY and LS acknowledge the support of NSF-CBET-1341062. CM acknowledges the support of NSF-AGS-1045189 and NSF-OISE-1243482.

  10. Soliton turbulence in shallow water ocean surface waves.

    PubMed

    Costa, Andrea; Osborne, Alfred R; Resio, Donald T; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivì, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E

    2014-09-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of soliton turbulence in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a dense soliton gas, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries equation, a completely integrable soliton system: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic-quasiperiodic boundary conditions the ergodic solutions of Korteweg-deVries are exactly solvable by finite gap theory (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as ∼ω-1. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter densely packed soliton wave trains from the data. We apply FGT to determine the soliton spectrum and find that the low frequency ∼ω-1 region is soliton dominated. The solitons have random FGT phases, a soliton random phase approximation, which supports our interpretation of the data as soliton turbulence. From the probability density of the solitons we are able to demonstrate that the solitons are dense in time and highly non-Gaussian.

  11. Soliton Turbulence in Shallow Water Ocean Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Andrea; Osborne, Alfred R.; Resio, Donald T.; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivı, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E.

    2014-09-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of soliton turbulence in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a dense soliton gas, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries equation, a completely integrable soliton system: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic-quasiperiodic boundary conditions the ergodic solutions of Korteweg-deVries are exactly solvable by finite gap theory (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as ˜ω-1. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter densely packed soliton wave trains from the data. We apply FGT to determine the soliton spectrum and find that the low frequency ˜ω-1 region is soliton dominated. The solitons have random FGT phases, a soliton random phase approximation, which supports our interpretation of the data as soliton turbulence. From the probability density of the solitons we are able to demonstrate that the solitons are dense in time and highly non-Gaussian.

  12. Soliton turbulence in shallow water ocean surface waves.

    PubMed

    Costa, Andrea; Osborne, Alfred R; Resio, Donald T; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivì, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E

    2014-09-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of soliton turbulence in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a dense soliton gas, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries equation, a completely integrable soliton system: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic-quasiperiodic boundary conditions the ergodic solutions of Korteweg-deVries are exactly solvable by finite gap theory (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as ∼ω-1. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter densely packed soliton wave trains from the data. We apply FGT to determine the soliton spectrum and find that the low frequency ∼ω-1 region is soliton dominated. The solitons have random FGT phases, a soliton random phase approximation, which supports our interpretation of the data as soliton turbulence. From the probability density of the solitons we are able to demonstrate that the solitons are dense in time and highly non-Gaussian. PMID:25238388

  13. Mesospheric Mountain Wave Breaking and Oceanic Wave Signatures During DEEPWAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Pautet, P. D.; Fritts, D. C.; Doyle, J. D.; Eckermann, S. D.; Williams, B. P.; Kaifler, B.; Bossert, K.; Criddle, N.

    2015-12-01

    DEEPWAVE is an international program designed to quantify gravity wave (GW) dynamics and effects from the ground to the upper mesosphere in unprecedented detail utilizing a range of airborne and ground-based measurements. DEEPWAVE was based on the South Island, New Zealand, to provide access to well-documented, but little understood, New Zealand and Tasmania "hotspots" as identified in satellite stratospheric measurements. Deep orographic GWs over New Zealand were a primary target, but multiple flights were also conducted over the Southern Ocean and Tasman Sea to quantify deep GW arising from convection, jet streams, and frontal systems. This presentation highlights new airborne and ground-based results obtained using an Advanced OH Mesospheric Temperature Mapper (AMTM) which creates high-quality intensity and temperature maps of a broad spectrum of mesospheric GWs. Two AMTM's were employed, one sited at the NIWA Observatory, Lauder (45°S), on the South Island, and one on the NSF GV Gulfstream aircraft which was supplemented by two side viewing IR OH imagers providing large field, ~900 km cross-track, GW maps. These instruments formed part of a comprehensive measurements capability including airborne Rayleigh and Na lidars, dropsondes, ground-based Rayleigh lidar, all-sky imagers and wind measurements. A total of 25 long duration (typically 7-8 hours) nighttime flights were conducted creating an exceptionally rich data set. Here we focus on two key initial findings (a) discovery of large amplitude, mesospheric mountain waves and their intermittent wave breaking signatures, and (b) first measurements of large-field open-ocean mesospheric GW and their near-identical stratospheric wave signatures using AIRS satellite and model forecasting data.

  14. Ocean surface waves in an ice-free Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Guo

    2016-08-01

    The retreat of the Arctic ice edge implies that global ocean surface wave models have to be extended at high latitudes or even to cover the North Pole in the future. The obstacles for conventional latitude-longitude grid wave models to cover the whole Arctic are the polar problems associated with their Eulerian advection schemes, including the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) restriction on diminishing grid length towards the Pole, the singularity at the Pole and the invalid scalar assumption for vector components defined relative to the local east direction. A spherical multiple-cell (SMC) grid is designed to solve these problems. It relaxes the CFL restriction by merging the longitudinal cells towards the Poles. A round polar cell is used to remove the singularity of the differential equation at the Pole. A fixed reference direction is introduced to define vector components within a limited Arctic part in mitigation of the scalar assumption errors at high latitudes. The SMC grid has been implemented in the WAVEWATCH III model and validated with altimeter and buoy observations, except for the Arctic part, which could not be fully tested due to a lack of observations as the polar region is still covered by sea ice. Here, an idealised ice-free Arctic case is used to test the Arctic part and it is compared with a reference case with real ice coverage. The comparison indicates that swell wave energy will increase near the ice-free Arctic coastlines due to increased fetch. An expanded Arctic part is used for comparisons of the Arctic part with available satellite measurements. It also provides a direct model comparison between the two reference systems in their overlapping zone.

  15. The sources of deep ocean infragravity waves observed in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Wayne; Ballu, Valerie; Bertin, Xavier; Karpytchev, Mikhail

    2015-07-01

    Infragravity waves are long-period (25-250 s) ocean surface gravity waves generated in coastal zones through wave-wave interactions or oscillation of the breaking point. Most of the infragravity wave energy is trapped or dissipated near coastlines, but a small percentage escapes into the open oceans. The source of deep ocean infragravity waves is debated, specifically whether they come mostly from regions with strong source waves or from sites with particular morphologies/orientations. We correlate measurements of infragravity waves in the deep North Atlantic Ocean with infragravity wave generation parameters throughout the Atlantic Ocean to find the dominant sources of deep ocean infragravity wave energy in the North Atlantic Ocean. The deep ocean infragravity wave data are from a 5 year deployment of absolute pressure gauges west of the Azores islands (37°N, 35°W) and shorter data sets from seafloor tsunami gauges (DART buoys). Two main sources are identified: one off of the west coast of southern Europe and northern Africa (25°N-40°N) in northern hemisphere winter and the other off the west coast of equatorial Africa (the Gulf of Guinea) in southern hemisphere winter. These regions have relatively weak source waves and weak infragravity wave propagation paths to the main measurement site, indicating that that the site morphology/orientation dominates the creation of deep ocean infragravity waves. Both regions have also been identified as potential sources of global seismological noise, suggesting that the same mechanisms may be behind the generation of deep ocean infragravity waves and global seismological noise in the frequency band from 0.001 to 0.04 Hz.

  16. Synergistic measurements of ocean winds and waves from SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Xiaofeng; Perrie, William; He, Yijun

    2015-09-01

    In this study we present a synergistic method to retrieve both ocean surface wave and wind fields from spaceborne quad-polarization (QP) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mode data. This algorithm integrates QP-SAR wind vector retrieval model and the wave retrieval model, with consideration to the nonlinear mapping relationship between ocean wave spectra and SAR image spectra, in order to synergistically retrieve wind fields and wave directional spectra. The method does not require a priori information on the sea state. It combines the observed VV-polarized SAR image spectra with the retrieved wind vectors from the VH-polarized SAR image, to estimate the wind-generated wave directional spectra. The differences between the observed SAR spectra and optimal SAR image spectra associated with the wind waves are interpreted as the contributions from the swell waves. The retrieved ocean wave spectra are used to estimate the integrated spectral wave parameters such as significant wave heights, wavelengths, wave directions and wave periods. The wind and wave parameters retrieved by QP-SAR are validated against those measured by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) directional wave buoys under different sea states. The validation results show that the QP-SAR SAR has potential to simultaneously measure the ocean surface waves and wind fields from space.

  17. Short wind waves on the ocean: Long-wave and wind-speed dependences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, William J.

    2015-09-01

    This second paper of our set on short wind waves on the ocean utilizes the wavenumber-frequency spectrum of short wave heights, F(k,f), derived in our previous paper to investigate kinematic effects on the dependence of the frequency spectrum, F(f), and the wavenumber spectrum, F(k), on long-wave height. We show that the model predicts that neither F(f) nor F(k) are exactly power law functions of their independent variables and that F(f) varies with significant wave height much more than F(k) does. After calibrating the model against wave gauges, we also investigate the dependence of mean-square-slopes (mss), mean-square heights (msh) and root-mean-square orbital velocities (rmsv) of short ocean waves on wind speed and maximum frequency or wavenumber. We use data from the wire wave gauges on University of Miami's Air-Sea Interaction Spar (ASIS) buoy for calibration purposes. Frequency spectra from the wave gauges begin to be affected by noise at about 2.5 Hz. Therefore, above 1 Hz, we utilize F(f) from the modeled F(k,f) to extend the frequency dependence up to 180 Hz. We set modeled spectral densities by matching measured spectra at 1 Hz. Using the calibrated F(f,k), we are able to estimate the average value of the total mss, for long and short waves, and its upwind and crosswind components up to 180 Hz for a variety of wind speeds. The average mss values are in good agreement with the measurements of Cox and Munk [1954], although the upwind and crosswind components agree less well.

  18. Infragravity waves in the deep ocean: An upward revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aucan, J.; Ardhuin, F.

    2013-07-01

    Ocean infragravity waves are surface gravity waves with periods of several minutes and corresponding wavelengths of up to tens of kilometers. When propagating freely in the deep ocean, these waves are typically small, several centimeters at most, so they have been seldom studied. In the context of future wide-swath altimetry missions, these waves need to be better quantified as they have wavelengths that will be resolved by such instruments. Here, we analyze the global climatology and variability of infragravity waves in the deep ocean using data from over 40 open ocean locations, with depths larger than 2000 m. We show that typical infragravity wave heights are higher than previously estimated, with winter-averaged values up to 11 mm off the U.S. West Coast, and typically less than 6 mm in the tropics. The mid to high latitudes exhibit a strong seasonal cycle consistent with the local variability of the wind-waves, while the tropical Pacific has a higher energy level during the Austral winter that does not correlate well with the local wind-waves, suggesting a remote source for the recorded infragravity waves. These infragravity wave energies are expected to be a significant contribution to the error budget for possible measurements of sea level associated to sub-mesoscale currents at horizontal scales around 10 km. Hence, a global numerical model of infragravity waves will likely be necessary for the analysis of the planned Surface Water Ocean Topography mission.

  19. Ocean thermal gradient hydraulic power plant.

    PubMed

    Beck, E J

    1975-07-25

    Solar energy stored in the oceans may be used to generate power by exploiting ploiting thermal gradients. A proposed open-cycle system uses low-pressure steam to elevate vate water, which is then run through a hydraulic turbine to generate power. The device is analogous to an air lift pump. PMID:17813707

  20. Real world ocean rogue waves explained without the modulational instability.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Francesco; Brennan, Joseph; Ponce de León, Sonia; Dudley, John; Dias, Frédéric

    2016-06-21

    Since the 1990s, the modulational instability has commonly been used to explain the occurrence of rogue waves that appear from nowhere in the open ocean. However, the importance of this instability in the context of ocean waves is not well established. This mechanism has been successfully studied in laboratory experiments and in mathematical studies, but there is no consensus on what actually takes place in the ocean. In this work, we question the oceanic relevance of this paradigm. In particular, we analyze several sets of field data in various European locations with various tools, and find that the main generation mechanism for rogue waves is the constructive interference of elementary waves enhanced by second-order bound nonlinearities and not the modulational instability. This implies that rogue waves are likely to be rare occurrences of weakly nonlinear random seas.

  1. Real world ocean rogue waves explained without the modulational instability.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Francesco; Brennan, Joseph; Ponce de León, Sonia; Dudley, John; Dias, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the modulational instability has commonly been used to explain the occurrence of rogue waves that appear from nowhere in the open ocean. However, the importance of this instability in the context of ocean waves is not well established. This mechanism has been successfully studied in laboratory experiments and in mathematical studies, but there is no consensus on what actually takes place in the ocean. In this work, we question the oceanic relevance of this paradigm. In particular, we analyze several sets of field data in various European locations with various tools, and find that the main generation mechanism for rogue waves is the constructive interference of elementary waves enhanced by second-order bound nonlinearities and not the modulational instability. This implies that rogue waves are likely to be rare occurrences of weakly nonlinear random seas. PMID:27323897

  2. Real world ocean rogue waves explained without the modulational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Francesco; Brennan, Joseph; Ponce de León, Sonia; Dudley, John; Dias, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Since the 1990s, the modulational instability has commonly been used to explain the occurrence of rogue waves that appear from nowhere in the open ocean. However, the importance of this instability in the context of ocean waves is not well established. This mechanism has been successfully studied in laboratory experiments and in mathematical studies, but there is no consensus on what actually takes place in the ocean. In this work, we question the oceanic relevance of this paradigm. In particular, we analyze several sets of field data in various European locations with various tools, and find that the main generation mechanism for rogue waves is the constructive interference of elementary waves enhanced by second-order bound nonlinearities and not the modulational instability. This implies that rogue waves are likely to be rare occurrences of weakly nonlinear random seas.

  3. Real world ocean rogue waves explained without the modulational instability

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Francesco; Brennan, Joseph; Ponce de León, Sonia; Dudley, John; Dias, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the modulational instability has commonly been used to explain the occurrence of rogue waves that appear from nowhere in the open ocean. However, the importance of this instability in the context of ocean waves is not well established. This mechanism has been successfully studied in laboratory experiments and in mathematical studies, but there is no consensus on what actually takes place in the ocean. In this work, we question the oceanic relevance of this paradigm. In particular, we analyze several sets of field data in various European locations with various tools, and find that the main generation mechanism for rogue waves is the constructive interference of elementary waves enhanced by second-order bound nonlinearities and not the modulational instability. This implies that rogue waves are likely to be rare occurrences of weakly nonlinear random seas. PMID:27323897

  4. Nonlinear shallow ocean-wave soliton interactions on flat beaches.

    PubMed

    Ablowitz, Mark J; Baldwin, Douglas E

    2012-09-01

    Ocean waves are complex and often turbulent. While most ocean-wave interactions are essentially linear, sometimes two or more waves interact in a nonlinear way. For example, two or more waves can interact and yield waves that are much taller than the sum of the original wave heights. Most of these shallow-water nonlinear interactions look like an X or a Y or two connected Ys; at other times, several lines appear on each side of the interaction region. It was thought that such nonlinear interactions are rare events: they are not. Here we report that such nonlinear interactions occur every day, close to low tide, on two flat beaches that are about 2000 km apart. These interactions are closely related to the analytic, soliton solutions of a widely studied multidimensional nonlinear wave equation. On a much larger scale, tsunami waves can merge in similar ways.

  5. North Atlantic Ocean drivers of the 2015 European heat wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchez, Aurélie; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Josey, Simon A.; Hirschi, Joël; Evans, Gwyn

    2016-04-01

    Major European heat waves have occurred on several occasions in the past two decades, including the summer of 2015, with dramatic socioeconomic impacts and in a globally warming world, heat waves are expected to become longer, more frequent and more intense. Nevertheless, our understanding of heat wave causes remains at a basic level, limiting the usefulness of event prediction. We show that 2015 was the most extreme heat wave in central Europe in the past 35 years. We find that the heat wave was preceded by cold mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean surface temperatures, which contributed to its development. In order to explain the genesis of the cold ocean anomaly, we consider surface heat loss, ocean heat content and wind driven upwelling. The anomaly is primarily due to extreme ocean heat loss in the preceding two winters and re-emergent cold ocean water masses. Further analysis indicates that this ocean anomaly was a driver for the 2015 heat wave as it favoured a stationary position of the Jet Stream, which steered Atlantic cyclones away from central Europe towards northern Europe. The cold Atlantic anomaly was also present during the most devastating European heat waves since the 1980s indicating that it is a common factor in the development of these extreme events.

  6. Climatic Influences on Indian and Pacific Ocean Heat Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scannell, H. A.; England, M. H.; Sen Gupta, A.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale ocean heat waves can be extremely damaging for both ecosystem functioning and fishery productivity. Unlike terrestrial heat waves, little work has been done to understand the dynamics of heat waves in sea surface temperature (SST). New high spatial and temporal resolution SST products now make it possible to investigate regions of persistent extreme anomalies in SST. Here we characterize the properties of Indian and Pacific Ocean heat waves and investigate how they are modulated by the dominant modes of Indo-Pacific climate variability. In particular, we investigate the influence of El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) in preconditioning ocean heat waves. For the purposes of this study we define heat waves based on an index of cumulative SST 1ºC above the annual maximum with a geographic extent on the order of 105 square kilometers. We examine the prevalence of ocean heat waves during different phases of ENSO and the IOD, and explore the oceanic and atmospheric processes that give rise to these events.

  7. Rogue waves in the ocean - review and progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinovsky, Efim; Kharif, Christian; Slunyaev, Alexey

    2010-05-01

    Rogue waves in the ocean and physical mechanisms of their appearance are discussed. Theyse waves are among waves naturally observed by people on the sea surface that represent inseparable feature of the Ocean. Rogue waves appear from nowhere, cause danger and disappear at once. They may occur at the surface of a relatively calm sea, reach not very high amplitudes, but be fatal for ships and crew due to their unexpectedness and abnormal features. The billows appear suddenly exceeding the surrounding waves twice and more, and obtained many names: abnormal, exceptional, extreme, giant, huge, sudden, episodic, freak, monster, rogue, vicious, killer, mad- or rabid-dog waves; cape rollers, holes in the sea, walls of water, three sisters… Freak monsters, though living for seconds, were able to arouse superstitious fear of the crew, cause damage, death of heedless sailors or the whole ship. All these epithets are full of human fear and feebleness. The serious studies of the phenomenon started about 20-30 years ago and have been intensified during the recent decade. The research is being conducted in different fields: in physics (search of physical mechanisms and adequate models of wave enhancement and statistics), in geoscience (determining the regions and weather conditions when rogue waves are most probable), and in ocean and coastal engineering (estimations of the wave loads on fixed and drifting floating structures). Thus, scientists and engineers specializing in different subject areas are involved in the solution of the problem. The state-of-art of the rogue wave study is summarized in our book [Kharif, Ch., Pelinovsky, E., and Slunyaev, A. Rogue Waves in the Ocean. Springer, 2009] and presented in given review. Firstly, we start with a brief introduction to the problem of freak waves aiming at formulating what is understood as rogue or freak waves, what consequences their existence imply in our life, why people are so worried about them. Then we discuss existing

  8. Electric power generation: Tidal and wave power. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the feasibility of obtaining electric power from ocean disturbances such as waves, swells, and tides. The engineering and economic aspects are emphasized. Theoretical analysis of the power plant potential of selected sites around the world is included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Electric power generation: Tidal and wave power. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the feasibility of obtaining electric power from ocean disturbances such as waves, swells, and tides. The engineering and economic aspects are emphasized. Theoretical analysis of the power plant potential of selected sites around the world is included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Evidence for infragravity wave-tide resonance in deep oceans.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Hiroko; Fukao, Yoshio; Kanazawa, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    Ocean tides are the oscillatory motions of seawater forced by the gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun with periods of a half to a day and wavelengths of the semi-Pacific to Pacific scale. Ocean infragravity (IG) waves are sea-surface gravity waves with periods of several minutes and wavelengths of several dozen kilometres. Here we report the first evidence of the resonance between these two ubiquitous phenomena, mutually very different in period and wavelength, in deep oceans. The evidence comes from long-term, large-scale observations with arrays of broadband ocean-bottom seismometers located at depths of more than 4,000 m in the Pacific Ocean. This observational evidence is substantiated by a theoretical argument that IG waves and the tide can resonantly couple and that such coupling occurs over unexpectedly wide areas of the Pacific Ocean. Through this resonant coupling, some of ocean tidal energy is transferred in deep oceans to IG wave energy. PMID:20981016

  11. A simulation of synthetic aperture radar imaging of ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    A simulation of radar imaging of ocean waves with synthetic aperture techniques is presented. The modelling is simplistic from the oceanographic and electromagnetic viewpoint in order to minimize the computational problems, yet reveal some of the physical problems associated with the imaging of moving ocean waves. The model assumes: (1) The radar illuminates a one-dimensional, one harmonic ocean wave. (2) The scattering is assumed to be governed by geometrical optics. (3) The radar is assumed to be down-looking, with Doppler processing (range processing is suppressed due to the one-dimensional nature of the problem). (4) The beamwidth of the antenna (or integration time) is assumed to be sufficiently narrow to restrict the specular points of the peaks and troughs of the wave. The results show that conventional processing of the image gives familiar results if the ocean waves are stationary. When the ocean wave dispersion relationship is satisfied, the image is smeared due to the motion of the specular points over the integration time. In effect, the image of the ocean is transferred to the near field of the synthetic aperture.

  12. Distribution of breaking waves at the ocean surface.

    PubMed

    Melville, W Kendall; Matusov, Peter

    2002-05-01

    Surface waves play an important role in the exchange of mass, momentum and energy between the atmosphere and the ocean. The development of the wave field depends on wind, wave-wave and wave-current interactions and wave dissipation owing to breaking, which is accompanied by momentum fluxes from waves to currents. Wave breaking supports air-sea fluxes of heat and gas, which have a profound effect on weather and climate. But wave breaking is poorly quantified and understood. Here we present measurements of wave breaking, using aerial imaging and analysis, and provide a statistical description of related sea-surface processes. We find that the distribution of the length of breaking fronts per unit area of sea surface is proportional to the cube of the wind speed and that, within the measured range of the speed of the wave fronts, the length of breaking fronts per unit area is an exponential function of the speed of the front. We also find that the fraction of the ocean surface mixed by breaking waves, which is important for air-sea exchange, is dominated by wave breaking at low velocities and short wavelengths.

  13. Mechanical Extraction of Power From Ocean Currents and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Chao, Yi

    2010-01-01

    A proposed scheme for generating electric power from rivers and from ocean currents, tides, and waves is intended to offer economic and environmental advantages over prior such schemes, some of which are at various stages of implementation, others of which have not yet advanced beyond the concept stage. This scheme would be less environmentally objectionable than are prior schemes that involve the use of dams to block rivers and tidal flows. This scheme would also not entail the high maintenance costs of other proposed schemes that call for submerged electric generators and cables, which would be subject to degradation by marine growth and corrosion. A basic power-generation system according to the scheme now proposed would not include any submerged electrical equipment. The submerged portion of the system would include an all-mechanical turbine/pump unit that would superficially resemble a large land-based wind turbine (see figure). The turbine axis would turn slowly as it captured energy from the local river flow, ocean current, tidal flow, or flow from an ocean-wave device. The turbine axis would drive a pump through a gearbox to generate an enclosed flow of water, hydraulic fluid, or other suitable fluid at a relatively high pressure [typically approx.500 psi (approx.3.4 MPa)]. The pressurized fluid could be piped to an onshore or offshore facility, above the ocean surface, where it would be used to drive a turbine that, in turn, would drive an electric generator. The fluid could be recirculated between the submerged unit and the power-generation facility in a closed flow system; alternatively, if the fluid were seawater, it could be taken in from the ocean at the submerged turbine/pump unit and discharged back into the ocean from the power-generation facility. Another alternative would be to use the pressurized flow to charge an elevated reservoir or other pumped-storage facility, from whence fluid could later be released to drive a turbine/generator unit at a

  14. Book review: Nonlinear ocean waves and the inverse scattering transform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear Ocean Waves and the Inverse Scattering Transform is a comprehensive examination of ocean waves built upon the theory of nonlinear Fourier analysis. The renowned author, Alfred R. Osborne, is perhaps best known for the discovery of internal solitons in the Andaman Sea during the 1970s. In this book, he provides an extensive treatment of nonlinear water waves based on a nonlinear spectral theory known as the inverse scattering transform. The writing is exceptional throughout the book, which is particularly useful in explaining some of the more difficult mathematical concepts.  Review info: Nonlinear Ocean Waves and the Inverse Scattering Transform. By Alfred R. Osborne, 2010. ISBN: 978-125286299, 917 pp.

  15. Open Ocean Internal Waves near Borneo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This unusual packet of internal waves was observed in Indonesia off the coast of Borneo (8.0N, 119.0E) early in the mission. These internal waves are thought to form at the boundries between water layers of different salinity or tempeature. The surface expression of these waves is very subtle but it can be seen quite readily from space in sunglint conditions. Several small eddies can also be seen in the sunglint pattern.

  16. Effects of the Gulf Stream on ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holthuijsen, L. H.; Tolman, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study a third-generation numerical wave model is used to study effects of a straight Gulf Stream ring on ocean waves in swell and storm conditions. The model accounts for all relevant processes of propagation, generation, and dissipation of the waves (including current effects) without imposing a priori restraints on the spectral development of the waves. The dominating mechanism affecting the waves appears to be current-induced refraction even though the short-crestedness of the incoming waves tends to mask its effects (also in swell conditions). Depending on wind and wave conditions, refraction may trap locally generated waves in the straight Gulf Stream or it may reflect wave energy back to the open ocean. In the Gulf Stream ring, refraction induces a considerable variation in significant wave height and short-crestedness, but it hardly affects the mean wave direction. In storm conditions the processes of generation and dissipation are considerably enhanced in countercurrent situations and reduced following-current situations.

  17. Novel two-stage piezoelectric-based ocean wave energy harvesters for moored or unmoored buoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, R.; Rastegar, J.

    2009-03-01

    Harvesting mechanical energy from ocean wave oscillations for conversion to electrical energy has long been pursued as an alternative or self-contained power source. The attraction to harvesting energy from ocean waves stems from the sheer power of the wave motion, which can easily exceed 50 kW per meter of wave front. The principal barrier to harvesting this power is the very low and varying frequency of ocean waves, which generally vary from 0.1Hz to 0.5Hz. In this paper the application of a novel class of two-stage electrical energy generators to buoyant structures is presented. The generators use the buoy's interaction with the ocean waves as a low-speed input to a primary system, which, in turn, successively excites an array of vibratory elements (secondary system) into resonance - like a musician strumming a guitar. The key advantage of the present system is that by having two decoupled systems, the low frequency and highly varying buoy motion is converted into constant and much higher frequency mechanical vibrations. Electrical energy may then be harvested from the vibrating elements of the secondary system with high efficiency using piezoelectric elements. The operating principles of the novel two-stage technique are presented, including analytical formulations describing the transfer of energy between the two systems. Also, prototypical design examples are offered, as well as an in-depth computer simulation of a prototypical heaving-based wave energy harvester which generates electrical energy from the up-and-down motion of a buoy riding on the ocean's surface.

  18. Further SEASAT SAR coastal ocean wave analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Shuchman, R. A.; Meadows, G. A.; Jackson, P. L.; Tseng, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis techniques used to exploit SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data of gravity waves are discussed and the SEASAT SAR's ability to monitor large scale variations in gravity wave fields in both deep and shallow water is evaluated. The SAR analysis techniques investigated included motion compensation adjustments and the semicausal model for spectral analysis of SAR wave data. It was determined that spectra generated from fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT) of SAR wave data were not significantly altered when either range telerotation adjustments or azimuth focus shifts were used during processing of the SAR signal histories, indicating that SEASAT imagery of gravity waves is not significantly improved or degraded by motion compensation adjustments. Evaluation of the semicausal (SC) model using SEASAT SAR data from Rev. 974 indicates that the SC spectral estimates were not significantly better than the FFT results.

  19. A Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean-Wave Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, R. A.; Smith, T.; Rogers, W. E.; Jensen, T. G.; Chu, P.; Campbell, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    A growing interest in the impacts that large and small scale ocean and atmospheric events (El Niño, hurricanes, etc.) have on weather forecasting has led to the coupling of atmospheric, ocean circulation and ocean wave models. The Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS™ ) consists of the Navy's atmospheric model coupled to the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) and the wave models SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) and WAVEWATCH III (WW3™). In a fully coupled mode, COAMPS, NCOM, and SWAN (or WW3) may be integrated concurrently so that currents and water levels, wave-induced stress, bottom drag, Stokes drift current, precipitation, and surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum are exchanged across the air-wave-sea interface. This coupling is facilitated through the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). The ESMF version of COAMPS is being transitioned to operational production centers at the Naval Oceanographic Office and the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center. Highlights from validation studies for the Florida Straits, Hurricane Ivan and the Adriatic Sea will be presented. COAMPS® is a registered trademark of the Naval Research Laboratory.

  20. Madden Julian Oscillation impacts on global ocean surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Andrew G.; Hendon, Harry H.; Durrant, Tom H.; Hemer, Mark A.

    2015-12-01

    We assess the impact of the tropical Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) on global ocean wind waves using 30 years of wave data from a wave model hindcast that is forced with high resolution surface winds from the NCEP-CFSR reanalysis. We concentrate on the boreal winter season when the MJO has its greatest amplitude and is potentially a source of predictable wave impacts at intra-seasonal lead times. Statistically significant anomalies in significant wave height (Hs), peak wave period (Tp) and zonal wave energy flux (CgE) are found to covary with the intra-seasonal variation of surface zonal wind induced by the MJO as it traverses eastward from the western tropical Indian Ocean to the eastern tropical Pacific. Tp varies generally out of phase with Hs over the life cycle of the MJO, indicating that these MJO-wave anomalies are locally wind-generated rather than remotely generated by ocean swell. Pronounced Hs anomalies develop on the northwest shelf of Australia, where the MJO is known to influence sea level and surface temperatures, and in the western Caribbean Sea and Guatemalan-Panama Seas with enhanced wave anomalies apparent in the vicinity of the Tehuantepec and Papagayo gaps. Significant wave anomalies are also detected in the North Pacific and North Atlantic oceans in connection with the MJO teleconnection to the extratropics via atmospheric wave propagation. The impact in the north Atlantic stems from induction of the high phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) about 1 week after MJO convection traverses the Indian Ocean, and the low phase of the NAO about one week after suppressed convection traverses the Indian Ocean. Strong positive Hs anomalies maximize on the Northern European coast in the positive NAO phase and vice versa for the negative NAO phase. The MJO also influences the occurrence of daily low (below the 5th percentile) and high (above the 95th percentile) wave conditions across the tropics and in the North Pacific and North Atlantic

  1. Kelvin-Helmholtz waves in the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahony, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Large amplitude short waves confined near the crests of a swell have been observed when a stiff breeze was blowing against the swell. This would seem to imply the existence of both a wavelength-selective generating mechanism and a trapping mechanism, neither of which is to be expected of surface gravity waves of the observed length. It is suggested that there are significant changes in the dynamics of such waves if allowance is made for the dynamic coupling between wind and waves. For a Kelvin-Helmholtz model it is shown that energy transfer rates from the turbulent pressure fluctuations are greatly enhanced for subcritical conditions by the inclusion of the dynamic coupling. The group velocity of subcritical waves is profoundly affected, becoming infinite at the stability boundary. Thus subcritical waves could be trapped on a swell. An examination of the effects of wind shear suggest that Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability could still be present, although for stronger winds, particularly for rather longer waves.

  2. Elastic waves in ice-covered ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presnov, Dmitriy; Zhostkow, Ruslan; Gusev, Vladimir; Shurup, Andrey; Sobisevich, Alex

    2014-05-01

    The problem of propagation of acoustic waves in a shallow ice-covered sea is considered in frames of the mathematical model of the layered medium: ice sheet over a liquid layer (shallow sea) positioned on an elastic half-space (seabed). As the result of analytical solution the simplified dispersion equation has been derived and used for further analytical and numerical analysis. It has been shown that there are five types of waves subject to propagate in the layered model medium: flexural waves of ice-cover, Rayleigh-type wave on the boundary between elastic half-space and the liquid layer, normal modes in ice (as in waveguide), hydro-acoustic normal modes and quasi-longitudinal wave in ice plate. Variations initial conditions as well as source parameters allow obtaining solution for acoustical pressure. Field experiments with geophones, hydrophones and microphones were carried out on the Ladoga Lake (Leningrad Oblast in northwestern Russia) using small controllable explosions as source signals. The experiment has shown satisfactory agreement with theoretical results. Analysis of the dispersion equation for various parameters of the model provides an opportunity to estimate geophysical characteristics of the geophysical medium, based on the experimentally registered wave's velocities. It has been shown, that it is possible to extract valuable information from flexural and Rayleigh-type waves in the low-frequency domain of the recorded data via spatial-temporal analysis. Separate study of those waves allows measuring ice thickness (which is important because of ice melting and ecological situation in Arctic) and velocity of transverse waves in seabed (that can help to determine type of material and can be useful in mineral deposit prospecting).

  3. Wave breaking turbulence in the ocean surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, J. M.; Gemmrich, J.; Schwendeman, M.; Zippel, S.; Moghimi, S.; Rogers, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present observations of turbulent dissipation rate beneath ocean waves measured from a wave following, Lagrangian, reference frame. We find that the strong turbulence associated with wave breaking is isolated to a small region (nominally less than one meter) beneath the surface. However, this strong turbulence is advected vertically by the orbital motions of the dominant waves, and thus, in an Eulerian reference frame, the strong turbulence penetrates below the wave trough level. We also test several scalings for the turbulent dissipation rates caused by wave breaking, and we conclude that the conventional scaling by the cube of the wind speed (or wind friction velocity) is biased, particularly in high winds. A formulation using a transfer velocity associated with the short waves and the wind stress is more successful in scaling the observations.

  4. In Brief: Waves tracked across Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2007-05-01

    Waves that were 11 meters high when they struck Réunion Island on 12 May have been detected with the European Space Agency satellite Envisat. The waves originated from very intense storm winds south of Cape Town, South Africa, on 8 May and traveled northeast for nearly 4000 kilometers before hitting the island's southern port of Saint Pierre, leaving two fishermen missing and flooding homes and businesses. Bertrand Chapron of the French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea, one of the scientists who used the Envisat Synthetic Aperture Radar data to track the waves, said that in the future the same technology might be used to better predict the arrival time and intensity of these types of waves.

  5. Effects of Offshore Wind Turbines on Ocean Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimer, Nicholas; Churchfield, Matthew; Hamlington, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Wakes from horizontal axis wind turbines create large downstream velocity deficits, thus reducing the available energy for downstream turbines while simultaneously increasing turbulent loading. Along with this deficit, however, comes a local increase in the velocity around the turbine rotor, resulting in increased surface wind speeds. For offshore turbines, these increased speeds can result in changes to the properties of wind-induced waves at the ocean surface. In this study, the characteristics and implications of such waves are explored by coupling a wave simulation code to the Simulator for Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The wave simulator and SOWFA are bi-directionally coupled using the surface wind field produced by an offshore wind farm to drive an ocean wave field, which is used to calculate a wave-dependent surface roughness that is fed back into SOWFA. The details of this combined framework are outlined. The potential for using the wave field created at offshore wind farms as an additional energy resource through the installation of on-site wave converters is discussed. Potential negative impacts of the turbine-induced wave field are also discussed, including increased oscillation of floating turbines.

  6. Ocean wavenumber estimation from wave-resolving time series imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, N.G.; Holland, K.T.; Haller, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    We review several approaches that have been used to estimate ocean surface gravity wavenumbers from wave-resolving remotely sensed image sequences. Two fundamentally different approaches that utilize these data exist. A power spectral density approach identifies wavenumbers where image intensity variance is maximized. Alternatively, a cross-spectral correlation approach identifies wavenumbers where intensity coherence is maximized. We develop a solution to the latter approach based on a tomographic analysis that utilizes a nonlinear inverse method. The solution is tolerant to noise and other forms of sampling deficiency and can be applied to arbitrary sampling patterns, as well as to full-frame imagery. The solution includes error predictions that can be used for data retrieval quality control and for evaluating sample designs. A quantitative analysis of the intrinsic resolution of the method indicates that the cross-spectral correlation fitting improves resolution by a factor of about ten times as compared to the power spectral density fitting approach. The resolution analysis also provides a rule of thumb for nearshore bathymetry retrievals-short-scale cross-shore patterns may be resolved if they are about ten times longer than the average water depth over the pattern. This guidance can be applied to sample design to constrain both the sensor array (image resolution) and the analysis array (tomographic resolution). ?? 2008 IEEE.

  7. SAR imaging and hydrodynamic analysis of ocean bottom topographic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Quanan; Li, Li; Guo, Xiaogang; Ge, Yong; Zhu, Dayong; Li, Chunyan

    2006-09-01

    The satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images display wave-like patterns of the ocean bottom topographic features at the south outlet of Taiwan Strait (TS). Field measurements indicate that the most TS water body is vertically stratified. However, SAR imaging models available were developed for homogeneous waters. Hence explaining SAR imaging mechanisms of bottom features in a stratified ocean is beyond the scope of those models. In order to explore these mechanisms and to determine the quantitative relations between the SAR imagery and the bottom features, a two-dimensional, three-layer ocean model with sinusoidal bottom topographic features is developed. Analytical solutions and inferences of the momentum equations of the ocean model lead to the following conditions. (1) In the lower layer, the topography-induced waves (topographic waves hereafter) exist in the form of stationary waves, which satisfy a lower boundary resonance condition σ = kC0, here σ is an angular frequency of the stationary waves, k is a wavenumber of bottom topographic corrugation, and C0 is a background current speed. (2) As internal waves, the topographic waves may propagate vertically to the upper layer with an unchanged wavenumber k, if a frequency relation N3 < σ < N2 is satisfied, here N2 and N3 are the Brunt-Wäisälä frequencies of middle layer and upper layer, respectively. (3) The topographic waves are extremely amplified if an upper layer resonance condition is satisfied. The SAR image of topographic waves is derived on the basis of current-modulated small wave spectra. The results indicate that the topographic waves on SAR images have the same wavelength of bottom topographic corrugation, and the imagery brightness peaks are either inphase or antiphase with respect to the topographic corrugation, depending on a sign of a coupling factor. These theoretical predictions are verified by field observations. The results of this study provide a physical basis for quantitative

  8. Radiative transfer in the earth's atmosphere and ocean: influence of ocean waves.

    PubMed

    Plass, G N; Kattawar, G W; Guinn, J A

    1975-08-01

    The radiance in the earth's atmosphere and ocean is calculated for a realistic model including an ocean surface with waves. Individual photons are followed in a Monte Carlo calculation. In the atmosphere, both Rayleigh scattering by the molecules and Mie scattering by the aerosols as well as molecular and aerosol absorption are taken into account. Similarly, in the ocean, both Rayleigh scattering by the water molecules and Mie scattering by the hydrosols as well as absorption by the water molecules and hydrosols are considered. Separate single-scattering functions are used which are calculated separately for the aerosols and the hydrosols from the Mie theory with appropriate and different size distributions in each case. The scattering angles are determined from the appropriate scattering function including the strong forwardscattering peak when there is aerosol or hydrosol scattering. Both the reflected and refracted rays, as well as the rays that undergo total internal reflection, are followed at the oceanc surface. The wave slope is chosen from the Cox-Munk distribution. Graphs show the influence of the waves on the upward radiance at the top of the atmosphere and just above the ocean surface and on the downward radiance just below the ocean surface as well as deeper within the ocean. The radiance changes are sufficient at the top of the atmosphere to determine the sea state from satellite measurements. Within the ocean the waves smooth out the abrupt transition that occurs at the edge of the allowed cone for radiation entering a calm ocean. The influence of the waves on the contrast between the sky and sea at the horizon is discussed. It is shown that the downward flux just below the surface increases with wind speed at all solar angles.

  9. Dynamical coupling of wind and ocean waves through wave-induced air flow.

    PubMed

    Hristov, T S; Miller, S D; Friehe, C A

    2003-03-01

    Understanding the physical mechanisms behind the generation of ocean waves by wind has been a longstanding challenge. Previous studies have assumed that ocean waves induce fluctuations in velocity and pressure of the overlying air that are synchronized with the waves, and numerical models have supported this assumption. In a complex feedback, these fluctuations provide the energy for wave generation. The spatial and temporal structure of the wave-induced airflow therefore holds the key to the physics of wind-wave coupling, but detailed observations have proved difficult. Here we present an analysis of wind velocities and ocean surface elevations observed over the open ocean. We use a linear filter to identify the wave-induced air flow from the measurements and find that its structure is in agreement with 'critical-layer' theory. Considering that the wave-induced momentum flux is then controlled by the wave spectrum and that it varies considerably in vertical direction, a simple parameterization of the total air-sea momentum flux is unlikely to exist.

  10. Laser probe for measuring 2-D wave slope spectra of ocean capillary waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, C. S.; Anderson, R. C.; Reece, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    A laser-optical instrument for use in determining the two-dimensional wave-slope spectrum of ocean capillary waves is described. The instrument measures up to a 35-deg tip angle of the surface normal by measuring the position of a refracted laser beam directed vertically upward through a water surface. A telescope, a continuous two-dimensional Schottky barrier photodiode, and a pair of analog dividers render the signals independent of water height and insensitive to laser-beam intensity fluctuations. Calibration is performed entirely in the laboratory before field use. Sample records and wave-slope spectra are shown for one-dimensional wave-tank tests and for two-dimensional ocean tests. These are presented along with comparison spectra for calm and choppy water conditions. A mechanical wave follower was used to adjust the instrument position in the presence of large ocean swell and tides.

  11. Laser probe for measuring 2-D wave slope spectra of ocean capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Palm, C S; Anderson, R C; Reece, A M

    1977-04-01

    A laser-optical instrument for use in determining the 2-D wave slope spectrum of ocean capillary waves is described. The instrument measures up to a 35 degrees tip angle of the surface normal by measuring the position of a refracted laser beam directed vertically upward through a water surface. A telescope, a continuous 2-D Schottky barrier photodiode, and a pair of analog dividers render the signals independent of water height and insensitive to laser beam intensity fluctuations. Calibration is performed entirely in the laboratory before field use. Sample records and wave slope spectra are shown for 1-D wave tank tests and for 2-D ocean tests. These are presented along with comparison spectra for calm and choppy water conditions. A mechanical wave follower was used to adjust the instrument position in the presence of large ocean swell and tides. PMID:20168638

  12. Airborne microwave Doppler measurements of ocean wave directional spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Reeves, A. B.; Uliana, E. A.; Johnson, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is presented for measuring ocean wave directional spectra from aircraft using microwave Doppler radar. The technique involves backscattering coherent microwave radiation from a patch of sea surface which is small compared to dominant ocean wavelengths in the antenna look direction, and large compared to these lengths in the perpendicular (azimuthal) direction. The mean Doppler shift of the return signal measured over short time intervals is proportional to the mean sea surface velocity of the illuminated patch. Variable sea surface velocities induced by wave motion therefore produce time-varying Doppler shifts in the received signal. The large azimuthal dimension of the patch implies that these variations must be produced by surface waves traveling near the horizontal antenna look direction thus allowing determination of the direction of wave travel. Linear wave theory is used to convert the measured velocities into ocean wave spectral densities. Spectra measured simultaneously with this technique and two laser profilometers, and nearly simultaneous with this technique and two laser profilometers, and nearly simultaneous with a surface buoy, are presented. Applications and limitations of this airborne Doppler technique are discussed.

  13. Impact of Parameterized Lee Wave Drag on the Energy Budget of an Eddying Global Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trossman, D. S.; Arbic, B. K.; Garner, S.; Goff, J. A.; Jayne, S. R.; Metzger, E.; Wallcraft, A.

    2012-12-01

    We examine the impact of a lee wave drag parameterization on an eddying global ocean model. The wave drag parameterization represents the the momentum transfer associated with the generation of lee waves arising from geostrophic flow impinging upon rough topography. It is included in the online model, thus ensuring that abyssal currents and stratification in the simulation are affected by the presence of the wave drag. The model utilized here is the nominally 1/12th degree Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) forced by winds and air-sea buoyancy fluxes. An energy budget including the parameterized wave drag, quadratic bottom boundary layer drag, vertical eddy viscosity, and horizontal eddy viscosity is diagnosed during the model runs and compared with the wind power input and buoyancy fluxes. Wave drag and vertical viscosity are the largest of the mechanical energy dissipation rate terms, each more than half of a terawatt when globally integrated. The sum of all four dissipative terms approximately balances the rate of energy put by the winds and buoyancy fluxes into the ocean. An ad hoc global enhancement of the bottom drag at each grid point by a constant factor cannot serve as a perfect substitute for wave drag, particularly where there is little wave drag. Eddy length scales at the surface, sea surface height variance, surface kinetic energy, and positions of intensified jets in the model are compared with those inferred from altimetric observations. Vertical profiles of kinetic energy from the model are compared with mooring observations to investigate whether the model is improved when wave drag is inserted.; The drag and viscosity terms in our energy budget [log_10(W m^-2)]: (a) quadratic bottom boundary layer drag, (b) parameterized internal lee wave drag, (c) vertical viscosity, and (d) "horizontal" viscosity. Shown is an average of inline estimates over one year of the spin-up phase with wave drag.

  14. Waves in the Ocean and the Atmosphere: Introduction to Wave Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samelson, Roger M.

    Anyone who has stood on a ship or a beach will recognize that wave motions are an essential element of the ocean environment. And in its deeps, along its margins and across its basins, the ocean seethes with a wide spectrum of slow-moving interior waves that are invisible to the casual eye of the surface observer. Their influence may ultimately be felt across the globe, on land as well as at sea, for years, decades, or centuries. The winds that buffet a land-locked observer may seem less like waves and more akin to the continuous rush of water through a pipe or down a river channel. However, viewed from a broader perspective, even the ever-changing weather patterns of the Earth's atmosphere have their own particular wave dynamics. With Waves in the Ocean and the Atmosphere: Introduction to Wave Dynamics, leading geophysical fluid dynamicist Joseph Pedlosky provides an accessible and authoritative theoretical introduction to the wide variety of wave motions that occur in the planetary fluid environment. This is a fine book, tailor-made for graduate teaching, but also suitable for use as a desk reference for the basic elements of oceanic and atmospheric wave dynamics. The oceanographic perspective is emphasized. Aside from a few, largely cosmetic typographical errors, the only disappointment is that it does not go on a little longer: chapters on acoustic waves, tides, coastal-trapped ocean waves, and some pointers toward the many fascinating phenomena of nonlinear wave dynamics would have been welcome extensions, and one can hope that they may be added to a future edition.

  15. Variational stereo imaging of oceanic waves with statistical constraints.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Guillermo; Yezzi, Anthony; Fedele, Francesco; Benetazzo, Alvise

    2013-11-01

    An image processing observational technique for the stereoscopic reconstruction of the waveform of oceanic sea states is developed. The technique incorporates the enforcement of any given statistical wave law modeling the quasi-Gaussianity of oceanic waves observed in nature. The problem is posed in a variational optimization framework, where the desired waveform is obtained as the minimizer of a cost functional that combines image observations, smoothness priors and a weak statistical constraint. The minimizer is obtained by combining gradient descent and multigrid methods on the necessary optimality equations of the cost functional. Robust photometric error criteria and a spatial intensity compensation model are also developed to improve the performance of the presented image matching strategy. The weak statistical constraint is thoroughly evaluated in combination with other elements presented to reconstruct and enforce constraints on experimental stereo data, demonstrating the improvement in the estimation of the observed ocean surface.

  16. Theory of Seismic Noise Excitation by Ocean Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, T.

    2009-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that seismic noise, recorded in continuous data, will be an important part of seismic data that will be used for seismic structure study. Causes of noise vary from frequency to frequency but the predominant noise, specifically in the microseismic frequency band (about 0.05-0.4 Hz), is now recognized to be ocean waves. The Hum, seismic noise in a lower frequency band about 0.003-0.015 Hz, may also be excited by this mechanism (Webb, 2007). The detailed excitation mechanism of microseisms by ocean waves is attributed to Longuet-Higgins (1950) (which credits earlier study by Miche, 1944) which beautifully explains one critical aspect of data, the double frequency noise peak. Longuet-Higgins (1950) basically showed how nonlinear advection term in the Navier-Stokes equation and the nonlinear term in the kinematic free-surface boundary condition lead to the generation of pressure when there are colliding ocean waves. In this paper, we will show that excitation of seismic noise can be formulated starting from the original nonlinear terms in the equations, basically skipping the intermediate pressure term derived by Longuet-Higgins. The equivalent body-force term by these nonlinear terms can be expressed in a compact formula and may be used to describe seismic wavefields. We will show 1. The equivalent Longuet-Higgins term arises from our approach but it is exact only for low frequencies below 0.1 Hz. At higher frequencies, depending on ocean depth, deviations up to a factor of 5-10 can arise. 2. At low frequencies (<0.005 Hz), a horizontal force term arises whose effects may become larger than pressure variations due to the Longuet-Higgins mechanism. Webb (2007) and Tanimoto (2007) pointed out this term. This term contains azimuthal effects (radiation pattern), as opposed to the isotropic vertical forcing by the Longuett-Higgins mechanism. 3. We also examine the excitation of the toroidal hum (Kurrle and Widmer, 2008). Infragravity waves

  17. The shape of extreme waves on the open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcock, Thomas A. A.; Taylor, Paul H.; Draper, Scott

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates how non-linear physics modifies the largest waves in random seas relative to linear evolution. Our method follows that described in [1]. We start with random simulations of extreme waves in linear sea-states with realistic spectra and directional spreading. Each wave-group, with the surrounding waves, is propagated backwards in time under linear evolution for ten periods. This is then used as initial conditions for non-linear simulations. We compare the maximum of the wave-group in the non-linear simulation with that in the linear case. We do this multiple times for different randomly generated extreme events. We find that, on average, there is relatively little extra elevation in the non-linear case - although in a few cases there is significant amplification. However, there are significant changes to the average shape of the group. For moderate wave steepness there is an expansion of the wave-group in the lateral direction forming a broader crest than predicted by linear evolution. For the most severe sea-states there is a significant contraction of the wave-group in the mean wave direction. There is also a movement of the largest wave to the front of the wave-group, suggesting that the largest waves will be preceded by relatively small waves. Reference [1] ADCOCK, T.A.A., TAYLOR, P.H. & DRAPER, S. (2015) Non-linear dynamics of wave-groups in random seas: Unexpected walls of water in the open ocean, Proceedings of the Royal Society A 471(2184).

  18. Near-Inertial Internal Gravity Waves in the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Alford, Matthew H; MacKinnon, Jennifer A; Simmons, Harper L; Nash, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    We review the physics of near-inertial waves (NIWs) in the ocean and the observations, theory, and models that have provided our present knowledge. NIWs appear nearly everywhere in the ocean as a spectral peak at and just above the local inertial period f, and the longest vertical wavelengths can propagate at least hundreds of kilometers toward the equator from their source regions; shorter vertical wavelengths do not travel as far and do not contain as much energy, but lead to turbulent mixing owing to their high shear. NIWs are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including the wind, nonlinear interactions with waves of other frequencies, lee waves over bottom topography, and geostrophic adjustment; the partition among these is not known, although the wind is likely the most important. NIWs likely interact strongly with mesoscale and submesoscale motions, in ways that are just beginning to be understood.

  19. Near-Inertial Internal Gravity Waves in the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Alford, Matthew H; MacKinnon, Jennifer A; Simmons, Harper L; Nash, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    We review the physics of near-inertial waves (NIWs) in the ocean and the observations, theory, and models that have provided our present knowledge. NIWs appear nearly everywhere in the ocean as a spectral peak at and just above the local inertial period f, and the longest vertical wavelengths can propagate at least hundreds of kilometers toward the equator from their source regions; shorter vertical wavelengths do not travel as far and do not contain as much energy, but lead to turbulent mixing owing to their high shear. NIWs are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including the wind, nonlinear interactions with waves of other frequencies, lee waves over bottom topography, and geostrophic adjustment; the partition among these is not known, although the wind is likely the most important. NIWs likely interact strongly with mesoscale and submesoscale motions, in ways that are just beginning to be understood. PMID:26331898

  20. Near-Inertial Internal Gravity Waves in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Matthew H.; MacKinnon, Jennifer A.; Simmons, Harper L.; Nash, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    We review the physics of near-inertial waves (NIWs) in the ocean and the observations, theory, and models that have provided our present knowledge. NIWs appear nearly everywhere in the ocean as a spectral peak at and just above the local inertial period f, and the longest vertical wavelengths can propagate at least hundreds of kilometers toward the equator from their source regions; shorter vertical wavelengths do not travel as far and do not contain as much energy, but lead to turbulent mixing owing to their high shear. NIWs are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including the wind, nonlinear interactions with waves of other frequencies, lee waves over bottom topography, and geostrophic adjustment; the partition among these is not known, although the wind is likely the most important. NIWs likely interact strongly with mesoscale and submesoscale motions, in ways that are just beginning to be understood.

  1. Modeling ocean wave propagation under sea ice covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Shen, Hayley H.; Cheng, Sukun

    2015-02-01

    Operational ocean wave models need to work globally, yet current ocean wave models can only treat ice-covered regions crudely. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of ice effects on wave propagation and different research methodology used in studying these effects. Based on its proximity to land or sea, sea ice can be classified as: landfast ice zone, shear zone, and the marginal ice zone. All ice covers attenuate wave energy. Only long swells can penetrate deep into an ice cover. Being closest to open water, wave propagation in the marginal ice zone is the most complex to model. The physical appearance of sea ice in the marginal ice zone varies. Grease ice, pancake ice, brash ice, floe aggregates, and continuous ice sheet may be found in this zone at different times and locations. These types of ice are formed under different thermal-mechanical forcing. There are three classic models that describe wave propagation through an idealized ice cover: mass loading, thin elastic plate, and viscous layer models. From physical arguments we may conjecture that mass loading model is suitable for disjoint aggregates of ice floes much smaller than the wavelength, thin elastic plate model is suitable for a continuous ice sheet, and the viscous layer model is suitable for grease ice. For different sea ice types we may need different wave ice interaction models. A recently proposed viscoelastic model is able to synthesize all three classic models into one. Under suitable limiting conditions it converges to the three previous models. The complete theoretical framework for evaluating wave propagation through various ice covers need to be implemented in the operational ocean wave models. In this review, we introduce the sea ice types, previous wave ice interaction models, wave attenuation mechanisms, the methods to calculate wave reflection and transmission between different ice covers, and the effect of ice floe breaking on shaping the sea ice morphology

  2. Ionospheric Stimulation By High Power Radio Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, S.; Nishino, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Sato, S.; Tanikawa, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Wong, A. Y.

    1999-01-01

    We have performed an experiment to artificially stimulate the ionosphere using higher power radio waves at the HIPAS (High Power Auroral Stimulation) facility in Alaska. A radio transmission of 2.85 MHz was made at 80 MW (ERP). Diagnostics were made at the other site located 35 km from the transmission site. The results of cross-correlating the excited HF wave and observed with an 8 channel, 30 MHz scanning cosmic radio noise absorption records revealed the excited height of 90 km. Also atmospheric pressure waves observed on the ground show evident propagation of pressure waves which are generated in the ionosphere by the high-power HF wave. The results determine the excitation height of 90 km in the ionosphere and show evidence of the pressure wave coupling between the ionosphere and the lower atmosphere for periods of 10 min

  3. Integration of ocean thermal energy conversion power plants with existing power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, N.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of integrating an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant with existing power systems is studied. A nonlinear model of an OTEC power system is developed. The dynamics of the large local induction motor load, and the coaxial cable connection to the mainland are included in the model. The effect of the motor load and the coaxial cable on the steady-state stability of the OTEC power plant is investigated using linearized analysis. The transient stability of the OTEC system is investigated through simulation. The contribution made by the motor load and the coaxial cable to the transient stability is studied. The occurrence of self excitation phenomena is analyzed using linear methods and simulation. The effects of wave and vessel motion on the electrical power output of the OTEC plant is investigated.

  4. Ocean Wave Separation Using CEEMD-Wavelet in GPS Wave Measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; He, Xiufeng; Ferreira, Vagner G

    2015-08-07

    Monitoring ocean waves plays a crucial role in, for example, coastal environmental and protection studies. Traditional methods for measuring ocean waves are based on ultrasonic sensors and accelerometers. However, the Global Positioning System (GPS) has been introduced recently and has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and not requiring calibration in comparison with the traditional methods. Therefore, for accurately measuring ocean waves using GPS, further research on the separation of the wave signals from the vertical GPS-mounted carrier displacements is still necessary. In order to contribute to this topic, we present a novel method that combines complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD) with a wavelet threshold denoising model (i.e., CEEMD-Wavelet). This method seeks to extract wave signals with less residual noise and without losing useful information. Compared with the wave parameters derived from the moving average skill, high pass filter and wave gauge, the results show that the accuracy of the wave parameters for the proposed method was improved with errors of about 2 cm and 0.2 s for mean wave height and mean period, respectively, verifying the validity of the proposed method.

  5. Ocean Wave Separation Using CEEMD-Wavelet in GPS Wave Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjie; He, Xiufeng; Ferreira, Vagner G.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring ocean waves plays a crucial role in, for example, coastal environmental and protection studies. Traditional methods for measuring ocean waves are based on ultrasonic sensors and accelerometers. However, the Global Positioning System (GPS) has been introduced recently and has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and not requiring calibration in comparison with the traditional methods. Therefore, for accurately measuring ocean waves using GPS, further research on the separation of the wave signals from the vertical GPS-mounted carrier displacements is still necessary. In order to contribute to this topic, we present a novel method that combines complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD) with a wavelet threshold denoising model (i.e., CEEMD-Wavelet). This method seeks to extract wave signals with less residual noise and without losing useful information. Compared with the wave parameters derived from the moving average skill, high pass filter and wave gauge, the results show that the accuracy of the wave parameters for the proposed method was improved with errors of about 2 cm and 0.2 s for mean wave height and mean period, respectively, verifying the validity of the proposed method. PMID:26262620

  6. Geoelectric power spectra over oceanic distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ikuko; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Utada, H.; Kinoshita, H.; Kasahara, J.; Medford, L. V.; Maclennan, C. G.

    1995-02-01

    We present initial results of simultaneous measurements of the geoelectric potential as measured across two long cable routes in the Pacific (Guam to Philippines and California to Hawaii) separated by approximately 6h in local time and approximately 30 deg in latitude. Over the frequency range approximately 10(exp -5) to 1.67 x 10(exp -3) Hz the power levels tend to be enhanced near local noon along the two routes, especially during geomagnetic quiet intervals. During the seven days analyzed, geoelectric power levels up to 10(exp 4) (mV/km)(exp 2)/km were measured on a geomagnetically disturbed day. The power levels at the longest periods, approximately 17 m to approximately 150 m, are generally found to be largest along the route at lower geomagnetic latitudes (Guam to Philippines) when comparisons are made at equivalent local times. In contrast, the power levels for periods in the hydromagnetic wave region (periods less than or approximately = 5 m) tend to be larger at all local times for the higher geomagnetic latitude route. The nightside geoelectric power levels along the higher latitude route tend to increase with increasing geomagnetic activity.

  7. Remote sensing of the directional ocean wave spectra using HF backscatter radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabdalla, A. M.

    Superresolution spectrum estimation techniques used in the remote sensing of the wave-height (DOWS) using HF backscatter radar were studied. The techniques investigated directional ocean wave spectrum are: (1) multiple signal classification (MUSIC), (2) maximum entropy (ME), and (3) maximum likelihood (ML). Two unbiased estimates of the directional spectrum based on the MUSIC and the ML algorithms were developed and implemented. The estimates of the DOWS using such techniques were compared with estimates using synthetic aperture radar. The comparison showed good agreement in estimating the mean direction of energy and the half power width. The advantages of using superresolution techniques are: (1) no assumptions need to be made about the shape of the spectrum and (2), if the ship (radar) is moving in a straight line, the spectrum estimate is not affected as long as the ship speed is less than the phase velocity of the ocean waves.

  8. Spectral wave conditions in the Colombian Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portilla, Jesús; Caicedo, Ana Lucía; Padilla-Hernández, Roberto; Cavaleri, Luigi

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive characterization of the wave conditions in the Colombian Pacific based on wave spectra is presented. The spectral approach offers a detailed description of the different wave regimes, their associated meteorological conditions and their variation in time and geographical space. To this end, two complementary data sources are used, the first is representative for the near-shore zone and comes from observations of the local monitoring network. The second comes from numerical wave model results that cover the open ocean. The measured data used are the first systematically collected spectral wave data in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific. Modelled spectra correspond to the ERA-Interim database of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts that spans 35 years. An indicator for statistical analysis of the wave spectra has been introduced which basically consists of the occurrence probability of spectral partitions. This indicator has proved to be skilful for the task of defining spectral wave systems of both model and, the more challenging, measured spectra. Following the spectral approach and using this new indicator, six main wave regimes are found in the study area. Two of these systems have well defined swell characteristics that are originated outside the study area in the northern and southern hemispheres. Other three wave systems are to a certain extent associated to the local winds, and in general may be classified as old wind-seas. These are found to flow northeastwards, westwards, and southwards. The sixth system is composed of locally generated wind waves of relatively low magnitude that propagate in several directions. The time variability of these wave systems is highly dependent on the boreal and austral winter storms and on the tropical conditions, in such a way that the wave energy propagation to the region is rather constant along the year, but their origin and characteristics vary significantly.

  9. Oceanic Lithosphere/Asthenosphere Boundary from surface wave dispersion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, G.; Montagner, J.; Beucler, E.; Capdeville, Y.; Mocquet, A.

    2013-12-01

    The nature of Lithosphere-Asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is controversial according to different types of observations. Using a massive dataset of surface wave dispersions in a broad frequency range (15-300s), we have developed a 3-D tomographic model (1st order perturbation theory) of the upper-mantle at the global scale. It is used to derive maps of LAB from the resolved elastic parameters. The key effects of shallow layers and anisotropy are taken into account in the inversion process. We investigate LAB distributions primarily below oceans according to three different proxies which corresponds to the base of the lithosphere from the vertically polarized shear velocity variation at depth, the top of the radial anisotropy positive anomaly and from the changes in orientation of the fast axis of azimuthal anisotropy. The LAB depth determinations of the different proxies are basically consistent for each oceanic region. The estimations of the LAB depth based on the shear velocity proxy increase from thin (20 km) lithosphere in the ridges to thick (120--130 km) old ocean lithosphere. The radial anisotropy proxy presents a very fast increase of the LAB depth from the ridges, from 50 km to older ocean where it reaches a remarkable monotonic sub-horizontal profile (70--80 km). LAB depths inferred from azimuthal anisotropy proxy show deeper values for the increasing oceanic lithosphere (130--135 km). The results present two types of pattern of the age of oceanic lithosphere evolution with the LAB depth. The shear velocity and azimuthal anisotropy proxies show age-dependent profiles in agreement with thermal plate models while the LAB based on radial anisotropy is characterized by a shallower depth, defining a sub-horizontal interface with a very small age dependence for all three main oceans (Pacific, Atlantic and Indian). These different patterns raise questions about the nature of the LAB in the oceanic regions, and of the formation of oceanic plates.

  10. Mid-Lithospheric boundary below oceans from seismic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagner, Jean-Paul; Burgos, Gael; Beucler, Eric; Capdeville, Yann; Mocquet, Antoine

    2014-05-01

    The nature of LithosphereAsthenosphere boundary (LAB) is controversial according to different types of observations. Using a massive dataset of surface wave dispersions in a broad frequency range (15300s), we have developed a 3D tomographic model (1st order perturbation theory) of the upper mantle at the global scale. It is used to derive maps of LAB from the resolved elastic parameters. The key effects of shallow layers and anisotropy are taken into account in the inversion process. We investigate LAB distributions primarily below oceans according to three different proxies which corresponds to the base of the lithosphere from the vertically polarized shear velocity variation at depth, from the changes in orientation of the fast axis of azimuthal anisotropy and from the maximum of the gradient of the radial anisotropy positive anomaly. The LAB depth determinations of the different proxies are consistent for the different oceanic regions. The estimations of the LAB depth based on the shear velocity proxy increase from thin (20 km) lithosphere in the ridges to thick (120-130 km) old ocean lithosphere. LAB depths inferred from azimuthal anisotropy proxy show deeper values for the increasing oceanic lithosphere (130-135 km). The radial anisotropy proxy presents a very fast increase of the LAB depth from the ridges, from 50 km to older ocean where it reaches a remarkable monotonic sub horizontal profile (70-80 km). The results present two types of pattern of the age of oceanic lithosphere evolution with the LAB depth. The shear velocity and azimuthal anisotropy proxies show age dependent profiles in agreement with thermal plate models while the LAB based on radial anisotropy is characterized by a shallower depth, defining a sub horizontal interface (mid-lithospheric boundary) with a very small age dependence for all three main oceans (Pacific, Atlantic and Indian). These different patterns raise questions about the nature of the LAB in the oceanic regions, and of the

  11. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics. PMID:26873972

  12. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics.

  13. Modeling of ocean wave effects for LIDAR remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, John W.

    1990-09-01

    A simulation nodel is described which generates realizations of the LIDAR return from a wind roughened ocean, including both surface specular and subsurface volumetric returns. The physical model includes representations for the two dimensional wavy surface (gravity waves), beam spread at the interface due to small scale roughness (capillary waves), and beam spread and attenuation due to multiple scattering and absorption in the water. The sensor model allows for arbitrary incidence angles, transmitter divergences, and receiver fields of view. From ensembles of realizations, the statistical characteristics of the surface wave induced fluctuations are determined, such as profiles of variance versus depth, and spatial/temporal correlations of the returns. Model results are compared with experimental data on specular return statistics and downwelling irradiance fluctuations. Predictions are presented for the round trip LIDAR fluctuations induced by surface waves.

  14. High power millimeter wave source development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. V.

    1989-01-01

    High power millimeter wave sources for fusion program; ECH source development program strategy; and 1 MW, 140 GHz gyrotron experiment design philosophy are briefly outlined. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  15. Ocean-atmosphere-wave characterisation of a wind jet (Ebro shelf, NW Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grifoll, Manel; Navarro, Jorge; Pallares, Elena; Ràfols, Laura; Espino, Manuel; Palomares, Ana

    2016-06-01

    In this contribution the wind jet dynamics in the northern margin of the Ebro River shelf (NW Mediterranean Sea) are investigated using coupled numerical models. The study area is characterised by persistent and energetic offshore winds during autumn and winter. During these seasons, a seaward wind jet usually develops in a ˜ 50 km wide band offshore. The COAWST (Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport) modelling system was implemented in the region with a set of downscaling meshes to obtain high-resolution meteo-oceanographic outputs. Wind, waves and water currents were compared with in situ observations and remote-sensing-derived products with an acceptable level of agreement. Focused on an intense offshore wind event, the modelled wind jet appears in a limited area offshore with strong spatial variability. The wave pattern during the wind jet is characterised by the development of bimodal directional spectra, and the ocean circulation tends to present well-defined two-layer flow in the shallower region (i.e. inner shelf). The outer shelf tends to be dominated by mesoscale dynamics such as the slope current. Due to the limited fetch length, ocean surface roughness considering sea state (wave-atmosphere coupling) modifies to a small extent the wind and significant wave height under severe cross-shelf wind events. However, the coupling effect in the wind resource assessment may be relevant due to the cubic relation between the wind intensity and power.

  16. Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocity in the Indian Ocean Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, K. E.; Dalton, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Current understanding of the seismic properties of the oceanic upper mantle is heavily weighted toward studies of the Pacific upper mantle. However, global seismic models indicate differences in upper-mantle properties beneath the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans. Furthermore, factors such as spreading rate, absolute plate motion, and the presence of intraplate volcanism vary between these regions. It is thus important to consider the broad range in parameters when forming ideas about mantle dynamics and lithosphere evolution within ocean basins. We are developing a high-resolution basin-wide seismic model of the Indian Ocean upper mantle. The Indian Ocean contains 16,000 km of mid-ocean ridge, with spreading rates ranging from approximately 14 mm/yr along the Southwest Indian Ridge to 55-75 mm/yr along the Southeast Indian Ridge. It also contains 12 volcanic hotspots, overlies a portion of a large low-shear-velocity province in the lower mantle, and is home to the Australian-Antarctic Discordance and a negative geoid anomaly just south of India, among other features. We measure phase velocity in the period range 30-130 seconds for fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves traversing the Indian Ocean; the data set includes 831 events that occurred between 1992 and 2014 and 769 stations. In order to isolate the signal of the oceanic upper mantle, paths with >30% of their length through continental upper mantle are excluded. Variations in phase velocity in the Indian Ocean upper mantle are explored with two approaches. One, phase velocity is allowed to vary only as a function of seafloor age. Two, a general two-dimensional parameterization is utilized in order to capture perturbations to age-dependent structure. Our preliminary results indicate a strong dependence of phase velocity on seafloor age, with higher velocity associated with older seafloor, and perturbations to the age-dependent trend in the vicinity of the Australian-Antarctic Discordance and the Marion and

  17. Apparatus for producing electrical energy from ocean waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, T.F.

    1981-05-05

    An energy conversion device is disclosed which utilizes the natural movements of ocean waves to produce electrical energy. The apparatus is contained in a tank which is adapted to float near the surface of the water and tilt from side to side about a pivot point located below the tank, thereby simulating a pendulum -like movement. A sinker weight is employed to produce the appropriate movement of the tank and maintain the floating tank in balance at the ocean surface. The pendulum motion of the tank is used to roll a plurality of gravity wheels or their respective horizontal platforms in the tank in such manner that shafts associated with the gravity wheels are caused to rotate. Electrical generators are operatively connected to the rotating shafts for producing electrical energy from the mechanical rotative energy of the shafts as the tank tilts from side to side with the wave motion. Each gravity wheel is equipped with a ratchet-like lock which prevents backward motion of the wheel such that it rolls in a single direction in a circular path on the platform. While one or more gravity wheels have their locks set so the wheels roll only in a clockwise direction, other gravity wheels are free to roll only in a counterclockwise direction. In this fashion, when the tank tilts to one side due to the rise of an ocean wave the gravity wheels roll from the higher side of their respective platforms to the lower sides along their prescribed circular paths. The centrifugal force generated by the weight of the gravity wheels and the unceasing action of the ocean waves provides the continuous generation of electrical energy.

  18. Deep Ocean Tsunami Waves off the Sri Lankan Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The initial tsunami waves resulting from the undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) on December 26, 2004, off the island of Sumatra, Indonesia, took a little over 2 hours to reach the teardrop-shaped island of Sri Lanka. Additional waves continued to arrive for many hours afterward. At approximately 05:15 UTC, as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead, the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) captured this image of deep ocean tsunami waves about 30-40 kilometers from Sri Lanka's southwestern coast. The waves are made visible due to the effects of changes in sea-surface slope on the reflected sunglint pattern, shown here in MISR's 46-degree-forward-pointing camera. Sunglint occurs when sunlight reflects off a water surface in much the same way light reflects off a mirror, and the position of the Sun, angle of observation, and orientation of the sea surface determines how bright each part of the ocean appears in the image. These large wave features were invisible to MISR's nadir (vertical-viewing) camera. The image covers an area of 208 kilometers by 207 kilometers. The greatest impact of the tsunami was generally in an east-west direction, so the havoc caused by the tsunami along the southwestern shores of Sri Lanka was not as severe as along the eastern coast. However, substantial damage did occur in this region' as evidenced by the brownish debris in the water' because tsunami waves can diffract around land masses. The ripple-like wave pattern evident in this MISR image roughly correlates with the undersea boundary of the continental shelf. The surface wave pattern is likely to have been caused by interaction of deep waves with the ocean floor, rather than by the more usually observed surface waves, which are driven by winds. It is possible that this semi-concentric pattern represents wave reflection from the continental land mass; however, a combination of wave modeling and detailed bathymetric data is required to

  19. Boat powered by sea waves

    SciTech Connect

    Gargos, G.

    1984-11-06

    A boat having an external float pivotally fixed to the boat. Through linkage, the motion of the float relative to the boat resulting from wave motion drives a dual cylinder pump. The pump admits water from the body of water in which the boat is suspended and pressurizes that water for direction aft as a means for propulsion.

  20. Ocean Wave Studies with Applications to Ocean Modeling and Improvement of Satellite Altimeter Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1999-01-01

    Combining analysis of satellite data (altimeter, scatterometer, high-resolution visible and infrared images, etc.) with mathematical modeling of non-linear wave processes, we investigate various ocean wave fields (on scales from capillary to planetary), their role in ocean dynamics and turbulent transport (of heat and biogeochemical quantities), and their effects on satellite altimeter measuring accuracy. In 1998 my attention was focused on long internal gravity waves (10 to 1000 km), known also as baroclinic inertia-gravity (BIG) waves. We found these waves to be a major factor of altimeter measurements "noise," resulting in a greater uncertainty [up to 10 cm in terms of sea surface height (SSH) amplitude] in the measured SSH signal than that caused by the sea state bias variations (up to 5 cm or so). This effect still remains largely overlooked by the satellite altimeter community. Our studies of BIG waves address not only their influence on altimeter measurements but also their role in global ocean dynamics and in transport and turbulent diffusion of biogeochemical quantities. In particular, in collaboration with Prof Peter Weichman, Caltech, we developed a theory of turbulent diffusion caused by wave motions of most general nature. Applied to the problem of horizontal turbulent diffusion in the ocean, the theory yielded the effective diffusion coefficient as a function of BIG wave parameters obtainable from satellite altimeter data. This effort, begun in 1997, has been successfully completed in 1998. We also developed a theory that relates spatial fluctuations of scalar fields (such as sea surface temperature, chlorophyll concentration, drifting ice concentration, etc.) to statistical characteristics of BIG waves obtainable from altimeter measurements. A manuscript is in the final stages of preparation. In order to verify the theoretical predictions and apply them to observations, we are now analyzing Sea-viewing Wide Field of view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Field of

  1. A joint method to retrieve directional ocean wave spectra from SAR and wave spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lin; Yang, Jingsong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Juan

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a joint method to simultaneously retrieve wave spectra at different scales from spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and wave spectrometer data. The method combines the output from the two different sensors to overcome retrieval limitations that occur in some sea states. The wave spectrometer sensitivity coefficient is estimated using an effective significant wave height (SWH), which is an average of SAR-derived and wave spectrometer-derived SWH. This averaging extends the area of the sea surface sampled by the nadir beam of the wave spectrometer to improve the accuracy of the estimated sensitivity coefficient in inhomogeneous sea states. Wave spectra are then retrieved from SAR data using wave spectrometer-derived spectra as first guess spectra to complement the short waves lost in SAR data retrieval. In addition, the problem of 180° ambiguity in retrieved spectra is overcome using SAR imaginary cross spectra. Simulated data were used to validate the joint method. The simulations demonstrated that retrieved wave parameters, including SWH, peak wave length (PWL), and peak wave direction (PWD), agree well with reference parameters. Collocated data from ENVISAT advanced SAR (ASAR), the airborne wave spectrometer STORM, the PHAROS buoy, and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) were then used to verify the proposed method. Wave parameters retrieved from STORM and two ASAR images were compared to buoy and ECMWF wave data. Most of the retrieved parameters were comparable to reference parameters. The results of this study show that the proposed joint retrieval method could be a valuable complement to traditional methods used to retrieve directional ocean wave spectra, particularly in inhomogeneous sea states.

  2. Role of south Indian Ocean swells in modulating the north Indian Ocean wave climate through modelling and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiksha, S. V.; Vethamony, P.; Aboobacker, V. M.; Rashmi, R.

    2012-04-01

    Implementation and validation of a third generation wave model, Wavewatch III was used to study the characteristics of the south Indian ocean swells and their propagation in the north Indian Ocean. The NCEP reanalysis wind data (2.5° x 2.5°) has been used to generate the wind waves for the entire Indian Ocean during 2006 - 2007. The modelled wave parameters have been compared with measured buoy data and with merged altimeter data. The model results show good agreement with the buoy and altimeter data. A case study is carried out to study the propagation of the swells generated at the roaring 40°S in the Indian Ocean during May 2007. The "southern swell" occurred during May 2007 has been successfully reproduced in the wave model, which confirmed by the comparison of modelled significant wave heights with the merged altimeter significant wave heights. These swells were generated in the Atlantic ocean near the southern tip of South Africa and propagated towards the north Indian Ocean. These waves touches the Madagascar region and further hits the La Reunion islands after three days thus creating numerous damages near the islands. The magnitude of the swell is around 15m near the generation area and it reduces to around 6m near the La Reunion islands while propagating towards the north Indian Ocean. Further the swell energy is spataially distributed in the northern and southern Indian Ocean. The study reveals that the swells generated in the roaring forties and propagating in the SW/SSW direction influences more to Bay of Bengal than Arabian Sea. This occurs during pre-monsoon season primarily because large scale winds are weak in the north Indian Ocean during this period and hence swells from south Indian Ocean dominates at this time. The case of "southern swell" also happened to be at the same season. Further wave parameters were extracted at few locations in the northern Indian Ocean to study the impact of May 2007 swells on the wave climate. An average of around

  3. Long Term Autonomous Ocean Remote Sensing Utilizing the Wave Glider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, J.

    2012-12-01

    Rising costs of ship time and increasing budgetary restrictions make installation and maintenance of fixed ocean buoys a logistical and financial challenge. The cost associated with launch, recovery, and maintenance has resulted in a limited number of deployed buoys, restricting data on oceanic conditions. To address these challenges, Liquid Robotics (LRI) has developed the Wave Glider, an autonomous, mobile remote sensing solution. This system utilizes wave energy for propulsion allowing for long duration deployments of up to one year while providing real-time data on meteorological and oceanographic conditions. In November 2011, LRI deployed four Wave Gliders on a mission to cross the Pacific Ocean (the PacX) from San Francisco to Australia (two vehicles) or Japan (two vehicles) while transmitting data on weather conditions, wave profiles, sea surface temperatures, and biological conditions in real-time. This report evaluates the vehicle's ability to operate as an ocean going data platform by comparing data from the onboard weather sensors with two moored buoys, NDBC 46092 (Monterey Bay) and NDBC 51000 (200 nmi NE of Maui). The report also analyzes data transmitted from all four vehicles as they passed directly through a tropical storm 580 nmi NE of Hawaii. Upon arriving at one of the aforementioned buoys, the gliders continuously circled for a period of two days at a distance of three to eight nautical miles to build a comparative dataset. Data from both platforms were streamed in near real time enabling mid-mission evaluation of the performance of sensors. Overall, results varied from a <0.5% difference in barometric pressure between buoy NDBC 46092 and the gliders to high disagreement in wind speed and direction. While comparisons to moored buoy data can provide valuable insight into the relative accuracy of each platform, differences in agreement on variables such as wind speed and direction were attributed to micro-spatial variability in oceanic conditions

  4. Stochastic simulations of ocean waves: An uncertainty quantification study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, B.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-02-01

    The primary objective of this study is to introduce a stochastic framework based on generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) for uncertainty quantification in numerical ocean wave simulations. The techniques we present can be easily extended to other numerical ocean simulation applications. We perform stochastic simulations using a relatively new numerical method to simulate the HISWA (Hindcasting Shallow Water Waves) laboratory experiment for directional near-shore wave propagation and induced currents in a shallow-water wave basin. We solve the phased-averaged equation with hybrid discretization based on discontinuous Galerkin projections, spectral elements, and Fourier expansions. We first validate the deterministic solver by comparing our simulation results against the HISWA experimental data as well as against the numerical model SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore). We then perform sensitivity analysis to assess the effects of the parametrized source terms, current field, and boundary conditions. We employ an efficient sparse-grid stochastic collocation method that can treat many uncertain parameters simultaneously. We find that the depth-induced wave-breaking coefficient is the most important parameter compared to other tunable parameters in the source terms. The current field is modeled as random process with large variation but it does not seem to have a significant effect. Uncertainty in the source terms does not influence significantly the region before the submerged breaker whereas uncertainty in the incoming boundary conditions does. Considering simultaneously the uncertainties from the source terms and boundary conditions, we obtain numerical error bars that contain almost all experimental data, hence identifying the proper range of parameters in the action balance equation.

  5. Investigation of Coastal Ocean Response to Landfalling Hurricane Using a Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) Model: Idealized Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambon, J. B.; He, R.; Warner, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate coupling mechanisms among ocean, atmosphere and waves during land-falling hurricanes on an idealized coastal ocean setting with the recently developed Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system. The atmosphere is represented by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, the ocean by the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), and waves by the Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN) model, with data fields exchanged by the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT) during concurrent simulations. Coupled model simulations are performed on an idealized ocean grid with a linear coastline and bathymetry representative of a typical coastal shelf. We focus on ocean responses before, during and after landfall. Six sensitivity experiments are performed by switching on and off the two- way communications of various ocean, atmosphere and wave state variables. Model solutions clearly demonstrate complex interactions between the atmosphere, ocean, and wave responses, highlighting the importance and necessity of using an advanced, interdisciplinary, coupled modeling system to study the dynamics of landfalling hurricanes

  6. Role of Ocean Waves in the Earth system (Fridtjof Nansen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Peter A. E. M.

    2015-04-01

    In this presentation I will start with a brief description of the field of ocean wave forecasting. This will include an introduction to the key quantity of wave forecasting, namely the wave spectrum, and to the role the evolution equation for the wave spectrum, known as the energy balance equation, plays in understanding the role of ocean waves in the earth system. The energy balance equation describes the rate of change of the wave spectrum due to advection and refraction on the one hand and, on the other hand, the rate of change due to physical processes such as wind input, the energy conserving nonlinear four-wave interactions and dissipation by white capping. If the wave spectrum is known at a certain location then all the wave quantities such as wave height, period, energy flux and mean wave direction can be obtained. But knowledge of the wave spectrum also allows to obtain information on the statistics of waves. Just recently it has been shown that the occurrence of extreme events is closely linked to the shape of the wave spectrum. Narrow spectra are, compared to broad spectra, much more prone to extreme events, known as freak waves. Furthermore, for known wave spectrum one may determine, using the wind input source function, how much momentum the atmosphere is transfering to the ocean waves, which, of course slows down the atmospheric flow. On the other hand, using the white capping source function one may determine the energy flux from breaking waves into the upper ocean which enhances the upper ocean mixing of temperature and currents. This suggests that at the sea surface there is a two-interaction between atmosphere and ocean waves, between ocean waves and ocean circulation and between atmosphere and ocean. At ECMWF we are in the process of developing such a coupled system and some interesting results from numerical experiments will be presented.

  7. Studying Nearshore Ocean Waves Using X-Band Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughlin, B.; Bland, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    In January of 2010, ocean waves generated by an unusually large storm caused major erosion damage to the San Francisco coastline, with an erosion "hot spot" partially collapsing a four-lane throughway and threatening important infrastructure. Every winter, swells from the northwest approach San Francisco's Ocean Beach by passing over the southern limb of the San Francisco Bar, an ebb-tidal delta seaward of the Golden Gate Bridge. Refraction of approaching wave-fronts causes focusing of wave energy at the southern end of Ocean Beach where the S.F. Bar meets the coast, possibly explaining the location of the 2010 hot spot. In 2011 an x-band radar system was installed on a site near the erosion hot spot, at an elevation of 13 m above low tide, about 40 m back from the high-tide line. The radar system collects images of wave crests out to 3 km from the scanner. Study of these images when offshore buoys report a single NW swell shows two swell patterns arriving at Ocean Beach, separated in direction by about 30 degrees, and producing a quilted interference pattern, as seen in the accompanying figure. We interpret these swells as following two different paths around the Bar. Preliminary ray-tracing studies tend to confirm this interpretation. To enhance these images we have employed two techniques. The first technique, which is concerned with identification and visualization of swells in the region of interest, involves iteration over possible swell periods: scans taken at integral multiples of a given period are added together, with the sharpest image determining the swell period (see figure) and providing an enhanced image for further analysis. The second technique involves displacement of images in time by phase incrementation in k-space, with subsequent addition of images. We will present results concerning the stability of the relative phase of the two swells, and the applicability to models for propagation of waves. Establishment of a tested propagation model would

  8. Unlocking Electric Power in the Oceans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurwood, David L.

    1985-01-01

    Cruising or stationary ocean thermal plants could convert the vast heat energy of the ocean into electricity for islands and underdeveloped countries. This approach to energy conservation is described with suggestions for design and outputs of plants. A model project operating in Hawaii is noted. (DH)

  9. Modeled dependence of wind and waves on ocean temperature in tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phibbs, S.; Toumi, R.

    2015-12-01

    A coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model is used to investigate the sensitivity of surface wind speed and significant wave height to ocean temperature for idealized tropical cyclones (TCs). More intense and larger TCs, with higher waves, form when ocean temperature is increased. The maximum significant wave height increases more than the maximum wind speed for TCs up to hurricane force wind. However, above hurricane force wind the change in maximum wind speed is similar or greater than the change in maximum significant wave height. This can be explained by the wind drag coefficient decreasing as wind speed exceeds hurricane force wind, so that the growth of waves is dampened. The areal footprint of wave height grows considerably more than the maximum as ocean temperature is increased. This suggests a large increase in the surface area of damaging waves generated by TCs may be the dominant impact of a future warmer ocean.

  10. Modeled dependence of wind and waves on ocean temperature in tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phibbs, Samuel; Toumi, Ralf

    2014-10-01

    A coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model is used to investigate the sensitivity of surface wind speed and significant wave height to ocean temperature for idealized tropical cyclones (TCs). More intense and larger TCs, with higher waves, form when ocean temperature is increased. The maximum significant wave height increases more than the maximum wind speed for TCs up to hurricane force wind. However, above hurricane force wind the change in maximum wind speed is similar or greater than the change in maximum significant wave height. This can be explained by the wind drag coefficient decreasing as wind speed exceeds hurricane force wind, so that the growth of waves is dampened. The areal footprint of wave height grows considerably more than the maximum as ocean temperature is increased. This suggests a large increase in the surface area of damaging waves generated by TCs may be the dominant impact of a future warmer ocean.

  11. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, Scott B.; Zender, Charles S.

    2009-05-01

    Global ocean wind power has recently been assessed (W. T. Liu et al., 2008) using scatterometry-based 10 m winds. We characterize, for the first time, wind power at 80 m (typical wind turbine hub height) above the global ocean surface, and account for the effects of surface layer stability. Accounting for realistic turbine height and atmospheric stability increases mean global ocean wind power by +58% and -4%, respectively. Our best estimate of mean global ocean wind power is 731 W m-2, about 50% greater than the 487 W m-2 based on previous methods. 80 m wind power is 1.2-1.5 times 10 m power equatorward of 30° latitude, between 1.4 and 1.7 times 10 m power in wintertime storm track regions and >6 times 10 m power in stable regimes east of continents. These results are relatively insensitive to methodology as wind power calculated using a fitted Weibull probability density function is within 10% of power calculated from discrete wind speed measurements over most of the global oceans.

  12. Two-frequency /Delta k/ microwave scatterometer measurements of ocean wave spectra from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Jones, W. L.; Weissman, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for remotely sensing the large-scale gravity wave spectrum on the ocean surface using a two frequency (Delta k) microwave scatterometer has been demonstrated from stationary platforms and proposed from moving platforms. This measurement takes advantage of Bragg type resonance matching between the electromagnetic wavelength at the difference frequency and the length of the large-scale surface waves. A prominent resonance appears in the cross product power spectral density (PSD) of the two backscattered signals. Ku-Band aircraft scatterometer measurements were conducted by NASA in the North Sea during the 1979 Maritime Remote Sensing (MARSEN) experiment. Typical examples of cross product PSD's computed from the MARSEN data are presented. They demonstrate strong resonances whose frequency and bandwidth agree with the surface characteristics and the theory. Directional modulation spectra of the surface reflectivity are compared to the gravity wave spectrum derived from surface truth measurements.

  13. Long Wave Resonance in Tropical Oceans and Implications on Climate: the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinault, Jean-Louis

    2013-11-01

    Kelvin wave, being deflected off the western boundary. The succession of warm and cold waters transferred by baroclinic waves during a cycle leaves the tropical ocean by radiation and contributes to western boundary currents. The main manifestation of the basin modes concerns the variability of the NECC, of the branch of the South Equatorial Current (SEC) along the equator, of the western boundary currents as well as the formation of remote resonances, as will be presented in a future work. Remote resonances occur at midlatitudes, the role of which is suspected of being crucial in the functioning of subtropical gyres and in climate variability.

  14. Hurricane Directional Wave Spectrum Spatial Variation in the Open Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. W.; Walsh, E. J.; Vandemark, D.; Krabill, W. B.; Garcia, A. W.

    1999-01-01

    The sea surface directional wave spectrum was measured for the first time in all quadrants of a hurricane in open water using the NASA airborne scanning radar altimeter (SRA) carried aboard one of the NOAA WP-3D hurricane hunter aircraft at 1.5 km height. The SRA measures the energetic portion of the directional wave spectrum by generating a topographic map of the sea surface. At 8 Hz, the SRA sweeps a radar beam of 1 deg half-power width (two-way) across the aircraft ground track over a swath equal to 0. 8 of the aircraft height, simultaneously measuring the backscattered power at its 36 GHz (8.3 mm) operating frequency and the range to the sea surface at 64 positions. These slant ranges are multiplied by the cosine of the incidence angles to determine the vertical distances from the aircraft to the sea surface. Subtracting these distances from the aircraft height produces the sea surface elevation map. The sea surface topography is interpolated to a uniform grid, transformed by a two-dimensional FFT, and Doppler corrected. The data presented were acquired on 24 August 1998 when hurricane Bonnie was east of the Bahamas and moving slowly to the north. Wave heights up to 18 m were observed and the spatial variation of the wave field was dramatic. The dominant waves generally propagated at significant angles to the downwind direction and at times there were wave fields traveling at right angles to each other. The NOAA aircraft spent over five hours within 180 km of the hurricane Bonnie eye, and made five eye penetrations. A 2-minute animation of the directional wave spectrum spatial variation over this period will be shown.

  15. Starting to Experiment with Wave Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Jonathan; McCallie, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    Outlined is a simple design for a working wave-powered electrical generator based on one made on the BBC "Rough Science" TV series. The design has been kept deliberately simple to facilitate rapid pupil/student involvement and most importantly so that there is much scope for their own ingenuity and ideas. The generator works on the principle of…

  16. Charge-coupled device camera system for remotely measuring the dynamics of ocean waves.

    PubMed

    Gotwols, B L; Irani, G B

    1982-03-01

    A camera system has been developed and employed for measuring the dynamics of ocean waves by recording image sequences of reflected sky light. Based on a modified commercially available CCD television camera, tests show that the system is completely free of frame-to-frame smearing and possesses adequate dynamic range for the intended use. A synchronous rotating shutter was also developed which prevents large optical overloads, such as might occur when sun glitter is inadvertently imaged, from causing vertical streaks in the image. The CCD array was found to have significant response nonuniformity. This nonuniformity proved to be less severe than that imposed by nature as a result of the reflection process. A scheme was devised to adequately correct for both using digital techniques. The resolution of the CCD array proved adequate for the oceanographic measurements performed thus far. The power law falloff of the observed radiance fluctuations with (ocean) wave number caused the actual resolution limit of the system to be set by recording system noise rather than CCD array architecture. A three-dimensional wave number-frequency spectrum was computed from a sequence of 256 images. The trend in this spectrum agrees with linear gravity wave dispersion to within 10%.

  17. The Wave Glider°: A New Autonomous Surface Vehicle to Augment MBARI's Growing Fleet of Ocean Observing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tougher, B. B.

    2011-12-01

    Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's (MBARI) evolving fleet of ocean observing systems has made it possible to collect information and data about a wide variety of ocean parameters, enabling researchers to better understand marine ecosystems. In collaboration with Liquid Robotics Inc, the designer of the Wave Glider autonomous surface vehicle (ASV), MBARI is adding a new capability to its suite of ocean observing tools. This new technology will augment MBARI research programs that use satellites, ships, moorings, drifters, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) to improve data collection of temporally and spatially variable oceanographic features. The Wave Glider ASV derives its propulsion from wave energy, while sensors and communications are powered through the use of two solar panels and batteries, enabling it to remain at sea indefinitely. Wave Gliders are remotely controlled via real-time Iridium burst communications, which also permit real-time data telemetry. MBARI has developed Ocean Acidification (OA) moorings to continuously monitor the chemical and physical changes occurring in the ocean as a result of increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). The moorings are spatially restricted by being anchored to the seafloor, so during the summer of 2011 the ocean acidification sensor suite designed for moorings was integrated into a Wave Glider ASV to increase both temporal and spatial ocean observation capabilities. The OA sensor package enables the measurement of parameters essential to better understanding the changing acidity of the ocean, specifically pCO2, pH, oxygen, salinity and temperature. The Wave Glider will also be equipped with a meteorological sensor suite that will measure air temperature, air pressure, and wind speed and direction. The OA sensor integration into a Wave Glider was part of MBARI's 2011 summer internship program. This project involved designing a new layout for the OA sensors

  18. Hurricane Directional Wave Spectrum Spatial Variation in the Open Ocean and at Landfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Wright, C. W.; Vandemark, D.; Krabill, W. B.; Garcia, A. W.; Houston, S. H.; Powell, M. D.; Black, P. G.; Marks, F. D.; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The sea surface directional wave spectrum was measured for the first time in all quadrants of a hurricane in open water using the NASA airborne scanning radar altimeter (SRA) carried aboard one of the NOAA WP-3D hurricane hunter aircraft at 1.5 km height. The SRA measures the energetic portion of the directional wave spectrum by generating a topographic map of the sea surface. At 8 Hz, the SRA sweeps a radar beam of 1 E half-power width (two-way) across the aircraft ground track over a swath equal to 0.8 of the aircraft height, simultaneously measuring the backscattered power at its 36 GHz (8.3 mm) operating frequency and the range to the sea surface at 64 positions. These slant ranges are multiplied by the cosine of the incidence angles to determine the vertical distances from the aircraft to the sea surface. Subtracting these distances from the aircraft height produces the sea surface elevation map. The sea surface topography is interpolated to a uniform grid, transformed by a two-dimensional FFT, and Doppler corrected. The open-ocean data were acquired on 24 August 1998 when hurricane Bonnie was east of the Bahamas and moving slowly to the north. Individual waves with heights up to 18 m were observed and the spatial variation of the wave field was dramatic. The dominant waves generally propagated at significant angles to the downwind direction. At some positions there were three different wave fields of comparable energy crossing each other. The NOAA aircraft spent over five hours within 180 km of the hurricane Bonnie eye, and made five eye penetrations. A 3-minute animation of the directional wave spectrum spatial variation over this period will be shown as well as summary plots of the wave field spatial variation. On 26 August 1998, the NOAA aircraft flew at 2.2 km height when hurricane Bonnie was making landfall near Wilmington, NC, documenting the directional wave spectrum in the region between Charleston, SC and Cape Hatteras, NC. The aircraft ground track

  19. Effect of wave-induced Stokes drift on the dynamics of ocean mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhifeng; Wu, Kejian; Dong, Sheng; Deng, Zeng'an; Zhang, Xiaoshuang

    2015-01-01

    The wave-forcing `Coriolis-Stokes forcing' and `Stokes-vortex force' induced by Stokes drift affect the upper ocean jointly. To study the effect of the wave-induced Stokes drift on the dynamics of the ocean mixed layer, a new three-dimensional (3D) numerical model is derived using the primitive basic equations and Eulerian wave averaging. The Princeton Ocean Model (POM), a 3D primitive equation ocean model is used with the upper wave-averaged basic equations. The global ocean circulation is simulated using the POM model, and the Stokes drift is evaluated based on the wave data generated by WAVEWATCH III. We compared simulations with and without the Stokes drift. The results show that the magnitude of the Stokes drift is comparable with the Eulerian mean current. Including the Stokes drift in the ocean model affects both the Eulerian current and the Lagranian drift and causes the vertical mixing coefficients to increase.

  20. An investigation of the modulation of capillary and short gravity waves in the open ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. D.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the modulation of capillary and gravity waves by long ocean waves is described. A pressure transducer is used to obtain water surface displacements, and a high-response laser-optical system is used to detect short-wave slopes. Analytical techniques are developed to account for the orbital motion of long waves. The local mean squared wave slope is found to be maximum leeward of the long-wave crests. For the long waves studied here and for short waves from 1 cm to 1 m, the longer a short-wave component is, the more leeward its maximum tends to occur. Also, the shortest waves tend to modulate least. The modulation of short waves is found to be strong enough to be an important component of the synthetic aperture radar image formation mechanism for long ocean waves.

  1. The comparison between the synthetic aperture radar imageries and the surface truth of ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, S. V.

    1978-01-01

    Ocean waves measured offshore of Marineland, Florida, by the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are compared with the surface truth data. The Fourier transform of SAR imageries are taken and the corrections of the wave directions and wave lengths due to the relative velocities between SAR and waves are considered. Favorable comparisons are obtained for the peak frequencies, wave directions, and directional distributions. However, the one-dimensional SAR spectra are quite different from the surface truth wave height spectra.

  2. Numerical simulation and observations of very severe cyclone generated surface wave fields in the north Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirisha, P.; Remya, P. G.; Balakrishnan Nair, T. M.; Rao, B. Venkateswara

    2015-12-01

    Accurate wave forecast is most needed during tropical cyclones as it has adverse effects on the entire marine activities. The present work evaluates the performance of a wave forecasting system under very severe cyclonic conditions for the Indian Ocean. The wave model results are validated separately for the deep water and shallow water using in-situ observations. Satellite altimeter observations are also utilized for validation purpose. The results show that the model performance is accurate (SI < 26% and correlation > 0.9) and consistent during very severe cyclones (categories 4 and 5). The power of the cyclone waves which hit in the eastern Indian coastal region is also analysed and it reveals that the coastal region which lies on the right side of the cyclone track receives high amount wave energy throughout the cyclone period. The study also says that the abnormal waves mostly present on the right side of the track.

  3. Wave-current interactions at the FloWave Ocean Energy Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Donald; Davey, Thomas; Steynor, Jeffrey; Bruce, Tom; Smith, Helen; Kaklis, Panagiotis

    2015-04-01

    Physical scale model testing is an important part of the marine renewable energy development process, allowing the study of forces and device behaviour in a controlled environment prior to deployment at sea. FloWave is a new state-of-the-art ocean energy research facility, designed to provide large scale physical modelling services to the tidal and wave sector. It has the unique ability to provide complex multi-directional waves that can be combined with currents from any direction in the 25m diameter circular tank. The facility is optimised for waves around 2s period and 0.4m height, and is capable of generating currents upwards of 1.6m/s. This offers the ability to model metocean conditions suitable for most renewable energy devices at a typical scale of between 1:10 and 1:40. The test section is 2m deep, which can be classed as intermediate-depth for most waves of interest, thus the full dispersion equation must be solved as the asymptotic simplifications do not apply. The interaction between waves and currents has been studied in the tank. This has involved producing in the tank sets of regular waves, focussed wave groups, and random sea spectra including multi-directional sea states. These waves have been both inline-with and opposing the current, as well as investigating waves at arbitrary angles to the current. Changes in wave height and wavelength have been measured, and compared with theoretical results. Using theoretical wave-current interaction models, methods have been explored to "correct" the wave height in the central test area of the tank when combined with a steady current. This allows the wave height with current to be set equal to that without a current. Thus permitting, for example, direct comparison of device motion response between tests with and without current. Alternatively, this would also permit a specific wave height and current combination to be produced in the tank, reproducing recorded conditions at a particular site of interest. The

  4. Estimated Overturning of Internal Waves due to Time-Dependent Shear in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Leonardo; Vanderhoff, Julie

    2010-11-01

    The ocean and atmosphere have a particular characteristic that sustains propagation of internal gravity waves called a stable stratification. Internal waves are generated, with wavelengths which can vary from a few meters to kilometers. These waves propagate through the ocean and atmosphere exchanging energy and momentum as they interact with other fluid phenomena and break, which in turn affects circulation, heat transport, nutrient distribution and biological activity in the oceans and the atmosphere. However large scale circulation models lack the appropriate resolution to detect these motions, hence it is necessary to accurately parameterize internal wave breaking in order to establish a better relationship between wave energy dissipation and its effects on oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns. In this research internal waves interact with a time dependent background in the form of a near-inertial wave, which are common in the ocean. Using a two dimensional, fully non-linear Navier-Stokes equation solver and ray theory, estimates of wave breaking parameters which predict breaking at the same location in both of these models are accomplished. A statistical analysis of waves observed during the Hawaiian Ocean Mixing Experiment will provide an estimate of the percentage of waves expected to break during propagation through an inertial wave.

  5. Elastic parabolic equation solutions for oceanic T-wave generation and propagation from deep seismic sources.

    PubMed

    Frank, Scott D; Collis, Jon M; Odom, Robert I

    2015-06-01

    Oceanic T-waves are earthquake signals that originate when elastic waves interact with the fluid-elastic interface at the ocean bottom and are converted to acoustic waves in the ocean. These waves propagate long distances in the Sound Fixing and Ranging (SOFAR) channel and tend to be the largest observed arrivals from seismic events. Thus, an understanding of their generation is important for event detection, localization, and source-type discrimination. Recently benchmarked seismic self-starting fields are used to generate elastic parabolic equation solutions that demonstrate generation and propagation of oceanic T-waves in range-dependent underwater acoustic environments. Both downward sloping and abyssal ocean range-dependent environments are considered, and results demonstrate conversion of elastic waves into water-borne oceanic T-waves. Examples demonstrating long-range broadband T-wave propagation in range-dependent environments are shown. These results confirm that elastic parabolic equation solutions are valuable for characterization of the relationships between T-wave propagation and variations in range-dependent bathymetry or elastic material parameters, as well as for modeling T-wave receptions at hydrophone arrays or coastal receiving stations. PMID:26093440

  6. Elastic parabolic equation solutions for oceanic T-wave generation and propagation from deep seismic sources.

    PubMed

    Frank, Scott D; Collis, Jon M; Odom, Robert I

    2015-06-01

    Oceanic T-waves are earthquake signals that originate when elastic waves interact with the fluid-elastic interface at the ocean bottom and are converted to acoustic waves in the ocean. These waves propagate long distances in the Sound Fixing and Ranging (SOFAR) channel and tend to be the largest observed arrivals from seismic events. Thus, an understanding of their generation is important for event detection, localization, and source-type discrimination. Recently benchmarked seismic self-starting fields are used to generate elastic parabolic equation solutions that demonstrate generation and propagation of oceanic T-waves in range-dependent underwater acoustic environments. Both downward sloping and abyssal ocean range-dependent environments are considered, and results demonstrate conversion of elastic waves into water-borne oceanic T-waves. Examples demonstrating long-range broadband T-wave propagation in range-dependent environments are shown. These results confirm that elastic parabolic equation solutions are valuable for characterization of the relationships between T-wave propagation and variations in range-dependent bathymetry or elastic material parameters, as well as for modeling T-wave receptions at hydrophone arrays or coastal receiving stations.

  7. Altimeter Observations of Baroclinic Oceanic Inertia-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, R. E.; Cheng, B.

    1996-01-01

    For a wide range of nonlinear wave processes - from capillary to planetary waves - theory predicts the existence of Kolmogorov-type spectral cascades of energy and other conserved quantities occuring via nonlinear resonant wave-wave interactions. So far, observations of wave turbulence (WT) have been limited to small-scale processes such as surface gravity and capillary-gravity waves.

  8. Ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) and Superstorm Sandy (2012): Coupled model predictions and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Forecasting hurricane impacts of extreme winds and flooding requires accurate prediction of hurricane structure and storm-induced ocean surface waves days in advance. The waves are complex, especially near landfall when the hurricane winds and water depth varies significantly and the surface waves refract, shoal and dissipate. In this study, we examine the spatial structure, magnitude, and directional spectrum of hurricane-induced ocean waves using a high resolution, fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model and observations. The coupled model predictions of ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) over the Gulf of Mexico and Superstorm Sandy (2012) in the northeastern Atlantic and coastal region are evaluated with the NDBC buoy and satellite altimeter observations. Although there are characteristics that are general to ocean waves in both hurricanes as documented in previous studies, wave fields in Ike and Sandy possess unique properties due mostly to the distinct wind fields and coastal bathymetry in the two storms. Several processes are found to significantly modulate hurricane surface waves near landfall. First, the phase speed and group velocities decrease as the waves become shorter and steeper in shallow water, effectively increasing surface roughness and wind stress. Second, the bottom-induced refraction acts to turn the waves toward the coast, increasing the misalignment between the wind and waves. Third, as the hurricane translates over land, the left side of the storm center is characterized by offshore winds over very short fetch, which opposes incoming swell. Landfalling hurricanes produce broader wave spectra overall than that of the open ocean. The front-left quadrant is most complex, where the combination of windsea, swell propagating against the wind, increasing wind-wave stress, and interaction with the coastal topography requires a fully coupled model to meet these challenges in hurricane wave and surge prediction.

  9. Identifying the types of waves: A value adding study on the ocean observing data buoy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, B.; Sannasiraj, S.; Sundar, V.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding of the wave climate in a particular place of interest is one of the primary aspects of any ocean observing system. Engineers and scientists working in the area of coastal or offshore engineering require to have knowledge on the types of waves that predominantly prevailing not only for the design of the ocean structures but also to understand the physical behavior of ocean surface. For example, identification of breaking waves is given prime importance as it has potential to answer for many of the water-air interaction or turbulence mixing problems. On the other hand, group of waves in which successive wave heights exceed the significant value could exert tremendous forces on the ocean structures and may lead catastrophic damage to it. Apart from deriving the conventional information such as the significant wave periods, heights and the predominant direction of prevailing, knowledge on the existence of type of waves would certainly help the designers, engineers and researchers. In an attempt to classify the types of waves from the buoy measurements, a detailed experimental program was conducted in the Department of Ocean Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras. The buoy model was subjected to variety of waves such as group and breaking waves. The challenging task of the study is to simulate the group and breaking waves in the controlled laboratory environment. For which, initially, these waves are simulated theoretically, which intern converted into first order wave paddle signals to simulate the waves in the flume. The buoy heave, surge and pitch motions were measured by using potentiometers and the non-contact motion capturing cameras. The experimentally obtained wave elevation and the buoy motions time histories were analyzed by statistical, continuous wavelet transformation and phase-time methods to find the traces of wave types. A careful step by step analysis of the buoy motions yields presence of wave groupiness and breaking events

  10. High frequency seismic noise generated from breaking swallow water ocean waves and the link to time-variable sea states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppeliers, C.; Mallinson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Breaking waves in the near-shore are known to generate a significant amount of high frequency (f>5 Hz) energy. We investigate the correlation between the spectrum of seismic energy and the local sea states. We deployed a single three-component broadband seismometer approximately 50 m from the sea shore and recorded continuously for approximately 10 days. Our observations show that during elevated sea states, and presumably larger breaking waves in the surf zone, the power spectral density of the wave-generated seismic energy shifts to lower frequencies and higher spectral amplitudes. The correlation of the seismic spectral power to the height and period of ocean waves suggests that seismic observations can be used as a proxy for local sea states, which may have implications for sea shore sediment transport.

  11. Separating Internal Waves and Vortical Structure in the Open Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauffenburger, N. E.; Sanford, T. B.; Lien, R.

    2012-12-01

    Deviating from past oceanographic surveys, a new, powerful array of profiling floats has been deployed for three weeks in the Sargasso Sea to monitor the evolving sub-mesoscale field. Using 18-20 EM-APEX floats, profiling to 100 m depth simultaneously, velocity (U and V), temperature, salinity and microstructure measurements (χ) were made on horizontal scales between 100 m and 10 km. This strategy provided a 3-D snapshot of the physical properties every half hour, which significantly reduces temporal aliasing. Area-averaged relative vorticity, vortex stretching, non-linear twisting, horizontal divergence and Ertel's potential vorticity have been computed and projected onto isopycnal surfaces. Since vortical modes carry Ertel's potential vorticity (and internal waves do not), this is a useful step in understanding the energetic contribution of vortical motions to the background internal wave field on small scales. In addition, the temporal material conservation law of Ertel's potential vorticity will be tested for the first time by determining the advection of the floats' measurements relative to the motion of the water parcels and by computing the horizontal gradients of the potential vorticity signal. The three deployments provide data to analyze the interaction of inertial waves, vortical processes and barotropic tides in and out of active frontogenesis.

  12. Directional ocean wave spectrum estimation based on the joint measurement from synthetic aperture radar and wave spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lin; Pan, Delu; Hao, Zengzhou; Mao, Zhihua; He, Xianqiang

    2011-11-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can measure directional wave spectrum based on the closed nonlinear SAR-ocean mapping mechanism. The according wave spectrum retrieval algorithm has been developing for decades, but some limitations remain, like high wave number cut off in azimuthal direction and the need for the first guess spectrum. Wave spectrometer is a kind of new satellite-based real aperture radar (RAR) operating at low incidence, which has a narrow beam and scans complete 360° by antenna rotation. It derives wave spectrum by the simple linear relation between the wave spectrum and the modulation spectrum from the wave spectrometer. The linear coefficient can be estimated by the nadir beam or external wind speed information. This paper proposes a method on the wave spectrum estimation based on the joint measurement from synchronous SAR and wave spectrometer. Firstly, the modulation spectrum is derived from the signal spectrum of the wave spectrometer, from which the relative wave spectrum can be constructed. Then the relative wave spectrum is seen as the first guess spectrum for the wave spectrum retrieval of SAR image. Because the relative wave spectrum has the same pattern with the real wave spectrum but has different absolute energy, we can retrieve the directional wave spectrum by the iteration way based on the relative wave spectrum from the SAR image. This paper makes use of simulation technology to validate the joint measurement. The simulation compares the input spectrum and the retrieved one in terms of peak direction, peak wavelength and significant wave height, which has a deviation of 6°, 4m and 0.3m, respectively. Simulation results show the joint measurement has the feasibility for the retrieval of directional ocean wave spectrum.

  13. Evidence of Doppler-shifted Bragg scattering in the vertical plane by ocean surface waves.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Stephen D; D'Spain, Gerald L

    2012-03-01

    A set of narrowband tones (280, 370, 535, and 695 Hz) were transmitted by an acoustic source mounted on the ocean floor in 10 m deep water and received by a 64-element hydrophone line array lying on the ocean bottom 1.25 km away. Beamformer output in the vertical plane for the received acoustic tones shows evidence of Doppler-shifted Bragg scattering of the transmitted acoustic signals by the ocean surface waves. The received, scattered signals show dependence on the ocean surface wave frequencies and wavenumber vectors, as well as on acoustic frequencies and acoustic mode wavenumbers. Sidebands in the beamformer output are offset in frequency by amounts corresponding to ocean surface wave frequencies. Deviations in vertical arrival angle from specular reflection agree with those predicted by the Bragg condition through first-order perturbation theory using measured directional surface wave spectra and acoustic modes measured by the horizontal hydrophone array.

  14. Sensitivity of the Ocean State to Internal Lee Wave Driven Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melet, A. V.; Hallberg, R.; Legg, S.; Nikurashin, M.

    2012-12-01

    Diapycnal mixing plays a key role in maintaining the ocean stratification and meridional overturning circulation. In the ocean interior, diapycnal mixing is mainly sustained by the breaking of internal gravity waves which are generated by abyssal flows interacting with rough topography. Two classes of topographic internal waves in the ocean are: internal tides, generated by barotropic tides, and lee waves, generated by geostrophic flows over rough topography. Currently, climate models include only a parameterization of mixing due to local dissipation of internal tides, using the scheme of St Laurent et al. (2002). In this study, we explore the combined effect of internal tide and lee wave driven mixing on the ocean state. We performed a series of sensitivity experiments using two models, developed at GFDL and configured for global simulations at one degree resolution: the GOLD isopycnal ocean model and the CM2G ocean-atmosphere coupled model. In these models, internal-tide driven mixing is parameterized using the St Laurent et al. (2002) scheme. We added a parameterization of lee wave driven mixing by using a recently estimated global map of energy conversion into lee waves (Nikurashin and Ferrari, 2011) in the St Laurent et al. (2002) scheme, with varying fraction of local dissipation and vertical decay scale. We show that although the global energy input into lee waves (0.2 TW) is small compared to that into internal tides (1 TW), lee wave driven mixing makes a significant impact on the ocean state. Notably, the addition of lee wave driven mixing impacts the thermal structure of the ocean, water mass transformation rates and the meridional overturning circulation. The vertically-integrated circulation is also impacted, notably in the Southern Ocean which accounts for half the lee-wave energy flux. Finally, we show that the different spatial distribution of the internal tide and lee wave energy input impacts the sensitivity described in this study. Our modeling

  15. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Philip R.

    2011-09-27

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics device design projects to scale up the current Ocean Power Technology PowerBuoy from 150kW to 500kW.

  16. Wave power extraction from a transient heaving cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Hudspeth, R. T.; Slotta, L. S.

    1980-01-01

    Wave power extracted from the transient motion of a periodically restrained-released heaving circular cylinder proposed by Falnes and Budal is examined under the limitations of linear wave theory excitation. Numerical estimates for the normalized radiated wave amplitudes required for the waveforce excitation derived by Mei are computed from the computationally efficient variational method developed by Black and Mei for the wave force diffraction regime. Wave power estimates for the rising period only of the heaving motion are given; while the falling period of the motion is neglected. A graphical summary is presented which demonstrates the parametric dependency of the dimensionless wave power rate on the design wave parameters and the body geometry for three general types of transient power systems heaving in deep water conditions. The total power requirements for the complete power extraction system as well as the real fluid viscous effects are not included.

  17. Diffraction from sharply peaked waves as an ocean surface scattering mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Glenn A.; Vesecky, John F.; Glazman, Roman E.

    1992-01-01

    The role of sharply peaked waves as a major ocean scattering mechanism for radar is investigated. A prototype three-dimensional wedgelike wave shape was constructed, and its scattering properties were analyzed. Using results from the theory of the statistical geometry of the ocean surface, it is estimated how many such wedges there are per unit area, as a function of sea conditions. Taking into account a directional distribution of the wedges, the total radar cross section due to wedge diffraction effects is estimated. At large incidence angles, wedge diffraction appears to account for a significant amount of the radar cross section on the ocean surface. The wedgelike wave shape used is a more realistic representation of sharplypeaked waves. The scale-size and spatial density of the wedgelike waves are computed directly from the wave-height spectrum.

  18. Wave heights in the 21st century Arctic Ocean simulated with a regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khon, V. C.; Mokhov, I. I.; Pogarskiy, F. A.; Babanin, A.; Dethloff, K.; Rinke, A.; Matthes, H.

    2014-04-01

    While wave heights globally have been growing over recent decades, observations of their regional trends vary. Simulations of future wave climate can be achieved by coupling wave and climate models. At present, wave heights and their future trends in the Arctic Ocean remain unknown. We use the third-generation wave forecast model WAVEWATCH-III forced by winds and sea ice concentration produced within the regional model HIRHAM, under the anthropogenic scenario SRES-A1B. We find that significant wave height and its extremes will increase over different inner Arctic areas due to reduction of sea ice cover and regional wind intensification in the 21st century. The opposite tendency, with a slight reduction in wave height appears for the Atlantic sector and the Barents Sea. Our results demonstrate the complex wave response in the Arctic Ocean to a combined effect of wind and sea ice forcings in a climate-change scenario during the 21st century.

  19. A wave investigation in the tropical Atlantic Ocean using satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melice, J. L. E.

    2015-12-01

    The intra-annual variability of the tropical Atlantic Ocean is investigated with satellite altimetry Absolute Dynamic Topography data. Three regions of high variability are found. The first region, between 3°N and 11°N, is characterized by the presence of westward propagating eddies linked to the North Equatorial Counter Current (NECC) retroflection in the vicinity of the Brazilian coast. In the second region, we observed the presence of westward propagating instability waves centered at 5°N between 30°W and 10°W. The third region, around the Equator, is characterized by the presence of eastward propagating Kelvin waves at the Equator, and westward propagating Rossby waves centered at 5°S and 5°N. The eddies linked to the NECC show a strong annual cycle: their number varies from ~4 per year in October to ~9 per year in March. The more powerful eddies occur in October around 40°W. Their diameter varies from 5° of longitude at 40°W to 2.5° at 60°W, and their speed is 18 cm/s. The instability waves also shows a strong seasonal cycle with maximum amplitude around August. They are generated by meridional winds at the African coast and by zonal winds at the Equator. The Kelvin waves at the Equator are generated by zonal wind anomalies at the Equator at 30°W with a 2.6 weeks delay, and their speed is 175 cm/s (2nd order baroclinic). The speed of the Rossby waves is 50 cm/s at 5°N, and 49 cm/s at 5°S.

  20. Towards a coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere four dimensional data assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngodock, Hans; Carrier, Matthew; Amerault, Clark; Campbell, Timothy; Holt, Teddy; Xu, Liang; Rowley, Clark

    2015-04-01

    Individual 4dvar systems have been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for the ocean model (Navy coastal ocean model, NCOM), the wave model (simulating waves in the nearshore, SWAN) and the atmospheric component of the coupled ocean-atmosphere mesoscale prediction system (COAMPS). Although the three models within COAPMS are coupled in the forward integration, the initialization of each model is done separately. The coupled system forecast is hindered, however, by the lack of a fully coupled and dynamically balanced ocean-atmosphere analysis. A recent work by Ngodock and Carrier (2013) has highlighted this shortcoming with the NCOM-4DVAR, showing that while the NCOM-4DVAR is able to adjust the ocean state properly, the resulting ocean forecast degrades quickly due to the fact that the atmospheric state has not also been adjusted relative to the ocean observations. Likewise, . Currently, the coupled model is initialized using separate analyses for the ocean and atmosphere that do not account for observations in the adjacent fluid. The lack of a coupled analysis produces shocks in the coupled model in the form of gravity waves that degrade the information gained through DA and increase the error in the coupled forecast. The goal of this presentation is to describe ongoing developments at NRL in building a fully coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere four-dimensional variational (4dvar) data assimilation system using the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF).

  1. Impact of improved wave dissipation parameterisations on wave-current interactions in a coupled wave-ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanafin, J. A.; Ardhuin, F.; Roland, A.; Leckler, F.; Rascle, N.

    2012-12-01

    The WAVEWATCH-III model is used operationally as part of the PREVIMER coastal forecast system. A global version of the model provides boundary conditions for a series of stand-alone high-resolution regional sub-domains, on unstructured grids, which are coupled with the regional ocean model MARS. New developments in the WW3 model include a combination of dissipation parameterisations (Ardhuin et al 2010). An anisotropic breaking-induced wind wave dissipation has been based on the local saturation spectrum, with a higher dissipation rate in the mean wave direction, designed to fit observed directional spreading. Additionally, a cumulative dissipation rate inspired by Babanin and Young (2005) but directly estimated from breaking wave probabilities dramatically enhances the dissipation at frequencies greater than 3 times the peak frequency. Regarding swell, a non-linear dissipation based on SAR-derived dissipation rates across the Pacific (Ardhuin et al., 2009) has been introduced. Validation of this model (Rascle and Ardhuin 2012, submitted) using a global hindcast from 1994-2010 shows improvements in significant wave height compared to an altimeter database, with values <10% in general. Regarding extreme events, Hanafin et al (2012) showed that the prediction of the timing of arrival, peak period and spectral distribution of very long swell generated by hurricane-level winds in the North Atlantic compared very well to coastal buoy observations. One of the aims of such improvements is to assist users by providing better geophysical parameters as output. Improvements noted in the mean squared slope compared to buoys, for example, implies a larger amount of energy is available to near-surface Langmuir turbulence. A recent study using the WW3 wave model and the MARS ocean model (Ardhuin et al, in press, JPO 2012) focused on near-shore wave interaction with strong currents. At small scales, rapid steepening of wave slopes by opposing currents induces enhanced breaking as

  2. Hurricane Directional Wave Spectrum Spatial Variation in the Open Ocean and at Landfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Edward J.; Wright, C. Wayne; Vandemark, Douglas C.; Krabill, William B.; Garcia, Andrew W.; Houston, Samuel H.; Powell, Mark D.; Black, Peter G.; Marks, Frank D.

    2000-01-01

    The sea surface directional wave spectrum was measured for the first time in all quadrants of a hurricane in open water using the NASA airborne scanning radar altimeter (SRA) carried aboard one of the NOAA WP-3D hurricane hunter aircraft at 1.5 km height. The SRA measures the energetic portion of the directional wave spectrum by generating a topographic map of the sea surface. At 8 Hz, the SRA sweeps a radar beam of 1' half-power width (two-way) across the aircraft ground track over a swath equal to 0.8 of the aircraft height, simultaneously measuring the backscattered power at its 36 GHz (8.3 mm) operating frequency and the range to the sea surface at 64 positions. These slant ranges are multiplied by the cosine of the off-nadir angles to determine the vertical distances from the aircraft to the sea surface. Subtracting these distances from the aircraft height produces the sea surface elevation map. The sea surface topography is interpolated to a uniform grid, transformed by a two dimensional FFT, and Doppler corrected. The open-ocean data were acquired on 24 August 1998 when hurricane Bonnie was east of the Bahamas and moving toward 330 deg at about 5 m/s. Individual waves up to 18 m height were observed and the spatial variation of the wave field was dramatic. The dominant waves generally propagated at significant angles to the downwind direction. At some positions there were three different wave fields of comparable energy crossing each other. The NOAA aircraft spent over five hours within 180 km of the eye, and made five eye penetrations. On 26 August 1998, the NOAA aircraft flew at 2.2 km height when hurricane Bonnie was making landfall near Wilmington, NC, documenting the directional wave spectrum in the region between Charleston, SC and Cape Hatteras, NC. The aircraft flight lines included segments near and along the shoreline as well as far offshore. Animations of the directional wave spectrum spatial variation along the aircraft tracks on the two flights

  3. Impact of atmospheric convectively coupled equatorial Kelvin waves on the upper ocean variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, Dariusz; Flatau, Maria; Flatau, Piotr; Matthews, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Air-sea interaction of Convectively Coupled Kelvin Waves is studied using precipitation, latent heat, wind speed and diurnal ocean surface temperature variability index. The index describing upper ocean diurnal temperature variability in terms of wind speed and solar irradiance was developed based on Sea Glider data collected during special observing period of the 2011 Dynamics of the Madden Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) field project. The climatology of Convectively Coupled Kelvin Waves based on 15 years of TRMM measurements is developed. Out of 1948 Kelvin wave trajectories identified, more that 40% were active in the Indian Ocean basin. It is noticed that many Kelvin waves propagate in groups with only short period of time separating members of a group. Such waves account for most of the cross basin differences in the overall Kelvin waves activity. It is suggested that although averaged mixed layer temperature is not affected by fast propagating Kelvin waves, its diurnal variability is highly sensitive to wave passage even though the diurnal cycle doesn't have the wake effect in the ocean. Composites of all the Kelvin waves show that although changes in wind speed, latent heat, and temperature index have similar signature in various Madden Julian Oscillation phases the intraseasonal variability modulates the typical response to the Kelvin wave passage.

  4. Ocean Wave Energy Estimation Using Active Satellite Imagery as a Solution of Energy Scarce in Indonesia Case Study: Poteran Island's Water, Madura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadzir, Z. A.; Karondia, L. A.; Jaelani, L. M.; Sulaiman, A.; Pamungkas, A.; Koenhardono, E. S.; Sulisetyono, A.

    2015-10-01

    Ocean wave energy is one of the ORE (Ocean Renewable Energies) sources, which potential, in which this energy has several advantages over fossil energy and being one of the most researched energy in developed countries nowadays. One of the efforts for mapping ORE potential is by computing energy potential generated from ocean wave, symbolized by Watt per area unit using various methods of observation. SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) is one of the hyped and most developed Remote Sensing method used to monitor and map the ocean wave energy potential effectively and fast. SAR imagery processing can be accomplished not only in remote sensing data applications, but using Matrices processing application as well such as MATLAB that utilizing Fast Fourier Transform and Band-Pass Filtering methods undergoing Pre-Processing stage. In this research, the processing and energy estimation from ALOSPALSAR satellite imagery acquired on the 5/12/2009 was accomplished using 2 methods (i.e Magnitude and Wavelength). This resulted in 9 potential locations of ocean wave energy between 0-228 W/m2, and 7 potential locations with ranged value between 182-1317 W/m2. After getting through buffering process with value of 2 km (to facilitate the construction of power plant installation), 9 sites of location were estimated to be the most potential location of ocean wave energy generation in the ocean with average depth of 8.058 m and annual wind speed of 6.553 knot.

  5. Secondary microseism generation mechanisms and microseism derived ocean wave parameters, NE Atlantic, West of Ireland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donne, S. E.; Bean, C. J.; Lokmer, I.; Nicolau, M.; O'Neill, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean waves, driven by atmospheric processes, generate faint continuous Earth vibrations known as microseisms (Bromirski, 1999). Under certain conditions, ocean waves travelling in opposite directions may interact with one another producing a partial or full standing wave. This wave-wave interaction produces a pressure profile, unattenuated with depth, which exerts a pressure change at the seafloor, resulting in secondary microseisms in the 0.1-0.33 Hz band. There are clear correlations between microseism amplitude and storm and ocean wave intensity. We aim to determine ocean wave heights in the Northeast Atlantic offshore Ireland at individual buoy locations, using terrestrially recorded microseism signals. Two evolutionary approaches are used: Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and Grammatical Evolution (GE). These systems learn to interpret particular input patterns and corresponding outputs and expose the often complex underlying relationship between them. They learn by example and are therefore entirely data driven so data selection is extremely important for the success of the methods. An analysis and comparison of the performance of these methods for a five month period in 2013 will be presented showing that ocean wave characteristics may be reconstructed using microseism amplitudes, adopting a purely data driven approach. There are periods during the year when the estimations made from both the GE and ANN are delayed in time by 10 to 20 hours when compared to the target buoy measurements. These delays hold important information about the totality of the conditions needed for microseism generation, an analysis of which will be presented.

  6. Using Seismic Noise Generated by Ocean Waves to Monitor Seasonal and Secular Changes in Antarctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, R. E.; Aster, R. C.; Thompson, D. W. J.; Reusch, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's background seismic noise between ~1-30 seconds period is commonly dominated by microseisms that arise when oceanic wave energy and swell are converted to ground displacement as the waves crash and interact with the continental shelf. Peak power in the microseism bands at high-latitude stations typically coincides with large-scale extratropical cyclonic winter storm activity. However, due to the seasonal formation of sea ice around the continental shelves of polar regions, oceanic waves are impeded from efficiently exciting seismic energy, and annual peak microseism power thus occurs prior to the midwinter storm peak. We utilize recently collected seismic data from across the continent to show that power in three distinct microseism bands is found to be strongly anti-correlated with sea ice extent, with the shorter period signals being exceptionally sensitive to local conditions. Particular focus is given to the Antarctic Peninsula, the strongest source of microseism energy on the continent, where we note a significant increase in primary microseism power attributable to near coastal sources from 1993-2012. This increase correlates with regional sea ice loss driven by large-scale wind changes associated with strengthening of the Southern Annular Mode. Additionally, we use microseism analysis to explore changes in sea ice strength and extent relative to wave state and storminess in the Southern Oceans. Investigation of microseism seasonality, power, and decadal-scale trends in the Antarctic shows promise as a spatially integrated tool for monitoring and interpreting such sea ice strength and extent metrics through time.

  7. Directional wave climate and power variability along the Southeast Australian shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortlock, Thomas R.; Goodwin, Ian D.

    2015-04-01

    Variability in the modal wave climate is a key process driving large-scale coastal behaviour on moderate- to high-energy sandy coastlines, and is strongly related to variability in synoptic climate drivers. On sub-tropical coasts, shifts in the sub-tropical ridge (STR) modulate the seasonal occurrence of different wave types. However, in semi-enclosed seas, isolating directional wave climates and synoptic drivers is hindered by a complex mixed sea-swell environment. Here we present a directional wave climate typology for the Tasman Sea based on a combined statistical-synoptic approach using mid-shelf wave buoy observations along the Southeast Australian Shelf (SEAS). Five synoptic-scale wave climates exist during winter, and six during summer. These can be clustered into easterly (Tradewind), south-easterly (Tasman Sea) and southerly (Southern Ocean) wave types, each with distinct wave power signatures. We show that a southerly shift in the STR and trade-wind zone, consistent with an observed poleward expansion of the tropics, forces an increase in the total wave energy flux in winter for the central New South Wales shelf of 1.9 GJ m-1 wave-crest-length for 1° southerly shift in the STR, and a reduction of similar magnitude (approximately 1.8 GJ m-1) during summer. In both seasons there is an anti-clockwise rotation of wave power towards the east and south-east at the expense of southerly waves. Reduced obliquity of constructive wave power would promote a general disruption to northward alongshore sediment transport, with the cross-shore component becoming increasingly prevalent. Results are of global relevance to sub-tropical east coasts where the modal wave climate is influenced by the position of the zonal STR.

  8. The Earth's 'hum' is driven by ocean waves over the continental shelves.

    PubMed

    Webb, Spahr C

    2007-02-15

    Observations show that the seismic normal modes of the Earth at frequencies near 10 mHz are excited at a nearly constant level in the absence of large earthquakes. This background level of excitation has been called the 'hum' of the Earth, and is equivalent to the maximum excitation from a magnitude 5.75 earthquake. Its origin is debated, with most studies attributing the forcing to atmospheric turbulence, analogous to the forcing of solar oscillations by solar turbulence. Some reports also predicted that turbulence might excite the planetary modes of Mars to detectable levels. Recent observations on Earth, however, suggest that the predominant excitation source lies under the oceans. Here I show that turbulence is a very weak source, and instead it is interacting ocean waves over the shallow continental shelves that drive the hum of the Earth. Ocean waves couple into seismic waves through the quadratic nonlinearity of the surface boundary condition, which couples pairs of slowly propagating ocean waves of similar frequency to a high phase velocity component at approximately double the frequency. This is the process by which ocean waves generate the well known 'microseism peak' that dominates the seismic spectrum near 140 mHz (refs 11, 12), but at hum frequencies, the mechanism differs significantly in frequency and depth dependence. A calculation of the coupling between ocean waves and seismic modes reproduces the seismic spectrum observed. Measurements of the temporal correlation between ocean wave data and seismic data have confirmed that ocean waves, rather than atmospheric turbulence, are driving the modes of the Earth.

  9. Numerical investigation of the instability and nonlinear evolution of narrow-band directional ocean waves.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, P K

    2010-07-01

    The instability and nonlinear evolution of directional ocean waves is investigated numerically by means of simulations of the governing kinetic equation for narrow-band surface waves. Our simulation results reveal the onset of the modulational instability for long-crested wave trains, which agrees well with recent large-scale experiments in wave basins, where it was found that narrower directional spectra lead to self-focusing of ocean waves and an enhanced probability of extreme events. We find that the modulational instability is nonlinearly saturated by a broadening of the wave spectrum, which leads to the stabilization of the water-wave system. Applications of our results to other fields of physics, such as nonlinear optics and plasma physics, are discussed.

  10. Modeling the Ocean Tide for Tidal Power Generation Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, M.; Gedney, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent years have seen renewed interest in the ocean tide as a source of energy for electrical power generation. Unlike in the 1960s, when the tidal barrage was the predominant method of power extraction considered and implemented, the current methodology favors operation of a free-stream turbine or an array of them in strong tidal currents. As tidal power generation moves from pilot-scale projects to actual array implementations, numerical modeling of tidal currents is expected to play an increasing role in site selection, resource assessment, array design, and environmental impact assessment. In this presentation, a simple, coupled ocean/estuary model designed for research into fundamental aspects of tidal power generation is described. The model consists of a Pacific Ocean-size rectangular basin and a connected fjord-like embayment with dimensions similar to that of Puget Sound, Washington, one of the potential power generation sites in the United States. The model is forced by an idealized lunar tide-generating potential. The study focuses on the energetics of a tidal system including tidal power extraction at both global and regional scales. The hyperbolic nature of the governing shallow water equations means consequence of tidal power extraction cannot be limited to the local waters, but is global in extent. Modeling power extraction with a regional model with standard boundary conditions introduces uncertainties of 3 ~ 25% in the power extraction estimate depending on the level of extraction. Power extraction in the model has a well-defined maximum (~800 MW in a standard case) that is in agreement with previous theoretical studies. Natural energy dissipation and tidal power extraction strongly interact; for a turbine array of a given capacity, the higher the level of natural dissipation the lower the power the array can extract. Conversely, power extraction leads to a decrease in the level of natural dissipation (Figure) as well as the tidal range and the

  11. Wave hindcast experiments in the Indian Ocean using MIKE 21 SW model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remya, P. G.; Kumar, Raj; Basu, Sujit; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2012-04-01

    Wave prediction and hindcast studies are important in ocean engineering, coastal infrastructure development and management. In view of sparse and infrequent in-situ observations, model derived hindcast wave data can be used for the assessment of wave climate in offshore and coastal areas. In the present study, MIKE 21 SW Model has been used to carry out wave hindcast experiments in the Indian Ocean. Model runs have been made for the year 2005 using QuickSCAT scatterometer winds blended with ECMWF model winds. In order to study the impact of southern ocean swells, the model has been run in two different domains, with the southern boundary being shifted far south for the Domain 60S model. The model simulated wave parameters have been validated by comparing with buoy and altimeter data and various statistical yardsticks have been employed to quantify the validation. Possible reason for the poorer performance of the model in the Arabian Sea has also been pointed out.

  12. Computationally Efficient Numerical Model for the Evolution of Directional Ocean Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malej, M.; Choi, W.; Goullet, A.

    2011-12-01

    The main focus of this work has been the asymptotic and numerical modeling of weakly nonlinear ocean surface wave fields. In particular, a development of an efficient numerical model for the evolution of nonlinear ocean waves, including extreme waves known as Rogue/Freak waves, is of direct interest. Due to their elusive and destructive nature, the media often portrays Rogue waves as unimaginatively huge and unpredictable monsters of the sea. To address some of these concerns, derivations of reduced phase-resolving numerical models, based on the small wave steepness assumption, are presented and their corresponding numerical simulations via Fourier pseudo-spectral methods are discussed. The simulations are initialized with a well-known JONSWAP wave spectrum and different angular distributions are employed. Both deterministic and Monte-Carlo ensemble average simulations were carried out. Furthermore, this work concerns the development of a new computationally efficient numerical model for the short term prediction of evolving weakly nonlinear ocean surface waves. The derivations are originally based on the work of West et al. (1987) and since the waves in the ocean tend to travel primarily in one direction, the aforementioned new numerical model is derived with an additional assumption of a weak transverse dependence. In turn, comparisons of the ensemble averaged randomly initialized spectra, as well as deterministic surface-to-surface correlations are presented. The new model is shown to behave well in various directional wave fields and can potentially be a candidate for computationally efficient prediction and propagation of extreme ocean surface waves - Rogue/Freak waves.

  13. 76 FR 63917 - Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted.... d. Applicant: Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC. e. Name of Project: Cobscook Bay Tidal...

  14. Wave effects on ocean-ice interaction in the marginal ice zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Hakkinen, Sirpa; Peng, Chih Y.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of wave train on ice-ocean interaction in the marginal ice zone are studied through numerical modeling. A coupled two-dimensional ice-ocean model has been developed to include wave effects and wind stress for the predictions of ice edge dynamics. The sea ice model is coupled to the reduced-gravity ocean model through interfacial stresses. The main dynamic balance in the ice momentum is between water-ice stress, wind stress, and wave radiation stresses. By considering the exchange of momentum between waves and ice pack through radiation stress for decaying waves, a parametric study of the effects of wave stress and wind stress on ice edge dynamics has been performed. The numerical results show significant effects from wave action. The ice edge is sharper, and ice edge meanders form in the marginal ice zone owing to forcing by wave action and refraction of swell system after a couple of days. Upwelling at the ice edge and eddy formation can be enhanced by the nonlinear effects of wave action; wave action sharpens the ice edge and can produce ice meandering, which enhances local Ekman pumping and pycnocline anomalies. The resulting ice concentration, pycnocline changes, and flow velocity field are shown to be consistent with previous observations.

  15. Ground motions on rocky, cliffed, and sandy shorelines generated by ocean waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Adam P.; Guza, Robert T.; Dickson, Mark E.; O'Reilly, William C.; Flick, Reinhard E.

    2013-12-01

    We compare ground motions observed within about 100 m of the waterline on eight sites located on shorelines with different morphologies (rock slope, cliff, and sand beaches). At all sites, local ocean waves generated ground motions in the frequency band 0.01-40 Hz. Between about 0.01 and 0.1 Hz, foreshore loading and gravitational attraction from ocean swell and infragravity waves drive coherent, in-phase ground flexing motions mostly oriented cross-shore that decay inland. At higher frequencies between 0.5 and 40 Hz, breaking ocean waves and wave-rock impacts cause ground shaking. Overall, seismic spectral shapes were generally consistent across shoreline sites and usually within a few orders of magnitude despite the diverse range of settings. However, specific site response varied and was influenced by a combination of tide level, incident wave energy, site morphology, ground composition, and signal decay. Flexing and shaking increased with incident wave energy and was often tidally modulated, consistent with a local generation source. Flexing magnitudes were usually larger than shaking, and flexing displacements of several mm were observed during relatively large incident wave conditions (Hs 4-5 m). Comparison with traffic noise and earthquakes illustrate the relative significance of local ocean-generated signals in coastal seismic data. Seismic observations are not a simple proxy for wave-cliff interaction.

  16. River plumes as a source of large-amplitude internal waves in the coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, Jonathan D.; Moum, James N.

    2005-09-01

    Satellite images have long revealed the surface expression of large amplitude internal waves that propagate along density interfaces beneath the sea surface. Internal waves are typically the most energetic high-frequency events in the coastal ocean, displacing water parcels by up to 100m and generating strong currents and turbulence that mix nutrients into near-surface waters for biological utilization. While internal waves are known to be generated by tidal currents over ocean-bottom topography, they have also been observed frequently in the absence of any apparent tide-topography interactions. Here we present repeated measurements of velocity, density and acoustic backscatter across the Columbia River plume front. These show how internal waves can be generated from a river plume that flows as a gravity current into the coastal ocean. We find that the convergence of horizontal velocities at the plume front causes frontal growth and subsequent displacement downward of near-surface waters. Individual freely propagating waves are released from the river plume front when the front's propagation speed decreases below the wave speed in the water ahead of it. This mechanism generates internal waves of similar amplitude and steepness as internal waves from tide-topography interactions observed elsewhere, and is therefore important to the understanding of coastal ocean mixing.

  17. River plumes as a source of large-amplitude internal waves in the coastal ocean.

    PubMed

    Nash, Jonathan D; Moum, James N

    2005-09-15

    Satellite images have long revealed the surface expression of large amplitude internal waves that propagate along density interfaces beneath the sea surface. Internal waves are typically the most energetic high-frequency events in the coastal ocean, displacing water parcels by up to 100 m and generating strong currents and turbulence that mix nutrients into near-surface waters for biological utilization. While internal waves are known to be generated by tidal currents over ocean-bottom topography, they have also been observed frequently in the absence of any apparent tide-topography interactions. Here we present repeated measurements of velocity, density and acoustic backscatter across the Columbia River plume front. These show how internal waves can be generated from a river plume that flows as a gravity current into the coastal ocean. We find that the convergence of horizontal velocities at the plume front causes frontal growth and subsequent displacement downward of near-surface waters. Individual freely propagating waves are released from the river plume front when the front's propagation speed decreases below the wave speed in the water ahead of it. This mechanism generates internal waves of similar amplitude and steepness as internal waves from tide-topography interactions observed elsewhere, and is therefore important to the understanding of coastal ocean mixing.

  18. Ocean dynamics studies. [of current-wave interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Both the theoretical and experimental investigations into current-wave interactions are discussed. The following three problems were studied: (1) the dispersive relation of a random gravity-capillary wave field; (2) the changes of the statistical properties of surface waves under the influence of currents; and (3) the interaction of capillary-gravity with the nonuniform currents. Wave current interaction was measured and the feasibility of using such measurements for remote sensing of surface currents was considered. A laser probe was developed to measure the surface statistics, and the possibility of using current-wave interaction as a means of current measurement was demonstrated.

  19. A Comparison of SIR-B Directional Ocean Wave Spectra with Aircraft Scanning Radar Spectra.

    PubMed

    Beal, R C; Monaldo, F M; Tilley, D G; Irvine, D E; Walsh, E J; Jackson, F C; Hancock, D W; Hines, D E; Swift, R N; Gonzalez, F L; Lyzenga, D R; Zambresky, L F

    1986-06-20

    Directional ocean wave spectra derived from Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) L-band imagery collected off the coast of southern Chile on 11 and 12 October 1984 were compared with independent spectral estimates from two airborne scanning radars. In sea states with significant wave heights ranging from 3 to 5 meters, the SIR-B-derived spectra at 18 degrees and 25 degrees off nadir yielded reasonable estimates of wavelengths, directions, and spectral shapes for all wave systems encountered, including a purely azimuth-traveling system. A SIR-B image intensity variance spectrum containing predominantly range-traveling waves closely resembles an independent aircraft estimate of the slope variance spectrum. The prediction of a U.S. Navy global spectral ocean wave model on 11 October 1984 exhibited no significant bias in dominant wave number but contained a directional bias of about 30 degrees espect to the mean of the aircraft and spacecraft estimates.

  20. Hamiltonian formalism and the Garrett-Munk spectrum of internal waves in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Lvov, Y V; Tabak, E G

    2001-10-15

    Wave turbulence formalism for long internal waves in a stratified fluid is developed, based on a natural Hamiltonian description. A kinetic equation appropriate for the description of spectral energy transfer is derived, and its anisotropic self-similar stationary solution corresponding to a direct cascade of energy toward the short scales is found. This solution is very close to the high wave-number limit of the Garrett-Munk spectrum of long internal waves in the ocean. In fact, a small modification of the Garrett-Munk formalism includes a spectrum consistent with the one predicted by wave turbulence.

  1. An Optimal Control Method for Maximizing the Efficiency of Direct Drive Ocean Wave Energy Extraction System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongxian; Yu, Haitao; Wen, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The goal of direct drive ocean wave energy extraction system is to convert ocean wave energy into electricity. The problem explored in this paper is the design and optimal control for the direct drive ocean wave energy extraction system. An optimal control method based on internal model proportion integration differentiation (IM-PID) is proposed in this paper though most of ocean wave energy extraction systems are optimized by the structure, weight, and material. With this control method, the heavy speed of outer heavy buoy of the energy extraction system is in resonance with incident wave, and the system efficiency is largely improved. Validity of the proposed optimal control method is verified in both regular and irregular ocean waves, and it is shown that IM-PID control method is optimal in that it maximizes the energy conversion efficiency. In addition, the anti-interference ability of IM-PID control method has been assessed, and the results show that the IM-PID control method has good robustness, high precision, and strong anti-interference ability. PMID:25152913

  2. An optimal control method for maximizing the efficiency of direct drive ocean wave energy extraction system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongxian; Yu, Haitao; Wen, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The goal of direct drive ocean wave energy extraction system is to convert ocean wave energy into electricity. The problem explored in this paper is the design and optimal control for the direct drive ocean wave energy extraction system. An optimal control method based on internal model proportion integration differentiation (IM-PID) is proposed in this paper though most of ocean wave energy extraction systems are optimized by the structure, weight, and material. With this control method, the heavy speed of outer heavy buoy of the energy extraction system is in resonance with incident wave, and the system efficiency is largely improved. Validity of the proposed optimal control method is verified in both regular and irregular ocean waves, and it is shown that IM-PID control method is optimal in that it maximizes the energy conversion efficiency. In addition, the anti-interference ability of IM-PID control method has been assessed, and the results show that the IM-PID control method has good robustness, high precision, and strong anti-interference ability.

  3. Simulation of asteroid impact on ocean surfaces, subsequent wave generation and the effect on US shorelines

    SciTech Connect

    Ezzedine, Souheil M.; Lomov, Ilya; Miller, Paul L.; Dennison, Deborah S.; Dearborn, David S.; Antoun, Tarabay H.

    2015-05-19

    As part of a larger effort involving members of several other organizations, we have conducted numerical simulations in support of emergency-response exercises of postulated asteroid ocean impacts. We have addressed the problem from source (asteroid entry) to ocean impact (splash) to wave generation, propagation and interaction with the U.S. shoreline. We simulated three impact sites. The first site is located off the east coast by Maryland's shoreline. The second site is located off of the West coast, the San Francisco bay. The third set of sites are situated in the Gulf of Mexico. Asteroid impacts on the ocean surface are conducted using LLNL's hydrocode GEODYN to create the impact wave source for the shallow water wave propagation code, SWWP, a shallow depth averaged water wave code.

  4. Simulation of asteroid impact on ocean surfaces, subsequent wave generation and the effect on US shorelines

    DOE PAGES

    Ezzedine, Souheil M.; Lomov, Ilya; Miller, Paul L.; Dennison, Deborah S.; Dearborn, David S.; Antoun, Tarabay H.

    2015-05-19

    As part of a larger effort involving members of several other organizations, we have conducted numerical simulations in support of emergency-response exercises of postulated asteroid ocean impacts. We have addressed the problem from source (asteroid entry) to ocean impact (splash) to wave generation, propagation and interaction with the U.S. shoreline. We simulated three impact sites. The first site is located off the east coast by Maryland's shoreline. The second site is located off of the West coast, the San Francisco bay. The third set of sites are situated in the Gulf of Mexico. Asteroid impacts on the ocean surface aremore » conducted using LLNL's hydrocode GEODYN to create the impact wave source for the shallow water wave propagation code, SWWP, a shallow depth averaged water wave code.« less

  5. Oceanic El-Niño wave dynamics and climate networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Gozolchiani, Avi; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Havlin, Shlomo

    2016-03-01

    The so-called El Niño-southern oscillation (ENSO) is the most important and influential climate phenomenon of contemporary climate variability, in which oceanic wave dynamics plays an important role. Here we develop and apply an approach based on network theory to quantify the characteristics of El-Niño related oceanic waves using the satellite dataset. We associate the majority of dominant long distance (≥500 km) links of the network with several kinds of oceanic waves, i.e. equatorial Kelvin, Rossby, and tropical instability waves. Notably, we find that the location of the out-going (∼ 180^\\circ {{E}}) and in-coming hubs (∼ 140^\\circ {{W}}) of the climate network coincide with the locations of the wave initiation and dissipation, respectively. We also find that this dissipation at ∼ 140^\\circ {{W}} is much weaker during El-Niño times. Moreover, the hubs of the equatorial network agree with the locations of westerly wind burst activity and high wind vorticity, two mechanisms that were associated with Rossby waves activity. This novel quantification method that is directly based on observational data leads to a better understanding of the oceanic wave dynamics, and it can also improve our understanding of El-Niño dynamics or its prediction.

  6. On narrow-band representation of ocean waves: 1. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayfun, M. Aziz

    1986-06-01

    The description of linear random waves in the form of an amplitude-modulated carrier wave is known as narrow-band representation. Herewith, the theoretical basis of such a representation is examined in terms of integral properties of surface spectra and criteria governing the statistical and kinematic characteristics of the carrier wave. These considerations are then extended systematically to derive two narrow-band type representations for nonlinear waves. The nature of these representations and their statistical properties are discussed and compared with other models such as those proposed earlier by Tayfun (1980) and Huang et al. (1983).

  7. Time-space Variability of Weekly to Monthly Period Equatorial Waves in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durland, T.; Farrar, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Data from satellite altimetry are used to characterize wavelike variability in the tropical Pacific Ocean at periods of days to two months. This period band is of interest because the space-time scales of oceanic equatorial waves at these frequencies have historically made adequate observation of the variability difficult. These waves have zonal scales that are very large (exceeding 3000 km) and meridional scales that are relatively short (~100 km), making in situ measurements difficult, and the short temporal scales pose challenges for observation with satellite altimeters because the wave periods are short compared to orbit repeat periods. As a result, there has been relatively little progress since the early 1980s in characterizing and understanding these equatorial inertia-gravity and mixed Rossby-gravity waves. In this analysis, we seek to exploit the long zonal length scales of these high-frequency equatorial waves in an analysis of satellite scatterometer and altimeter data to shed new light on the properties and dynamics of these waves. At periods of 2-14 days, there is clear evidence for the presence of several basin-scale equatorial wave modes, including mixed Rossby-gravity waves and inertia-gravity waves associated with baroclinic modes one and two. Here, we focus on equatorial Kelvin waves and mixed Rossby-gravity waves forced in the western Pacific, and examine their variability in time and space and their relation to wind.

  8. Global dynamical projections of surface ocean wave climate for a future high greenhouse gas emission scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemer, Mark A.; Katzfey, Jack; Trenham, Claire E.

    2013-10-01

    A global 1° implementation of the spectral wave model, WaveWatch III, was forced with surface winds from two atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs: ECHAM5 and CSIRO Mk3.5), dynamically downscaled to 60 km using the Cubic Conformal Atmospheric Model. Two 30-yr time slices were simulated: 1979-2009 representing current climate, and 2070-2099 representing a future climate scenario under a high greenhouse gas emission scenario (SRES A2). A further wave model simulation with forcing from the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis for 1979-2009, using the same model settings as the climate model forced runs, serves as a benchmark hindcast to assess skill of climate-model-derived wave fields. Climate model forced wave simulations for the 1979-2009 time-slice display biases relative to the benchmark wave climate - notably an overestimation of wave generation in the Southern Ocean, which influences broad regions of the Pacific which receive these waves as swell. Wave model runs were repeated following bias-adjustment of the climate model forcing winds with the aim to reduce biases, but model skill to simulate the monthly 99th percentile of significant wave heights deteriorates severely. Projected future changes in wave climate (between 1979-2009 and 2070-2099) under the SRES A2 greenhouse gas emission scenario are relatively insensitive to whether bias-adjustment of winds has been applied. Two robust features of projected change are observed from the two climate model sets which are qualitatively consistent with previous studies: a projected increase of Southern Ocean wave generation leading to approximately 10% increase in Southern Ocean mean significant wave heights (HSm), and a projected decrease in wave generation in the North Atlantic, with changes in HSm of similar magnitude. Interannual anomalies of monthly mean significant wave height, HSm, were regressed against climate indices (Southern Oscillation Index - SOI; North Atlantic Oscillation - NAO and

  9. Accuracy of Satellite-Measured Wave Heights in the Australian Region for Wave Power Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meath, Sian E.; Aye, Lu; Haritos, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the accuracy of satellite data, which may then be used in wave power applications. The satellite data are compared to data from wave buoys, which are currently considered to be the most accurate of the devices available for measuring wave characteristics. This article presents an analysis of satellite- (Topex/Poseidon) and…

  10. Statistical estimation of extreme ocean waves over the eastern Canadian shelf from 30-year numerical wave simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lanli; Sheng, Jinyu

    2015-11-01

    Reliable estimation of extreme ocean surface gravity waves is important for many scientific and practical issues. In this study, WAVEWATCHIII is used to simulate wave conditions over the eastern Canadian shelf (ECS) for the 30-year period, 1979-2008. The wave model is forced by the 6-hourly winds and ice cover taken from the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR). A parametric vortex is inserted into the CFSR winds to better represent surface winds associated with tropical storms or hurricanes. The model performance in simulating the bulk significant wave height is assessed by comparing model results with wave observations at 12 buoy stations over the ECS. The peaks-over-threshold method is used to estimate the extreme significant wave heights from 30-year wave simulations. The estimated extreme waves with the 50-year return period over the ECS feature large wave heights of more than 12 m in the offshore deep waters and about 8-12 m over the open shelf waters of the ECS. By comparison, the 50-year extreme waves are moderate and 7 m or less in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and inner Gulf of Maine.

  11. Elimination of the impact of vessels on ocean wave height inversion with X-band wave monitoring radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Wu, Xiongbin; Ma, Ketao; Tian, Yun; Fei, Yuejun

    2016-09-01

    Directional wave spectra and integrated wave parameters can be derived from X-band radar sea surface images. A vessel on the sea surface has a significant influence on wave parameter inversions that can be seen as intensive backscatter speckles in X-band wave monitoring radar sea surface images. A novel algorithm to eliminate the interference of vessels in ocean wave height inversions from X-band wave monitoring radar is proposed. This algorithm is based on the characteristics of the interference. The principal components (PCs) of a sea surface image sequence are extracted using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis. The standard deviation of the PCs is then used to identify vessel interference within the image sequence. To mitigate the interference, a suppression method based on a frequency domain geometric model is applied. The algorithm framework has been applied to OSMAR-X, a wave monitoring system developed by Wuhan University, based on nautical X-band radar. Several sea surface images captured on vessels by OSMAR-X are processed using the method proposed in this paper. Inversion schemes are validated by comparisons with data from in situ wave buoys. The root-mean-square error between the significant wave heights (SWH) retrieved from original interference radar images and those measured by the buoy is reduced by 0.25 m. The determinations of surface gravity wave parameters, in particular SWH, confirm the applicability of the proposed method.

  12. Discrete-element model for the interaction between ocean waves and sea ice

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Pan, Wenxiao

    2012-01-05

    We present a discrete element method (DEM) model to simulate the mechanical behavior of sea ice in response to ocean waves. The wave/ice interaction can potentially lead to the fracture and fragmentation of sea ice depending on the wave amplitude and period. The fracture behavior of sea ice is explicitly modeled by a DEM method, where sea ice is modeled by densely packed spherical particles with finite size. These particles are bonded together at their contact points through mechanical bonds that can sustain both tensile & compressive forces and moments. Fracturing can be naturally represented by the sequential breaking of mechanical bonds. For a given amplitude and period of incident ocean wave, the model provides information for the spatial distribution and time evolution of stress and micro-fractures and the fragment size distribution. We demonstrate that the fraction of broken bonds,, increases with increasing wave amplitude. In contrast, the ice fragment size decreases with increasing amplitude.

  13. Ocean internal waves off the North American and African coasts from ERTS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apel, J. R.; Charnell, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Periodic features observed in the ocean portions of certain ERTS-1 images have been identified with reasonable certainty as surface manifestations of oceanic internal gravity waves. A series of images taken over the New York Bight, commencing with the 16 July 1972 overpass and continuing on into autumn of 1973, has shown the internal waves to be present when summer solar heating stratifies the water sufficiently well to support such oscillations. When fall and winter wind action mixes the shelf water down to the bottom, the waves no longer appear. In the Bight, the wavelengths range from approximately 400 to 1000 m, with the wave field being most sharply delineated near the edges of the continental shelf, at the mouth of the Hudson Canyon. They appear in packets consisting of several waves separated by 10-15 km, which propagate up on the shelf and disappear.

  14. On strongly interacting internal waves in a rotating ocean and coupled Ostrovsky equations.

    PubMed

    Alias, A; Grimshaw, R H J; Khusnutdinova, K R

    2013-06-01

    In the weakly nonlinear limit, oceanic internal solitary waves for a single linear long wave mode are described by the KdV equation, extended to the Ostrovsky equation in the presence of background rotation. In this paper we consider the scenario when two different linear long wave modes have nearly coincident phase speeds and show that the appropriate model is a system of two coupled Ostrovsky equations. These are systematically derived for a density-stratified ocean. Some preliminary numerical simulations are reported which show that, in the generic case, initial solitary-like waves are destroyed and replaced by two coupled nonlinear wave packets, being the counterpart of the same phenomenon in the single Ostrovsky equation. PMID:23822486

  15. On strongly interacting internal waves in a rotating ocean and coupled Ostrovsky equations.

    PubMed

    Alias, A; Grimshaw, R H J; Khusnutdinova, K R

    2013-06-01

    In the weakly nonlinear limit, oceanic internal solitary waves for a single linear long wave mode are described by the KdV equation, extended to the Ostrovsky equation in the presence of background rotation. In this paper we consider the scenario when two different linear long wave modes have nearly coincident phase speeds and show that the appropriate model is a system of two coupled Ostrovsky equations. These are systematically derived for a density-stratified ocean. Some preliminary numerical simulations are reported which show that, in the generic case, initial solitary-like waves are destroyed and replaced by two coupled nonlinear wave packets, being the counterpart of the same phenomenon in the single Ostrovsky equation.

  16. GANDER: Commercial Ocean Wave Height Monitoring Service using GPS Reflectometry from Nano-Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Paul; Unwin, Martin; Sweeting, Martin, , Sir

    Ocean storms cause damage to shipping costing over 2.5 billion p.a. in insurance claims. At the same time many thousands of lives are lost every year at sea. The GANDER programme, developed by Satellite Observing Systems Ltd. and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. in the UK, aims to provide accurate and timely data to shipping regarding wind speed and wave heights, with the intention of reducing operational costs and improving the efficiency and safety of commercial shipping. The original concept for GANDER was based upon a constellation of sixteen 100kg microsatellites in low Earth orbit, actively measuring sea surface conditions with an altimeter radar. This paper describes the development of a new method using passive GPS reflectometry for the measurement of sea-surface roughness and thus wave height. The GPS instrument offers significant advantages in power consumption, size and weight which enable the mission to be carried out using small 10kg nanosatellites at a greatly reduced cost, thus enhancing the commercial viability of GANDER. This paper presents a description of the constellation of nanosatellites carrying GPS receivers with directional antennas. It explores the economic benefits of GANDER and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the new technical solution.

  17. Ocean-Wave Dynamics Analysis during Hurricane Ida and Norida Using a Fully Coupled Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olabarrieta, M.; Warner, J. C.; Armstrong, B. N.

    2010-12-01

    Extreme storms, such as hurricanes and extratropical storms play a dominant role in shaping the beaches of the East and Gulf Coasts of the United States. Future tropical depressions will be more intense than in the present climate (Assessment Report of IPCC, 2007) and therefore coastal areas are likely to become more susceptible to their effects. The major damage caused by these extreme events is associated with the duration of the storm, storm intensity, waves, and the total water levels reached during the storm. Numerical models provide a useful approach to study the spatial and temporal distribution of these parameters. However, the correct estimation of the total water levels and wind wave heights through numerical modeling requires accurate representation of the air-sea interface dynamics. These processes are highly complex due to the variable interactions between winds, ocean waves and currents near the sea surface. In the present research we use the COAWST (Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport) modeling system (Warner et al., 2010) to address the key role of the atmosphere-ocean-wave interactions during Hurricane Ida and its posterior evolution to NorIda, November 2009. This northeastern storm was one of the most costly in the past two decades and likely in the top five of the past century. One interesting aspect of the considered period is that it includes two very different atmospheric extreme conditions, a hurricane and a northeastern storm, developed in regions with very different oceanographic characteristics. By performing a suite of numerical runs we are able to isolate the effect of the interaction terms between the atmosphere (WRF model), the ocean (ROMS model) and the wave propagation and generation model (SWAN). Special attention is given to the role of the ocean surface roughness and high resolution SST fields on the atmospheric boundary layers dynamics and consequently these effects on the wind wave generation, surface currents and

  18. Acoustic propagation from a spiral wave front source in an ocean environment.

    PubMed

    Hefner, Brian T; Dzikowicz, Benjamin R

    2012-03-01

    A spiral wave front source generates a pressure field that has a phase that depends linearly on the azimuthal angle at which it is measured. This differs from a point source that has a phase that is constant with direction. The spiral wave front source has been developed for use in navigation; however, very little work has been done to model this source in an ocean environment. To this end, the spiral wave front analogue of the acoustic point source is developed and is shown to be related to the point source through a simple transformation. This makes it possible to transform the point source solution in a particular ocean environment into the solution for a spiral source in the same environment. Applications of this transformation are presented for a spiral source near the ocean surface and seafloor as well as for the more general case of propagation in a horizontally stratified waveguide.

  19. Yellow Sea ocean-acoustic solitary wave modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warn-Varnas, A. C.; Chin-Bing, S. A.; King, D. B.; Hawkins, J. A.; Lamb, K. G.; Teixeira, M.

    2005-08-01

    This study is in an area south of the Shandong peninsula, near the region where Zhou et al. (1991) observed anomalous drops in acoustical intensity. Solitary wave generation and propagation simulations are performed using the Lamb (1994) nonhydrostatic model. The model simulations show that, for summer conditions, the existing semi-diurnal tidal flow over the topographic variations formed internal bores and solitary waves. For the Shandong area, we analyzed summer observations from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) that tracked solitary wave trains from their surface roughness signatures. The images contained seven events consisting of internal bores and solitary waves that traveled in a well-defined direction for 2.5 days. The origin of the trains appeared at a well-defined point along a steep topographic drop. The SAR observations guided and tuned the model simulations, by comparing spectra of observed and modeled wavelengths. The tuned model yields wavelengths within factors of 2, or less, of those derived from SAR data. Wavelength and amplitude dispersion analysis showed two dispersion regimes. Modeled phase speeds were at the lower limit of phase speeds deduced from SAR data, from about 0.8 to 1.0 m/s. Acoustical intensity calculations in the presence of solitary wave trains will be undertaken in a subsequent paper using a parabolic equation acoustical model along the path of solitary wave train propagation.

  20. Mapping turbulent diffusivity associated with oceanic internal lee waves offshore Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Will F. J.; Holbrook, W. Steven; Schmitt, Raymond W.

    2016-04-01

    Breaking internal waves play a primary role in maintaining the meridional overturning circulation. Oceanic lee waves are known to be a significant contributor to diapycnal mixing associated with internal wave dissipation, but direct measurement is difficult with standard oceanographic sampling methods due to the limited spatial extent of standing lee waves. Here, we present an analysis of oceanic internal lee waves observed offshore eastern Costa Rica using seismic imaging and estimate the turbulent diffusivity via a new seismic slope spectrum method that extracts diffusivities directly from seismic images, using tracked reflections only to scale diffusivity values. The result provides estimates of turbulent diffusivities throughout the water column at scales of a few hundred meters laterally and 10 m vertically. Synthetic tests demonstrate the method's ability to resolve turbulent structures and reproduce accurate diffusivities. A turbulence map of our seismic section in the western Caribbean shows elevated turbulent diffusivities near rough seafloor topography as well as in the mid-water column where observed lee wave propagation terminates. Mid-water column hotspots of turbulent diffusivity show levels 5 times higher than surrounding waters and 50 times greater than typical open-ocean diffusivities. This site has steady currents that make it an exceptionally accessible laboratory for the study of lee-wave generation, propagation, and decay.

  1. Phase locking of convectively coupled equatorial atmospheric Kelvin waves over Indian Ocean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, Dariusz; Flatau, Maria; Flatau, Piotr; Matthews, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    The properties of convectively coupled Kelvin waves in the Indian Ocean and their propagation over the Maritime Continent are studied. It is shown that Kelvin waves are longitude - diurnal cycle phase locked over the Maritime Continent, Africa and the Indian Ocean. Thus, it is shown that they tend to propagate over definite areas during specific times of the day. Over the Maritime Continent, longitude-diurnal cycle phase locking is such that it agrees with mean, local diurnal cycle of convection. The strength of the longitude-diurnal cycle phase locking differs between 'non-blocked' Kelvin waves, which make successful transition over the Maritime Continent, and 'blocked' waves that terminated within it. It is shown that a specific combination of Kelvin wave phase speed and time of the day at which a wave approaches the Maritime Continent influence the chance of successful transition into the Western Pacific. Kelvin waves that maintain phase speed of 10 to 11 degrees per day over the central-eastern Indian Ocean and arrive at 90E between 9UTC and 18UTC have the highest chance of being 'non-blocked' by the Maritime Continent. The distance between the islands of Sumatra and Borneo agrees with the distance travelled by an average convectively coupled Kelvin wave in one day. This suggests that the Maritime Continent may act as a 'filter' for Kelvin waves favoring successful propagation of those waves for which propagation is in phase with the local diurnal cycle of precipitation. The AmPm index, a simple measure of local diurnal cycle for propagating disturbances, is introduced and shown to be useful metric depicting key characteristics of the convection associated with propagating Kelvin waves.

  2. Synthetic aperture radar images of ocean waves, theories of imaging physics and experimental tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Durden, S. L.; Smith, M. P.; Napolitano, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The physical mechanism for the synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging of ocean waves is investigated through the use of analytical models. The models are tested by comparison with data sets from the SEASAT mission and airborne SAR's. Dominant ocean wavelengths from SAR estimates are biased towards longer wavelengths. The quasispecular scattering mechanism agrees with experimental data. The Doppler shift for ship wakes is that of the mean sea surface.

  3. Oblique sounding of the ionosphere by powerful wave beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, I. A.; Atamaniuk, B.

    2011-04-01

    The article is devoted to modeling the impact on the ionosphere powerful obliquely incident wave beam. The basis of this analysis will be orbital variational principle for the intense wave beams-generalization of Fermat's principle to the case of a nonlinear medium (Molotkov and Vakulenko, 1988a,b; Molotkov, 2003, 2005). Under the influence of a powerful wave beam appears manageable the additional stratification of the ionospheric layer F2. Explicit expressions show how the properties of the test beam, with a shifted frequency, released in the same direction as the beam depend on the intensity of a powerful beam and the frequency shift.

  4. Fundamental research on oscillating water column wave power absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, H.; Kato, W.; Kinoshita, T.; Masuda, K.

    1985-03-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave power absorber is one of the most promising devices, as well as the Salter Duck and the Clam. This paper presents a simple prediction method, in which the equivalent floating body approximation is used, for absorbing wave power characteristics of an oscillating water column device. The effects of the compressibility of air and inertia of an air turbine and electric generator on absorbed wave power are obtained by using the equivalent electric circuit concept. Both the experimental and theoretical studies are carried out in this paper.

  5. Large-Scale Patterns of Waves in Partial Ice Cover in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Thomson, J. M.; Rogers, W.

    2014-12-01

    Surface waves are becoming a central feature of the emerging Arctic Ocean; however, few direct measurements of waves have been made. We present multi-year time series of wave height and ice draft from moorings at two locations in the Beaufort Sea, as well as wavelength and direction estimated from high-resolution satellite imagery. In situ wave and ice data are used to examine large-scale spatial and temporal patterns of waves in the previously ice-covered Arctic Ocean. In particular, we investigate the dependence of waves on ice-controlled fetch, and wave physics in partial ice cover in the Beaufort Sea. These results are compared with WaveWatch III hindcasts to evaluate the model's accuracy in the marginal ice zone. We will expand on the approach of Thomson and Rogers (2014), who found that the energy of waves in the Arctic is directly correlated with open water distances. Incorporating new (2014) data collected throughout the marginal ice zone, we will examine adjustments to conventional fetch scaling laws in the presence of partial ice cover.

  6. Ocean rogue waves and their phase space dynamics in the limit of a linear interference model

    PubMed Central

    Birkholz, Simon; Brée, Carsten; Veselić, Ivan; Demircan, Ayhan; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2016-01-01

    We reanalyse the probability for formation of extreme waves using the simple model of linear interference of a finite number of elementary waves with fixed amplitude and random phase fluctuations. Under these model assumptions no rogue waves appear when less than 10 elementary waves interfere with each other. Above this threshold rogue wave formation becomes increasingly likely, with appearance frequencies that may even exceed long-term observations by an order of magnitude. For estimation of the effective number of interfering waves, we suggest the Grassberger-Procaccia dimensional analysis of individual time series. For the ocean system, it is further shown that the resulting phase space dimension may vary, such that the threshold for rogue wave formation is not always reached. Time series analysis as well as the appearance of particular focusing wind conditions may enable an effective forecast of such rogue-wave prone situations. In particular, extracting the dimension from ocean time series allows much more specific estimation of the rogue wave probability. PMID:27731411

  7. Wave-turbulence interaction-induced vertical mixing and its effects in ocean and climate models.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Fangli; Yuan, Yeli; Deng, Jia; Dai, Dejun; Song, Zhenya

    2016-04-13

    Heated from above, the oceans are stably stratified. Therefore, the performance of general ocean circulation models and climate studies through coupled atmosphere-ocean models depends critically on vertical mixing of energy and momentum in the water column. Many of the traditional general circulation models are based on total kinetic energy (TKE), in which the roles of waves are averaged out. Although theoretical calculations suggest that waves could greatly enhance coexisting turbulence, no field measurements on turbulence have ever validated this mechanism directly. To address this problem, a specially designed field experiment has been conducted. The experimental results indicate that the wave-turbulence interaction-induced enhancement of the background turbulence is indeed the predominant mechanism for turbulence generation and enhancement. Based on this understanding, we propose a new parametrization for vertical mixing as an additive part to the traditional TKE approach. This new result reconfirmed the past theoretical model that had been tested and validated in numerical model experiments and field observations. It firmly establishes the critical role of wave-turbulence interaction effects in both general ocean circulation models and atmosphere-ocean coupled models, which could greatly improve the understanding of the sea surface temperature and water column properties distributions, and hence model-based climate forecasting capability.

  8. Wave-turbulence interaction-induced vertical mixing and its effects in ocean and climate models.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Fangli; Yuan, Yeli; Deng, Jia; Dai, Dejun; Song, Zhenya

    2016-04-13

    Heated from above, the oceans are stably stratified. Therefore, the performance of general ocean circulation models and climate studies through coupled atmosphere-ocean models depends critically on vertical mixing of energy and momentum in the water column. Many of the traditional general circulation models are based on total kinetic energy (TKE), in which the roles of waves are averaged out. Although theoretical calculations suggest that waves could greatly enhance coexisting turbulence, no field measurements on turbulence have ever validated this mechanism directly. To address this problem, a specially designed field experiment has been conducted. The experimental results indicate that the wave-turbulence interaction-induced enhancement of the background turbulence is indeed the predominant mechanism for turbulence generation and enhancement. Based on this understanding, we propose a new parametrization for vertical mixing as an additive part to the traditional TKE approach. This new result reconfirmed the past theoretical model that had been tested and validated in numerical model experiments and field observations. It firmly establishes the critical role of wave-turbulence interaction effects in both general ocean circulation models and atmosphere-ocean coupled models, which could greatly improve the understanding of the sea surface temperature and water column properties distributions, and hence model-based climate forecasting capability. PMID:26953182

  9. Application of monochromatic ocean wave forecasts to prediction of wave-induced currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The use of monochromatic wind-wave forecasts in prediction of wind-wave-induced currents was assessed. Currents were computed for selected combinations of wind conditions by using a spectrum approach which was developed by using the Bretschneider wave spectrum for partially developed wind seas. These currents were compared with currents computed by using the significant and average monochromatic wave parameters related to the Bretschneider spectrum. Results indicate that forecasts of significant wave parameters can be used to predict surface wind-wave-induced currents. Conversion of these parameters to average wave parameters can furnish reasonable estimates of subsurface current values.

  10. Ocean-atmosphere dynamics during Hurricane Ida and Nor'Ida: An application of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olabarrieta, Maitane; Warner, John C.; Armstrong, Brandy; Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying

    The coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system was used to investigate atmosphere-ocean-wave interactions in November 2009 during Hurricane Ida and its subsequent evolution to Nor'Ida, which was one of the most costly storm systems of the past two decades. One interesting aspect of this event is that it included two unique atmospheric extreme conditions, a hurricane and a nor'easter storm, which developed in regions with different oceanographic characteristics. Our modeled results were compared with several data sources, including GOES satellite infrared data, JASON-1 and JASON-2 altimeter data, CODAR measurements, and wave and tidal information from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and the National Tidal Database. By performing a series of numerical runs, we were able to isolate the effect of the interaction terms between the atmosphere (modeled with Weather Research and Forecasting, the WRF model), the ocean (modeled with Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)), and the wave propagation and generation model (modeled with Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN)). Special attention was given to the role of the ocean surface roughness. Three different ocean roughness closure models were analyzed: DGHQ (which is based on wave age), TY2001 (which is based on wave steepness), and OOST (which considers both the effects of wave age and steepness). Including the ocean roughness in the atmospheric module improved the wind intensity estimation and therefore also the wind waves, surface currents, and storm surge amplitude. For example, during the passage of Hurricane Ida through the Gulf of Mexico, the wind speeds were reduced due to wave-induced ocean roughness, resulting in better agreement with the measured winds. During Nor'Ida, including the wave-induced surface roughness changed the form and dimension of the main low pressure cell, affecting the intensity and direction of the winds. The combined wave age- and wave steepness

  11. Ocean-atmosphere dynamics during Hurricane Ida and Nor'Ida: An application of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olabarrieta, M.; Warner, J.C.; Armstrong, B.; Zambon, J.B.; He, R.

    2012-01-01

    The coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system was used to investigate atmosphere-ocean-wave interactions in November 2009 during Hurricane Ida and its subsequent evolution to Nor'Ida, which was one of the most costly storm systems of the past two decades. One interesting aspect of this event is that it included two unique atmospheric extreme conditions, a hurricane and a nor'easter storm, which developed in regions with different oceanographic characteristics. Our modeled results were compared with several data sources, including GOES satellite infrared data, JASON-1 and JASON-2 altimeter data, CODAR measurements, and wave and tidal information from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and the National Tidal Database. By performing a series of numerical runs, we were able to isolate the effect of the interaction terms between the atmosphere (modeled with Weather Research and Forecasting, the WRF model), the ocean (modeled with Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)), and the wave propagation and generation model (modeled with Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN)). Special attention was given to the role of the ocean surface roughness. Three different ocean roughness closure models were analyzed: DGHQ (which is based on wave age), TY2001 (which is based on wave steepness), and OOST (which considers both the effects of wave age and steepness). Including the ocean roughness in the atmospheric module improved the wind intensity estimation and therefore also the wind waves, surface currents, and storm surge amplitude. For example, during the passage of Hurricane Ida through the Gulf of Mexico, the wind speeds were reduced due to wave-induced ocean roughness, resulting in better agreement with the measured winds. During Nor'Ida, including the wave-induced surface roughness changed the form and dimension of the main low pressure cell, affecting the intensity and direction of the winds. The combined wave age- and wave steepness

  12. A method for retrieving the directional ocean wave spectra from synthetic aperture radar image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lin; Yang, Jingsong; Chen, Peng

    2012-09-01

    Directional ocean wave spectra can describe the energy distribution of ocean wave and play an important role in oceanography. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can measure wave spectra based on a nonlinear mapping model between the image spectra (or cross spectra) and wave spectra. Due to the complexity of variable estimation and wave number cut off in azimuth direction in the mapping process, some scientists have been endeavoring to improve the retrieval of wave spectra. The paper proposes a method for the retrieval, which don't depend on any external information except wind direction. It separates into two parts. In part 1, the spectra for real image or the cross spectra for complex image are calculated. And the modulation transfer function (MTF) is estimated including real aperture radar (RAR) MTF and velocity bunching. Then the wave spectra are retrieved by direct dividing based on the quasi-linear relation. The 180° ambiguity is removed from the imaginary part of cross spectra or the wind direction. The significant wave height (Hs), peak wave wavelength (L) and peak wave direction (D) are extracted from the retrieval. If the angle between the D and the azimuth direction is higher than 45°, the retrieval is finished. If the angle is lower than 45°, we go on retrieving. In part 2, the first guess spectra are needed to compensate the lost wave information, which can be parametrically constructed based on the retrieved wave spectra in part 1. Finally the wave spectra are iteratively retrieved from the first guess spectra based on the nonlinear relation. The Envisat ASAR images are used to validate the method. In case 1, the RMSE between this method and SARTool on D, L, Hs is 7.6°, 19.7 m, 0.18 m respectively. In case 2, the RMSE between this method and Jason-1 on Hs is 0.5 m.

  13. Southern Ocean monthly wave fields for austral winters 1985-1988 by Geosat radar altimeter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Josberger, E.G.; Mognard, N.M.

    1996-01-01

    Four years of monthly averaged wave height fields for the austral winters 19851988 derived from the Geosat altimeter data show a spatial variability of the scale of 500-1000 km that varies monthly and annually. This variability is superimposed on the zonal patterns surrounding the Antarctic continent and characteristic of the climatology derived from the U.S. Navy [1992] Marine Climatic Atlas of the World. The location and the intensity of these large-scale features, which are not found in the climatological fields, exhibit strong monthly and yearly variations. A global underestimation of the climatological mean wave heights by more than l m is also found over large regions of the Southern Ocean. The largest monthly averaged significant wave heights are above 5 m and are found during August of every year in the Indian Ocean, south of 40??S. The monthly wave fields show more variability in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans than in the Indian Ocean. The Seasat data from 1978 and the Geosat data from 1985 and 1988 show an eastward rotation of the largest wave heights. However, this rotation is absent in 1986 and 1987; the former was a year of unusually low sea states, and the latter was a year of unusually high sea states, which suggests a link to the El Nin??o-Southern Oscillation event of 1986. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Investigation of hurricane Ivan using the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying; Warner, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) model is used to hindcast Hurricane Ivan (2004), an extremely intense tropical cyclone (TC) translating through the Gulf of Mexico. Sensitivity experiments with increasing complexity in ocean–atmosphere–wave coupled exchange processes are performed to assess the impacts of coupling on the predictions of the atmosphere, ocean, and wave environments during the occurrence of a TC. Modest improvement in track but significant improvement in intensity are found when using the fully atmosphere–ocean-wave coupled configuration versus uncoupled (e.g., standalone atmosphere, ocean, or wave) model simulations. Surface wave fields generated in the fully coupled configuration also demonstrates good agreement with in situ buoy measurements. Coupled and uncoupled model-simulated sea surface temperature (SST) fields are compared with both in situ and remote observations. Detailed heat budget analysis reveals that the mixed layer temperature cooling in the deep ocean (on the shelf) is caused primarily by advection (equally by advection and diffusion).

  15. Two new ways of mapping sea ice thickness using ocean waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhams, P.

    2010-12-01

    TWO NEW METHODS OF MAPPING SEA ICE THICKNESS USING OCEAN WAVES. P. Wadhams (1,2), Martin Doble (1,2) and F. Parmiggiani (3) (1) Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA, UK. (2) Laboratoire d’Océanographie de Villefranche, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 06234 Villefranche-sur-Mer, France (2) ISAC-CNR, Bologna, Italy Two new methods of mapping ice thickness have been recently developed and tested, both making use of the dispersion relation of ocean waves in ice of radically different types. In frazil-pancake ice, a young ice type in which cakes less than 5 m across float in a suspension of individual ice crystals, the propagation of waves has been successfully modelled by treating the ice layer as a highly viscous fluid. The model predicts a shortening of wavelengths within the ice. Two-dimensional Fourier analysis of successive SAR subscenes to track the directional spectrum of a wave field as it enters an ice edge shows that waves do indeed shorten within the ice, and the change has been successfully used to predict the thickness of the frazil-pancake layer. Concurrent shipborne sampling in the Antarctic has shown that the method is accurate, and we now propose its use throughout the important frazil-pancake regimes in the world ocean (Antarctic circumpolar ice edge zone, Greenland Sea, Bering Sea and others). A radically different type of dispersion occurs when ocean waves enter the continuous icefields of the central Arctic, when they couple with the elastic ice cover to propagate as a flexural-gravity wave. A two-axis tiltmeter array has been used to measure the resulting change in the dispersion relation for long ocean swell (15-30 s) originating from storms in the Greenland Sea. The dispersion relation is slightly different from swell in the open ocean, so if two such arrays are placed a substantial distance (100s of km) apart and used to observe the changing wave period of arrivals from a given

  16. Protective, Modular Wave Power Generation System

    SciTech Connect

    Vvedensky, Jane M.; Park, Robert Y.

    2012-11-27

    The concept of small wave energy conversion modules that can be built into large, scalable arrays, in the same vein as solar panels, has been developed. This innovation lends itself to an organic business and development model, and enables the use of large-run manufacturing technology to reduce system costs. The first prototype module has been built to full-scale, and tested in a laboratory wave channel. The device has been shown to generate electricity and dissipate wave energy. Improvements need to be made to the electrical generator and a demonstration of an array of modules should be made in natural conditions.

  17. Energy from Ocean Waves, River Currents, and Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Shyamal

    2006-03-01

    The Earth we live in is surrounded by fluids, which are in perpetual motion. The air in the atmosphere and water found in lakes, ocean, and rivers form our natural environment. Much of the fluid medium is in constant motion. The kinetic energy of this moving fluid is astronomical in magnitude. Over the years, I have considered methods of converting a fraction of the vast reserve of this kinetic energy into electro-mechanical energy. I have conceived a few schemes of such conversions. The fluids whose kinetic energy can be converted into electro-mechanical energy are the following: ocean waters, river currents and atmospheric air. In a book to be published in the spring of 2006, I have described different techniques of energy conversion. In the upcoming APS meeting, I plan to discuss some of these techniques.

  18. Energy from Ocean Waves, River Currents, and Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Shyamal

    2006-05-01

    The earth we live in is surrounded by fluids, which are in perpetual motion. There is air in the atmosphere, water in lakes, oceans and rivers. The air and water around us form our natural environment. Much of the fluid medium is in constant motion. The kinetic energy of this moving fluid is astronomical in magnitude. Over the years, I considered methods of converting a fraction of the vast reserve of this kinetic energy into electro-mechanical energy. I conceived a few schemes of such conversion. The fluids whose kinetic energy can be converted into electro-mechanical energy are: ocean waters, river current and atmospheric air. In a book to be published in 2006, I have described different techniques of energy conversion. In the APS meeting, I plan to discuss some of these techniques.

  19. Tracking Ocean Gravity Waves in Real-time: Highlights of Bottom Pressure Data Recorded on Ocean Networks Canada's NEPTUNE observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesemann, Martin; Mihaly, Steve; Gemmrich, Johannes; Davis, Earl; Thomson, Richard; Dewey, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Ocean Networks Canada operates two cabled ocean observatories off Vancouver Island on Canada's west coast. The regional NEPTUNE observatory spans the entire Juan de Fuca tectonic plate from the coast across the subduction zone to the hydrothermally active Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Segment while the VENUS observatory focuses on coastal processes. Both observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex earth processes. High-precision bottom pressure recorders (BPR) deployed on the NEPTUNE observatory are capable of detecting a wide range of phenomena related to sea level variations. The observatory BPRs provide observations of nano-resolution (with respect to full scale of the instrument) pressure variations which correspond to sub-millimeter scale surface water displacements in several kilometers of water. Detected signals include tides, tsunamis, infragravity waves, swell, wave-induced microseisms, storm surge, and seismic signals. Spectral analysis reveals many of these phenomena with periods ranging from a few seconds to many hours. Dispersion patterns from distant swells are prominent in the swell and microseism bands. By comparing the difference of arrival times between longer period waves, which arrive first, and shorter period waves we can estimate the distance the swells travelled since they were generated. Using this information, swell can be tracked back to specific storms across the Pacific. The presentation will high-light some examples of the mentioned phenomena in the continuous time-series that in some instances are more than seven years long.

  20. Aircraft and satellite measurement of ocean wave directional spectra using scanning-beam microwave radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Baker, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave radar technique for remotely measuring the vector wave number spectrum of the ocean surface is described. The technique, which employs short-pulse, noncoherent radars in a conical scan mode near vertical incidence, is shown to be suitable for both aircraft and satellite application, the technique was validated at 10 km aircraft altitude, where we have found excellent agreement between buoy and radar-inferred absolute wave height spectra.

  1. The Seasat SAR Wind and Ocean Wave Monitoring Capabilities: A case study for pass 1339m

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    A well organized low energy 11 sec. swell system off the East Coast of the U.S. was detected with the Seasat Synthetic Aperture Radar and successfully tracked from deep water, across the continental shelf, and into shallow water. In addition, a less organized 7 sec. system was tentatively identified in the imagery. Both systems were independently confirmed with simultaneous wave spectral measurements from a research pier, aircraft laser profilometer data, and Fleet Numerical Spectral Ocean Wave Models.

  2. Dispersion of interface waves in sediments with power-law shear speed profiles. I. Exact and approximate analytical results.

    PubMed

    Godin, O A; Chapman, D M

    2001-10-01

    In the upper tens of meters of ocean bottom, unconsolidated marine sediments consisting of clay, silt, or fine sand with high porosity are "almost incompressible" in the sense that the shear wave velocity is much smaller than the compressional wave velocity. The shear velocity has very large gradients close to the ocean floor leading to strong coupling of compressional and shear waves in such "soft" sediments. The weak compressibility opens an avenue for developing a theory of elastic wave propagation in continuously stratified soft sediments that fully accounts for the coupling. Elastic waves in soft sediments consist of "fast" waves propagating with velocities close to the compressional velocity and "slow" waves propagating with velocities on the order of the shear velocity. For the slow waves, the theory predicts the existence of surface waves at the ocean-sediment boundary. In the important special case of the power-law depth-dependence of shear rigidity, phase and group velocities of the interface waves are shown to scale as a certain power of frequency. An explicit, exact solution was obtained for the surface waves in sediments characterized by constant density and a linear increase of shear rigidity with depth, that is, for the case of shear speed proportional to the square root of the depth below the sediment-water interface. Asymptotic and perturbation techniques were used to extend the result to more general environments. Theoretical dispersion relations agreed well with numerical simulations and available experimental data and, as demonstrated in a companion paper [D. M. F. Chapman and O. A. Godin, J. Acoust. Soc. Am 110, 1908 (2001)] led to a simple and robust inversion of interface wave travel times for shear velocity profiles in the sediment.

  3. Artificial ocean upwelling utilizing the energy of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Artificial upwelling can bring cold water from below the thermocline to the sea surface. Vershinsky, Pshenichnyy, and Soloviev (1987) developed a prototype device, utilizing the energy of surface waves to create an upward flow of water in the tube. This is a wave-inertia pump consisting of a vertical tube, a valve, and a buoy to keep the device afloat. An outlet valve at the top of the unit synchronizes the operation of the device with surface waves and prevents back-splashing. A single device with a 100 m long and 1.2 m diameter tube is able to produce up to 1 m3s‑1 flow of deep water to the surface. With a 10 oC temperature difference over 100 m depth, the negative heat supply rate to the sea surface is 42 MW, which is equivalent to a 42 Wm‑2 heat flux, if distributed over 1 km2 area. Such flux is comparable to the average net air-sea flux. A system of artificial upwelling devices can cool down the sea surface, modify climate on a regional scale and possibly help mitigate hurricanes. The cold water brought from a deeper layer, however, has a larger density than the surface water and therefore has a tendency to sink back down. In this work, the efficiency of wave-inertia pumps and climatic consequences are estimated for different environmental conditions using a computational fluid dynamics model.

  4. Artificial ocean upwelling utilizing the energy of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Artificial upwelling can bring cold water from below the thermocline to the sea surface. Vershinsky, Pshenichnyy, and Soloviev (1987) developed a prototype device, utilizing the energy of surface waves to create an upward flow of water in the tube. This is a wave-inertia pump consisting of a vertical tube, a valve, and a buoy to keep the device afloat. An outlet valve at the top of the unit synchronizes the operation of the device with surface waves and prevents back-splashing. A single device with a 100 m long and 1.2 m diameter tube is able to produce up to 1 m3s-1 flow of deep water to the surface. With a 10 oC temperature difference over 100 m depth, the negative heat supply rate to the sea surface is 42 MW, which is equivalent to a 42 Wm-2 heat flux, if distributed over 1 km2 area. Such flux is comparable to the average net air-sea flux. A system of artificial upwelling devices can cool down the sea surface, modify climate on a regional scale and possibly help mitigate hurricanes. The cold water brought from a deeper layer, however, has a larger density than the surface water and therefore has a tendency to sink back down. In this work, the efficiency of wave-inertia pumps and climatic consequences are estimated for different environmental conditions using a computational fluid dynamics model.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Power Generation Performance of Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Yu, Y.; Epler, J.; Previsic, M.

    2012-04-01

    The extraction of energy from ocean waves has gained interest in recent years. The floating-point absorber (FPA) is one of the most promising devices among a wide variety of wave energy conversion technologies. Early theoretical studies mainly focused on understanding the hydrodynamics of the system and on predicting the maximum power that could be extracted by a heaving body. These studies evolve from the investigation of floating-body interactions in offshore engineering and naval architecture disciplines. To our best knowledge, no systematic study has been reported about the investigation of the power generation performance of an FPA with a close-to-commercial design. A series of experimental tests was conducted to investigate the power extraction performance of an FPA system.

  6. Development of an ensemble prediction system for ocean surface waves in a coastal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Arno

    2015-04-01

    An ensemble prediction system for ocean surface waves has been developed and applied on a local scale to the German Bight and the western Baltic Sea. U10-wind fields generated by the COSMO-DE-EPS upstream forecast chain of the German Met Service (DWD: Deutscher Wetterdienst) have been used as the driving force for the third-generation spectral wave model WAM. The atmospheric chain includes four different global models that provide boundary values for four regional COSMO-EU realisations. Each of those drive five COSMO-DE members, respectively, with different sets of physical parameterisations, so that finally 20 members are available to run 20 corresponding wave ensemble members of the coastal wave model CWAM (Coastal WAve Model) for the German Bight and the western Baltic Sea. It is the first time that in an ensemble prediction system for ocean waves, an atmospheric model of such a fine spatial resolution of 2.8 km has been combined with a wave model running on a model grid with a mesh size of 900 m only. Test runs with the wave ensemble prediction system have been executed for two entire months (April 2013 and June 2014) and for an 8-day storm case (Xaver) in December 2013 in order to check whether such a system could be a reasonable step to improve the future operational wave forecasts of the DWD. The results computed by the different wave model members agree fairly well with available buoy data. The differences between the results for the integrated wave parameters of the individual members are small only, but more pronounced in extreme storm situations. Finally, the statistical analysis of the comparisons with measurements show without exception slightly improved values for the ensemble mean of the wave ensemble members compared with the usual deterministic routine control run.

  7. A model to simulate nonhydrostatic internal gravity waves in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitousek, S.; Fringer, O. B.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Internal gravity waves in the ocean are primarily generated due to tidal flow over topography that generates internal tides, or internal waves of tidal frequency. As they propagate, internal tides steepen into trains of internal solitary waves that eventually break upon interacting with shallow coastal topography. Modeling internal solitary waves is difficult because they have length scales that are short relative to the internal tide, and so many grid points in three dimensions are needed to accurately resolve their evolution. Because internal solitary waves arise from a balance between nonlinear advection of momentum and nonhydrostatic dispersion, they must be simulated with nonhydrostatic ocean models. Such models are expensive because computation of the nonhydrostatic pressure requires solution of a three-dimensional Poisson equation that can incur an order of magnitude increase in the computational cost. Finally, because internal solitary waves can propagate over long distances with little to no dissipation or mixing of the thermocline upon which they propagate, the numerical model must minimize spurious vertical numerical diffusion of the density field. We will discuss development of a new ocean model designed to accurately simulate internal solitary waves. Horizontally unstructured, finite-volume grids are employed to enable resolution of the multiscale nature of internal solitary waves by refining the grid where they are likely to form. To resolve the nonlinear-nonhydrostatic balance in the waves, the model computes the nonhydrostatic pressure, but with a preconditioner that ensures minimal overhead where the nonhydrotatic pressure is not needed. Finally, to minimize spurious numerical diffusion, we employ an Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE), or hybrid, vertical coordinate system in which the vertical direction is discretized with boundary-following (sigma or s), Cartesian (z), or density-following (isopycnal) coordinates. Because isopycnal coordinates

  8. Effects of ocean surface gravity waves: on turbulence, climate, and frontogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Surface waves affect turbulence of the upper ocean on a variety of scales, with impacts from the meter scale to the global. This talk will review simulations and theory quantifying and elucidating these effects. This presentation will first touch upon the best understood wave influence-Langmuir turbulence-concluding with a quantification of the importance of Langmuir turbulence on global climate. This quantification is based on prognosis of wave statistics using WaveWatch-III as a component of the Community Earth System Model. These statistics are used to enhance mixing in the K-Profile Parameterization consistently with scalings based on Large Eddy Simulations of the Wave-Averaged, or Craik-Leibovich, equations. In this system, all of the wave effects arrive via Stokes forces-rectified forces proportional to the Stokes drift which exchange properties between waves and turbulence. The second major portion of the talk will address the importance of Stokes forces on oceanic fronts. High resolution simulations and observations of the ocean surface boundary layer have revealed 100m to 10km frontal structures in temperature and other properties worldwide. The formation and evolution of these features, through frontogenesis, instability, and frontolysis is an important and often poorly-simulated part of the climate system, yet fronts and filaments dominate the transport of energy, momentum, dissolved gasses, oil, and pollutants over a wide range of scales. Large Eddy Simulations of the the Wave-Averaged Equations spanning the scales from 5m to 20km will illustrate the theory of frontogenesis-including the leading order effects of Langmuir turbulence and surface waves which imbue the fronts with ageostrophic and nonhydrostatic character.

  9. Impacts of ULF wave power on the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Doherty, P.; Zesta, E.; Moldwin, M.

    2015-12-01

    The impact of the ULF wave power, which is excited by long-lived high solar wind speed streams, in the magnetosphere has been well understood. For example, it has been reported that ULF pulsations may be the likely acceleration mechanism for generating storm-time MeV "killer" electrons in the magnetosphere. However, the impact of this energetic ULF wave power onto the ionosphere is not yet explored very well. In this paper we unequivocally demonstrated that during intense Pc5 ULF wave activity period, distinct pulsations with the same periodicity were found in the TEC data observed by GPS receivers located at different latitudes. The GPS-TEC has been used as a powerful tool to study the propagation pattern of transient ionospheric disturbances generated by seismic or internal gravity waves. Since then the small-scale variations (undulation) of GPS TEC has been associated with either gravity wave or TIDs. However, these small scale undulations of TECs turned out to be sensitive enough to the intense global ULF waves as well. The wavelet analysis of GPS TEC small scale undulations shows a peak value at the frequency of 2-10mHz which is a typical frequency range of Pc5 ULF wave. The typical internal gravity wave frequency is less than 1.6 or 2 mHz, therefore the TEC waves are likely due to ULF waves. At the same time, we detect the ULF activity on the ground using a chain of ground-based magnetometer data, depicting the ULF wave penetration from high latitude to low latitude region. All these observations demonstrate that Pc5 waves with a likely driver in the solar wind can penetrate to the ionosphere and cause small scale undulation on the ionospheric density structures.

  10. Long Wave Resonance in Tropical Oceans and Implications on Climate: The Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinault, Jean-Louis

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of the tropical Pacific can be understood satisfactorily by invoking the coupling between the basin modes of 1-, 4- and 8-year average periods. The annual quasi-stationary wave (QSW) is a first baroclinic-mode, fourth meridional-mode Rossby wave resonantly forced by easterlies. The quadrennial QSW is built up from a first baroclinic-mode Kelvin wave and a first baroclinic-mode, first meridional-mode Rossby wave equatorially trapped and two off-equatorial Rossby waves, their dovetailing forming a resonantly forced wave (RFW). The 8-year period QSW is a replica of the quadrennial QSW for the second-baroclinic mode. The coupling between basin modes results from the merging of modulated currents both in the western part of the North Equatorial Counter Current and along the South Equatorial Current. Consequently, a sub-harmonic mode locking occurs, which means that the average period of QSWs is 1-, 4- and 8-year exactly. The quadrennial sub-harmonic is subject to two modes of forcing. One results from coupling with the annual QSW that produces a Kelvin wave at the origin of transfer of the warm waters from the western part of the basin to the central-eastern Pacific. The other is induced by El Niño and La Niña that self-sustain the sub-harmonic by stimulating the Rossby wave accompanying the westward recession of the QSW at a critical stage of its evolution. The interpretation of ENSO from the coupling of different basin modes allows predicting and estimating the amplitude of El Niño events a few months before they become mature from the accelerations of the geostrophic component of the North Equatorial Counter Current.

  11. Acoustic-gravity waves in atmospheric and oceanic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2012-08-01

    A theory of guided propagation of sound in layered, moving fluids is extended to include acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) in waveguides with piecewise continuous parameters. The orthogonality of AGW normal modes is established in moving and motionless media. A perturbation theory is developed to quantify the relative significance of the gravity and fluid compressibility as well as sensitivity of the normal modes to variations in sound speed, flow velocity, and density profiles and in boundary conditions. Phase and group speeds of the normal modes are found to have certain universal properties which are valid for waveguides with arbitrary stratification. The Lamb wave is shown to be the only AGW normal mode that can propagate without dispersion in a layered medium.

  12. Empirical ground-based characterization of ULF wave power: Towards a ULF wave index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Jonathan; Pahud, Danielle; Amalraj, Valantina; Mann, Ian; Murphy, Kyle

    Ultra-Low Frequency (ULF) waves are believed to play an important role in the dynamics of the outer radiation belt electrons following geomagnetic storms. The energisation mechanism is thought to be the adiabatic radial transport of electrons inward into regions of higher magnetic field strength, through violation of the third invariant. This transport is generally thought to be diffusive in nature and can be characterised by a diffusion coefficient which is dependent on the ULF wave power. The CARISMA magnetometer network (www.carisma.ca) has been in operation since 1986 and thus has an uninterrupted database of ground magnetic observations throughout nearly two solar cycles. Using this database, we present a statistical characterisation of Pc5 ULF power as a function of magnetic local time (MLT), and solar wind speed. We examine the power across L-shells spanning the outer radiation belts between 4.2 and 7.9, using data from the "Churchill Line" stations. We demonstrate the solar wind speed dependence of Pc5 ULF wave power as a function of MLT and L-shell. It is suggested that the dawn-dusk asymmetry of ULF waves observed on the ground is determined by the Parker spiral angle. We address the statistical dependence of ULF wave power as a function of IMF angle. Finally, we present results of median ULF wave power during CIR and CME storms in order to address the solar wind drivers potentially responsible for ULF-wave driven radial diffusion of radiation belt electrons.

  13. Exploitation of SAR data for measurement of ocean currents and wave velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Lyzenga, D. R.; Klooster, A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of extracting information on ocean currents and wave orbital velocities from SAR data by an analysis of the Doppler frequency content of the data are discussed. The theory and data analysis methods are discussed, and results are presented for both aircraft and satellite (SEASAT) data sets. A method of measuring the phase velocity of a gravity wave field is also described. This method uses the shift in position of the wave crests on two images generated from the same data set using two separate Doppler bands. Results of the current measurements are pesented for 11 aircraft data sets and 4 SEASAT data sets.

  14. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms.

    PubMed

    Maestas, Joseph T; Taylor, Larissa F; Collis, Jon M

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear progressive wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long-range shock propagation using a wave-following computational domain. Current models are capable of treating smoothly spatially varying medium properties, and fluid-fluid interfaces that align horizontally with a computational grid that can be handled by enforcing appropriate interface conditions. However, sloping interfaces that do not align with a horizontal grid present a computational challenge as application of interface conditions to vertical contacts is non-trivial. In this work, range-dependent environments, characterized by sloping bathymetry, are treated using a rotated coordinate system approach where the irregular interface is aligned with the coordinate axes. The coordinate rotation does not change the governing equation due to the narrow-angle assumption adopted in its derivation, but care is taken with applying initial, interface, and boundary conditions. Additionally, sound pressure level influences on nonlinear steepening for range-independent and range-dependent domains are used to quantify the pressures for which linear acoustic models suffice. A study is also performed to investigate the effects of thin sediment layers on the propagation of blast waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line.

  15. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms.

    PubMed

    Maestas, Joseph T; Taylor, Larissa F; Collis, Jon M

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear progressive wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long-range shock propagation using a wave-following computational domain. Current models are capable of treating smoothly spatially varying medium properties, and fluid-fluid interfaces that align horizontally with a computational grid that can be handled by enforcing appropriate interface conditions. However, sloping interfaces that do not align with a horizontal grid present a computational challenge as application of interface conditions to vertical contacts is non-trivial. In this work, range-dependent environments, characterized by sloping bathymetry, are treated using a rotated coordinate system approach where the irregular interface is aligned with the coordinate axes. The coordinate rotation does not change the governing equation due to the narrow-angle assumption adopted in its derivation, but care is taken with applying initial, interface, and boundary conditions. Additionally, sound pressure level influences on nonlinear steepening for range-independent and range-dependent domains are used to quantify the pressures for which linear acoustic models suffice. A study is also performed to investigate the effects of thin sediment layers on the propagation of blast waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line. PMID:25480048

  16. Long-Term Change of Sound Wave Propagation Attenuation Due to the Effects of Ocean Acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, S.; Tsuchiya, T.; Hiyoshi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing due to global warming. And, the ocean acidification advances because this melts into seawater, pH decrease in seawater are concerned. The sound wave to propagate seawater, pH is known to affect absorption loss (α) by chemical buffer effects of the seawater. However, conventionally, α has not been investigated much in the calculation of pH. Therefore, when calculating the propagation distance in the sonar equation, pH =8~8.1 (Weak alkaline) are used empirically. Therefore we used an actual value of pH of 30 years from 1984 in the sea near the Japan, and investigated change over the years of absorption loss (α) at some frequency. As a result, we found that α value decreases gradually in the past 30 years, as high-latitude decreases. Further, the future, assuming that ocean acidification is more advanced, and to simulate a change of the absorption loss and propagation loss in end of this century using the pH value reported from the "Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change" (IPCC). As a result, it was just suggested that α decreased more in the end of this century and affected the submarine detection. In addition, in recent years, we examined the effects of noise that offshore wind power construction proceeds in each country emits gives to the underwater sound. As a result, in the end of this century, an underwater noise increases about 17%, and underwater sound environmental degradation of the sea is concerned.

  17. El Nino as an element of a global-scale wave in the atmosphere-ocean system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serykh, Ilya; Sonechkin, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    The analyses of the real meteorological and oceanographical data, and long runs of the coupled atmosphere-ocean hydro- thermodynamical models identify a spatial-temporal structure of the main mode of the interannual to decadal climatic variations. This mode looks like a global-scale wave that extends from West to East around the Earth, and varies rhythmically. In fact, the establishment of this wave is a generalization and development of the well-known structures of the so-called "teleconnections" in the ocean-atmosphere system. The known regional structures like ENSO, IOD, PDO, IPO, PNA, NAO, AO, ACW and other can be considered as parts of this global-scale wave. Moving eastward around the Earth, this wave triggers El Nino - Southern oscillation events. An index of this wave is proposed as a sum of normalized anomalies of the sea level pressure and the near-surface temperature in 20 locations around the globe. It is proven that the power spectrum of this index is not continuous but discrete in its character. Thus, one can suppose that the dynamics of the global-scale wave is nonchaotic, and so predictable with no limit in principle. The index power spectrum reveals statistically significant peaks at the same periods that are inherent to the power spectra of the traditional ENSO indices. The main peaks are at the sub-harmonics of the well-known Chandler wobble (of the ~1.2 year period) in the Earth's pole motion: 3.6; 4.8; 2.4 years. Some other statistically significant peaks also are seen at the super-harmonics of the Luni-Solar nutation (of the ~18.6 year period), and combinational harmonics of the Schwabe's and Hale's solar activity cycles. Based on the eastward propagation of the global-scale wave, a predictor of ENSO events was suggested. It has high correlation (about 0.7) with Nino indices but leads them on about 12 months. The use of this predictor opens a possibility to overcome the Spring Predictability Barrier in ENSO forecasting.

  18. Measurements of ocean wave spectra and modulation transfer function with the airborne two frequency scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer function of ocean waves can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, wave orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.

  19. On the wave number spectrum of oceanic mesoscale variability observed by the SEASAT altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L.-L.

    1983-01-01

    The wave number spectrum of mesoscale variability in various parts of the oceans is computed on the basis of sea surface height variations measured by the SEASAT altimeter in nearly repeat orbits during the last 24 days of its mission, and it is noted that oceanic spectrum characteristics are dependent on the energy level of the mesoscale variability. On the basis of an assumed horizontal isotropy of mesoscale variability, scalar-wave number spectra of sea surface height and geostrophic kinetic energy are presented and the dynamical implications of these spectra are discussed. A rigorous examination of the effects of residual geoid and atmospheric water vapor on the computed oceanic spectra indicates that the general characteristics of the spectra were not significantly affected by them.

  20. Statistical multi-model climate projections of surface ocean waves in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jorge; Menendez, Melisa; Camus, Paula; Mendez, Fernando J.; Losada, Inigo J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the impact of climate change on sea surface waves has received increasingly more attention by the climate community. Indeed, ocean waves reaching the coast play an important role in several processes concerning coastal communities, such as inundation and erosion. However, regional downscaling at the high spatial resolution necessary for coastal studies has received less attention. Here, we present a novel framework for regional wave climate projections and its application in the European region. Changes in the wave dynamics under different scenarios in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean are analyzed. The multi-model projection methodology is based on a statistical downscaling approach. The statistical relation between the predictor (atmospheric conditions) and the predictand (multivariate wave climate) is based on a weather type (WT) classification. This atmospheric classification is developed by applying the k-means clustering technique over historical offshore sea level pressure (SLP) fields. Each WT is linked to sea wave conditions from a wave hindcast. This link is developed by associating atmospheric conditions from reanalysis with multivariate local waves. This predictor-predictand relationship is applied to the daily SLP fields from global climate models (GCMs) in order to project future changes in regional wave conditions. The GCMs used in the multi-model projection are selected according to skill criteria. The application of this framework uses CMIP5-based wave climate projections in Europe. The low computational requirements of the statistical approach allow a large number of GCMs and climate change scenarios to be studied. Consistent with previous works on global wave climate projections, the estimated changes from the regional wave climate projections show a general decrease in wave heights and periods in the Atlantic Europe for the late twenty-first century. The regional projections, however, allow a more detailed

  1. On the coupled evolution of oceanic internal waves and quasi-geostrophic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Gregory LeClaire

    Oceanic motion outside thin boundary layers is primarily a mixture of quasi-geostrophic flow and internal waves with either near-inertial frequencies or the frequency of the semidiurnal lunar tide. This dissertation seeks a deeper understanding of waves and flow through reduced models that isolate their nonlinear and coupled evolution from the Boussinesq equations. Three physical-space models are developed: an equation that describes quasi-geostrophic evolution in an arbitrary and prescribed field of hydrostatic internal waves; a three-component model that couples quasi-geostrophic flow to both near-inertial waves and the near-inertial second harmonic; and a model for the slow evolution of hydrostatic internal tides in quasi-geostrophic flow of near-arbitrary scale. This slow internal tide equation opens the path to a coupled model for the energetic interaction of quasi-geostrophic flow and oceanic internal tides. Four results emerge. First, the wave-averaged quasi-geostrophic equation reveals that finite-amplitude waves give rise to a mean flow that advects quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity. Second is the definition of a new material invariant: Available Potential Vorticity, or APV. APV isolates the part of Ertel potential vorticity available for balanced-flow evolution in Eulerian frames and proves necessary in the separating waves and quasi-geostrophic flow. The third result, hashed out for near-inertial waves and quasi-geostrophic flow, is that wave-flow interaction leads to energy exchange even under conditions of weak nonlinearity. For storm-forced oceanic near-inertial waves the interaction often energizes waves at the expense of flow. We call this extraction of balanced quasi-geostrophic energy 'stimulated generation' since it requires externally-forced rather than spontaneously-generated waves. The fourth result is that quasi-geostrophic flow can encourage or 'catalyze' a nonlinear interaction between a near-inertial wave field and its second harmonic

  2. Ocean wave parameters and spectrum estimated from single and dual high-frequency radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisaki, Yukiharu

    2016-09-01

    The high-frequency (HF) radar inversion algorithm for spectrum estimation (HIAS) can estimate ocean wave directional spectra from both dual and single radar. Wave data from a dual radar and two single radars are compared with in situ observations. The agreement of the wave parameters estimated from the dual radar with those from in situ observations is the best of the three. In contrast, the agreement of the wave parameters estimated from the single radar in which no Doppler spectra are observed in the cell closest to the in situ observation point is the worst among the three. Wave data from the dual radar and the two single radars are compared. The comparison of the wave heights estimated from the single and dual radars shows that the area sampled by the Doppler spectra for the single radar is more critical than the number of Doppler spectra in terms of agreement with the dual-radar-estimated wave heights. In contrast, the comparison of the wave periods demonstrates that the number of Doppler spectra observed by the single radar is more critical for agreement of the wave periods than the area of the Doppler spectra. There is a bias directed to the radar position in the single radar estimated wave direction.

  3. Tunable multi-channel terahertz wave power splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiu-Sheng, Li; Han, Liu; Le, Zhang

    2015-12-01

    The combination of terahertz technology and photonic crystal provides a new approach to realize compact terahertz wave devices. Relying on a conventional photonic crystal waveguide and photonic crystal surface-mode waveguides, a tunable multi-channel terahertz-wave power splitter is proposed. The mechanism of such a power splitter is further theoretically analyzed and numerically investigated with the aid of the plane-wave-expansion method and the finite-difference time-domain method. With an appropriate design, the proposed device can split the input terahertz wave energy equally into six output ports at the frequency of 0.6 THz. When changing the external magnetic field, the input terahertz wave can be equally divided into four output ports with the aid of a magnetic-sensitive material. Furthermore, the present device is very compact and the total size is of 4.4×6.0 mm2.

  4. The Future Potential of Wave Power in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previsic, M.; Epler, J.; Hand, M.; Heimiller, D.; Short, W.; Eurek, K.

    2012-12-01

    The theoretical ocean wave energy resource potential exceeds 50% of the annual domestic energy demand of the US, is located in close proximity of coastal population centers, and, although variable in nature, may be more consistent and predictable than some other renewable generation technologies. As renewable electricity generation technologies, ocean wave energy offers a low air pollutant option for diversifying the US electricity generation portfolio. Furthermore, the output characteristics of these technologies may complement other renewable technologies. This study addresses: (1) The energy extraction potential from the US wave energy resource, (2) The present cost of wave technology in /kW, (3) The estimated cost of energy in /kWh, and (4) Cost levels at which the technology should see significant deployment. RE Vision Consulting in collaboration with NREL engaged in various analyses to establish present-day and future cost profiles for MHK technologies, compiled existing resource assessments and wave energy supply curves, and developed cost and deployment scenarios using the ReEDS analysis model to estimate the present-day technology cost reductions necessary to facilitate significant technology deployment in the US.

  5. Comparison of viscoelastic-type models for ocean wave attenuation in ice-covered seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosig, Johannes E. M.; Montiel, Fabien; Squire, Vernon A.

    2015-09-01

    Continuum-based models that describe the propagation of ocean waves in ice-infested seas are considered, where the surface ocean layer (including ice floes, brash ice, etc.) is modeled by a homogeneous viscoelastic material which causes waves to attenuate as they travel through the medium. Three ice layer models are compared, namely a viscoelastic fluid layer model currently being trialed in the spectral wave model WAVEWATCH III® and two simpler viscoelastic thin beam models. All three models are two dimensional. A comparative analysis shows that one of the beam models provides similar predictions for wave attenuation and wavelength to the viscoelastic fluid model. The three models are calibrated using wave attenuation data recently collected in the Antarctic marginal ice zone as an example. Although agreement with the data is obtained with all three models, several important issues related to the viscoelastic fluid model are identified that raise questions about its suitability to characterize wave attenuation in ice-covered seas. Viscoelastic beam models appear to provide a more robust parameterization of the phenomenon being modeled, but still remain questionable as a valid characterization of wave-ice interactions generally.

  6. Modelling rogue waves through exact dynamical lump soliton controlled by ocean currents.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Anjan; Mukherjee, Abhik; Naskar, Tapan

    2014-04-01

    Rogue waves are extraordinarily high and steep isolated waves, which appear suddenly in a calm sea and disappear equally fast. However, though the rogue waves are localized surface waves, their theoretical models and experimental observations are available mostly in one dimension, with the majority of them admitting only limited and fixed amplitude and modular inclination of the wave. We propose two dimensions, exactly solvable nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation derivable from the basic hydrodynamic equations and endowed with integrable structures. The proposed two-dimensional equation exhibits modulation instability and frequency correction induced by the nonlinear effect, with a directional preference, all of which can be determined through precise analytic result. The two-dimensional NLS equation allows also an exact lump soliton which can model a full-grown surface rogue wave with adjustable height and modular inclination. The lump soliton under the influence of an ocean current appears and disappears preceded by a hole state, with its dynamics controlled by the current term. These desirable properties make our exact model promising for describing ocean rogue waves.

  7. Case studies of nonorographic gravity waves over the Southern Ocean emphasize the role of moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plougonven, Riwal; Hertzog, Albert; Alexander, M. Joan

    2015-02-01

    Two case studies of nonorographic gravity waves are carried out for wave events that occurred over the Southern Ocean in November 2005. Mesoscale simulations were carried out with the Weather and Research Forecast model. The simulated waves were compared to observations from superpressure balloons of the Vorcore campaign and from the High Resolution Dynamic Limb Sounder satellite. Satisfactory agreement is found, giving confidence in the estimations of wave parameters and amplitudes. For the amplitudes, both the model and observations provide a lower bound, for different reasons. Waves are found in the lower stratosphere with horizontal wavelengths of the order of 150-200 km in the horizontal, 5-8 km in the vertical, corresponding to intrinsic frequencies between 5 and 10 f, where f is the Coriolis parameter. Although the tropospheric flow is very different between the two cases, there are features which are common and appear significant for the gravity waves: these include intense localized updrafts associated with convection in the troposphere and a displaced polar vortex inducing strong winds in the stratosphere above the frontal region. Relative to theoretical expectations, the simulations emphasize the role of moisture. Intrinsic frequencies are significantly higher than those expected for waves produced by dry spontaneous generation from jets. To quantify the contribution of moisture, dry simulations were carried out, yielding momentum fluxes over oceanic regions that were 2.5 times weaker. Identification of the generation mechanisms in these complex flows calls for further study, and these should include moisture and a realistic stratospheric jet.

  8. Modelling rogue waves through exact dynamical lump soliton controlled by ocean currents

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Anjan; Mukherjee, Abhik; Naskar, Tapan

    2014-01-01

    Rogue waves are extraordinarily high and steep isolated waves, which appear suddenly in a calm sea and disappear equally fast. However, though the rogue waves are localized surface waves, their theoretical models and experimental observations are available mostly in one dimension, with the majority of them admitting only limited and fixed amplitude and modular inclination of the wave. We propose two dimensions, exactly solvable nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation derivable from the basic hydrodynamic equations and endowed with integrable structures. The proposed two-dimensional equation exhibits modulation instability and frequency correction induced by the nonlinear effect, with a directional preference, all of which can be determined through precise analytic result. The two-dimensional NLS equation allows also an exact lump soliton which can model a full-grown surface rogue wave with adjustable height and modular inclination. The lump soliton under the influence of an ocean current appears and disappears preceded by a hole state, with its dynamics controlled by the current term. These desirable properties make our exact model promising for describing ocean rogue waves. PMID:24711719

  9. Redistribution of energy available for ocean mixing by long-range propagation of internal waves.

    PubMed

    Alford, Matthew H

    2003-05-01

    Ocean mixing, which affects pollutant dispersal, marine productivity and global climate, largely results from the breaking of internal gravity waves--disturbances propagating along the ocean's internal stratification. A global map of internal-wave dissipation would be useful in improving climate models, but would require knowledge of the sources of internal gravity waves and their propagation. Towards this goal, I present here computations of horizontal internal-wave propagation from 60 historical moorings and relate them to the source terms of internal waves as computed previously. Analysis of the two most energetic frequency ranges--near-inertial frequencies and semidiurnal tidal frequencies--reveals that the fluxes in both frequency bands are of the order of 1 kW x m(-1) (that is, 15-50% of the energy input) and are directed away from their respective source regions. However, the energy flux due to near-inertial waves is stronger in winter, whereas the tidal fluxes are uniform throughout the year. Both varieties of internal waves can thus significantly affect the space-time distribution of energy available for global mixing.

  10. Modeling explosion generated Scholte waves in sandy sediments with power law dependent shear wave speed.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Alexander G; Dahl, Peter H; Odom, Robert I

    2015-10-01

    Experimental measurements of Scholte waves from underwater explosions collected off the coast of Virginia Beach, VA in shallow water are presented. It is shown here that the dispersion of these explosion-generated Scholte waves traveling in the sandy seabed can be modeled using a power-law dependent shear wave speed profile and an empirical source model that determines the pressure time-series at 1 m from the source as a function of TNT-equivalent charge weight.

  11. Discrete-element model for the interaction between ocean waves and sea ice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M; Pan, Wenxiao

    2012-01-01

    We present a discrete-element method (DEM) model to simulate the mechanical behavior of sea ice in response to ocean waves. The interaction of ocean waves and sea ice potentially can lead to the fracture and fragmentation of sea ice depending on the wave amplitude and period. The fracture behavior of sea ice explicitly is modeled by a DEM method where sea ice is modeled by densely packed spherical particles with finite sizes. These particles are bonded together at their contact points through mechanical bonds that can sustain both tensile and compressive forces and moments. Fracturing naturally can be represented by the sequential breaking of mechanical bonds. For a given amplitude and period of incident ocean waves, the model provides information for the spatial distribution and time evolution of stress and microfractures and the fragment size distribution. We demonstrate that the fraction of broken bonds α increases with increasing wave amplitude. In contrast, the ice fragment size l decreases with increasing amplitude. This information is important for the understanding of the breakup of individual ice floes and floe fragment size.

  12. Directional ocean wave measurements in a coastal setting using a focused array imaging radar

    SciTech Connect

    Frasier, S.J.; Liu, Y.; Moller, D.; McIntosh, R.E.; Long, C.

    1995-03-01

    A unique focused array imaging Doppler radar was used to measure directional spectra of ocean surface waves in a nearshore experiment performed on the North Carolina Outer Banks. Radar images of the ocean surface`s Doppler velocity were used to generate two dimensional spectra of the radial component of the ocean surface velocity field. These are compared to simultaneous in-situ measurements made by a nearby array of submerged pressure sensors. Analysis of the resulting two-dimensional spectra include comparisons of dominant wave lengths, wave directions, and wave energy accounting for relative differences in water depth at the measurement locations. Limited estimates of the two-dimensional surface displacement spectrum are derived from the radar data. The radar measurements are analogous to those of interferometric synthetic aperture radars (INSAR), and the equivalent INSAR parameters are shown. The agreement between the remote and in-situ measurements suggests that an imaging Doppler radar is effective for these wave measurements at near grazing incidence angles.

  13. Calibration of Ocean Wave Measurements by the TOPEX, Jason-1, and Jason-2 Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Beckley, B. D.

    2012-01-01

    The calibration and validation of ocean wave height measurements by the TOPEX, Jason-1, and Jason-2 satellite altimeters is addressed by comparing the measurements internally among them- selves and against independent wave measurements at moored buoys. The two six-month verification campaigns, when two of the satellites made near-simultaneous measurements along the same ground track, are invaluable for such work and reveal subtle aspects that otherwise might go undetected. The two Jason satellites are remarkably consistent; Topex reports waves generally 1-2% larger. External calibration is complicated by some systematic errors in the buoy data. We confirm a recent report by Durrant et al. that Canadian buoys underestimate significant wave heights by about 10% relative to U.S. buoys. Wave heights from all three altimetric satellites require scaling upwards by 5 6% to be consistent with U.S. buoys.

  14. An improved dual-frequency technique for the remote sensing of ocean currents and wave spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, D. L.; Eng, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    A two frequency microwave radar technique for the remote sensing of directional ocean wave spectra and surface currents is investigated. This technique is conceptually attractive because its operational physical principle involves a spatial electromagnetic scattering resonance with a single, but selectable, long gravity wave. Multiplexing of signals having different spacing of the two transmitted frequencies allows measurements of the entire long wave ocean spectrum to be carried out. A new scatterometer is developed and experimentally tested which is capable of making measurements having much larger signal/background values than previously possible. This instrument couples the resonance technique with coherent, frequency agility radar capabilities. This scatterometer is presently configured for supporting a program of surface current measurements.

  15. Airborne remote sensing of ocean wave directional wavenumber spectra in the marginal ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Peter; Gascard, Jean-Claude

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between surface waves and sea ice are thought to be an important, but poorly understood, physical process in the atmosphere-ice-ocean system. In this work, airborne scanning lidar was used to observe ocean waves propagating into the marginal ice zone (MIZ). These represent the first direct spatial measurements of the surface wavefield in the polar MIZ. Data were compared against two attenuation models, one based on viscous dissipation and one based on scattering. Both models were capable of reproducing the measured wave energy. The observed wavenumber dependence of attenuation was found to be consistent with viscous processes, while the spectral spreading of higher wavenumbers suggested a scattering mechanism. Both models reproduced a change in peak direction due to preferential directional filtering. Floe sizes were recorded using colocated visible imagery, and their distribution was found to be consistent with ice breakup by the wavefield.

  16. Hurricane Directional Wave Spectrum Spatial Variation in the Open Ocean and at Landfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Wright, C. W.; Vandemark, D.; Krabill, W. B.; Garcia, A. W.; Houston, S. H.; Murillo, S. T.; Powell, M. D.; Black, P. G.; Marks, F. D.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The sea surface directional wave spectrum was measured for the first time in all quadrants of a hurricane in open water using the NASA scanning radar altimeter (SRA) carried aboard one of the NOAA WP-3D hurricane research aircraft at 1.5 kilometer height. The SRA measures the energetic portion of the directional wave spectrum by generating a topographic map of the sea surface. The data were acquired on 24 August 1998 when Hurricane Bonnie was 400 km east of Abaco Island, Bahamas. Individual waves with heights up to 19 meters were observed and the spatial variation of the wave field was dramatic. The dominant waves generally propagated at significant angles to the downwind direction. At one position, three different wave systems of comparable energy and wavelength crossed each other. The aircraft spent over five hours within 180 kilometers of the Hurricane Bonnie eye and made five eye penetrations. On 26 August 1998, the SRA at 2.2 kilometer height documented the directional wave spectrum in the region between Charleston, SC, and Cape Hatteras, NC, as Hurricane Bonnie was making landfall near Wilmington, NC. The storm was similar in size during the two flights, but the maximum speed in the NOAA Hurricane Research Division surface wind analysis was 15% lower prior to landfall (39 meters per second) than it had been in the open ocean (46 meters per second). This was compensated for by its faster movement prior to landfall (9.5 meters per second) than when it was encountered in the open ocean (5 meters per second), significantly increasing the effective fetch and duration of waves near the peak of the spectrum which propagated in the direction of the storm track. The open ocean wave height variation indicated that Hurricane Bonnie would have produced waves of 11 meters significant wave height on the shore northeast of Wilmington had it not been for the continental shelf. The bathymetry distributed the steepening and breaking process across the shelf so that the

  17. Impact of topographic internal lee wave drag on an eddying global ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trossman, David S.; Arbic, Brian K.; Richman, James G.; Garner, Stephen T.; Jayne, Steven R.; Wallcraft, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of topographic internal lee wave drag (wave drag hereafter) on several aspects of the low-frequency circulation in a high-resolution global ocean model forced by winds and air-sea buoyancy fluxes is examined here. The HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) is run at two different horizontal resolutions (one nominally 1/12° and the other 1/25°). Wave drag, which parameterizes both topographic blocking and the generation of lee waves arising from geostrophic flow impinging upon rough topography, is inserted into the simulations as they run. The parameterization used here affects the momentum equations and hence the structure of eddy kinetic energy. Lee waves also have implications for diapycnal mixing in the ocean, though the parameterization does not directly modify the density. Total near-bottom energy dissipation due to wave drag and quadratic bottom boundary layer drag is nearly doubled, and the energy dissipation due to quadratic bottom drag is reduced by about a factor of two, in simulations with an inserted wave drag compared to simulations having only quadratic bottom drag. With the insertion of wave drag, the kinetic energy is reduced in the abyss and in a three-dimensional global integral. Deflection by partial topographic blocking is inferred to be one reason why the near-bottom kinetic energy can increase in locations where there is little change in dissipation by quadratic bottom drag. Despite large changes seen in the abyss, the changes that occur near the sea surface are relatively small upon insertion of wave drag into the simulations. Both the sea surface height variance and geostrophic surface kinetic energy are reduced on global average by more than twice the seasonal variability in these diagnostics. Alterations in the intensified jet positions brought about by inserting wave drag are not distinguishable from the temporal variability of jet positions. Various statistical measures suggest that applying wave drag only within a fixed

  18. Estimation of the real aperture radar modulation transfer function directly from synthetic aperture radar ocean wave image spectra without a priori knowledge of the ocean wave height spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, S.; HøGda, K. A.

    1994-07-01

    The phase and amplitude of the real aperture radar (RAR) modulation transfer function (MTF) are, applying both simulated and real synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image spectra, shown to strongly influence the SAR ocean wave imaging of range- (or near-range) traveling wave systems. Conventionally, in situ measurement of the sea state has been used in connection with SAR estimation of the RAR MTF. In most cases, the SAR imaging has been simulated by varying the phase and amplitude of the transfer function until some criterium for best fit between the measured and simulated spectra is met. The main problem with this method is the need for in situ buoy measurements of the underlying ocean wave height spectrum. This paper proposes a new method for estimating the RAR MTF directly from the SAR ocean wave image spectrum. Hence the method differs from previously used methods in that it is independent of in situ measurements of the sea state. The only (weak) restriction is that the observed wave system is range- or near-range traveling. On the basis of three range-going profiles the RAR MTF phase and amplitude are estimated. Investigations using synthetic data reveal that the SAR image spectrum for realistic sea states is colored by the unknown transfer function to such an extent that the underlying wave spectral form is not critical. Experimentally, the phase and amplitude of the RAR modulation are computed using the Norwegian Continental Shelf Experiment 1988 data. It is shown that the phase is most important for the SAR spectral distribution. Typically, the phase is observed to be in the interval from 60° to 110° and the amplitude to be of the order of 10-18. Furthermore, it is shown from simulation studies that marked changes in real SAR image spectra crossing an atmospheric front are recreated when the measured MTF phase and amplitude are used. Eventually, the hydrodynamic modulation is also extracted from the RAR MTF data. Variations of the hydrodynamic MTF phase

  19. Role of evanescent waves in power calculations for counterpropagating beams.

    PubMed

    Petersson, L E Rickard; Smith, Glenn S

    2003-12-01

    A general expression is obtained for the time-average power passing through a plane transverse to the direction of propagation for two counterpropagating electromagnetic beams. Each beam is represented by its plane-wave spectrum, which contains both propagating and evanescent plane waves. The expression clearly shows that, under certain conditions, the evanescent plane waves contribute to the time-average power passing through the plane. This is in contrast to the case of a single electromagnetic beam, in which only the propagating plane waves contribute to the time-average power passing through the plane. The utility of the expression is demonstrated with a practical example: a line current placed over a dielectric slab. Here the counterpropagating beams are the incident and reflected fields in the region between the current and the slab. The expression is applied to a plane in this region, and it is used to determine the time-average power associated with the evanescent waves passing through this plane. This power is then shown to be equal to the time-average power carried by the guided modes of the slab.

  20. Role of evanescent waves in power calculations for counterpropagating beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, L. E. Rickard; Smith, Glenn S.

    2003-12-01

    A general expression is obtained for the time-average power passing through a plane transverse to the direction of propagation for two counterpropagating electromagnetic beams. Each beam is represented by its plane-wave spectrum, which contains both propagating and evanescent plane waves. The expression clearly shows that, under certain conditions, the evanescent plane waves contribute to the time-average power passing through the plane. This is in contrast to the case of a single electromagnetic beam, in which only the propagating plane waves contribute to the time-average power passing through the plane. The utility of the expression is demonstrated with a practical example: a line current placed over a dielectric slab. Here the counterpropagating beams are the incident and reflected fields in the region between the current and the slab. The expression is applied to a plane in this region, and it is used to determine the time-average power associated with the evanescent waves passing through this plane. This power is then shown to be equal to the time-average power carried by the guided modes of the slab.

  1. Solitary Waves in the Western Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, R.; Merrifield, M.; McPhaden, M.; Picaut, J.; Rutledge, S.; Siegel, D.; Washburn, L.

    1997-01-01

    During the spring tides of early January and February 1993, groups of solitary internal waves were observed propagating through the Intensive Flux Array of the TOGA COARE experiment. The waves appear to originate near the islands of Nugarba (3 deg S 30 deg S - 154 deg 30'E). They travel north-eastward at 2.5-3 m/s, closely coupled with the semi-diurnal baroclinic tide. Peak amplitudes exceed 60 m. Velocities are in excess of .8 m/s. Sea-surface vertical displacements of order.3 m can be inferred directly from the lateral acceleration of surface waters. The Equatorial Undercurrent is displaced by soliton passage but apparently is unaffected otherwise. The intrinsic shear of the solitary crests is small compared to ambient equatorial shears. The crests, while not themselves unstable, are effective at triggering instabilities on the background flow. The motions potentially contribute 10-15 Watts/sq m to the flux of heat into the mixed layer.

  2. On narrow-band representation of ocean waves: 2. Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayfun, M. Aziz

    1986-06-01

    In paper 1 (Tayfun, this issue) we derived two narrow-band type representations for nonlinear waves and obtained theoretical expressions for the key statistics of the corresponding surface elevations, namely, the variance, skewness, and kurtosis. The nature of these statistics and the underlying probability structure were examined qualitatively with particular emphasis on the effects of the spectrum bandwidth. In this paper we explore the reliability of these results quantitatively. Proceeding via the Monte Carlo approach and finite Fourier transform techniques, we generate extensive samples of surface time history with preassigned spectral and statistical properties. Each sample is synthesized from a systematic superposition of the first-order linear field and the second-order corrections, consisting of shortwave and long-wave modulations, respectively. This approach enables us to demonstrate explicitly the individual as well as combined effects of second-order nonlinearities on the probability distribution and statistics of the surface elevation. In the final analysis we find that the simulated results compare favorably with the theoretical predictions and confirm the validity of various qualitative arguments put forward in paper 1.

  3. Real aperture radar imaging of ocean waves during SAXON-FPN: A case of azimuth-traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askari, F.; Keller, W. C.

    1994-05-01

    This paper investigates the radar imaging of ocean waves under two separate wind speed and sea state conditions using an X band real aperture radar (RAR). It is shown experimentally that for the case of higher sea state and wind speed (9.1 m/s), the RAR is capable of imaging the waves from all directions including the azimuth. The case for low sea state and wind speed (4.5 m/s), however, shows somewhat stronger imaging contrast in the range direction with reduced contrast for the azimuth-traveling waves. The results of the aircraft observations are compared with numerical simulations of a RAR imaging model. Simulations show that cross tilt is a viable mechanism for enhancing the azimuthal modulations, but the results are sensitive to the level of upwind/cross-wind anisotropy of the shortwave spectrum. Simulations also show that the variations in incidence angle create irregularities in the azimuthal angle distribution.

  4. On a set of 20th century monumental events that shaped the modern discipline of ocean wind wave's research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.

    2012-04-01

    History is made up of individual events. The modern ocean wind waves research has been active for nearly 70 years since the early years of the decade of 1940's while the World War II was still fighting in earnest and Sverdrup and Munk were embarked on an unprecedented attempt to make wave condition prediction for Navy Amphibious forces carrying out landing operation. That was certainly a monumental event that started the modern ocean wind wave's research. Here I wish to present a set of other monumental events in the intervening years which, in my personal view, are vital to the formation of our present day conventional ocean wind wave's research: • Circa 1945: The war time invention of underwater pressure wave gage that measures pressure fluctuations induced by surface waves and also marked as the start of single-point wave measurements prevalent today. • Circa 1950: When oceanographer Pierson met statistician Tukey and ocean wave spectrum analysis was thereby born. • Circa 1952: Something old something new - Longuet-Higgins introduced the distribution function of Load Rayleigh to the emerging ocean wave data analysis and Rayleigh distribution has been the mainstay of ocean wind wave's research ever since. • Circa 1953: Neumann started the quest to formulate a wind wave spectrum with his impressive first empirical spectrum before spectrum was widely measured. • Circa 1957: Phillips worked out the resonance theory for wind wave's generation. • Circa 1957: Miles simultaneously developed the shear flow model for wind wave's generation, complementary to Phillips theory. • Circa 1959: Hasselmann formulated the source function to start the first framework of comprehensive wind wave modeling. These are all the basic innovative milestones that the bulk of the conventional ocean wind wave research studies today were evolved from. While the monumental status of these works may represent merely the personal opinion of a single aficionado, I do feel that they

  5. On the nonlinear mapping of an ocean wave spectrum into a synthetic aperture radar image spectrum and its inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselmann, Klaus; Hasselmann, Susanne

    1991-06-01

    A new, closed nonlinear integral transformation relation is derived describing the mapping of a two-dimensional ocean wave spectrum into a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image spectrum. The general integral relation is expanded in a power series with respect to orders of nonlinearity and velocity bunching. The individual terms of the series can be readily computed using fast Fourier transforms. The convergence of the series is rapid. The series expansion is also useful in identifying the different contributions to the net imaging process, consisting of the real aperture radar (RAR) cross-section modulation, the nonlinear motion (velocity bunching) effects, and their various interaction products. The lowest term of the expansion with respect to nonlinearity order yields a simple quasi-linear approximate mapping relation consisting of the standard linear SAR modulation expression multiplied by an additional nonlinear Gaussian azimuthal cutoff factor. The cutoff scale is given by the rms azimuthal (velocity bunching) displacement. The same cutoff factor applies to all terms of the power series expansion. The nonlinear mapping relation is inverted using a standard first-guess wave spectrum as regularization term. This is needed to overcome the basic 180° mapping ambiguity and the loss of information beyond the azimuthal cutoff. The inversion is solved numerically using an iteration technique based on the successive application of the explicit solution for the quasi-linear mapping approximation, with interposed corrections invoking the full nonlinear mapping expression. A straightforward application of this technique, however, generally yields unrealistic discontinuities of the best fit wave spectrum in the transition region separating the low azimuthal wave number domain, in which useful SAR information is available and the wave spectrum is modified, from the high azimuthal wave number region beyond the azimuthal cutoff, where the first-guess wave spectrum is retained

  6. Variations of ULF wave power throughout the Halloween 2003 superstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I.; Balasis, G.; Papadimitriou, C.; Zesta, E.; Georgiou, M.; Mann, I.

    2013-09-01

    Focused on the exceptional 2003 Halloween geospace magnetic storm, when Dst reached a minimum of -383 nT, we examine data from topside ionosphere and two magnetospheric missions (CHAMP, Cluster, and Geotail) for signatures of ULF waves. We present the overall ULF wave activity through the six-day interval from 27 October to 1 November 2003 as observed by the three spacecraft and by the Andenes ground magnetic station of the IMAGE magnetometerer array in terms of time variations of the ULF wave power. The ULF wave activity is divided upon Pc3 and Pc5 wave power. Thus, we provide different ULF wave activity indices according to the wave frequency (Pc3 and Pc5) and location of observation (Earth’s magnetosphere, topside ionosphere and surface). We also look at three specific intervals during different phases of the storm when at least two of the satellites are in good local time (LT) conjunction and examine separately Pc3 and Pc4-5 ULF wave activity and its concurrence in the different regions of the magnetosphere and down to the topside ionosphere and on the ground. This work has received support from the European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no. 284520 for the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project.

  7. Variations of ULF wave power throughout the Halloween 2003 superstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, Ioannis; Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Zesta, Eftyhia; Georgiou, Marina; Mann, Ian

    2013-04-01

    Focused on the exceptional 2003 Halloween geospace magnetic storm, when Dst reached a minimum of -383 nT, we examine data from topside ionosphere and two magnetospheric missions (CHAMP, Cluster, and Geotail) for signatures of ULF waves. We present the overall ULF wave activity through the six-day interval from 27 October to 1 November 2003 as observed by the three spacecraft and by the Andenes ground magnetic station of the IMAGE magnetometerer array in terms of time variations of the ULF wave power. The ULF wave activity is divided upon Pc3 and Pc5 wave power. Thus, we provide different ULF wave activity indices according to the wave frequency (Pc3 and Pc5) and location of observation (Earth's magnetosphere, topside ionosphere and surface). We also look at three specific intervals during different phases of the storm when at least two of the satellites are in good local time (LT) conjunction and examine separately Pc3 and Pc4-5 ULF wave activity and its concurrence in the different regions of the magnetosphere and down to the topside ionosphere and on the ground. This work has received support from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no. 284520 for the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project.

  8. Variations of ULF wave power throughout the Halloween 2003 superstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I. A.; Balasis, G.; Papadimitriou, C.; Zesta, E.; Georgiou, M.; Mann, I.

    2013-09-01

    Focused on the exceptional 2003 Halloween geospace magnetic storm, when Dst reached a minimum of -383 nT, we examine data from topside ionosphere and two magnetospheric missions (CHAMP, Cluster, and Geotail) for signatures of ULF waves. We present the overall ULF wave activity through the six-day interval from 27 October to 1 November 2003 as observed by the three spacecraft and by the Andenes ground magnetic station of the IMAGE magnetometer array in terms of time variations of the ULF wave power. The ULF wave activity is divided upon Pc3 and Pc5 wave power. Thus, we provide different ULF wave activity indices according to the wave frequency (Pc3 and Pc5) and location of observation (Earth's magnetosphere, topside ionosphere and surface). We also look at three specific intervals during different phases of the storm when at least two of the satellites are in good local time (LT) conjunction and examine separately Pc3 and Pc4-5 ULF wave activity and its concurrence in the different regions of the magnetosphere and down to the topside ionosphere and on the ground.

  9. Open Ocean and Landfalling Hurricane Directional Wave Spectra from a Scanning Radar Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. Wayne; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The sea surface directional wave spectrum was measured for the first time in all quadrants of a hurricane in open water using the NASA airborne scanning radar altimeter (SRA) carried aboard one of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WP-3D hurricane research aircraft at 1.5 km height. The open-ocean data were acquired on 24 August 1998 when Bonnie, a large category 3 hurricane, was east of the Bahamas and moving about 5 meters per second toward 330. The NOAA aircraft spent over five hours within 180 km of the hurricane Bonnie eye and made five eye penetrations. Individual waves with heights up to 18 m were observed and the spatial variation of the wave field was dramatic. The dominant waves generally propagated at significant angles to the downwind direction. At some positions there were three different wave fields of comparable energy crossing each other. On 26 August 1998, the SRA documented the wave spectrum spatial variation while Bonnie was making landfall near Wilmington, NC.

  10. New wave systems in the "ice-free" future of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, Mikhail; Murawski, Jens; Pohlmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Near "ice-free" future of the Arctic Ocean offers new possibilities for maritime activities. Retreat of the sea ice projected in the climate change scenarios in the coming decades will open new ship routes, which potentially can be much more efficient compared to the present days. Nevertheless, it is currently unknown what kind of wave systems will develop under new ice conditions. We investigate the near future of the Arctic wave climate using new projections of wind and ice conditions from the CMIP5 set of experiments. We use the output (wind and ice data) of an Earth system model (EC-Earth) to force a high-resolution Arctic setup of the wave model WAM. The grid of the WAM was rotated ensuring a free propagation of waves over the North Pole. Model results from the historical (spanning the years 1850-2010) and future projections (for the period of 2010-2100) of Earth's climate will be presented. We investigate the changes in the wave systems of the Arctic Ocean under future sea ice conditions. We show that the region will develop new patterns in wave regimes including the generation of the Arctic swell and the new surfing zones along the coastal line.

  11. Application of the principle of breaking ocean waves to mixing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doman, Michael

    1991-05-01

    Turbulent mixing in the multiphase system of breaking ocean waves and whitecaps is known to play an important role in the mass exchange between ocean and atmosphere. Thus engineering applications to this naturally occurring dynamic exchange process appear to be of interest in various areas of applied mixing technology. Starting from the fact that ocean waves break after having reached their point of instability, a three-dimensional collapsible swivel mechanism (CSM) was developed for simulating by mechanical means the highly dynamic movement of breaking ocean waves. The CSM, employing reversion kinematics of a six-link spatial kinematic chain, has been realized in the construction of a new mixing technology (called swing mixer) that can either move the fluid by the use of mixing tools in a vessel (stirrer principle) or by moving the entire vessel (shaker principle). A first description of swing mixers has recently been given.1 A special characteristic of swing mixers is their three-dimensional reversing motion, the forward and backward paths being nonsuperimposable mirror images of one another. During the mixing process in swing mixers, the efficient mixing principle of repeated stretching and folding2 also takes place in the third dimension. Details of the mixing technology of swing mixers will be discussed together with some suggestions as to how spatial and temporal changes in the concentration may be determined with the help of CCD cameras in a given multiphase system agitated by swing mixers.

  12. Finite frequency P-wave traveltime measurements on ocean bottom seismometers and hydrophones in the western Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekhmistrenko, Maria; Sigloch, Karin; Hosseini, Kasra; Barruol, Guilhem

    2016-04-01

    From 2011 to 2014, the RHUM-RUM project (Reunion Hotspot Upper Mantle - Reunions Unterer Mantel) instrumented a 2000x2000km2 area of Indian Ocean seafloor, islands and Madagascar with broadband seismometers and hydrophones. The central component was a 13-month deployment of 57 German and French Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) in 2300-5600 m depth. This was supplemented by 2-3 year deployments of 37 island stations on Reunion, Mauritius, Rodrigues, the southern Seychelles, the Iles Eparses and southern Madagascar. Two partner projects contributed another 30+ stations on Madagascar. Our ultimate objective is multifrequency waveform tomography of the entire mantle column beneath the Reunion hotspot. Ideally we would use all passbands that efficiently transmit body waves but this meets practical limits in the noise characteristics of ocean-bottom recordings in particular. Here we present the preliminary data set of frequency-dependent P-wave traveltime measurements on seismometers and hydrophones, obtained by cross-correlation of observed with predicted waveforms. The latter are synthesized from fully numerical Green's functions and carefully estimated, broadband source time functions. More than 200 teleseismic events during the 13-month long deployment yielded usable P-waveform measurements. We present our methods and discuss data yield and quality of ocean-bottom versus land seismometers, and of OBS versus broadband hydrophones. Above and below the microseismic noise band, data yields are higher than within it, especially for OBS. The 48 German OBS, equipped with Guralp 60 s sensors, were afflicted by relatively high self-noise compared to the 9 French instruments equipped with Nanometrics Trillium 240 s sensors. The HighTechInc (model HTI-01 and HTI-04-PCA/ULF) hydrophones (100 s corner period) functioned particularly reliably but their waveforms are relatively more challenging to model due to reverberations in the water column. We obtain ~15000 combined cross

  13. Abrupt Cooling and the Oceanic Rossby Wave Observed during CINDY2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiki, A.; Katsumata, M.; Horii, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Richards, K. J.; Yoneyama, K.; Shirooka, R.

    2012-12-01

    Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY 2011) was conducted to capture atmospheric and oceanic characteristics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the central Indian Ocean. During CINDY, the research vessel MIRAI basically stayed at 8°S, 80.5°E from 1 October to 28 November 2011. Intraseasonal convection associated with MJO was organized in the central Indian Ocean twice in late October and late November during the period. In the southern hemisphere, however, it was weak and lagged the northern one by a week in the October and November events, respectively. In the middle of November, both sea surface temperature (SST) and mixed layer temperature decreased suddenly when cold low salinity water intruded in the surface layer around the MIRAI. This intrusion was accompanied by a surface current change from southwestward to northwestward associated with the passage of the downwelling Rossby wave. Advective cooling is shown to play an important role in the heat budget of the mixed layer. This is an interesting result because the associated downwelling Rossby wave is usually considered to increase SST. In addition, the cooling is suggested to suppress the convection, resulting in the lagged convective onset in the south Indian Ocean in late November.

  14. On theories dealing with the interaction of surface waves and ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellor, George

    2016-07-01

    The classic theory for the interaction of surface gravity waves and the general ocean circulation entails the so-called wave radiation stress terms in the phase-averaged momentum equation. The equations of motion are for the combined Eulerian current and Stokes drift. On the other hand, a more recent approach includes the so-called vortex force term in the momentum equation wherein the only wave property is Stokes drift. The equations of motion are for the Eulerian current. The idea has gained traction in the ocean science community, a fact that motivates this paper. A question is: can both theories be correct? This paper answers the question in the negative and presents arguments in favor of the wave radiation theory. The vortex force approach stems from an interesting mathematical construct, but it does stand up to physical or mathematical scrutiny as described in this paper. Although not the primary focus of the paper, some discussion of Langmuir circulation is included since the vortex force was first introduced as the basis of this oceanic cellular phenomenon. Finaly the paper explains the difference in the derivation of the radiation stress theory and the vortex force theory: the later theory entails errors related to its use of curl and reverse-curl [or uncurl] processes.

  15. Seaglider observations of equatorial Indian Ocean Rossby waves associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Benjamin G. M.; Matthews, Adrian J.; Heywood, Karen J.; Kaiser, Jan; Schmidtko, Sunke

    2014-06-01

    During the CINDY-DYNAMO field campaign of September 2011-January 2012, a Seaglider was deployed at 80°E and completed 10 north-south sections between 3 and 4°S, measuring temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen concentration, and chlorophyll fluorescence. These high-resolution subsurface observations provide insight into equatorial ocean Rossby wave activity forced by three Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) events during this time period. These Rossby waves generate variability in temperature O(1°C), salinity O(0.2 g kg-1), density O(0.2 kg m-3), and oxygen concentration O(10 μmol kg-1), associated with 10 m vertical displacements of the thermocline. The variability extends down to 1000 m, the greatest depth of the Seaglider observations, highlighting the importance of surface forcing for the deep equatorial ocean. The temperature variability observed by the Seaglider is greater than that simulated in the ECCO-JPL reanalysis, especially at depth. There is also marked variability in chlorophyll fluorescence at the surface and at the depth of the chlorophyll maximum. Upwelling from Rossby waves and local wind stress curl leads to an enhanced shoaling of the chlorophyll maximum by 10-25 m in response to the increased availability of nutrients and light. This influence of the MJO on primary production via equatorial ocean Rossby waves has not previously been recognized.

  16. Simultaneous Ocean Wave Measurements by the JASON and TOPEX Satellites, With Buoy and Model Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. D.; Beckley, B. D.

    2003-01-01

    The verification phase of the Jason-1 satellite altimeter mission presents a unique opportunity for comparing near-simultaneous, independent satellite measurements. We here examine simultaneous significant wave height measurements by the Jason-1 and Topex/Poseidon altimeters. These data are also compared with in-situ measurements from deep-ocean buoys and with predicted wave heights from the WaveWatch 111 operational model. The rms difference between Jason and Topex wave heights is 28 cm, and this can be lowered by half through improved outlier editing and filtering of high-frequency noise. Noise is slightly larger in the Jason dataset, exceeding Topex by about 7 cm rms at frequencies above 0.05 Hz, which is the frequency at which the coherence between Topex and Jason measurements drops to zero. Jason wave heights are more prone to outliers, especially during periods of moderate to high backscatter. Buoy comparisons confirm previous reports that Topex wave heights are roughly 5% smaller than buoy measurements for waves between 2 and 5m; Jason heights in general are 3% smaller than Topex. Spurious dips in the Topex density function for 3- and 6-meter waves, a problem that has existed since the beginning of the mission, can be solved by waveform retracking.

  17. Simultaneous Ocean Wave Measurements by the Jason and Topex Satellites, With Buoy and Model Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Beckley, B. D.

    2003-01-01

    The verification phase of the Jason-1 satellite altimeter mission presents a unique opportunity for comparing near-simultaneous, independent satellite measurements. We here examine simultaneous significant wave height measurements by the Jason-1 and Topex/Poseidon altimeters. These data are also compared with in-situ measurements from deep-ocean buoys and with predicted wave heights from the Wave Watch 111 operational model. The rms difference between Jason and Topex wave heights is 21 cm, and this can be further lowered by application of median filters to reduce high-frequency noise. This noise is slightly larger in the Jason dataset, amounting to about 7 cm rms for frequencies above 0.05 Hz, which is the frequency at which the coherence between Topex and Jason measurements drops to zero. The probability density function for Jason shows a dearth of small waves relative to Topex. Buoy comparisons confirm that this problem lies with the Jason measurements. The buoy comparisons confirm previous reports that Topex wave heights are roughly 5% smaller than buoy measurements for waves between 2 and 5m; Jason heights in general are 2.7% smaller than Topex. Spurious dips in the Topex density function for 3- and 6-meter waves, a problem that has existed since the beginning of the mission, can be solved by waveform retracking..

  18. Abrupt cooling associated with the oceanic Rossby wave and lateral advection during CINDY2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiki, Ayako; Katsumata, Masaki; Horii, Takanori; Hasegawa, Takuya; Richards, Kelvin J.; Yoneyama, Kunio; Shirooka, Ryuichi

    2013-10-01

    The cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY2011) was conducted to capture atmospheric and oceanic characteristics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the central Indian Ocean from late 2011 to early 2012. During CINDY2011, the research vessel (R/V) MIRAI stayed at 8°S, 80.5°E for two months during the special observing period (SOP). Intraseasonal convection associated with the MJO was organized in the central Indian Ocean in late October and late November during the SOP. In the middle of November, both sea surface temperature (SST) and mixed layer temperature decreased suddenly when cold low salinity water intruded into the upper layer around the R/V MIRAI. This intrusion was accompanied by a surface current change from southwestward to westward/west-northwestward associated with the passage of the annual oceanic downwelling Rossby wave. The mixed layer heat budget analysis shows that horizontal advection plays an important role in the abrupt cooling whereas the net surface heat flux cannot account for the cooling. This is an interesting result because the associated downwelling Rossby wave is usually considered to increase SST through a reduction of entrainment cooling. In addition, for the second MJO event convection was activated around 20 November over the central north and equatorial Indian Ocean but not in the south. It is suggested that the cooler surface waters (as seen at the location of the R/V MIRAI) tended to suppress the initial atmospheric convection, resulting in the lagged convective onset in the end of November over the central south Indian Ocean.

  19. Magnetic power spectrum of the ocean crust on large scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Michael S.; Parker, Robert L.; Constable, Catherine G.

    1999-12-01

    The geomagnetic power spectrum Rl is the squared magnetic field in each spherical harmonic degree averaged over a spherical surface. Satellite measurements have given reliable estimates of the spectrum for the part that originates in the core, but above l = 15, where the geomagnetic field arises primarily from crustal magnetization, there is considerable disagreement between various estimates derived from observation. Furthermore, several theoretical models for the spectrum disagree with each other and the data. We have examined observations from a different source, 5000-km-long Project Magnet aeromagnetic survey lines; we make new estimates of the spectrum which overlap with the wavelength interval accessible to the satellites. The usual way the spectrum is derived from observation is to construct a large spherical harmonic decomposition first, then square, weight, and add the Gauss coefficients in each degree, but this method cannot be applied to isolated flight lines. Instead, we apply a statistical technique based on an idea of McLeod and Coleman which relates the geomagnetic spectrum to the power and cross spectra of magnetic field components measured on the survey lines. Power spectra from the 17 aeromagnetic surveys, all of which were conducted over the oceans, are averaged together to improve geographic coverage and reduce variance, and the average spectra are then inverted for the geomagnetic spectrum Rl. Like most of the theoretical models, our spectrum exhibits a maximum, but at a wavelength of 100 km, about a factor of 2 smaller than the closest theoretical prediction. Our spectrum agrees quite well with the most recent estimates based on satellite observations in the range 20≤l≤50, but above l = 50, our values increase slowly, while all the satellite data suggest a sharply rising curve. In this wavelength range we believe our measurements are more trustworthy. Further work is planned to confirm the accuracy of our spectrum when continental survey

  20. Reactive power in the full Gaussian light wave.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, S R

    2009-11-01

    The electric current sources that are required for the excitation of the fundamental Gaussian beam and the corresponding full Gaussian light wave are determined. The current sources are situated on the secondary source plane that forms the boundary between the two half-spaces in which the waves are launched. The electromagnetic fields and the complex power generated by the current sources are evaluated. For the fundamental Gaussian beam, the reactive power vanishes, and the normalization is chosen such that the real power is 2 W. The various full Gaussian waves are identified by the length parameter b(t) that lies in the range 0 < or = b(t) < or = b, where b is the Rayleigh distance. The other parameters are the wavenumber k, the free-space wavelength lambda, and the beam waist w0 at the input plane. The dependence of the real power of the full Gaussian light wave on b(t)/b and w0/lambda is examined. For a specified w0/lambda, the reactive power, which can be positive or negative, increases as b(t)/b is increased from 0 to 1 and becomes infinite for b(t)/b=1. For a specified b(t)/b, the reactive power approaches zero as kw0 is increased and reaches the limiting value of zero of the paraxial beam.

  1. Location of high-frequency P wave microseismic noise in the Pacific Ocean using multiple small aperture arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Pyle, Moira L.; Koper, Keith D.; Euler, Garrett G.; Burlacu, Relu

    2015-04-20

    We investigate source locations of P-wave microseisms within a narrow frequency band (0.67–1.33 Hz) that is significantly higher than the classic microseism band (~0.05–0.3 Hz). Employing a backprojection method, we analyze data recorded during January 2010 from five International Monitoring System arrays that border the Pacific Ocean. We develop a ranking scheme that allows us to combine beam power from multiple arrays to obtain robust locations of the microseisms. Some individual arrays exhibit a strong regional component, but results from the combination of all arrays show high-frequency P wave energy emanating from the North Pacific basin, in general agreement withmore » previous observations in the double-frequency (DF) microseism band (~0.1–0.3 Hz). This suggests that the North Pacific source of ambient P noise covers a broad range of frequencies and that the wave-wave interaction model is likely valid at shorter periods.« less

  2. 77 FR 5791 - Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC; Notice of Staff Participation in Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC; Notice of Staff Participation in... representatives from Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's... environmental assessment issued on January 4, 2012, for the Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Project No. 12711....

  3. 76 FR 18750 - Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC; Notice of Change in Docket Number

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC; Notice of Change in Docket Number On July 24, 2009, Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (ORPC) filed a draft hydrokinetic pilot license application (DLA) for the proposed Eastport Tidal Energy Project, a proposal that unified two...

  4. Mm-wave power meter mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, D. L.; Oltmans, D. A.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1968-01-01

    E-band thermistor mount and a technique for adjusting a temperature compensating thermistor to provide an electrically balanced bridge are used for measuring RF power in the mm-wavelength. The mount is relatively insensitive to temperature effects that cause measurement errors in single ended circuits.

  5. Power and polarization monitor development for high power millimeter-wave

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, R. Kobayashi, K.; Kubo, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Mutoh, T.

    2014-11-15

    A new type monitor of power and polarization states of millimeter-waves has been developed to be installed at a miter-bend, which is a part of transmission lines of millimeter-waves, for electron cyclotron resonance heating on the Large Helical Device. The monitor measures amplitudes and phase difference of the electric field of the two orthogonal polarizations which are needed for calculation of the power and polarization states of waves. The power and phase differences of two orthogonal polarizations were successfully detected simultaneously.

  6. Power and polarization monitor development for high power millimeter-wave.

    PubMed

    Makino, R; Kubo, S; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, S; Shimozuma, T; Yoshimura, Y; Igami, H; Takahashi, H; Mutoh, T

    2014-11-01

    A new type monitor of power and polarization states of millimeter-waves has been developed to be installed at a miter-bend, which is a part of transmission lines of millimeter-waves, for electron cyclotron resonance heating on the Large Helical Device. The monitor measures amplitudes and phase difference of the electric field of the two orthogonal polarizations which are needed for calculation of the power and polarization states of waves. The power and phase differences of two orthogonal polarizations were successfully detected simultaneously.

  7. A model for the probability density function of downwelling irradiance under ocean waves.

    PubMed

    Shen, Meng; Xu, Zao; Yue, Dick K P

    2011-08-29

    We present a statistical model that analytically quantifies the probability density function (PDF) of the downwelling light irradiance under random ocean waves modeling the surface as independent and identically distributed flat facets. The model can incorporate the separate effects of surface short waves and volume light scattering. The theoretical model captures the characteristics of the PDF, from skewed to near-Gaussian shape as the depth increases from shallow to deep water. The model obtains a closed-form asymptotic for the probability that diminishes at a rate between exponential and Gaussian with increasing extreme values. The model is validated by comparisons with existing field measurements and Monte Carlo simulation.

  8. Development of a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami, sea waves, ocean bottom crustal deformation and atmospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Teruyuki; Terada, Yukihiro; Nagai, Toshihiko; Koshimura, Shun'ichi

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami for over 12 years. The idea was that a buoy equipped with a GPS antenna and placed offshore may be an effective way of monitoring tsunami before its arrival to the coast and to give warning to the coastal residents. The key technology for the system is real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS technology. We have successfully developed the system; we have detected tsunamis of about 10cm in height for three large earthquakes, namely, the 23 June 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.4), the 26 September 2003 Tokachi earthquake (Mw8.3) and the 5 September 2004 earthquake (Mw7.4). The developed GPS buoy system is also capable of monitoring sea waves that are mainly caused by winds. Only the difference between tsunami and sea waves is their frequency range and can be segregated each other by a simple filtering technique. Given the success of GPS buoy experiments, the system has been adopted as a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information system for Port and HArborS (NOWPHAS) by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism of Japan. They have established more than eight GPS buoys along the Japanese coasts and the system has been operated by the Port and Airport Research Institute. As a future scope, we are now planning to implement some other additional facilities for the GPS buoy system. The first application is a so-called GPS/Acoustic system for monitoring ocean bottom crustal deformation. The system requires acoustic waves to detect ocean bottom reference position, which is the geometrical center of an array of transponders, by measuring distances between a position at the sea surface (vessel) and ocean bottom equipments to return the received sonic wave. The position of the vessel is measured using GPS. The system was first proposed by a research group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in early 1980's. The system was extensively developed by Japanese researchers and is now capable of detecting ocean

  9. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Paul T; Hagerman, George; Scott, George

    2011-12-01

    This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables wave diffraction to substantially reestablish wave power densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available wave energy resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge, based on accumulating unit circle wave power densities, is estimated to be 2,640 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 590 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 240 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 80 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 1570 TWh/yr for Alaska, 130 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 30 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico. The total recoverable wave energy resource, as constrained by an array capacity packing density of 15 megawatts per kilometer of coastline, with a 100-fold operating range between threshold and maximum operating conditions in terms of input wave power density available to such arrays, yields a total recoverable resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge of 1,170 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 250 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 160 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 60 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 620 TWh/yr for Alaska, 80 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 20 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico.

  10. Size distribution of oceanic air bubbles entrained in sea-water by wave-breaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, F.; Avellan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The size of oceanic air bubbles produced by whitecaps and wave-breaking is determined. The production of liquid aerosols at the sea surface is predicted. These liquid aerosols are at the origin of most of the particulate materials exchanged between the ocean and the atmosphere. A prototype was designed and built using an optical technique based on the principle of light scattering at an angle of ninety degrees from the incident light beam. The output voltage is a direct function of the bubble diameter. Calibration of the probe was carried out within a range of 300 microns to 1.2 mm. Bubbles produced by wave-breaking in a large air-sea interaction simulating facility. Experimental results are given in the form of size spectrum.

  11. Coaxial extraction of RF power from a traveling wave amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.; Kerslick, G.S.; Nation, J.A.; Schaecter, L.

    1996-12-31

    The authors present new results from a high-power relativistic traveling wave tube amplifier experiment in which the RF power is extracted in a coaxial output section. The amplifier consists of two slow-wave structures separated by a resistive sever. The first stage imparts a small modulation to the beam. The second stage consists of an iris-loaded circular waveguide which is tapered from both ends by an adiabatic increase in the iris aperture with each successive period. The periodic length and the external cavity radius are kept constant. This provides a low-reflection transition from the slow-wave structure to the empty circular waveguide. A coaxial inner conductor is inserted into the output tapered section of the slow-wave structure and its` position and radius chosen to minimize reflections and maximize extracted RF power. It is shown both experimentally and through MAGIC simulations that a fairly low reflection circular TM{sub 01} to coaxial TEM mode transition can be made this way. Any small reflections form the output end travel backwards and are absorbed in the sever. In contrast to the traditional transverse extraction of power into a rectangular waveguide, the coaxial extraction is fairly broadband and exhibits much lower sensitivity to dimensions. The beam is dumped through an aperture in the inner conductor. Presently, the power is extracted into the coaxial waveguide and absorbed into a tapered resistive load. This will be later converted to the TE{sub 10} mode of a rectangular waveguide.

  12. Altimetry, Sea Surface Temperature and Ocean Colour Unveil the Effects of Planetary Waves on Phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollini, P.

    2006-07-01

    In the present paper w e discuss the manifestation of planetary w aves in sea surface temper atur e (SST) and ocean co lour, and the insigh t that can be gain ed by comparing those observations w ith altimetry. We focus in particular on the discovery of planetary waves in ocean co lour, which implies some eff ects of the wav es on phytoplankton. A critical assessment of the v arious mech anisms th at may be r esponsib le for th e formation of a signal in ocean colour h ighligh ts the importan t role played by horizon tal adv ection of phytoplankton. However, v ertical mechanisms su ch as upw elling of nutrien ts cannot b e ruled out comp letely at this stage, and there remains ample scope for a systematic global study of th e w ave signature in h eigh t, colour and SST.

  13. Impact of atmospheric convectively coupled equatorial Kelvin waves on upper ocean variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, Dariusz B.; Flatau, Maria K.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Matthews, Adrian J.

    2016-03-01

    Convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) are atmospheric weather systems that propagate eastward along the equatorial wave guide with phase speeds between 11 and 14 m s-1. They are an important constituent of the convective envelope of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), for which ocean-atmosphere interactions play a vital role. Hence, ocean-atmosphere interactions within CCKWs may be important for MJO development and prediction and for tropical climate, in general. Although the atmospheric structure of CCKWs has been well studied, their impact on the underlying ocean is unknown. In this paper, the ocean-atmosphere interactions in CCKWs are investigated by a case study from November 2011 during the CINDY/DYNAMO field experiment, using in situ oceanographic measurements from an ocean glider. The analysis is then extended to a 15 year period using precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission and surface fluxes from the TropFlux analysis. A methodology is developed to calculate trajectories of CCKWs. CCKW events are strongly controlled by the MJO, with twice as many CCKWs observed during the convectively active phase of the MJO compared to the suppressed phase. Coherent ocean-atmosphere interaction is observed during the passage of a CCKW, which lasts approximately 4 days at any given longitude. Surface wind speed and latent heat flux are enhanced, leading to a transient suppression of the diurnal cycle of sea surface temperature (SST) and a sustained decrease in bulk SST of 0.1°C. Given that a typical composite mean MJO SST anomaly is of the order of 0.3°C, and more than one CCKW can occur during the active phase of a single MJO event, the oceanographic impact of CCKWs is of major importance to the MJO cycle.

  14. Wave power variability and trends across the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromirski, Peter D.; Cayan, Daniel R.; Helly, John; Wittmann, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Multiyear climate variations influence North Pacific storm intensity and resultant variations in wave energy levels. The timing of these decadal fluctuations and strong El Niño's have had a strong influence on long-term trends. Here we investigate variations in the North Pacific wave power, PW, determined from WAVEWATCH III (WW3) wave model significant wave height, Hs, and peak period data forced by NRA-1 winds spanning the 1948-2008 epoch. Over the entire hindcast, upward trends in Hs and PW, especially in winter, are observed over much of the North Pacific, strongly influenced by an apparent storm intensification after the mid-1970s regime shift. Heightened PW is concentrated in particular regions of the basin, and is associated with increased wave activity during the warm phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Wave power events, PE, defined as episodes when Hs exceeded the 90th percentile threshold for at least 12 h, exhibit significant upward trends along much of the U.S. Pacific coast during winter months. Importantly, the hindcast exhibits a recent decrease in PW across much of the North Pacific, in contrast to the long-term increase of PW and Hs. This recent decrease is associated with the prevalent PDO cool phase that developed after the late 1990s. Variability and intensification of coastal PW and PE have important practical implications for shoreline and beach erosion, coastal wetlands inundation, storm-surge flooding, and coastal planning. These considerations will become increasingly important as sea level rises.

  15. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhiche, Mike; Dufera, Hiz; Montagna, Deb

    2012-10-29

    The project conducted under DOE contract DE‐EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven‐stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling‐up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke‐ unlimited Power Take‐Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

  16. Constructing the frequency and wave normal distribution of whistler-mode wave power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, C. E. J.; Degeling, A. W.; Rankin, R.

    2013-05-01

    We introduce a new methodology that allows the construction of wave frequency distributions due to growing incoherent whistler-mode waves in the magnetosphere. The technique combines the equations of geometric optics (i.e., raytracing) with the equation of transfer of radiation in an anisotropic lossy medium to obtain spectral energy density as a function of frequency and wavenormal angle. We describe the method in detail and then demonstrate how it could be used in an idealized magnetosphere during quiet geomagnetic conditions. For a specific set of plasma conditions, we predict that the wave power peaks off the equator at ˜15° magnetic latitude. The new calculations predict that wave power as a function of frequency can be adequately described using a Gaussian function, but as a function of wavenormal angle, it more closely resembles a skew normal distribution. The technique described in this paper is the first known estimate of the parallel and oblique incoherent wave spectrum as a result of growing whistler-mode waves and provides a means to incorporate self-consistent wave-particle interactions in a kinetic model of the magnetosphere over a large volume.

  17. Repulsive magnetic levitation-based ocean wave energy harvester with variable resonance: Modeling, simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Masoud; Wang, Ya

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates a magnetic levitation characteristic used in a vibration based energy harvester, called repulsive magnetic scavenger (RMS). The RMS is capable of harvesting ocean wave energy with a unique repelling permanent magnet array, which provides a stronger and more uniform magnetic field, compared to its attracting magnetic counterparts. The levitating magnets are stacked together around a threaded rod so that the same pole is facing each other. Two fixed magnets placed with one at each end of the RMS provides a collocated harvesting and braking mechanism in the face of high amplitude vibrations. Magnets in the levitated magnet stack are separated by pole pieces which are made of metals to intensify the magnetic field strength. The effect of the thickness and the use of different materials with different permeability for pole pieces is also studied to obtain an optimal energy harvesting efficiency. Moreover, the procedure to find the restoring force applied to the levitating magnet stack is demonstrated. Then, the Duffing vibration equation of the harvester is solved and the frequency response function is calculated for various force amplitudes and electrical damping so as to investigate the effect of these parameters on the response of the system. Furthermore, the effect of the maximum displacement of the moving magnet stack on the natural frequency of the device is studied. And finally, Faraday's law is employed to estimate the output voltage and power of the system under the specified input excitation force. Experiments show that the output emf voltage of the manufactured prototype reaches up to 42 V for an excitation force with the frequency of 9 Hz and the maximum amplitude of 3.4 g.

  18. A 3D MPI-Parallel GPU-accelerated framework for simulating ocean wave energy converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    We present an MPI-parallel GPU-accelerated computational framework for studying the interaction between ocean waves and wave energy converters (WECs). The computational framework captures the viscous effects, nonlinear fluid-structure interaction (FSI), and breaking of waves around the structure, which cannot be captured in many potential flow solvers commonly used for WEC simulations. The full Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the two-step projection method, which is accelerated by porting the pressure Poisson equation to GPUs. The FSI is captured using the numerically stable fictitious domain method. A novel three-phase interface reconstruction algorithm is used to resolve three phases in a VOF-PLIC context. A consistent mass and momentum transport approach enables simulations at high density ratios. The accuracy of the overall framework is demonstrated via an array of test cases. Numerical simulations of the interaction between ocean waves and WECs are presented. Funding from the National Science Foundation CBET-1236462 grant is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Calving Signature in Ocean Waves: Helheim Glacier and Sermilik Fjord Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vankova, I.; Holland, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the characteristics of calving on Helheim glacier from data recorded on an array of five high frequency pressure meters placed along Sermilik fjord. Calving generated tsunami waves were recorded and used to construct a calving event catalog and to characterize the post-calving ocean state. Calving on Helheim is highly seasonal: it onsets after months of inactivity in early spring, immediately following the rise of daily average temperatures above freezing point, which indicates the potentially dominant role of meltwater in the calving mechanism. Tidal phase and amplitude, ocean temperature variations or surges did not seem to be significant calving factors. In the ocean spectra, we observe discrete peaks between 0.4 to 6 mHz associated with calving events. These peak frequencies are consistent among all the events and they travel as propagating modes up and down the fjord for several hours while being slowly radiated away to the open ocean, an observation which we support with a model. Large part of the spectrum is trapped in evanescent modes or is quickly dissipated. These observations are relevant for our understanding of the time scale and rate of mixing in glacier fjords, and eventually for improving boundary conditions for ocean models.

  20. Antarctic Circumpolar Wave dynamics in a simplified ocean- atmosphere coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maze, G.; D'Andrea, F.; Colin de Verdiere, A.

    2004-12-01

    The Antarctic Circumpolar Wave (ACW) is one of the main pattern of variability in the Ocean-Atmosphere system in the southern Hemisphere extratropics. It involves sea surface temperature (SST), sea level pressure (SLP) and other variables, and consists of a wave train of zonal number 2, travelling around Antarctica at the speed of 6-8 cm s-1, hence taking around 8 years to complete a circle. A fundamental feature of this observed pattern is that anomalies are eastward propagating and seem to be phase locked: for example SST and SLP are in quadrature (high downstream of warm SST). Nevertheless the atmospheric part of the wave has been questioned by some observational studies. Different analytical and numerical studies have veen proposed, but a convincing theoretical explanation for the ACW is still missing. In this work we study the ACW as simulated by a simple dynamical model, in order to determine the basic physical processes that characterize it. The model used is an atmospheric quasi-geostrophic tridimensional model coupled to an ocean "slab" mixed layer, which includes mean geostrophic advection by the antarctic circumpolar current (ACC). The atmosphere-ocean coupling is obtained via surface sensible heat fluxes. We analyse three configuration of the model, a "passive ocean" one, where the ocean responds to the atmopheric forcing but does not feeds back to the atmosphere; a "passive atmosphere" one, where the stationary reponse of the atmosphere to prescribed SST anomalies; and a fully coupled one. The two forced experiment show separately a positive feedback in the coupled system.The passive ocean experiment shows an ACW-type low frequency variability in the ocean, ie a propagating SST anomaly with 4 years period. SSTa amplitude created were around 0.5C wich is less than observed anomalies (1.5oC). This means that the stochastic focing of the atmosphere is sufficient to substain a variability of the SST whose periodicity is set by the mean advection

  1. Tsunami Wave Analysis and Possibility of Splay Fault Rupture During the 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeDontney, Nora; Rice, James R.

    2012-10-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was observed by two satellites, close in space and time, that traversed the Indian Ocean 2 h after the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, but which observed different tsunami lead wave morphologies. The earlier satellite, Jason-1, recorded a lead wave with two peaks of similar amplitude and wavelength, while the later satellite, TOPEX/Poseidon, recorded a lead wave with only one longer wavelength uplift. To resolve this disparity, we examine the travel paths of long wavelength waves over the seafloor bathymetry. Waves traveling from the margin will traverse significantly different paths to arrive at the two satellite transects. The result is that the satellites are sensitive to different parts of the margin; Jason-1 is highly sensitive to the margin in the area of the epicenter, while TOPEX is sensitive to a more northerly section. By developing solutions of the ocean gravity wave equations, accounting for dispersion, we show that the double peak of the Jason-1 satellite observations are consistent with coseismic rupture of a splay fault of limited along-strike extent, located north of Simeulue Island. The doubly peaked morphology can be reproduced with co-activation of the subduction zone interface and the splay fault, which creates a seafloor uplift pattern with two distinct areas of uplift. The Jason-1 satellite is sensitive to a splay fault in this portion of the margin, whereas the TOPEX satellite would not be significantly affected by this uplift pattern. By back-projecting satellite observation points to the margin, we constrain the location of the proposed splay fault and find that it correlates with a bathymetric high. The aftershock locations, uplift of corals on Simeulue Island and a fault scarp on Pulau Salaut Besar are also consistent with the activation of a splay fault in the area delimited by the back-projection. Our work also shows that it is critical to fully capture gravity wave dispersion in order to represent features of

  2. Investigation of Hurricane Ivan Using the Three-Way Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambon, J. B.; He, R.; Warner, J. C.; Armstrong, B. N.

    2010-12-01

    We utilized the newly developed Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system to understand the dynamic couplings of the ocean, atmosphere, and wave during Hurricane Ivan (2004). The COAWST system consists of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) ocean model, and the Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) wave model. COAWST utilizes the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT) to exchange fields of sea surface temperature, ocean currents, water levels, bathymetry, wave heights, wave lengths, wave periods, bottom orbital velocities, and atmosphere radiation fluxes, winds, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, precipitation, and cloud cover between the models. Data field exchanges are regridded using sparse matrix interpolation with weights from the Spherical Coordinate Remapping and Interpolation Package (SCRIP). The passage of Hurricane Ivan (2004) across the Gulf of Mexico provides a realistic, but extreme scenario in which a number of important dynamical interactions between the tropical cyclone (TC) and ocean are present. These interactions are examined by using several different sea state conditions and enabling or disabling features of both uncoupled and coupled models. Improvement is sought in initial conditions that are based on a coarse, half-degree GFS operational analysis resulting in a TC initialized with a weak intensity. The latest techniques in variational data assimilation and model ensembles are used to improve the gap in initial intensity. Hurricane Ivan’s simulated track and intensity, its effect on the 3-dimensional ocean states, and comparisons with in-situ observations will be presented. We find that using a coupled numerical model results in accurate representation of the three-dimensional ocean, atmosphere, and wave environments. Examining this coupling is critical for TC hindcast and forecast applications of the coastal environment.

  3. Instability observations associated with wave breaking in the stable-stratified deep-ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haren, Hans

    2015-02-01

    High-resolution temperature observations above underwater topography in the deep, stably stratified ocean have revealed two distinctive turbulence processes. These processes are associated with different phases of a large-scale (here tidal) internal gravity wave: (i) highly nonlinear turbulent bores during the upslope propagating phase, and (ii) Kelvin-Helmholtz billows, at some distance above the slope, during the downslope phase. Whilst the former may be associated in part with convective turbulent overturning following Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities 'RTi', the latter is mainly related to shear-induced Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. In this paper, details are particularly presented of rare (convective) RTi penetrating stable density stratification under high-frequency internal waves. Such 'apparent RTi' can be explained using both stability parameterization of entrainment across a density interface, and, more relevant here, internal wave acceleration overcoming the reduced gravity.

  4. Transformation of apparent ocean wave spectra observed from an aircraft sensor platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    The problem considered was transformation of a unidirectional apparent ocean wave spectrum observed from an aircraft sensor platform into the true spectrum that would be observed from a stationary platform. Spectral transformation equations were developed in terms of the linear wave dispersion relationship and the wave group speed. An iterative solution to the equations was outlined and used to transform reference theoretical apparent spectra for several assumed values of average water depth. Results show that changing the average water depth leads to a redistribution of energy density among the various frequency bands of the transformed spectrum. This redistribution is most severe when much of the energy density is expected, a priori, to reside at relatively low true frequencies.

  5. Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Modeling of Tropical Cyclones: Progress, Challenges, and Ways Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuyi

    2015-04-01

    It has long been recognized that air-sea interaction plays an important role in tropical cyclones (TC) intensity change. However, most current numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are deficient in predicting TC intensity. The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in TCs push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. Parameterizations of air-sea fluxes in NWP models are often crude and create "manmade" energy source/sink that does not exist, especially in the absence of a fully interactive ocean in the model. The erroneous surface heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes can cause compounding errors in the model (e.g., precipitation, water vapor, boundary layer properties). The energy source (heat and moisture fluxes from the ocean) and sink (surface friction and wind-induced upper ocean cooling) are critical to TC intensity. However, observations of air-sea fluxes in TCs are very limited, especially in extreme high wind conditions underneath of the eyewall region. The Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST) program was designed to better understand the air-sea interaction, especially in high wind conditions, which included laboratory and coupled model experiments and field campaign in 2003-04 hurricane seasons. Significant progress has been made in better understanding of air-sea exchange coefficients up to 30 m/s, i.e., a leveling off in drag coefficient and relatively invariant exchange coefficient of enthalpy with wind speed. More recently, the Impact of Typhoon on the Ocean in the Pacific (ITOP) field campaign in 2010 has provided an unprecedented data set to study the air-sea fluxes in TCs and their impact on TC structure and intensity. More than 800 GPS dropsondes and 900 AXBTs/AXCTs as well as drifters, floats, and moorings were deployed in TCs, including Typhoons Fanapi and Malakas, and Supertyphoon Megi with a record peak wind speed of more than 80 m

  6. Verification results for the Spectral Ocean Wave Model (SOWM) by means of significant wave height measurements made by the GEOS-3 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J.; Salfi, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Significant wave heights estimated from the shape of the return pulse wave form of the altimeter on GEOS-3 for forty-four orbit segments obtained during 1975 and 1976 are compared with the significant wave heights specified by the spectral ocean wave model (SOWM), which is the presently operational numerical wave forecasting model at the Fleet Numerical Weather Central. Except for a number of orbit segments with poor agreement and larger errors, the SOWM specifications tended to be biased from 0.5 to 1.0 meters too low and to have RMS errors of 1.0 to 1.4 meters. The much fewer larger errors can be attributed to poor wind data for some parts of the Northern Hemisphere oceans. The bias can be attributed to the somewhat too light winds used to generate the waves in the model. Other sources of error are identified in the equatorial and trade wind areas.

  7. On the influence of ocean waves on simulated GNSS-R delay-doppler maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarizia, M. P.; di Bisceglie, M.; Galdi, C.; Gommenginger, C.; Srokosz, M.

    2012-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflectometry (GNSS-R), is an established technique that exploits GNSS signals of opportunity reflected from the surface of the ocean, to look primarily at the ocean surface roughness. The strength of this technique, and the primary motivation to carry it forward, is in the fact that GNSS signals are available globally, all the time and over the long term, and could help dramatically improve the monitoring of ocean wind and waves. GNSS-R offers the prospect of high density global measurements of directional sea surface roughness, which are essential for scientific purposes (i.e. quantifying the air-sea exchanges of gases), operational weather and ocean forecasting (i.e. prediction of high winds, dangerous sea states, risk of flooding and storm surges) and to support important climate-relevant Earth Observation techniques (IR SST, or surface salinity retrieval). The retrieval of ocean roughness from GNSS-R data has now been demonstrated with a reasonable level of accuracy from both airborne [1] and spaceborne [2] platforms. In both cases, Directional Mean Square Slopes (DMSS) of the ocean surface have been retrieved from GNSS-R data, in the form of Delay-Doppler Maps (DDMs), using an established theoretical scattering model by Zavorotny and Voronovich (Z-V) [3]. The need for a better assessment of the way the ocean waves influence the scattering of GPS signals has recently led to a different approach, consisting of simulating the scattering of such signals, using a more sophisticated large-scale scattering model than Z-V, and explicit simulations of realistic seas. Initial results produced from these simulations have been recently published in [4], where the emphasis has been put on the effects of different sea states on Radar Cross Section (RCS) and Polarization Ratio (PR) in space domain. Linear wind wave surfaces have been simulated using the Elfouhaily wind wave spectrum [5], for different wind speeds and directions, and with

  8. Numerical simulation of Typhoon Muifa (2011) using a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Ling, Tiejun; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yunfei; Gao, Zhiyi; Wang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    The newly developed Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System is applied to investigate typhoon-ocean interactions in this study. The COAWST modeling system represents the state-of-the-art numerical simulation technique comprising several coupled models to study coastal and environmental processes. The modeling system is applied to simulate Typhoon Muifa (2011), which strengthened from a tropical storm to a super typhoon in the Northwestern Pacific, to explore the heat fluxes exchanged among the processes simulated using the atmosphere model WRF, ocean model ROMS and wave model SWAN. These three models adopted the same horizontal grid. Three numerical experiments with different coupling configurations are performed in order to investigate the impact of typhoon-ocean interaction on the intensity and ocean response to typhoon. The simulated typhoon tracks and intensities agree with observations. Comparisons of the simulated variables with available atmospheric and oceanic observations show the good performance of using the coupled modeling system for simulating the ocean and atmosphere processes during a typhoon event. The fully coupled simulation that includes a ocean model identifies a decreased SST as a result of the typhoon-forced entrainment. Typhoon intensity and wind speed are reduced due to the decrease of the sea surface temperature when using a coupled ocean model. The experiments with ocean coupled to atmosphere also results in decreased sea surface heat flux and air temperature. The heat flux decreases by about 29% compared to the WRF only case. The reduction of the energy induced by SST decreases, resulting in weakening of the typhoon. Coupling of the waves to the atmosphere and ocean model induces a slight increase of SST in the typhoon center area with the ocean-atmosphere interaction increased as a result of wave feedback to atmosphere.

  9. Rapid Hurricane Intensity Change: Results using High-Resolution Fully Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    2008-12-01

    The extreme active Atlantic hurricane seasons in recent years have highlighted the urgent need for a better understanding of the factors that contribute to rapid hurricane intensity and for development of the corresponding advanced hurricane prediction models to improve intensity forecasts. The lack of skill in present forecasts of hurricane structure and intensity may be attributed in part to deficiencies in the current prediction models: insufficient grid resolution, inadequate surface and boundary layer formulations, and the lack of full coupling to a dynamic ocean. The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The recent modeling effort at the University of Miami is to develop and test a fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system (UMCM) that is capable of resolving the eye and eyewall in a hurricane at ~1 km grid resolution. The new challenges for these very high resolution models are the corresponding physical representations at 1-km scale, including microphysics, sub-grid turbulence parameterization, atmospheric boundary layer, physical processes at the air-sea interface with surface waves among others. The lack of accurate initial conditions for high-resolution hurricane modeling presents another major challenge. Improvements in initial conditions rest on the use of airborne and remotely sensed observations (e.g., QuikSCAT and other satellite data) in high-resolution assimilation systems and on the application of advanced assimilation schemes to hurricanes. This study aimed to provide an overview of these new challenges using high-resolution coupled model simulations of hurricanes in 2003-2008. Several cases were observed extensively by two recent field programs, namely, the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST)-Hurricane in 2003-2004 and the Hurricane Rainbands and Intensity Change

  10. Delta wave power: an independent sleep phenotype or epiphenomenon?

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher J; Clinton, James M; Jewett, Kathryn A; Zielinski, Mark R; Krueger, James M

    2011-10-15

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) δ waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) after sleep deprivation are enhanced. That observation eventually led to the use of EEG δ power as a parameter to model process S in the two-process model of sleep. It works remarkably well as a model parameter because it often co-varies with sleep duration and intensity. Nevertheless there is a large volume of literature indicating that EEG δ power is regulated independently of sleep duration. For example, high amplitude EEG δ waves occur in wakefulness after systemic atropine administration or after hyperventilation in children. Human neonates have periods of sleep with an almost flat EEG. Similarly, elderly people have reduced EEG δ power, yet retain substantial NREMS. Rats provided with a cafeteria diet have excess duration of NREMS but simultaneously decreased EEG δ power for days. Mice challenged with influenza virus have excessive EEG δ power and NREMS. In contrast, if mice lacking TNF receptors are infected, they still sleep more but have reduced EEG δ power. Sleep regulatory substances, e.g., IL1, TNF, and GHRH, directly injected unilaterally onto the cortex induce state-dependent ipsilateral enhancement of EEG δ power without changing duration of organism sleep. IL1 given systemically enhances duration of NREMS but reduces EEG δ power in mice. Benzodiazepines enhance NREMS but inhibit EEG δ power. If duration of NREMS is an indicator of prior sleepiness then simultaneous EEG δ power may or may not be a useful index of sleepiness. Finally, most sleep regulatory substances are cerebral vasodilators and blood flow affects EEG δ power. In conclusion, it seems unlikely that a single EEG measure will be reliable as a marker of sleepiness for all conditions.

  11. Implementation of 3D wave forcing terms in the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ody, Cédric; Filipot, Jean-François; Pichon, Annick; Lathuilière, Cyril; Baraille, Rémy

    2013-04-01

    Waves may influence the circulation in coastal regions at temporal and spatial scales that are larger than the periods and wavelengths of the waves respectively. The setup of the mean sea surface level or longshore currents are two examples of coastal processes that are generated by the mean effects of waves. Although simple models have been shown to provide reasonable estimates of setup and mean currents, the prediction of such wave-induced mechanisms has been improved since the recent development of theories on 3D wave-current interactions. Amongst these theories, the works of Ardhuin et al. (2008) and Mc Williams et al. (2004) give rise to forcing terms that may be used in existing circulation models. Under some assumptions on the shear of the mean current, the two previous works derive similar expressions for the wave forcing terms. In this talk, we will detail and discuss the implementation of these 3D terms in the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM, Bleck 2002). We will focus in particular on the hybrid and layered features of the code. The hybrid coordinate, which allows to use distinct vertical coordinates in a same simulation, requires to reformulate the wave forcing terms with a generalised vertical coordinate. Then, these terms must be averaged on each layer of the water column. Two academic tests are investigated to validate the numerical implementation : the gently sloping bottom of Ardhuin (2008) and the plane beach of Haas and Warner (2009). Forcing terms are calculated with simple numerical methods under classical assumptions on conservation of wave properties. The results obtained with distinct configurations are shown to agree with the analytical or numerical known solutions. To conclude, we will discuss the impact of wetting and drying in numerical simulations.

  12. Structure and stability of wave-theoretic kernels in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Cornuelle, Bruce D; Skarsoulis, Emmanuel K

    2013-10-01

    Wave-theoretic modeling can be applied to obtain travel-time sensitivity kernels (TSKs) representing the amount ray travel times are affected by sound-speed variations anywhere in the medium. This work explores the spatial frequency content of the TSK compared to expected ocean variability. It also examines the stability of the TSK in environments that produce strong sensitivity of ray paths to initial conditions. The conclusion is that the linear TSK model is an effective predictor of travel-time changes and that the rays perform nearly as well as the full-wave kernel. The TSK is examined in physical space and in wavenumber space, and it is found that this is the key to understanding how the travel time reacts to ocean perturbations. There are minimum vertical and horizontal length scales of ocean perturbations that are required for the travel time to be affected. The result is that the correspondence between true travel times and those calculated from the kernel is high for large-scale perturbations and somewhat less for the small scales. This demonstrates the validity of ray-based inversion of travel time observations for the cases under study.

  13. Coupling of wave and circulation models in coastal-ocean predicting systems: a case study for the German Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staneva, J.; Wahle, K.; Günther, H.; Stanev, E.

    2015-12-01

    This study addresses the impact of coupling between wind wave and circulation models on the quality of coastal ocean predicting systems. This is exemplified for the German Bight and its coastal area known as the Wadden Sea. The latter is the area between the barrier islands and the coast. This topic reflects the increased interest in operational oceanography to reduce prediction errors of state estimates at coastal scales, which in many cases are due to unresolved nonlinear feedback between strong tidal currents and wind-waves. In this study we present analysis of wave and hydrographic observations, as well as results of numerical simulations. A nested-grid modelling system is used to producing reliable nowcasts and short-term forecasts of ocean state variables, including wind waves and hydrodynamics. The data base includes ADCP observations and continuous measurements from data stations. The individual and collective role of wind, waves and tidal forcing are quantified. The performance of the forecast system is illustrated for the cases of several extreme events. Effects of ocean waves on coastal circulation and sea level are investigated by considering the wave-dependent stress and wave breaking parameterization. Also the effects which the circulation exerts on the wind waves are tested for the coastal areas using different parameterizations. The improved skill of the coupled forecasts compared to the non-coupled ones, in particular during extreme events, justifies the further enhancements of coastal operational systems by including wind wave models.

  14. Performance assessment of the database downscaled ocean waves (DOW) on Santa Catarina coast, South Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paula G; Klein, Antonio H F; González, Mauricio; Gutierrez, Omar; Espejo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a validation of wave parameters from the new sixty years Downscaled Ocean Waves (DOW) reanalysis database. This study compares quantiles of the Gumbel distribution of Hs (significant wave height) and Tp (peak period) from simulated data with an 11 months' time series obtained from a buoy moored seaward on the Santa Catarina coast. Analysis by means of Gumbel distribution quantiles allows more weight to be given to the highest values of the time series, which are especially important in design projects. The statistical parameters used to verify the fit between the measured and the modeled data included: RMSE, BIAS, Scatter Index and Pearson Correlation Coefficient. Mean direction (θm) validation was conducted qualitatively. The database showed good fit of the mean conditions, especially Hs which was well reproduced by the wave model. Underestimation of Tp, related mainly to the low spatial and temporal resolution of wind data used to generate waves, highlights this general modeling problem. Based on calculated statistical parameters, DOW data were considered comparable to the values obtained by measurements; however, such data must be cautiously used for extreme events analysis and in areas of bimodal sea conditions, where major deficiencies in the database were observed.

  15. Determining tomographic arrival times based on matched filter processing: considering the impact of ocean waves.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James K

    2008-02-01

    Reflection of high-frequency acoustic signals from an air-sea interface with waves is considered in terms of determining travel times for acoustic tomography. Wave-induced, multi-path rays are investigated to determine how they influence the assumption that the time of the largest matched filter magnitude between the source and receiver signals is the best estimate of the arrival time of the flat-surface specular ray path. A simple reflection model is developed to consider the impact of in-plane, multi-path arrivals on the signal detected by a receiver. It is found that the number of multi-path rays between a source and receiver increases significantly with the number of times the ray paths strike the ocean surface. In test cases, there was always one of the multi-path rays that closely followed the flat-surface specular ray path. But all the multi-path rays arrive at the receiver almost simultaneously, resulting in interference with the signal from the flat-surface specular ray path. As a result, multi-path arrivals due to open ocean surface waves often distort the received signal such that maxima of matched filtering magnitudes will not always be a reliable indicator of the arrival time of flat-surface specular ray paths.

  16. Electronic Power Conditioner for Ku-band Travelling Wave Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowstubha, Palle; Krishnaveni, K.; Ramesh Reddy, K.

    2016-07-01

    A highly sophisticated regulated power supply is known as electronic power conditioner (EPC) is required to energise travelling wave tubes (TWTs), which are used as RF signal amplifiers in satellite payloads. The assembly consisting of TWT and EPC together is known as travelling wave tube amplifier (TWTA). EPC is used to provide isolated and conditioned voltage rails with tight regulation to various electrodes of TWT and makes its RF performance independent of solar bus variations which are caused due to varying conditions of eclipse and sunlit. The payload mass and their power consumption is mainly due to the existence of TWTAs that represent about 35 % of total mass and about 70-90 % (based on the type of satellite application) of overall dc power consumption. This situation ensures a continuous improvement in the design of TWTAs and their associated EPCs to realize more efficient and light products. Critical technologies involved in EPCs are design and configuration, closed loop regulation, component and material selection, energy limiting of high voltage (HV) outputs and potting of HV card etc. This work addresses some of these critical technologies evolved in realizing and testing the state of art of EPC and it focuses on the design of HV supply with a HV and high power capability, up to 6 kV and 170 WRF, respectively required for a space TWTA. Finally, an experimental prototype of EPC with a dc power of 320 W provides different voltages required by Ku-band TWT in open loop configuration.

  17. The impact of wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing on satellite-derived ocean surface currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zhenli; Xu, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Ocean surface currents estimated from the satellite data consist of two terms: Ekman currents from the wind stress and geostrophic currents from the sea surface height (SSH). But the classical Ekman model does not consider the wave effects. By taking the wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing into account, the impact of waves (primarily the Stokes drift) on ocean surface currents is investigated and the wave-modified currents are formed. The products are validated by comparing with OSCAR currents and Lagrangian drifter velocity. The result shows that our products with the Stokes drift are better adapted to the in situ Lagrangian drifter currents. Especially in the Southern Ocean region (40°S-65°S), 90% (91%) of the zonal (meridional) currents have been improved compared with currents that do not include Stokes drift. The correlation (RMSE) in the Southern Ocean has also increased (decreased) from 0.78 (13) to 0.81 (10.99) for the zonal component and 0.76 (10.87) to 0.79 (10.09) for the meridional component. This finding provides the evidence that waves indeed play an important role in the ocean circulation, and need to be represented in numerical simulations of the global ocean circulation. This article was corrected on 10 FEB 2016. See the end of the full text for details.

  18. Orographic Gravity Waves above Small Islands in the Southern Ocean and Their Role in Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M.; Grimsdell, A.

    2012-12-01

    Most of today's climate models struggle with systematic westerly biases in the stratospheric circulation that lead to a delayed breakdown of the stratospheric vortex in spring and associated effects on temperature and ozone loss. Ozone loss in recent decades and predicted ozone recovery in the 21st century has a first-order impact on surface winds and climate, highlighting the importance of these common model biases in stratospheric winds. The cause is long believed to be that the Southern Hemisphere lacks sources for orographic gravity waves and associated wave drag relative to the Northern Hemisphere. Some models include hemispherically asymmetric non-orographic gravity wave momentum fluxes in their parameterizations despite any clear observational or theoretical justification for such differences other than the need to obtain more realistic stratospheric simulations. Our work examines the role of orographic gravity waves above small islands in the Southern Ocean, which are too small to be resolved in most climate models. Orographic waves above these small islands have been observed as temperature anomalies in radiance observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on the Aqua satellite. A previously analyzed case study with AIRS data concluded such waves above South Georgia Island in the South Atlantic can have a considerable impact on the stratospheric circulation, yet these effects are omitted in most climate models. In the present work, we use AIRS observations to examine occurrence frequencies and momentum fluxes above six island groups in the Southern Ocean. Further, detailed seasonal and interannual variations and areal maps of time-mean momentum fluxes are examined for two of these groups: South Georgia/Sandwich Islands and Heard/Kerguelen Islands. We examine the effects of winds at the surface and winds in the stratosphere to infer the relative roles of source intermittency, propagation effects, and observational filter effects on the

  19. Constraining shallow slip and tsunami excitation in megathrust ruptures using seismic and ocean acoustic waves recorded on ocean-bottom sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdon, Jeremy E.; Dunham, Eric M.

    2014-06-01

    Great earthquakes along subduction-zone plate boundaries, like the 2011 magnitude 9.0 Tohoku-Oki, Japan, event, deform the seafloor to generate massive tsunamis. Tsunami wave heights near shore are greatest when excitation occurs far offshore near the trench, where water depths are greatest and fault slip is shallow. The Tohoku event, featuring over 30 m of slip near the trench, exemplifies this hazard. Unfortunately the rupture process that far offshore is poorly constrained with land-based geodetic and even most seafloor deformation measurements, and seismic inferences of shallow slip are often nonunique. Here we demonstrate, through dynamic rupture simulations of the Tohoku event, that long-period guided waves in the ocean (specifically, leaking oceanic P-wave modes known as PL waves) can resolve the shallow rupture process and tsunami excitation near the trench. With predicted pressure changes of ∼0.1-1 MPa along most of the seafloor landward of the trench, and periods of several seconds, these PL waves should be observable with ocean-bottom pressure sensors and/or seismometers. With cabled sensor networks like those being deployed offshore Japan and in other subduction zones, these waves could be used to rapidly quantify shallow slip and near-trench seafloor uplift and improve local tsunami early warning systems.

  20. High power single frequency solid state master oscillator power amplifier for gravitational wave detection.

    PubMed

    Basu, Chandrajit; Wessels, Peter; Neumann, Jörg; Kracht, Dietmar

    2012-07-15

    High power single frequency, single mode, linearly polarized laser output at the 1 μm regime is in demand for the interferometric gravitational wave detectors (GWDs). A robust single frequency solid state master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) is a promising candidate for such applications. We present a single frequency solid state multistage MOPA system delivering 177 W of linearly polarized output power at 1 μm with 83.5% TEM(00) mode content.

  1. Tsunami waves extensively resurfaced the shorelines of a receding, early Martian ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairen, A.; Palmero Rodriguez, A.; Linares, R.; Zarroca, M.; Platz, T.; Komatsu, G.; Kargel, J. S.; Gulick, V. C.; Yan, J.; Higuchi, K.; Baker, V. R.; Glines, N. H.

    2015-12-01

    It has been proposed that ~3.5 billion years ago an enormous ocean fed by catastrophic groundwater discharges covered most of the Martian northern plains. However, a persistent problem with this hypothesis is the lack of definitive paleoshoreline features. Here, based on geomorphic and thermal surface character mapping and numerical analysis in the circum-Chryse region of the northern plains, we show evidence for two enormous tsunami events possibly triggered by bolide impacts resulting in craters ~30 km in diameter and occurring perhaps a few million years apart. The tsunami events produced widespread, extant littoral landforms, including run-up sedimentary lobes hundreds of kilometers long across gently sloping plains and backwash channels where wave retreat occurred on highland boundary surfaces. Variations among the features associated with each tsunami event suggest that the ocean was relatively more frozen during the second event.

  2. Drivers of exceptionally cold North Atlantic Ocean temperatures and their link to the 2015 European heat wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchez, Aurélie; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Josey, Simon A.; Evans, Dafydd G.; Grist, Jeremy P.; Marsh, Robert; McCarthy, Gerard D.; Sinha, Bablu; Berry, David I.; J-M Hirschi, Joël

    2016-07-01

    The North Atlantic and Europe experienced two extreme climate events in 2015: exceptionally cold ocean surface temperatures and a summer heat wave ranked in the top ten over the past 65 years. Here, we show that the cold ocean temperatures were the most extreme in the modern record over much of the mid-high latitude North-East Atlantic. Further, by considering surface heat loss, ocean heat content and wind driven upwelling we explain for the first time the genesis of this cold ocean anomaly. We find that it is primarily due to extreme ocean heat loss driven by atmospheric circulation changes in the preceding two winters combined with the re-emergence of cold ocean water masses. Furthermore, we reveal that a similar cold Atlantic anomaly was also present prior to the most extreme European heat waves since the 1980s indicating that it is a common factor in the development of these events. For the specific case of 2015, we show that the ocean anomaly is linked to a stationary position of the Jet Stream that favours the development of high surface temperatures over Central Europe during the heat wave. Our study calls for an urgent assessment of the impact of ocean drivers on major European summer temperature extremes in order to provide better advance warning measures of these high societal impact events.

  3. Efficiency enhancement in high power backward-wave oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, D.M.; Feicht, J.R. Adler, E.A. ); Ponti, E.S. ); Eisenhart, R.L. ); Lemke, R.W. )

    1999-06-01

    High power microwave (HPM) sources based on the backward-wave oscillator (BWO) have been investigated for the past two decades primarily because of their potential for very high efficiency (15 to 40%) operation. Several different effects have been proposed to explain this high efficiency compared to conventional BWO's. One of the major contributors to the high efficiency of the plasma-filled Pasotron HPM BWO source is the presence of optimally phased end reflections. The Pasotron uses a long pulse ([ge]100 [micro]s) plasma-cathode electron-gun and plasma-filled slow-wave structure to produce microwave pulses in the range of 1 to 10 MW without the use of externally produced magnetic fields. The efficiency of the Pasotron can be enhanced by up to a factor of two when the device is configured as a standing-wave oscillator in which properly phased reflections from the downstream collector end of the finite length SWS constructively interfere with the fundamental backward-wave modes and improve the coupling of the beam to the circuit. Operation in this configuration increases the efficiency up to 30% but causes the frequency to vary in discrete steps and the output power to change strongly with beam parameters and oscillation frequency.

  4. A powerful reflector in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yibing Sun, Jun; Teng, Yan; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Lijun; Shi, Yanchao; Ye, Hu; Chen, Changhua

    2014-09-15

    An improved TM{sub 021} resonant reflector is put forward. Similarly with most of the slow wave structures used in relativistic backward wave oscillator, the section plane of the proposed reflector is designed to be trapezoidal. Compared with the rectangular TM{sub 021} resonant reflector, such a structure can depress RF breakdown more effectively by weakening the localized field convergence and realizing good electrostatic insulation. As shown in the high power microwave (HPM) generation experiments, with almost the same output power obtained by the previous structure, the improved structure can increase the pulse width from 25 ns to over 27 ns and no obvious surface damage is observed even if the generated HPM pulses exceed 1000 shots.

  5. A powerful reflector in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yibing; Sun, Jun; Teng, Yan; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Lijun; Shi, Yanchao; Ye, Hu; Chen, Changhua

    2014-09-01

    An improved TM021 resonant reflector is put forward. Similarly with most of the slow wave structures used in relativistic backward wave oscillator, the section plane of the proposed reflector is designed to be trapezoidal. Compared with the rectangular TM021 resonant reflector, such a structure can depress RF breakdown more effectively by weakening the localized field convergence and realizing good electrostatic insulation. As shown in the high power microwave (HPM) generation experiments, with almost the same output power obtained by the previous structure, the improved structure can increase the pulse width from 25 ns to over 27 ns and no obvious surface damage is observed even if the generated HPM pulses exceed 1000 shots.

  6. Estimates of ocean wave heights and attenuation in sea ice using the SAR wave mode on Sentinel-1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Collard, Fabrice; Chapron, Bertrand; Girard-Ardhuin, Fanny; Guitton, Gilles; Mouche, Alexis; Stopa, Justin E.

    2015-04-01

    Swell evolution from the open ocean into sea ice is poorly understood, in particular the amplitude attenuation expected from scattering and dissipation. New synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from Sentinel-1A wave mode reveal intriguing patterns of bright oscillating lines shaped like instant noodles. We investigate cases in which the oscillations are in the azimuth direction, around a straight line in the range direction. This observation is interpreted as the distortion by the SAR processing of crests from a first swell, due to the presence of a second swell. Since deviations from a straight line should be proportional to the orbital velocity toward the satellite, swell height can be estimated, from 1.5 to 5 m in the present case. The evolution of this 13 s period swell across the ice pack is consistent with an exponential attenuation on a length scale of 200 km.

  7. Estimates of ocean wave heights and attenuation in sea ice using the SAR wave mode on Sentinel-1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Collard, Fabrice; Chapron, Bertrand; Girard-Ardhuin, Fanny; Guitton, Gilles; Mouche, Alexis; Stopa, Justin

    2015-04-01

    Swell evolution from the open ocean into sea ice is poorly understood, in particular the amplitude attenuation expected from scattering and dissipation. New synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from Sentinel-1 wave mode reveal intriguing patterns of bright oscillating lines shaped like instant noodles. We investigate cases in which the oscillations are in the azimuth direction, around a straight line in the range direction. This observation is interpreted as the distortion by the SAR processing of crests from a first swell, due to the presence of a second swell. As deviations from a straight line should be proportional to the orbital velocity towards the satellite, swell height can be estimated, from 1.5 to 5 m in the present case. This evolution of this 13 s period swell across the ice pack is consistent with an exponential attenuation on a length scale of 200 km.

  8. Effect of surface waves on the irradiance distribution in the upper ocean.

    PubMed

    Wijesekera, Hemantha; Pegau, W Scott; Boyd, Timothy

    2005-11-14

    The distribution of irradiance in the upper ocean was examined from sensors mounted on an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV). Apparent and inherent optical properties along with physical variability ranging from scales O(10 cm) to O(1 km) were collected off the coast of Oregon during the summer of 2004. Horizontal wavenumber spectra of downwelling irradiance showed that irradiance varied as a function of wavenumber and depth. The analysis indicates that irradiance variability between 1 and 20 m spatial scales was attributed to the focusing effects of surface wave geometry. The dominant wavelength of focusing at depths of 2 - 6 m was about 2 m for ~6 m s-1 wind speeds.

  9. Interaction of a strong blast wave with a free surface. [at ocean surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falade, A.; Holt, M.

    1978-01-01

    When a point source explosion is initiated at the ocean surface, the shock propagated into the water is reflected at the surface as a centered expansion wave. The solution in the neighborhood of the interaction point is obtained by writing the equations of motion in the appropriate similarity variables and then changing the independent variables to polar coordinates based at the interaction point. From the zero-order solution of the resulting equations the slopes of boundaries at the interaction point are obtained. A first-order perturbation of this solution provides more accurate representation of the flow variables and the curvature of the shock surface near the interaction point.

  10. Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) preprocessing program (PREROWS2.EXE). User's manual and program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Charles R.

    1993-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum is a user's manual with additional program documentation for the computer program PREROWS2.EXE. PREROWS2 works with data collected by an ocean wave spectrometer that uses radar (ROWS) as an active remote sensor. The original ROWS data acquisition subsystem was replaced with a PC in 1990. PREROWS2.EXE is a compiled QuickBasic 4.5 program that unpacks the recorded data, displays various variables, and provides for copying blocks of data from the original 8mm tape to a PC file.

  11. Effects of tropical instability wave (TIW)-induced surface wind feedback in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Tropical instability waves (TIWs) arise from oceanic instability in the eastern tropical Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, having a clear atmospheric signature that results in coupled atmosphere-ocean interactions at TIW scales. In this study, the extent to which TIW-induced surface wind feedback influences the ocean is examined using an ocean general circulation model (OGCM). The TIW-induced wind stress (τTIW) part is diagnostically determined using an empirical τTIW model from sea surface temperature (SST) fields simulated in the OGCM. The interactively represented TIW wind tends to reduce TIW activity in the ocean and influence the mean state, with largest impacts during TIW active periods in fall and winter. In December, the interactive τTIW forcing induces a surface cooling (an order of -0.1 to -0.3 °C), an increased heat flux into the ocean, a shallower mixed layer and a weakening of the South Equatorial Current in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Additionally, the TIW wind effect yields a pronounced latitudinal asymmetry of sea level field across the equator, and a change to upper thermal structure, characterized by a surface cooling and a warming below in the thermocline, leading to a decreased temperature gradient between the mixed layer and the thermocline. Processes responsible for the τTIW-induced cooling effects are analyzed. Vertical mixing and meridional advection are the two terms in the SST budget that are dominantly affected by the TIW wind feedback: the cooling effect from the vertical mixing on SST is enhanced, with the maximum induced cooling in winter; the warming effect from the meridional advection is reduced in July-October, but enhanced in November-December. Additional experiments are performed to separate the relative roles the affected surface momentum and heat fluxes play in the cooling effect on SST. This ocean-only modeling work indicates that the effect of TIW-induced wind feedback is small but not negligible, and may need to be

  12. A low-power wave union TDC implemented in FPGA

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Shi, Yanchen; Zhu, Douglas; /Illinois Math. Sci. Acad.

    2011-10-01

    A low-power time-to-digital convertor (TDC) for an application inside a vacuum has been implemented based on the Wave Union TDC scheme in a low-cost field programmable gate array (FPGA) device. Bench top tests have shown that a time measurement resolution better than 30 ps (standard deviation of time differences between two channels) is achieved. Special firmware design practices are taken to reduce power consumption. The measurements indicate that with 32 channels fitting in the FPGA device, the power consumption on the FPGA core voltage is approximately 9.3 mW/channel and the total power consumption including both core and I/O banks is less than 27 mW/channel.

  13. High power continuous-wave Alexandrite laser with green pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Shirin; Major, Arkady

    2016-07-01

    We report on a continuous-wave (CW) Alexandrite (Cr:BeAl2O4) laser, pumped by a high power green source at 532 nm with a diffraction limited beam. An output power of 2.6 W at 755 nm, a slope efficiency of 26%, and wavelength tunability of 85 nm have been achieved using 11 W of green pump. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest CW output power of a high brightness laser pumped Alexandrite laser reported to date. The results obtained in this experiment can lead to the development of a high power tunable CW and ultrafast sources of the near-infrared or ultraviolet radiation through frequency conversion.

  14. Wind, Wave, and Tidal Energy Without Power Conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    Most present wind, wave, and tidal energy systems require expensive power conditioning systems that reduce overall efficiency. This new design eliminates power conditioning all, or nearly all, of the time. Wind, wave, and tidal energy systems can transmit their energy to pumps that send high-pressure fluid to a central power production area. The central power production area can consist of a series of hydraulic generators. The hydraulic generators can be variable displacement generators such that the RPM, and thus the voltage, remains constant, eliminating the need for further power conditioning. A series of wind blades is attached to a series of radial piston pumps, which pump fluid to a series of axial piston motors attached to generators. As the wind is reduced, the amount of energy is reduced, and the number of active hydraulic generators can be reduced to maintain a nearly constant RPM. If the axial piston motors have variable displacement, an exact RPM can be maintained for all, or nearly all, wind speeds. Analyses have been performed that show over 20% performance improvements with this technique over conventional wind turbines

  15. Origins of features in wave number-frequency spectra of space-time images of the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, William J.; Farquharson, Gordon

    2012-06-01

    Wave number-frequency spectra measured with remote sensing systems consist of energy along the ocean wave dispersion relation and additional features that lie above and below this relation. At low frequencies a feature passing through the origin as a straight line is observed while one or more high-frequency features exhibit substantial curvature. Here we utilize images obtained on the open ocean from microwave Doppler shifts, which are directly related to scatterer velocity and allow us to calculate expected wave-wave interaction effects. We show that the strongest features lying off the first-order dispersion relation are not primarily due to second-order interactions, breaking caused by wind turbulence, advection by turbulence, or shadowing. The low-frequency feature can be seen traveling in the opposite direction to swell when looking nearly crosswind. We show that the most probable cause of these features is the interference of long ocean waves, which causes breaking near local maxima of surface slope. Doppler spectra observed by the radars indicate that the maximum speed reached by water particles on the open ocean is less than 6 m/s and usually close to the speed of the low-frequency feature in the wave number-frequency spectrum. Since this is much less than the phase speeds of dominant wind waves and swell, neither of these waves can be the breaking wave. Rather, we hypothesize that the superposition of these waves steepens short gravity waves on the surface, which then break to produce water parcels traveling near their phase speed, the speed observed by the radar.

  16. Directional spectra of ocean waves from microwave backscatter: A physical optics solution with application to the short-pulse and two-frequency measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    Two simple microwave radar techniques that are potentially capable of providing routine satellite measurements of the directional spectrum of ocean waves were developed. One technique, the short pulse technique, makes use of very short pulses to resolve ocean surface wave contrast features in the range direction; the other technique, the two frequency correlation technique makes use of coherency in the transmitted waveform to detect the large ocean wave contrast modulation as a beat or mixing frequency in the power backscattered at two closely separated microwave frequencies. A frequency domain analysis of the short pulse and two frequency systems shows that the two measurement systems are essentially duals; they each operate on the generalized (three frequency) fourth-order statistical moment of the surface transfer function in different, but symmetrical ways, and they both measure the same directional contrast modulation spectrum. A three dimensional physical optics solution for the fourth-order moment was obtained for backscatter in the near vertical, specular regime, assuming Gaussian surface statistics.

  17. Evolution of submesoscale coastal frontal waves in the East China Sea based on geostationary ocean color imager observational data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wenbin; Huang, Daji

    2016-09-01

    Oceanic frontal waves are frequently observed, but their life cycles are poorly understood because of the lack of time series data. In this study, the data of geostationary ocean color imager was used to explore the complete evolutionary process of submesoscale frontal waves off the southeast coast of China. Their evolution was analyzed in terms of both wave outline and ridge lines. The process lasted approximately 10 days as the waves propagated southward along the isobaths, accompanied by tidal oscillations. The life cycle comprised three stages: development, maturation, and decay. Scale estimation suggested that the onset of this process is caused by the collective effect of forced motion and unforced instability which is triggered by the passage of a tropical storm. The observed life cycle of frontal waves will provide an empirical basis for future theoretical investigations.

  18. Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Test Sites: A Catalogue of Met-Ocean Data.

    SciTech Connect

    Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-10-01

    This report presents met - ocean data and wave energy characteristics at three U.S. wave energy converter (WEC) test and potential deployment sites . Its purpose is to enable the compari son of wave resource characteristics among sites as well as the select io n of test sites that are most suitable for a developer's device and that best meet their testing needs and objectives . It also provides essential inputs for the design of WEC test devices and planning WEC tests, including the planning of deployment and op eration s and maintenance. For each site, this report catalogues wave statistics recommended in the (draft) International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Specification (IEC 62600 - 101 TS) on Wave Energy Characterization, as well as the frequency of oc currence of weather windows and extreme sea states, and statistics on wind and ocean currents. It also provides useful information on test site infrastructure and services .

  19. Sensitivity of modeled ocean heat content to errors in short wave radiation and its attenuation with depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulman, Igor; Gould, Richard W.; Anderson, Stephanie; Sakalaukus, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Short wave radiation (SWR) and its attenuation with depth have a major impact on the vertical distribution of the oceanic water temperature, dynamical processes, and ocean-atmosphere interactions. In numerical modeling of oceanic processes, the SWR usually comes from the atmospheric model predictions, while the short wave attenuation schemes are internally prescribed (estimated) inside the oceanic dynamical model. It has been reported that atmospheric models show a tendency to overestimate the shortwave radiation due to underestimation of predicted low-level clouds. Most existing schemes to specify the attenuation of SWR with depth in numerical models are based on: the Jerlov (1976) water-types classification; climatological estimates of attenuation coefficients or from the biological model predictions of light-absorbing and scattering water constituents. All of the above attenuation schemes are prone to introducing errors in the attenuation of short wave radiation with depth. As a result, we have to deal with two types of errors in the oceanic modeling: those due to the incorrect specification of the magnitude of SWR at the surface (from the atmospheric model), and those due to inaccurate vertical attenuation of SWR (prescribed in the oceanic model). We have developed an approach for estimating errors in the oceanic model heat budget due to errors in surface values of SWR and in its attenuation with depth. Based on this approach, we present examples illustrating sensitivities of the heat budget of the water column to the changes in specification of surface SWR and its attenuation.

  20. Determining Ocean-Bottom Seismometer Orientations from the RHUM-RUM experiment from P-wave and Rayleigh wave polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, John-Robert; Barruol, Guilhem; Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Sigloch, Karin

    2016-04-01

    To image the upper mantle structure beneath La Réunion hotspot, a large-scale seismic network has been deployed on land and at sea in the frame of the RHUM-RUM project (Réunion Hotspot and Upper Mantle - Réunions Unterer Mantel). This French-German passive seismic experiment was designed to investigate and image the deep structure beneath La Réunion, from crust to core, to precise the shape and depth origin of a mantle plume, if any, and to precise the horizontal and vertical mantle flow associated to a possible plume upwelling, to its interaction with the overlying plate and with the neighboring Indian ridges. For this purpose, 57 Ocean-Bottom Seismometers (OBS) were installed around La Réunion and along the Central and Southwest Indian ridges. Broad-band instruments were deployed with the French R/V Marion Dufresne in late 2012 (cruise MD192), and recovered 13 months later by the German R/V Meteor (cruise M101). The pool of OBS was complemented by ~60 terrestrial stations, installed on different islands in the western Indian Ocean, such as La Réunion, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles, Mayotte and the Îles Éparses in the Mozambique channel. The OBS installation is a free-fall down to the seafloor, where they landed in an unknown orientation. Since seismologic investigations of crustal and upper mantle structure (e.g., receiver functions) and azimuthal anisotropy (e.g., SKS-splitting and Rayleigh waves) rely on the knowledge of the correct OBS orientation with respect to the geographic reference frame, it is of importance to determine the orientations of the OBS while recording on the seafloor. In an isotropic, horizontally homogeneous and non-dipping layered globe, the misorientation of each station refers to the offset between theoretical and recorded back-azimuth angle of a passive seismic event. Using large earthquakes (MW > 5.0), it is possible to establish multiple successful measurements per station and thus to determine with good confidence the

  1. Study the impacts of Coriolis-Stokes forcing on upper ocean circulation in a fully coupled wave-current model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z.; Han, G.; Zhang, X.

    2010-12-01

    The Stokes drift-induced ocean currents and wind energy input into the upper ocean have been investigated using a fully coupled wave-current model consisting of the Princeton Ocean Model (POMgcs), Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) wave model and the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). The Coriolis-Stokes forcing (CSF), which is computed using the wave parameters from SWAN, has been incorporated into the momentum equation of POMgcs as the core coupling process in the coupled model. Experimental results in an idealized setting show that under the steady state, the scale of the speed of CSF-induced current is 0.001 m/s and the maximum reaches 0.02 m/s. The Stokes drift-induced energy rate input into the model ocean is estimated to be 2.85E10 W, which is about 14% of the direct wind energy rate input. Taking the Stokes drift effects into consideration, the total mechanical energy rate input is increased by approximately 14%. Therefore, the importance of CSF in modulating the upper ocean circulation is obviously demonstrated. The actual run conducted in Taiwan Adjacent Sea (TAS) region shows that: 1) CSF-based wave-current coupling influences the ocean surface currents month by month depending on the activities of monsoon winds; 2) wave-current coupling plays a more significant role at regions of strong eddies present and tends to intensify the eddy’s vorticity; 3) wave-current coupling affects the Taiwan Strait throughflow volume transport in a nontrivial degree, 3.75% on average.

  2. Progress Report on the GROWTH (GNSS Reflectometry for Ocean Waves, Tides, and Height) Research Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Kaoru; Akiyama, Hiroaki; Ebinuma, Takuji; Isoguchi, Osamu; Kimura, Noriaki; Kitazawa, Yukihito; Konda, Masanori; Kouguchi, Nobuyuki; Tamura, Hitoshi; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Waseda, Takuji

    2016-04-01

    There has been considerable interest in GNSS Reflectometry (GNSS-R) as a new remote-sensing method. We have started a research program for GNSS-R applications on oceanographic observations under the contract with MEXT (Ministry of Education Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, JAPAN) and launched a Japanese research consortium, GROWTH. It is aiming to evaluate the capabilities of GNSS-R observations for oceanographic phenomena with different time scales, such as ocean waves (1/10 to tens of seconds), tides (one or half days), and sea surface dynamic height (a few days to years). In situ observations of ocean wave spectrum, wind speed vertical profile, and sea surface height will be quantitatively compared with equivalent estimates from simultaneous GNSS-R measurements. The GROWTH project will utilize different types of observation platforms; marine observation towers (about 20 m height), multi-copters (about 100 to 200 m height), and much higher-altitude CYGNSS data. Cross-platform data, together with in situ oceanographic observations, will be compared after adequate temporal averaging that accounts differences of the footprint sizes and temporal and spatial scales of oceanographic phenomena. This paper will provide overview of the GROWTH project, preliminary test results obtained by the multi-sensor platform at observation towers, and preparation status of a ground station that will be supplied to receive CYGNSS data at Japan.

  3. Coupling of wave and circulation models in coastal-ocean predicting systems: a case study for the German Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staneva, Joanna; Wahle, Kathrin; Günther, Heinz; Stanev, Emil

    2016-06-01

    This study addresses the impact of coupling between wave and circulation models on the quality of coastal ocean predicting systems. This is exemplified for the German Bight and its coastal area known as the Wadden Sea. The latter is the area between the barrier islands and the coast. This topic reflects the increased interest in operational oceanography to reduce prediction errors of state estimates at coastal scales, which in many cases are due to unresolved non-linear feedback between strong currents and wind waves. In this study we present analysis of wave and hydrographic observations, as well as results of numerical simulations. A nested-grid modelling system is used to produce reliable nowcasts and short-term forecasts of ocean state variables, including waves and hydrodynamics. The database includes ADCP observations and continuous measurements from data stations. The individual and combined effects of wind, waves and tidal forcing are quantified. The performance of the forecast system is illustrated for the cases of several extreme events. The combined role of wave effects on coastal circulation and sea level are investigated by considering the wave-dependent stress and wave breaking parameterization. Also the response, which the circulation exerts on the waves, is tested for the coastal areas. The improved skill of the coupled forecasts compared to the non-coupled ones, in particular during extreme events, justifies the further enhancements of coastal operational systems by including wave effects in circulation models.

  4. The spatial evolution of t he directional wave spectrum in the Southern Ocean: Its relation to extreme waves in Agulhas Current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R. C.; Goldfinger, A.; Irvine, D.; Monaldo, F.; Tilley, D.; Shuchman, R.; Lyzenga, D.; Lyden, J.; Deleonibus, P.; Rufenach, C.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment using the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) to monitor certain properties of the ocean wave directional spectrum and to track the long swell systems as they propagate northward to encounter the Agulhas near the southeastern coast of Africa is discussed. The experiment is designed around the unique capability of SIR-B to overcome key limitations of the Seasat synthetic aperture radar data set, and to extend the existing Seasat results into new areas. Ocean wave systems will be tracked. The variable-incidence-angle capability to examine wave imaging quality will be utilized. Doppler current measurements will be attempted. An effort will be made to verify that the lower range-to-velocity ratio of SIR-B will lead to the improved response of azimuth-traveling wave systems.

  5. Mariscope: Observing P Waves (and much more) Everywhere in the Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolet, G.; Hello, Y.; Bonnieux, S.; Sukhovich, A.; Simons, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    The lack of stations on islands or the ocean bottom deprives seismic tomographers of almost 2/3 of the information potentially available for global seismic tomography. The "Mermaid", developed at Geoazur, is an underwater seismograph, based on a TWR Apex float. P wave signals are automatically identified and transmitted using the detection algorithm from Sukhovich et al. (GRL, 2011), GPS is used to locate the sensor at the time of transmission. We have studied the performance of Mermaids under different noise conditions in the Mediterranean, Indian Ocean and most recently near the Galapagos islands and will show a selection of observations. In the Mediterranean, we regularly detect P waves at teleseismic distances of earthquakes with magnitude 6, occasionally below that. Local and regional earthquakes of much lower magnitude, such as a M 4.9 earthquake near Barcelonette (figure), yield seismograms with a high signal to noise ratio.In the much noisier environment of the Indian Ocean the threshold for useful seismograms is close to magnitude 6.5. Yet we were also able to record 235 low magnitude events when a Mermaid was close to a swarm near the Indian Ocean triple junction, with the lowest magnitude estimated to be 2.1; this sequence also enabled us to put an upper limit of about 250 m to the error in sensor location at the time of recording. Preliminary data from the Galapagos indicate low noise conditions similar to those in the Mediterranean, with good recordings of events in the magnitude 5 range.A new prototype of a spherical "MultiMermaid" is currently being tested. It allows for multidisciplinary observations (seismic and kHz acoustics, magnetic field, temperature, bathymetry) and will function about five years with lithium batteries. A global deployment of such instruments in a five-year program is affordable: project MariScope aims for at least 300 floating seismometers in the world's oceans. At the time of writing of this abstract, a proposal is being

  6. Modern Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Power Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Robert J.; Luhmann, Neville C.; Booske, John H.; Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2005-04-01

    A comprehensive study of microwave vacuum electronic devices and their current and future applications While both vacuum and solid-state electronics continue to evolve and provide unique solutions, emerging commercial and military applications that call for higher power and higher frequencies to accommodate massive volumes of transmitted data are the natural domain of vacuum electronics technology. Modern Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Power Electronics provides systems designers, engineers, and researchers-especially those with primarily solid-state training-with a thoroughly up-to-date survey of the rich field of microwave vacuum electronic device (MVED) technology. This book familiarizes the R&D and academic communities with the capabilities and limitations of MVED and highlights the exciting scientific breakthroughs of the past decade that are dramatically increasing the compactness, efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and reliability of this entire class of devices. This comprehensive text explores a wide range of topics: * Traveling-wave tubes, which form the backbone of satellite and airborne communications, as well as of military electronic countermeasures systems * Microfabricated MVEDs and advanced electron beam sources * Klystrons, gyro-amplifiers, and crossed-field devices * "Virtual prototyping" of MVEDs via advanced 3-D computational models * High-Power Microwave (HPM) sources * Next-generation microwave structures and circuits * How to achieve linear amplification * Advanced materials technologies for MVEDs * A Web site appendix providing a step-by-step walk-through of a typical MVED design process Concluding with an in-depth examination of emerging applications and future possibilities for MVEDs, Modern Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Power Electronics ensures that systems designers and engineers understand and utilize the significant potential of this mature, yet continually developing technology. SPECIAL NOTE: All of the editors' royalties realized from

  7. An analysis of short pulse and dual frequency radar techniques for measuring ocean wave spectra from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning beam microwave radars were used to measure ocean wave directional spectra from satellites. In principle, surface wave spectral resolution in wave number can be obtained using either short pulse (SP) or dual frequency (DF) techniques; in either case, directional resolution obtains naturally as a consequence of a Bragg-like wave front matching. A four frequency moment characterization of backscatter from the near vertical using physical optics in the high frequency limit was applied to an analysis of the SP and DF measurement techniques. The intrinsic electromagnetic modulation spectrum was to the first order in wave steepness proportional to the large wave directional slope spectrum. Harmonic distortion was small and was a minimum near 10 deg incidence. NonGaussian wave statistics can have an effect comparable to that in the second order of scattering from a normally distributed sea surface. The SP technique is superior to the DF technique in terms of measurement signal to noise ratio and contrast ratio.

  8. Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haut, R; Jahn, G; Goldman, J; Colvin, J; Karpinski, A; Dobley, A; Halfinger, J; Nagley, S; Wolf, K; Shapiro, A; Doucette, P; Hansen, P; Oke, A; Compton, D; Cobb, M; Kopps, R; Chitwood, J; Spence, W; Remacle, P; Noel, C; Vicic, J; Dee, R

    2010-02-19

    An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operations: (1) PWR = Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor + Lead-Acid Battery; (2) FC1 = Line for Surface O{sub 2} + Well Head Gas + Reformer + PEMFC + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (3) FC2 = Stored O2 + Well Head Gas + Reformer + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (4) SV1 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (5) SV2 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Engine or Turbine + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (6) SV3 = Submersible Vehicle + Charge at Docking Station + ZEBRA & Li-Ion Batteries; (7) PWR TEG = PWR + Thermoelectric Generator + Lead-Acid Battery; (8) WELL TEG = Thermoelectric Generator + Well Head Waste Heat + Lead-Acid Battery; (9) GRID = Ocean Floor Electrical Grid + Lead-Acid Battery; and (10) DOC = Deep Ocean Current + Lead-Acid Battery.

  9. Solitary and shock waves in discrete double power law materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbold, Eric; Nesterenko, Vitali

    2007-06-01

    A novel strongly nonlinear metamaterial is composed using a periodic arrangement of toroidal rings between plates. The toroids are considered massless strongly nonlinear springs where the force versus displacement relationship is described by two additive power-law relationships. In these systems the nonlinearity is due to the dramatic change of the contact plane, which starts as an arbitrarily thin circle then increases in thickness with increasing compression. Solitary and shock waves are examined numerically and experimentally using three different types of polymer or rubber o-rings allowing mitigation of higher amplitude shock impulses in comparison with granular systems. In these systems a train of pulses can consist of two separate groups related to two strongly nonlinear regimes with different values of exponents, depending on the amplitude. In experiments two types of shock waves (monotonic or oscillatory) were observed depending on the type of o-rings.

  10. Artificial airglow excited by high-power radio waves.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, P A; Duncan, L M; Tepley, C A

    1988-11-18

    High-power electromagnetic waves beamed into the ionosphere from ground-based transmitters illuminate the night sky with enhanced airglow. The recent development of a new intensified, charge coupled-device imager made it possible to record optical emissions during ionospheric heating. Clouds of enhanced airglow are associated with large-scale plasma density cavities that are generated by the heater beam. Trapping and focusing of electromagnetic waves in these cavities produces accelerated electrons that collisionally excite oxygen atoms, which emit light at visible wavelengths. Convection of plasma across magnetic field lines is the primary source for horizontal motion of the cavities and the airglow enhancements. During ionospheric heating experiments, quasi-cyclic formation, convection, dissipation and reappearance of the cavites comprise a major source of long-term variability in plasma densities during ionospheric heating experiments.

  11. High power continuous wave injection-locked solid state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nabors, C.D.; Byer, R.L.

    1991-06-25

    This patent describes an injection locked laser system. It comprises a master laser, the master laser including a solid state gain medium and having a continuous wave, single frequency output; a slave laser including a solid state gain medium located in a resonant cavity and having a continuous wave output at a power at least ten times greater than the master laser, with the output of the master laser being injected into the slave laser in order to cause the slave laser to oscillate at the same frequency as the output of the master laser; and means for actively stabilizing the slave laser so that its output frequency remains locked with the output frequency of the master laser.

  12. 77 FR 1674 - Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... Renewable Power Company, LLC's application for an 8-year pilot license for the proposed Cobscook Bay Tidal... Energy Regulatory Commission Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Project In accordance with the...

  13. Observations of wave-driven surf-zone dynamics on a high-energy beach, Ocean Beach, San Francisco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, I. S.; Janssen, T. T.; Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P.

    2010-12-01

    Alongshore variations in wave energy, currents and water depth affect wave-driven surf-zone hydrodynamics and are important for near-shore transport processes and beach evolution. These processes are not that well understood, in part because most earlier field studies were conducted in areas characterized by alongshore-uniform conditions and moderate incident wave energy. In this study, we present observations of the surf zone circulation at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, an area characterized by energetic wave conditions (near-shore wave heights can exceed 10 m), strong tidal currents (> 1 m/s alongshore), refractive wave focusing, and alongshore inhomogeneity of the incident wave field. The experiment was specifically designed to capture the effects of spatially inhomogeneous wave fields and to quantify the contribution of the pressure gradient to the alongshore momentum balance. The data set includes detailed pressure, current, and wave measurements from a two-week long experiment at Ocean Beach, including a wide range of wave (significant wave heights of 1-5 m) and wind conditions. In the analysis, the various terms of the mean-flow momentum balance have been extracted from observations. The momentum balance will be evaluated to determine the comparative role of wave-induced set-up and radiation stress gradients in driving circulation. We will present the field experiment set-up, time series of the bulk wave statistics over the duration of the experiment and a surf-zone momentum analysis to identify the role of wave inhomogeneity on the near-shore circulation. This experiment and research is funded by the U. S. Geological Survey.

  14. The Effect of Atmosphere-Ocean-Wave Interactions and Model Resolution on Hurricane Katrina in a Coupled Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patricola, C. M.; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Montuoro, R.

    2012-04-01

    The sensitivity of simulated strength, track, and structure of Hurricane Katrina to atmospheric model resolution, cumulus parameterization, and initialization time, as well as mesoscale ocean-atmosphere interactions with and without small-scale ocean-wave effect, are investigated with a fully coupled regional climate model. The atmosphere, ocean, and wave components are represented by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF), Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), and Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) model. Uncoupled atmosphere-only simulations with horizontal resolutions of 1, 3, 9, and 27 km show that while the simulated cyclone track is highly sensitive to initialization time, its dependence on model resolution is relatively weak. Using NCEP/CFSR reanalysis as initial and boundary conditions, WRF, even at low resolution, is able to track Katrina accurately for 3 days before it made landfall on August 29, 2005. Katrina's strength, however, is much more difficult to reproduce and exhibits a strong dependence on model resolution. At its lowest resolution (27 km), WRF is only capable of simulating a maximum strength of Category 2 storm. Even at 1 km resolution, the simulated Katrina only reaches Category 4 storm intensity. Further WRF experiments with and without cumulus parameterization reveal minor changes in strength. None of the WRF-only simulations capture the observed rapid intensification of Katrina to Category 5 when it passed over a warm Loop-Current eddy (LCE) in the Gulf of Mexico, suggesting that mesoscale ocean-atmosphere interactions involving LCEs may play a crucial role in Katrina's rapid intensification. Coupled atmosphere-ocean simulations are designed and carried out to investigate hurricane Katrina-LCE interactions with and without considering small-scale ocean wave processes in order to fully understand the dynamical ocean-atmosphere processes in the observed rapid cyclone intensification.

  15. Studies related to ocean dynamics. Task 3.2: Aircraft Field Test Program to investigate the ability of remote sensing methods to measure current/wind-wave interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, N. E.; Flood, W. A.; Brown, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of remote sensing of current flows in the ocean and the remote sensing of ocean currents by backscattering cross section techniques was studied. It was established that for capillary waves, small scale currents could be accurately measured through observation of wave kinematics. Drastic modifications of waves by changing currents were noted. The development of new methods for the measurement of capillary waves are discussed. Improvement methods to resolve data processing problems are suggested.

  16. Propulsion of small launch vehicles using high power millimeter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Benford, J.; Myrabo, L.

    1994-12-31

    The use of microwave and millimeter wave beamed energy for propulsion of vehicles in the atmosphere and in space has been under study for at least 35 years. The need for improved propulsion technology is clear: chemical rockets orbit only a few percent of the liftoff mass at a cost of over $3,000/lb. The key advantage of the beamed power approach is to place the heavy and expensive components on the ground or in space, not in the vehicle. This paper, following upon the high power laser propulsion programs, uses a multi-cycle propulsion engine in which the first phase of ascent is based on the air breathing ramjet principle, a repetitive Pulsed Detonation Engine (PDE) which uses a microwave-supported detonation to heat the air working fluid, i.e., propellant. The second phase is a pure beam-heated rocket. The key factor is that high peak power is essential to this pulsed engine. This paper explores this propulsion concept using millimeter waves, the most advantageous part of the spectrum. The authors find that efficient system concepts can be developed for the beam powered launch system and that, while the capital cost may be as high as the earlier orbital transfer concepts, the operating cost is much lower. The vehicle can have payload-to-mass ratios on the order of one and cost (per pound to orbit) two orders of magnitudes less than for chemical rockets. This allows the weight of microwave powered vehicles to be very small, as low as {approximately}100 kg for test devices.

  17. Extraction of Stoneley and acoustic Rayleigh waves from ambient noise on ocean bottom observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonegawa, T.; Fukao, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Obana, K.; Kodaira, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2013-12-01

    the separation distance of ~5 km, the peak emerged in the CCFs clearly shows a travel time variation as a function of water depth. The group velocity of the signal gradually changes from 1.2 km/s to 0.7 km/s at water depths from 2000 to 4000 m. In addition to the wave, a relatively weak signal can be seen, which shows a group velocity of 1.4-1.5 km/s with no depth dependency. This would correspond to the ocean acoustic wave. For the case of the analysis for seismometer, similar patterns could be seen in the CCFs, but the signal with a velocity of 1.4-1.5 km/s emerged clearly compared to those using records of hydrophone. We investigated by using a numerical simulation with finite difference technique and normal mode approach in order to confirm what the signals are. As a result, the signal with a group velocities of 1.2 km/s at shallower water depths can be explained by acoustic Rayleigh wave, which has the energy within not only the ocean but also sediment, whereas the other signal with a group velocity of 0.7 km/s at deeper water depths corresponds to the Stoneley wave whose energy is concentrated on the seafloor. The generation of the acoustic Rayleigh wave would be caused by water depth, wavelength, and thickness and velocity of sediment layer.

  18. Experimental results using active control of traveling wave power flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Active structural control experiments conducted on a 24-ft pinned-free beam derived feedback compensators on the basis of a traveling-wave approach. A compensator is thus obtained which eliminates resonant behavior by absorbing all impinging power. A causal solution is derived for this noncausal compensator which mimics its behavior in a given frequency range, using the Wiener-Hopf. This optimal Wiener-Hopf compensator's structure-damping performance is found to exceed any obtainable by means of rate feedback. Performance limitations encompassed the discovery of frequencies above which the sensor and actuator were no longer dual and an inadvertent coupling of the control hardware to unmodeled structure torsion modes.

  19. Millimeter-Wave Wireless Power Transfer Technology for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Manohara, Harish; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Vo, Tuan A.; Mojarradi, Hadi; Bae, Sam Y.; Marzwell, Neville

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a new compact, scalable, and low cost technology for efficient receiving of power using RF waves at 94 GHz. This technology employs a highly innovative array of slot antennas that is integrated on substrate composed of gold (Au), silicon (Si), and silicon dioxide (SiO2) layers. The length of the slots and spacing between them are optimized for a highly efficient beam through a 3-D electromagnetic simulation process. Antenna simulation results shows a good beam profile with very low side lobe levels and better than 93% antenna efficiency.

  20. Near-Millimeter Wave Issues for a Space Power Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komerath, Narayanan; Venkat, Vigneshwar; Fernandez, Jason

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports continuing work on an evolutionary revenue-generating approach to Space Solar Power. The 220 GHz atmospheric transmission window is chosen, leaving open the option of using millimeter wave or laser wavelengths. The progression from frequency to system business case is laid out, seeking the performance figures needed for a self-sustaining system and to open up Space Solar Power in 15 to 17 years from first launch. An overall transmission efficiency in excess of 30 percent is required, from DC to beamed power and back to DC or high-voltage AC, to meet a delivered free-market price target of 30 cents per KWH, or 20 percent if a price of 45 cents per KWH. Climate data show that rain obscuration is a non-issue for many of the renewable-power sites that comprise the market. The technology of direct solar conversion to DC and to beamed power would satisfy the needed efficiencies but requires advances in nano-scale fabrication with dielectrics.

  1. HOS-ocean: Open-source solver for nonlinear waves in open ocean based on High-Order Spectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducrozet, Guillaume; Bonnefoy, Félicien; Le Touzé, David; Ferrant, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    HOS-ocean is an efficient High-Order Spectral code developed to solve the deterministic propagation of nonlinear wavefields in open ocean. HOS-ocean is released as open-source, developed and distributed under the terms of GNU General Public License (GPLv3). Along with the source code, a documentation under wiki format is available which makes easy the compilation and execution of the source files. The code has been shown to be accurate and efficient.

  2. Speech articulator measurements using low power EM-wave sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Burnett, G.C.; Ng, L.C.; Lea, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    Very low power electromagnetic (EM) wave sensors are being used to measure speech articulator motions as speech is produced. Glottal tissue oscillations, jaw, tongue, soft palate, and other organs have been measured. Previously, microwave imaging (e.g., using radar sensors) appears not to have been considered for such monitoring. Glottal tissue movements detected by radar sensors correlate well with those obtained by established laboratory techniques, and have been used to estimate a voiced excitation function for speech processing applications. The noninvasive access, coupled with the small size, low power, and high resolution of these new sensors, permit promising research and development applications in speech production, communication disorders, speech recognition and related topics. {copyright} {ital 1998 Acoustical Society of America.}

  3. Real-time Coupled Ensemble Kalman Filter Forecasting & Nonlinear Model Predictive Control Approach for Optimal Power Take-off of a Wave Energy Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaglieri, Daniele; Bewley, Thomas; Previsic, Mirko

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in renewable energy. Among all the available possibilities, wave energy conversion, due to the huge availability of energy that the ocean could provide, represents nowadays one of the most promising solutions. However, the efficiency of a wave energy converter for ocean wave energy harvesting is still far from making it competitive with more mature fields of renewable energy, such as solar and wind energy. One of the main problems is related to the difficulty to increase the power take-off through the implementation of an active controller without a precise knowledge of the oncoming wavefield. This work represents the first attempt at defining a realistic control framework for optimal power take-off of a wave energy converter where the ocean wavefield is predicted through a nonlinear Ensemble Kalman filter which assimilates data from a wave measurement device, such as a Doppler radar or a measurement buoy. Knowledge of the future wave profile is then leveraged in a nonlinear direct multiple shooting model predictive control framework allowing the online optimization of the energy absorption under motion and machinery constraints of the device.

  4. Coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave simulations of a storm event over the Gulf of Lion and Balearic Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renault, Lionel; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Warner, John C.; Gomez, Marta; Vizoso, Guillermo; Tintore, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    The coastal areas of the North-Western Mediterranean Sea are one of the most challenging places for ocean forecasting. This region is exposed to severe storms events that are of short duration. During these events, significant air-sea interactions, strong winds and large sea-state can have catastrophic consequences in the coastal areas. To investigate these air-sea interactions and the oceanic response to such events, we implemented the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport Modeling System simulating a severe storm in the Mediterranean Sea that occurred in May 2010. During this event, wind speed reached up to 25 m.s-1 inducing significant sea surface cooling (up to 2°C) over the Gulf of Lion (GoL) and along the storm track, and generating surface waves with a significant height of 6 m. It is shown that the event, associated with a cyclogenesis between the Balearic Islands and the GoL, is relatively well reproduced by the coupled system. A surface heat budget analysis showed that ocean vertical mixing was a major contributor to the cooling tendency along the storm track and in the GoL where turbulent heat fluxes also played an important role. Sensitivity experiments on the ocean-atmosphere coupling suggested that the coupled system is sensitive to the momentum flux parameterization as well as air-sea and air-wave coupling. Comparisons with available atmospheric and oceanic observations showed that the use of the fully coupled system provides the most skillful simulation, illustrating the benefit of using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model for the assessment of these storm events.

  5. Seismic wave velocity of rocks in the Oman ophiolite: constraints for petrological structure of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Shibata, S.; Akizuki, R.; Arima, M.; Tatsumi, Y.; Arai, S.

    2010-12-01

    Evaluation of rock velocities and comparison with velocity profiles defined by seismic refraction experiments are a crucial approach for understanding the petrological structure of the crust. In this study, we calculated the seismic wave velocities of various types of rocks from the Oman ophiolite in order to constrain a petrological structure of the oceanic crust. Christensen & Smewing (1981, JGR) have reported experimental elastic velocities of rocks from the Oman ophiolite under oceanic crust-mantle conditions (6-430 MPa). However, in their relatively low-pressure experiments, internal pore-spaces might affect the velocity and resulted in lower values than the intrinsic velocity of sample. In this study we calculated the velocities of samples based on their modal proportions and chemical compositions of mineral constituents. Our calculated velocities represent the ‘pore-space-free’ intrinsic velocities of the sample. We calculated seismic velocities of rocks from the Oman ophiolite including pillow lavas, dolerites, plagiogranites, gabbros and peridotites at high-pressure-temperature conditions with an Excel macro (Hacker & Avers 2004, G-cubed). The minerals used for calculations for pillow lavas, dolerites and plagiogranites were Qtz, Pl, Prh, Pmp, Chl, Ep, Act, Hbl, Cpx and Mag. Pl, Hbl, Cpx, Opx and Ol were used for the calculations for gabbros and peridotites. Assuming thermal gradient of 20° C/km and pressure gradient of 25 MPa/km, the velocities were calculated in the ranges from the atmospheric pressure (0° C) to 200 MPa (160° C). The calculation yielded P-wave velocities (Vp) of 6.5-6.7 km/s for the pillow lavas, 6.6-6.8 km/s for the dolerites, 6.1-6.3 km/s for the plagiogranites, 6.9-7.5 km/s for the gabbros and 8.1-8.2 km/s for the peridotites. On the other hand, experimental results reported by Christensen & Smewing (1981, JGR) were 4.5-5.9 km/s for the pillow lavas, 5.5-6.3 km/s for the dolerites, 6.1-6.3 km/s for the plagiogranites, 6

  6. On the developments of spectral wave models: numerics and parameterizations for the coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Aron; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2014-06-01

    The development of numerical wave models for coastal applications, including coupling with ocean circulation models, has spurred an ongoing effort on theoretical foundations, numerical techniques, and physical parameterizations. Some important aspects of this effort are reviewed here, and results are shown in the case of the French Atlantic and Channel coast using version 4.18 of the WAVEWATCH III R model. Compared to previous results, the model errors have been strongly reduced thanks to, among other things, the introduction of currents, coastal reflection, and bottom sediment types. This last item is described here for the first time, allowing unprecedented accuracy at some sites along the French Atlantic Coast. The adequate resolution, necessary to represent strong gradients in tidal currents, was made possible by the efficiency brought by unstructured grids. A further increase in resolution, necessary to resolve surf zones and still cover vast regions,will require further developments in numerical methods.

  7. Optimal spatial filtering and transfer function for SAR ocean wave spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R. C.; Tilley, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    The impulse response of the SAR system is not a delta function and the spectra represent the product of the underlying image spectrum with the transform of the impulse response which must be removed. A digitally computed spectrum of SEASAT imagery of the Atlantic Ocean east of Cape Hatteras was smoothed with a 5 x 5 convolution filter and the trend was sampled in a direction normal to the predominant wave direction. This yielded a transform of a noise-like process. The smoothed value of this trend is the transform of the impulse response. This trend is fit with either a second- or fourth-order polynomial which is then used to correct the entire spectrum. A 16 x 16 smoothing of the spectrum shows the presence of two distinct swells. Correction of the effects of speckle is effected by the subtraction of a bias from the spectrum.

  8. Basic Research on Time-Reversal Waves in Deep Ocean for Long Acoustic Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Takuya; Watanabe, Yoshitaka; Ochi, Hiroshi

    2005-06-01

    We have studied the focusing property of time-reversal waves and its application to acoustic communication in shallow water. In this study, this focusing property in the deep ocean and its application to long horizontal acoustic communication are discussed. The results are as follows. Even if a time-reversal array (TRA) does not expand from the sea surface to the seabed, time-reversal signals converge, and the focusing property is not significantly affected by the depths of the focus and TRA. Then, it is revealed that by using time reversal, it is possible to enssure communication channel over a long range, through the simulation. In phase modulation, time reversal can demodulate almost only by itself, while in amplitude and phase modulation, an adaptive filter to compensates further.

  9. Internal waves as a proposed mechanism for increasing ambient noise in an increasingly acidic ocean.

    PubMed

    Rouseff, Daniel; Tang, Dajun

    2010-06-01

    The effect on the ambient noise level in shallow water of the ocean growing more acidic is modeled. Because most noise sources are near the surface, high-order acoustic modes are preferentially excited. Linear internal waves, however, can scatter the noise into the low-order, low-loss modes most affected by the changes in acidity. The model uses transport theory to couple the modes and assumes an isotropic distribution for the noise sources. For a scenario typical of the East China Sea, the noise at 3 kHz is predicted to increase by 30%, about one decibel, as the pH decreases from 8.0 to 7.4.

  10. Turbulence and mixing by internal waves in the Celtic Sea determined from ocean glider microstructure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, M. R.; Stephenson, G. R.; Inall, M. E.; Balfour, C.; Düsterhus, A.; Green, J. A. M.

    2015-04-01

    We present a new series of data from a 9-day deployment of an ocean microstructure glider (OMG) in the Celtic Sea during the summer of 2012. The OMG has been specially adapted to measure shear microstructure and coincident density structure from which we derive the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (ε) and diapycnal diffusion rates (K). The methods employed to provide trustworthy turbulent parameters are described and data from 766 profiles of ε, temperature, salinity and density structure are presented. Surface and bottom boundary layers are intuitively controlled by wind and tidal forcing. Interior dynamics is dominated by a highly variable internal wave-field with peak vertical displacements in excess of 50 m, equivalent to over a third of the water depth. Following a relatively quiescent period internal wave energy, represented by the available potential energy (APE), increases dramatically close to the spring tide flow. Rather than follow the assumed spring-neap cycle however, APE is divided into two distinct peak periods lasting only one or two days. Pycnocline ε also increases close to the spring tide period and similar to APE, is distinguishable as two distinct energetic periods, however the timing of these periods is not consistent with APE. Pycnocline mixing associated with the observed ε is shown to be responsible for the majority of the observed reduction in bottom boundary layer density suggesting that diapycnal exchange is a key mechanism in controlling or limiting exchange between the continental shelf and the deep ocean. Results confirm pycnocline turbulence to be highly variable and difficult to predict however a log-normal distribution does suggest that natural variability could be reproduced if the mean state can be accurately simulated.

  11. Interactions between Oceanic Saharan Air Layer and African Easterly Jet- African Easterly Waves System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, F.; Wilcox, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols have robust influences on multi-scale climatic systems and variability. Non-linear aerosol-cloud-climate interactions depend on many parameters such as aerosol features, regional atmospheric dynamics and variability. Although there are remarkable modeling studies indicating that aerosols induce robust modifications in cloud properties, circulations and the hydrological cycle, many of the physical and dynamical processes involving in these complex interactions between aerosols and Earth's system are still poorly understood. Better understanding the contribution of aerosols with atmospheric phenomena and their transient changes are crucial for efforts to evaluate climate predictions by next generation climate models. This study provides strong evidence of mechanistic relationships between perturbations of the oceanic Saharan air layer (OSAL) and anomalies of atmospheric circulations over the eastern tropical Atlantic/Africa. These relationships are characterized using an ensemble of daily datasets including the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS), and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWIFS) for the boreal summer season. The study is motivated by previous results suggesting that oceanic dust-induced large-scale to meso-scale climatic adjustments. Our hypothesis is that perturbations in OSAL significantly interact with regional climate variability through African Easterly Jet- African Easterly Waves (AEJ-AEW) system. Passive/ active phases of AEWs in the northern and southern-track wave packets are associated with dipole patterns of thermal/dynamical anomalies correlated with perturbations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in OSAL. Enhanced (suppressed) dust AOD in OSAL are significantly correlated with convective re-circulation within subsidence region of Hadley cell as well as robust mid-level dipole vorticity disturbances downstream of the AEJ core

  12. A Regional View of Easterly Waves over Pacific and Atlantic Ocean: Tropical Cyclogenesis Thresholds and Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, C.; Done, J.; Bruyere, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are well known as important contributors to summer precipitation over Intra America Seas (IAS) and the Eastern Pacific Ocean (EPA). They contribute up to 30% in the Caribbean Region, Gulf of Mexico and Eastern Pacific during high active seasons. Although Easterly Waves (EWs) are considered high-impact weather phenomena, their regional importance in summer rainfall and regional differences in their development into TCs remains uncertain. This study quantifies the contribution of EWs to summer rainfall. We find that EWs contributed up to 50% of summer rainfall over IAS and EPA during the period 1980-2013. In addition, this study demonstrates regional dependency of the structure of EWs that develop into hurricanes and the thresholds of tropical cyclogenesis. Using ERA-Interim data, vorticity at three levels (850, 700 and 600), Column Integrated Heating, equivalent potential temperature, sea surface temperature, wind speed, stretching radius and integrated moisture flux were analyzed to investigate regional dependency of thresholds for tropical cyclogenesis during the 1980-2013 period. We found that tropical cyclogenesis occurred under different regional environments over Pacific and Atlantic Ocean and the structure of EWs changed depending on the basin. This research can be relevant to improve operational forecast of tropical cyclogenesis since thresholds are used to indicate where and when a TC formation can occur.

  13. Global Subducting Slab Entrainment of Oceanic Asthenosphere: Re-examination of Sub-Slab Shear-Wave Splitting Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, T.; Liu, L.; Kawakatsu, H.

    2011-12-01

    Oceanic asthenosphere is characterized as a low seismic velocity, low viscosity, and strongly anisotropic channel separating from the oceanic lithosphere through a sharp shear wave velocity contrast. It has been a great challenge to reconcile all these observations and ultimately illuminate the fate of oceanic asthenosphere near convergent plate margins. Sub-slab shear wave splitting patterns are particularly useful to address the fate of oceanic asthenosphere since they are directly linked to deformation induced by the mantle flow beneath the subducting slab. To address slab entrainment of oceanic asthenosphere through shear wave splitting, it is important to recognize that oceanic asthenosphere is characterized by azimuthal anisotropy (1-3%) as well as strong P wave and S wave radial anisotropy (3-7%) for horizontally travelling P wave (VPH > VPV) and S wave (VSH > VSV), making it effectively an orthorhombic medium. Here we show that entrained asthenosphere predicts sub-slab SKS splitting pattern, where the fast splitting direction changes from predominantly trench-normal under shallow subduction zones to predominantly trench-parallel under relatively steep subduction zones. This result can be recognized by the 90 degrees shift in the polarization of the fast wave at about 20 degrees incident angle, where VSH equals to VSV forming a classical point singularity (Crampin, 1991). The thickness of the entrained asthenosphere is estimated to be on the order of 100 km, which predicts SKS splitting time varying from 0.5 seconds to 2 seconds. After briefly discussing improvement of the millefeuille model (Kawakatsu et al. 2009) of the asthenosphere upon this new constraint and long wave Backus averaging of orthorhombic solid and melt, we will illustrate that, in the range of observed trench migration speed, dynamic models of 2-D mantle convection with temperature-dependent viscosity do support thick subducting slab entrainment of asthenosphere under ranges of

  14. Twenty-first century wave climate projections for Ireland and surface winds in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Sarah; Gleeson, Emily; Tiron, Roxana; McGrath, Ray; Dias, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Ireland has a highly energetic wave and wind climate, and is therefore uniquely placed in terms of its ocean renewable energy resource. The socio-economic importance of the marine resource to Ireland makes it critical to quantify how the wave and wind climate may change in the future due to global climate change. Projected changes in winds, ocean waves and the frequency and severity of extreme weather events should be carefully assessed for long-term marine and coastal planning. We derived an ensemble of future wave climate projections for Ireland using the EC-Earth global climate model and the WAVEWATCH III® wave model, by comparing the future 30-year period 2070-2099 to the period 1980-2009 for the RCP4.5 and the RCP8.5 forcing scenarios. This dataset is currently the highest resolution wave projection dataset available for Ireland. The EC-Earth ensemble predicts decreases in mean (up to 2 % for RCP4.5 and up to 3.5 % for RCP8.5) 10 m wind speeds over the North Atlantic Ocean (5-75° N, 0-80° W) by the end of the century, which will consequently affect swell generation for the Irish wave climate. The WAVEWATCH III® model predicts an overall decrease in annual and seasonal mean significant wave heights around Ireland, with the largest decreases in summer (up to 15 %) and winter (up to 10 %) for RCP8.5. Projected decreases in mean significant wave heights for spring and autumn were found to be small for both forcing scenarios (less than 5 %), with no significant decrease found for RCP4.5 off the west coast in those seasons.

  15. Relative role of El Niño and IOD forcing on the southern tropical Indian Ocean Rossby waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravorty, Soumi; Gnanaseelan, C.; Chowdary, J. S.; Luo, Jing-Jia

    2014-08-01

    The role of local air-sea interactions over the tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) and remote forcing from the tropical Pacific Ocean in the formation and maintenance of southern TIO Rossby waves during El Niño and positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) years is investigated. These Rossby waves are significantly intensified during the El Niño and IOD cooccurrence years, as compared to those during pure El Niño or IOD years. Coupled ocean-atmosphere model sensitivity experiments reveal that air-sea coupled processes in the TIO are responsible for the Rossby wave formation and its maintenance from boreal summer to fall, while remote forcing from the Pacific intensifies and maintains these waves up to the following spring. During the cooccurrence years, the Rossby waves are generated by both the persistent equatorial easterlies and off-equatorial wind stress curl. During pure El Niño years, however, only off-equatorial wind stress curl exists to drive weak Rossby wave. Asymmetric heating associated with IOD and the mean background easterly vertical wind shear (in the northern hemisphere) during summer and fall excite two symmetric anticyclones in both sides of the equator as atmospheric Rossby wave response, which are responsible for the anomalous equatorial surface easterlies. In contrast, symmetric heat sink over the Maritime Continent in winter associated with El Niño-induced subsidence and mean easterly vertical shear (in southern hemisphere) are responsible for strong anticyclone in the southern TIO, which supports off-equatorial wind stress curl.

  16. Concentric Parallel Combining Balun for Millimeter-Wave Power Amplifier in Low-Power CMOS with High-Power Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiang-An; Kong, Zhi-Hui; Ma, Kaixue; Yeo, Kiat Seng; Lim, Wei Meng

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a novel balun for a millimeter-wave power amplifier (PA) design to achieve high-power density in a 65-nm low-power (LP) CMOS process. By using a concentric winding technique, the proposed parallel combining balun with compact size accomplishes power combining and unbalance-balance conversion concurrently. For calculating its power combination efficiency in the condition of various amplitude and phase wave components, a method basing on S-parameters is derived. Based on the proposed parallel combining balun, a fabricated 60-GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band PA with single-ended I/O achieves an 18.9-dB gain and an 8.8-dBm output power at 1-dB compression and 14.3-dBm saturated output power ( P sat) at 62 GHz. This PA occupying only a 0.10-mm2 core area has demonstrated a high-power density of 269.15 mW/mm2 in 65 nm LP CMOS.

  17. Concentric Parallel Combining Balun for Millimeter-Wave Power Amplifier in Low-Power CMOS with High-Power Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiang-An; Kong, Zhi-Hui; Ma, Kaixue; Yeo, Kiat Seng; Lim, Wei Meng

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a novel balun for a millimeter-wave power amplifier (PA) design to achieve high-power density in a 65-nm low-power (LP) CMOS process. By using a concentric winding technique, the proposed parallel combining balun with compact size accomplishes power combining and unbalance-balance conversion concurrently. For calculating its power combination efficiency in the condition of various amplitude and phase wave components, a method basing on S-parameters is derived. Based on the proposed parallel combining balun, a fabricated 60-GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band PA with single-ended I/O achieves an 18.9-dB gain and an 8.8-dBm output power at 1-dB compression and 14.3-dBm saturated output power (P sat) at 62 GHz. This PA occupying only a 0.10-mm2 core area has demonstrated a high-power density of 269.15 mW/mm2 in 65 nm LP CMOS.

  18. Sea Spray Physics in Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Models for Hurricane Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, J.; Fairall, C. W.; Bianco, L.; Michelson, S. A.; Ginis, I.; Hara, T.; Thomas, B.

    2010-12-01

    Although it is widely recognized that sea spray under hurricane-strength winds is omnipresent in the marine surface boundary layer (MSBL), how to parameterize sea spray physics in coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean models for hurricane prediction still remains a subject of research. This paper focuses on how the effects of sea spray on the momentum and enthalpy fluxes are parameterized in an air-sea coupled modeling system using the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. In this scheme, the effects of sea spray can be considered as an additional modification to the stratification of the near surface profiles of wind, temperature and moisture in the MSBL. The overall impact of sea-spray droplets on the mean profiles of wind, temperature and moisture depends on the surface stress, wave state and sea surface temperature. As the wind speed increases, the droplet size increases, rendering an increase in the spray-mediated total enthalpy flux from the sea to the air and leveling off of the surface drag. When the wind is below 35 m/s, the droplets are small in size and tend to evaporate substantially and thus cool the spray-filled layer. When the wind is above 50 m/s, the size of droplets is so big that they do not have enough time to evaporate that much before falling back into the sea. Results from preliminary testing of the scheme in the coupled GFDL hurricane model are presented along our perspective of future direction for research on the subject.

  19. Mixing and Restratification in the Upper Ocean: Competing Mechanisms in the Wave-Averaged Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Sean

    The ocean mixed layer serves as buffer through which the deep ocean and atmosphere communicate. Fluxes of heat, momentum, fresh water, and gases must pass through the mixed layer, and phytoplankton flourish most in the mixed layer where light is abundant. The dynamics of the mixed layer influence these fluxes and productivity of phytoplankton by altering the stratification and mean flow. Restratifying hurricane wakes provide a unique setting in which a dramatically perturbed mixed layer is observable from satellite sea surface temperature. Strong horizontal temperature fronts which border these wakes suggest that two and three dimensional, adiabatic processes play a role. These observations provide the necessary parameters to estimate wake restratification timescales by surface heat fluxes (SF), Ekman buoyancy fluxes (EBF), and mixed layer eddies (MLEs). In the four wakes observed, the timescales for SF and EBF were comparable, while MLEs were much slower. The restratification time for MLEs is reduced for deeper and narrower wakes compared with other mechanisms. Therefore, stronger mixed layer fronts make MLEs competitive with surface heat and wind forcing. Fronts are influenced by winds, waves (Langmuir circulations; LC), MLEs, and symmetric instabilities (SI). The wave averaged (Stokes drift) effects on MLEs are subtle, with aligned (anti-aligned) Stokes and geostrophic flows yielding a slight increase (decrease) in wavenumber and growth rate. Frontal effects on LC are very weak, with the primary result confirming that increased vertical stratification suppresses LC. The effect of Stokes drift on SI is profound. It changes the background flow necessary for SI, and it alters the structure of the SI themselves. Analytic stability criteria show that iii SI exist when the Ertel potential vorticity (PV) is negative. When the Stokes drift is aligned (anti-aligned) with the geostrophic shear, the PV is increased (reduced). This PV criterion is confirmed in more

  20. Coupling Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion technology /OTEC/ with nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, M. K.; Rezachek, D.; Chen, C. S.

    The use of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Related Bottoming Cycle (ORBC) to recover the waste heat generated by a large nuclear or fossil power plant is considered. To take advantage of an ORBC, a plant must be located close to cold, deep ocean water, either open-ocean or shore-based. The ORBC can also be retrofitted to existing shore-based nuclear plants or it can be a part of the design of future plants. The increased efficiency of a nuclear floating system due to the ammonia bottoming cycle and ORBC systems is shown for the example of the proposed facility in Murata, Japan. It is noted that the size of the heat exchangers and the diameter of the cold water pipe would be relatively smaller for an ORBC than for a conventional ocean thermal energy conversion system.

  1. Propulsion of small launch vehicles using high power millimeter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Benford, J.; Myrabo, L.

    1994-12-31

    High power microwaves have been proposed for propulsion of vehicles and projectiles in the atmosphere and in space. The requirements in terms of high power microwave technology have not been examined in any detail. The need for improved propulsion technology is clear: chemical rockets orbit only a few percent of the liftoff mass at a cost of about 3,000$/lb. The key advantage of any beamed power approach is in placing the heavy and expensive components on the ground or in space. The authors propose a system with uses a two-stage propulsion method in which the first phase of ascent is based on the ramjet principle, a repetitive Pulsed Detonation Engine which uses a microwave-supported detonation to heat the air fuel. The second phase is a pure rocket. This paper explores this propulsion concept using millimeter waves, the most advantageous part of the spectrum. They find that efficient system concepts can be developed: the vehicle can have payload-to-mass ratios on the order of one and cost per pound to orbit one or two orders of magnitude less that chemical rockets.

  2. 77 FR 5817 - Ocean Renewable Power Company, Tidal Energy Project, Cobscook Bay, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ..., issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Dated: January 20, 2012. C.L. Roberge, Captain, U.S. Coast... five turbine generator units secured to the ocean floor, used for generating electricity from tidal... an underwater cable assembly to transfer electricity to a power control and grid interface...

  3. Seaglider Observations of Equatorial Ocean Rossby Wave Interactions With the Madden-Julian Oscillation During CINDY-DYNAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, B. G.; Matthews, A. J.; Heywood, K. J.; Stevens, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    During the CINDY-DYNAMO field campaign in 2011-12, a Seaglider was deployed at 80°E in the Indian Ocean, and patrolled between 3° and 4°S over a period of three months. In addition, the periods when the Seaglider was travelling to and from the deployment location at 1.5°S represent two independent sections almost four months apart. The 3-4°S data have been optimally interpolated to generate unique and very high resolution data sets of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll and oxygen, along with derived geostrophic velocities in a region that has been under-observed to date. These observations reveal the importance of equatorial ocean Rossby waves in generating intraseasonal variability in the subsurface Indian Ocean, with temperature anomalies of around 0.5°C and salinity anomalies of 0.1 due to such waves. These anomalies extend with only slightly reduced magnitude into the deep ocean up to the maximum observed depth of 1000 m. The latitudinal structure of the temperature, salinity and density anomalies is generally very coherent, consistent with the structure of first meridional mode equatorial ocean Rossby waves. The chlorophyll and oxygen data from the Seaglider show how these waves have a substantial impact on biological activity at this location, with the peak productivity shifting vertically by up to 20 metres due to upwelling and downwelling. Linearised numerical ocean model simulations were conducted for the period around the Seaglider deployment period, to put the observations in context. These model simulations were forced by ERA-Interim winds that were filtered to remove the high-frequency variability while retaining that relating to the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Comparison between the model runs and Seaglider observations indicates that the MJO-related winds are directly responsible for a large portion of the observed ocean Rossby wave activity, although there is also a role for lower-frequency wind forcing. The model results also highlight

  4. Seafloor P- to T-wave Conversion at the Scotia Volcanic-Arc, South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Dziak, R. P.; Park, M.; Lee, W.; Embley, R. W.; Fowler, M. J.; Monigle, P.

    2009-12-01

    In December '07, a one-year deployment of six autonomous hydrophones (AUH) was conducted off South Georgia Island in the Scotia Sea. The array had an average spacing of 280km, allowing us to monitor hydroacoustic events in a ~80,000 km2 area around the Scotia Volcanic Arc. Of the six, five AUHs were successfully recovered in January '09 and all five logged continuous low frequency acoustic signals throughout the deployment. Long-term spectral analysis shows a bell-shaped, seasonal ambient-noise pattern with high sound levels in Fall and low in mid-Winter, which is likely due to seasonal variations of sea-ice coverage. A total of 200 earthquakes and 232 ice tremors have been located to date with ~50% of the data being processed. In comparison, the NEIC (National Earthquake Information Center) registered 89 seismic events over the same time period, indicative of the high sensitivity of the hydroacoustic methods even at high latitudes. An evidence was found that the submarine portion of the Scotia Arc is acting as an acoustic radiator of hydroacoustic phases for earthquakes with epicenters east of the ridge. There is an early arriving T-wave that appears to radiate from the shallow bathymetry after traveling a considerable distance as a seismic phase through the ocean crust. The earlier arrival tends to be diffuse or emergent which may reflect the arc's parabolic shape as an acoustic radiator. The larger amplitude T-, which typically arrives several minutes after the converted phase. This is the first evidence that seismic energy from out rise and forearc events may travel through island arcs and be converted to acoustic T-waves on the opposite side, likely coupling into the water-column via down-slope conversion processes. We will discuss in detail the spectral content of the T-wave codas, as well as the arrival time patterns of the direct T- and long-range converted phases, which are consistent with the distances between the earthquake epicenters, volcanic-arc and

  5. Modeling of wave-induced irradiance fluctuations at near-surface depths in the ocean: a comparison with measurements.

    PubMed

    You, Yu; Stramski, Dariusz; Darecki, Miroslaw; Kattawar, George W

    2010-02-20

    We develop a computationally fast radiative transfer model for simulating the fluctuations of the underwater downwelling irradiance E(d) at near-surface depths, which occur due to focusing of sunlight by wind-driven surface waves. The model is based on the hybrid matrix operator-Monte Carlo method, which was specifically designed for simulating radiative transfer in a coupled atmosphere-surface-ocean system involving a dynamic ocean surface. In the current version of the model, we use a simplified description of surface waves, which accounts for surface slope statistics, but not surface wave elevation, as a direct source of underwater light fluctuations. We compare the model results with measurements made in the Santa Barbara Channel. The model-simulated and measured time series of E(d)(t) show remarkable similarity. Major features of the probability distribution of instantaneous irradiance, the frequency content of irradiance fluctuations, and the statistical properties of light flashes produced by wave focusing are also generally consistent between the model simulations and measurements for a few near-surface depths and light wavelengths examined. Despite the simplification in the representation of surface waves, this model provides a reasonable first-order approximation to modeling the wave focusing effects at near-surface depths, which require high temporal and spatial resolution (of the order of 1 ms and 1 mm, respectively) to be adequately resolved.

  6. 76 FR 42122 - Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC; Notice Concluding Pre-Filing Process and Approving Process...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC; Notice Concluding Pre-Filing Process and... By: Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC. e. Name of Project: Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Project....

  7. Power Amplifier Module with 734-mW Continuous Wave Output Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, King Man; Samoska, Lorene A.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Lamgrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Lin, Robert H.; Soria, Mary M.; Cooperrider, Joelle T.; Micovic, Moroslav; Kurdoghlian, Ara

    2010-01-01

    Research findings were reported from an investigation of new gallium nitride (GaN) monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers (PAs) targeting the highest output power and the highest efficiency for class-A operation in W-band (75-110 GHz). W-band PAs are a major component of many frequency multiplied submillimeter-wave LO signal sources. For spectrometer arrays, substantial W-band power is required due to the passive lossy frequency multipliers-to generate higher frequency signals in nonlinear Schottky diode-based LO sources. By advancing PA technology, the LO system performance can be increased with possible cost reductions compared to current GaAs PAs. High-power, high-efficiency GaN PAs are cross-cutting and can enable more efficient local oscillator distribution systems for new astrophysics and planetary receivers and heterodyne array instruments. It can also allow for a new, electronically scannable solid-state array technology for future Earth science radar instruments and communications platforms.

  8. A numerical model for ocean ultra-low frequency noise: wave-generated acoustic-gravity and Rayleigh modes.

    PubMed

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Lavanant, Thibaut; Obrebski, Mathias; Marié, Louis; Royer, Jean-Yves; d'Eu, Jean-François; Howe, Bruce M; Lukas, Roger; Aucan, Jerome

    2013-10-01

    The generation of ultra-low frequency acoustic noise (0.1 to 1 Hz) by the nonlinear interaction of ocean surface gravity waves is well established. More controversial are the quantitative theories that attempt to predict the recorded noise levels and their variability. Here a single theoretical framework is used to predict the noise level associated with propagating pseudo-Rayleigh modes and evanescent acoustic-gravity modes. The latter are dominant only within 200 m from the sea surface, in shallow or deep water. At depths larger than 500 m, the comparison of a numerical noise model with hydrophone records from two open-ocean sites near Hawaii and the Kerguelen islands reveal: (a) Deep ocean acoustic noise at frequencies 0.1 to 1 Hz is consistent with the Rayleigh wave theory, in which the presence of the ocean bottom amplifies the noise by 10 to 20 dB; (b) in agreement with previous results, the local maxima in the noise spectrum support the theoretical prediction for the vertical structure of acoustic modes; and (c) noise level and variability are well predicted for frequencies up to 0.4 Hz. Above 0.6 Hz, the model results are less accurate, probably due to the poor estimation of the directional properties of wind-waves with frequencies higher than 0.3 Hz.

  9. Estimating the Power per Mode Number and Power vs L-shell of Broadband, Storm-time ULF Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarris, T. E.; Li, X.; Liu, W.; Argyriadis, E.

    2013-12-01

    In studies of particles' radial diffusion processes in the magnetosphere it is well known that Ultra-Low Frequency (ULF) waves of frequency m*ωd can resonantly interact with particles of drift frequency ωd, where m is the azimuthal mode number of the waves; however due to difficulties in estimating m an over-simplifying assumption is often made in radial diffusion simulations, namely that all ULF wave power is located at m=1 or, in some cases, m=2. In another assumption that is commonly made, power measured from geosynchronous satellites is assumed to be uniform across L-shells. In the present work, a technique is presented for extracting information on the distribution of ULF wave power in a range of azimuthal mode numbers, through calculations of the cross-power and phase differences between a number of azimuthally aligned pairs of magnetometers, either in space or on the ground. We find that the temporal evolution of power at each mode number gives unique insight into the temporal evolution of ULF waves during a storm as well as a more accurate characterization of broadband ULF waves. Furthermore, using multi-spacecraft measurements during a particular storm, we calculate the L-dependence of ULF wave power. These measurements and calculations can be used in more accurate ULF wave representation in radial diffusion simulations.

  10. Passive buoyant tracers in the ocean surface boundary layer: 1. Influence of equilibrium wind-waves on vertical distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukulka, T.; Brunner, K.

    2015-05-01

    This paper is the first of a two part series that investigates passive buoyant tracers in the ocean surface boundary layer. The first part examines the influence of equilibrium wind-waves on vertical tracer distributions, based on large eddy simulations (LES) of the wave-averaged Navier-Stokes equation. The second part applies the model to investigate observations of buoyant microplastic marine debris, which has emerged as a major ocean pollutant. The LES model captures both Langmuir turbulence (LT) and enhanced turbulent kinetic energy input due to breaking waves (BW) by imposing equilibrium wind-wave statistics for a range of wind and wave conditions. Concentration profiles of LES agree well with analytic solutions obtained for an eddy diffusivity profile that is constant near the surface and transitions into the K-Profile Parameterization (KPP) profile shape at greater depth. For a range of wind and wave conditions, the eddy diffusivity normalized by the product of water-side friction velocity and mixed layer depth, h, mainly depends on a single nondimensional parameter, the peak wavelength (which is related to Stokes drift decay depth) normalized by h. For smaller wave ages, BW critically enhances near-surface mixing, while LT effects are relatively small. For greater wave ages, both BW and LT contribute to elevated near-surface mixing, and LT significantly increases turbulent transport at greater depth. We identify a range of realistic wind and wave conditions for which only Langmuir (and not BW or shear driven) turbulence is capable of deeply submerging buoyant tracers.

  11. High-power millimeter-wave rotary joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. H.; Yu, B. R.

    2009-03-01

    The rotary joint is a useful microwave component that connects a fixed part to a rotatable part. This study systematically analyzes the effect of the discontinuity on the interface of a rotary joint for several waveguide modes. Simulation results indicate that the transmission of the TE01 mode is independent of the geometry of the joint, and thus is ideal for such application. A rotary joint consisting of two identical TE01 mode converters, clasped each other by a bearing, is designed, fabricated, and tested. Back-to-back transmission measurements exhibit an excellent agreement to the results of computer simulations. The measured optimum transmission is 97% with a 3 dB bandwidth of 8.5 GHz, centered at 35.0 GHz. The cold measurement shows that the results are independent of the angle of rotation. In addition, a high-power experiment is conducted. The just developed rotary joint can operate up to a peak input power of 210 W with a duty of 18%. The working principle, although demonstrated in the millimeter-wave region, can be applied up to the terahertz region where the joint gap is generally critical except for the operating TE01 mode.

  12. High power continuous-wave titanium:sapphire laser

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, G.V.; Bass, I.L.; Hackel, R.P.; Jenkins, S.L.; Kanz, V.K.; Paisner, J.A.

    1993-09-21

    A high-power continuous-wave laser resonator is provided, wherein first, second, third, fourth, fifth and sixth mirrors form a double-Z optical cavity. A first Ti:sapphire rod is disposed between the second and third mirrors and at the mid-point of the length of the optical cavity, and a second Ti:sapphire rod is disposed between the fourth and fifth mirrors at a quarter-length point in the optical cavity. Each Ti:sapphire rod is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a pair of argon-ion lasers. For narrow band operation, a 3-plate birefringent filter and an etalon are disposed in the optical cavity so that the spectral output of the laser consists of 5 adjacent cavity modes. For increased power, seventy and eighth mirrors are disposed between the first and second mirrors to form a triple-Z optical cavity. A third Ti:sapphire rod is disposed between the seventh and eighth mirrors at the other quarter-length point in the optical cavity, and is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a third pair of argon-ion lasers. 5 figures.

  13. High power continuous-wave titanium:sapphire laser

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.; Bass, Isaac L.; Hackel, Richard P.; Jenkins, Sherman L.; Kanz, Vernon K.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    A high-power continuous-wave laser resonator (10) is provided, wherein first, second, third, fourth, fifth and sixth mirrors (11-16) form a double-Z optical cavity. A first Ti:Sapphire rod (17) is disposed between the second and third mirrors (12,13) and at the mid-point of the length of the optical cavity, and a second Ti:Sapphire rod (18) is disposed between the fourth and fifth mirrors (14,15) at a quarter-length point in the optical cavity. Each Ti:Sapphire rod (17,18) is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a pair of argon-ion lasers (21-22, 23-24). For narrow band operation, a 3-plate birefringent filter (36) and an etalon (37) are disposed in the optical cavity so that the spectral output of the laser consists of 5 adjacent cavity modes. For increased power, seventy and eighth mirrors (101, 192) are disposed between the first and second mirrors (11, 12) to form a triple-Z optical cavity. A third Ti:Sapphire rod (103) is disposed between the seventh and eighth mirrors (101, 102) at the other quarter-length point in the optical cavity, and is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a third pair of argon-ion lasers (104, 105).

  14. A novel slotted helix slow-wave structure for high power Ka-band traveling-wave tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu-Wei; Wei, Yan-Yu; Wang, Shao-Meng; Hou, Yan; Yin, Hai-Rong; Zhao, Guo-Qing; Duan, Zhao-Yun; Xu, Jin; Gong, Yu-Bin; Wang, Wen-Xiang; Yang, Ming-Hua

    2013-10-01

    A novel slotted helix slow-wave structure (SWS) is proposed to develop a high power, wide-bandwidth, and high reliability millimeter-wave traveling-wave tube (TWT). This novel structure, which has higher heat capacity than a conventional helix SWS, evolves from conventional helix SWS with three parallel rows of rectangular slots made in the outside of the helix tape. In this paper, the electromagnetic characteristics and the beam-wave interaction of this novel structure operating in the Ka-band are investigated. From our calculations, when the designed beam voltage and beam current are set to be 18.45 kV and 0.2 A, respectively, this novel circuit can produce over 700-W average output power in a frequency range from 27.5 GHz to 32.5 GHz, and the corresponding conversion efficiency values vary from 19% to 21.3%, and the maximum output power is 787 W at 30 GHz.

  15. The integration of remote sensing data into global weather prediction, wave forecasting, and ocean circulation computer based systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Data from infrared imaging systems and satellite infrared spectrometer (SIRS) for determining sea surface temperature and the atmospheric structure in cloudless areas over the oceans are discussed. Although some interpretations differ, it is clear that simultaneous measurements of radar sea return and passive microwave temperature will provide estimates of the wind speed, and perhaps wind direction, over the oceans, especially in cloudless areas, for a wide range of wind speeds. The problem of integrating the data that would be obtained by a spacecraft, especially one with a combination radar-radiometer, into global analysis procedures for meteorological, wave, and oceanographic predictions is described.

  16. Powerful surface-wave oscillators with two-dimensional periodic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu.; Malkin, A. M.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2012-04-02

    We propose planar relativistic surface-wave oscillators with two-dimensional periodic gratings. Additional transverse propagating waves emerging on these gratings synchronize the emission from the wide sheet rectilinear electron beam which allows realizing a Cherenkov millimeter wave oscillator with gigawatt output power.

  17. Detection of Rossby Waves in Multi-Parameters in Multi-Mission Satellite Observations and HYCOM Simulations in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, Bulusu; Heffner, David M.; Cromwell, David; Shriver, Jay F.

    2009-01-01

    Rossby waves are difficult to detect with in situ methods. However, as we show in this paper, they can be clearly identified in multi-parameters in multi-mission satellite observations of sea surface height (SSH), sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean color observations of chlorophyll-a (chl-a), as well as 1/12-deg global HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) simulations of SSH, SST and sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Indian Ocean. While the surface structure of Rossby waves can be elucidated from comparisons of the signal in different sea surface parameters, models are needed to gain direct information about how these waves affect the ocean at depth. The first three baroclinic modes of the Rossby waves are inferred from the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), and two-dimensional Radon Transform (2D RT). At many latitudes the first and second baroclinic mode Rossby wave phase speeds from satellite observations and model parameters are identified.

  18. Energy transport and secondary circulations due to vertically-propagating Yanai waves observed in the equatorial Indian Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, W.; Durland, T.; Moum, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Shipboard current measurements in the equatorial Indian Ocean in October and November of 2011 revealed oscillations in the meridional velocity with amplitude ~0.10m/s. These were clearest in a layer extending from ~300 to 600 m depth and had periods near 3 weeks. Phase propagation was upward. Measurements from a time series at the equator, four meridional transects and one zonal transect are used to identify the oscillation as a Yanai wave packet and to establish its dominant frequency and vertical wavelength. The Doppler shift is accounted for, so that measured wave properties are translated into the reference frame of the mean zonal flow. We take advantage of the fact that, in the depth range where the wave signal was clearest, the time-averaged current and buoyancy frequency were nearly uniform with depth, allowing application of the classical theoretical representation of vertically propagating waves. Using the theory, we estimate wave properties that are not directly measured, such as the group velocity and the zonal wavelength and phase speed. The theory predicts a vertical energy flux that is comparable to that carried by midlatitude near-inertial waves. Also predicted is an equatorward heat flux that is balanced, in the limit of a linear plane wave, by a wave-driven Eulerian mean flow. The volume transport carried by this mean flow is in turn balanced by the Stokes drift.

  19. Ocean thermal gradient as a generator of electricity. OTEC power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrique, Luna-Gomez Victor; Angel, Alatorre-Mendieta Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) is a power plant that uses the thermal gradient of the sea water between the surface and a depth of about 700 meters. It works by supplying the heat to a steam machine, for evaporation, with sea water from the surface and cold, to condense the steam, with deep sea water. The energy generated by the power plant OTEC can be transferred to the electric power grid, another use is to desalinate seawater. During the twentieth century in some countries experimental power plants to produce electricity or obtaining drinking water they were installed. On the Mexico's coast itself this thermal gradient, as it is located in tropical seas it occurs, so it has possibilities of installing OTEC power plant type. In this paper one type OTEC power plant operation is represented in most of its components.

  20. Location of high-frequency P wave microseismic noise in the Pacific Ocean using multiple small aperture arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Pyle, Moira L.; Koper, Keith D.; Euler, Garrett G.; Burlacu, Relu

    2015-04-20

    We investigate source locations of P-wave microseisms within a narrow frequency band (0.67–1.33 Hz) that is significantly higher than the classic microseism band (~0.05–0.3 Hz). Employing a backprojection method, we analyze data recorded during January 2010 from five International Monitoring System arrays that border the Pacific Ocean. We develop a ranking scheme that allows us to combine beam power from multiple arrays to obtain robust locations of the microseisms. Some individual arrays exhibit a strong regional component, but results from the combination of all arrays show high-frequency P wave energy emanating from the North Pacific basin, in general agreement with previous observations in the double-frequency (DF) microseism band (~0.1–0.3 Hz). This suggests that the North Pacific source of ambient P noise covers a broad range of frequencies and that the wave-wave interaction model is likely valid at shorter periods.

  1. Fitting dynamic models to the Geosat sea level observations in the tropical Pacific Ocean. I - A free wave model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Vazquez, Jorge; Perigaud, Claire

    1991-01-01

    Free, equatorially trapped sinusoidal wave solutions to a linear model on an equatorial beta plane are used to fit the Geosat altimetric sea level observations in the tropical Pacific Ocean. The Kalman filter technique is used to estimate the wave amplitude and phase from the data. The estimation is performed at each time step by combining the model forecast with the observation in an optimal fashion utilizing the respective error covariances. The model error covariance is determined such that the performance of the model forecast is optimized. It is found that the dominant observed features can be described qualitatively by basin-scale Kelvin waves and the first meridional-mode Rossby waves. Quantitatively, however, only 23 percent of the signal variance can be accounted for by this simple model.

  2. Numerical wave modelling with WAVEWATCH III: numerics and parameterizations for the coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, F.; Roland, A.; Dutour, M.; Leckler, F.

    2014-12-01

    The development of numerical wave models for coastal applications, including coupling with ocean circulation models, has spurred an on-going effort on theoretical foundations, numerical techniques and physical parameterizations. Some important aspects of this effort are reviewed here, and results are shown in different settings including the French Atlantic, Hawaii and U.S. West Coast, using version 4.18 of the WAVEWATCH III® modelling framework. Compared to previous results, the model errors have been strongly reduced thanks to, among other things, the introduction of currents, coastal reflection, and bottom sediment types. This last item allowed unprecedented accuracy at some sites along the French Atlantic coast. The adequate resolution, necessary to represent strong gradients in tidal currents, was made possible by the efficiency brought by unstructured grids. A further increase in resolution, necessary to resolve surf zones and still cover vast regions is now made possible by the use of implicit schemes. First results with that scheme are presented here and should be made available in a future version 5.xx of WAVEWATCH III.

  3. Tsunami waves extensively resurfaced the shorelines of an early Martian ocean.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J Alexis P; Fairén, Alberto G; Tanaka, Kenneth L; Zarroca, Mario; Linares, Rogelio; Platz, Thomas; Komatsu, Goro; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Kargel, Jeffrey S; Yan, Jianguo; Gulick, Virginia; Higuchi, Kana; Baker, Victor R; Glines, Natalie

    2016-05-19

    It has been proposed that ~3.4 billion years ago an ocean fed by enormous catastrophic floods covered most of the Martian northern lowlands. However, a persistent problem with this hypothesis is the lack of definitive paleoshoreline features. Here, based on geomorphic and thermal image mapping in the circum-Chryse and northwestern Arabia Terra regions of the northern plains, in combination with numerical analyses, we show evidence for two enormous tsunami events possibly triggered by bolide impacts, resulting in craters ~30 km in diameter and occurring perhaps a few million years apart. The tsunamis produced widespread littoral landforms, including run-up water-ice-rich and bouldery lobes, which extended tens to hundreds of kilometers over gently sloping plains and boundary cratered highlands, as well as backwash channels where wave retreat occurred on highland-boundary surfaces. The ice-rich lobes formed in association with the younger tsunami, showing that their emplacement took place following a transition into a colder global climatic regime that occurred after the older tsunami event. We conclude that, on early Mars, tsunamis played a major role in generating and resurfacing coastal terrains.

  4. Tsunami waves extensively resurfaced the shorelines of an early Martian ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. Alexis P.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Zarroca, Mario; Linares, Rogelio; Platz, Thomas; Komatsu, Goro; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Yan, Jianguo; Gulick, Virginia; Higuchi, Kana; Baker, Victor R.; Glines, Natalie

    2016-05-01

    It has been proposed that ~3.4 billion years ago an ocean fed by enormous catastrophic floods covered most of the Martian northern lowlands. However, a persistent problem with this hypothesis is the lack of definitive paleoshoreline features. Here, based on geomorphic and thermal image mapping in the circum-Chryse and northwestern Arabia Terra regions of the northern plains, in combination with numerical analyses, we show evidence for two enormous tsunami events possibly triggered by bolide impacts, resulting in craters ~30 km in diameter and occurring perhaps a few million years apart. The tsunamis produced widespread littoral landforms, including run-up water-ice-rich and bouldery lobes, which extended tens to hundreds of kilometers over gently sloping plains and boundary cratered highlands, as well as backwash channels where wave retreat occurred on highland-boundary surfaces. The ice-rich lobes formed in association with the younger tsunami, showing that their emplacement took place following a transition into a colder global climatic regime that occurred after the older tsunami event. We conclude that, on early Mars, tsunamis played a major role in generating and resurfacing coastal terrains.

  5. Tsunami waves extensively resurfaced the shorelines of an early Martian ocean.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J Alexis P; Fairén, Alberto G; Tanaka, Kenneth L; Zarroca, Mario; Linares, Rogelio; Platz, Thomas; Komatsu, Goro; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Kargel, Jeffrey S; Yan, Jianguo; Gulick, Virginia; Higuchi, Kana; Baker, Victor R; Glines, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that ~3.4 billion years ago an ocean fed by enormous catastrophic floods covered most of the Martian northern lowlands. However, a persistent problem with this hypothesis is the lack of definitive paleoshoreline features. Here, based on geomorphic and thermal image mapping in the circum-Chryse and northwestern Arabia Terra regions of the northern plains, in combination with numerical analyses, we show evidence for two enormous tsunami events possibly triggered by bolide impacts, resulting in craters ~30 km in diameter and occurring perhaps a few million years apart. The tsunamis produced widespread littoral landforms, including run-up water-ice-rich and bouldery lobes, which extended tens to hundreds of kilometers over gently sloping plains and boundary cratered highlands, as well as backwash channels where wave retreat occurred on highland-boundary surfaces. The ice-rich lobes formed in association with the younger tsunami, showing that their emplacement took place following a transition into a colder global climatic regime that occurred after the older tsunami event. We conclude that, on early Mars, tsunamis played a major role in generating and resurfacing coastal terrains. PMID:27196957

  6. Investigating the seasonal predictability of significant wave height in the West Pacific and Indian Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Hosmay; Kirtman, Ben P.

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates seasonal prediction skill of significant wave height (SWH) in the West Pacific and Indian Oceans. We forced the WAVEWATCH III model with 10 m winds from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Reanalysis-2 and from the Community Climate System Model version 4 North American Multi-Model Ensemble retrospective forecasts for the period of January 1979 to December 2013. Results indicate potential for predicting SWH with several months lead time during boreal summers after the warm phase of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) measured by deterministic and probabilistic skill scores in the Northwest Pacific and Bay of Bengal. During these summers, SWH is smaller than normal due to reduced atmospheric synoptic activity associated with an anomalously anticyclone in the western Pacific, leading to larger signal-to-noise ratio in the 10 m winds, hence increasing SWH prediction skill. It is shown that ENSO has a nonlinear influence on the number of extremely large SWH events, with reduced number of extreme occurrences during boreal summers after the warm phase of ENSO.

  7. Large-Amplitude, Scattered Tsunami Wave Mapping Enabled by Ocean Bottom Seismometer Array Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Kohler, M. D.; Ampuero, J. P.; Sutton, J.

    2015-12-01

    A deployment of ocean bottom seismometers off the coast of southern California recorded the March 2011 Tohoku tsunami on 22 differential pressure gauges (DPGs). The DPG tsunami records across the entire array show multiple large-amplitude, coherent phases arriving one hour to more than 36 hours after the initial tsunami phase. Analysis of the DPG recordings reveals possible locations of the geographical sources that contributed to secondary tsunami arrivals in southern California. A beamforming technique is applied to the DPG data to determine the azimuths and arrival times of scattered wave energy. In addition, a backward ray tracing procedure is applied to a wide range of back azimuth starting values from the DPG array to map possible source locations. The results show several possible candidates of secondary tsunami source structures. These include the Alaskan Peninsula island chain producing a tsunami arrival ~60 minutes after the first arrival, and the Hawaiian Islands producing an arrival ~170 minutes after the first arrival. The results are mapped into modified tsunami warning messages to show how a time-varying hazard could be communicated with more effective message format and content. The results are demonstrating the effects of including clearly described locations, time of impact, and hazard impact consequences on message perception among the public.

  8. Tsunami waves extensively resurfaced the shorelines of an early Martian ocean

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J. Alexis P.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Zarroca, Mario; Linares, Rogelio; Platz, Thomas; Komatsu, Goro; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Yan, Jianguo; Gulick, Virginia; Higuchi, Kana; Baker, Victor R.; Glines, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that ~3.4 billion years ago an ocean fed by enormous catastrophic floods covered most of the Martian northern lowlands. However, a persistent problem with this hypothesis is the lack of definitive paleoshoreline features. Here, based on geomorphic and thermal image mapping in the circum-Chryse and northwestern Arabia Terra regions of the northern plains, in combination with numerical analyses, we show evidence for two enormous tsunami events possibly triggered by bolide impacts, resulting in craters ~30 km in diameter and occurring perhaps a few million years apart. The tsunamis produced widespread littoral landforms, including run-up water-ice-rich and bouldery lobes, which extended tens to hundreds of kilometers over gently sloping plains and boundary cratered highlands, as well as backwash channels where wave retreat occurred on highland-boundary surfaces. The ice-rich lobes formed in association with the younger tsunami, showing that their emplacement took place following a transition into a colder global climatic regime that occurred after the older tsunami event. We conclude that, on early Mars, tsunamis played a major role in generating and resurfacing coastal terrains. PMID:27196957

  9. Quantifying Beach Response to Episodic Large Wave Events, a Predictive Empirical Model, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    Predicting beach response on an event scale is extremely difficult due to highly variable spatial and temporal conditions, lack of data on antecedent beach morphology, generic model shortcomings, and uncertainty of local forcing parameters. Each beach system is unique and classical beach erosion models may not be applicable to many high-energy beaches, especially those receiving large long-period waves. Therefore, developing an empirical model is the best way to predict future beach response at a given site. Based on 12 closely spaced (temporally) GPS topographic surveys during the winter of 2005-2006 at Ocean Beach, in San Francisco, California, we have developed a predictive empirical model that relates sub-aerial beach response to observed wave height, period, and direction. The model will provide important information to coastal managers, who will be able to better predict and mitigate possible loss from a forecasted wave event. Ocean Beach, located immediately south of the Golden Gate in San Francisco, is a high-energy, intermediate- slope beach that is exposed to waves generated in both the North and South Pacific. Winter breaking wave heights frequently reach 4 m and can exceed 7 m, with periods sometimes greater than 20 s. Our observations demonstrate that large seasonal variations in the sub-aerial beach profile are likely forced by several single large wave events. These events have led to the partial destruction of a recreational parking lot at the south end of the beach where an erosion hot spot is currently located, and continued erosion will threaten other parts of public infrastructure. This study, in combination with other ongoing research at Ocean Beach, will provide valuable insight that will not only aid local personnel in their management decisions but also contribute to a better understanding of sediment transport at high-energy beaches.

  10. Comparison of fractional wave equations for power law attenuation in ultrasound and elastography.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sverre; Näsholm, Sven Peter

    2014-04-01

    A set of wave equations with fractional loss operators in time and space are analyzed. The fractional Szabo equation, the power law wave equation and the causal fractional Laplacian wave equation are all found to be low-frequency approximations of the fractional Kelvin-Voigt wave equation and the more general fractional Zener wave equation. The latter two equations are based on fractional constitutive equations, whereas the former wave equations have been derived from the desire to model power law attenuation in applications like medical ultrasound. This has consequences for use in modeling and simulation, especially for applications that do not satisfy the low-frequency approximation, such as shear wave elastography. In such applications, the wave equations based on constitutive equations are the viable ones.

  11. Wave propagation downstream of a high power helicon in a dipolelike magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, James; Winglee, Robert; Roberson, B. Race; Ziemba, Timothy

    2010-01-15

    The wave propagating downstream of a high power helicon source in a diverging magnetic field was investigated experimentally. The magnetic field of the wave has been measured both axially and radially. The three-dimensional structure of the propagating wave is observed and its wavelength and phase velocity are determined. The measurements are compared to predictions from helicon theory and that of a freely propagating whistler wave. The implications of this work on the helicon as a thruster are also discussed.

  12. Reconstruction of 137Cs activity in the ocean following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Aoyama, Michio; Tsubono, Takaki; Tateda, Yutaka; Misumi, Kazuhiro; Hayami, Hiroshi; Toyoda, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Yoshikatsu; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    2014-05-01

    A series of accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant following the earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011 resulted in the release of radioactive materials to the ocean by two major pathways, direct release from the accident site and atmospheric deposition. We reconstructed spatiotemporal variability of 137Cs activity in the ocean by the comparison model simulations and observed data. We employed a regional scale and the North Pacific scale oceanic dispersion models, an atmospheric transport model, a sediment transport model, a dynamic biological compartment model for marine biota and river runoff model to investigate the oceanic contamination. Direct releases of 137Cs were estimated for more than 2 years after the accident by comparing simulated results and observed activities very close to the site. The estimated total amounts of directly released 137Cs was 3.6±0.7 PBq. Directly release rate of 137Cs decreased exponentially with time by the end of December 2012 and then, was almost constant. The daily release rate of 137Cs was estimated to be 3.0 x 1010 Bq day-1 by the end of September 2013. The activity of directly released 137Cs was detectable only in the coastal zone after December 2012. Simulated 137Cs activities attributable to direct release were in good agreement with observed activities, a result that implies the estimated direct release rate was reasonable, while simulated 137Cs activities attributable to atmospheric deposition were low compared to measured activities. The rate of atmospheric deposition onto the ocean was underestimated because of a lack of measurements of dose rate and air activity of 137Cs over the ocean when atmospheric deposition rates were being estimated. Observed 137Cs activities attributable to atmospheric deposition in the ocean helped to improve the accuracy of simulated atmospheric deposition rates. Although there is no observed data of 137Cs activity in the ocean from 11 to 21 March 2011, observed data of

  13. Minimal-resource computer program for automatic generation of ocean wave ray or crest diagrams in shoaling waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Lecroy, S. R.; Morris, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program for studying linear ocean wave refraction is described. The program features random-access modular bathymetry data storage. Three bottom topography approximation techniques are available in the program which provide varying degrees of bathymetry data smoothing. Refraction diagrams are generated automatically and can be displayed graphically in three forms: Ray patterns with specified uniform deepwater ray density, ray patterns with controlled nearshore ray density, or crest patterns constructed by using a cubic polynomial to approximate crest segments between adjacent rays.

  14. Ocean energy - Forms and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, J. D.; Schmitt, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The primary nonpetroleum power sources of the sea can be classified as mechanical (waves, tides and currents), chemical (salinity gradients and biomass), and thermal (temperature gradients, including ice). Power potential of each of these sources, their particular characteristics, geographic distribution, energy density and feasibility of practical utilization are analyzed. Waves, tides and currents are already employed to produce power. Examples of some existing practical devices which utilize tidal and wave power are: wave pumps, Salter's Duck power plants, and tidal power plants. Different approaches to utilizing other marine power sources are discussed. The complexity of practical devices for the extraction of power seems to vary with energy density, the salinity gradient requiring the most complex approaches and the currents the simplest. Even more important than direct utilization of ocean energy may be the use of seawater as a coolant and of the sediments below the seabed for the disposal of nuclear wastes.

  15. An oscillating wave energy converter with nonlinear snap-through Power-Take-Off systems in regular waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xian-tao; Yang, Jian-min; Xiao, Long-fei

    2016-07-01

    Floating oscillating bodies constitute a large class of wave energy converters, especially for offshore deployment. Usually the Power-Take-Off (PTO) system is a directly linear electric generator or a hydraulic motor that drives an electric generator. The PTO system is simplified as a linear spring and a linear damper. However the conversion is less powerful with wave periods off resonance. Thus, a nonlinear snap-through mechanism with two symmetrically oblique springs and a linear damper is applied in the PTO system. The nonlinear snap-through mechanism is characteristics of negative stiffness and double-well potential. An important nonlinear parameter γ is defined as the ratio of half of the horizontal distance between the two springs to the original length of both springs. Time domain method is applied to the dynamics of wave energy converter in regular waves. And the state space model is used to replace the convolution terms in the time domain equation. The results show that the energy harvested by the nonlinear PTO system is larger than that by linear system for low frequency input. While the power captured by nonlinear converters is slightly smaller than that by linear converters for high frequency input. The wave amplitude, damping coefficient of PTO systems and the nonlinear parameter γ affect power capture performance of nonlinear converters. The oscillation of nonlinear wave energy converters may be local or periodically inter well for certain values of the incident wave frequency and the nonlinear parameter γ, which is different from linear converters characteristics of sinusoidal response in regular waves.

  16. High-power picosecond terahertz-wave generation in photonic crystal fiber via four-wave mixing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huihui; Liu, Hongjun; Huang, Nan; Sun, Qibing; Wen, Jin

    2011-09-20

    We demonstrate picosecond terahertz (THz)-wave generation via four-wave mixing in an octagonal photonic crystal fiber (O-PCF). Perfect phase-matching is obtained at the pump wavelength of 1.55 μm and a generation scheme is proposed. Using this method, THz waves can be generated in the frequency range of 7.07-7.74 THz. Moreover, peak power of 2.55 W, average power of 1.53 mW, and peak conversion efficiency of more than -66.65 dB at 7.42 THz in a 6.25 cm long fiber are realized with a pump peak power of 2 kW.

  17. A Novel Multimode Waveguide Coupler for Accurate Power Measurement of Traveling Wave Tube Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler fabricated from two dissimilar waveguides is capable of isolating the power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). In addition to accurate power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  18. Design of High-Power, MM-Wave Traveling-Wave Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsten, Bruce E.; Earley, Lawrence M.; Haynes, W. Brian; Wheat, Robert M.

    2002-08-01

    Simulations have indicated that emerging electron sheet-beam technology can drive simple rippled and stepped waveguide traveling-wave tubes with extremely high gain. There are many design possibilities that need to be evaluated. The interaction can be made with the n=-1 (backward wave), n=0 (fundamental forward wave), or n=+1 (first space harmonic forward wave) interactions. In this paper, we discuss some of the fundamental design issues.

  19. A passive low frequency instrument for radio wave sounding the subsurface oceans of the Jovian icy moons: An instrument concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartogh, P.; Ilyushin, Ya. A.

    2016-10-01

    Exploration of subsurface oceans on Jovian icy moons is a key issue of the icy moons' geology. Electromagnetic wave propagation is the only way to probe their icy mantles from the orbit. In the present paper, a principal concept of a passive interferometric instrument for deep sounding of the icy moons' crust is proposed. Its working principle is measuring and correlating Jupiter's radio wave emissions with reflections from the deep sub-surface of the icy moons. A number of the functional aspects of the proposed experiment are studied, in particular, impact of the wave scattering on the surface terrain on the instrument performance and digital sampling of the noisy signal. Results of the test of the laboratory prototype of the instrument are also presented in the paper.

  20. The impact of sea surface currents in wave power potential modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Kallos, George; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Kalogeri, Christina; Liakatas, Aristotelis; Stylianou, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The impact of sea surface currents to the estimation and modeling of wave energy potential over an area of increased economic interest, the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, is investigated in this work. High-resolution atmospheric, wave, and circulation models, the latter downscaled from the regional Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) of the Copernicus marine service (former MyOcean regional MFS system), are utilized towards this goal. The modeled data are analyzed by means of a variety of statistical tools measuring the potential changes not only in the main wave characteristics, but also in the general distribution of the wave energy and the wave parameters that mainly affect it, when using sea surface currents as a forcing to the wave models. The obtained results prove that the impact of the sea surface currents is quite significant in wave energy-related modeling, as well as temporally and spatially dependent. These facts are revealing the necessity of the utilization of the sea surface currents characteristics in renewable energy studies in conjunction with their meteo-ocean forecasting counterparts.

  1. On the nature of ULF wave power during nightside auroral activations and substorms: 2. Temporal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, I. J.; Murphy, K. R.; Watt, C. E. J.; Mann, I. R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the time evolution of ground magnetic fluctuations in three (12-48 s, 24-96 s and 48-192 s) period bands during nightside auroral activations. We use an independently derived auroral activation list composed of both substorms and pseudo-breakups to provide an estimate of the activation times of nightside aurora during periods with comprehensive ground magnetometer coverage. One hundred eighty-one events in total are studied to demonstrate the statistical nature of the time evolution of magnetic wave power during the ˜30 min surrounding auroral activations. We find that the magnetic wave power is approximately constant before an auroral activation, starts to grow up to 90 s prior to the optical onset time, maximizes a few minutes after the auroral activation, then decays slightly to a new, and higher, constant level. Importantly, magnetic ULF wave power always remains elevated after an auroral activation, whether it is a substorm or a pseudo-breakup. We subsequently divide the auroral activation list into events that formed part of ongoing auroral activity and events that had little preceding geomagnetic activity. We find that the evolution of wave power in the ˜10-200 s period band essentially behaves in the same manner through auroral onset, regardless of event type. The absolute power across ULF wave bands, however, displays a power law-like dependency throughout a 30 min period centered on auroral onset time. We also find evidence of a secondary maximum in wave power at high latitudes ˜10 min following isolated substorm activations. Most significantly, we demonstrate that magnetic wave power levels persist after auroral activations for ˜10 min, which is consistent with recent findings of wave-driven auroral precipitation during substorms. This suggests that magnetic wave power and auroral particle precipitation are intimately linked and key components of the substorm onset process.

  2. Chromospheric alfvenic waves strong enough to power the solar wind.

    PubMed

    De Pontieu, B; McIntosh, S W; Carlsson, M; Hansteen, V H; Tarbell, T D; Schrijver, C J; Title, A M; Shine, R A; Tsuneta, S; Katsukawa, Y; Ichimoto, K; Suematsu, Y; Shimizu, T; Nagata, S

    2007-12-01

    Alfvén waves have been invoked as a possible mechanism for the heating of the Sun's outer atmosphere, or corona, to millions of degrees and for the acceleration of the solar wind to hundreds of kilometers per second. However, Alfvén waves of sufficient strength have not been unambiguously observed in the solar atmosphere. We used images of high temporal and spatial resolution obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope onboard the Japanese Hinode satellite to reveal that the chromosphere, the region sandwiched between the solar surface and the corona, is permeated by Alfvén waves with strong amplitudes on the order of 10 to 25 kilometers per second and periods of 100 to 500 seconds. Estimates of the energy flux carried by these waves and comparisons with advanced radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations indicate that such Alfvén waves are energetic enough to accelerate the solar wind and possibly to heat the quiet corona. PMID:18063784

  3. Chromospheric alfvenic waves strong enough to power the solar wind.

    PubMed

    De Pontieu, B; McIntosh, S W; Carlsson, M; Hansteen, V H; Tarbell, T D; Schrijver, C J; Title, A M; Shine, R A; Tsuneta, S; Katsukawa, Y; Ichimoto, K; Suematsu, Y; Shimizu, T; Nagata, S

    2007-12-01

    Alfvén waves have been invoked as a possible mechanism for the heating of the Sun's outer atmosphere, or corona, to millions of degrees and for the acceleration of the solar wind to hundreds of kilometers per second. However, Alfvén waves of sufficient strength have not been unambiguously observed in the solar atmosphere. We used images of high temporal and spatial resolution obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope onboard the Japanese Hinode satellite to reveal that the chromosphere, the region sandwiched between the solar surface and the corona, is permeated by Alfvén waves with strong amplitudes on the order of 10 to 25 kilometers per second and periods of 100 to 500 seconds. Estimates of the energy flux carried by these waves and comparisons with advanced radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations indicate that such Alfvén waves are energetic enough to accelerate the solar wind and possibly to heat the quiet corona.

  4. A 35 GHz wireless millimeter-wave power sensor based on GaAs micromachining technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, De-bo; Liao, Xiao-ping

    2012-06-01

    A novel MEMS wireless millimeter-wave power sensor based on GaAs MMIC technology is presented in this paper. The principle of this wireless millimeter-wave power sensor is explained. It is designed and fabricated using MEMS technology and the GaAs MMIC process. With the millimeter-wave power range from 0.1 to 80 mW, the sensitivity of the wireless millimeter-wave power sensor is about 0.246 mV mW-1 at 35 GHz. In order to verify the power detection capability, this wireless power sensor is mounted on a PCB which influences the microwave performance of the CPW-fed antenna including the return loss and the radiation pattern. The frequency-dependent characteristic and the degree-dependent characteristic of this wireless power sensor are researched. Furthermore, in addition to the combination of the advantages of CPW-fed antenna with the advantages of the thermoelectric power sensor, another significant advantage of this wireless millimeter-wave power sensor is that it can be integrated with MMICs and other planar connecting circuit structures with zero dc power consumption. These features make it suitable for various applications ranging from the environment or space radiation detection systems to radar receiver and transmitter systems.

  5. Low-power four-wave mixing in porous silicon microring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simbula, A.; Rodriguez, G. A.; Menotti, M.; De Pace, S.; Weiss, S. M.; Galli, M.; Liscidini, M.; Bajoni, D.

    2016-07-01

    We report the measurement of low-power continuous-wave four-wave mixing in porous silicon microring resonators operating in the 1550 nm telecom band. Resonantly enhanced stimulated four-wave mixing has been measured in rings with 25 μm radius and quality factor around 5000 for pump powers as low as a few hundreds of microwatts. A waveguide nonlinear parameter γ = 20 W-1 m-1 has been determined. These results suggest further research on porous silicon for low-power nonlinear optics, possibly taking advantage of its tunable porosity.

  6. Downward Wave Coupling Changes in Response to Future Climate Change, Two Way Atmosphere/Ocean Coupling and QBO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellyanto Lubis, Sandro; Matthes, Katja; Harnik, Nili; Omrani, Nour-Eddine

    2014-05-01

    Wave reflection in the stratosphere can impact the troposphere via a well-defined, high latitude meridional waveguide that is bounded above by a vertical reflecting surface. Such wave reflection is known as downward wave coupling (DWC). Recent studies have shown that stratospheric ozone affects DWC, affecting wave propagation and subsequent wave-mean flow interaction in the Southern Hemisphere. However the factors controlling DWC in the Northern Hemisphere are still unclear. There is new evidence that the frequency of Major Stratospheric Warming (MSW) is significantly influenced by the QBO and two-way ocean/ atmosphere interaction. However the resulting impact on DWC has thus far not been investigated. Here we examine the impact of future climate change, two way atmosphere/ ocean coupling, and the QBO on wave geometry and DWC using different CESM-WACCM model experiments. A transient simulation of present and future climate (1955-2099), with green house gases (GHG) and ozone depleting substances (ODS) following the RCP 8.5 scenario, shows the largest reduction in the DWC over last few decades of the simulation. This reduction is associated with an absence of the vertical reflecting surface and statistically insignificant downward wave reflection. Comparison to an experiment with GHG/ODS fixed at 1960s levels, shows no indication of DWC-changes. The lack of a DWC response is associated with insignificant changes of the background wind states, whose vertical structure directly impacts the DWC. The comparison of this experiment with simulations with and without QBO nudging shows that the QBO strengthens the DWC. This can be explained by the fact that our nonQBO simulation has a permanent, strong QBO-like east phase, which dampens the DWC. Comparison of experiments with dynamically-coupled and fixed SSTs shows that the background zonal wind is strengthened significantly when the ocean/atmosphere interaction is removed. However, no apparent strengthening of DWC is seen

  7. The shear wave velocity of the upper mantle beneath the Bay of Bengal, Northeast Indian Ocean from interstation phase velocities of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, S. N.; Mitra, Supriyo; Suresh, G.

    2013-06-01

    The Bay of Bengal evolved along the eastern margin of the Indian subcontinent about 130 Ma with the breakup of India from eastern Gondwanaland. Since then the Indian lithospheric Plate has moved northward, along with the Bay of Bengal, and eventually collided with the Eurasian Plate. The age of the lithosphere beneath the central Bay of Bengal is ˜110 Ma. We evaluate the shear wave velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the central Bay through inversion of phase velocities of fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves along two wave paths: (i) between Port Blair (PBA) and VIS (Visakhapatnam) and (ii) between DGPR (Diglipur) and VIS. The seismological observatories PBA and DGPR are located on the Andaman Island and to the east of the Bay and the observatory at VIS in located on the eastern coast of India to the west of the Bay. Using broad-band records of earthquakes, which lie along the great circle arc joining each pair of observatories, we obtain phase velocities between 20 and 240 s periods for Rayleigh waves and between 23 and 170 s for Love waves. These phase velocities are inverted to find the S-wave velocity structure of the upper mantle down to 400 km. The crustal structure is based on previous studies of the Bay and kept fixed in the inversion. We obtain a radially anisotropic upper-mantle structure, where the SH-wave velocity (VSH) is greater than the SV-wave velocity (VSV) down to 400 km. The S-wave velocity decreases sharply by ˜4.5 per cent for VSV and ˜1.5 per cent for VSH at a depth 110 km, which is considered as the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere boundary (LAB), that is, the bottom of the mantle lid. Based on recent studies, such sharp fall of S-wave velocity below the mantle lid appears to indicate a partially molten thin layer (G-discontinuity) at this depth. The thickness of the mantle lid is intermediate between oceanic and continental regions. The lid is also characterized

  8. Modeling of the Acoustic Reverberation Special Research Program deep ocean seafloor scattering experiments using a hybrid wave propagation simulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Levander, Alan; Holliger, Klaus

    1996-02-01

    Quantitative modeling of bottom-interacting ocean acoustic waves is complicated by the long propagation ranges and by the complexity of the scattering targets. We employ a two-dimensional (2-D) hybrid technique combining Gaussian beam, finite difference, and Kirchhoff integral solutions of the wave equation to simulate ocean acoustic experiments within half of a convergence zone in the SOFAR channel. The 2-D modeling approach is reasonable due to the one-dimensional (1-D) velocity distribution in the water column and the strong lineation of the seafloor morphology parallel to the mid-ocean ridges. Full-waveform modeling of ocean acoustic data requires that the topography and the material properties of the seafloor are available at scales that are several orders of magnitude smaller than typical bathymetric sampling rates. We have therefore investigated the effects on the ocean acoustic response of a stochastic interpolation scheme used to generate seafloor models. For typical grazing angles of the incident wave field (approximately 5°-20°), we found that different stochastic realizations of the same seafloor segment (sampled at 200 m) yield an intrinsic uncertainty of the order of 3-8 dB in amplitude and 0.1-0.3 s in time for individual prominent events in the reverberant acoustic field. Hybrid simulations are compared to beam-formed ocean acoustic data collected during the Acoustic Reverberation Special Research Program (ARSRP) cruises. Side lobe noise in the observed acoustic data is simulated by adding band-limited white noise at -30 dB relative to the maximum intensity in the synthetic data. Numerical simulations can be limited to the response of only one of the mirror azimuth beams provided that the experimental geometry is suitably chosen. For the 2-D approximation to be valid, the cross-range resolution of the observed data must be smaller than the characteristic scale of seafloor lineations, and the beams of interest must be approximately perpendicular to

  9. Excitation of small-scale waves in the F region of the ionosphere by powerful HF radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Chernyshev, M. Y.; Kornienko, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    Ionospheric small-scale waves in the F region, initiated by heating facilities in Nizhniy Novgorod, have been studied by the method of field-aligned scattering of diagnostic HF radio signals. Experimental data have been obtained on the radio path Kiev-N. Novgorod-St. Petersburg during heating campaigns with heater radiated power ERP = 20 MW and 100 MW. Observations of scattered HF signals have been made by a Doppler spectrum device with high temporal resolution. Analysis of the experimental data shows a relation between the heater power level and the parameters of ionospheric small-scale oscillations falling within the range of Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations. It is found that the periods of wave processes in the F region of the ionosphere, induced by the heating facility, decrease with increasing heating power. The level of heating power also has an impact on the horizontal east-west component of the electric field E, the vertical component of the Doppler velocity Vd and the amplitude of the vertical displacements M of the heated region. Typical magnitudes of these parameters are the following: E = 1.25 mVm, Vd = 6 ms, M = 600-1500 m for ERP = 20 MW and E = 2.5-4.5 mVm, Vd = 11-25 ms, M = 1000-5000 m for ERP = 100 MW. The results obtained confirm the hypothesis of excitation of the Alfvén resonator by powerful HF radio waves which leads to the generation of magnetic field oscillations in the heated region giving rise to artificial Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations and ionospheric small-scale wave processes. In this situation an increase of the heater power would lead to a growth of the electric field of hydromagnetic waves propagating in the ionosphere as well as the amplitude of the vertical displacements of the heated region.

  10. Optimizing OBS data using shielding and by removing ocean wave loading noise with Pressure and Horizontal Pressure Gradient Sensor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Spahr C.; Barclay, Andrew H.

    2016-04-01

    Ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data, particularly from sites in shallow water are notoriously noisy. Ocean currents generate forces on an unshielded OBS sensor causing time varying tilt that greatly raises noise levels. Shallow burial can mitigate this source of noise, but is expensive and difficult to accomplish, particularly for large fleets of instruments. Large shields can provide significant reduction in noise levels as demonstrated with Cascadia Array OBS data. A recent test deployment investigated the relative motion of the shield and the sensor within the shield, providing guidance on the effectiveness of shielding. Even with shielding or burial, deformation of the seafloor caused by loading by the ocean waves raises seismic noise levels. We have previously shown the vertical component noise can be reduced using data from pressure sensors to predict the vertical deformation and remove it from the vertical record. We recently deployed a new OBS instrument in shallow water (80m) that measured two horizontal components of pressure gradient and show these data can be used to reduce wave induced deformation noise from horizontal component seismic data.

  11. ULF wave power features in the topside ionosphere revealed by Swarm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Pilipenko, Viacheslav

    2015-09-01

    Recently developed automated methods for deriving the characteristics of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves are applied to the Swarm data sets in order to retrieve new information about the near-Earth electromagnetic environment. Here we present the first ULF wave observations by Swarm, analyzing 1 year data from the mission. We find evidence for the decay of the amplitude of the Pc3 (20-100 mHz) signal with altitude in the topside ionosphere as predicted by theoretical models of wave propagation. We show that the major characteristics of the Swarm ULF power maps generally agree with respect to the wave activity seen by the upper satellite and the lower pair of satellites when the power spectrum of the upper satellite is shifted by 1 h in magnetic local time. Moreover, a puzzling enhancement, not predicted by current ULF wave theories, of compressional Pc3 wave energy was revealed by Swarm in the region of South Atlantic Anomaly.

  12. A Ka-band radial relativistic backward wave oscillator with GW-class output power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Xiaoping; Dang, Fangchao

    2016-07-01

    A novel radial relativistic backward wave oscillator with a reflector is proposed and designed to generate GW-level high power microwaves at Ka-band. The segmented radial slow wave structure and the reflector are matched to enhance interaction efficiency. We choose the volume wave TM01 mode as the working mode due to the volume wave characteristic. The main structural parameters of the novel device are optimized by particle-in-cell simulation. High power microwaves with power of 2 GW and a frequency of 29.4 GHz are generated with 30% efficiency when the electron beam voltage is 383 kV, the beam current is 17 kA, and the guiding magnetic field is only 0.6 T. Simultaneously, the highest electric field in the novel Ka-band device is just about 960 kV/cm in second slow wave structure.

  13. Ultra-compact 1 × 8 Channel terahertz Wave Power Splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jian-Rong; Li, Jiu-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Relying on 1 × 2 photonic crystal waveguide and photonic crystal resonator, a compact eight-channel terahertz wave power splitter is proposed. The mechanism of such a device is further theoretically analyzed and numerically investigated with the aid of the plane wave expansion method and the finite-difference time-domain method. With an appropriate design, the proposed power splitter can split the input terahertz wave energy equally into eight output ports at the frequency of 0.667 THz. Furthermore, the total size of the present device is of 4.33 mm × 3.74 mm. Due to its small size, the multi-channel terahertz wave power splitter has practical applications in the terahertz wave integrated circuit fields.

  14. [The Effect of Cortical Spreading Depression Wave on EEG Spectral Power Anaesthesed and Conscious Rats].

    PubMed

    Koroleva, V I; Sakharov, D S; Bogdanov, A V

    2016-01-01

    EEG power changes in anaesthetized and conscious rats were studied (under repeated experiments) in wide frequency band (0.1-200 Hz) during cortical spreading depression wave (SD). In anaesthetized rats the decrease of EEG spectral power was shown through all diapasons under consideration. The most pronounced decay of the EEG power was marked in the 30-40 Hz band (27.3 ± 18.5, p = 2.46 x 10-(11)). In other frequency ranges the power decrease was less but its significance remained high. In conscious rats the simultaneous decay of the EEG power from 20 to 100 Hz range was also the most informative index of SD wave. The maximum power loss was found for band 30-40 Hz (11.2 ± 7.8, p = 2.55 x 10(-7)). It was shown that besides of EEG power decay the development of SD wave was characterized by the appearance of high frequency activity in front of SD and at the end of it. The increase of high-frequency activity in front of SD wave appeared in the ipsilateral hemisphere and moved along the cortex with the velocity of the SD wave itself. However the bursts of high frequency activity at the end of unilateral SD occurred simultaneously in both hemispheres and lasted 1.5-2.5 min. Findings contribute to detection of SD wave on basis of EEG spectral analysis. PMID:27538287

  15. Energy Flux in the Cochlea: Evidence Against Power Amplification of the Traveling Wave.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Marcel; Versteegh, Corstiaen P C

    2015-10-01

    Traveling waves in the inner ear exhibit an amplitude peak that shifts with frequency. The peaking is commonly believed to rely on motile processes that amplify the wave by inserting energy. We recorded the vibrations at adjacent positions on the basilar membrane in sensitive gerbil cochleae and tested the putative power amplification in two ways. First, we determined the energy flux of the traveling wave at its peak and compared it to the acoustic power entering the ear, thereby obtaining the net cochlear power gain. For soft sounds, the energy flux at the peak was 1 ± 0.6 dB less than the middle ear input power. For more intense sounds, increasingly smaller fractions of the acoustic power actually reached the peak region. Thus, we found no net power amplification of soft sounds and a strong net attenuation of intense sounds. Second, we analyzed local wave propagation on the basilar membrane. We found that the waves slowed down abruptly when approaching their peak, causing an energy densification that quantitatively matched the amplitude peaking, similar to the growth of sea waves approaching the beach. Thus, we found no local power amplification of soft sounds and strong local attenuation of intense sounds. The most parsimonious interpretation of these findings is that cochlear sensitivity is not realized by amplifying acoustic energy, but by spatially focusing it, and that dynamic compression is realized by adjusting the amount of dissipation to sound intensity.

  16. [The Effect of Cortical Spreading Depression Wave on EEG Spectral Power Anaesthesed and Conscious Rats].

    PubMed

    Koroleva, V I; Sakharov, D S; Bogdanov, A V

    2016-01-01

    EEG power changes in anaesthetized and conscious rats were studied (under repeated experiments) in wide frequency band (0.1-200 Hz) during cortical spreading depression wave (SD). In anaesthetized rats the decrease of EEG spectral power was shown through all diapasons under consideration. The most pronounced decay of the EEG power was marked in the 30-40 Hz band (27.3 ± 18.5, p = 2.46 x 10-(11)). In other frequency ranges the power decrease was less but its significance remained high. In conscious rats the simultaneous decay of the EEG power from 20 to 100 Hz range was also the most informative index of SD wave. The maximum power loss was found for band 30-40 Hz (11.2 ± 7.8, p = 2.55 x 10(-7)). It was shown that besides of EEG power decay the development of SD wave was characterized by the appearance of high frequency activity in front of SD and at the end of it. The increase of high-frequency activity in front of SD wave appeared in the ipsilateral hemisphere and moved along the cortex with the velocity of the SD wave itself. However the bursts of high frequency activity at the end of unilateral SD occurred simultaneously in both hemispheres and lasted 1.5-2.5 min. Findings contribute to detection of SD wave on basis of EEG spectral analysis.

  17. Significance of radial seismic anisotropy of the oceanic asthenosphere inferred from sub-slab shear-wave splitting observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, H.; Song, T.

    2012-12-01

    We (Song and Kawakatsu, 2012, GRL in press) have recently demonstrated that the subduction of the oceanic asthenosphere characterized by weak azimuthal anisotropy and strong radial anisotropy explains the essence of sub-slab shear-wave splitting patterns, where the fast splitting direction changes from predominantly trench-parallel (or sub-parallel) under relatively steep subduction zones to frequently trench-normal under shallow subduction zones. While a critical appraisal of this scenario at a specific subduction zone is under way [Song and Kawakatsu, this meeting], this result provides a new perspective on the nature of the oceanic asthenosphere. The derived model requires a strong radial anisotropy of a specific form that cannot be solely explained by the presence of melt layers as advocated by Kawakatsu et al (2009) and that thus has to be originated from the solid fabric. We will discuss processes such as melt-solid interaction (e.g., Holtzman et al., 2003), simultaneous activation of different slip systems (e.g., Ohuchi et al., 2011) or/and transpression deformation (e.g., Tommasi et al., 1999) that may influence the solid fabric of the asthenosphere. The in-situ broadband surface wave dispersion analysis of OBS observation data (e.g., Takeo et al., 2012, in revision; Takeo et al., 2012, this meeting), combined with the shear wave splitting analysis, will be essential to constrain the relative strength between azimuthal and radial anisotropy and to further verify the model.

  18. Alongshore momentum transfer to the nearshore zone from energetic ocean waves generated by passing hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Ryan P.; Hanson, Jeffrey L.

    2016-06-01

    Wave and current measurements from a cross-shore array of nearshore sensors in Duck, NC, are used to elucidate the balance of alongshore momentum under energetic wave conditions with wide surf zones, generated by passing hurricanes that are close to and far from to the coast. The observations indicate that a distant storm (Hurricane Bill, 2009) with large waves has low variability in directional wave characteristics resulting in alongshore currents that are driven mainly by the changes in wave energy. A storm close to the coast (Hurricane Earl, 2010), with strong local wind stress and combined sea and swell components in wave energy spectra, has high variability in wave direction and wave period that influence wave breaking and nearshore circulation as the storm passes. During both large wave events, the horizontal current shear is strong and radiation stress gradients, bottom stress, wind stress, horizontal mixing, and cross-shore advection contribute to alongshore momentum at different spatial locations across the nearshore region. Horizontal mixing during Hurricane Earl, estimated from rotational velocities, was particularly strong suggesting that intense eddies were generated by the high horizontal shear from opposing wind-driven and wave-driven currents. The results provide insight into the cross-shore distribution of the alongshore current and the connection between flows inside and outside the surf zone during major storms, indicating that the current shear and mixing at the interface between the surf zone and shallow inner shelf is strongly dependent on the distance from the storm center to the coast.

  19. A model for the generation of strongly nonlinear, weakly nonhydrostatic interfacial waves in a rotating ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar-González, Borja; Gerkema, Theo

    2015-04-01

    We derive a new two-fluid layer model consisting of a set of forced rotation-modified Boussinesq equations for studying the generation and evolution of strongly nonlinear weakly nonhydrostatic dispersive interfacial waves in a rotating ocean. The forcing for internal tide generation is due to tide-topography interaction (an oscillating non-flat bottom mimicking a barotropic tidal flow over topography). The resulting model forms a generalization of the Miyata-Choi-Camassa (MCC) equations, to which we add topography, tidal forcing and Coriolis dispersion due to Earth's rotation. Solitons are generated by disintegration of the first-mode of the internal tide. Because of strong non-linearity, they can attain a table-shaped form. Our moving (accelerating) topography is not an inertial frame and, hence, the transformation to a frame at rest is not simply a Galilean transformation. The effect of this transformation is discussed and is shown to be slight for the parameters under consideration. The set of equations is solved numerically using finite-difference methods. Numerical experiments using these equations are a useful tool for exploring and interpreting the conditions under which full nonlinearity becomes important for soliton generation. In particular, this is the case for table-top solitons when approaching the theoretical maximum amplitude and the appearance of nonlinearities when the two-layer system consists of two layers of equal thickness. At the early stage of the strongly nonlinear disintegration of an internal tide into table-top solitons, we observe that the low mode internal tide splits up into two different groups of rank-ordered solitons: a train of depressions on the leading edge and a train of elevations, after the former packet, with initially smaller amplitudes. Evolving in time, the largest elevations reach the smaller depressions in the train ahead, and three leading solitons at the front attain almost equal amplitudes. The table-top soliton

  20. Grating formation by a high power radio wave in near-equator ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rohtash; Sharma, A. K.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2011-11-15

    The formation of a volume grating in the near-equator regions of ionosphere due to a high power radio wave is investigated. The radio wave, launched from a ground based transmitter, forms a standing wave pattern below the critical layer, heating the electrons in a space periodic manner. The thermal conduction along the magnetic lines of force inhibits the rise in electron temperature, limiting the efficacy of heating to within a latitude of few degrees around the equator. The space periodic electron partial pressure leads to ambipolar diffusion creating a space periodic density ripple with wave vector along the vertical. Such a volume grating is effective to cause strong reflection of radio waves at a frequency one order of magnitude higher than the maximum plasma frequency in the ionosphere. Linearly mode converted plasma wave could scatter even higher frequency radio waves.

  1. Wave-plate structures, power selective optical filter devices, and optical systems using same

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2012-07-03

    In an embodiment, an optical filter device includes an input polarizer for selectively transmitting an input signal. The device includes a wave-plate structure positioned to receive the input signal, which includes first and second substantially zero-order, zero-wave plates arranged in series with and oriented at an angle relative to each other. The first and second zero-wave plates are configured to alter a polarization state of the input signal passing in a manner that depends on the power of the input signal. Each zero-wave plate includes an entry and exit wave plate each having a fast axis, with the fast axes oriented substantially perpendicular to each other. Each entry wave plate is oriented relative to a transmission axis of the input polarizer at a respective angle. An output polarizer is positioned to receive a signal output from the wave-plate structure and selectively transmits the signal based on the polarization state.

  2. Coupling alongshore variations in wave energy to beach morphologic change using the SWAN wave model at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshleman, Jodi L.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hanes, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    Coastal managers have faced increasing pressure to manage their resources wisely over the last century as a result of heightened development and changing environmental forcing. It is crucial to understand seasonal changes in beach volume and shape in order to identify areas vulnerable to accelerated erosion. Shepard (1950) was among the first to quantify seasonal beach cycles. Sonu and Van Beek (1971) and Wright et al. (1985) described commonly occurring beach states. Most studies utilize widest spaced 2-D cross shore profiles or shorelines extracted from aerial photographs (e.g. Winant et al. 1975; Aubrey, 1979, Aubrey and Ross, 1985; Larson and Kraus, 1994; Jimenez et al., 1977; Lacey and Peck, 1998; Guillen et al., 1999; Norcorss et al., 2002) to analyzed systematic changes in beach evolution. But with the exception of established field stations, such as Duck, NC (Birkemeier and Mason, 1984), ans Hazaki Oceanographical Research Station (HORS) in Japan (Katoh, 1997), there are very few beach change data sets with high temporal and spatial resolutions (e.g. Dail et al., 2000; Ruggiero et al., 2005; Yates et al., in press). Comprehensive sets of nearshore morphological data and local in situ measurements outside of these field stations are very rare and virtually non-existent high-energy coasts. Studied that have attempted to relate wave statistics to beach morphology change require some knowledge of the nearshore wave climate, and have had limited success using offshore measurement (Sonu and Van Beek, 1971; Dail et al., 2000). The primary objective of this study is to qualitatively compare spatially variable nearshore wave predictions to beach change measurements in order to understand the processes responsible for a persistent erosion 'hotspot' at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA. Local wave measurements are used to calibrate and validate a wave model that provides nearshore wave prediction along the beach. The model is run for thousands of binned offshore wave

  3. Coupling alongshore variations in wave energy to beach morphologic change using the SWAN wave model at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshleman, Jodi L.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hanes, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    Coastal managers have faced increasing pressure to manage their resources wisely over the last century as a result of heightened development and changing environmental forcing. It is crucial to understand seasonal changes in beach volume and shape in order to identify areas vulnerable to accelerated erosion. Shepard (1950) was among the first to quantify seasonal beach cycles. Sonu and Van Beek (1971) and Wright et al. (1985) described commonly occurring beach states. Most studies utilize widest spaced 2-D cross shore profiles or shorelines extracted from aerial photographs (e.g. Winant et al. 1975; Aubrey, 1979, Aubrey and Ross, 1985; Larson and Kraus, 1994; Jimenez et al., 1977; Lacey and Peck, 1998; Guillen et al., 1999; Norcorss et al., 2002) to analyzed systematic changes in beach evolution. But with the exception of established field stations, such as Duck, NC (Birkemeier and Mason, 1984), ans Hazaki Oceanographical Research Station (HORS) in Japan (Katoh, 1997), there are very few beach change data sets with high temporal and spatial resolutions (e.g. Dail et al., 2000; Ruggiero et al., 2005; Yates et al., in press). Comprehensive sets of nearshore morphological data and local in situ measurements outside of these field stations are very rare and virtually non-existent high-energy coasts. Studied that have attempted to relate wave statistics to beach morphology change require some knowledge of the nearshore wave climate, and have had limited success using offshore measurement (Sonu and Van Beek, 1971; Dail et al., 2000). The primary objective of this study is to qualitatively compare spatially variable nearshore wave predictions to beach change measurements in order to understand the processes responsible for a persistent erosion 'hotspot' at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA. Local wave measurements are used to calibrate and validate a wave model that provides nearshore wave prediction along the beach. The model is run for thousands of binned offshore wave

  4. On the Crest of a Wave: A Review of Wave Power Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Fank

    2014-01-01

    The energy potentially available from waves around the coast of the UK far exceeds our domestic and industrial demands and yet, despite much research, numerous patent applications and several pilot schemes, the exploitation of waves for their energy largely remains in transition between development and commercialisation. This article examines the…

  5. Ocean wave effects on the retrieved wind field from the scatterometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Yang, J. S.; Zheng, G.

    2014-03-01

    The scatterometer is a kind of non-nadir real aperture radar (RAR), which can estimate the wind field of sea surface based on geophysical model function (GMF). GMF describes the empirical relation between the wind field and the sea surface roughness characterized by sigma0. The wind wave is generated from the local wind and the swell wave is independent of the one. Based on the multi-scale scattering model, both wind wave and swell wave will modulate the sea surface roughness. This paper tries to find out the wave effects on wind field retrieval from scatterometer in swell and wind wave by the synchronous scatterometer and buoy data. The wind field data used in this paper are collected from Metop's Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) and buoy of NDBC. The NDBC buoy also provides the synchronous significant wave height (swh) and peak wavelength. From these data, the sea states are divided into swell and wind wave. Then the wave effects on retrieval are analyzed along with the swh and peak wavelength in each sea states. Results show that swell wave has a serious effect on the wind field retrieval. When the swh is higher than 1.5 m or the peak wavelength is lower than 230 m, the retrievals have significant errors.

  6. Long equatorial wave reflection in the Pacific Ocean from TOPEX/POSEIDON data during the 1992-1998 period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, J.-P.; Menkes, C.

    The TOPEX/POSEIDON sea level data have been shown to observe the sea surface height variability accurately over the globe and, more particularly, in the tropical Pacific, core region of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Various studies have already provided descriptions of long equatorial wave propagation as well as estimates of their reflection at both the eastern and western boundaries using TOPEX/POSEIDON data over short time periods. In this present work, we are first interested in computing long equatorial wave amplitudes over a much longer period (October 1992-May 1998) focusing on the Kelvin and first three largest Rossby waves. Secondly, we are examining qualitatively potential theories of ENSO in the light of observations of the strong 1997-1998 El Niño event. At the eastern boundary, Kelvin waves are observed to reflect into first (third) mode Rossby waves with a reflection efficiency of 75% (65%) of that of an infinite meridional wall. In the western Pacific Ocean, the reflection of the first Rossby wave does explain more than 90% of the Kelvin wave variance. The second Rossby wave is found not to be correlated to the Kelvin wave amplitude, and the third Rossby wave is highly correlated to the Kelvin signal although its contribution is weak. The investigation during the 1997-1998 event of two theories potentially important for ENSO (the delayed action oscillator mechanism and the recent theory of Picaut et al., 1997) led us to the following conclusions. The westerly wind anomalies observed in the western Pacific in December 1996 and March 1997 forced downwelling Kelvin waves which advected the eastern edge of the warm pool eastward and deepened the thermocline in the east Pacific. Both zonal advection and vertical processes are suggested to act constructively during the onset of positive anomalies in the central and eastern Pacific. From May to September 1997, downwelling Kelvin wave wind-forced in the central Pacific and reflected downwelling Rossby

  7. Comparison of techniques for approximating ocean bottom topography in a wave-refraction computer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the effects of using different methods for approximating bottom topography in a wave-refraction computer model was conducted. Approximation techniques involving quadratic least squares, cubic least squares, and constrained bicubic polynomial interpolation were compared for computed wave patterns and parameters in the region of Saco Bay, Maine. Although substantial local differences can be attributed to use of the different approximation techniques, results indicated that overall computed wave patterns and parameter distributions were quite similar.

  8. Data assimilation of ocean wind waves using Neural Networks. A case study for the German Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahle, Kathrin; Staneva, Joanna; Guenther, Heinz

    2015-12-01

    A novel approach of data assimilation based on Neural Networks (NN's) is presented and applied to wave modeling in the German Bight. The method takes advantage from the ability of NN's to emulate models and to invert them. Combining forward and inverse model NN with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm provides boundary values or wind fields in agreement with measured wave integrated parameters. Synthesized HF-radar wave data are used to test the technique for two academic cases.

  9. A Comparison of SIR-B Synthetic Aperture Radar Data with Ocean Internal Wave Measurements.

    PubMed

    Gasparovic, R F; Apel, J R; Thompson, D R; Tochko, J S

    1986-06-20

    An image from the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) shows internal wave features in an area south of Long Island, New York Coincident oceanographic measurements are used in conjunction with hydrodynamic interaction and electromagnetic scattering models to estimate the expected SAR image intensity modulations associated with the internal waves. There is reasonable agreement between the predicted and observed internal wave signatures.

  10. Using traveling wave structures to extract power from relativistic klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Yu, S.S.

    1990-09-19

    The purpose of this note is to analyze the excitation of traveling wave (TW) output structures by an RF current. Such structures are being used in relativistic klystron experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. First we will preset a set of difference equations that describes the excitation of the cells of a TW structure. Next we will restrict our attention to structures that have identical cells, except possibly for the first and last cells. Under these circumstances one can obtain difference equations that have constant coefficients, and we will present the general solution of these equations. Lastly we will apply our results to the analysis of a TW output structure. We will show that, by appropriate choice of the quality factors (Qs) and eigenfrequencies of the first and last cells, it is possible to obtain a traveling wave solution for which there is no reflected wave and where the excitation grows linearly with cell number.

  11. Surface drift prediction in the Adriatic Sea using hyper-ensemble statistics on atmospheric, ocean and wave models: Uncertainties and probability distribution areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rixen, M.; Ferreira-Coelho, E.; Signell, R.

    2008-01-01

    Despite numerous and regular improvements in underlying models, surface drift prediction in the ocean remains a challenging task because of our yet limited understanding of all processes involved. Hence, deterministic approaches to the problem are often limited by empirical assumptions on underlying physics. Multi-model hyper-ensemble forecasts, which exploit the power of an optimal local combination of available information including ocean, atmospheric and wave models, may show superior forecasting skills when compared to individual models because they allow for local correction and/or bias removal. In this work, we explore in greater detail the potential and limitations of the hyper-ensemble method in the Adriatic Sea, using a comprehensive surface drifter database. The performance of the hyper-ensembles and the individual models are discussed by analyzing associated uncertainties and probability distribution maps. Results suggest that the stochastic method may reduce position errors significantly for 12 to 72??h forecasts and hence compete with pure deterministic approaches. ?? 2007 NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC).

  12. Reduction of the Powerful Greenhouse Gas N2O in the South-Eastern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Raes, Eric J; Bodrossy, Levente; Van de Kamp, Jodie; Holmes, Bronwyn; Hardman-Mountford, Nick; Thompson, Peter A; McInnes, Allison S; Waite, Anya M

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a key catalyst of stratospheric ozone depletion. Yet, little data exist about the sink and source terms of the production and reduction of N2O outside the well-known oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). Here we show the presence of functional marker genes for the reduction of N2O in the last step of the denitrification process (nitrous oxide reductase genes; nosZ) in oxygenated surface waters (180-250 O2 μmol.kg(-1)) in the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Overall copy numbers indicated that nosZ genes represented a significant proportion of the microbial community, which is unexpected in these oxygenated waters. Our data show strong temperature sensitivity for nosZ genes and reaction rates along a vast latitudinal gradient (32°S-12°S). These data suggest a large N2O sink in the warmer Tropical waters of the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Clone sequencing from PCR products revealed that most denitrification genes belonged to Rhodobacteraceae. Our work highlights the need to investigate the feedback and tight linkages between nitrification and denitrification (both sources of N2O, but the latter also a source of bioavailable N losses) in the understudied yet strategic Indian Ocean and other oligotrophic systems.

  13. Reduction of the Powerful Greenhouse Gas N2O in the South-Eastern Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Raes, Eric J.; Bodrossy, Levente; Van de Kamp, Jodie; Holmes, Bronwyn; Hardman-Mountford, Nick; Thompson, Peter A.; McInnes, Allison S.; Waite, Anya M.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a key catalyst of stratospheric ozone depletion. Yet, little data exist about the sink and source terms of the production and reduction of N2O outside the well-known oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). Here we show the presence of functional marker genes for the reduction of N2O in the last step of the denitrification process (nitrous oxide reductase genes; nosZ) in oxygenated surface waters (180–250 O2 μmol.kg-1) in the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Overall copy numbers indicated that nosZ genes represented a significant proportion of the microbial community, which is unexpected in these oxygenated waters. Our data show strong temperature sensitivity for nosZ genes and reaction rates along a vast latitudinal gradient (32°S-12°S). These data suggest a large N2O sink in the warmer Tropical waters of the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Clone sequencing from PCR products revealed that most denitrification genes belonged to Rhodobacteraceae. Our work highlights the need to investigate the feedback and tight linkages between nitrification and denitrification (both sources of N2O, but the latter also a source of bioavailable N losses) in the understudied yet strategic Indian Ocean and other oligotrophic systems. PMID:26800249

  14. Reduction of the Powerful Greenhouse Gas N2O in the South-Eastern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Raes, Eric J; Bodrossy, Levente; Van de Kamp, Jodie; Holmes, Bronwyn; Hardman-Mountford, Nick; Thompson, Peter A; McInnes, Allison S; Waite, Anya M

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a key catalyst of stratospheric ozone depletion. Yet, little data exist about the sink and source terms of the production and reduction of N2O outside the well-known oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). Here we show the presence of functional marker genes for the reduction of N2O in the last step of the denitrification process (nitrous oxide reductase genes; nosZ) in oxygenated surface waters (180-250 O2 μmol.kg(-1)) in the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Overall copy numbers indicated that nosZ genes represented a significant proportion of the microbial community, which is unexpected in these oxygenated waters. Our data show strong temperature sensitivity for nosZ genes and reaction rates along a vast latitudinal gradient (32°S-12°S). These data suggest a large N2O sink in the warmer Tropical waters of the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Clone sequencing from PCR products revealed that most denitrification genes belonged to Rhodobacteraceae. Our work highlights the need to investigate the feedback and tight linkages between nitrification and denitrification (both sources of N2O, but the latter also a source of bioavailable N losses) in the understudied yet strategic Indian Ocean and other oligotrophic systems. PMID:26800249

  15. Low-power continuous-wave four-wave mixing wavelength conversion in AlGaAs-nanowaveguide microresonators.

    PubMed

    Kultavewuti, Pisek; Pusino, Vincenzo; Sorel, Marc; Stewart Aitchison, J

    2015-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate enhanced wavelength conversion in a Q∼7500 deeply etched AlGaAs-nanowaveguide microresonator via degenerate continuous-wave four-wave mixing with a pump power of 24 mW. The maximum conversion efficiency is -43  dB and accounts for 12 dB enhancement compared to that of a straight nanowaveguide. The experimental results and theoretical predictions agree very well and show optimized conversion efficiency of -15  dB. This work represents a step toward realizing a fully integrated optical devices for generating new optical frequencies.

  16. Solitary and shock waves in discrete strongly nonlinear double power-law materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbold, E. B.; Nesterenko, V. F.

    2007-06-01

    A laminar metamaterial supporting strongly nonlinear solitary and shock waves with impact energy mitigating capabilities is presented. It consists of steel plates with intermittent polymer toroidal rings acting as strongly nonlinear springs with large allowable strain. The force-displacement relationship of a compressed o-ring is described by the addition of two power-law relationships resulting in a solitary wave speed and width depending on the amplitude. This double nonlinearity allows splitting of an initial impulse into three separate strongly nonlinear solitary wave trains. Solitary and shock waves are observed experimentally and analyzed numerically in an assembly with Teflon o-rings.

  17. Pump enhanced monochromatic terahertz-wave parametric oscillator toward megawatt peak power.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kyosuke; Tanabe, Tadao; Oyama, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    Pump enhanced optical parametric oscillation under a cavity phase matching configuration is an effective way to obtain monochromatic THz waves with high pulse energy. Numerical simulations are conducted for THz wave generations using a GaP sheet cavity. By optimizing the optical pulse duration and cavity configuration, the estimated peak power of THz waves is 4 MW at 3 THz, which corresponds to the photon conversion efficiency of η≈0.81. Our proposed scheme can generate a THz wave with high pulse energy, which is suitable for the nonlinear optical effects in the THz frequency region.

  18. Sea Surface Slope Statistics for Intermediate and Shore Scale Ocean Waves Measured Using a Low-Altitude Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandemack, Douglas; Crawford, Tim; Dobosy, Ron; Elfouhaily, Tanos; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Ocean surface remote sensing techniques often rely on scattering or emission linked to shorter- scale gravity-capillary ocean wavelets. However, it is increasingly apparent that slightly longer wavelengths of O(10 to 500 cm) are vital components in the robust sea surface description needed to link varied global remote sensing data sets. This paper describes a sensor suite developed to examine sea surface slope variations in the field using an aircraft flying at very low altitude (below 30 m) and will also provide preliminary measurements detailing changes in slope characteristics versus sea state and friction velocity. Two-dimensional surface slope is measured using simultaneous range measurements from three compact short-range laser altimeters mounted in an equilateral triangle arrangement with spacing of about 1 m. In addition, all three lasers provide independent wave elevation profiles after GPS-aided correction for aircraft altitude. Laser range precision is 1 cm rms while vertical motion correction is 15 cm rms. The measurements are made along-track at approximately 1 m intervals setting the spatial scale of the measurement to cover waves of intermediate to long scale. Products available for this array then include surface elevation, two-dimensional slope distribution, and the cross- and along-track 1-D slope distributions. To complement the laser, a down-looking mm-wave radar scatterometer is centered within the laser array to measure radar backscatter simultaneously with the laser slope. The radar's footprint is nominally 1 m in diameter. Near-vertical radar backscatter is inversely proportional to the small-scale surface slope variance and to the tilt of the underlying (laser-measured) surface facet. Together the laser and radar data provide information on wave roughness from the longest scales down to about 1 cm. These measurements are complemented by aircraft turbulence probe data that provides robust surface flux information.

  19. Distribution of oceanic 137Cs from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant simulated numerically by a regional ocean model.

    PubMed

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Tsubono, Takaki; Aoyama, Michio; Hirose, Katsumi

    2012-09-01

    Radioactive materials were released to the environment from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant as a result of the reactor accident after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011. The measured (137)Cs concentration in a seawater sample near the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant site reached 68 kBq L(-1) (6.8 × 10(4)Bq L(-1)) on 6 April. The two major likely pathways from the accident site to the ocean existed: direct release of high radioactive liquid wastes to the ocean and the deposition of airborne radioactivity to the ocean surface. By analysis of the (131)I/(137)Cs activity ratio, we determined that direct release from the site contributed more to the measured (137)Cs concentration than atmospheric deposition did. We then used a regional ocean model to simulate the (137)Cs concentrations resulting from the direct release to the ocean off Fukushima and found that from March 26 to the end of May the total amount of (137)Cs directly released was 3.5 ± 0.7 PBq ((3.5 ± 0.7) × 10(15)Bq). The simulated temporal change in (137)Cs concentrations near the Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Plant site agreed well with observations. Our simulation results showed that (1) the released (137)Cs advected southward along the coast during the simulation period; (2) the eastward-flowing Kuroshio and its extension transported (137)C during May 2011; and (3) (137)Cs concentrations decreased to less than 10 BqL(-1) by the end of May 2011 in the whole simulation domain as a result of oceanic advection and diffusion. We compared the total amount and concentration of (137)Cs released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors to the ocean with the (137)Cs released to the ocean by global fallout. Even though the measured (137)Cs concentration from the Fukushima accident was the highest recorded, the total released amount of (137)Cs was not very large. Therefore, the effect of (137)Cs released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors on concentration in the whole North

  20. On the use of ocean-atmosphere-wave models during an extreme CAO event: the importance of being coupled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniel, Sandro; Barbariol, Francesco; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bonaldo, Davide; Falcieri, Francesco M.; Miglietta, Mario M.; Ricchi, Antonio; Sclavo, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    During winter 2012 an extreme meteorological event stroke the whole Europe and particularly its central-southern sector. A strong and persistent spit of cold air coming from Siberian region (a Cold Air Outbreak, CAO) insisted on northern Italy and the Adriatic sea basin, leading to decreases in the sea temperatures up to 6 °C in less than two weeks, ice formation on the Venice lagoon and an exceptional snow fall in the Apennine region. In the sea the CAO was associated to a significant episode of dense water formation (DWF), a crucial phenomenon that heavily impacts the whole Adriatic Sea (from the sinking of water masses and associated ventilation of the northernmost shelf, to the flow along the western coast, until the flushing of southern Adriatic open slope and submarine canyons, with associated sediment transport and bottom reshaping). The extent of the DWF event in the Northern Adriatic sub-basin was estimated by means of coastal observatories, ad hoc measurements and, until now, results from existing one-way coupled atmosphere-ocean models. These are characterized by no SST feedback from the ocean to the atmosphere, and therefore by turbulent heat fluxes that may heavily reflect a non-consistent ocean state. The study proposes an investigation of the 2012 CAO using a fully coupled, three components, ocean-atmosphere-wave system (COAWST). Results highlight that, although the energy interplays between air and sea do not seem to significantly impact the wind forecasts, when providing heat fluxes that are consistent with the ocean temperature we find modified heat fluxes and air sea temperatures figures. Moreover, the consistent description of thermal exchanges adopted in the fully coupled model can affect the basin circulation, the quantification of dense water produced mass, and the description of its migration pathways and rates of off-shelf descent.

  1. Power and frequency measurements from a uniform backward wave oscillator as a function of length

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, L.D.; Roitman, A.M.; Schamiloglu, E.; Pegel, I.V.; Lemke, R.W.

    1994-12-31

    The authors describe results from an experiment where the number of ripple periods in the slow wave structure of a backward wave oscillator (BWO) is increased. Both microwave power and frequency measurements are made for each shot. For a given cathode voltage and beam current, the microwave peak power and frequency are plotted as a function of BWO length. In previous investigations, the observation of two power maxima as a function of length was explained by the interaction of the electron beam with the forward traveling wave and reflections at the transition from the slow wave structure into the output waveguide. However, recent numerical calculations using the phase dynamics of electron beam and electromagnetic modes suggest that the power maxima are due to the phase relationship between the electron beam density wave and the backward wave. Experiments were performed on the Sinus-6, a relativistic electron beam accelerator. By adjusting the pressure in the Sinus-6 spark gap switch, cathode voltages between 400 kV to 650 kV can be obtained. The experiment was repeated for different sets of beam parameters. In all cases, the magnetic field used for beam transport was longer than the length of the slow wave structure. The experimental results are compared with phase model calculations and PIC code simulations using KARAT and TWOQUICK.

  2. A high power Ka band millimeter wave generator with low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jun; Shu Ting; Zhang Jun; Li Guolin; Zhang Zehai

    2010-08-15

    A slow wave type gigawatt millimeter wave generator is proposed in this paper. In order to increase power capacity, overmoded slow wave structures (SWSs) with larger diameter have been used. Taking advantage of the ''surface wave'' property of overmoded SWSs, the TM{sub 01} mode can be selected to be the operating mode. Calculations have also been carried out to choose a proper low operating magnetic field strength, and it agrees with particle in cell (PIC) simulations. Main structure parameters of the device are optimized by PIC simulations. A typical simulation result is that, at the beam parameters of 600 keV and 5.05 kA, and guiding magnetic field of 0.85 T, a Ka band millimeter wave with an output power of 1.05 GW is generated, yielding a conversion efficiency of about 35%.

  3. Linking multiple relaxation, power-law attenuation, and fractional wave equations.

    PubMed

    Näsholm, Sven Peter; Holm, Sverre

    2011-11-01

    The acoustic wave attenuation is described by an experimentally established frequency power law in a variety of complex media, e.g., biological tissue, polymers, rocks, and rubber. Recent papers present a variety of acoustical fractional derivative wave equations that have the ability to model power-law attenuation. On the other hand, a multiple relaxation model is widely recognized as a physically based description of the acoustic loss mechanisms as developed by Nachman et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 1584-1595 (1990)]. Through assumption of a continuum of relaxation mechanisms, each with an effective compressibility described by a distribution related to the Mittag-Leffler function, this paper shows that the wave equation corresponding to the multiple relaxation approach is identical to a given fractional derivative wave equation. This work therefore provides a physically based motivation for use of fractional wave equations in acoustic modeling.

  4. On the wave and current interaction with a rippled seabed in the coastal ocean bottom boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Aditya R.; Li, Cheng; Kiani, Bobak T.; Katz, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Interactions of currents and waves with a rippled seabed in the inner part of the coastal ocean bottom boundary layer are studied using particle image velocimetry, ADV, and bottom roughness measurements. Mean velocity profiles collapse with appropriate scaling in the log layer, but vary substantially in the roughness sublayer. When wave-induced motions are similar or greater than the mean current, the hydrodynamic roughness (z0) determined from velocity profiles is substantially larger than directly measured values. The roughness signature in turbulent energy spectra persists with elevation when its scale falls in the dissipation range, but decays in the log layer for larger roughness elements. Reynolds shear stress profiles peak in the lower parts of the log layer, diminishing below it, and gradually decaying at higher elevations. In contrast, wave shear stresses are negligible within the log layer, but become significant within the roughness sublayer. This phenomenon is caused by an increase in the magnitude and phase lag of the vertical component of wave-induced motion. No single boundary layer length scale collapses the Reynolds stresses, but both the Prandtl mixing length and eddy viscosity profiles agree well with the classical model of linear increase with elevation, especially near the seabed. Within the log region, profiles of shear production and dissipation rates of turbulence converge. Below it, dissipation rapidly increases, peaking near the seabed. Conversely, the shear production decays near the seabed, in agreement with the eddy viscosity model, but in contrast to both laboratory and computational rough wall studies.

  5. Ocean energy program summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    The oceans are the world's largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71 percent of the earth's surface, they collect and store this energy as waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ocean Energy Technology (OET) Program is to develop techniques that harness this ocean energy cost effectively and in a way that does not harm the environment. The program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point where industry can accurately assess whether the technology is a viable energy conversion alternative, or supplement, to current power generating systems. In past studies, DOE identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), which uses the temperature difference between warm surface water and cold deep water, as the most promising of the ocean energy technologies. As a result, the OET Program is concentrating on research that advances the OTEC technology. The program also continues to monitor and study developments in wave energy, ocean current, and salinity gradient concepts; but it is not actively developing these technologies now.

  6. Enhanced frequency agility of high-power relativistic backward wave oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, L.D.; Schamiloglu, E.; Lemke, R.W.; Roitman, A.M.; Korovin, S.D.; Rostov, V.V.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes how finite length effects in high-power backward wave oscillators can be exploited in a controlled manner to achieve enhanced frequency agility. Experiments were performed using a Sinus-6 high-power relativistic repetitively pulsed electron beam accelerator. A uniform slow wave structure was used in these studies and its parameters were fixed. Sections of smooth-walled circular waveguide of varying lengths were inserted both before and after the slow wave structure. Variations in the length of smooth-walled waveguide on the order of a quarter-wavelength of the generated electromagnetic radiation were found to significantly affect both microwave frequency and radiation efficiency in a periodic-like manner. The experimental results were reproduced in TWOQUICK electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations. A bandwidth of about 500 MHz centered around 9.5 GHz at hundreds of MW power levels has been achieved with constant beam and slow wave structure parameters.

  7. Time- and power-dependent operation of a parametric spin-wave amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Brächer, T.; Heussner, F.; Pirro, P.; Fischer, T.; Geilen, M.; Heinz, B.; Lägel, B.; Serga, A. A.; Hillebrands, B.

    2014-12-08

    We present the experimental observation of the localized amplification of externally excited, propagating spin waves in a transversely in-plane magnetized Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} magnonic waveguide by means of parallel pumping. By employing microfocussed Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy, we analyze the dependency of the amplification on the applied pumping power and on the delay between the input spin-wave packet and the pumping pulse. We show that there are two different operation regimes: At large pumping powers, the spin-wave packet needs to enter the amplifier before the pumping is switched on in order to be amplified while at low powers the spin-wave packet can arrive at any time during the pumping pulse.

  8. 77 FR 50062 - Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic... Daytona Beach, Florida during the Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves air show. The event is scheduled to take...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of...

  9. Formation of undular bores and solitary waves in the Strait of Malacca caused by the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grue, J.; Pelinovsky, E. N.; Fructus, D.; Talipova, T.; Kharif, C.

    2008-05-01

    Deformation of the Indian Ocean tsunami moving into the shallow Strait of Malacca and formation of undular bores and solitary waves in the strait are simulated in a model study using the fully nonlinear dispersive method (FNDM) and the Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation. Two different versions of the incoming wave are studied where the waveshape is the same but the amplitude is varied: full amplitude and half amplitude. While moving across three shallow bottom ridges, the back face of the leading depression wave steepens until the wave slope reaches a level of 0.0036-0.0038, when short waves form, resembling an undular bore for both full and half amplitude. The group of short waves has very small amplitude in the beginning, behaving like a linear dispersive wave train, the front moving with the shallow water speed and the tail moving with the linear group velocity. Energy transfer from long to short modes is similar for the two input waves, indicating the fundamental role of the bottom topography to the formation of short waves. The dominant period becomes about 20 s in both cases. The train of short waves, emerging earlier for the larger input wave than for the smaller one, eventually develops into a sequence of rank-ordered solitary waves moving faster than the leading depression wave and resembles a fission of the mother wave. The KdV equation has limited capacity in resolving dispersion compared to FNDM.

  10. Millimeter wave technology IV and radio frequency power sources; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 21, 22, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltse, James C.; Coleman, James T.

    1987-01-01

    The present conference on mm-wave technology and radio-frequency power sources discusses topics in the fields of vacuum devices, mm-wave antennas and transmission lines, mm-wave systems and subsystems, and mm-wave techniques and components. Attention is given to recent experiments with planar orotrons, a high peak power X-band gyroklystron for linear supercolliders, cathode-driven crossed-field amplifiers, multi-MW quasi-optical gyrotrons, the radiation coupling of interinjection-locked oscillators, air-to-air mm-wave communications, mm-wave active and passive sensors for terrain mapping, and mm-wave components for electronically controllable antennas.

  11. Probability function of breaking-limited surface elevation. [wind generated waves of ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tung, C. C.; Huang, N. E.; Yuan, Y.; Long, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of wave breaking on the probability function of surface elevation is examined. The surface elevation limited by wave breaking zeta sub b(t) is first related to the original wave elevation zeta(t) and its second derivative. An approximate, second-order, nonlinear, non-Gaussian model for zeta(t) of arbitrary but moderate bandwidth is presented, and an expression for the probability density function zeta sub b(t) is derived. The results show clearly that the effect of wave breaking on the probability density function of surface elevation is to introduce a secondary hump on the positive side of the probability density function, a phenomenon also observed in wind wave tank experiments.

  12. Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Test Sites: A Catalogue of Met-Ocean Data, 2nd Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Ann R. Dallman; Neary, Vincent S.

    2015-09-01

    This report presents met-ocean data and wave energy characteristics at eight U.S. wave energy converter (WEC) test and potential deployment sites. Its purpose is to enable the comparison of wave resource characteristics among sites as well as the selection of test sites that are most suitable for a developer's device and that best meet their testing needs and objectives. It also provides essential inputs for the design of WEC test devices and planning WEC tests, including the planning of deployment, and operations and maintenance. For each site, this report catalogues wave statistics recommended in the International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Speci cation (IEC 62600-101 TS) on Wave Energy Characterization, as well as the frequency of occurrence of weather windows and extreme sea states, and statistics on wind and ocean currents. It also provides useful information on test site infrastructure and services.

  13. Ocean Circulation Modeling for Aquatic Dispersion of Liquid Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.G.; Lee, G.B.; Bang, S.Y.; Choi, S.B.; Lee, S.U.; Yoon, J.H.; Nam, S.Y.; Lee, H.R.

    2006-07-01

    Recently, three-dimensional models have been used for aquatic dispersion of radioactive effluents in relation to nuclear power plant siting based on the Notice No. 2003-12 'Guideline for investigating and assessing hydrological and aquatic characteristics of nuclear facility site' of the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) in Korea. Several nuclear power plants have been under construction or planed, which are Shin-Kori Unit 1 and 2, Shin-Wolsong Unit 1 and 2, and Shin-Ulchin Unit 1 and 2. For assessing the aquatic dispersion of radionuclides released from the above nuclear power plants, it is necessary to know the coastal currents around sites which are affected by circulation of East Sea. In this study, a three dimensional hydrodynamic model for the circulation of the East Sea of Korea has been developed as the first phase, which is based on the RIAMOM (Research Institute of Applied Mechanics' Ocean Model, Kyushu University, Japan). The model uses the primitive equation with hydrostatic approximation, and uses Arakawa-B grid system horizontally and Z coordinate vertically. Model domain is 126.5 deg. E to 142.5 deg. E of east longitude and 33 deg. N and 52 deg. N of the north latitude. The space of the horizontal grid was 1/12 deg. to longitude and latitude direction and vertical level was divided to 20. This model uses Generalized Arakawa Scheme, Slant Advection, and Mode-Splitting Method. The input data were from JODC (Japan Oceanographic Data Center), KNFRDI (Korea National Fisheries Research and Development Institute), and ECMWF (European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts). The modeling results are in fairly good agreement with schematic patterns of the surface circulation in the East Sea/Japan Sea. The local current model and aquatic dispersion model of the coastal region will be developed as the second phase. The oceanic dispersion experiments will be also carried out by using ARGO Drifter around a nuclear power plant site. (authors)

  14. A high-resolution OGCM simulation of the Tropical Pacific Ocean during the 1985-1994 TOGA period. Part I: Long equatorial waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, J. P.; Delecluse, F.; Maes, C.; Levy, C.

    1995-01-01

    A high resolution oceanic general circulation model of the three topical oceans is used to investigate long equatorial wave activity in the Pacific Ocean during the 1985-1994 TOGA period. Zonal wind stress forcing and simulated dynamic height are interpreted using techniques previously applied to data. Kelvin and first Rossby waves are observed propagating during all the period. A seasonal cycle and interannual anomalies are computed for each long equatorial wave. The east Pacific basin is mainly dominated by seasonal cycle variations while strong interannual anomalies are observed west of the dateline. Long wave interannual anomalies are then compared to wave coefficients simulated by a simple wind-forced model. Our results outline the major role played by wind forcing on interannual time scales in generating long equatorial waves. However, near both eastern and western boundaries, some differences can be attributed to long wave reflections. A comparison to wave coefficients calculated from GEOSAT sea-level data gives some insight of the model behavior.

  15. Challenges and Techniques in Measurements of Noise, Cryogenic Noise and Power in Millimeter-Wave and Submillimeter-Wave Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene

    2014-01-01

    We will present the topic of noise measurements, including cryogenic noise measurements, of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) and Sub-Millimeter-Wave Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (S-MMIC) amplifiers, both on-wafer, and interfaced to waveguide modules via coupling probes. We will also present an overview of the state-of-the-art in waveguide probe techniques for packaging amplifier chips, and discuss methods to obtain the lowest loss packaging techniques available to date. Linearity in noise measurements will be discussed, and experimental methods for room temperature and cryogenic noise measurements will be presented. We will also present a discussion of power amplifier measurements for millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave amplifiers, and the tools and hardware needed for this characterization.

  16. The effect of Coriolis-Stokes forcing on upper ocean circulation in a two-way coupled wave-current model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zeng'an; Xie, Li'an; Han, Guijun; Zhang, Xuefeng; Wu, Kejian

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the Stokes drift-driven ocean currents and Stokes drift-induced wind energy input into the upper ocean using a two-way coupled wave-current modeling system that consists of the Princeton Ocean Model generalized coordinate system (POMgcs), Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) wave model, and the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). The Coriolis-Stokes forcing (CSF) computed using the wave parameters from SWAN was incorporated with the momentum equation of POMgcs as the core coupling process. Experimental results in an idealized setting show that under the steady state, the scale of the speed of CSF-driven current was 0.001 m/s and the maximum reached 0.02 m/s. The Stokes drift-induced energy rate input into the model ocean was estimated to be 28.5 GW, taking 14% of the direct wind energy rate input. Considering the Stokes drift effects, the total mechanical energy rate input was increased by approximately 14%, which highlights the importance of CSF in modulating the upper ocean circulation. The actual run conducted in Taiwan Adjacent Sea (TAS) shows that: 1) CSF-based wave-current coupling has an impact on ocean surface currents, which is related to the activities of monsoon winds; 2) wave-current coupling plays a significant role in a place where strong eddies present and tends to intensify the eddy's vorticity; 3) wave-current coupling affects the volume transport of the Taiwan Strait (TS) throughflow in a nontrivial degree, 3.75% on average.

  17. Continuous-wave 193.4 nm laser with 120 mW output power.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Jun; Kaneda, Yushi; Oka, Naoya; Ishida, Takayuki; Moriizumi, Koichi; Kusunose, Haruhiko; Furukawa, Yasunori

    2015-12-01

    This Letter describes an all-solid-state continuous-wave, deep-ultraviolet coherent source that generates more than 100 mW of output power at 193.4 nm. The source is based on nonlinear frequency conversion of three single-frequency infrared fiber laser master-oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) light sources.

  18. Tidal-Induced Internal Ocean Waves as an Explanation for Enceladus' Tiger Stripe Pattern and Hotspot Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeersen, B. L. A.; Maas, L. R.; van Oers, S.; Rabitti, A.; Jara-Orue, H.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most peculiar features on Saturn moon Enceladus is its so-called tiger stripe pattern at the geologically active South Polar Terrain (SPT), as first observed in detail by the Cassini spacecraft early 2005. It is generally assumed that the four almost parallel surface lines that constitute this pattern are faults in the icy surface overlying a confined salty water reservoir. Indeed, later Cassini observations have shown that salty water jets originate from the tiger stripes [e.g., Hansen et al., Science, 311, 1422-1425, 2006; Postberg et al., Nature, 474, 620-622, 2011]. More recently, Porco et al. [Astron. J., 148:45, Sep. 2014] and Nimmo et al. [Astron. J., 148:46, Sep. 2014] have reported strong evidence that the geysers are not caused by frictional heating at the surface, but that geysers must originate deeper in Enceladus' interior. Tidal flexing models, like those of Hurford et al., Nature, 447, 292-294, 2007, give a good match for the brightness variations Cassini observes, but they seem to fail to reproduce the exact timing of plume brightening. Although jet activity is thus strongly connected to tidal forcing, another mechanism must be involved as well. Last year, we formulated the original idea [Vermeersen et al., AGU Fall Meeting 2013, abstract #P53B-1848] that the tiger stripe pattern is formed and maintained by induced, tidally and rotationally driven, wave-attractor motions in the ocean underneath the icy surface of the tiger-stripe region. Such wave-attractor motions are observed in water tank experiments in laboratories on Earth and in numerical experiments [Maas et al., Nature, 338, 557-561, 1997; Drijfhout and Maas, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 37, 2740-2763, 2007; Hazewinkel et al., Phys. Fluids, 22, 107102, 2010]. The latest observations by Porco et al. and Nimmo et al. seem to be in agreement with this tidal-induced wave attractor phenomenon, both with respect to tiger stripe pattern and with respect to timing of hotspot activity. However, in

  19. Observations of polarized seismoacoustic T waves at and beneath the seafloor in the abyssal Pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Butler, Rhett

    2006-12-01

    Combined seismic and hydrophone observations show that the traditional T wave propagates as a seismoacoustic polarized interface wave (Ti) coupled to the seafloor. Seismoacoustic Ti waves propagating at the sound speed of water are routinely observed over megameter distances at the deep (4979 m) seafloor Hawaii-2 Observatory (H2O) between Hawaii and California, even though the seafloor site is within a shadow zone for acoustic wave propagation. Ti has also been observed on seismometers 225 km SSW of Oahu at the OSN1 site at the seafloor and within an ODP borehole into the basalt basement. Analyses of timing, apparent velocity, energy, and polarization of these interface waves are presented. At low frequency (< approximately 5 Hz) Ti propagates dominantly in the sediments and is consistent with higher-mode Rayleigh waves. At higher frequencies the observed Ti waves dominantly propagate acoustically with characteristics suggesting local scattering. The observation of Ti from an earthquake in Guatemala at OSN1, whose path is blocked by the Island of Hawaii, is consistent with scattering from the vicinity of the Cross Seamount.

  20. The influence of surface gravity waves on the injection of turbulence in the upper ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhoday Paskyabi, M.; Fer, I.

    2014-06-01

    Observations were made in the near-surface layer, at about 8 m depth in 132 m deep water off the coast of Ålesund in Norway, for a duration of 2.5 months in late 2011. The measurement period covers the passage of two low pressure systems with substantial wind and wave forcing. The time series of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, ɛ, and the estimates of surface gravity waves are analysed. Dissipation rates varied by 5 orders of magnitude and reached 10-5-10-4 W kg-1 in conditions when wind speed exceeded 15 m s-1 and the significant wave height was of the order of 10 m. The data set suggests substantial injection of turbulence from breaking surface gravity waves and Langmuir turbulence. To support and interpret the observations, numerical calculations are conducted using a second-order turbulence closure scheme based on the Mellor-Yamada level 2.5 scheme, modified to incorporate the near-surface processes such as Langmuir circulation and wave breaking. The results from a run forced by observed wind and wave fields compare favourably with the observations. Comparisons with other near-surface data sets available from the literature lend confidence on our dissipation measurements and the wave-forced simulations.

  1. Validation of a synthetic aperture radar ocean wave imaging theory by the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B Experiment over the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüning, Claus; Alpers, Werner; Zambresky, Liana F.; Tilley, David G.

    1988-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image intensity spectra measured during the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) mission on October 6 and 8, 1984, over the North Sea are compared with ocean wave spectra obtained from a wave prediction model. The relationship between both spectra is discussed in the light of a previously proposed SAR imaging theory of ocean waves. Most of the measured SAR image spectra of October 6 show double peaks, while the hindcast ocean wave spectra have only single peaks. It is shown that the double peaks are generated by the SAR imaging mechanism. They occur only when velocity bunching is sufficiently strong near the range direction and when enough spectral energy density is present in this spectral region. Double peaks are generated when the SAR modulation transfer function (MTF) consisting of the sum of the complex real aperture radar (RAR) MTF and the velocity bunching MTF has a strong minimum near the range direction by which the wave spectrum is cut into two, in general unequal, pieces. The azimuth angle at which this minimum occurs depends strongly on the phase of the RAR MTF. In general, the two peaks are not located symmetrically with respect to the range direction, nor do they have equal heights. We interpret the reasonably good agreement between simulated and measured SAR image spectra during the SIR-B mission over the North Sea as further experimental evidence in support of the validity of the previously proposed SAR imaging theory of ocean waves.

  2. Electrojet-independent ionospheric extremely low frequency/very low frequency wave generation by powerful high frequency waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer; Snyder, Arnold; Chang, Chia-Lie

    2010-08-15

    Results of extremely low frequency/very low frequency (ELF/VLF) wave generation by intensity-modulated high frequency (HF) heaters of 3.2 MHz in Gakona, Alaska, near local solar noon during a geomagnetic quiet time, are presented to support an electrojet-independent ELF/VLF wave generation mechanism. The modulation was set by splitting the HF transmitter array into two subarrays; one was run at cw full power and the other run alternatively at 50% and 100% power modulation by rectangular waves of 2.02, 5, 8, and 13 kHz. The most effective generation was from the X-mode heater with 100% modulation. While the 8 kHz radiation has the largest wave amplitude, the spectral intensity of the radiation increases with the modulation frequency, i.e., 13 kHz line is the strongest. Ionograms recorded significant virtual height spread of the O-mode sounding echoes. The patterns of the spreads and the changes of the second and third hop virtual height traces caused by the O/X-mode heaters are distinctively different, evidencing that it is due to differently polarized density irregularities generated by the filamentation instability of the O/X-mode HF heaters.

  3. Method and apparatus for generating electric power by waves

    SciTech Connect

    Watabe, T.; Dote, Y.; Kondo, H.; Matsuda, T.; Takagi, M.; Yano, K.

    1984-12-25

    At least one caisson which is part or all of a breakwater forms a water chamber therein whose closure is a pendulum having a natural period in rocking or oscillating the same as a period of stationary wave surges caused in the water chamber by rocking movement of the pendulum owing to wave force impinging against the pendulum. At least one double-acting piston and cylinder assembly is connected to the pendulum, so that when a piston of the assembly is reciprocatively moved by the pendulum, pressure difference between cylinder chambers on both sides of the piston of the assembly controls a change-over valve which in turn controls hydraulic pressure discharged from the cylinder chambers to be supplied to a plurality of hydraulic motors respectively having accumulators of a type wherein accumulated pressure and volume of the hydraulic liquid are proportional to each other, whereby driving a common generator alternately by the hydraulic motors.

  4. Experimental demonstration of a high-power slow wave electron cyclotron maser utilizing corrugated metal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, K.; Ogura, K.; Kurashina, K; Kim, W.; Watanabe, Tsuguhiro; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.

    1994-12-31

    High-power microwave (HPM) sources based on electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) such as gyrotrons are fast wave devices and velocity component of electron beam perpendicular to guiding magnetic field is the origin of HPM. HPM sources based on Cherenkove mechanism are slow wave devices and can be driven by a beam without initial perpendicular velocity. The authors present here the experimental result that seems to be the first demonstration of high-power slow wave electron cyclotron maser (ECM) consisting of a large diameter sinusoidally corrugated metal waveguide driven by a beam with predominant parallel velocity. The designed size parameters of slow wave structure (SWS) are as follows: average radius 30 mm, corrugation pitch 3.4 mm, its amplitude h = 1.7 mm and total length 238 mm. They use an annular beam with radius 26.3 mm, energy 55 keV, current 200 A in their experiment. Expected Cherenkov oscillation frequency of TM01 mode is 20 GHz. The observed high-power microwaves can be quantitatively explained by a backward wave oscillation with Cherenkov mechanism enhanced by positive feedback of anomalous Doppler slow cyclotron wave. In conclusion, the slow wave ECM presented here will be a competitive candidate against gyrotrons for generating multi-MW millimeter microwaves available in fusion plasma research.

  5. Frequency correlation of probe waves backscattered from small scale ionospheric irregularities generated by high power HF radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchkov, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    Aspect sensitive scattering of multi-frequency probe signals by artificial, magnetic field aligned density irregularities (with t